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Sample records for proton-rich nucleus 24si

  1. Hindered proton collectivity in the proton-rich nucleus 28S: Possible magic number Z = 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togano, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Yamada, K.; Motobayashi, T.; Aoi, N.; Baba, H.; Bishop, S.; Cai, X.; Doornenbal, P.; Fang, D.; Furukawa, T.; Ieki, K.; Kawabata, T.; Kanno, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Kondo, Y.; Kuboki, T.; Kume, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurokawa, M.; Ma, Y. G.; Matsuo, Y.; Murakami, H.; Matsushita, M.; Nakamura, T.; Okada, K.; Ota, S.; Satou, Y.; Shimoura, S.; Shioda, R.; Tanaka, K. N.; Takeuchi, S.; Tian, W.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Yoneda, K.

    2012-10-01

    The reduced transition probability B(E2;0gs+→21+) for the proton-rich nucleus 28S was determined experimentally using intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation. The resultant B(E2) value 181(31) e2fm4 is smaller than those of neighboring N = 12 isotones and Z = 16 isotopes. The double ratio |Mn/Mp|/(N/Z) of the 0gs+→21+ transition in 28S was obtained to be 1.9(2) by evaluating the Mn value from the known B(E2) value of the mirror nucleus 28Mg, showing the hindrance of proton collectivity relative to that of neutrons. These results indicate the emergence of the magic number Z = 16 in 28S.

  2. Hindered Proton Collectivity in the Proton-Rich Nucleus 28S: Possible Magic Number Z = 16 at Proton-Rich Side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togano, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Yusuke; Iwasa, Naohito; Yamada, Kazunari; Motobayashi, Tohru; Aoi, Nori; Baba, Hidetada; Bishop, Shawn; Cai, Xiangzhou; Doornenbal, Pieter; Fang, Deqing; Furukawa, Takeshi; Ieki, Kazuo; Kawabata, Takahiro; Kanno, Shoko; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Yosuke; Kuboki, Takamasa; Kume, Naoto; Kurita, Kazuyoshi; Kurokawa, Meiko; Ma, Yu-Gang; Matsuo, Yukari; Murakami, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Masafumi; Nakamura, Takashi; Okada, Kensuke; Ota, Shinsuke; Satou, Yoshiteru; Shimoura, Susumu; Shioda, Ryota; Tanaka, Kana; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tian, Wendong; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jiansong; Yoneda, Ken-ichiro

    The reduced transition probability B(E2;0gs + to 21 + ) for the most proton-rich even-even sulfur isotope 28S was determined experimentally using Coulomb excitation at 53 MeV/nucleon. The resultant B(E2) value is smaller than those of neighboring N = 12 isotones and Z = 16 isotopes. The ratio of neutron/proton transition matrix amplitudes for the 0gs + to 21 + transition were obtained to be 1.9(2) × N/Z from the present result and known B(E2) value in the mirror nucleus 28Mg. These results indicate the emergence of the magic number Z = 16 in 28S.

  3. Proton-Rich Nuclei in Nuclear Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K. E.

    2007-11-30

    The stable isotopes which we observe on Earth are to a large extent, produced in nature via a 'detour' through unstable nuclei. The reaction path leading through proton-rich nuclei is the so-called rapid proton capture process, where, starting from carbon, nitrogen and oxygen through successive capture or protons and alphas, followed by beta decays, nuclei up to the mass 100 region can be produced. In order to understand the reaction paths and the conditions at various astrophysical sites (e.g. Novae and X-ray bursts) cross sections, masses and half-lives of unstable nuclei have to be measured. In this contribution recent results involving proton-rich nuclei are discussed.

  4. Proton-rich nuclei in nuclear astrophysics.

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K. E.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The stable isotopes which we observe on Earth are to a large extent, produced in nature via a 'detour' through unstable nuclei. The reaction path leading through proton-rich nuclei is the so-called rapid proton capture process, where, starting from carbon, nitrogen and oxygen through successive capture or protons and alphas, followed by beta decays, nuclei up to the mass 100 region can be produced. In order to understand the reaction paths and the conditions at various astrophysical sites (e.g. Novae and X-ray bursts) cross sections, masses and half-lives of unstable nuclei have to be measured. In this contribution recent results involving proton-rich nuclei are discussed.

  5. Mass Evaluation for Proton Rich Nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-11-30

    The Atomic mass evaluation (AME) provides the reliable resource for the values related to atomic masses. Since the publication of the latest version of AME in 2003, many developments for atomic mass determination have been done and important results changed significantly our knowledge. A preliminary version of AME was released in April 2011, and an official version is foreseen to be published in early 2013. The general status of AME is presented and some specific features of AME for proton-rich nuclides are discussed.

  6. Gamow-Teller Transitions in Proton Rich Exotic pf-shell Nuclei Deduced from Mirror Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, H.; Blank, B.; Brentano, P. von; Zell, K. O.; Berg, G. P. A.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Negret, A.; Popescu, L.; Rubio, B.; Shimbara, Y.

    2010-08-12

    The rp-process nucleosynthesis proceeds through nuclei near the proton drip-line, in which Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions starting from unstable pf-shell nuclei play important roles. In the {beta}-decay study of these nuclei, half-lives can be measured rather accurately. On the other hand, in the high-resolution ({sup 3}He, t) charge-exchange reactions on mirror nuclei, individual GT transitions can be studied up to high excitations. For the accurate study of the GT transition strengths in the A = 52, T = 2, system, we compare and combine the {beta}-decay study of the proton-rich nucleus {sup 52}Ni and the {sup 52}Cr({sup 3}He, t) measurement assuming the isospin symmetry of the T{sub z} = {+-}2{yields}{+-}1 transitions.

  7. Three-Body Forces and Proton-Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Jason D; Menendez, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first study of three-nucleon (3N) forces for proton-rich nuclei along the N 8 and N 20 isotones. Our results for the ground-state energies and proton separation energies are in very good agreement with experiment where available, and with the empirical isobaric multiplet mass equation. We predict the spectra for all N 8 and N 20 isotones to the proton dripline, which agree well with experiment for 18Ne, 19Na, 20Mg and 42Ti. In all other cases, we provide first predictions based on nuclear forces. Our results are also very promising for studying isospin symmetry breaking in medium-mass nuclei based on chiral effective field theory.

  8. New routes for production of proton-rich Tc isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2010-02-15

    Proton-rich Tc radionuclides have been identified as potential candidates for specific clinical and biological applications in the last decade. So far, these radionuclides have been produced either by proton-induced reaction on Mo targets or {alpha}-particle-induced reaction on Nb targets. This article lightens two heavy-ion-induced production routes of {sup 93,94,95,96}Tc radionuclides through {sup 7}Li+{sup nat}Zr and {sup 9}Be+{sup nat}Y reactions and provides important cross-sectional information in the projectile energy ranges 37-45 MeV and 30-48 MeV, respectively. Excitation functions of those reactions have been measured using the stacked-foil technique followed by the off-line {gamma}-spectrometric studies. Measured cross-sectional data have been interpreted comparing theoretical predictions of the two nuclear reaction model codes PACE-II and ALICE91. Experimental cross sections agreed with the theory. Measured production cross sections of {sup 94,95}Tc have been compared with those produced from the {alpha}+{sup 93}Nb reaction.

  9. Level density from evaporation spectra for proton rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinov, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    The level density is an important characteristic of atomic nuclei. It tells us about the nuclear structure and is needed to calculate reaction rates. The experimental information about the level density and corresponding model parameter systematics are available for the nuclei close to the stability line but little is known for the nuclei beyond the stability line. It follows from theoretical consideration that several physical effects might give the of Fermi-gas parameter `a' dependence on N and/or Z rather than on simply on A [1]. To study this and other features, the level density from neutron evaporation spectra has been measured for proton-rich nuclei ^60Zn and ^56Ni as well as for corresponding stable nuclei ^60Ni and^ 56Fe of the same A. Targets of ^58Ni, ^54Fe,^ 58Fe, and ^55Mn were bombarded with beams of 3He and deuterium at Ohio University's Edwards Accelerator Laboratory. Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight method. The different level density models have been tested in the excitation energy interval up to 8-10 MeV and the best parameters have been found. The results are compared to available systematics as well as to calculations performed on the basis of microscopic model recommended in RIPL data base. [1] S.I. Al-Quraishi, S.M.Grimes, T.N. Massey and D.A.Resler, Phys.Rev. C63, 065803 (2001).

  10. New type of asymmetric fission in proton-rich nuclei.

    PubMed

    Andreyev, A N; Elseviers, J; Huyse, M; Van Duppen, P; Antalic, S; Barzakh, A; Bree, N; Cocolios, T E; Comas, V F; Diriken, J; Fedorov, D; Fedosseev, V; Franchoo, S; Heredia, J A; Ivanov, O; Köster, U; Marsh, B A; Nishio, K; Page, R D; Patronis, N; Seliverstov, M; Tsekhanovich, I; Van den Bergh, P; Van De Walle, J; Venhart, M; Vermote, S; Veselsky, M; Wagemans, C; Ichikawa, T; Iwamoto, A; Möller, P; Sierk, A J

    2010-12-17

    A very exotic process of β-delayed fission of 180Tl is studied in detail by using resonant laser ionization with subsequent mass separation at ISOLDE (CERN). In contrast to common expectations, the fission-fragment mass distribution of the post-β-decay daughter nucleus 180Hg (N/Z=1.25) is asymmetric. This asymmetry is more surprising since a mass-symmetric split of this extremely neutron-deficient nucleus would lead to two 90Zr fragments, with magic N=50 and semimagic Z=40. This is a new type of asymmetric fission, not caused by large shell effects related to fragment magic proton and neutron numbers, as observed in the actinide region. The newly measured branching ratio for β-delayed fission of 180Tl is 3.6(7) × 10(-3)%, approximately 2 orders of magnitude larger than in an earlier study. PMID:21231583

  11. {beta} decay of proton-rich nucleus {sup 23}Al and astrophysical consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Iacob, V. E.; Zhai, Y.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Fu, C.; Hardy, J. C.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2006-10-15

    We present the first study of the {beta} decay of {sup 23}Al undertaken with pure samples. The study was motivated by nuclear astrophysics questions. Pure samples of {sup 23}Al were obtained from the momentum achromat recoil separator (MARS) of Texas A and M University, collected on a fast tape-transport system, and moved to a shielded location where {beta} and {beta}-{gamma} coincidence measurements were made. We deduced {beta} branching ratios and log ft values for transitions to states in {sup 23}Mg, and from them determined unambiguously the spin and parity of the {sup 23}Al ground state to be J{sup {pi}}=5/2{sup +}. We discuss how this excludes the large increases in the radiative proton capture cross section for the reaction {sup 22}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Al at astrophysical energies, which were implied by claims that the spin and parity is J{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +}. The log ft for the Fermi transition to its isobaric analog state (IAS) in {sup 23}Mg is also determined for the first time. This IAS and a state 16 keV below it are observed, well separated in the same experiment for the first time. We can now solve a number of inconsistencies in the literature, exclude strong isospin mixing claimed before, and obtain a new determination of the resonance strength. Both states are resonances in the {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg reaction at energies important in novae. The reactions {sup 22}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Al and {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg have both been suggested as possible candidates for diverting some of the flux in oxygen-neon novae explosions from the A=22 into the A=23 mass 0011cha.

  12. The production of proton-rich isotopes beyond iron: The γ-process in stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, Marco; Göbel, Kathrin; Reifarth, René; Travaglio, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Beyond iron, a small fraction of the total abundances in the Solar System is made of proton-rich isotopes, the p-nuclei. The clear understanding of their production is a fundamental challenge for nuclear astrophysics. The p-nuclei constrain the nucleosynthesis in core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae. The γ-process is the most established scenario for the production of the p-nuclei, which are produced via different photodisintegration paths starting on heavier nuclei. A large effort from nuclear physics is needed to access the relevant nuclear reaction rates far from the valley of stability. This review describes the production of the heavy proton-rich isotopes by the γ-process in stars, and explores the state of the art of experimental nuclear physics to provide nuclear data for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  13. Interaction radii of proton-rich radioactive nuclei at A=60-80

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, G. F.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Villari, A. C. C.; Mittig, W.; Casandjian, J. M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Chartier, M.; Hirata, D.; Angelique, J. C.; Orr, N. A.; Audi, G.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Donzeaud, C.; MacCormick, M.; Stephan, C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Gillibert, A.

    1998-12-21

    The interaction radii of proton-rich, radioactive {sub 31}Ga, {sub 32}Ge, {sub 33}As, {sub 34}Se, {sub 35}Br isotopes were measured using the direct method. The secondary beams were produced using a {sup 78}Kr primary beam of 73 MeV/nucleon in conjunction with SISSI and the SPEG spectrometers at GANIL. Most elements show reduced radii which vary with N, with a minimum around N=36-38. The experimental reduced radii are compared to theoretical values obtained from Glauber reaction cross-section calculations based on Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) nuclear densities.

  14. Direct mass measurements of proton-rich isotopes of Ge, As, Se, and Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, G. F.; Lépine-Szily, A.; Audi, G.; Mittig, W.; Chartier, M.; Orr, N. A.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Angelique, J. C.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cunsolo, A.; Donzaud, C.; Foti, A.; Gillibert, A.; Lewitowicz, M.; Lukyanov, S.; MacCormick, M.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ostrowski, A. N.; Sherrill, B. M.; Stephan, C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Vieira, D. J.; Villari, A. C.; Wouters, J. M.

    2002-04-01

    The masses of neutron-deficient nuclei close to the proton drip line are an important input for the rapid proton-capture process modeling above 56Ni. The measurement of the masses of proton-rich nuclei with 32<=Z<=35 has been made using a direct time-of-flight technique. The masses of the nuclides 66As,68Se, and 71Br are reported for the first time, with mass excesses of -51 500(680), -53 620(1000), and -57 060(570) keV being found. The masses agree well in most cases with the Audi-Wapstra systematics.

  15. Static and dynamic aspect of covariant density functional theory in proton rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ring, P.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2007-11-30

    Proton rich nuclei are investigated in the framework of Covariant Density Functional Theory (CDFT). The Relativistic Hartree Bogoliubov (RHB) model is used to study the proton drip line in the region of heavy and superheavy nuclei. The dynamical behavior of nuclei with a large proton excess is studied within the Relativistic Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (RQRPA). Low lying El-strength is observed and it is shown that it corresponds to an oscillation of the proton skin against the isospin saturated neutron-proton core. This mode is in full analogy to the neutron pygmy resonances found in many nuclei with neutron excess.

  16. Mass Measurements of Proton-rich Nuclides at the Cooler Storage Ring at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. H.; Xu, H. S.; Wang, M.; Zhou, X. H.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Hu, Z. G.; Huang, W. X.; Liu, Y.; Ma, X.; Mao, R. S.; Mei, B.; Sun, Z. Y.; Wang, J. S.; Xiao, G. Q.; Yan, X. L.; Yang, J. C.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhang, X. Y.; and others

    2011-11-30

    Recent results and progress of mass measurements of proton-rich nuclei using isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS) are reported. The nuclei under investigation were produced via fragmentation of relativistic energy heavy ions of {sup 78}Kr and {sup 58}Ni. After in-flight separation by the fragment separator RIBLL-2, the nuclei were injected and stored in the experimental storage ring CSRe, and their masses were determined from measurements of the revolution times. The impact of these measurements on the stellar nucleosynthesis in the rp-process is discussed.

  17. Interaction radii of proton-rich radioactive nuclei at A=60{endash}80

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, G.F.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Villari, A.C.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Villari, A.C.; Mittig, W.; Chartier, M.; Casandjian, J.M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Ostrowski, A.N.; Hirata, D.; Angelique, J.C.; Orr, N.A.; Audi, G.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Donzeaud, C.; MacCormick, M.; Stephan, C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Gillibert, A.; Chartier, M.; Morrissey, D.J.; Sherrill, B.M.; Ostrowski, A.N.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    The interaction radii of proton-rich, radioactive {sub 31}Ga,thinsp{sub 32}Ge,thinsp{sub 33}As,thinsp{sub 34}Se,thinsp{sub 35}Br isotopes were measured using the direct method. The secondary beams were produced using a {sup 78}Kr primary beam of 73 MeV/nucleon in conjunction with SISSI and the SPEG spectrometers at GANIL. Most elements show reduced radii which vary with N, with a minimum around N=36{endash}38. The experimental reduced radii are compared to theoretical values obtained from Glauber reaction cross-section calculations based on Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) nuclear densities. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Schottky Mass Measurements of Cooled Proton-Rich Nuclei at the GSI Experimental Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Radon, T.; Schlitt, B.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Eickhoff, H.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Hausmann, M.; Irnich, H.; Klepper, O.; Kluge, H.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kraus, G.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nickel, F.; Nolden, F.; Patyk, Z.; Reich, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schwab, W.; Steck, M.; Suemmerer, K.; Kerscher, T.; Beha, T.; Loebner, K.E.; Fujita, Y.; Jung, H.C.; Wollnik, H.; Novikov, Y.

    1997-06-01

    High-precision mass measurements of proton-rich isotopes in the range of 60{le}Z{le}84 were performed using the novel technique of Schottky spectrometry. Projectile fragments produced by {sup 209}Bi ions at 930{ital A} MeV were separated with the magnetic spectrometer FRS and stored and cooled in the experimental storage ring (ESR). A typical mass resolving power of 350000 and a precision of 100keV were achieved in the region A{approx}200 . Masses of members of {alpha} chains linked by precise Q{sub {alpha}} values but not yet connected to the known masses were determined. In this way it is concluded that {sup 201}Fr and {sup 197}At are proton unbound. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Nucleosynthesis of elements between Sr and Ag in neutron- and proton-rich neutrino-driven winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcones, A.; Bliss, J.

    2014-04-01

    Neutrino-driven winds that follow core collapse supernovae were thought to be the site where half of the heavy elements are produced by the r-process. Although recent hydrodynamic simulations show that the conditions in the wind are not enough for the r-process, lighter heavy elements like Sr, Y, and Zr can be produced. However, it is still not clear whether the conditions in the wind are slightly neutron-rich or proton-rich. Here, we investigate the nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds for both these conditions and systematically explore the impact of wind parameters on abundances. Our results show the difficulty of obtaining a robust abundance pattern in neutron-rich winds, where an over production of Sr, Y, and Zr is also likely. In proton-rich conditions, the abundances smoothly change when varying wind parameters. Constraints for wind parameters and neutrino energies and luminosities will soon become available by combining nucleosynthesis studies, like the one presented here, with new and future experimental data and observations.

  20. Isotopic excesses of proton-rich nuclei related to space weathering observed in a gas-rich meteorite Kapoeta

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Shigekazu E-mail: s-yoneda@kahaku.go.jp

    2014-05-10

    The idea that solar system materials were irradiated by solar cosmic rays from the early Sun has long been suggested, but is still questionable. In this study, Sr, Ba, Ce, Nd, Sm, and Gd isotopic compositions of sequential acid leachates from the Kapoeta meteorite (howardite) were determined to find systematic and correlated variations in their isotopic abundances of proton-rich nuclei, leading to an understanding of the irradiation condition by cosmic rays. Significantly large excesses of proton-rich isotopes (p-isotopes), {sup 84}Sr, {sup 130}Ba, {sup 132}Ba, {sup 136}Ce, {sup 138}Ce, and {sup 144}Sm, were observed, particularly in the first chemical separate, which possibly leached out of the very shallow layer within a few μm from the surface of regolith grains in the sample. The results reveal the production of p-isotopes through the interaction of solar cosmic rays with the superficial region of the regolith grains before the formation of the Kapoeta meteorite parent body, suggesting strong activity in the early Sun.

  1. Pygmy dipole response of proton-rich argon nuclei in random-phase approximation and no-core shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, C.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Caurier, E.; Langanke, K.

    2008-02-15

    The occurrence of a pygmy dipole resonance in proton rich {sup 32,34}Ar is studied using the unitary correlator operator method interaction V{sub UCOM}, based on Argonne V18. Predictions from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and the shell model in a no-core basis are compared. It is found that the inclusion of configuration mixing up to two-particles-two-holes broadens the pygmy strength slightly and reduces sensibly its strength, as compared to the RPA predictions. For {sup 32}Ar, a clear peak associated with a pygmy resonance is found. For {sup 34}Ar, the pygmy states are obtained close to the giant dipole resonance and mix with it.

  2. High-precision β decay half-life measurements of proton-rich nuclei for testing the CVC hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtukian-Nieto, T.

    2011-11-01

    The experimental study of super-allowed nuclear β decays serves as a sensitive probe of the conservation of the weak vector current (CVC) and allows tight limits to be set on the presence of scalar or right-handed currents. Once CVC is verified, it is possible to determine the Vud element of the CKM quark-mixing matrix. Similarly, the study of nuclear mirror β decays allows to arrive at the same final quantity Vud. Whereas dedicated studies of 0+ → 0+ decays are performed for several decades now, the potential of mirror transitions was only rediscovered recently. Therefore, it can be expected that important progress is possible with high-precision studies of different mirror β decays. In the present piece of work the half-life measurements performed by the CENBG group of the proton-rich nuclei 42Ti, 38-39Ca, 30-31S and 29P are summarised.

  3. Stability of proton-rich nuclei in the upper {ital sd} shell and lower {ital pf} shell

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, B.J.

    1996-09-01

    The decay properties of proton-rich nuclei with {ital Z}=19{endash}30 are investigated using measured binding energies of the analog neutron-rich nuclei and Coulomb energy shifts deduced from a parametrization of measured Coulomb displacement energies. Predicted binding energies and separation energies are compared where possible with previous calculations; in most cases the calculations agree within the quoted uncertainties. The positions of the one-proton and diproton drip lines are determined from the calculated separation energies. It is suggested that good candidates for the observation of correlated two-proton emission are {sup 34}Ca, {sup 38,39}Ti, {sup 45}Fe, {sup 48}Ni, and {sup 54}Zn. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Neutron-Proton pairing effect on the thermodynamical quantities of even-even proton-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belabbas, M.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.; Ami, I.

    2012-02-01

    Expressions of the thermodynamical quantities, i.e. the energy E, the entropy S and the heat capacity C are established by including the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing effect. They are deduced using temperature-dependent gap equations . E, S and C are numerically studied as a function of the temperature for some even-even proton-rich nuclei. The single-particle energies used are those of a Woods-Saxon deformed mean field. It is shown that the isovector pairing effect on E, S and C is non-negligible, not only in the 0 <= T <= Tcnp region (Tcnp being the critical temperature beyond which the np pairing vanishes), but also in the Tcnp <= T <= Tcn region (Tcn being the neutron-system critical temperature).

  5. Spectroscopy of {sup 22,23,24}Si and {sup 22}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, S.; Andriamonje, S.; Blank, B.; Del Moral, R.; Dufour, J. P.; Fleury, A.; Pourre, P.; Pravikoff, M. S.; Boue, F.; Hanelt, E.; Orr, N. A.; Schmidt, K.-H.

    1998-12-21

    {beta}-delayed one- and two-proton and {alpha} spectroscopic studies of the neutron-deficient nuclei {sup 22,23,24}Si and {sup 22}Al produced in projectile fragmentation of a {sup 36}Ar primary beam at 95 MeV/u have been performed at GANIL. Isotopes of interest were analyzed using the LISE3 spectrometer and were implanted in a telescope made of silicon detectors and a micro-strip gaseous counter where decay particles were detected.

  6. Gamow-Teller Transitions and beta-decay Half-life in Proton Rich pf-shell Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, H.; Shimbara, Y.; Blank, B.; Brentano, P. von; Zell, K. O.; Berg, G. P. A.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Negret, A.; Popescu, L.; Rubio, B.

    2010-06-01

    In violent neutrino-induced reactions at the core-collapse stage of type II supernovae, Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions starting from stable as well as unstable pf-shell nuclei play important roles. In the beta-decay study of these unstable pf-shell nuclei, half-lives can be measured rather accurately. On the other hand, in high-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reactions at 0 deg., individual GT transitions up to high excitations can be studied. Assuming the isospin symmetry for the strengths of T{sub z} = +-2->+-1 analogous GT transitions, we present a 'merged analysis' for the determination of GT transition strengths starting from proton-rich T{sub z} = -2 nuclei. We applied this analysis to the A = 52, T = 2 system, and it was found that the GT transitions and the properties of the {sup 52}Nibeta decay can be understood better by combining the mirror GT strength distribution obtained from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 3}He,t) reaction.

  7. Beyond Mean Field Description of the Gamow-Teller {beta}{sup +} Decay of Proton-Rich Kr Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovici, A.

    2008-01-24

    We studied the influence of shape mixing on the Gamow-Teller {beta}{sup +} decay of the nucleus {sup 74}Kr using the complex Excited Vampir variational approach for the description of the ground state of the parent nucleus and the 1{sup +} states in the beta window in the daughter nucleus {sup 74}Br. Within the same approach the Gamow-Teller strength distributions for the decay of the ground state and the lowest-excited states in the nucleus {sup 72}Kr to the 1{sup +} states in the nucleus {sup 72}Br are obtained using a rather large model space and realistic effective interaction. The shape coexistence and mixing are consistently described for both the 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} states in the even-even parent nucleus and the 1{sup +} states in the odd-odd daughter nucleus. The theoretical results for the Gamow-Teller strength distributions and the accumulated strengths are compared with the available data and predictions concerning the decay of the first excited 0{sup +} and the yrast 2{sup +} in the rp-process waiting point nucleus {sup 72}Kr are presented.

  8. Observation of the particle-unstable nucleus 10N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine-Szily, A.; Oliveira, J. M.; Vanin, V. R.; Ostrowski, A. N.; Lichtenthäler, R.; di Pietro, A.; Guimarães, V.; Laird, A. M.; Maunoury, L.; Lima, G. F.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Trinder, W.; Villari, A. C.; de Vismes, A.

    2002-05-01

    For the first time evidence of the ground state of the proton-rich, unbound nucleus 10N has been found in the multinucleon transfer reaction 10B(14N,14B)10N. The observed resonance of 10N has a mass excess of 38.8(4) MeV and a width of Γ=2.3(16) MeV, close to the Audi-Wapstra estimation of 38.5(4) MeV. 10N is the last missing A=10 multiplet partner.

  9. Systematic study of the isovector pairing effect on the moment of inertia of proton-rich nuclei in the region 30 <= Z <= 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami, I.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Allal, N. H.

    2013-02-01

    A systematic study of the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing effect on the moment of inertia is performed at zero temperature. This study is based on a recently established expression obtained using the framework of the quantum perturbation theory and the Inglis cranking method, at the limit when the temperature is nil. We considered even-even proton-rich nuclei such as 30 <= Z <= 40 and N - Z = 0, 2, 4 using the single-particle energies and eigen-states of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean-field. The obtained results are compared to their homologues of the conventional BCS theory (i. e. when only the pairing between like-particles is considered).

  10. Design of an rf separation system for a proton-rich radioisotope beam produced by using an in-flight fragment separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myeongjin; Yun, Chong-Cheol; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Jaeyu

    2013-03-01

    An in-flight fragment separator is a device to separate a radioisotope (RI) beam of interest produced by bombarding a thin target with a primary heavy-beam usually of high intensity. The isotope beam separation is done by momentum dispersion of dipole magnets and energy loss in a wedge-shaped degrader. However, this separation method is not sufficient for proton-rich isotope beams because their momenta tend to overlap with the low-momentum tails of more abundant fragments produced with larger cross sections. An additional separation technique, which relies on the velocity difference in the isotope beams, can be used to enhance the purity of the desired isotope beam. A separation system based on an rf-kicker was considered, and its beam line was designed using the TRANSPORT and the COSY INFINITY codes. Trajectories and vertical separations of the RI beams were calculated using the LISE++ code. The background isotope beam can be greatly reduced with the use of the rf separator system, but transmission of the isotope beam may be reduced by the aperture of the rf kicker. The lower rf frequency of the primary beam is an important factor in adopting the rf separator system. The electromagnetic design of the rf-kicker was studied.

  11. Precursor routes to quaternary intermetallics: Synthesis, crystal structure, and physical properties of clathrate-II Cs8Na16Al24Si112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kaya; Dong, Yongkwan; Nolas, George S.

    2016-05-01

    A new quaternary clathrate-II composition, Cs8Na16Al24Si112, was synthesized by kinetically controlled thermal decomposition (KCTD) employing both NaSi and NaAlSi as the precursors and CsCl as a reactive flux. The crystal structure and composition of Cs8Na16Al24Si112 were investigated using both Rietveld refinement and elemental analysis, and the temperature dependent transport properties were investigated. Our results indicate that KCTD with multiple precursors is an effective method for the synthesis of multinary inorganic phases that are not easily accessible by traditional solid-state synthesis or crystal growth techniques.

  12. Global optical potential for nucleus-nucleus systems from 50 MeV/u to 400 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumoto, T.; Horiuchi, W.; Takashina, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sakuragi, Y.

    2012-04-01

    We present a new global optical potential (GOP) for nucleus-nucleus systems, including neutron-rich and proton-rich isotopes, in the energy range of 50-400 MeV/u. The GOP is derived from the microscopic folding model with the complex G-matrix interaction CEG07 and the global density presented by the São Paulo group. The folding model accounts for realistic complex optical potentials of nucleus-nucleus systems well and reproduces the existing elastic scattering data for stable heavy-ion projectiles at incident energies above 50 MeV/u. We then calculate the folding-model potentials (FMPs) for projectiles of even-even isotopes, 8-22C, 12-24O, 16-38Ne, 20-40Mg, 22-48Si, 26-52S, 30-62Ar, and 34-70Ca, scattered by stable target nuclei of 12C, 16O, 28Si, 40Ca 58Ni, 90Zr, 120Sn, and 208Pb at incident energies of 50, 60, 70, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200, 250, 300, 350, and 400 MeV/u. The calculated FMP is represented, with a sufficient accuracy, by a linear combination of 10-range Gaussian functions. The expansion coefficients depend on the incident energy, the projectile and target mass numbers, and the projectile atomic number, while the range parameters depend only on the projectile and target mass numbers. The adequate mass region of the present GOP by the global density is inspected in comparison with FMP by realistic density. The full set of the range parameters and the coefficients for all the projectile-target combinations at each incident energy are provided on a permanent open-access website together with a fortran program for calculating the microscopic-basis GOP (MGOP) for a desired projectile nucleus by the spline interpolation over the incident energy and the target mass number.

  13. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions are presented. The data are discussed within the framework of standard super-position models and from the point-of-view of the possible formation of new states of matter in heavy ion collisions.

  14. Nucleus-nucleus scattering at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Varma, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Nucleus-nucleus scattering is treated in the Glauber approximation. The usual optical limit result, generally thought to improve as the number of nucleons in the colliding nuclei increases, is found to be the first term of a series which diverges for large nuclei. Corrections to the optical limit are obtained which provide a means of performing realistic calculations for collisions involving light nuclei. Total cross section predictions agree well with recent measurements.

  15. Review of Experimental Data on Alpha-Induced Reactions on Some Nuclei (Mg-24, Si-28, S-32, Ar-36, Ca-40) in Terms of Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dunaeva, S.A.; McLane, V.; Savin, M.; Taova, S.

    2005-05-24

    The present report gives a detailed analysis of experimental works and a review of alpha-induced reaction cross-section data of five alpha-alpha nuclei, Mg-24, Si-28, S-32, Ar-36 and Ca-40, for incident alpha energy up to 20 MeV. Alpha-induced reactions play an important role in the helium burning stage of stars, novae, and supernovae. These reactions are basic to the CNO and Al-Mg cycles, and also to the production of neutrons producing S and R processes occurring in stars. Thus, the availability of cross-section data for these reactions is a prime need for the study of nuclear interactions taking place in stars.These data have been compiled as part of an international collaboration, funded in part by the Civilian Research and Development Foundation, and are available in the EXFOR databases.

  16. Beta Decay Study of the Tz = - 256Zn Nucleus and the Determination of the Half-Lives of a Few fp-shell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, B.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Kucuk, L.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Fujita, Y.; Fujita, H.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Adachi, T.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; de France, G.; Ganioğlu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grevy, S.; Kamalou, O.; Kozer, H. C.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Marqués, F. M.; Molina, F.; Oktem, Y.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Perrot, L.; Popescu, L.; Raabe, R.; Rogers, A. M.; Srivastava, P. C.; Susoy, G.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thomas, J. C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper concerns the experimental study of the β decay properties of few proton-rich fp-shell nuclei. The nuclei were produced at GANIL in fragmentation reactions, separated with the LISE spectrometer and stopped in an implantation detector surrounded by Ge detectors. The β-delayed gammas, β-delayed protons and the exotic β-delayed gamma-proton emission have been studied. Preliminary results are presented. The decay of the Tz = - 2 nucleus 56Zn has been studied in detail. Information from the β-delayed protons and β-delayed gammas has been used to deduce the decay scheme. The exotic beta-delayed gamma-proton decay has been observed for the first time in the fp-shell. The interpretation of the data was made possible thanks to the detailed knowledge of the mirror Charge Exchange (CE) process and the gamma de-excitation of the states in 56Co, the mirror nucleus of 56Cu.

  17. Identification of highly deformed even-even nuclei in the neutron- and proton-rich regions of the nuclear chart from the B(E2)↑ and E2 predictions in the generalized differential equation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, R. C.; Pattnaik, S.

    2015-11-01

    We identify here the possible occurrence of large deformations in the neutron- and proton-rich (n-rich and p-rich) regions of the nuclear chart from extensive predictions of the values of the reduced quadrupole transition probability B(E2)↑ for the transition from the ground state to the first 2+ state and the corresponding excitation energy E2 of even-even nuclei in the recently developed generalized differential equation (GDE) model exclusively meant for these physical quantities. This is made possible from our analysis of the predicted values of these two physical quantities and the corresponding deformation parameters derived from them such as the quadrupole deformation β2, the ratio of β2 to the Weisskopf single-particle β2(sp) and the intrinsic electric quadrupole moment Q0, calculated for a large number of both known as well as hitherto unknown even-even isotopes of oxygen to fermium (0 to FM; Z = 8-100). Our critical analysis of the resulting data convincingly support possible existence of large collectivity for the nuclides 30,32Ne,34Mg, 60Ti, 42,62,64Cr,50,68Fe, 52,72Ni, 72,70,96Kr,74,76Sr,78,80,106,108Zr, 82,84,110,112Mo, 140Te,144Xe, 148Ba,122Ce, 128,156Nd,130,132,158,160Sm and 138,162,164,166Gd, whose values of β2 are found to exceed 0.3 and even 0.4 in some cases. Our findings of large deformations in the exotic n-rich regions support the existence of another “island of inversion” in the heavy-mass region possibly caused by breaking of the N = 70 subshell closure.

  18. Proton-rich nucleosynthesis and nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rauscher, T.; Froehlich, C.

    2012-11-12

    Although the detailed conditions for explosive nucleosynthesis are derived from astrophysical modeling, nuclear physics determines fundamental patterns in abundance yields, not only for equilibrium processes. Focussing on the {nu}p- and the {gamma}-process, general nucleosynthesis features within the range of astrophysical models, but (mostly) independent of details in the modelling, are presented. Remaining uncertainties due to uncertain Q-values and reaction rates are discussed.

  19. The Nucleus Introduced

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    2011-01-01

    Now is an opportune moment to address the confluence of cell biological form and function that is the nucleus. Its arrival is especially timely because the recognition that the nucleus is extremely dynamic has now been solidly established as a paradigm shift over the past two decades, and also because we now see on the horizon numerous ways in which organization itself, including gene location and possibly self-organizing bodies, underlies nuclear functions. PMID:20660024

  20. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Maung, Khin Maung; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.

    1989-01-01

    The derivations of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and Watson multiple scattering are given. A simple optical potential is found to be the first term of that series. The number density distribution models of the nucleus, harmonic well, and Woods-Saxon are used without t-matrix taken from the scattering experiments. The parameterized two-body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are presented. The eikonal approximation was chosen as our solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  1. Convergence of the nucleus-nucleus Glauber multiple scattering series

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A.A.; Ahmad, I. )

    1991-05-01

    The Glauber {ital S}-matrix operator for nucleus-nucleus scattering is expressed as a finite series of matrix elements involving Bell's polynomials. Analyzing {alpha}{sup 4}He elastic-scattering data at the incident momentum of 4.32 GeV/{ital c}, we infer that our expansion is appreciably converging. Further, by applying closure over target and projectile states and neglecting a certain class of terms involving intermediate excitations, we arrive at a recurrence relation for nucleus-nucleus multiple scattering series terms, which invites further study as it seems to provide a simple method for calculating the nucleus-nucleus elastic-scattering cross section.

  2. Nucleus Course in Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiyama, Nobuo; Flamm, Carol S.

    The "Nucleus Course in Japanese," based on the Institute of Modern Languages'"Situational Reinforcement" approach, is designed for 80 to 100 hours of instruction. Each lesson has several sections--Response drills, Appropriate Response Sequence, and Reading. Most of the lessons also include optional sections with Sentences for Repetition or a…

  3. Cell nucleus in context

    SciTech Connect

    Lelievre, Sophie A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Pujuguet, Philippe

    1999-11-11

    The molecular pathways that participate in regulation of gene expression are being progressively unraveled. Extracellular signals, including the binding of extracellular matrix and soluble molecules to cell membrane receptors, activate specific signal transducers that convey information inside the cell and can alter gene products. Some of these transducers when translocated to the cell nucleus may bind to transcription complexes and thereby modify the transcriptional activity of specific genes. However, the basic molecules involved in the regulation of gene expression are found in many different cell and tissue types; thus the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific gene expression are still obscure. In this review, we focus on the study of signals that are conveyed to the nucleus. We propose that the way in which extracellular signals are integrated may account for tissue-specific gene expression. We argue that the integration of signals depends on the structural organization of cells ( i.e., extracellular matrix, cell membrane, cytoskeleton, nucleus) which a particular cell type within a tissue. Putting the nuclei in context allows us to envision gene expression as being regulated not only by the communication between the extracellular environment and the nucleus, but also by the influence of organized assemblies of cells on extracellular-nuclear communications.

  4. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  5. Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-08-18

    Version 00 The Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data file PNESD contains the numerical data and the related bibliography for the differential elastic cross sections, polarization and integral nonelastic cross sections for elastic proton-nucleus scattering.

  6. Analytic optical potentials for nucleon-nucleus nucleus-nucleus collisions involving light and medium nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, H. B.; Townsend, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing an optical model potential approximation to the exact nucleus-nucleus multiple-scattering series, optical potentials for nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are analytically derived. These expressions are applicable to light and medium cosmic ray nuclei as their single-particle density distributions are analytically determined, without approximation, from their actual harmonic well charge density distributions. Pauli correlation effects are included through the use of a simple Gaussian function to replace the usual expression obtained in the infinite nuclear matter approximation.

  7. Nucleus from string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Morita, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    In generic holographic QCD, we find that baryons are bound to form a nucleus, and that its radius obeys the empirically-known mass-number (A) dependence r∝A1/3 for large A. Our result is robust, since we use only a generic property of D-brane actions in string theory. We also show that nucleons are bound completely in a finite volume. Furthermore, employing a concrete holographic model (derived by Hashimoto, Iizuka, and Yi, describing a multibaryon system in the Sakai-Sugimoto model), the nuclear radius is evaluated as O(1)×A1/3[fm], which is consistent with experiments.

  8. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  9. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  10. Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Networking the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Indika; Scalzo, David; Tapscott, Stephen J; Kosak, Steven T; Groudine, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The nuclei of differentiating cells exhibit several fundamental principles of self-organization. They are composed of many dynamical units connected physically and functionally to each other—a complex network—and the different parts of the system are mutually adapted and produce a characteristic end state. A unique cell-specific signature emerges over time from complex interactions among constituent elements that delineate coordinate gene expression and chromosome topology. Each element itself consists of many interacting components, all dynamical in nature. Self-organizing systems can be simplified while retaining complex information using approaches that examine the relationship between elements, such as spatial relationships and transcriptional information. These relationships can be represented using well-defined networks. We hypothesize that during the process of differentiation, networks within the cell nucleus rewire according to simple rules, from which a higher level of order emerges. Studying the interaction within and among networks provides a useful framework for investigating the complex organization and dynamic function of the nucleus. PMID:20664641

  12. Electric quadrupole excitations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations are presented for electric quadrupole excitations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results are compared to an extensive data set and it is found that electric quadrupole effects provide substantial corrections to cross sections, especially for heavier nuclei.

  13. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  14. Scaling phenomenon in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C. Y.; Blankenbecler, R.

    1980-01-01

    New scaling variables for proton and pion production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are introduced which are the generalizations of the Feynmann scaling variable. They allow a simple description of the cross sections at forward and backward angles. 2 figures.

  15. Momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Ferdous; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    An optical model description, based on multiple scattering theory, of longitudinal momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The crucial role of the imaginary component of the nucleon-nucleon transition matrix in accounting for longitudinal momentum transfer is demonstrated. Results obtained with this model are compared with Intranuclear Cascade (INC) calculations, as well as with predictions from Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VUU) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. Comparisons are also made with experimental data where available. These indicate that the present model is adequate to account for longitudinal momentum transfer in both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies.

  16. The Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    Exciting new broadband observations of the galactic nucleus have placed the heart of the Milky Way under intense scrutiny in recent years. This has been due in part to the growing interest from theorists motivated to study the physics of black hole accretion, magnetized gas dynamics, and unusual star formation. The center of our Galaxy is now known to harbor the most compelling supermassive black hole candidate, weighing in at 3-4 million solar masses. Its nearby environment is comprised of a molecular dusty ring, clusters of evolved and young stars, diffuse hot gas, ionized gas streamers, and several supernova remnants. This chapter will focus on the physical makeup of this dynamic region and the feasibility of actually imaging the black hole's shadow in the coming decade with mm interferometry.

  17. Antiproton-nucleus interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugnon, J.; Vandermeulen, J.

    The antiproton-nucleus physics is reviewed. On the experimental side, the recent results obtained at the LEAR, BNL and KEK facilities are analyzed. A brief summary of the main pp and pn experimental data is also given. The antiproton-nucleus interaction can lead to elasic, inelastic and charge exchange scattering and to annihilation. The latter is very dominant. The scattering cross-sections are usually analyzed in terms of complex potential models. The relationship between potentials, charge conjugation and Dirac phenomenology is discussed. Much emphasis is put on the dynamics of the antiproton annihilation on nuclei. The energy transfer, pion absorption and target response are analyzed within the intranuclear cascade model. Special interest is devoted to strangeness production, hypernucleus formation and possible annihilation on two nucleons. Signatures for this new process are searched in experimental data. Finally, the highly debated question of quark-gluon formation is analyzed. Cet article constitue une revue de la physique antiproton-noyau. Du point de vue expérimental, cette revue porte particulièrement sur les récents résultats obtenus à LEAR, BNL et KEK. On y a aussi inclus une mise à jour des faits expérimentaux principaux pour pp et pn. L'interaction antiproton-noyau conduit à la diffusion élastique, inélastique et d'xA9change de charge et à des processus d'annihilation. Habituellement, les expériences de diffusion sont analysées en termes de potentiels complexes. La relation entre ces potentiels, la conjugaison de charge et la phénoménologie de Dirac est discutée. On s'est particulièrement intéressé à la dynamique de l'annihilation d'antiprotons sur des noyaux. Le transfert d'énergie, l'absorption de pions et la réponse de la cible sont analysés dans le cadre du modèle de cascade intranucléaire. Certains autres points sont discutés plus en détail: la production d'étrangeté, la formation d'hypernoyaux et l'annihilation sur

  18. Mechanics of the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus is the distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Until recently, it was often considered simply as a unique compartment containing the genetic information of the cell and associated machinery, without much attention to its structure and mechanical properties. This article provides compelling examples that illustrate how specific nuclear structures are associated with important cellular functions, and how defects in nuclear mechanics can cause a multitude of human diseases. During differentiation, embryonic stem cells modify their nuclear envelope composition and chromatin structure, resulting in stiffer nuclei that reflect decreased transcriptional plasticity. In contrast, neutrophils have evolved characteristic lobulated nuclei that increase their physical plasticity, enabling passage through narrow tissue spaces in their response to inflammation. Research on diverse cell types further demonstrates how induced nuclear deformations during cellular compression or stretch can modulate cellular function. Pathological examples of disturbed nuclear mechanics include the many diseases caused by mutations in the nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C and associated proteins, as well as cancer cells that are often characterized by abnormal nuclear morphology. In this article, we will focus on determining the functional relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular (dys-)function, describing the molecular changes associated with physiological and pathological examples, the resulting defects in nuclear mechanics, and the effects on cellular function. New insights into the close relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular organization and function will yield a better understanding of normal biology and will offer new clues into therapeutic approaches to the various diseases associated with defective nuclear mechanics. PMID:23737203

  19. Two Neutron Removal in Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for double neutron removal via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work examines the cause of these discrepancies and systematically investigates whether the problem might be due to electromagnetic theory, nuclear contributions, or an underestimate of experimental error. Using cross section systematics from other reactions it is found that the discrepancies can be resolved in a plausible manner.

  20. Unexpected doubly-magic nucleus.

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, R. V. F.; Physics

    2009-01-01

    Nuclei with a 'magic' number of both protons and neutrons, dubbed doubly magic, are particularly stable. The oxygen isotope {sup 24}O has been found to be one such nucleus - yet it lies just at the limit of stability.

  1. Sensitivity of cross sections for elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering to halo nucleus density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V.

    2012-12-15

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li.

  2. Double Nucleus in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, Damián; Díaz, Rubén J.; Agüero, M. Paz

    2006-03-01

    M83 is one of the nearest galaxies with enhanced nuclear star formation, and it presents one of the best opportunities to study the kinematics and physical properties of a circumnuclear starburst. Our three-dimensional spectroscopy data in the R band confirm the presence of a secondary nucleus or mass concentration (previously suggested by Thatte and coworkers). We determine the position of this hidden nucleus, which would be more massive than the visible one and was not detected in the optical Hubble Space Telescope images due, probably, to the strong dust extinction. Using a Keplerian approximation, we estimated for the optical nucleus a mass of (5.0+/-0.8)×106 Msolar/sini (r<1.5"), and for the hidden nucleus, located 4''+/-1'' to the northwest (position angle of 271deg+/-15deg) of the optical nucleus, a mass of (1.00+/-0.08)×107 Msolar/sini (r<1.5"). The emission-line ratio map also unveils the presence of a second circumnuclear ring structure, previously discovered by IR imaging (Elmegreen and coworkers). The data allow us to resolve the behavior of the interstellar medium inside the circumnuclear ring and around the binary mass concentration.

  3. Nucleus management with irrigating vectis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Aravind

    2009-01-01

    The main objective in modern cataract surgery is to achieve a better unaided visual acuity with rapid post-surgical recovery and minimal surgery-related complications. Early visual rehabilitation and better unaided vision can be achieved only by reducing the incision size. In manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), incision is between 5.5 to 7 mm. Once the nucleus is prolapsed into the anterior chamber, it can be extracted through the tunnel. Nucleus extraction with an irrigating vectis is a very simple technique, which combines mechanical and hydrostatic forces to express out the nucleus. This technique is time-tested with good results and more than 95% of nuclei in MSICS are extracted in this way offering all the merits of phacoemulsification with the added benefits of having wider applicability, better safety, shorter learning curve and lower cost. PMID:19075403

  4. Cometary nucleus and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the icy conglomerate model of cometary nuclei, various observations demonstrate the spotted nature of many or most nuclei, i.e., regions of unusual activity, either high or low. Rotation periods, spin axes and even precession of the axes are determined. The observational evidence for variations in activity over the surfaces of cometary nuclei are listed and discussed. On June 11 the comet IRAS-ARAKI-ALCOCK approached the Earth to a distance of 0.031 AU, the nearest since C/Lexell, 1770 I, providing a unique opportunity for near-nucleus observations. Preliminary analysis of these images establishes the spin axis of the nucleus, with an oblioquity to the orbit plane of approximately 50 deg, and a lag angle of sublimation approximately 35 deg from the solar meridian on the nucleus. Asymmetries of the inner coma suggests a crazy-quilt distribution of ices with differing volatility over the surface of the nucleus. The observations of Comet P/Homes 1892 III, exhibiting two 8-10 magnitude bursts, are carefully analyzed. The grazing encounter produced, besides the first great burst, an active area on the nucleus, which was rotating retrograde with a period of 16.3hr and inclination nearly 180 deg. After the first burst the total magnitude fell less than two magnitudes from November 7 to November 30 (barely naked eye) while the nuclear region remained diffuse or complex, rarely if ever showing a stellar appearance. The fading was much more rapid after the second burst. The grazing encounter distributed a volume of large chunks in the neighborhood of the nucleus, maintaining activity for weeks.

  5. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner. PMID:24637338

  6. Acridine: a versatile heterocyclic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kaur, Mandeep; Kumari, Meena

    2012-01-01

    Acridine is a heterocyclic nucleus. It plays an important role in various medicines. A number of therapeutic agents are based on acridine nucleus such as quinacrine (antimalarial), acriflavine and proflavine (antiseptics), ethacridine (abortifacient), amsacrine and nitracine (anticancer), and tacrine. Acridine is obtained from high boiling fraction of coal tar. It is also obtained in nature from plant and marine sources. Acridine undergoes a number of reactions such as nucleophilic addition, electrophilic substitution, oxidation, reduction, reductive alkylation and photoalkylation. The present review article summarizes the synthesis, reaction, literature review and pharmaceutical importance of acridine. PMID:22574501

  7. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  8. Higgs and Particle Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe

    We apply a diagrammatic approach to study Higgs boson, a color-neutral heavy particle, pro- duction in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the saturation framework without quantum evolution. We assume the strong coupling constant much smaller than one. Due to the heavy mass and colorless nature of Higgs particle, final state interactions are absent in our calculation. In order to treat the two nuclei dynamically symmetric, we use the Coulomb gauge which gives the appropriate light cone gauge for each nucleus. To further eliminate initial state interactions we choose specific prescriptions in the light cone propagators. We start the calculation from only two nucleons in each nucleus and then demonstrate how to generalize the calculation to higher orders diagrammatically. We simplify the diagrams by the Slavnov-Taylor-Ward identities. The resulting cross section is factorized into a product of two Weizsacker-Williams gluon distributions of the two nuclei when the transverse momentum of the produced scalar particle is around the saturation momentum. To our knowledge this is the first process where an exact analytic formula has been formed for a physical process, involving momenta on the order of the saturation momentum, in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the quasi-classical approximation. Since we have performed the calculation in an unconventional gauge choice, we further confirm our results in Feynman gauge where the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution is interpreted as a transverse momentum broadening of a hard gluons traversing a nuclear medium. The transverse momentum factorization manifests itself in light cone gauge but not so clearly in Feynman gauge. In saturation physics there are two different unintegrated gluon distributions usually encountered in the literature: the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution and the dipole gluon distribution. The first gluon distribution is constructed by solving classical Yang-Mills equation of motion in the Mc

  9. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yongying; Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-04-15

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 126}Sn+{sup 130}Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depths of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of the fusion barrier is also investigated. The fusion pocket becomes shallow for a heavy fusion system and almost disappears for heavy nearly symmetric systems, and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  10. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A. Sarkar, S.; Singh, G.

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  11. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  12. Single nucleon emission in relativistic nucleus-nucleus reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for nucleon emission via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work investigates the hypothesis that these discrepancies have arisen due to uncertainties about how to deduce the experimental electromagnetic cross section from the total measured cross section. An optical-model calculation of single neutron removal is added to electromagnetic cross sections and compared to the total experimental cross sections. Good agreement is found thereby resolving some of the earlier noted discrepancies. A detailed comparison to the recent work of Benesh, Cook, and Vary is made for both the impact parameter and the nuclear cross section. Good agreement is obtained giving an independent confirmation of the parameterized formulas developed by those authors.

  13. Hummingbird Comet Nucleus Analysis Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel; Carle, Glenn C.; Lasher, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    Hummingbird is a highly focused scientific mission, proposed to NASA s Discovery Program, designed to address the highest priority questions in cometary science-that of the chemical composition of the cometary nucleus. After rendezvous with the comet, Hummingbird would first methodically image and map the comet, then collect and analyze dust, ice and gases from the cometary atmosphere to enrich characterization of the comet and support landing site selection. Then, like its namesake, Hummingbird would carefully descend to a pre-selected surface site obtaining a high-resolution image, gather a surface material sample, acquire surface temperature and then immediately return to orbit for detailed chemical and elemental analyses followed by a high resolution post-sampling image of the site. Hummingbird s analytical laboratory contains instrumentation for a comprehensive molecular and elemental analysis of the cometary nucleus as well as an innovative surface sample acquisition device.

  14. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  15. Exotic modes of excitation in proton rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Paar, N.

    2011-11-30

    The framework of relativistic energy density functional has been applied in description of excitation phenomena in nuclei close to the proton drip line. In particular, low-lying dipole excitations have been studied using relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation, based on effective Lagrangians with density dependent meson nucleon couplings. In the isovector dipole channel, the occurrence of pronounced low-lying dipole peaks is predicted, corresponding to the proton pygmy dipole resonance. Since this exotic mode still awaits its experimental confirmation, systematic calculations have been conducted within a pool of neutron deficient nuclei, in order to identify the best possible candidates for measurements.

  16. Comet nucleus sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A comet nucleus sample return mission in terms of its relevant science objectives, candidate mission concepts, key design/technology requirements, and programmatic issues is discussed. The primary objective was to collect a sample of undisturbed comet material from beneath the surface of an active comet and to preserve its chemical and, if possible, its physical integrity and return it to Earth in a minimally altered state. The secondary objectives are to: (1) characterize the comet to a level consistent with a rendezvous mission; (2) monitor the comet dynamics through perihelion and aphelion with a long lived lander; and (3) determine the subsurface properties of the nucleus in an area local to the sampled core. A set of candidate comets is discussed. The hazards which the spacecraft would encounter in the vicinity of the comet are also discussed. The encounter strategy, the sampling hardware, the thermal control of the pristine comet material during the return to Earth, and the flight performance of various spacecraft systems and the cost estimates of such a mission are presented.

  17. Beta Decay Study of the T{sub z}=−2{sup 56}Zn Nucleus and the Determination of the Half-Lives of a Few fp-shell Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, B.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Kucuk, L.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Fujita, Y.; Fujita, H.; Blank, B.; Adachi, T.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Cáceres, L.; France, G. de; Gerbaux, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grevy, S. [CENBG, Université Bordeaux 1, UMR 5797 CNRS and others

    2014-06-15

    This paper concerns the experimental study of the β decay properties of few proton-rich fp-shell nuclei. The nuclei were produced at GANIL in fragmentation reactions, separated with the LISE spectrometer and stopped in an implantation detector surrounded by Ge detectors. The β-delayed gammas, β-delayed protons and the exotic β-delayed gamma-proton emission have been studied. Preliminary results are presented. The decay of the T{sub z}=−2 nucleus {sup 56}Zn has been studied in detail. Information from the β-delayed protons and β-delayed gammas has been used to deduce the decay scheme. The exotic beta-delayed gamma-proton decay has been observed for the first time in the fp-shell. The interpretation of the data was made possible thanks to the detailed knowledge of the mirror Charge Exchange (CE) process and the gamma de-excitation of the states in {sup 56}Co, the mirror nucleus of {sup 56}Cu.

  18. Theoretical antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, W. W.; Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections for intermediate to high energies are calculated using an ion-ion optical model. Good agreement with experiment (within 15 percent) is obtained in this same model for (bar p)-nucleus cross sections at laboratory energies up to 15 GeV. We describe a technique for estimating antinucleus-nucleus cross sections from NN data and suggest that further cosmic ray studies to search for antideuterons and other antinuclei be undertaken.

  19. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

  20. The retrotrapezoid nucleus and breathing.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Abbott, Stephen B G; Depuy, Seth D; Kanbar, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is located in the rostral medulla oblongata close to the ventral surface and consists of a bilateral cluster of glutamatergic neurons that are non-aminergic and express homeodomain transcription factor Phox2b throughout life. These neurons respond vigorously to increases in local pCO(2) via cell-autonomous and paracrine (glial) mechanisms and receive additional chemosensory information from the carotid bodies. RTN neurons exclusively innervate the regions of the brainstem that contain the respiratory pattern generator (RPG). Lesion or inhibition of RTN neurons largely attenuates the respiratory chemoreflex of adult rats whereas their activation increases respiratory rate, inspiratory amplitude and active expiration. Phox2b mutations that cause congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in humans prevent the development of RTN neurons in mice. Selective deletion of the RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons by genetic means in mice eliminates the respiratory chemoreflex in neonates.In short, RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons are a major nodal point of the CNS network that regulates pCO(2) via breathing and these cells are probable central chemoreceptors. PMID:23080151

  1. The multifunctional lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Weyand, Theodore G

    2016-02-01

    Providing the critical link between the retina and visual cortex, the well-studied lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) has stood out as a structure in search of a function exceeding the mundane 'relay'. For many mammals, it is structurally impressive: Exquisite lamination, sophisticated microcircuits, and blending of multiple inputs suggest some fundamental transform. This impression is bolstered by the fact that numerically, the retina accounts for a small fraction of its input. Despite such promise, the extent to which an LGN neuron separates itself from its retinal brethren has proven difficult to appreciate. Here, I argue that whereas retinogeniculate coupling is strong, what occurs in the LGN is judicious pruning of a retinal drive by nonretinal inputs. These nonretinal inputs reshape a receptive field that under the right conditions departs significantly from its retinal drive, even if transiently. I first review design features of the LGN and follow with evidence for 10 putative functions. Only two of these tend to surface in textbooks: parsing retinal axons by eye and functional group and gating by state. Among the remaining putative functions, implementation of the principle of graceful degradation and temporal decorrelation are at least as interesting but much less promoted. The retina solves formidable problems imposed by physics to yield multiple efficient and sensitive representations of the world. The LGN applies context, increasing content, and gates several of these representations. Even if the basic concentric receptive field remains, information transmitted for each LGN spike relative to each retinal spike is measurably increased. PMID:26479339

  2. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA. PMID:25102783

  3. Nucleus accumbens stimulation in pathological obesity.

    PubMed

    Harat, Marek; Rudaś, Marcin; Zieliński, Piotr; Birska, Julita; Sokal, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    One of the potential treatment methods of obesity is deep brain stimulation (DBS) of nucleus accumbens. We describe the case of 19 years old woman with hypothalamic obesity. She weighted 151.4 kg before DBS and the non-surgical methods proved to be inefficient. She was treated with implantation of DBS electrode to nucleus accumbens bilaterally. Results were measured with body mass index and neuropsychological tests. Follow-up was 14 months. Fourteen months after surgery weight was 138 kg, BMI was 48.3. Neuropsychological test results were intact. The presented case supports the thesis of treatment of obesity with nucleus accumbens stimulation. PMID:27154450

  4. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Nachev, Parashkev; Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio; Strange, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established. PMID:26428667

  5. Testing string dynamics in lepton nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.; Pluemer, M.

    1989-10-01

    The sensitivity of nuclear attenuation of 10-100 GeV lepton nucleus ({ell}A) reactions to space-time aspects of hadronization is investigated within the context of the Lund string model. We consider two mechanisms for attenuation in a nucleus: final state cascading and string flip excitations. Implications for the evolution of the energy density in nuclear collisions are discussed. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Volumes of cochlear nucleus regions in rodents.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Donald A; Lee, Augustine C; Hamilton, Walter D; Benjamin, Louis C; Vishwanath, Shilpa; Simo, Hermann; Godfrey, Lynn M; Mustapha, Abdurrahman I A A; Heffner, Rickye S

    2016-09-01

    The cochlear nucleus receives all the coded information about sound from the cochlea and is the source of auditory information for the rest of the central auditory system. As such, it is a critical auditory nucleus. The sizes of the cochlear nucleus as a whole and its three major subdivisions - anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN), posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN), and dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) - have been measured in a large number of mammals, but measurements of its subregions at a more detailed level for a variety of species have not previously been made. Size measurements are reported here for the summed granular regions, DCN layers, AVCN, PVCN, and interstitial nucleus in 15 different rodent species, as well as a lagomorph, carnivore, and small primate. This further refinement of measurements is important because the granular regions and superficial layers of the DCN appear to have some different functions than the other cochlear nucleus regions. Except for DCN layers in the mountain beaver, all regions were clearly identifiable in all the animals studied. Relative regional size differences among most of the rodents, and even the 3 non-rodents, were not large and did not show a consistent relation to their wide range of lifestyles and hearing parameters. However, the mountain beaver, and to a lesser extent the pocket gopher, two rodents that live in tunnel systems, had relative sizes of summed granular regions and DCN molecular layer distinctly larger than those of the other mammals. Among all the mammals studied, there was a high correlation between the size per body weight of summed granular regions and that of the DCN molecular layer, consistent with other evidence for a close relationship between granule cells and superficial DCN neurons. PMID:27435005

  7. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course. PMID:23124982

  8. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  9. Computer program for parameterization of nucleus-nucleus electromagnetic dissociation cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Badavi, Forooz F.

    1988-01-01

    A computer subroutine parameterization of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented that is suitable for implementation in a heavy ion transport code. The only inputs required are the projectile kinetic energy and the projectile and target charge and mass numbers.

  10. A Model of Comet Nucleus Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, H. U.; Jorda, L.; Rickman, H.; Thomas, N.

    2000-10-01

    Modelling cometary rotation is of particular interest for the preparation of space missions to comets. For example, the mapping phase during the ROSETTA mission must be planned keeping in mind that, unlike most asteroids, the rotational state of most short-period comets might be complex (excited). The modelling of cometary nucleus rotation can also provide us with important parameters that are needed to interpret coma structures or to build time-dependent thermal models of the nucleus. We combine a general three-dimensional model for the nucleus shape, surface properties, and insolation with a simplified thermal model to calculate the local time-dependent activity and consequently the non-gravitational forces acting on the nucleus. The torque of this force is then used to numerically solve the forced Euler equations for a homogeneously outgassing irregularly-shaped cometary nucleus. We will discuss the results of our model for comets 46P/Wirtanen, the target of the ROSETTA mission, and 19P/Borrelly, the target of DEEP-SPACE 1 and derive some generalized inferences.

  11. Protein quality control in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ramon D; Gardner, Richard G

    2016-06-01

    The nucleus is the repository for the eukaryotic cell's genetic blueprint, which must be protected from harm to ensure survival. Multiple quality control (QC) pathways operate in the nucleus to maintain the integrity of the DNA, the fidelity of the DNA code during replication, its transcription into mRNA, and the functional structure of the proteins that are required for DNA maintenance, mRNA transcription, and other important nuclear processes. Although we understand a great deal about DNA and RNA QC mechanisms, we know far less about nuclear protein quality control (PQC) mechanisms despite that fact that many human diseases are causally linked to protein misfolding in the nucleus. In this review, we discuss what is known about nuclear PQC and we highlight new questions that have emerged from recent developments in nuclear PQC studies. PMID:27015023

  12. Interpretive monitoring in the caudate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yanike, Marianna; Ferrera, Vincent P

    2014-01-01

    In a dynamic environment an organism has to constantly adjust ongoing behavior to adapt to a given context. This process requires continuous monitoring of ongoing behavior to provide its meaningful interpretation. The caudate nucleus is known to have a role in behavioral monitoring, but the nature of these signals during dynamic behavior is still unclear. We recorded neuronal activity in the caudate nucleus in monkeys during categorization behavior that changed rapidly across contexts. We found that neuronal activity maintained representation of the identity and context of a recently categorized stimulus, as well as interpreted the behavioral meaningfulness of the maintained trace. The accuracy of this cognitive monitoring signal was highest for behavior for which subjects were prone to make errors. Thus, the caudate nucleus provides interpretive monitoring of ongoing behavior, which is necessary for contextually specific decisions to adapt to rapidly changing conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03727.001 PMID:25415238

  13. Uncovering the Nucleus Candidate for NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Agüero, M. P.; Camperi, J. A.; Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Bosch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2015-11-01

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H2 rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  14. Sigma-nucleus potential in A=28.

    PubMed

    Noumi, H; Saha, P K; Abe, D; Ajimura, S; Aoki, K; Bhang, H C; Endo, T; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, T; Guo, H C; Imai, K; Hashimoto, O; Hotchi, H; Kim, E H; Kim, J H; Kishimoto, T; Krutenkova, A; Maeda, K; Nagae, T; Nakamura, M; Outa, H; Sekimoto, M; Saito, T; Sakaguchi, A; Sato, Y; Sawafta, R; Shimizu, Y; Takahashi, T; Tang, L; Tamura, H; Tanida, K; Watanabe, T; Xia, H H; Zhou, S H; Zhu, L H; Zhu, X F

    2002-08-12

    We have studied the (pi(-),K+) reaction on a silicon target to investigate the sigma-nucleus potential. The inclusive spectrum was measured at a beam momentum of 1.2 GeV/c with an energy resolution of 3.3 MeV (FWHM) by employing the superconducting kaon spectrometer system. The spectrum was compared with theoretical calculations within the framework of the distorted-wave impulse approximation, which demonstrates that a strongly repulsive sigma-nucleus potential with a nonzero size of the imaginary part reproduces the observed spectrum. PMID:12190516

  15. Nucleus model for periodic Comet Tempel 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1991-01-01

    Observational data obtained primarily during 1988 are analyzed and synthesized to develop a comprehensive physical model for the nucleus of Periodic Comet Tempel 2, one of the best studied members of Jupiter's family of short-period comets. It is confirmed that a previous investigation provided reliable information on the comet's spin-axis orientation, which implies and obliquity of 54 degrees of the orbit plane to the equatorial plane and which appears to have varied little - if at all - with time. This conclusion is critical for fitting a triaxial ellipsoid to approximate the figure of the nucleus.

  16. Hydrated nucleus pulposus herniation in seven dogs.

    PubMed

    Manunta, M L; Evangelisti, M A; Bergknut, N; Grinwis, G C M; Ballocco, I; Meij, B P

    2015-03-01

    The clinical signs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, treatment and follow-up in seven dogs with hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion (HNPE) are reported. All dogs had tetraparesis or tetraplegia. T2-weighted MRI revealed extradural hyperintense homogeneous material compressing the cervical spinal cord. After conservative treatment (five dogs) or surgical decompression (two dogs), all dogs returned to ambulatory function within 1 month. Follow-up MRI in conservatively treated dogs revealed complete disappearance of the extruded material. Histopathological examination of surgical specimens confirmed that the retrieved material was extruded nucleus pulposus with evidence of early degeneration. PMID:25599897

  17. Projections of the sensory trigeminal nucleus in a percomorph teleost, tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Xue, Hao-Gang; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yang, Chun-Ying; Kerem, Gulnisa; Yoshimoto, Masami; Sawai, Nobuhiko; Ito, Hironobu; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2006-03-20

    The sensory trigeminal nucleus of teleosts is the rostralmost nucleus among the trigeminal sensory nuclear group in the rhombencephalon. The sensory trigeminal nucleus is known to receive the somatosensory afferents of the ophthalmic, maxillar, and mandibular nerves. However, the central connections of the sensory trigeminal nucleus remain unclear. Efferents of the sensory trigeminal nucleus were examined by means of tract-tracing methods, in a percomorph teleost, tilapia. After tracer injections to the sensory trigeminal nucleus, labeled terminals were seen bilaterally in the ventromedial thalamic nucleus, periventricular pretectal nucleus, medial part of preglomerular nucleus, stratum album centrale of the optic tectum, ventrolateral nucleus of the semicircular torus, lateral valvular nucleus, prethalamic nucleus, tegmentoterminal nucleus, and superior and inferior reticular formation, with preference for the contralateral side. Labeled terminals were also found bilaterally in the oculomotor nucleus, trochlear nucleus, trigeminal motor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, facial lobe, descending trigeminal nucleus, medial funicular nucleus, and contralateral sensory trigeminal nucleus and inferior olive. Labeled terminals in the oculomotor nucleus and trochlear nucleus showed similar densities on both sides of the brain. However, labelings in the trigeminal motor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, facial lobe, descending trigeminal nucleus, and medial funicular nucleus showed a clear ipsilateral dominance. Reciprocal tracer injection experiments to the ventromedial thalamic nucleus, optic tectum, and semicircular torus resulted in labeled cell bodies in the sensory trigeminal nucleus, with a few also in the descending trigeminal nucleus. PMID:16440296

  18. Nucleus-nucleus interactions between 20 and 65 GeV per nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Roberts, F. E.; Watts, J. W.; Oda, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Jones, W. V.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid electronic-counter/emulsion-chamber instrument was exposed to high-energy cosmic rays on a balloon. The data on 105 nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 20-65 GeV/nucleon and for incident nuclear charges Zp in the range of 22 to 28 are presented. Inclusive characteristics of particle production on different targets (plastic, emulsion, and lead) are shown and compared with models based on the superposition of nucleon-nucleus interactions. Features of a subset of the more central collisions with a plastic target and some characteristics of individual events with the highest multiplicity of produced particles are described.

  19. Compound nucleus studies withy reverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1985-06-01

    Reverse kinematics reactions are used to demonstrate the compound nucleus origin of intermediate mass particles at low energies and the extension of the same mechanism at higher energies. No evidence has appeared in our energy range for liquid-vapor equilibrium or cold fragmentation mechanisms. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate

    2015-05-01

    I describe physics potential and experimental prospects for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS), a process which has not yet been observed. Germanium- based detectors represent a promising technology for CEvNS experiments. I focus primarily on stopped-pion neutrino sources.

  1. Transport model of nucleon-nucleus reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified model of nucleon-nucleus reaction is developed and some of its properties are examined. Comparisons with proton production measured for targets of Al-27, Ni-58, Zr-90, and Bi-209 show some hope for developing an accurate model for these complex reactions. It is suggested that binding effects are the next step required for further development.

  2. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2015-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated extended standard model predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3 and that Nucleus is 2 dimensional. The CBM theory began with an insight into the structure of the He nucleus around the year 1989. Details of how this theory evolved which took many years, and is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references One independent check of this model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light (around the ``dn'' quark in the center of the proton) turns out to be exactly one de Broglie wavelength something determined after the mass and speed of the up quark were determined by other means. This theory explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments and this along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. When this theory was first presented at Argonne in 1996, it was the first time that anyone had predicted the quarks orbited inside the proton at relativistic speeds and it was met with skepticism.

  3. The Nucleus and the Simple Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Brian J.

    1982-01-01

    The 150th anniversary of the naming of the nucleus by Robert Brown in 1831 was commemorated by re-creating some of his most important observations using two of his microscopes. Comments on Brown's career and the microtechnique employed during his time are provided. (Author/JN)

  4. Nucleon-nucleus interactions from JACEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on hadron-nucleus interactions from the Japanese-American Cooperation Emulsion Experiment experiment are presented. Angular distributions for charged particles, and angular and transverse momentum spectra for photons have been measured for a sample of events with sigma epsilon sub gamma. Results on central rapidity density and transverse energy flow are discussed.

  5. Heavy-flavour dynamics in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardi, M.; Beraudo, A.; De Pace, A.; Monteno, M.; Prino, F.

    2016-01-01

    We present recent results for heavy-quark observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies, obtained by the POWLANG transport setup. The initial creation of c c ¯ and b b ¯ pairs is simulated with a perturbative QCD approach (POWHEG+PYTHIA) and validated through comparison to experimental data of proton-proton collisions. In the nucleus-nucleus case, the propagation of the heavy quarks in the plasma is studied with the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport-coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow v2 of the final D mesons, as well as D - h correlations, and compare our results to experimental data from the ALICE and CMS Collaborations.

  6. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  7. Results on ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions from balloon-borne emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W.; Meegan, C. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of balloon-borne emulsion-chamber measurements on high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei (Burnett et al., 1983) are summarized in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Special consideration is given to seven nucleus-nucleus interaction events at energy in excess of 1 TeV/A with multiplicity greater than 400, and to Fe interactions (53 with CHO, 10 with emulsion, and 14 with Pb) at 20-60 GeV/A.

  8. Applicability of fluid-dynamical modeling of nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazineh, Dean; Auvinen, Jussi; Nahrgang, Marlene; Bass, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    At sufficiently high temperatures and densities, similar to the conditions found in the early universe, QCD matter forms a deconfined state called the quark gluon plasma (QGP). This state of matter can be created in collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy-ions, and RHIC data suggests that this QGP behaves similar to an ideal fluid. Viscous relativistic fluid dynamics therefore is one of the preferred theoretical tools to model the time-evolution and properties of the QGP. As the collision energy or the system size is decreased, the range of applicability of viscous fluid dynamics becomes smaller as the length scale of the interaction among the basic constituents is similar to the overall scale of the collision system itself. In order to investigate the validity of fluid-dynamical modeling of proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC and RHIC, we conduct an analysis of the spatial and temporal evolution of the Knudsen number, i.e. the ratio of the microscopic mean free path to the macroscopic length scale of the system. We show results for large and small collision systems, as a function of the specific shear viscosity, and discuss the range of applicability of fluid-dynamical modeling in relativistic proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at different energies.

  9. Nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections, and the nuclear interaction radius

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Ibrahim, Badawy

    2011-04-15

    We study the nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections for stable nuclei, in the energy region from 30A MeV to about 1A GeV, and find them to be in proportion to ({radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 1}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 1}{sup 2/3})+{radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 2}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 2}{sup 2/3})) {sup 2} in the mass range 8 to 100. Also, we find a parameter-free relation that enables us to predict a total reaction cross section for any nucleus-nucleus within 10% uncertainty at most, using the experimental value of the total reaction cross section of a given nucleus-nucleus. The power of the relation is demonstrated by several examples. The energy dependence of the nuclear interaction radius is deduced; it is found to be almost constant in the energy range from about 200A MeV to about 1A GeV; in this energy range and for nuclei with N=Z, R{sub I}(A)=(1.14{+-}0.02)A{sup 1/3} fm.

  10. Collateral projections from the lateral parabrachial nucleus to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus and the central amygdaloid nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shao-Hua; Yin, Jun-Bin; Sun, Yi; Bai, Yang; Zhou, Kai-Xiang; Zhao, Wen-Jun; Wang, Wei; Dong, Yu-Lin; Li, Yun-Qing

    2016-08-26

    Combined the retrograde double tracing with immunofluorescence histochemical staining, we examined the neurons in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB) sent collateral projections to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) and central amygdaloid nucleus (CeA) and their roles in the nociceptive transmission in the rat. After the injection of Fluoro-gold (FG) into the PVT and tetramethylrhodamine-dextran (TMR) into the CeA, respectively, FG/TMR double-labeled neurons were observed in the LPB. The percentages of FG/TMR double-labeled neurons to the total number of FG- or TMR-labeled neurons were 6.18% and 9.09%, respectively. Almost all of the FG/TMR double-labeled neurons (95%) exhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity. In the condition of neuropathic pain, 94% of these neurons showed FOS immunoreactivity. The present data indicates that some of CGRP-expressing neurons in the LPB may transmit nociceptive information toward the PVT and CeA by way of axon collaterals. PMID:27423318

  11. Dropped nucleus following phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Tajunisah, I; Reddy, S C

    2007-12-01

    Twenty two cases of dropped nucleus following 1,196 phacoemulsification procedures in cataract surgery were examined retrospectively to determine the incidence, predisposing factors and visual outcomes of this dreaded complication. All the cases underwent pars plana vitrectomy and the lens fragments were removed with phacofragmotome, vitrectomy cutter or delivered through limbus. The incidence of dropped nucleus was 1.84%. The predisposing factors were hard cataracts (13.6%), polar cataracts (9.1%), previously vitrectomized eyes (4.5%) and high myopia (4.5%). The final visual outcome was > or = 6/12 in 10 eyes (45.5%); complications were seen in 5 eyes (22.7%). The interval between initial surgery and vitrectomy, the method of fragment removal and the type of lens implanted, did not influence the final visual outcome. PMID:18705466

  12. Cell Nucleus-Targeting Zwitterionic Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-01-01

    An innovative nucleus-targeting zwitterionic carbon dot (CD) vehicle has been developed for anticancer drug delivery and optical monitoring. The zwitterionic functional groups of the CDs introduced by a simple one-step synthesis using β-alanine as a passivating and zwitterionic ligand allow cytoplasmic uptake and subsequent nuclear translocation of the CDs. Moreover, multicolor fluorescence improves the accuracy of the CDs as an optical code. The CD-based drug delivery system constructed by non-covalent grafting of doxorubicin, exhibits superior antitumor efficacy owing to enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, resulting in highly effective tumor growth inhibition. Since the zwitterionic CDs are highly biocompatible and effectively translocated into the nucleus, it provides a compelling solution to a multifunctional nanoparticle for substantially enhanced nuclear uptake of drugs and optical monitoring of translocation. PMID:26689549

  13. Macromolecular transport in synapse to nucleus communication.

    PubMed

    Panayotis, Nicolas; Karpova, Anna; Kreutz, Michael R; Fainzilber, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Local signaling events at synapses or axon terminals must be communicated to the nucleus to elicit transcriptional responses. The lengths of neuronal processes pose a significant challenge for such intracellular communication. This challenge is met by mechanisms ranging from rapid signals encoded in calcium waves to slower macromolecular signaling complexes carried by molecular motors. Here we summarize recent findings on macromolecular signaling from the synapse to the nucleus, in comparison to those employed in injury signaling along axons. A number of common themes emerge, including combinatorial signal encoding by post-translational mechanisms such as differential phosphorylation and proteolysis, and conserved roles for importins in coordinating signaling complexes. Neurons may integrate ionic flux with motor-transported signals as a temporal code for synaptic plasticity signaling. PMID:25534890

  14. Core-nucleus distortation in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    We are completing a study of the effects of the spherical distortion of the {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} nucleus by the {Lambda} in a hypernucleus. The response of the core was determined by an appropriately chosen energy-density functional which depends, in particular, on the nuclear compressibility. The forcing action of the A is determined by the nuclear density dependence of the {Lambda} binding in nuclear matter which is obtained from our work on the {Lambda} single-particle energies. Because of the strongly repulsive {Lambda}NN forces, this {Lambda} binding {open_quotes}saturates{close_quotes} at a density close to the central density of nuclei, and results in a reduced core-nucleus distortion much less than would otherwise be obtained. The effects of the core distortion then turn out to be very small even for quite light hypernuclei. This result justifies the assumption that spherical core nuclei are effectively undistorted in a hypernucleus.

  15. Coherency in neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerman, S.; Sharma, V.; Deniz, M.; Wong, H. T.; Chen, J.-W.; Li, H. B.; Lin, S. T.; Liu, C.-P.; Yue, Q.; Texono Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter (α ) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold, and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of α that can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in α would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to α >0.95 are derived.

  16. Finite nucleus effects on relativistic energy corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Faegri, Knut, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of using a finite nucleus model in quantum-chemical calculations is examined. Relativistic corrections from the first order Foldy-Wouthuysen terms are affected indirectly by the change in wavefunction, but also directly as a result of revised expressions for the Darwin and spin-orbit terms due to the change in nuclear potential. A calculation for the Rn atom indicates that the mass-velocity and Darwin corrections are much more sensitive to the finite nucleus than the non-relativistic total energy, but that the total contribution for these two terms is quite stable provided the revised form of the Darwin term is used. The spin-orbit interaction is not greatly affected by the choice of nuclear model.

  17. Neurofibromin is actively transported to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Ina; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; Coene, Elisabeth; De Paepe, Anne; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2004-02-27

    Mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to a variety of benign and malignant tumors. Many tumor suppressors 'shuttle' between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, thus regulating their function. By expressing different NF1 constructs in COS-7 cells (encompassing exons 28-49 and fused to the green fluorescent protein), we identified a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) in exon 43. Mutation of the NLS completely abolishes the nuclear entry of the NF1-derivative fusion protein. A highly expressed splice variant that lacks this NLS controls the localization and hence the function of neurofibromin. The localization of neurofibromin in the nucleus may provide novel clues to unknown functions for NF1. PMID:14988005

  18. Revisiting the supratrigeminal nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fujio, T; Sato, F; Tachibana, Y; Kato, T; Tomita, A; Higashiyama, K; Ono, T; Maeda, Y; Yoshida, A

    2016-06-01

    The supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup), originally proposed as a premotoneuron pool in the trigeminal reflex arc, is a key structure of jaw movement control. Surprisingly, however, the location of the rat Vsup has not precisely been defined. In light of our previous cat studies, we made two hypotheses regarding the rat Vsup: (1) the Vsup is cytoarchitectonically distinguishable from its surrounding structures; (2) the Vsup receives central axon terminals of the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) neurons which are primary afferents innervating muscle spindles of jaw-closing muscles and periodontal ligaments around the teeth. To test the first hypothesis, we examined the cytoarchitecture of the rat Vsup. The Vsup was identified as an area medially adjacent to the dorsomedial part of trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (Vp), and extended from the level just rostral to the caudal two-thirds of the trigeminal motor nucleus (Vmo) to the level approximately 150μm caudal to the Vmo. Our rat Vsup was much smaller and its location was considerably different in comparison to the Vsup reported previously. To evaluate the second hypothesis, we tested the distribution patterns of Vmes primary afferent terminals in the cytoarchitectonically identified Vsup. After transganglionic tracer applications to the masseter, deep temporal, and medial pterygoid nerves, a large number of axon terminals were observed in all parts of Vsup (especially in its medial part). After applications to the inferior alveolar, infraorbital, and lingual nerves, a small number of axon terminals were labeled in the caudolateral Vsup. The Vsup could also be identified electrophysiologically. After electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, evoked potentials with slow negative component were isolated only in the Vsup. The present findings suggest that the rat Vsup can be cytoarchitectonically and electrophysiologically identified, receives somatotopic termination of the trigeminal primary afferents, and

  19. Physical Properties of Cometary Nucleus Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David; Hillman, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In this proposal we aim to study the physical properties of the Centaurs and the dead comets, these being the precursors to, and the remnants from, the active cometary nuclei. The nuclei themselves are very difficult to study, because of the contaminating effects of near-nucleus coma. Systematic investigation of the nuclei both before they enter the zone of strong sublimation and after they have depleted their near-surface volatiles should neatly bracket the properties of these objects, revealing evolutionary effects.

  20. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  1. The fast Ice Nucleus chamber FINCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Wetter, T.; Klein, H.; Bingemer, H.

    2008-11-01

    We present first results of our new developed Ice Nucleus (IN) counter FINCH from the sixth Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6) campaign at Jungfraujoch station, 3571 m asl. Measurements were made at the total and the ICE CVI inlet. Laboratory measurements of ice onset temperatures by FINCH are compared to those of the static diffusion chamber FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice Deposition Freezing Experiment). Within the errors of both new instruments the results compare well to published data.

  2. Parity violation in the compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Crawford, B. E.; Grossmann, C. A.; Lowie, L. Y.; Bowman, J. D.; Knudson, J.; Penttilae, S.; Seestrom, S. J.; Smith, D. A.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Yuan, V. W.; Delheij, P. P. J.; Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Postma, H.; Roberson, N. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Stephenson, S. L.

    1999-06-10

    Measurements have been performed on the helicity dependence of the neutron resonance cross section for many nuclei by our TRIPLE Collaboration. A large number of parity violations are observed. Generic enhancements amplify the signal for symmetry breaking and the stochastic properties of the compound nucleus permit the strength of the symmetry-breaking interaction to be determined without knowledge of the wave functions of individual states. A total of 15 nuclei have been analyzed with this statistical approach. The results are summarized.

  3. Comet nucleus impact probe feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    A top level listing of the comet nucleus impact probe (CNIP) feasibility experiments requirements are presented. A conceptual configuration which shows that the feasibility of engineering the experiment is possible and describes the candidate hardware is discussed. The design studies required in order to design the operating experiment are outlined. An overview of a program plan used to estimate a rough order of magnitude cost for the CNIP experiment is given.

  4. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-06-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  5. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  6. Efficient nucleus detector in histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Vink, J P; Van Leeuwen, M B; Van Deurzen, C H M; De Haan, G

    2013-02-01

    In traditional cancer diagnosis, (histo)pathological images of biopsy samples are visually analysed by pathologists. However, this judgment is subjective and leads to variability among pathologists. Digital scanners may enable automated objective assessment, improved quality and reduced throughput time. Nucleus detection is seen as the corner stone for a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. In this paper, we propose an efficient nucleus detector designed with machine learning. We applied colour deconvolution to reconstruct each applied stain. Next, we constructed a large feature set and modified AdaBoost to create two detectors, focused on different characteristics in appearance of nuclei. The proposed modification of AdaBoost enables inclusion of the computational cost of each feature during selection, thus improving the computational efficiency of the resulting detectors. The outputs of the two detectors are merged by a globally optimal active contour algorithm to refine the border of the detected nuclei. With a detection rate of 95% (on average 58 incorrectly found objects per field-of-view) based on 51 field-of-view images of Her2 immunohistochemistry stained breast tissue and a complete analysis in 1 s per field-of-view, our nucleus detector shows good performance and could enable a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. PMID:23252774

  7. The nucleus basalis in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, A W; Parhad, I M; Folstein, S E; Whitehouse, P J; Hedreen, J C; Price, D L; Chase, G A

    1983-10-01

    The nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) provides most of the cholinergic input to the cerebral cortex. The loss of cortical choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT) appears to be related to a severe depopulation of the nbM in this dementia. In Huntington's disease (HD), by contrast, there is no loss of cortical CAT activity. The present quantitative study indicates that (1) there is no significant loss of neurons from the nbM in HD, and (2) that the previously described cytologic changes in the neurons of this nucleus in HD patients do not differ significantly from controls. These findings are consistent with the working hypothesis that the types of dementia associated with reductions of neocortical CAT activity are characterized by dysfunction or death of neurons in the nbM, but dementing disorders with normal neocortical CAT activity manifest no major abnormalities in this cholinergic nucleus of the basal forebrain. PMID:6225032

  8. Functional morphology of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Y; Okamura, H; Tanaka, M; Tamada, Y; Hayashi, S; Iijima, N; Matsuda, T; Munekawa, K; Takamatsu, T; Hisa, Y; Shigeyoshi, Y; Amaya, F

    1999-07-01

    In mammals, the biological clock (circadian oscillator) is situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a small bilaterally paired structure just above the optic chiasm. Circadian rhythms of sleep-wakefulness and hormone release disappear when the SCN is destroyed, and transplantation of fetal or neonatal SCN into an arrhythmic host restores rhythmicity. There are several kinds of peptide-synthesizing neurons in the SCN, with vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, and somatostatine neurons being most prominent. Those peptides and their mRNA show diurnal rhythmicity and may or may not be affected by light stimuli. Major neuronal inputs from retinal ganglion cells as well as other inputs such as those from the lateral geniculate nucleus and raphe nucleus are very important for entrainment and shift of circadian rhythms. In this review, we describe morphological and functional interactions between neurons and glial elements and their development. We also consider the expression of immediate-early genes in the SCN after light stimulation during subjective night and their role in the mechanism of signal transduction. The reciprocal interaction between the SCN and melatonin, which is synthesized in the pineal body under the influence of polysynaptic inputs from the SCN, is also considered. Finally, morphological and functional characteristics of clock genes, particularly mPers, which are considered to promote circadian rhythm, are reviewed. PMID:10433864

  9. Low P sub T hadron-nucleus interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holynski, R.; Wozniak, K.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of describing hadron-nucleus (hA) interactions is discussed in terms of a number of independent collisions of the projectile inside the target nucleus. This multiple rescattering may occur on a particle or quark parton level. To investigate the characteristics of hA interactions as a function of antineutrinos advantage is taken of the correlation between the average number antineutrinos of collisions of the projectile inside the nucleus and the number Ng of fast protons ejected from the struck nucleus. The relation antineutrinos vs Ng obtained in antineutrinos was used. For a given target nucleus this allows the selection of interactions occurring at different impact parameters.

  10. a Unified Approach to Hadron-Hadron Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at High Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    The problem of multiparticle production in high -energy hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied systematically in the framework of the Geometrical Branching Model (GBM). The model is based on the geometrical properties of nucleons and the stochastic nature of the interaction among the soft partons. The eikonal formalism is used to relate the elastic and inelastic cross sections and AGK cutting rule is used in connection with the multiparticle production process. The stochastic process of Furry branching is employed to describe the proliferation and hadronization of partons which lead to the produced particles. The approach describes hh, hA and AA collisions in a unified formalism for c.m. energies less than 100 GeV. The result of multiplicity distribution of produced particles exhibits Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) scaling. The universality of KNO scaling breaks down due to the different geometrical sizes of the hadron and nuclei. For hA and AA collisions, the formalism of GBM allows the hadron to be broken (to h^') by the first collision; indeed, it is the attention given to h^'h and h ^'h^' collisions that distinguishes this work from other earlier investigations on the subject. All of the calculated results are in good agreement with experiments. A general Monte Carlo simulation of GBM for multiparticle production in hh, hA and AA collisions is also given. The particle productivity in particular is studied in detail and is contrasted from the case where quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is produced in the AA collisions. This work forms a definitive description of hadronic and nuclear collisions that can serve as a basis from which exotic features such as the formation of QGP can be recognized as signatures deviating from the normal background.

  11. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  12. Cold breakup of spectator residues in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aichelin, J.; Hüfner, J.; Ibarra, R.

    1984-07-01

    Inclusive data from fragmentation reactions of the type AP+AT-->Z+X are analyzed and a reaction mechanism is proposed. A projectile AP (p, He, α, or Ne) collides with a target nucleus AT (Au) and one fragment with charge Z and energy E is observed at a solid angle Ω. Projectile energies vary between 84A MeV and several A GeV. We propose a parametrization for the triple differential cross section d3σdΩ dE dZ with six free parameters. The parametrization generalizes the two-vector model which is often used to describe spallation products in proton-nucleus collisions. By fitting data from various experiments we establish a systematics of the six parameters. The experimental values of the parameters can be quantitatively understood in a model where the target nucleus breaks into several fragments similar to the shattering of glass.

  13. The orientation of nucleus, nucleus-associated body and protruding nucleolus in aggregating Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Sameshima, M

    1985-02-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum growing or developing on cellulose dialysis membranes were fixed with acrolein vapour for electron microscopy. In interphase amoebae, nucleoli began to protrude from the nuclei. The percentage of cells with protruding nucleoli increased during aggregation by a value approximately twice as high in aggregation streams as in centers. Cells in pseudoplasmodia showed only a low percentage and protrusions disappeared at early culmination stage. The protrusions did not reappear when cells from dissociated pseudoplasmodia migrated toward cAMP. Thus the formation of the protrusions did not depend solely on chemotaxis; rather, it was specific to the aggregation stage. In aggregation streams, the nucleus was anterior in the cell, with the protrusion at its anterior periphery. In contrast, the nucleus associated body (NAB) was evident at the cell's mid-point. This orientation of nucleus and NAB in the aggregating slime mould amoeba is contrary to that seen in human neutrophils or cultured mouse 3T3 cells. PMID:2981691

  14. Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

  15. The effect of the relative nuclear size on the nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erofeeva, I. N.; Murzin, V. S.; Sivoklokov, S. Y.; Smirnova, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental data on the interactions of light nuclei (d, He(4), C(12)) at the momentum 4.2 GeV/cA with the carbon nuclei were taken in the 2-m propane bubble chamber. The distributions in the number of interacting nucleons, the spectra of protons, the mean energies of secondary pions and protons, the mean fractions of energy transferred to the pion and nucleon components are presented. The results of the investigation of the mechanism of nucleus-nucleus interactions can be used to calculate the nuclear cascades in the atmosphere.

  16. Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

  17. Observation of direct hadronic pairs in nucleus-nucleus collisions in JACEE emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Hayashi, T.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of high energy ( or = 1 TeV/amu) nucleus-nucleus collisions observed in Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) emulsion chambers, nonrandom spatial association of produced charged particles, mostly hadronic pairs, are observed. Similar narrow pairs are observed in about 100 events at much low energy (20 to 60 GeV/amu). Analysis shows that 30 to 50% of Pair abundances are understood by the Hambury-Brown-Twiss effect, and the remainder seems to require other explanations.

  18. High energy factorization in nucleus-nucleus collisions. II. Multigluon correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Francois; Lappi, Tuomas

    2008-09-01

    We extend previous results from the preceding paper on factorization in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions by computing the inclusive multigluon spectrum to next-to-leading order. The factorization formula is strictly valid for multigluon emission in a slice of rapidity of width {delta}Y{<=}{alpha}{sub s}{sup -1}. Our results shows that often neglected disconnected graphs dominate the inclusive multigluon spectrum, and are crucial in order to achieve factorization for this quantity. These results provide a dynamical framework for the Glasma flux tube picture of the striking ''ridge''-like correlation seen in heavy ion collisions.

  19. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2014-03-01

    The Lach Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated ESM predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3. The heaviest generation in the Extended Standard Model (ESM) has a t' quark of mass 65 GeV and a b' quark of 42.4 GeV. The lepton in this generation has a mass of 27 GeV. Part of this theory evolved because it appears that the quarks and lepton of each generation have masses related by the geometric mean. The Geometric mean of 65 and 27 is 42. Charge is conserved (+2/3 and -1 is -1/3). Details of how this theory evolved is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references [T.M. Lach, Checkerboard Structure of the Nucleus, Infinite Energy, Vol. 5, issue 30, (2000); T.M. Lach, Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/0008026, @http://xxx.lanl.gov/] One independent check of this CB model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light around the ``dn'' quark in the center turns out to be exactly one DeBroglie wavelength. This explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments. This along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. One would expect a t'-anti t' meson of mass of about 130 GeV.

  20. Angular distributions of neutron-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Tapan; Lahiri, Joydev; Basu, D. N.

    2011-06-15

    We derive the total and the differential cross sections with respect to angle for neutron-induced reactions from an analytical model having a simple functional form to demonstrate the quantitative agreement with the measured cross sections. The energy dependence of the neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections are estimated successfully for energies ranging from 5 to 600 MeV. In this work, the effect of the imaginary part of the nuclear potential is treated more appropriately compared to our earlier work. The angular distributions for neutron scattering also agree reasonably well with the experimental data at forward angles.

  1. Unveiling the nucleus of NGC 7172

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smajić, S.; Fischer, S.; Zuther, J.; Eckart, A.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: We present the results of near-infrared (NIR) H + K European Southern Observatory SINFONI integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 7172. We investigate the central 800 pc, concentrating on excitation conditions, morphology, and stellar content. NGC 7172 was selected from a sample of the ten nearest Seyfert 2 galaxies from the Veron-Cetty & Veron catalogue. All objects were chosen as test cases for adaptive optics (AO) assisted observations that allow a detailed study (at high spatial and spectral resolution) of the nuclear and host environments. NGC 7172 has a prominent dustlane crossing the central galaxy region from east to west, which makes it an ideal candidate to investigate the effect of obscuration by strong galactic extinction on (active) galaxies and their classification. Methods: The NIR is less influenced by dust extinction than optical light and is sensitive to the mass-dominating stellar populations. SINFONI integral field spectroscopy combines NIR imaging and spectroscopy and provides us with the opportunity to analyze several emission and absorption lines to investigate the stellar populations and ionization mechanisms over the 4″ × 4″ field of view (FOV). Results: We present emission and absorption line measurements in the central 800 pc of NGC 7172. The detection of [Si vi] and broad Paα and Brγ components are clear signs of an accreting super-massive black hole hiding behind the prominent dustlane at visible wavelengths. Hot temperatures of about 1300 K are indicative of a dusty torus in the nuclear region. Narrow components of Paα and Brγ enable us to make an extinction measurement. Our measures of the molecular hydrogen lines, hydrogen recombination lines, and [Fe ii] indicate that the excitation of these lines is caused by an active galactic nucleus. The central region of the galactic disk is predominantly inhabited by gas, dust, and an old K-M type giant stellar population. The gaseous, molecular, and

  2. Parity violation in the compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.E.; Crawford, B.E.; Grossmann, C.A.; Lowie, L.Y.; Bowman, J.D.; Knudson, J.; Penttilae, S.; Seestrom, S.J.; Smith, D.A.; Yen, Y.; Yuan, V.W.; Delheij, P.P.; Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Postma, H.; Roberson, N.R.; Sharapov, E.I.; Stephenson, S.L.

    1999-06-01

    Measurements have been performed on the helicity dependence of the neutron resonance cross section for many nuclei by our TRIPLE Collaboration. A large number of parity violations are observed. Generic enhancements amplify the signal for symmetry breaking and the stochastic properties of the compound nucleus permit the strength of the symmetry-breaking interaction to be determined without knowledge of the wave functions of individual states. A total of 15 nuclei have been analyzed with this statistical approach. The results are summarized. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. The bare nucleus of comet Neujmin 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campins, Humberto; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Mcfadden, Lucy-Ann

    1987-01-01

    Simultaneous visible and infrared observations of comet P/Neujmin 1 1984c are presented which show that the comet has a large (mean radius 10 km), dark (geometric albedo 2-3 percent) nucleus with a surface which is mostly inert material but which still shows a low level of gaseous activity. This is the first physical evidence that cometary nuclei can leave behind an inert body after the coma activity ceases. No asteroid or asteroid class has been found to match the reflectance and albedo of this comet except possibly some D asteroids.

  4. The Subthalamic Nucleus, oscillations and conflict

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Baltazar; Zaghloul, Kareem; Brown, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN), which is currently the most common target for deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease, has received increased attention over the past few years for the roles it may play in functions beyond simple motor control. In this article we will highlight several of the theoretical, interventional, and electrophysiological studies that have implicated the STN in response inhibition. Most influential amongst this evidence has been the reported effect of STN deep brain stimulation in increasing impulsive responses in the laboratory setting. Yet, how this relates to pathological impulsivity in patient’s everyday lives remains uncertain. PMID:25688872

  5. A thalamic input to the nucleus accumbens mediates opiate dependence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingjie; Wienecke, Carl F R; Nachtrab, Gregory; Chen, Xiaoke

    2016-02-11

    Chronic opiate use induces opiate dependence, which is characterized by extremely unpleasant physical and emotional feelings after drug use is terminated. Both the rewarding effects of a drug and the desire to avoid withdrawal symptoms motivate continued drug use, and the nucleus accumbens is important for orchestrating both processes. While multiple inputs to the nucleus accumbens regulate reward, little is known about the nucleus accumbens circuitry underlying withdrawal. Here we identify the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus as a prominent input to the nucleus accumbens mediating the expression of opiate-withdrawal-induced physical signs and aversive memory. Activity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens pathway is necessary and sufficient to mediate behavioural aversion. Selectively silencing this pathway abolishes aversive symptoms in two different mouse models of opiate withdrawal. Chronic morphine exposure selectively potentiates excitatory transmission between the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus and D2-receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons via synaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Notably, in vivo optogenetic depotentiation restores normal transmission at these synapses and robustly suppresses morphine withdrawal symptoms. This links morphine-evoked pathway- and cell-type-specific plasticity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens circuit to opiate dependence, and suggests that reprogramming this circuit holds promise for treating opiate addiction. PMID:26840481

  6. Paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus: axonal projections to the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Geerling, Joel C.; Shin, Jung-Won; Chimenti, Peter C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    The paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) contains many neurons that innervate the brainstem, but information regarding their target sites remains incomplete. Here, we labeled neurons in the rat PVH with an anterograde axonal tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL) and studied their descending projections in reference to specific neuronal subpopulations throughout the brainstem. While many of their target sites were identified previously, numerous new observations were made. Major findings include: (1) In the midbrain, the PVH projects lightly to the ventral tegmental area, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter, reticular formation, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, and dorsal raphe nucleus. (2) In the dorsal pons, the PVH projects heavily to the pre-locus coeruleus, yet very little to the catecholamine neurons in the locus coeruleus, and selectively targets the viscerosensory subregions of the parabrachial nucleus; (3) In the ventral medulla, the superior salivatory nucleus, retrotrapezoid nucleus, compact and external formations of the nucleus ambiguus, A1 and caudal C1 catecholamine neurons, and caudal pressor area receive dense axonal projections, generally exceeding the PVH projection to the rostral C1 region; (4) The medial nucleus of the solitary tract (including A2 noradrenergic and aldosterone-sensitive neurons) receives the most extensive projections of the PVH, substantially more than the dorsal vagal nucleus or area postrema. Our findings suggest that the PVH may modulate a range of homeostatic functions, including cerebral and ocular blood flow, corneal and nasal hydration, ingestive behavior, sodium intake, and glucose metabolism, as well as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and respiratory activities. PMID:20187136

  7. On M31's Double Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The recent HST discovery of a double nucleus in M31 brings into prominence the question how long, a second core can survive within the nuclear regions of a galaxy. Physical conditions in the nuclear regions of a typical galaxy help a second core survive, so it can orbit for a long time. possibly for thousands of orbits. Given the nearly uniform mass density in a core, tidal forces within a core radius are compressive in all directions and help the core survive the buffeting it takes as it orbits near the center of the galaxy. We use numerical experiments to illustrate these physical principles. Our method allows the full power of the experiments to be concentrated on the nuclear regions. Spatial resolution of about 0.2 pc comfortably resolves detail within the 1.4 parsec core radius of the second, but brighter core (P1) in M31. We use these physical principles to discuss M31's double nucleus, but they apply to other galaxies as well. and in other astronomical situations such as dumbbell galaxies. galaxies orbiting near the center of a galaxy cluster, and subclustering in galaxy clusters. The experiments also illustrate that galaxy encounters and merging are quite sensitive to external tidal forces, such as those produced by the gravitational potential in a group or cluster of galaxies.

  8. Comet Borrelly Nucleus Found to the Side

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Deep Space 1 flew by comet Borrelly on September 22, 2001 and took these measurements with its plasma instruments between 90,000 kilometers (56,000 miles) and 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) away. These data show that the flow of ions around the comet's rocky, icy nucleus (the center of the deep V-shaped feature) is not centered on the comet's nucleus as scientists expected before the Borrelly flyby. Ions in the turbulent flow are heated to about 1 million Kelvin (2 million degrees Fahrenheit) causing the bands of ions to appear broad and jagged compared to the solar wind.

    Deep Space 1 completed its primary mission testing ion propulsion and 11 other advanced, high-risk technologies in September 1999. NASA extended the mission, taking advantage of the ion propulsion and other systems to undertake this chancy but exciting, and ultimately successful, encounter with the comet. More information can be found on the Deep Space 1 home page at http://nmp.jpl.nasa.gov/ds1/ .

    Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The California Institute of Technology manages JPL for NASA.

  9. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Robert G.; Thompson, Roger C.; Starchville, Thomas F., Jr.; Adams, C.; Aldo, A.; Dobson, K.; Flotta, C.; Gagliardino, J.; Lear, M.; McMillan, C.

    During the 1991-92 academic year, the Pennsylvania State University has developed three sample return missions: one to the nucleus of comet Wild 2, one to the asteroid Eros, and one to three asteroids located in the Main Belt. The primary objective of the comet nucleus sample return mission is to rendezvous with a short period comet and acquire a 10 kg sample for return to Earth. Upon rendezvous with the comet, a tethered coring and sampler drill will contact the surface and extract a two-meter core sample from the target site. Before the spacecraft returns to Earth, a monitoring penetrator containing scientific instruments will be deployed for gathering long-term data about the comet. A single asteroid sample return mission to the asteroid 433 Eros (chosen for proximity and launch opportunities) will extract a sample from the asteroid surface for return to Earth. To limit overall mission cost, most of the mission design uses current technologies, except the sampler drill design. The multiple asteroid sample return mission could best be characterized through its use of future technology including an optical communications system, a nuclear power reactor, and a low-thrust propulsion system. A low-thrust trajectory optimization code (QuickTop 2) obtained from the NASA LeRC helped in planning the size of major subsystem components, as well as the trajectory between targets.

  10. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Robert G.; Thompson, Roger C.; Starchville, Thomas F., Jr.; Adams, C.; Aldo, A.; Dobson, K.; Flotta, C.; Gagliardino, J.; Lear, M.; Mcmillan, C.

    1992-01-01

    During the 1991-92 academic year, the Pennsylvania State University has developed three sample return missions: one to the nucleus of comet Wild 2, one to the asteroid Eros, and one to three asteroids located in the Main Belt. The primary objective of the comet nucleus sample return mission is to rendezvous with a short period comet and acquire a 10 kg sample for return to Earth. Upon rendezvous with the comet, a tethered coring and sampler drill will contact the surface and extract a two-meter core sample from the target site. Before the spacecraft returns to Earth, a monitoring penetrator containing scientific instruments will be deployed for gathering long-term data about the comet. A single asteroid sample return mission to the asteroid 433 Eros (chosen for proximity and launch opportunities) will extract a sample from the asteroid surface for return to Earth. To limit overall mission cost, most of the mission design uses current technologies, except the sampler drill design. The multiple asteroid sample return mission could best be characterized through its use of future technology including an optical communications system, a nuclear power reactor, and a low-thrust propulsion system. A low-thrust trajectory optimization code (QuickTop 2) obtained from the NASA LeRC helped in planning the size of major subsystem components, as well as the trajectory between targets.

  11. Neutronic Cross Section Calculations on Fluorine Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, A.; Tel, E.

    2013-06-01

    Certain light nuclei such as Lithium (Li), Beryllium (Be), Fluorine (F) (which are known as FLİBE) and its molten salt compounds (LiF, BeF2 and NaF) can serve as a coolant which can be used at high temperatures without reaching a high vapor pressure. These molten salt compounds are also a good neutron moderator. In this study, cross sections of neutron induced reactions have been calculated for fluorine target nucleus. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 19F( n, 2n), 19F( n, p), 19F( n, xn), 19F( n, xp) have been made. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the full exciton model and the cascade exciton model. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, the ( n, 2n) and ( n, p) reaction cross sections have calculated by using evaluated empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The multiple pre-equilibrium mean free path constant from internal transition have been investigated for 19F nucleus. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data.

  12. Effect of repulsive and attractive three-body forces on nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Furumoto, T.; Sakuragi, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2009-10-15

    The effect of the three-body force (TBF) is studied in nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering on the basis of Brueckner theory for nucleon-nucleon (NN) effective interaction (complex G matrix) in the nuclear matter. A new G matrix called CEG07 proposed recently by the present authors includes the TBF effect and reproduces a realistic saturation curve in the nuclear matter, and it is shown to well reproduce proton-nucleus elastic scattering. The microscopic optical potential for the nucleus-nucleus system is obtained by folding the G matrix with nucleon density distributions in colliding nuclei. We first analyze in detail the {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O elastic scattering at E/A=70 MeV. The observed cross sections are nicely reproduced up to the most backward scattering angles only when the TBF effect is included. The use of the frozen-density approximation (FDA) is essentially important to properly estimate the effect of the TBF in nucleus-nucleus scattering. Other prescriptions for defining the local density have also been tested, but only the FDA prescription gives a proper description of the experimental cross sections as well as the effect of the TBF. The effects of the three-body attraction and the {omega}-rearrangement term are also analyzed. The CEG07 interaction is compared with CDM3Y6, which is a reliable and successful effective density-dependent NN interaction used in the double-folding model. The CEG07 G matrix is also tested in the elastic scattering of {sup 16}O by the {sup 12}C, {sup 28}Si, and {sup 40}Ca targets at E/A=93.9 MeV, and in the elastic scattering of {sup 12}C by the {sup 12}C target at E/A=135 MeV with great success. The decisive effect of the TBF is clearly seen also in those systems. Finally, we have tested CEG07a, CEG07b, and CEG07c for the {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O system at various energies.

  13. Centrifugal inhibitory processes affecting neurones in the cat cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Comis, S. D.

    1970-01-01

    1. Stimulation of the lateral part of the olivary S-segment in the cat inhibited neurones in the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus. A smaller number of neurones located in the ventral division of the cochlear nucleus were excited. 2. It is suggested that inhibition in the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus may be mediated directly by fibres making synaptic connexions on the cochlear nucleus neurones, or indirectly by inhibitory fibres acting at the cochlea. 3. The direct inhibitory process at the cochlear nucleus is unaffected by strychnine, whereas the inhibitory process at the cochlea is abolished by strychnine. 4. A cochlear nucleus neurone can be influenced simultaneously by excitatory and inhibitory processes. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5499823

  14. A search for ϕ meson nucleus bound state using antiproton annihilation on nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, H.; Bühler, P.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; Guaraldo, C.; Hartmann, O.; Hicks, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Muto, R.; Naruki, M.; Niiyama, M.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.; Vidal, A. Romero; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sawada, S.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, K.; Tsukada, K.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Yokkaichi, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    The mass shift of the vector mesons in nuclei is known to be a powerful tool for investigating the mechanism of generating hadron mass from the QCD vacuum. The mechanism is known to be the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. In 2007, KEK-PS E325 experiment reported about 3.4 % mass reduction of the ϕ meson in medium-heavy nuclei (Cu). This result is possibly one of the indications of the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei, however, unfortunately it is hard to make strong conclusions from the data. One of the ways to conclude the strength of the ϕ meson mass shift in nuclei will be by trying to produce only slowly moving ϕ mesons where the maximum nuclear matter effect can be probed. The observed mass reduction of the ϕ meson in the nucleus can be translated as the existence of an attractive force between ϕ meson and nucleus. Thus, one of the extreme conditions that can be achieved in the laboratory is indeed the formation of a ϕ-nucleus bound state, where the ϕ meson is "trapped" in the nucleus. The purpose of the experiment is to search for a ϕ-nucleus bound state and measure the binding energy of the system. We will demonstrate that a completely background-free missing-mass spectrum can be obtained efficiently by (bar{p}, φ) spectroscopy together with K + Λ tagging, using the primary reaction channel bar{p} p rightarrow φ φ. This paper gives an overview of the physics motivation and the detector concept, and explains the direction of the initial research and development effort.

  15. A search for ϕ meson nucleus bound state using antiproton annihilation on nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, H.; Bühler, P.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; Guaraldo, C.; Hartmann, O.; Hicks, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Muto, R.; Naruki, M.; Niiyama, M.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.; Vidal, A. Romero; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sawada, S.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, K.; Tsukada, K.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Yokkaichi, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    2012-12-01

    The mass shift of the vector mesons in nuclei is known to be a powerful tool for investigating the mechanism of generating hadron mass from the QCD vacuum. The mechanism is known to be the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. In 2007, KEK-PS E325 experiment reported about 3.4 % mass reduction of the ϕ meson in medium-heavy nuclei (Cu). This result is possibly one of the indications of the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei, however, unfortunately it is hard to make strong conclusions from the data. One of the ways to conclude the strength of the ϕ meson mass shift in nuclei will be by trying to produce only slowly moving ϕ mesons where the maximum nuclear matter effect can be probed. The observed mass reduction of the ϕ meson in the nucleus can be translated as the existence of an attractive force between ϕ meson and nucleus. Thus, one of the extreme conditions that can be achieved in the laboratory is indeed the formation of a ϕ-nucleus bound state, where the ϕ meson is "trapped" in the nucleus. The purpose of the experiment is to search for a ϕ-nucleus bound state and measure the binding energy of the system. We will demonstrate that a completely background-free missing-mass spectrum can be obtained efficiently by (bar{p}, φ) spectroscopy together with K + Λ tagging, using the primary reaction channel bar{p} p rightarrow φ φ. This paper gives an overview of the physics motivation and the detector concept, and explains the direction of the initial research and development effort.

  16. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  17. Satellite control system nucleus for the Brazilian complete space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguti, Wilson; Decarvalhovieira, Anastacio Emanuel; Deoliveira, Julia Leocadia; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo; Dacosta, Petronio Osorio

    1990-10-01

    The nucleus of the satellite control system for the Brazilian data collecting and remote sensing satellites is described. The system is based on Digital Equipment Computers and the VAX/VMS operating system. The nucleus provides the access control, the system configuration, the event management, history files management, time synchronization, wall display control, and X25 data communication network access facilities. The architecture of the nucleus and its main implementation aspects are described. The implementation experience acquired is considered.

  18. Decrease and conquer: Phacoemulsification technique for hard nucleus cataracts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Kyun

    2009-10-01

    I describe a technique to improve the control and safety of phacoemulsification during hard nucleus cataract surgery. Whereas the goal of the conventional nucleofractis technique is complete fragmentation of the lens, the technique aims to separate the endonuclear core from the epinucleus. This is done in 3 steps: circumferential disassembly, decreasing the central nucleus volume, and conquering the remnant. The technique offers safer and more effective phacoemulsification in patients with hard nucleus cataracts. PMID:19781457

  19. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration. PMID:27406341

  20. Thalamic reticular nucleus in Caiman crocodilus: forebrain connections.

    PubMed

    Pritz, Michael B

    2016-08-01

    Forebrain connections of the thalamic reticular nucleus associated with the lateral forebrain bundle were analyzed in Caiman crocodilus. Both the compact portion, the dorsal peduncular nucleus, and the diffuse part, the perireticular region, associated with the lateral forebrain bundle, were studied. A small tracer injection into the dorsal peduncular nucleus demonstrated reciprocal connections with a restricted portion of the dorsal thalamus. Tracer placements into this nucleus retrogradely labeled cells in a caudal portion of the ventrolateral area of the telencephalon. These results are compared with similar studies in other amniotes. PMID:27233216

  1. Giant Resonances in the Alpha-Nucleus Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2010-04-30

    Tunneling of alpha particles through the Coulomb barrier for the source {sup 135}Pr nucleus is consecutively considered. The effect of sharp peaks arising in the case of coincidence of the alpha energy with that of a quasistationary state within the barrier is elucidated. Peaks' energy depend on the alpha-nucleus potential. They can give rise to 'anomalous' properties of some neutron resonances. The peaks can also be observed in the incoming alpha-nucleus channel. The method can be applied for solution of the reverse problem of the alpha-nucleus scattering.

  2. Determination of the cross sections for the production of fragments from relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions. I. Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.R.; Binns, W.R.; Garrard, T.L.; Israel, M.H.; Klarmann, J.; Stone, E.C.; Waddington, C.J. Department of Physics, Washington, University, St. Louis, MO McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO George W. Downs Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-12-01

    Relativistic iron, lanthanum, holmium, and gold projectile nuclei with several different energies have been fragmented in targets of polyethylene, carbon, aluminum, copper, and lead. Our detectors cleanly resolve the individual charges of the heaviest of these fragments and provide some limited information on the masses. We have measured 1256 elemental partial cross sections for the production of fragments from interactions in these target materials. Values have been derived for another 417 cross sections in a hydrogen medium. These cross sections depend on the energy and mass of the projectile nuclei as well as on the nature of the target. Total charge-changing cross sections were also found, but only in a composite target, and have been shown to be weakly dependent on energy. The mean mass losses observed for fragments that have lost a few protons show that typically many neutrons are lost with each proton, producing fragment nuclei that must be highly proton rich, and consequently very unstable. The cross sections for charge pickup on heavy targets show a rapid increase with decreasing energy, particularly for the heaviest targets. The systematics of the dependencies of the partial cross sections will be discussed in a companion paper.

  3. Theoretical assessment of the electro-optical features of the group III nitrides (B12N12, Al12N12 and Ga12N12) and group IV carbides (C24, Si12C12 and Ge12C12) nanoclusters encapsulated with alkali metals (Li, Na and K)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Elham; Shakerzadeh, Ehsan; Biglari, Zeinab

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to study the influence of alkali metals (Li, Na and K) encapsulation within the group III nitrides (B12N12, Al12N12 and Ga12N12) and the group IV carbides (C24, Si12C12and Ge12C12) nanoclusters. The encapsulation of Li, Na and K atoms is found to narrow the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the considered clusters. The electronic properties of these clusters, especially the group III nitrides nanoclusters, are strongly sensitive to interaction with the alkali metals. Moreover it is observed that the encapsulation of alkali metals enhances the first hyperpolarizabilities of B12N12 nanocluster. Surprisingly, due to the alkali metals encapsulation within B12N12 nanocluster, the first hyperpolarizability values are remarkably increased to 8505.49 and 122,503.76 a.u. for Na@B12N12 and K@B12N12, respectively. Also the TD-DFT calculations at both CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and PBE0/6-311+G(d) levels of theory are also performed to investigate the origin of first hyperpolarizabilities.

  4. Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sherwood

    1997-12-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

  5. Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sherwood (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

  6. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Cell Autonomy and Network Properties

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, David K.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Kay, Steve A.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the primary circadian pacemaker in mammals. Individual SCN neurons in dispersed culture can generate independent circadian oscillations of clock gene expression and neuronal firing. However, SCN rhythmicity depends on sufficient membrane depolarization and levels of intracellular calcium and cAMP. In the intact SCN, cellular oscillations are synchronized and reinforced by rhythmic synaptic input from other cells, resulting in a reproducible topographic pattern of distinct phases and amplitudes specified by SCN circuit organization. The SCN network synchronizes its component cellular oscillators, reinforces their oscillations, responds to light input by altering their phase distribution, increases their robustness to genetic perturbations, and enhances their precision. Thus, even though individual SCN neurons can be cell-autonomous circadian oscillators, neuronal network properties are integral to normal function of the SCN. PMID:20148688

  7. The Bivalent Side of the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Levita, Liat; Hare, Todd A.; Voss, Henning U.; Glover, Gary; Ballon, Douglas J.; Casey, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is engaged in both incentive reward processes and in adaptive responses to conditioned and unconditioned aversive stimuli. Yet, it has been argued that NAcc activation to aversive stimuli may be a consequence of the rewarding effects of their termination, i.e., relief. To address this question we used fMRI to delineate brain response to the onset and offset of unpleasant and pleasant auditory stimuli in the absence of learning or motor response. Increased NAcc activity was seen for the onset of both pleasant and unpleasant stimuli. Our results support the expanded bivalent view of NAcc function and call for expansion of current models of NAcc function that are solely focused on reward. PMID:18976715

  8. Nature of multiple-nucleus cluster galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, D.

    1984-05-01

    In models for the evolution of galaxy clusters which include dynamical friction with the dark binding matter, the distribution of galaxies becomes more concentrated to the cluster center with time. In a cluster like Coma, this evolution could increase by a factor of approximately 3 the probability of finding a galaxy very close to the cluster center, without decreasing the typical velocity of such a galaxy significantly below the cluster mean. Such an enhancement is roughly what is needed to explain the large number of first-ranked cluster galaxies which are observed to have extra ''nuclei''; it is also consistent with the high velocities typically measured for these ''nuclei.'' Unlike the cannibalism model, this model predicts that the majority of multiple-nucleus systems are transient phenomena, and not galaxies in the process of merging.

  9. Isotopic microanalysis of returned comet nucleus samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, Ernst

    1989-01-01

    If isotopic measurements of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and primitive meteorites can serve as a guide to the isotopic analysis of returned comet nucleus material, an essential requirement will be the capability for microanalysis. The reason is that in both types of extraterrestrial samples large isotopic heterogeneities on a small spatial scale have become apparent once it was possible to measure isotopes in small samples. In the discovery of large isotopic anomalies the ion microprobe has played a significant role because of its high spatial resolution for isotopic ratio measurements. The largest isotopic anomalies in C, N, O, Mg, Si, Ca and Ti found to date were measured by ion microprobe mass spectrometry. The most striking examples are D/H measurements in IDPs and isotopic measurements of C, N and Si in SiC from the CM chondrites Murray and Murchison.

  10. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  11. Retrotrapezoid nucleus, respiratory chemosensitivity and breathing automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Guyenet, Patrice G.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Fortuna, Michal G.; Abbott, Stephen B.; Depuy, Seth D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Breathing automaticity and CO2 regulation are inseparable neural processes. The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a group of glutamatergic neurons that express the transcription factor Phox2b, may be a crucial nodal point through which breathing automaticity is regulated to maintain CO2 constant. This review updates the analysis presented in prior publications. Additional evidence that RTN neurons have central respiratory chemoreceptor properties is presented but this is only one of many factors that determine their activity. The RTN is also regulated by powerful inputs from the carotid bodies and, at least in the adult, by many other synaptic inputs. We also analyze how RTN neurons may control the activity of the downstream central respiratory pattern generator. Specifically, we review the evidence which suggests that RTN neurons a) innervate the entire ventral respiratory column, and b) control both inspiration and expiration. Finally, we argue that the RTN neurons are the adult form of the parafacial respiratory group in neonate rats. PMID:19712903

  12. Nucleus of Comet P/Arend-Rigaux

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, T.Y.; Knacke, R.F.

    1986-07-01

    Photometry data at 1-20 microns taken of Comet P/Arend-Rigaux are reported. The observations were carried out to test the possibility of observing the nuclei of low activity, nearly extinct comets at visible and IR wavelengths. The data were collected in February 1985 using the NASA 3 m IR telescope on Mauna Kea. The comet was at 1.67 AU heliocentric distance at the time. Attempts were made to detect rotation of the core on the bases of variations in the J, H and K light curves. The images obtained were those of a rotating nucleus with a radius of 4.0-6.2 km surrounded by a faint coma. The comet had a geometric albedo of 0.01-0.03 and a near-IR red slope that exhibited no evidence of the presence of ice. 32 references.

  13. Nonlinear osmotic properties of the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Finan, John D.; Chalut, Kevin J.; Wax, Adam; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-01-01

    Summary In the absence of active volume regulation processes, cell volume is inversely proportional to osmolarity, as predicted by the Boyle Van’t Hoff relation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nuclear volume has a similar relationship with extracellular osmolarity in articular chondrocytes, cells that are exposed to changes in the osmotic environment in vivo, and furthermore, we explored the mechanism of the relationships between osmolarity and nuclear size and shape. Nuclear size was quantified using two independent techniques, confocal laser scanning microscopy and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. Nuclear volume was osmotically-sensitive but this relationship was not linear, showing a decline in the osmotic sensitivity in the hypo-osmotic range. Nuclear shape was also influenced by extracellular osmolarity, becoming smoother as the osmolarity decreased. The osmotically-induced changes in nuclear size paralleled the changes in nuclear shape, suggesting that shape and volume are interdependent. The osmotic sensitivity of shape and volume persisted after disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Isolated nuclei contracted in response to physiologic changes in macromolecule concentration but not in response to physiologic changes in ion concentration, suggesting solute size has an important influence on the osmotic pressurization of the nucleus. This finding in turn implies that the diffusion barrier that causes osmotic effects is not a semi-permeable membrane, but rather due to size constraints that prevent large solute molecules from entering small spaces in the nucleus. As nuclear morphology has been associated previously with cell phenotype, these findings may provide new insight into the role of mechanical and osmotic signals in regulating cell physiology. PMID:19107599

  14. Recent developments in the study of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2014-05-01

    Deconfinement refers to the creation of a state of quasi-free quarks and gluons in strongly interacting matter. Model predictions and experimental evidence for the onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions were discussed in our first review on this subject. These results motivated further experimental and theoretical studies. This review addresses two subjects. First, a summary of the past, present and future experimental programmes related to discovery and study of properties of the onset of deconfinement are presented. Second, recent progress is reviewed on analysis methods and preliminary experimental results for new strongly intensive fluctuation measures are discussed, which are relevant for current and future studies of the onset of deconfinement and searches for the critical point of strongly interacting matter.

  15. Fluctuation analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for identifying enhanced fluctuations in the angular distributions of secondary particles produced from relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The method is applied under the assumption that the masses of the produced particles are small compared to their linear momenta. The importance of particles rests in the fact that enhanced fluctuations in the rapidity distributions is considered to be an experimental signal for the creation of the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP), a state of nuclear matter predicted from the quantum chromodynamics theory (QCD). In the approach, Monte Carlo simulations are employed that make use of a portable random member generator that allow the calculations to be performed on a desk-top computer. The method is illustrated with data taken from high altitude emulsion exposures and is immediately applicable to similar data from accelerator-based emulsion exposures.

  16. Dynamical and Statistical Aspects in Nucleus--Nucleus Collisions Around the Fermi Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamain, B.; Assenard, M.; Auger, G.; Bacri, C. O.; Benlliure, J.; Bisquer, E.; Bocage, F.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Buchet, P.; Charvet, J. L.; Chbihi, A.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Dayras, R.; Demeyer, A.; Dore, D.; Durand, D.; Eudes, P.; Frankland, J.; Galichet, E.; Genouin-Duhamel, E.; Gerlic, E.; Germain, M.; Gourio, D.; Guinet, D.; Gulminelli, F.; Lautesse, P.; Laville, J. L.; Lebrun, C.; Lecolley, J. F.; Lefevre, A.; Lefort, T.; Legrain, R.; Le Neindre, N.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Lukasik, J.; Marie, N.; Maskay, M.; Metivier, V.; Nalpas, L.; Nguyen, A.; Parlog, M.; Peter, J.; Plagnol, E.; Rahmani, A.; Reposeur, T.; Rivet, M. F.; Rosato, E.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Salou, S.; Squalli, M.; Steckmeyer, J. C.; Stern, M.; Tabacaru, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tirel, O.; Vient, E.; Volan, C.; Wieleczko, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    This contribution is devoted to two important aspects of intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions: the competition of dynamical and statistical features, and the origin of the multifragmentation process. These two questions are discussed in focusing on Indra data. It turns out that most of collisions are binary and reminiscent of deep inelastic collisions observed at low energy. However, intermediate velocity emission is a clear signature of dynamical emission and establishes a link with the participant-spectator picture which applies at high bombarding energies. Multifragmentation is observed when the dissipated energy is large and it turns out that expansion occurs at least for central collisions, as it is expected if this phenomenum has a dynamical origin.

  17. Experimental evidence and the Landau-Zener promotion in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cindro, N.; Freeman, R.M.; Haas, F.

    1986-04-01

    Recent data from C+O collisions are analyzed in terms of the Landau-Zener promotion in nuclei. Evidence for the presence of this mechanism in nuclear collisions is of considerable interest, since it provides a signature of single-particle orbitals in molecular-type potentials and, at the same time, paves the way to a microscopic understanding of the collision dynamics, in particular of the energy dissipation rate. The analyzed data are of two types: integrated cross sections and angular distributions of inelastically scattered particles. The first set of data shows structure qualitatively consistent with recent calculations of the Landau-Zener effect; for this set of data no other reasonable explanation is presently available. The second set of data, while consistent with the presence of the Landau-Zener promotion, is examined in terms of other possible explanations too. The combined data show evidence favoring the presence of the Landau-Zener promotion in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  18. Nonmonotonic Target Excitation Dependence of Pion Clans in Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Dutta, Srimonti

    Target excitation dependence of fluctuation of produced pions (i.e. classifying data of the fluctuation pattern on pions on the basis of the number of gray tracks) is studied for nucleus-nucleus collisions at different projectile energies. In each set the experimental multiplicity distribution is compared with the negative binomial distribution (NBD), which is found to describe the experimental distribution quite well. Target excitation dependence is studied in respect of the clan model parameters bar {n}c and bar {N}, which are extracted from the NBD fit parameters bar {n} and k. A detailed comparison between different interactions at the same energy and the same interactions at different energies is also drawn. A nonmonotonic dependence of D2/bar {n} on is revealed, which is also a characteristic of multiplicity fluctuations at RHIC data.

  19. On the geometric nature of high energy nucleus-nucleus reaction cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Bidasaria, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Within the context of a high energy double-folding optical potential approximation to the exact nucleus-nucleus multiple-scattering series, eikonal scattering theory is used to investigate the validity of geometric reaction cross sections in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The potential used includes a finite range interaction and nuclear single-particle densities extracted from nuclear charge distributions by unfolding the finite proton charge distribution. Pauli correlation effects are also included in an approximate way. The sensitivity of the predictions to the assumed interaction, Pauli correlation approximation, and nuclear density distributions is investigated. These results are in agreement with early predictions concerning the geometric nature of relativistic heavy ion collisions and in disagreement with a recent analysis, utilizing the zero range approximation, which suggested otherwise. Reasons for the lack of agreement between the analyses are also presented. Finally, approximate applicability limits for geometric reaction cross sections are determined.

  20. Measuring gene expression noise in early Drosophila embryos: nucleus-to-nucleus variability.

    PubMed

    Golyandina, Nina E; Holloway, David M; Lopes, Francisco J P; Spirov, Alexander V; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Usevich, Konstantin D

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the analysis of noise in gene expression has widely attracted the attention of experimentalists and theoreticians. Experimentally, the approaches based on in vivo fluorescent reporters in single cells appear to be straightforward and effective tools for bacteria and yeast. However, transferring these approaches to multicellular organisms presents many methodological problems. Here we describe our approach to measure between-nucleus variability (noise) in the primary morphogenetic gradient of Bicoid (Bcd) in the precellular blastoderm stage of fruit fly (Drosophila) embryos. The approach is based on the comparison of results for fixed immunostained embryos with observations of live embryos carrying fluorescent Bcd (Bcd-GFP). We measure the noise using two-dimensional Singular Spectrum Analysis (2D SSA). We have found that the nucleus-to-nucleus noise in Bcd intensity, both for live (Bcd-GFP) and for fixed immunstained embryos, tends to be signal-independent. In addition, the character of the noise is sensitive to the nuclear masking technique used to extract quantitative intensities. Further, the method of decomposing the raw quantitative expression data into a signal (expression surface) and residual noise affects the character of the residual noise. We find that careful masking of confocal images and use of appropriate computational tools to decompose raw expression data into trend and noise makes it possible to extract and study the biological noise of gene expression. PMID:22723811

  1. Measuring gene expression noise in early Drosophila embryos: nucleus-to-nucleus variability

    PubMed Central

    Golyandina, Nina E.; Holloway, David M.; Lopes, Francisco J.P.; Spirov, Alexander V.; Spirova, Ekaterina N.; Usevich, Konstantin D.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the analysis of noise in gene expression has widely attracted the attention of experimentalists and theoreticians. Experimentally, the approaches based on in vivo fluorescent reporters in single cells appear to be straightforward and effective tools for bacteria and yeast. However, transferring these approaches to multicellular organisms presents many methodological problems. Here we describe our approach to measure between-nucleus variability (noise) in the primary morphogenetic gradient of Bicoid (Bcd) in the precellular blastoderm stage of fruit fly (Drosophila) embryos. The approach is based on the comparison of results for fixed immunostained embryos with observations of live embryos carrying fluorescent Bcd (Bcd-GFP). We measure the noise using two-dimensional Singular Spectrum Analysis (2D SSA). We have found that the nucleus-to-nucleus noise in Bcd intensity, both for live (Bcd-GFP) and for fixed immunstained embryos, tends to be signal-independent. In addition, the character of the noise is sensitive to the nuclear masking technique used to extract quantitative intensities. Further, the method of decomposing the raw quantitative expression data into a signal (expression surface) and residual noise affects the character of the residual noise. We find that careful masking of confocal images and use of appropriate computational tools to decompose raw expression data into trend and noise makes it possible to extract and study the biological noise of gene expression. PMID:22723811

  2. Analysis of subthreshold antiproton production in [ital p]-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions in the relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck approach

    SciTech Connect

    Teis, S.; Cassing, W.; Maruyama, T.; Mosel, U. )

    1994-07-01

    We calculate the subthreshold production of antiprotons in the Lorentz-covariant relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (RBUU) approach employing a weighted testparticle method to treat the antiproton propagation and absorption nonperturbatively. We find that the antiproton differential cross sections are highly sensitive to the baryon and antiproton self-energies in the dense baryonic environment. Adopting the baryon scalar and vector self-energies from the empirical optical potential for proton-nucleus elastic scattering and from Dirac-Brueckner calculations at higher density [rho][gt][rho][sub 0] we examine the differential antiproton spectra as a function of the antiproton self-energy. A detailed comparison with the available experimental data for [ital p]-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions shows that the antiproton feels a moderately attractive mean field at normal nuclear matter density [rho][sub 0] which is in line with a dispersive potential extracted from the free annihilation cross section.

  3. Structure and Function in the Budding Yeast Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Angela; Gasser, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Budding yeast, like other eukaryotes, carries its genetic information on chromosomes that are sequestered from other cellular constituents by a double membrane, which forms the nucleus. An elaborate molecular machinery forms large pores that span the double membrane and regulate the traffic of macromolecules into and out of the nucleus. In multicellular eukaryotes, an intermediate filament meshwork formed of lamin proteins bridges from pore to pore and helps the nucleus reform after mitosis. Yeast, however, lacks lamins, and the nuclear envelope is not disrupted during yeast mitosis. The mitotic spindle nucleates from the nucleoplasmic face of the spindle pole body, which is embedded in the nuclear envelope. Surprisingly, the kinetochores remain attached to short microtubules throughout interphase, influencing the position of centromeres in the interphase nucleus, and telomeres are found clustered in foci at the nuclear periphery. In addition to this chromosomal organization, the yeast nucleus is functionally compartmentalized to allow efficient gene expression, repression, RNA processing, genomic replication, and repair. The formation of functional subcompartments is achieved in the nucleus without intranuclear membranes and depends instead on sequence elements, protein–protein interactions, specific anchorage sites at the nuclear envelope or at pores, and long-range contacts between specific chromosomal loci, such as telomeres. Here we review the spatial organization of the budding yeast nucleus, the proteins involved in forming nuclear subcompartments, and evidence suggesting that the spatial organization of the nucleus is important for nuclear function. PMID:22964839

  4. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  5. Medium Modified Nucleon-Nucleon Cross Sections in a Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    A simple reliable formalism is presented for obtaining nucleon-nucleon cross sections within a nucleus in nuclear collisions for a given projectile and target nucleus combination at a given energy for use in transport, Monte Carlo and other calculations. The method relies on extraction of these values from experiments and has been tested for absorption experiments to give excellent results.

  6. Possibility of synthesizing a doubly magic superheavy nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomo, Y.

    2007-02-15

    The possibility of synthesizing a doubly magic superheavy nucleus, {sup 298}114{sub 184}, is investigated on the basis of fluctuation-dissipation dynamics. In order to synthesize this nucleus, we must generate more neutron-rich compound nuclei because of the neutron emissions from excited compound nuclei. The compound nucleus {sup 304}114 has two advantages to achieving a high survival probability. First, because of low neutron separation energy and rapid cooling, the shell correction energy recovers quickly. Secondly, owing to neutron emissions, the neutron number in the nucleus approaches that of the double closed shell and the nucleus attains a large fission barrier. Because of these two effects, the survival probability of {sup 304}114 does not decrease until the excitation energy E{sup *}=50 MeV. These properties lead to a rather high evaporation residue cross section.

  7. Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, R.B.; Severin, C.M.

    1982-01-10

    Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DMN) of the rat were demonstrated with axonal transport techniques. Potential sources for projections to the DMN were first identified by injecting the nucleus with HRP and examining the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cortex for retrogradely labeled neurons. Areas consistently labeled were then injected with a tritiated radioisotope, the tissue processed for autoradiography, and the DMN examined for anterograde labeling. Afferent projections to the medial and/or lateral parts of the DMN were found to originate from a number of spinal, bulbar, and cortical centers. Rostral brain centers projecting to both medial and lateral parts of the DMN include the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortex, the entopeduncular nucleus, and zona incerta. at the level of the midbrain, the ipsilateral substantia nigra and contralateral DMN likewise project to the DMN. Furthermore, the ipsilateral superior colliculus projects to the DMN, involving mainly the lateral part of the nucleus. Afferents from caudal centers include bilateral projections from the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal complex and the nucleus medulla oblongata centralis, as well as from the contralateral dentate nucleus. The projections from the trigeminal complex and nucleus medullae oblongatae centralis terminate in the intermediate and medial parts of the DMN, whereas projections from the contralateral dentate nucleus terminate mainly in its lateral part. In general, the afferent connections of the DMN arise from diverse areas of the brain. Although most of these projections distribute throughout the entire extent of the DMN, some of them project mainly to either medial or lateral parts of the nucleus, thus suggesting that the organization of the DMN is comparable, at least in part, to that of the reticular formation of the pons and medulla, a region in which hodological differences between medial and lateral subdivisions are known to exist.

  8. Nucleon emission via electromagnetic excitation in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Re-analysis of the Weizsacker-Williams method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous analyses of the comparison of Weizsacker-Williams (WW) theory to experiment for nucleon emission via electromagnetic (EM) excitations in nucleus-nucleus collisions were not definitive because of different assumptions concerning the value of the minimum impact parameter. This situation is corrected by providing criteria that allows definitive statements to be made concerning agreement or disagreement between WW theory and experiment.

  9. Inside a plant nucleus: discovering the proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrovská, Beáta; Šebela, Marek; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear proteins are a vital component of eukaryotic cell nuclei and have a profound effect on the way in which genetic information is stored, expressed, replicated, repaired, and transmitted to daughter cells and progeny. Because of the plethora of functions, nuclear proteins represent the most abundant components of cell nuclei in all eukaryotes. However, while the plant genome is well understood at the DNA level, information on plant nuclear proteins remains scarce, perhaps with the exception of histones and a few other proteins. This lack of knowledge hampers efforts to understand how the plant genome is organized in the nucleus and how it functions. This review focuses on the current state of the art of the analysis of the plant nuclear proteome. Previous proteome studies have generally been designed to search for proteins involved in plant response to various forms of stress or to identify rather a modest number of proteins. Thus, there is a need for more comprehensive and systematic studies of proteins in the nuclei obtained at individual phases of the cell cycle, or isolated from various tissue types and stages of cell and tissue differentiation. All this in combination with protein structure, predicted function, and physical localization in 3D nuclear space could provide much needed progress in our understanding of the plant nuclear proteome and its role in plant genome organization and function. PMID:25697798

  10. Neutrino-Nucleus Reactions and Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Chiba, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takashi; Honma, Michio; Higashiyama, Koji; Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Kajino, Toshitaka; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2008-05-21

    Neutrino-induced reactions on {sup 12}C, {sup 4}He as well as Fe and Ni isotopes are studied based on new shell model Hamiltonians for p-shell and fp-shell. Gamow-Teller and spin-dipole transitions are investigated, and applied to neutrino-nucleus reactions induced by both DAR and supernova neutrinos. The reaction cross sections are found to be enhanced compared with conventional Hamiltonians as well as previous calculations. The production yields of {sup 7}Li and {sup 11}B during supernova explosions are found to be enhanced, and the effects of neutrino oscillations and implications of the enhancement on the constraint on temperature for {nu}{sub {mu}}{sub ,{tau}} and {nu}-bar{sub {mu}}{sub ,{tau}} are discussed. Production of other light elements such as {sup 10}Be and {sup 10}B by neutrino processes is also discussed. Neutral current reactions on Ni and Fe isotopes induced by supernova neutrinos are investigated. Effects of neutrino-induced reactions on the production yields of heavy elements such as Mn are discussed.

  11. Calretinin Neurons in the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert Y

    2016-08-01

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a circadian pacemaker, is present in all mammalian brains. It has a complex organization of peptide-containing neurons that is similar among species, but calcium-binding proteins are expressed variably. Neurons containing calretinin have been described in the SCN in a number of species but not with association to circadian function. The objective of the present study is to characterize a calretinin neuron (CAR) group in the rat anterior hypothalamus anatomically and functionally with a detailed description of its location and a quantitative analysis of neuronal calretinin immunoreactivity at 3 times of day, 0600, 1400, and 1900 h, from animals in either light-dark or constant dark conditions. CAR neurons occupy a region in the dorsal and lateral SCN with a circadian rhythm in CAR immunoreactivity with a peak at 0600 h and a rhythm in cytoplasmic CAR distribution with a peak at 1400 h. CAR neurons should be viewed as an anatomical and functional component of the rat SCN that expands the definition from observations with cell stains. CAR neurons are likely to modulate temporal regulation of calcium in synaptic transmission. PMID:27330050

  12. Evolution of a protein folding nucleus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue; Longo, Liam M; Sutherland, Mason A; Blaber, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The folding nucleus (FN) is a cryptic element within protein primary structure that enables an efficient folding pathway and is the postulated heritable element in the evolution of protein architecture; however, almost nothing is known regarding how the FN structurally changes as complex protein architecture evolves from simpler peptide motifs. We report characterization of the FN of a designed purely symmetric β-trefoil protein by ϕ-value analysis. We compare the structure and folding properties of key foldable intermediates along the evolutionary trajectory of the β-trefoil. The results show structural acquisition of the FN during gene fusion events, incorporating novel turn structure created by gene fusion. Furthermore, the FN is adjusted by circular permutation in response to destabilizing functional mutation. FN plasticity by way of circular permutation is made possible by the intrinsic C3 cyclic symmetry of the β-trefoil architecture, identifying a possible selective advantage that helps explain the prevalence of cyclic structural symmetry in the proteome. PMID:26610273

  13. Neuropeptidomics of the Supraoptic Rat Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian supraoptic nucleus (SON) is a neuroendocrine center in the brain regulating a variety of physiological functions. Within the SON, peptidergic magnocellular neurons that project to the neurohypophysis (posterior pituitary) are involved in controlling osmotic balance, lactation, and parturition, partly through secretion of signaling peptides such as oxytocin and vasopressin into the blood. An improved understanding of SON activity and function requires identification and characterization of the peptides used by the SON. Here, small-volume sample preparation approaches are optimized for neuropeptidomic studies of isolated SON samples ranging from entire nuclei down to single magnocellular neurons. Unlike most previous mammalian peptidome studies, tissues are not immediately heated or microwaved. SON samples are obtained from ex vivo brain slice preparations via tissue punch and the samples processed through sequential steps of peptide extraction. Analyses of the samples via liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry result in the identification of 85 peptides, including 20 unique peptides from known prohormones. As the sample size is further reduced, the depth of peptide coverage decreases; however, even from individually isolated magnocellular neuroendocrine cells, vasopressin and several other peptides are detected. PMID:18816085

  14. SUNrises on the International Plant Nucleus Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Graumann, Katja; Bass, Hank W.; Parry, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear periphery is a dynamic, structured environment, whose precise functions are essential for global processes—from nuclear, to cellular, to organismal. Its main components—the nuclear envelope (NE) with inner and outer nuclear membranes (INM and ONM), nuclear pore complexes (NPC), associated cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal components as well as chromatin are conserved across eukaryotes (Fig. 1). In metazoans in particular, the structure and functions of nuclear periphery components are intensely researched partly because of their involvement in various human diseases. While far less is known about these in plants, the last few years have seen a significant increase in research activity in this area. Plant biologists are not only catching up with the animal field, but recent findings are pushing our advances in this field globally. In recognition of this developing field, the Annual Society of Experimental Biology Meeting in Salzburg kindly hosted a session co-organized by Katja Graumann and David E. Evans (Oxford Brookes University) highlighting new insights into plant nuclear envelope proteins and their interactions. This session brought together leading researchers with expertise in topics such as epigenetics, meiosis, nuclear pore structure and functions, nucleoskeleton and nuclear envelope composition. An open and friendly exchange of ideas was fundamental to the success of the meeting, which resulted in founding the International Plant Nucleus Consortium. This review highlights new developments in plant nuclear envelope research presented at the conference and their importance for the wider understanding of metazoan, yeast and plant nuclear envelope functions and properties. PMID:23324458

  15. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Abel, John H; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St John, Peter C; Wang, Thomas J; Bales, Benjamin B; Doyle, Francis J; Herzog, Erik D; Petzold, Linda R

    2016-04-19

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure. PMID:27044085

  16. The LINC-less granulocyte nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Olins, Ada L.; Hoang, Thanh V.; Zwerger, Monika; Herrmann, Harald; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Noegel, Angelika A.; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos; Hodzic, Didier; Olins, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    The major blood granulocyte (neutrophil) is rapidly recruited to sites of bacterial and fungal infections. It is a highly malleable cell, allowing it to squeeze out of blood vessels and migrate through tight tissue spaces. The human granulocyte nucleus is lobulated and exhibits a paucity of nuclear lamins, increasing its capability for deformation. The present study examined the existence of protein connections between the nuclear envelope and cytoskeletal elements (the LINC complex) in differentiated cell states (i.e. granulocytic, monocytic and macrophage) of the human leukemic cell line HL-60, as well as in human blood leukocytes. HL-60 granulocytes exhibited a deficiency of several LINC complex proteins (i.e. nesprin 1 giant, nesprin 2 giant, SUN1, plectin and vimentin); whereas, the macrophage state revealed nesprin 1 giant, plectin and vimentin. Both states possessed SUN2 in the nuclear envelope. Parallel differences were observed with some of the LINC complex proteins in isolated human blood leukocytes, including macrophage cells derived from blood monocytes. The present study documenting the paucity of LINC complex proteins in granulocytic forms, in combination with previous data on granulocyte nuclear shape and nuclear envelope composition, suggest the hypothesis that these adaptations evolved to facilitate granulocyte cellular malleability. PMID:19019491

  17. Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

  18. The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Modulates the Sensitivity of Arcuate Nucleus to Hypoglycemia in the Male Rat.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Moro Chao, D; León-Mercado, L; Foppen, E; Guzmán-Ruiz, M; Basualdo, M C; Escobar, C; Buijs, R M

    2016-09-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and arcuate nucleus (ARC) have reciprocal connections; catabolic metabolic information activates the ARC and inhibits SCN neuronal activity. Little is known about the influence of the SCN on the ARC. Here, we investigated whether the SCN modulated the sensitivity of the ARC to catabolic metabolic conditions. ARC neuronal activity, as determined by c-Fos immunoreactivity, was increased after a hypoglycemic stimulus by 2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The highest ARC neuronal activity after 2DG was found at the end of the light period (zeitgeber 11, ZT11) with a lower activity in the beginning of the light period (zeitgeber 2, ZT2), suggesting the involvement of the SCN. The higher activation of ARC neurons after 2DG at ZT11 was associated with higher 2DG induced blood glucose levels as compared with ZT2. Unilateral SCN-lesioned animals, gave a mainly ipsilateral activation of ARC neurons at the lesioned side, suggesting an inhibitory role of the SCN on ARC neurons. The 2DG-induced counterregulatory glucose response correlated with increased ARC neuronal activity and was significantly higher in unilateral SCN-lesioned animals. Finally, the ARC as site where 2DG may, at least partly, induce a counterregulatory response was confirmed by local microdialysis of 2DG. 2DG administration in the ARC produced a higher increase in circulating glucose compared with 2DG administration in surrounding areas such as the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH). We conclude that the SCN uses neuronal pathways to the ARC to gate sensory metabolic information to the brain, regulating ARC glucose sensitivity and counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemic conditions. PMID:27429160

  19. Multiple pion and kaon production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions: measurements versus specific models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guptaroy, P.; de, Bh.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bhattacharyya, D. P.

    The pion and kaon rapidity densities and the nature of kaon-pion ratios offer two very prominent and crucial physical observables on which modestly sufficient data for heavy nucleus collisions are available to date. In the light of two sets of models - one purely phenomenological and the other with a modest degree of a dynamical basis - we try to examine the state of agreement between calculations and experimental results obtainable from the past and the latest measurements. Impact and implications of all these would also finally be spelt out.

  20. Ice nucleus activity measurements of solid rocket motor exhaust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The ice Nucleus activity of exhaust particles generated from combustion of Space Shuttle propellant in small rocket motors has been measured. The activity at -20 C was substantially lower than that of aerosols generated by unpressurized combustion of propellant samples in previous studies. The activity decays rapidly with time and is decreased further in the presence of moist air. These tests corroborate the low effectivity ice nucleus measurement results obtained in the exhaust ground cloud of the Space Shuttle. Such low ice nucleus activity implies that Space Shuttle induced inadvertent weather modification via an ice phase process is extremely unlikely.

  1. Nucleus of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock (1983 VII)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Optical, radar, infrared, UV, and microwave-continuum observations of Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcok were obtained in May 1983, the week of the comet's close approach to earth. The comet has a nucleus dimension and a rotation period which are similar to those of Comet Halley, but a different morphological signature (a persisting sunward fan-shaped coma). Time variations are noted in the projected nucleus cross section. Results suggest significant limb-darkening effects in the relevant domains of radio waves, and that the comet's interior must be extremely cold. It is found that the thermal-infrared fluxes from the inner coma of the comet are dominated by the nucleus.

  2. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S.  R.; Chang, E.; Cohen, S.  D.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H. -W.; Orginos, K.; Parreño, A.; Savage, M.  J.

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  3. Determination of electron-nucleus collisions geometry with forward neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Aschenauer, E.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-29

    There are a large number of physics programs one can explore in electron-nucleus collisions at a future electron-ion collider. Collision geometry is very important in these studies, while the measurement for an event-by-event geometric control is rarely discussed in the prior deep-inelastic scattering experiments off a nucleus. This paper seeks to provide some detailed studies on the potential of tagging collision geometries through forward neutron multiplicity measurements with a zero degree calorimeter. As a result, this type of geometry handle, if achieved, can be extremely beneficial in constraining nuclear effects for the electron-nucleus program at an electron-ion collider.

  4. Nucleas (hadron) nucleus elastic scattering and geometrical picture

    SciTech Connect

    Aleem F.; Ali, S.; Saleem, M.

    1995-08-01

    A comprehensive explanation of nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus elastic scattering is elusive ever since the measurements of these reactions were made. By proposing energy dependent hadronic form factors for deuteron and alpha, in analogy to that of the proton as suggested by Chou and Yang recently, the authors have fitted all the available data for alpha-alpha and deuteron-deuteron elastic scattering. In order to further verify the validity of the proposed form factor, they have also fitted the data for proton-alpha and proton-deuteron elastic scattering. It is concluded that the hadronic matter is expanding with an increase in energy. 30 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Smallest Black Hole in Galactic Nucleus Detected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    A team of astronomers have reported the detection of the smallest black hole (BH) ever observed in a galactic nucleus. The BH is hosted in the center of dwarf galaxy RGG 118, and it weighs in at 50,000 solar masses, according to observations made by Vivienne Baldassare of University of Michigan and her collaborators. Small Discoveries: Why is the discovery of a small nuclear BH important? Some open questions that this could help answer are: - Do the very smallest dwarf galaxies have BHs at their centers too? Though we believe that there's a giant BH at the center of every galaxy, we aren't sure how far down the size scale this holds true. - What is the formation mechanism for BHs at the center of galaxies? - What's the behavior of the M-sigma relation at the low-mass end? The M-sigma relation is an observed correlation between the mass of a galaxy's central BH and the velocity dispersion of the stars in the galaxy. This relation is incredibly useful for determining properties of distant BHs and their galaxies empirically, but little data is available to constrain the low-mass end of the relation. M-sigma relation, plotting systems with dynamically-measured black hole masses. RGG 118 is plotted as the pink star. The solid and dashed lines represent various determinations of scaling relations. Credit: Baldassare et al. 2015. Identifying a Black Hole: RGG 118 was identified as a candidate host for an accreting, nuclear BH from the catalog of dwarf galaxies observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Baldassare and her team followed up with high-resolution spectroscopy from the Clay telescope in Chile and Chandra x-ray observations. Using these observations, the team determined that RGG 118 plays host to a massive BH at its center based on three clues: 1) narrow emission line ratios, which is a signature of accretion onto a massive BH, 2) the presence of broad emission lines, indicating that gas is rotating around a central BH, and 3) the existence of an X-ray point

  6. Projections of nucleus angularis and nucleus laminaris to the lateral lemniscal nuclear complex of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T T; Konishi, M

    1988-08-01

    Interaural phase and intensity are cues by which the barn owl determines, respectively, the azimuth and elevation of a sound source. Physiological studies indicate that phase and intensity are processed independently in the auditory brainstem of the barn owl. The phases of spectral components of a sound are encoded in nucleus magnocellularis (NM), one of the two cochlear nuclei. NM projects solely and bilaterally to nucleus laminaris (NL), wherein interaural phase difference is computed. The other cochlear nucleus, nucleus angularis (NA), encodes the amplitudes of spectral components of sounds. We report here the projections of NA and NL to the lateral lemniscal nuclei of the barn owl. The lateral lemniscal complex comprises nucleus olivaris superior (SO); nucleus lemnisci lateralis, pars ventralis (LLv); and nucleus ventralis lemnisci lateralis (VLV). At caudal levels, VLV may be divided into a posterior (VLVp) and an anterior (VLVa) subdivision on cytoarchitectonic grounds. At rostral levels, the cytoarchitectural differences diminish and the boundaries between the two subdivisions become obscured. Likewise, our data from anterograde tracing studies suggest that at caudal levels the terminal fields of NA and NL remain confined to VLVp and VLVa, respectively. They merge, however, at rostral levels. The data also suggest that NL projects to the medial portion of the ipsilateral SO and that NA projects bilaterally to all parts of SO and LLv. Studies with the retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase confirm these projections. PMID:2463287

  7. Nucleus Accumbens Invulnerability to Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Donald M.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Thomas, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages neurons and nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. Emerging studies of human Meth addicts using both postmortem analyses of brain tissue and noninvasive imaging studies of intact brains have confirmed that Meth causes persistent structural abnormalities. Animal and human studies have also defined a number of significant functional problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with long-term Meth abuse. This review summarizes the salient features of Meth-induced neurotoxicity with a focus on the dopamine (DA) neuronal system. DA nerve endings in the caudate-putamen (CPu) are damaged by Meth in a highly delimited manner. Even within the CPu, damage is remarkably heterogeneous, with ventral and lateral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared the damage that accompanies binge Meth intoxication, but relatively subtle changes in the disposition of DA in its nerve endings can lead to dramatic increases in Meth-induced toxicity in the CPu and overcome the normal resistance of the NAc to damage. In contrast to the CPu, where DA neuronal deficiencies are persistent, alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery. Animal models have been indispensable in studies of the causes and consequences of Meth neurotoxicity and in the development of new therapies. This research has shown that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of Meth to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage. The resistance of the NAc to Meth-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of Meth neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the numerous important roles played by this brain structure. PMID:23382149

  8. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus.

    PubMed

    2011-05-19

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus (4He), also known as the anti-α (α), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the α-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B < -1 have been observed only as rare products of interactions at particle accelerators, where the rate of antinucleus production in high-energy collisions decreases by a factor of about 1,000 with each additional antinucleon. Here we report the observation of 4He, the heaviest observed antinucleus to date. In total, 18 4He counts were detected at the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC; ref. 6) in 10(9) recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of 4He in cosmic radiation. PMID:21516103

  9. 2D model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore M.

    2003-10-01

    The CBM (model) of the nucleus has resulted in the prediction of two new quarks, an "up" quark of mass 237.31 MeV/c2 and a "dn" quark of mass 42.392 MeV/c2. These two new predicted quarks helped to determine that the masses of the quarks and leptons are all related by a geometric progression relationship. The mass of each quark or lepton is just the "geometric mean" of two related elementary particles, either in the same generation or in the same family. This numerology predicts the following masses for the electron family: 0.511000 (electron), 7.74 (predicted), 117.3, 1778.4 (tau), 26950.1 MeV. The geometric ratio of this progression is 15.154 (e to the power e). The mass of the tau in this theory agrees very well with accepted values. This theory suggests that all the "dn like" quarks have a mass of just 10X multiples of 4.24 MeV (the mass of the "d" quark). The first 3 "up like" quark masses are 38, 237.31 and 1500 MeV. This theory also predicts a new heavy generation with a lepton mass of 27 GeV, a "dn like" quark of 42.4 GeV, and an "up like" quark of 65 GeV. Significant evidence already exists for the existence of these new quarks, and lepton. Ref. Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/ 0008026, @ http://xxx.lanl.gov. Infinite Energy, Vol 5, issue 30.

  10. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Agakishiev, H.; Tang, A.; et al.

    2011-04-24

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus ({sup 4}He), also known as the anti-{alpha} ({alpha}), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the {alpha}-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B < -1 have been observed only as rare products of interactions at particle accelerators, where the rate of antinucleus production in high-energy collisions decreases by a factor of about 1,000 with each additional antinucleon. Here we report the observation of {sup 4}He, the heaviest observed antinucleus to date. In total, 18 {sup 4}He counts were detected at the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in 10{sup 9} recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of {sup 4}He in cosmic radiation.

  11. EOS: A time projection chamber for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, H.G.; Odyniec, G.; Rai, G.; Seidl, P.

    1986-12-01

    The conceptual design is presented for a detector to identify and measure (..delta..p/p approx. = 1%) most of the 200 or so mid-rapidity charged particles (p, d, t, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, ..pi../sup + -/, K/sup + -/) produced in each central nucleus-nucleus collision (Au + Au) at Bevalac energies, as well as K/sub 3//sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/. The beam particles and heavy spectator fragments are excluded from the detection volume by means of a central vacuum pipe. Particle identification is achieved by a combination of dE/dx measurements in the TPC, and of time-of-flight measurements in a scintillator array. The TPC is single-ended and its end cap is entirely covered with cathode pads (about 25,000 pads and about 1000 anode wires). A non-uniform pad distribution is proposed to accommodate the high multiplicity of particles emitted at forward angles. The performance of the detector is assessed with regard to multihit capability, tracking, momentum resolution, particle identification, ..lambda../sup 0/ reconstruction, space charge effects, field non-uniformity, dynamic range, data acquisition rate, and data analysis rate. 72 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Statistical analysis of secondary particle distributions in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The use is described of several statistical techniques to characterize structure in the angular distributions of secondary particles from nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 24 to 61 GeV/nucleon. The objective of this work was to determine whether there are correlations between emitted particle intensity and angle that may be used to support the existence of the quark gluon plasma. The techniques include chi-square null hypothesis tests, the method of discrete Fourier transform analysis, and fluctuation analysis. We have also used the method of composite unit vectors to test for azimuthal asymmetry in a data set of 63 JACEE-3 events. Each method is presented in a manner that provides the reader with some practical detail regarding its application. Of those events with relatively high statistics, Fe approaches 0 at 55 GeV/nucleon was found to possess an azimuthal distribution with a highly non-random structure. No evidence of non-statistical fluctuations was found in the pseudo-rapidity distributions of the events studied. It is seen that the most effective application of these methods relies upon the availability of many events or single events that possess very high multiplicities.

  13. Major diencephalic inputs to the hippocampus: supramammillary nucleus and nucleus reuniens. Circuitry and function

    PubMed Central

    Vertes, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus receives two major external inputs from the diencephalon, that is, from the supramammillary nucleus (SUM) and nucleus reuniens (RE) of the midline thalamus. These two afferents systems project to separate, nonoverlapping, regions of the hippocampus. Specifically, the SUM distributes to the dentate gyrus (DG) and to CA2 of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, whereas RE projects to CA1 of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and to the subiculum. SUM and RE fibers to the hippocampus participate in common as well as in separate functions. Both systems would appear to amplify signals from other sources to their respective hippocampal targets. SUM amplifies signals from the entorhinal cortex (EC) to DG, whereas RE may amplify them from CA3 (and EC) to CA1 of the hippocampus. This “amplification” may serve to promote the transfer, encoding, and possibly storage of information from EC to DG and from CA3 and EC to CA1. Regarding their unique actions on the hippocampus, the SUM is a vital part of an ascending brainstem to hippocampal system generating the theta rhythm of the hippocampus, whereas RE importantly routes information from the medial prefrontal cortex to the hippocampus to thereby mediate functions involving both structures. In summary, although, to date, SUM and RE afferents to the hippocampus have not been extensively explored, the SUM and RE exert a profound influence on the hippocampus in processes of learning and memory. PMID:26072237

  14. Modulation of medial geniculate nucleus neuronal activity by electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Barry, K M; Paolini, A G; Robertson, D; Mulders, W H A M

    2015-11-12

    Dysfunctional sensory gating has been proposed to result in the generation of phantom perceptions. In agreement, it has been recently suggested that tinnitus, a phantom perception of sound commonly associated with hearing loss, is the result of a breakdown of circuitry involving the limbic system and the medial geniculate nucleus (MGN) of the thalamus. In humans with tinnitus, structural changes and abnormal activity have been found to occur in the auditory pathway as well as parts of the limbic system such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, at present, no studies have been conducted on the influence of the NAc on the MGN. We investigated the functional connectivity between the NAc and MGN single neurons. Bipolar electrical stimulation was delivered to the NAc while recording single neuron activity in MGN in anesthetized Wistar rats. Histological analysis was used to confirm placement of electrodes. NAc electrical stimulation generally decreased spontaneous firing rates in MGN neurons and, in a limited number of neurons, caused an increase in firing rate. This suggests that NAc can modulate the activity of auditory neurons in the MGN and may play a role in the development of tinnitus. PMID:26349008

  15. Pion production at 180/sup 0/ in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chessin, S.A.

    1983-05-01

    A survey experiment of pion production at 180/sup 0/ in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. Beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 2.1 GeV/A protons, alphas, and carbon were used, as well as proton beams of 0.80 GeV, 3.5 GeV, and 4.89 GeV, and argon beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 1.83 GeV/A. This is the first such experiment to use the heavier beams. Targets used ranged from carbon to lead. An in-depth review of the literature, both experimental and theoretical, is also presented. The systematics of the data are discussed, and comparisons are made both with prior experiments and with the predictions of the models reviewed. The cross sections appear consistent with a simple single nucleon-nucleon collision picture, without the need for collective or other exotic effects. Suggestions for future work are made.

  16. Multiple-scattering effects in nucleus-nucleus reactions with Glauber theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Shinya; Ebata, Shuichiro; Horiuchi, Wataru; Kimura, Masaaki

    2014-09-01

    A study of new unstable nuclei has become possible in new radioactive beam facilities. In order to understand the relationship between reaction observables and nuclear structure, we need reaction theory which exactly reflects the nuclear structure. The Glauber theory is a powerful tool of analyzing high energy nuclear reactions. The theory describes the multiple scattering processes, whereas the optical limit approximation (OLA), which is widely used, ignores those processes. Those effects are expected to play an important role in the nuclear collision involving unstable nuclei (see for example Phys. Rev. C 54, 1843 (1996)). Here we apply the Glauber theory to nucleus-nucleus reactions. The wave functions are generated by the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method and are expressed in a Slater determinant that allows us to evaluate the complete Glauber amplitude easily. We calculate total reaction cross sections, elastic cross sections and differential elastic cross sections for 16~24O, 40~70Ca, 56,58Ni, 100~140Sn, 190~214Pb on proton, 4He, 12C targets and compare with experimental data. The Glauber theory gives much better description than the OLA, especially at larger scattering angles.

  17. Cloud condensation nucleus-sulfate mass relationship and cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously published, simultaneous measurements of cloud condensation nucleus number concentration and sulfate mass concentration suggest a nonlinear relationship between the two variables. This nonlinearity reduces the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in the sulfur cycle.

  18. Red nucleus connectivity as revealed by constrained spherical deconvolution tractography.

    PubMed

    Milardi, Demetrio; Cacciola, Alberto; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Marino, Silvia; Irrera, Mariangela; Cacciola, Giorgio; Santoro, Giuseppe; Ciolli, Pietro; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-07-28

    Previous Diffusion Tensor Imaging studies have demonstrated that the human red nucleus is widely interconnected with sensory-motor and prefrontal cortices. In this study, we assessed red nucleus connectivity by using a multi-tensor model called non- negative Constrained Spherical Deconvolution (CSD), which is able to resolve more than one fiber orientation per voxel. Connections of the red nuclei of fifteen volunteers were studied at 3T using CSD axonal tracking. We found significant connectivity between RN and the following cortical and subcortical areas: cerebellar cortex, thalamus, paracentral lobule, postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, superior frontal gyrus and dentate nucleus. We confirmed that red nucleus is tightly linked with the cerebral cortex and has dense subcortical connections with thalamus and cerebellar cortex. These findings may be useful in a clinical context considering that RN is involved in motor control and it is known to have potential to compensate for injury of the corticospinal tract. PMID:27181514

  19. Active diffusion positions the nucleus in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Maria; Ahmed, Wylie W; Bussonnier, Matthias; Mailly, Philippe; Betz, Timo; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2015-04-01

    In somatic cells, the position of the cell centroid is dictated by the centrosome. The centrosome is instrumental in nucleus positioning, the two structures being physically connected. Mouse oocytes have no centrosomes, yet harbour centrally located nuclei. We demonstrate how oocytes define their geometric centre in the absence of centrosomes. Using live imaging of oocytes, knockout for the formin 2 actin nucleator, with off-centred nuclei, together with optical trapping and modelling, we discover an unprecedented mode of nucleus positioning. We document how active diffusion of actin-coated vesicles, driven by myosin Vb, generates a pressure gradient and a propulsion force sufficient to move the oocyte nucleus. It promotes fluidization of the cytoplasm, contributing to nucleus directional movement towards the centre. Our results highlight the potential of active diffusion, a prominent source of intracellular transport, able to move large organelles such as nuclei, providing in vivo evidence of its biological function. PMID:25774831

  20. Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell

  1. Deconvolving the Nucleus of Centaurus A Using Chandra PSF Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karovska, Margarita

    2000-01-01

    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is a giant early-type galaxy containing the nearest (at 3.5 Mpc) radio-bright Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). Cen A was observed with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory on several occasions since the launch in July 1999. The high-angular resolution (less than 0.5 arcsecond) Chandra/HRC images reveal X ray multi-scale structures in this object with unprecedented detail and clarity, including the bright nucleus believed to be associated with a supermassive black hole. We explored the spatial extent of the Cen A nucleus using deconvolution techniques on the full resolution Chandra images. Model point spread functions (PSFs) were derived from the standard Chandra raytrace PSF library as well as unresolved point sources observed with Chandra. The deconvolved images show that the Cen A nucleus is resolved and asymmetric. We discuss several possible causes of this extended emission and of the asymmetries.

  2. Nucleus management in manual small incision cataract surgery by phacosection.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, M S

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus management is critical in manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), as the integrity of the tunnel, endothelium and posterior capsule needs to be respected. Several techniques of nucleus management are in vogue, depending upon the specific technique of MSICS. Nucleus can be removed in toto or bisected or trisected into smaller segments. The pressure in the eye can be maintained at the desired level with the use of an anterior chamber maintainer or kept at atmospheric levels. In MSICS, unlike phacoemulsification, there is no need to limit the size of the tunnel or restrain the size of capsulorrhexis. Large well-structured tunnels and larger capsulorrhexis provide better control on the surgical maneuvers. Safety and simplicity of MSICS has made it extremely popular. The purpose of this article is to describe nucleus management by phacosection in MSICS. PMID:19075409

  3. Under Pressure: Mechanical Stress Management in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Belaadi, Néjma; Aureille, Julien; Guilluy, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cells are constantly adjusting to the mechanical properties of their surroundings, operating a complex mechanochemical feedback, which hinges on mechanotransduction mechanisms. Whereas adhesion structures have been shown to play a central role in mechanotransduction, it now emerges that the nucleus may act as a mechanosensitive structure. Here, we review recent advances demonstrating that mechanical stress emanating from the cytoskeleton can activate pathways in the nucleus which eventually impact both its structure and the transcriptional machinery. PMID:27314389

  4. Acts and knowledge management in the NUCLEUS hospital information system.

    PubMed Central

    Kanoui, H.; Joubert, M.; Favard, R.; Maury, G.; Pelletier, M.

    1995-01-01

    NUCLEUS is a project completed in June 1995 in the frame of the European Community programme AIM (Advanced Informatics in Medicine). The main result of NUCLEUS is a prototype of an integrated patient dossier. Together with this patient dossier, facilities have been developed for its customisation by the various categories of end-users. A semantic model has been designed to guide and control the exploitation of data, and ensures the overall integrity of the information system. PMID:8563297

  5. International Halley Watch: Discipline specialists for near-nucleus studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, S.; Sekanina, Z.; Rahe, J.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Near-Nucleus Studies Net is to study the processes taking place in the near-nucleus environment as they relate to the nature of nucleus. This is accomplisghed by measuring the spatial and temporal distribution of dust, gases and ions in the coma on high resolution images taken from many observatories around the world. By modeling the motions of discrete dust features in Comet Halley, it is often possible to determine the locations of the emission sources on the surface and learn about the nucleus structure. In addition to the general goals shared by all IHW nets, the scientific goals of the net has been to determine (1)the gross surface structure of the nucleus, (2)the nucleus spin vector, (3)the distribution and evolution of jet sources and (4)the interrelationships between the gas, dust and ion components of the coma. An additional Comet Giacobini-Zinner watch was carried out by the NNSN in support of the NASA International Cometary Explorer flyby.

  6. 3200 Phaethon, Asteroid or Comet Nucleus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Benkhoff, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    Physico-chemical modeling is central to understand the important physical processes in small solar system bodies. We have developed a computer simulation, SUISEI, that includes the physico-chemical processes relevant to comets within a global modeling framework. Our goals are to gain valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of cometary nuclei so we can better understand observations and in situ measurements. SUISEI includes a 3-D model of gas and heat transport in porous sub-surface layers in the interior of the nucleus.We present results on the application of SUISEI to the near-Sun object, Phaethon. Discovered in 1983 and classified as an asteroid, it has recently exhibited an active dust coma. Phaethon has long been associated as the source of the Geminids meteor shower so the dust activity provides a clear link to the meteor shower. The observed dust activity would traditionally lead to Phaethon being also classified as a comet (e.g., 2060-95P/Chiron, 133P/Elst-Pizarro). This is unusual since the orbit of Phaethon has a perihelion of 0.14 AU, resulting in surface temperatures of more than 1025K, much too hot for water ice or other volatiles to exist near the surface and drive the activity. This situation and others such as the “Active Asteroids” necessitates a revision of how we understand and classify these small asteroid-comet transition objects.We conclude the following for Phaethon:1. It is likely to contain relatively pristine volatiles in its interior despite repeated near perihelion passages of 0.14 AU during its history in its present orbit,2. Steady water gas fluxes at perihelion and throughout its orbit are insufficient to entrain the currently observed dust production,3. Thermal gradients into the surface as well as those caused by diurnal rotation are consistent with the mechanism of dust release due to thermal fracture,4. The initial large gas release during the first perihelion passage may be sufficient to produce enough dust to explain

  7. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

  8. [The role of the nucleus accumbens in psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Mavridis, I

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens is the most inferior part of the striatum and is mainly connected to the limbic system. It is neurochemically and immunohistochemically divided into a shell laterally and a core medially. As a functionally central structure between amygdala, basal ganglia, mesolimbic dopaminergic regions, mediodorsal thalamus and prefrontal cortex, the nucleus accumbens appears to play a modulative role in the flow of the information from the amygdaloid complex to these regions. Dopamine is a major neurotransmitter of the nucleus accumbens and this nucleus has a modulative function to the amygdala-basal ganglia-prefrontal cortex circuit. Together with the prefrontal cortex and amygdala, nucleus accumbens consists a part of the cerebral circuit which regulates functions associated with effort. It is anatomically located in a unique way to serve emotional and behavioral components of feelings. It is considered as a neural interface between motivation and action, having a key-role in food intake, sexual behavior, reward-motivated behavior, stress-related behavior and substance-dependence. It is involved in several cognitive, emotional and psychomotor functions, altered in some psychopathology. Moreover it is involved in some of the commonest and most severe psychiatric disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other anxiety disorders, as well as in addiction, including drugs abuse, alcoholism and smoking. Nucleus accumbens has also a role in other psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder, attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Because of its rich dopaminergic projections, this nucleus has been subject of many studies in animals as well as in humans, connecting its malfunction with the disturbed reward process observed in depression. Neuromodulation interventions targeting the nucleus accumbens are nowadays applied in strictly selected patients suffering from treatment

  9. The deafferented reticular thalamic nucleus generates spindle rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Steriade, M; Domich, L; Oakson, G; Deschênes, M

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that nucleus reticularis thalami (RE) is the generator of spindle rhythmicity during electroencephalogram (EEG) synchronization was tested in acutely prepared cats. Unit discharges and focal waves were extracellularly recorded in the rostral pole of RE nucleus, which was completely disconnected by transections from all other thalamic nuclei. In some experiments, additional transections through corona radiata created a triangular island in which the rostral RE pole survived with the caudate nucleus, putamen, basal forebrain nuclei, prepyriform area, and the adjacent cortex. Similar results were obtained in two types of experiments: brain stem-transected preparations that exhibited spontaneous spindle sequences, and animals under ketamine anesthesia in which transient spindling was repeatedly precipitated during recording by very low doses of a short-acting barbiturate. Both spindle-related rhythms (7- to 16-Hz waves grouped in sequences that recur with a rhythm of 0.1-0.3 Hz) are seen in focal recordings of the deafferented RE nucleus. The presence of spindling rhythmicity in the disconnected RE nucleus contrasts with total absence of spindles in cortical EEG leads and in thalamic recordings behind the transection. Oscillations within the same frequency range as that of spontaneous spindles can be evoked in the deafferented RE nucleus by subcortical white matter stimulation. In deafferented RE cells, the burst structure consists of an initially biphasic acceleration-deceleration pattern, eventually leading to a long-lasting tonic tail. Quantitative group data show that the burst parameters of disconnected RE cells are very similar to those of RE neurons with intact connections. In the deafferented RE nucleus, spike bursts of RE neurons recur periodically (0.1-0.3 Hz) in close time-relation with simultaneously recorded focal spindle sequences. The burst occurrence of deafferented RE cells is greatly reduced after systemic administration of bicuculline

  10. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent 'fusion by diffusion' model

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.

    2011-05-15

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section {sigma}{sub cap}(l), the fusion probability P{sub fus}(l), and the survival probability P{sub surv}(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of P{sub fus}(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of P{sub fus}(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  11. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  12. Heterogeneous calretinin expression in the avian cochlear nucleus angularis.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S; Williams, A; MacLeod, K M

    2014-08-01

    Multiple calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) are expressed at high levels and in complementary patterns in the auditory pathways of birds, mammals, and other vertebrates, but whether specific members of the CaBP family can be used to identify neuronal subpopulations is unclear. We used double immunofluorescence labeling of calretinin (CR) in combination with neuronal markers to investigate the distribution of CR-expressing neurons in brainstem sections of the cochlear nucleus in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). While CR was homogeneously expressed in cochlear nucleus magnocellularis, CR expression was highly heterogeneous in cochlear nucleus angularis (NA), a nucleus with diverse cell types analogous in function to neurons in the mammalian ventral cochlear nucleus. To quantify the distribution of CR in the total NA cell population, we used antibodies against neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), a postmitotic neuron-specific nuclear marker. In NA neurons, NeuN label was variably localized to the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm, and the intensity of NeuN immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with the intensity of CR immunoreactivity. The percentage of CR + neurons in NA increased from 31 % in embryonic (E)17/18 chicks, to 44 % around hatching (E21), to 51 % in postnatal day (P) 8 chicks. By P8, the distribution of CR + neurons was uniform, both rostrocaudal and in the tonotopic (dorsoventral) axis. Immunoreactivity for the voltage-gated potassium ion channel Kv1.1, used as a marker for physiological type, showed broad and heterogeneous postsynaptic expression in NA, but did not correlate with CR expression. These results suggest that CR may define a subpopulation of neurons within nucleus angularis. PMID:24752525

  13. Masses of proton-rich T/sub z/<0 nuclei via the isobaric mass equation

    SciTech Connect

    Pape, A.; Antony, M.S.

    1988-07-01

    Masses of T/sub z/<0 nuclei through the element Sm, corresponding to Aless than or equal to117, have been calculated with the isobaric multiplet mass equation using parameterizations of its constant b and T/sub z/>0 reference masses of Wapstra, Audi, and Hoekstra. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  14. Isovector pairing effect on the moments of inertia of proton-rich heated nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami, I.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Allal, N. H.; Belabbas, M.

    2012-02-01

    The perpendicular and parallel moments of inertia are calculated as a function of the temperature by taking into account the isovector pairing. The used single-particles energies are those of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean-field. The obtained results are compared to their homologues of the conventional Finite Temperature BCS (FTBCS) theory. With this aim, the generalized gap equations have been solved for even-even heated deformed nuclei such as Z = 30 - 38 and N - Z = 0, 2, 4. The isovector pairing effect leads to a change in the behavior of the perpendicular and parallel moments of inertia. Moreover, there is a non-negligible discrepancy between the perpendicular and parallel moments of inertia values calculated within the two models when T < Tcnp (Tcnp being the critical temperature beyond which the neutron-proton (np) gap parameter vanishes). Beyond this temperature, a discrepancy between the two models persists. It is due to the shift of the critical temperatures of the proton (Tcpp) and neutron (Tcnn) systems when evaluated with and without inclusion of the isovector pairing effect.

  15. Calculated dynamical evolution of the nucleus of comet Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    The nucleus of comet Hartley 2 has a relatively regular dumbbell shape with unequal heads. The narrow part of elongated shape contains a relatively smooth region whose covering material is highly different in its shallow structure compared to other parts of this celestial body. The surface of crudely spherical parts of the nucleus is different from the surface of the "neck", which implies a hypothesis that the shape of the nucleus of Hartley 2 is indicative of destruction of this celestial body occurring in our days. The nucleus rotates around its axis passing through the center of mass, and centrifugal forces arise. This process is hindered by gravitation between parts of the nucleus and gradual slowing of rotation due to body lengthening because of the increase in the moment of inertia (proportional to R2) and due to friction losses in the neck material. We posed the task to determine centrifugal and gravitational forces in the neck (and, respectively, the strains of stretching and compression), the moment of inertia of the body and supply of its rotational energy E, the volume of the nucleus and its average density, and the position of the barycenter and center of rotation. It can be assumed that these forces cause slow but progressive lengthening of the neck which should eventually result in fragmentation of the nucleus. Centrifugal forces can be found as a result of summation of forces produced by parts of the body. According to the calculation model, the total stretching forces in the section passing through the narrowest cut of the neck are 1.21E6 N. The corresponding compression forces in the section passing through the narrow section are 1.04E6 N. The comparison of these values indicates a paradoxical result: stretching strains dominate in the neck, while compressions are dominant in the section passing through the common center of mass. The excess of stretching strains in the neck is 11%. The inference is as follows: the right part of the neck and the

  16. Coordinated Dynamics of RNA Splicing Speckles in the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Kota, Krishna P; Alam, Samer G; Nickerson, Jeffrey A; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-06-01

    Despite being densely packed with chromatin, nuclear bodies and a nucleoskeletal network, the nucleus is a remarkably dynamic organelle. Chromatin loops form and relax, RNA transcripts and transcription factors move diffusively, and nuclear bodies move. We show here that RNA splicing speckled domains (splicing speckles) fluctuate in constrained nuclear volumes and remodel their shapes. Small speckles move in a directed way toward larger speckles with which they fuse. This directed movement is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels or inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. The random movement of speckles is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels, moderately reduced after inhibition of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling and modestly increased upon inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. To define the paths through which speckles can translocate in the nucleus, we generated a pressure gradient to create flows in the nucleus. In response to the pressure gradient, speckles moved along curvilinear paths in the nucleus. Collectively, our results demonstrate a new type of ATP-dependent motion in the nucleus. We present a model where recycling splicing factors return as part of small sub-speckles from distal sites of RNA processing to larger splicing speckles by a directed ATP-driven mechanism through interchromatin spaces. PMID:26496460

  17. Cochlear nucleus whole mount explants promote the differentiation of neuronal stem cells from the cochlear nucleus in co-culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Jürgens, Lukas; Völker, Christine; Frenz, Silke; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Jablonka, Sibylle; Mlynski, Robert; Radeloff, Andreas; Hagen, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    The cochlear nucleus is the first brainstem nucleus to receive sensory input from the cochlea. Depriving this nucleus of auditory input leads to cellular and molecular disorganization which may potentially be counteracted by the activation or application of stem cells. Neuronal stem cells (NSCs) have recently been identified in the neonatal cochlear nucleus and a persistent neurogenic niche was demonstrated in this brainstem nucleus until adulthood. The present work investigates whether the neurogenic environment of the cochlear nucleus can promote the survival of engrafted NSCs and whether cochlear nucleus-derived NSCs can differentiate into neurons and glia in brain tissue. Therefore, cochlear nucleus whole-mount explants were co-cultured with NSCs extracted from either the cochlear nucleus or the hippocampus and compared to a second environment using whole-mount explants from the hippocampus. Factors that are known to induce neuronal differentiation were also investigated in these NSC-explant experiments. NSCs derived from the cochlear nucleus engrafted in the brain tissue and differentiated into all cells of the neuronal lineage. Hippocampal NSCs also immigrated in cochlear nucleus explants and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Laminin expression was up-regulated in the cochlear nucleus whole-mounts and regulated the in vitro differentiation of NSCs from the cochlear nucleus. These experiments confirm a neurogenic environment in the cochlear nucleus and the capacity of cochlear nucleus-derived NSCs to differentiate into neurons and glia. Consequently, the presented results provide a first step for the possible application of stem cells to repair the disorganization of the cochlear nucleus, which occurs after hearing loss. PMID:25960344

  18. Magnetic Manipulation of Nanorods in the Nucleus of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Celedon, Alfredo; Hale, Christopher M.; Wirtz, Denis

    2011-01-01

    The organization of chromatin in the cell nucleus is crucial for gene expression regulation. However, physically probing the nuclear interior is challenging because high forces have to be applied using minimally invasive techniques. Here, magnetic nanorods embedded in the nucleus of living cells are subjected to controlled rotational forces, producing micron-sized displacements in the nuclear interior. The resulting time-dependent rotation of the nanorods is analyzed in terms of viscoelastic parameters of the nucleus, in wild-type and Lamin A/C deficient cells. This method and analysis reveal that Lamin A/C knockout, together perhaps with other changes that result from the knockout, induce significant decreases in the nuclear viscosity and elasticity. PMID:22004741

  19. The Potential Roles of Actin in The Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Falahzadeh, Khadijeh; Banaei-Esfahani, Amir; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, actin’s presence in the nucleus has been demonstrated. Actin is a key protein necessary for different nuclear processes. Although actin is well known for its functional role in dynamic behavior of the cytoskeleton, emerging studies are now highlighting new roles for actin. At the present time there is no doubt about the presence of actin in the nucleus. A number of studies have uncovered the functional involvement of actin in nuclear processes. Actin as one of the nuclear components has its own structured and functional rules, such as nuclear matrix association, chromatin remodeling, transcription by RNA polymerases I, II, III and mRNA processing. In this historical review, we attempt to provide an overview of our current understanding of the functions of actin in the nucleus. PMID:25870830

  20. Brain networks modulated by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Ettore A; Herrojo Ruiz, Maria; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Draganski, Bogdan; Kühn, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Given the frequent occurrence of stimulation-induced affective and cognitive adverse effects, a better understanding about the role of the subthalamic nucleus in non-motor functions is needed. The main goal of this study is to characterize anatomical circuits modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation, and infer about the inner organization of the nucleus in terms of motor and non-motor areas. Given its small size and anatomical intersubject variability, functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus is difficult to investigate in vivo with current methods. Here, we used local field potential recordings obtained from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease to identify a subthalamic area with an analogous electrophysiological signature, namely a predominant beta oscillatory activity. The spatial accuracy was improved by identifying a single contact per macroelectrode for its vicinity to the electrophysiological source of the beta oscillation. We then conducted whole brain probabilistic tractography seeding from the previously identified contacts, and further described connectivity modifications along the macroelectrode's main axis. The designated subthalamic 'beta' area projected predominantly to motor and premotor cortical regions additional to connections to limbic and associative areas. More ventral subthalamic areas showed predominant connectivity to medial temporal regions including amygdala and hippocampus. We interpret our findings as evidence for the convergence of different functional circuits within subthalamic nucleus' portions deemed to be appropriate as deep brain stimulation target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Potential clinical implications of our study are illustrated by an index case where deep brain stimulation of estimated predominant non-motor subthalamic nucleus induced hypomanic behaviour. PMID

  1. Morphometric study of dentate nucleus of cerebellum in Bangladeshi cadaver.

    PubMed

    Haque, M A; Khalil, M; Sultana, S Z; Mannan, S; Uddin, M M; Hossain, M; Ara, A; Choudhury, S; Shammi, N J

    2015-01-01

    This cross sectional descriptive study was done by using nonprobability sampling technique and performed by examining 63 (sixty three) cerebellum. Out of them 40 postmortem human cerebellum collected from Bangladeshi cadavers of both sexes (male 25 and female 15) age ranging from 5 to 60 years and 23 cerebellums from caesarian section of intrauterine death cases of both sexes (male 14 and female 9) age ranging from 34 to 41 weeks of gestation. Specimens were collected from dead bodies autopsied on different dates from April' 2009 to September' 2009 at the autopsy laboratory of department of Forensic Medicine and prenatal cases from Gynaecology and Obstetrics Department of Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh. The collected specimens were grouped into three age groups like Group A (28 to 42 weeks of gestation), Group B (5 to 30 years) and Group C (31 to 60 years) and, two sex groups (male and female) and two sides (right and left). A transverse section was made at the level of horizontal fissure, and length and breadth of dentate nucleus were measured by divider and scale. The mean (±SD) length and breadth of dentate nucleus was 8.619±2.995mm and 14.770±3.604mm respectively and it was observed that length and breadth of dentate nucleus increased with age upto certain level then slightly decreased in the late age Group C. In this study, differences of the mean length of dentate nucleus on both right and left sides were statistically moderately significant between age Groups A&B. The differences of mean breadth of dentate nucleus on both right and left side were statistically highly significant between age Groups A&B and moderately significant between age Groups A&C on right side and only significant on left side. The differences between male & female were statistically insignificant in length and breadth of dentate nucleus. PMID:25725664

  2. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Tomasz; Juszczak, Cezary; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  3. Analysis of organic compounds in returned comet nucleus samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for analysis of organic compounds in returned comet nucleus samples are described. Interstellar, chondritic and transitional organic components are discussed. Appropriate sampling procedures will be essential to the success of these analyses. It will be necessary to return samples that represent all the various regimes found in the nucleus, e.g., a complete core, volatile components (deep interior), and crustal components (surface minerals, rocks, processed organics such as macromolecular carbon and polymers). Furthermore, sampling, storage, return, and distribution of samples must be done under conditions that preclude contamination of the samples by terrestrial matter.

  4. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  5. Figure Caption for pair of images of 'Comet Nucleus Q

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Figure Caption for pair of images of 'Comet Nucleus Q'. 21Jul94 Last Look at the Q-nuclei First image - March 30, 1994. Two Q-nuclei and a split nucleus, P. Second image - July 20, 1994. at T - 10 hours. Both nuclei still show no sign of further fragmentation, although the coma near each is being stretched out along the direction of motion. Both images were taken with the WFPC2 Planetary Camera using a red filter. Credit: H. A. Weaver and T. E. Smith

  6. Neutral current neutrino-nucleus interactions at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2009-04-01

    We present a QCD analysis of the neutral current (NC) neutrino-nucleus interaction at the small-x region using the color dipole formalism. This phenomenological approach is quite successful in describing experimental results in deep inelastic ep scattering and charged current neutrino-nucleus interactions at high energies. We present theoretical predictions for the relevant structure functions and the corresponding implications for the total NC neutrino cross section. It is shown that at small x, the NC boson-nucleon cross section should exhibit the geometric scaling property that has important consequences for ultrahigh energy neutrino phenomenology.

  7. Counting the number of correlated pairs in a nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Vanhalst, Maarten; Cosyn, Wim; Ryckebusch, Jan

    2011-09-15

    We suggest that the number of correlated nucleon pairs in an arbitrary nucleus can be estimated by counting the number of proton-neutron, proton-proton, and neutron-neutron pairs residing in a relative S state. We present numerical calculations of those amounts for the nuclei {sup 4}He, {sup 9}Be, {sup 12}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 63}Cu, {sup 108}Ag, and {sup 197}Au. The results are used to predict the values of the ratios of the per-nucleon electron-nucleus inelastic scattering cross section to the deuteron in the kinematic regime where correlations dominate.

  8. Examination of the fission time of the Z =120 nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikdar, A. K.; Ray, A.; Chatterjee, A.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the large difference in the measured lifetime for asymmetric fission of the highly excited (T ≈1.5 -MeV ) Z =120 nucleus as measured by the atomic techniques (crystal blocking and x-ray methods) with those measured by the nuclear techniques (mass-angle distribution and prefission neutron multiplicity) cannot be due to the different sensitivities of the atomic and nuclear techniques in different time domains. The claim of formation of a superheavy Z =120 nucleus with a high fission barrier on the basis of an observed long fission time by the atomic techniques is in direct conflict with all other available measurements and calculations.

  9. Hypertrophy of the Inferior Olivary Nucleus Impacts Perception of Gravity

    PubMed Central

    Tarnutzer, Alexander A.; Palla, Antonella; Marti, Sarah; Schuknecht, Bernhard; Straumann, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Interruption of the dentato-olivary projections, interconnecting the dentate nucleus (DN) and the contralateral inferior olivary nucleus (ION), is predicted to interfere with the DN’ role in estimating direction of gravity. In a patient with pendular nystagmus due to hypertrophy of the ION secondary to predominantly right-sided ponto-mesencephalic hemorrhage, perceived vertical shifted from clockwise to counter-clockwise deviations within 4 months. We hypothesize that synchronized oscillations of ION neurons induce a loss of inhibitory control, leading to hyperactivity of the contralateral DN and, as a result, to perceived vertical roll–tilt to the side of the over-active DN. PMID:22593754

  10. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  11. Scaling and asymptotic properties of evaporated neutron inclusive cross sections in high energy hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galoyan, A. S.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinsky, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    New properties of the evaporated neutron ( E < 30 MeV) energy spectra in hadron-nucleus interactions have been found. Particularly, the spectra approach the asymptotic regime, namely, they weakly depend on the collision energy at momenta of projectile protons larger than 5-6 GeV/ c; the spectra for various nuclei are similar, and can be approximately described by the function A n f( E). Experimental data on neutron spectra in the case of projectile π-mesons show analogous behavior, but the statistics of the data do not allow one to draw clear conclusions. In our analysis we used ITEP experimental data on inclusive cross sections of neutrons produced in interactions of π-mesons and protons with various nuclei in the energy range from 747 MeV up to 8.1 GeV. The observed properties allow one to predict neutron yields in the nucleus-nucleus interactions at high and super high energies. Predictions for the NICA/MPD experiment at JINR are presented. It is shown that the FTF (Fritiof)-model of the Geant4 toolkit qualitatively reproduces the observed regularities. For the first time estimates of the neutron energy flows are obtained at both RHIC and LHC energies.

  12. Changes of reactions of neurones in dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus to electroacupuncture by hypothalamic arcuate nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Q H; Mao, J R; Guo, S Y

    1988-01-01

    In this experiment the role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) in acupuncture analgesia and its mechanisms were studied with behavioural and electrophysiological methods. After ARC stimulation the analgesic effect of acupuncture was enhanced significantly and the responses of neurones to electroacupuncture were increased in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and reduced in the locus coeruleus (LC), which could be reversed by intraperitoneal injection of naloxone. The results indicate that ARC might participate in acupuncture analgesia via changing the responses of DR and LC neurones to electroacupuncture, a process in which opiate-like substances (probably beta-endorphin) are involved. PMID:3192102

  13. Active processes in cometary nucleus and new meteoroid swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadinov, Kh. I.; Buriev, A. M.; Safarov, A. G.; Rahmonov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Based on the catalogs of comets capable of nucleus splitting and comets with abnormal tail 30 short-Jupiter-family comets were identified, which are capable of producing meteoroid swarms that do not intersect the Earth's orbit, but are of interest for drafting of space missions and studying the distribution of meteoroid streams.

  14. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  15. Measuring neutrino-nucleus interactions with MINERνA

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, P. A.

    2015-07-15

    We present results from the MINERνA experiment for neutrino-nucleus scattering in the few-GeV energy region. These measurements cover a range of processes that must be modeled correctly in neutrino oscillation experiments, and in which recent results from other experiments have suggested deficiencies in the models currently used.

  16. Nucleus to Mitochondria: Lost in Transcription, Found in Translation.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Julie; Topisirovic, Ivan

    2016-06-20

    Mitochondrial genes reside in the nucleus and mitochondria. In a recent paper in Nature, Couvillion et al. (2016) describe their development of a "mitoribosome profiling" approach and demonstrate that changes in expression of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded genes are coordinated at the level of translation during metabolic adaptation to fuel source changes. PMID:27326927

  17. Brackett Gamma Imaging of the Nucleus of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosthwaite, L. P.; Turner, J. L.; Beck, S. C.; Meier, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    The gas-rich nucleus of barred spiral galaxy, M83, is a hotbed of star formation, with a total infrared luminosity of 4 X 109 Lo. We have observed the nucleus of M83 with the near infrared spectrometer, NIRSPEC, on Keck 2 to obtain high resolution Brγ recombination line spectra of the nucleus. Simultaneous imaging with the SCAM camera in a broadband K filter shows the position of the slit on the near-infrared galaxy. This allows us to map the nucleus with a continuum reference. The SCAM image shows a bright peak at the nucleus and a complex semi-circular arc of emission to the southwest. We stepped the 0.5'' X 24'' length slit in small declination increments to map a 20'' X 20'' region just west of the nucleus. Individual spectra were used to form a ra-dec-lambda cube and an integrated intensity map of Brγ . A total of 1.1 X 10-16 W m-2 of Brγ emission is detected in the map, in good agreement with previous low resolution observations (Turner, Ho, & Beck 1987, ApJ, 313, 644). This is not corrected for extinction within the molecular clouds in M83 or to the nebulae themselves and is therefore a lower limit to the true Brγ flux. Extinction is estimated to be at least a magnitude in the near-IR as measured in larger (4'') beams (Turner et al.) The bulk of the Brγ emission extends along the northern portion of the near-IR continuum semi-circle. Twenty percent of the total Brγ emission comes from single a 3'' (FWHM) source located 5'' west of the near-IR nucleus. The complementary NIRSPEC Brα data we have obtained will eventually allow us to evaluate the near-IR extinction on subarcsecond sizescales and obtain an extinction-corrected estimate of the Lyman continuum rate and therefore the number of ionizing stars.

  18. Morphometric analysis of the supraoptic nucleus in the human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, M A; Goudsmit, E; Purba, J S; Swaab, D F

    1990-01-01

    The supraoptic nucleus (SON) in the human hypothalamus is an elongated, densely packed collection of large neurosecretory cells. The size, shape and cellular morphology of the dorsolateral part of the SON was examined in relation to sex and age in adult subjects. In this region, the following parameters were measured: length of the rostrocaudal axis, maximum cross-sectional area, volume, numerical cell density, total cell number and the mean diameter of the cell nuclei. No sexual differences were observed in any of these parameters with the exception that males have a more elongated SON than females. In contrast to absolute size, sex-linked differences were found in the way the morphometric parameters are interrelated. Of the parameters investigated, only the number of cells in the SON showed significant changes with ageing. A striking increase in the total number of cells, by about 30%, was found between 40 and 65 years of age. A further increase in cell number was observed after the age of 65 years, as a result of which the nucleus contained, on average, 1.4 times as many cells in old subjects (65-90 years) as in young individuals (20-40 years). These findings suggest that a substantial proliferation of glial cells takes place in the human supraoptic nucleus with advancing age. Finally, the morphology of the SON was compared with that of other hypothalamic regions--the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the paraventricular nucleus (PVN)--using the same material as that used in previous investigations in this series (Hofman et al. 1988; Hofman & Swaab, 1989). PMID:2272907

  19. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion) forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete "territories" for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a "crumpled globule" with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates). This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter-intuitive consequences.

  20. Cytoskeletal tension induces the polarized architecture of the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a thin filamentous meshwork that provides mechanical support to the nucleus and regulates essential cellular processes such as DNA replication, chromatin organization, cell division, and differentiation. Isolated horizontal imaging using fluorescence and electron microscopy has long suggested that the nuclear lamina is composed of structurally different A-type and B-type lamin proteins and nuclear lamin-associated membrane proteins that together form a thin layer that is spatially isotropic with no apparent difference in molecular content or density between the top and bottom of the nucleus. Chromosomes are condensed differently along the radial direction from the periphery of the nucleus to the nuclear center; therefore, chromatin accessibility for gene expression is different along the nuclear radius. However, 3D confocal reconstruction reveals instead that major lamin protein lamin A/C forms an apically polarized Frisbee-like dome structure in the nucleus of adherent cells. Here we show that both A-type lamins and transcriptionally active chromatins are vertically polarized by the tension exercised by the perinuclear actin cap (or actin cap) that is composed of highly contractile actomyosin fibers organized at the apical surface of the nucleus. Mechanical coupling between actin cap and lamina through LINC (linkers of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) protein complexes induces an apical distribution of transcription-active subnucleolar compartments and epigenetic markers of transcription-active genes. This study reveals that intranuclear structures, such as nuclear lamina and chromosomal architecture, are apically polarized through the extranuclear perinuclear actin cap in a wide range of somatic adherent cells. PMID:25701041

  1. Responses of primate caudal parabrachial nucleus and Kolliker-fuse nucleus neurons to whole body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaban, Carey D.; McGee, David M.; Zhou, Jianxun; Scudder, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The caudal aspect of the parabrachial (PBN) and Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nuclei receive vestibular nuclear and visceral afferent information and are connected reciprocally with the spinal cord, hypothalamus, amygdala, and limbic cortex. Hence, they may be important sites of vestibulo-visceral integration, particularly for the development of affective responses to gravitoinertial challenges. Extracellular recordings were made from caudal PBN cells in three alert, adult female Macaca nemestrina through an implanted chamber. Sinusoidal and position trapezoid angular whole body rotation was delivered in yaw, roll, pitch, and vertical semicircular canal planes. Sites were confirmed histologically. Units that responded during rotation were located in lateral and medial PBN and KF caudal to the trochlear nerve at sites that were confirmed anatomically to receive superior vestibular nucleus afferents. Responses to whole-body angular rotation were modeled as a sum of three signals: angular velocity, a leaky integration of angular velocity, and vertical position. All neurons displayed angular velocity and integrated angular velocity sensitivity, but only 60% of the neurons were position-sensitive. These responses to vertical rotation could display symmetric, asymmetric, or fully rectified cosinusoidal spatial tuning about a best orientation in different cells. The spatial properties of velocity and integrated velocity and position responses were independent for all position-sensitive neurons; the angular velocity and integrated angular velocity signals showed independent spatial tuning in the position-insensitive neurons. Individual units showed one of three different orientations of their excitatory axis of velocity rotation sensitivity: vertical-plane-only responses, positive elevation responses (vertical plane plus ipsilateral yaw), and negative elevation axis responses (vertical plane plus negative yaw). The interactions between the velocity and integrated velocity components

  2. Semiphenomenological method of analysis for intermediate-energy alpha-nucleus elastic scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Alvi, M.A.

    1983-12-01

    We propose a semiphenomenological method of analysis for intermediate energy ..cap alpha..-nucleus elastic scattering experiments and demonstrate its usefulness by analyzing available elastic ..cap alpha..-nucleus scattering data at 1.37 GeV.

  3. Development of injectable hydrogels for nucleus pulposus replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jonathan D.

    Intervertebral disc degeneration has been reported as the underlying cause for 75% of cases of lower back pain and is marked by dehydration of the nucleus pulposus within the intervertebral disc. There have been many implant designs to replace the nucleus pulposus. Some researchers have proposed the replacement of the nucleus pulposus with hydrogel materials. The insertion of devices made from these materials further compromises the annulus of the disc. An ideal nucleus replacement could be injected into the disc space and form a solid in vivo. However, injectable replacements using curing elastomers and thermoplastic materials are not ideal because of the potentially harmful exothermic heat evolved from their reactions and the toxicity of the reactants used. We propose a hydrogel system that can be injected as a liquid at 25°C and solidified to yield a hydrogel within the intervertebral disc at 37°C. In aqueous solutions, these polymers have Lower Critical Solution Temperatures (LCST) between 25-37°C, making them unique candidate materials for this application. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) is the most widely studied LCST polymer due to its drastic transition near body temperature. However, by itself, pure PNIPAAm forms a hydrogel that has low water content and can readily undergo plastic deformation. To increase the water content and impart elasticity to PNIPAAm hydrogels, grafted and branched hydrogel systems were created that incorporated the thermogelling PNIPAAm and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). In this research, the effects of polymer composition and monomer to initiator ratio, which controls polymer MW, on the in vitro swelling properties (mass, chemical, and compressive mechanical stability) of hydrogels formed from aqueous solutions of these polymers were evaluated. Immersion studies were also conducted in solutions to simulate the osmotic environment of the nucleus pulposus. The effects of repeated compression and unloading cycles

  4. The Nucleus of Translating as One Critical Concern in Translation Pedagogy and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen Chau

    1999-01-01

    Studies the translation of nonliterary texts. The objective is to associate the nucleus of translating with the value of a source-language text, advancing the claim that appropriately translating the nucleus is among the most important concerns, and to propose an approach to assessment for translation quality based on how the nucleus is rendered.…

  5. Towards a Deeper Understanding of the Nucleus with Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormand, Erich

    2006-10-01

    Despite more than fifty years of study, many questions about now nuclei are put together remain. While nuclei near the valley of stability have provided a wealth of information, they are not sufficient to provide us with a comprehensive and unified description of the nucleus. Especially lacking is an accurate picture of those exotic species that are the basis of cosmic alchemy. The missing pieces in the puzzle can be filled in with a determined experimental and theoretical effort focusing on nuclei lying far from the valley of stability. Here, I will outline the intellectual challenges that can be addressed by proposed exotic-beam facilities, and how new experimental data will quide and refine theoretical descriptions of the nucleus.

  6. The cellular mastermind(?) – Mechanotransduction and the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Ashley; Fedorchak, Gregory R.; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimulation by activation of specific signaling pathways and genes that allow the cell to adapt to its dynamic physical environment. How cells sense the various mechanical inputs and translate them into biochemical signals remains an area of active investigation. Recent reports suggest that the cell nucleus may be directly implicated in this cellular mechanotransduction process. In this chapter, we discuss how forces applied to the cell surface and cytoplasm induce changes in nuclear structure and organization, which could directly affect gene expression, while also highlighting the complex interplay between nuclear structural proteins and transcriptional regulators that may further modulate mechanotransduction signaling. Taken together, these findings paint a picture of the nucleus as a central hub in cellular mechanotransduction—both structurally and biochemically—with important implications in physiology and disease. PMID:25081618

  7. Physical plasticity of the nucleus and its manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ivanovska, Irena; Swift, Joe; Harada, Takamasa; Pajerowski, J David; Discher, Dennis E

    2010-01-01

    The genome is virtually identical in all cells within an organism, with epigenetic changes contributing largely to the plasticity in gene expression during both development and aging. These changes include covalent modifications of chromatin components and altered chromatin organization as well as changes in other nuclear components, such as nuclear envelope lamins. Given that DNA in each chromosome is centimeters long and dozens of chromosomes are compacted into a microns-diameter nucleus through non-trivial interactions with the bounding envelope, the polymer physics of such a structure under stress can be complex but perhaps systematic. We summarize micromanipulation methods for measuring the physical plasticity of the nucleus, with recent studies documenting the extreme flexibility of human embryonic stem cells and the rigidification in model aging of progerin-type nuclei. Lamin-A/C is a common molecular factor, and methods are presented for its knockdown and measurement. PMID:20816236

  8. Neutrino-nucleus interactions at the LBNF near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2015-10-15

    The reaction mechanisms for neutrino interactions with an {sup 40}Ar nucleus with the LBNF flux are calculated with the Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) transport-theoretical implementation of these interactions. Quasielastic scattering, many-body effects, pion production and absorption and Deep Inelastic Scattering are discussed; they all play a role at the LBNF energies and are experimentally entangled with each other. Quasielastic scattering makes up for only about 1/3 of the total cross section whereas pion production channels make up about 2/3 of the total. This underlines the need for a consistent description of the neutrino-nucleus reaction that treats all channels on an equal, consistent footing. The results discussed here can also serve as useful guideposts for the Intermediate Neutrino Program.

  9. Triple F - A Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kueppers, Michael; Keller, H. U.; Kuehrt, E.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Altwegg, K.; Bertrand, R.; Busemann, H.; Capria, M. T.; Colangeli, L.; Davidsson, B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Knollenberg, J.; Mottola, S.; Weiss, P.; Zolensky, M.; Akim, E.; Basilevsky, A.; Galimov, E.; Gerasimov, M.; Korablev, O.; Charnley, S.; Nittler, L. R.; Sandford, S.; Weissman, P.

    2008-01-01

    The Triple F (Fresh From the Fridge) mission, a Comet Nucleus Sample Return, has been proposed to ESA's Cosmic Vision program. A sample return from a comet enables us to reach the ultimate goal of cometary research. Since comets are the least processed bodies in the solar system, the proposal goes far beyond cometary science topics (like the explanation of cometary activity) and delivers invaluable information about the formation of the solar system and the interstellar molecular cloud from which it formed. The proposed mission would extract three sample cores of the upper 50 cm from three locations on a cometary nucleus and return them cooled to Earth for analysis in the laboratory. The simple mission concept with a touch-andgo sampling by a single spacecraft was proposed as an M-class mission in collaboration with the Russian space agency ROSCOSMOS.

  10. Triple F - A Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kueppers, Michael; Keller, Horst Uwe; Kuhrt, Ekkehard; A'Hearn, Michael; Altwegg, Kathrin; Betrand, Regis; Busemann, Henner; Capria, Maria Teresa; Colangeli, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    The Triple F (Fresh From the Fridge) mission, a Comet Nucleus Sample Return, has been proposed to ESA s Cosmic Vision program. A sample return from a comet enables us to reach the ultimate goal of cometary research. Since comets are the least processed bodies in the solar system, the proposal goes far beyond cometary science topics (like the explanation of cometary activity) and delivers invaluable information about the formation of the solar system and the interstellar molecular cloud from which it formed. The proposed mission would extract three samples of the upper 50 cm from three locations on a cometary nucleus and return them cooled to Earth for analysis in the laboratory. The simple mission concept with a touch-and-go sampling by a single spacecraft was proposed as an M-class mission in collaboration with the Russian space agency ROSCOSMOS.

  11. Maps of interaural delay in the owl's nucleus laminaris.

    PubMed

    Carr, Catherine E; Shah, Sahil; McColgan, Thomas; Ashida, Go; Kuokkanen, Paula T; Brill, Sandra; Kempter, Richard; Wagner, Hermann

    2015-09-01

    Axons from the nucleus magnocellularis form a presynaptic map of interaural time differences (ITDs) in the nucleus laminaris (NL). These inputs generate a field potential that varies systematically with recording position and can be used to measure the map of ITDs. In the barn owl, the representation of best ITD shifts with mediolateral position in NL, so as to form continuous, smoothly overlapping maps of ITD with iso-ITD contours that are not parallel to the NL border. Frontal space (0°) is, however, represented throughout and thus overrepresented with respect to the periphery. Measurements of presynaptic conduction delay, combined with a model of delay line conduction velocity, reveal that conduction delays can account for the mediolateral shifts in the map of ITD. PMID:26224776

  12. Maps of interaural delay in the owl's nucleus laminaris

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sahil; McColgan, Thomas; Ashida, Go; Kuokkanen, Paula T.; Brill, Sandra; Kempter, Richard; Wagner, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Axons from the nucleus magnocellularis form a presynaptic map of interaural time differences (ITDs) in the nucleus laminaris (NL). These inputs generate a field potential that varies systematically with recording position and can be used to measure the map of ITDs. In the barn owl, the representation of best ITD shifts with mediolateral position in NL, so as to form continuous, smoothly overlapping maps of ITD with iso-ITD contours that are not parallel to the NL border. Frontal space (0°) is, however, represented throughout and thus overrepresented with respect to the periphery. Measurements of presynaptic conduction delay, combined with a model of delay line conduction velocity, reveal that conduction delays can account for the mediolateral shifts in the map of ITD. PMID:26224776

  13. Direct observation of nanoparticle-cancer cell nucleus interactions.

    PubMed

    Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Lee, Jung Heon; Sisco, Patrick N; Co, Dick T; Zhang, Ming; Wasielewski, Michael R; Odom, Teri W

    2012-04-24

    We report the direct visualization of interactions between drug-loaded nanoparticles and the cancer cell nucleus. Nanoconstructs composed of nucleolin-specific aptamers and gold nanostars were actively transported to the nucleus and induced major changes to the nuclear phenotype via nuclear envelope invaginations near the site of the construct. The number of local deformations could be increased by ultrafast, light-triggered release of the aptamers from the surface of the gold nanostars. Cancer cells with more nuclear envelope folding showed increased caspase 3 and 7 activity (apoptosis) as well as decreased cell viability. This newly revealed correlation between drug-induced changes in nuclear phenotype and increased therapeutic efficacy could provide new insight for nuclear-targeted cancer therapy. PMID:22424173

  14. Triple F—a comet nucleus sample return mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küppers, Michael; Keller, H. U.; Kührt, E.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Altwegg, K.; Bertrand, R.; Busemann, H.; Capria, M. T.; Colangeli, L.; Davidsson, B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Knollenberg, J.; Mottola, S.; Rathke, A.; Weiss, P.; Zolensky, M.; Akim, E.; Basilevsky, A.; Galimov, E.; Gerasimov, M.; Korablev, O.; Lomakin, I.; Marov, M.; Martynov, M.; Nazarov, M.; Zakharov, A.; Zelenyi, L.; Aronica, A.; Ball, A. J.; Barbieri, C.; Bar-Nun, A.; Benkhoff, J.; Biele, J.; Biver, N.; Blum, J.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Botta, O.; Bredehöft, J.-H.; Capaccioni, F.; Charnley, S.; Cloutis, E.; Cottin, H.; Cremonese, G.; Crovisier, J.; Crowther, S. A.; Epifani, E. M.; Esposito, F.; Ferrari, A. C.; Ferri, F.; Fulle, M.; Gilmour, J.; Goesmann, F.; Gortsas, N.; Green, S. F.; Groussin, O.; Grün, E.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Hartogh, P.; Henkel, T.; Hilchenbach, M.; Ho, T.-M.; Horneck, G.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jäckel, A.; Jessberger, E.; Kallenbach, R.; Kargl, G.; Kömle, N. I.; Korth, A.; Kossacki, K.; Krause, C.; Krüger, H.; Li, Z.-Y.; Licandro, J.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Lowry, S. C.; Lyon, I.; Magni, G.; Mall, U.; Mann, I.; Markiewicz, W.; Martins, Z.; Maurette, M.; Meierhenrich, U.; Mennella, V.; Ng, T. C.; Nittler, L. R.; Palumbo, P.; Pätzold, M.; Prialnik, D.; Rengel, M.; Rickman, H.; Rodriguez, J.; Roll, R.; Rost, D.; Rotundi, A.; Sandford, S.; Schönbächler, M.; Sierks, H.; Srama, R.; Stroud, R. M.; Szutowicz, S.; Tornow, C.; Ulamec, S.; Wallis, M.; Waniak, W.; Weissman, P.; Wieler, R.; Wurz, P.; Yung, K. L.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2009-03-01

    The Triple F ( Fresh From the Fridge) mission, a Comet Nucleus Sample Return, has been proposed to ESA’s Cosmic Vision program. A sample return from a comet enables us to reach the ultimate goal of cometary research. Since comets are the least processed bodies in the solar system, the proposal goes far beyond cometary science topics (like the explanation of cometary activity) and delivers invaluable information about the formation of the solar system and the interstellar molecular cloud from which it formed. The proposed mission would extract three sample cores of the upper 50 cm from three locations on a cometary nucleus and return them cooled to Earth for analysis in the laboratory. The simple mission concept with a touch-and-go sampling by a single spacecraft was proposed as an M-class mission in collaboration with the Russian space agency ROSCOSMOS.

  15. Theoretical description of the decay chain of the nucleus 294118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiczewski, Adam

    2016-09-01

    The decay chain of the nucleus 294118, the heaviest nucleus observed (at JINR-Dubna) up to now, is analyzed theoretically. The α-decay energies {Q}α , the α-decay and the spontaneous-fission half-lives, {T}α and {T}{{sf}}, are studied. The analysis of the α decay is based on a phenomenological model using only three parameters. The calculations are performed in three variants using masses obtained with three nuclear-mass models accurately describing masses of heaviest nuclei. The experimental {Q}α energies are reconstructed with the average of the absolute values of the discrepancies: 180 keV, 270 keV and 290 keV, in the three variants considered. Measured half-lives {T}α are reproduced within the average ratios: 2.9, 9.8 and 5.2 in these variants.

  16. Cell autonomy and synchrony of suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian oscillators.

    PubMed

    Mohawk, Jennifer A; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2011-07-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the site of the master circadian pacemaker in mammals. The individual cells of the SCN are capable of functioning independently from one another and therefore must form a cohesive circadian network through intercellular coupling. The network properties of the SCN lead to coordination of circadian rhythms among its neurons and neuronal subpopulations. There is increasing evidence for multiple interconnected oscillators within the SCN, and in this review we will highlight recent advances in our knowledge of the complex organization and function of the cellular and network-level SCN clock. Understanding the way in which synchrony is achieved between cells in the SCN will provide insight into the means by which this important nucleus orchestrates circadian rhythms throughout the organism. PMID:21665298

  17. Cell Autonomy and Synchrony of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Circadian Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Mohawk, Jennifer A.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the site of the master circadian pacemaker in mammals. The individual cells of the SCN are capable of functioning independently from one another and therefore must form a cohesive circadian network through intercellular coupling. The network properties of the SCN lead to coordination of circadian rhythms among its neurons and neuronal subpopulations. There is increasing evidence for multiple interconnected oscillators within the SCN, and in this Review, we will highlight recent advances in our understanding of the complex organization and function of the cellular and network-level SCN clock. Understanding the way in which synchrony is achieved between cells in the SCN will provide insight into the means by which this important nucleus orchestrates circadian rhythms throughout the organism. PMID:21665298

  18. Progressive activation of paratrigeminal nucleus during entrance to hibernation

    SciTech Connect

    Kilduff, T.S.; Sharp, F.R.; Heller, H.C. Univ. of California, San Francisco Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Francisco, CA )

    1988-07-01

    The paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5) undergoes a progressive increase in its uptake of 2-({sup 14}C)deoxyglucose (2DG) relative to other brain structures during entrance to hibernation in the ground squirrel. This highly significant increase results in the Pa5 becoming the most highly labeled brain region during hibernation, even though it exhibits one of the lowest levels of 2DG uptake in the brain during the nonhibernating state. The progressive activation of the Pa5 observed during entrance is reversed during arousal from hibernation. These observations and the neuroanatomical projections of the Pa5 implicate this nucleus as playing a role in the entrance and maintenance of the hibernating state.

  19. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) Studies of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1997-01-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) studies have been carried out on organic and inorganic free radicals generated by gamma-ray and/or UV-irradiation and trapped in ice matrices. It is suggested that the concentration of these free radicals together with their thermal stability can be used as an accurate built-in geothermometer and radiation probe for returned comet nucleus sample studies. ESR studies have also been carried out on paramagnetic (Mn(2+), Ti(3+), and Fe(3+)) and ferromagnetic (ferric oxide and metallic iron) centers known to be present in terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples. The presence or absence of these magnetic centers coupled with their characteristic ESR lineshape can be used to investigate the shock effects, quenching/cooling rate and oxidation-reduction conditions in the formation and subsequent evolution of returned comet nucleus samples.

  20. The identification of musical instruments through nucleus cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Grasmeder, M L; Lutman, M E

    2006-09-01

    In this study, self-reported ability to recognize musical instruments was investigated by means of a questionnaire, which was sent to a group of adult Nucleus cochlear implant users and a group of normally hearing subjects. In addition, spectrograms and electrodograms were produced and analysed for samples of music played on 10 different musical instruments. Self-reported ability to recognize some instruments was poor in the group of implant users, particularly for the saxophone, tuba and clarinet. Electrodograms showed that these instruments could only be identified using distorted spectral information or reduced temporal information. Other instruments, such as the drum and piano, could be identified using temporal information. Limited spectral resolution makes the recognition of musical instruments difficult for Nucleus implant users. PMID:18792382

  1. Organotypic slice culture of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of rat

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Seong; Lee, So Yeong; Park, Jae-Yong; Hong, Seong-Geun

    2007-01-01

    Organotypic slice cultures have been developed as an alternative to acute brain slices because the neuronal viability and synaptic connectivity in these cultures can be preserved well for a prolonged period of time. This study evaluated a stationary organotypic slice culture developed for the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rat. The results showed that the slice cultures maintain the typical shape of the nucleus, the immunocytochemical signals for oxytocin, vasopressin, and corticotropin-releasing hormone, and the electrophysiological properties of PVN neurons for up to 3 weeks in vitro. The PVN neurons in the culture expressed the green fluorescent protein gene that had been delivered by the adenoviral vectors. The results indicate that the cultured slices preserve the properties of the PVN neurons, and can be used in longterm studies on these neurons in vitro. PMID:17322769

  2. Doubly magic nucleus (108)(270)Hs162.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, J; Brüchle, W; Chelnokov, M; Dressler, R; Düllmann, Ch E; Eberhardt, K; Gorshkov, V; Jäger, E; Krücken, R; Kuznetsov, A; Nagame, Y; Nebel, F; Novackova, Z; Qin, Z; Schädel, M; Schausten, B; Schimpf, E; Semchenkov, A; Thörle, P; Türler, A; Wegrzecki, M; Wierczinski, B; Yakushev, A; Yeremin, A

    2006-12-15

    Theoretical calculations predict 270Hs (Z=108, N=162) to be a doubly magic deformed nucleus, decaying mainly by alpha-particle emission. In this work, based on a rapid chemical isolation of Hs isotopes produced in the 26Mg+248Cm reaction, we observed 15 genetically linked nuclear decay chains. Four chains were attributed to the new nuclide 270Hs, which decays by alpha-particle emission with Qalpha=9.02+/-0.03 MeV to 266Sg which undergoes spontaneous fission with a half-life of 444(-148)(+444) ms. A production cross section of about 3 pb was measured for 270Hs. Thus, 270Hs is the first nucleus for which experimental nuclear decay properties have become available for comparison with theoretical predictions of the N=162 shell stability. PMID:17280272

  3. Neutrino magnetic moment effects in neutrino nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Athar, M.S.

    1995-10-01

    Some low energy neutrino nucleus reactions induced by neutrinos (antineutrinos) having a magnetic moment of the order of 10{sup {minus}9}{minus}10{sup {minus}10} Bohr magneton are studied. It is found that in the case of {sup 4}He, {sup 12}C, and {sup 16}O, the detection of very low energy scalar and isoscalar elastic and inelastic reactions induced by the isoscalar vector currents can provide a better limit on the neutrino magnetic moment.

  4. Study of Comet Nucleus Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Penetration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. L.; Amundsen, R. J.; Beardsley, R. W.; Cash, R. H.; Clark, B. C.; Knight, T. C. D.; Martin, J. P.; Monti, P.; Outteridge, D. A.; Plaster, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A penetrator system has been suggested as an approach for making in situ measurements of the composition and physical properties of the nucleus of a comet. This study has examined in detail the feasibility of implementing the penetrator concept. The penetrator system and mission designs have been developed and iterated in sufficient detail to provide a high level of confidence that the concept can be implemented within the constraints of the Mariner Mark 2 spacecraft.

  5. Methods and compositions for targeting macromolecules into the nucleus

    DOEpatents

    Chook, Yuh Min

    2013-06-25

    The present invention includes compositions, methods and kits for directing an agent across the nuclear membrane of a cell. The present invention includes a Karyopherin beta2 translocation motif in a polypeptide having a slightly positively charged region or a slightly hydrophobic region and one or more R/K/H-X.sub.(2-5)-P-Y motifs. The polypeptide targets the agent into the cell nucleus.

  6. Theory and phenomenology of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Gail

    2015-07-15

    We review the theory and phenomenology of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEνNS). After a brief introduction, we summarize the places where CEνNS is already in use and then turn to future physics opportunities from CEνNS. CEνNS has been proposed as a way to limit or discover beyond the standard model physics, measure the nuclear-neutron radius and constrain the Weinberg angle.

  7. Emission of charged particles from excited compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2010-11-24

    The formation and decay of excited compound nucleus are studied within the dinuclear system model[1]. The cross sections of complex fragment emission are calculated and compared with experimental data for the reactions {sup 3}He+{sup 108}Ag, {sup 78,82}Kr+{sup 12}C. Angular momentum dependence of cluster emission in {sup 78}Kr+{sup 12}C and {sup 40}Ca+{sup 78}Kr reactions is demonstrated.

  8. mRNA-Producing Pseudo-nucleus System.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Shin, Woo Jung; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-11-01

    A pseudo-eukaryotic nucleus (PEN) system consisting of a gene-containing DNA hydrogel encapsulated in a liposome is fabricated. Owing to the structural characteristics of gene-containing DNA hydrogel, mRNA transcription efficiency is promoted 2.57-fold. Through the use of PEN as a platform for mRNA delivery to the cytosol, prolonged protein translation is achieved. PMID:26310990

  9. Increased R2* in the Caudate Nucleus of Asymptomatic Welders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Young; Flynn, Michael R; Du, Guangwei; Li, Yunqing; Lewis, Mechelle M; Herring, Amy H; Van Buren, Eric; Van Buren, Scott; Kong, Lan; Fry, Rebecca C; Snyder, Amanda M; Connor, James R; Yang, Qing X; Mailman, Richard B; Huang, Xuemei

    2016-04-01

    Welding has been associated with neurobehavioral disorders. Welding fumes contain several metals including copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and iron (Fe) that may interact to influence welding-related neurotoxicity. Although welding-related airborne Fe levels are about 10-fold higher than Mn, previous studies have focused on Mn and its accumulation in the basal ganglia. This study examined differences in the apparent transverse relaxation rates [R2* (1/T2*), estimate of Fe accumulation] in the basal ganglia (caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus) between welders and controls, and the dose-response relationship between estimated Fe exposure and R2* values. Occupational questionnaires estimated recent and lifetime Fe exposure, and blood Fe levels and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained. Complete exposure and MRI R2* and R1 (1/T1: measure to estimate Mn accumulation) data from 42 subjects with welding exposure and 29 controls were analyzed. Welders had significantly greater exposure metrics and higher whole-blood Fe levels compared with controls. R2* in the caudate nucleus was significantly higher in welders after controlling for age, body mass index, respirator use, caudate R1, and blood metals of Cu and Mn, whereas there was no difference in R1 values in the basal ganglia between groups. The R2* in the caudate nucleus was positively correlated with whole-blood Fe concentration. This study provides the first evidence of higher R2* in the caudate nucleus of welders, which is suggestive of increased Fe accumulation in this area. Further studies are needed to replicate the findings and determine the neurobehavioral relevance. PMID:26769335

  10. Attention alters orientation processing in the human lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ling, Sam; Pratte, Michael S; Tong, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Orientation selectivity is a cornerstone property of vision, commonly believed to emerge in the primary visual cortex. We found that reliable orientation information could be detected even earlier, in the human lateral geniculate nucleus, and that attentional feedback selectively altered these orientation responses. This attentional modulation may allow the visual system to modify incoming feature-specific signals at the earliest possible processing site. PMID:25730671

  11. Attention alters orientation processing in the human lateral geniculate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Sam; Pratte, Michael; Tong, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Orientation selectivity is a cornerstone property of vision, commonly believed to emerge in the primary visual cortex (V1). Here, we demonstrate that reliable orientation information can be detected even earlier, in the human lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), and that attentional feedback selectively alters these orientation responses. This attentional modulation may allow the visual system to modify incoming feature-specific signals at the earliest possible processing site. PMID:25730671

  12. Hidden Glashow resonance in neutrino-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhanov, I.

    2016-05-01

    Today it is widely believed that s-channel excitation of an on-shell W boson, commonly known as the Glashow resonance, can be initiated in matter only by the electron antineutrino in the process νbaree- →W- at the laboratory energy around 6.3 PeV. In this Letter we argue that the Glashow resonance within the Standard Model also occurs in neutrino-nucleus collisions. The main conclusions are as follows. 1) The Glashow resonance can be excited by both neutrinos and antineutrinos of all the three flavors scattering in the Coulomb field of a nucleus. 2) The Glashow resonance in a neutrino-nucleus reaction does not manifest itself as a Breit-Wigner-like peak in the cross section but the latter exhibits instead a slow logarithmic-law growth with the neutrino energy. The resonance turns thus out to be hidden. 3) More than 98% of W bosons produced in the sub-PeV region in neutrino-initiated reactions in water/ice will be from the Glashow resonance. 4) The vast majority of the Glashow resonance events in a neutrino detector are expected at energies from a few TeV to a few tens of TeV, being mostly initiated by the conventional atmospheric neutrinos dominant in this energy range. Calculations of the cross sections for Glashow resonance excitation on the oxygen nucleus as well as on the proton are carried out in detail. The results of this Letter can be useful for studies of neutrino interactions at large volume water/ice neutrino detectors. For example, in the IceCube detector one can expect 0.3 Glashow resonance events with shower-like topologies and the deposited energies above 300 TeV per year. It is therefore likely already to have at least one Glashow resonance event in the IceCube data set.

  13. The Ionization Source in the Nucleus of M84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, G. A.; Green, R. F.; Quillen, A. C.; Danks, A.; Malumuth, E. M.; Gull, T.; Woodgate, B.; Hutchings, J.; Joseph, C.; Kaiser, M. E.

    2000-01-01

    We have obtained new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of M84, a nearby massive elliptical galaxy whose nucleus contains a approximately 1.5 X 10(exp 9) solar mass dark compact object, which presumably is a supermassive black hole. Our Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectrum provides the first clear detection of emission lines in the blue (e.g., [0 II] lambda 3727, HBeta and [0 III] lambda lambda4959,5007), which arise from a compact region approximately 0".28 across centered on the nucleus. Our Near Infrared Camera and MultiObject Spectrometer (NICMOS) images exhibit the best view through the prominent dust lanes evident at optical wavelengths and provide a more accurate correction for the internal extinction. The relative fluxes of the emission lines we have detected in the blue together with those detected in the wavelength range 6295 - 6867 A by Bower et al. indicate that the gas at the nucleus is photoionized by a nonstellar process, instead of hot stars. Stellar absorption features from cool stars at the nucleus are very weak. We update the spectral energy distribution of the nuclear point source and find that although it is roughly flat in most bands, the optical to UV continuum is very red, similar to the spectral energy distribution of BL Lac. Thus, the nuclear point source seen in high-resolution optical images is not a star cluster but is instead a nonstellar source. Assuming isotropic emission from this source, we estimate that the ratio of bolometric luminosity to Eddington luminosity is about 5 x 10(exp -7). However, this could be underestimated if this source is a misaligned BL Lac object, which is a possibility suggested by the spectral energy distribution and the evidence of optical variability we describe.

  14. Exotic atoms, K-nucleus scattering and hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P. D.

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in exotic atom physics, kaon-nucleus scattering, and hypernuclear physics is reviewed. Specific problems discussed include searches for muon-nucleon interactions beyond QED, a comparison of data and recent calculation of K/sup + -/ + /sup 12/C elastic and inelastic scattering, as well as recent studies of ..sigma.. and ..lambda.. hypernuclei including new data on the level structure of /sup 13/C/..lambda...

  15. DIS on a large nucleus in AdS/CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2008-07-01

    We calculate the total cross section for deep inelastic scattering (DIS) on a nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled Script N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. In analogy to the small coupling case we argue that at high energy the total DIS cross section is related to the expectation value of the Wilson loop formed by the quark-antiquark dipole. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS5. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS5 shock wave. We find three extrema of the Nambu-Goto action: the string coordinates at the extrema are complex-valued and are given by three different branches of the solution of a cubic equation. The physically meaningful solutions for the total DIS cross section are given either by the only branch with a purely imaginary string coordinate in the bulk or by a superposition of the two other branches. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale, while energy-dependent at lower energies, at very high energy becomes independent of energy/Bjorken-x. The saturation scale depends very strongly on the atomic number of the nucleus as Qs ~ A1/3.

  16. Hidden Glashow resonance in neutrino-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhanov, I.

    2016-05-01

    Today it is widely believed that s-channel excitation of an on-shell W boson, commonly known as the Glashow resonance, can be initiated in matter only by the electron antineutrino in the process νbaree- →W- at the laboratory energy around 6.3 PeV. In this Letter we argue that the Glashow resonance within the Standard Model also occurs in neutrino-nucleus collisions. The main conclusions are as follows. 1) The Glashow resonance can be excited by both neutrinos and antineutrinos of all the three flavors scattering in the Coulomb field of a nucleus. 2) The Glashow resonance in a neutrino-nucleus reaction does not manifest itself as a Breit-Wigner-like peak in the cross section but the latter exhibits instead a slow logarithmic-law growth with the neutrino energy. The resonance turns thus out to be hidden. 3) More than 98% of W bosons produced in the sub-PeV region in neutrino-initiated reactions in water/ice will be from the Glashow resonance. 4) The vast majority of the Glashow resonance events in a neutrino detector are expected at energies from a few TeV to a few tens of TeV, being mostly initiated by the conventional atmospheric neutrinos dominant in this energy range. Calculations of the cross sections for Glashow resonance excitation on the oxygen nucleus as well as on the proton are carried out in detail. The results of this Letter can be useful for studies of neutrino interactions at large volume water/ice neutrino detectors. For example, in the IceCube detector one can expect 0.3 Glashow resonance events with shower-like topologies and the deposited energies above 300 TeV per year. It is therefore likely already to have at least one Glashow resonance event in the IceCube data set.

  17. Analysis about the force of electrons revolve around the nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    1, Let's compare the difference of two algorithms: the electrostatic force between protons and electrons, F1 = ke2 / r2, r is the radius of the electron around the nucleus movement - within 10-10 meters; Electronic movement speed is close to the light- about 107 meters per second, the size of the centripetal force F2 = v2m/r. F1 should be approximately equal to F2,calculate the ratio of F1 and F2, F2 / F1 = (v2m/r) (ke2 / r2) / = (107 * 107 * 0.91 * 10-30 / r)/(9 * 109 * 1.6* 10-19*1.6*10-19 / r2) = 4 x 103.The calculation shows that not only the electrostatic force and other force. 2, The radius of the electron orbiting around the nucleus named r, F = Ke2 / r2 = 9 x 109 x #¨1.6 x 10 -19) 2 / r2 = v2m/r, r = 2.5 x 10-14 meters, namely that the radius of hydrogen atom is about 2.5 x 10- 14 meters, that is different with the observed result (10-10 meters).Electrons revolve around the nucleus may faster than 107 m/s, can almost reach 108 meters per second, if the electronic moves by 108 meters per second, hydrogen atom radius is approximately 2. 5 x 10 -16 meters, has converged in the interior of the nucleus, it is not possible. Use density to instead of electricity, can solve this problem. Author: hanyongquan TEL: 15611860790

  18. Mechanics and deformation of the nucleus in micropipette aspiration experiment.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Ashkan; Mofrad, Mohammad R Kaazempur

    2007-01-01

    Robust biomechanical models are essential for the study of nuclear mechanics and deformation and can help shed light on the underlying mechanisms of stress transition in nuclear elements. Here, we develop a computational model for an isolated nucleus undergoing micropipette aspiration. Our model includes distinct components representing the nucleoplasm and nuclear envelope. The nuclear envelope itself comprises three layers: inner and outer nuclear membranes and one thicker layer representing the nuclear lamina. The nucleoplasm is modeled as a viscoelastic Maxwell material with a single time constant, while a modified Maxwell model, equivalent to a spring and a dashpot in series and both in parallel with a spring, is adopted for the inner and outer nuclear membranes. The nuclear envelope layer is taken as a linear elastic material. The proposed computational model, validated using experimental observations of Guilak et al. [2000. Viscoelastic properties of the cell nucleus. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 269, 781-786] and Deguchi et al. [2005, Flow-induced hardening of endothelial nucleus as an intracellular stress-bearing organelle. Journal of Biomechanics 38, 1751-1759], is employed to study nuclear mechanics and deformation in micropipette aspiration and to shed light on the contribution of individual nuclear components on the response. The results indicate that the overall response of an isolated nucleus in micropipette aspiration is highly sensitive to the apparent stiffness of the nuclear lamina. This observation suggests that micropipette aspiration is an effective technique for examining the influence of various kinds of alteration in the nuclear lamina, such as mutations in the gene encoding lamin A, and also structural remodeling due to mechanical perturbation. PMID:17112531

  19. EHD2 shuttles to the nucleus and represses transcription.

    PubMed

    Pekar, Olga; Benjamin, Sigi; Weidberg, Hilla; Smaldone, Silvia; Ramirez, Francesco; Horowitz, Mia

    2012-06-15

    EHD {EH [Eps15 (epidermal growth factor receptor substrate 15) homology]-domain-containing} proteins participate in several endocytic events, such as the internalization and the recycling processes. There are four EHD proteins in mammalian cells, EHD1-EHD4, each with diverse roles in the recycling pathway of endocytosis. EHD2 is a plasma-membrane-associated member of the EHD family that regulates internalization. Since several endocytic proteins have been shown to undergo nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and have been assigned roles in regulation of gene expression, we tested the possibility that EHD proteins also shuttle to the nucleus. Our results showed that, among the three EHD proteins (EHD1-EHD3) that were tested, only EHD2 accumulates in the nucleus under nuclear export inhibition treatment. Moreover, the presence of a NLS (nuclear localization signal) was essential for its entry into the nucleus. Nuclear exit of EHD2 depended partially on its NES (nuclear export signal). Elimination of a potential SUMOylation site in EHD2 resulted in a major accumulation of the protein in the nucleus, indicating the involvement of SUMOylation in the nuclear exit of EHD2. We confirmed the SUMOylation of EHD2 by employing co-immunoprecipitation and the yeast two-hybrid system. Using GAL4-based transactivation assay as well as a KLF7 (Krüppel-like factor 7)-dependent transcription assay of the p21WAF1/Cip1 [CDKN1A (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A)] gene, we showed that EHD2 represses transcription. qRT-PCR (quantitative real-time PCR) of RNA from cells overexpressing EHD2 or of RNA from cells knocked down for EHD2 confirmed that EHD2 represses transcription of the p21WAF1/Cip1 gene. PMID:22448906

  20. The subthalamic nucleus. Part I: development, cytology, topography and connections.

    PubMed

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A J F; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    This monograph (Part I of two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. Part II of the two volumes (volume 199) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models--single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727483

  1. The subthalamic nucleus part II: modelling and simulation of activity.

    PubMed

    Heida, Tjitske; Marani, Enrico; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    Part I of The Subthalamic Nucleus (volume 198) (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections.The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. This monograph (Part II of the two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models - single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727495

  2. Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Gary E.; So, Kwok-Fai; Pu, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely what this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/escape responses, which dis-facilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26363667

  3. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Paves, Heiti; Truve, Erkki

    2004-01-01

    Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area. PMID:15102327

  4. AN OFF-CENTERED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V.

    2014-11-20

    NGC 3115 is an S0 galaxy that has always been considered to have a pure absorption-line spectrum. Some recent studies have detected a compact radio-emitting nucleus in this object, coinciding with the photometric center and with a candidate for the X-ray nucleus. This is evidence of the existence of a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the galaxy, although no emission line has ever been observed. We report the detection of an emission-line spectrum of a type 1 AGN in NGC 3115, with an Hα luminosity of L {sub Hα} = (4.2 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}. Our analysis revealed that this AGN is located at a projected distance of ∼0.''29 ± 0.''05 (corresponding to ∼14.3 ± 2.5 pc) from the stellar bulge center, which is coincident with the kinematic center of this object's stellar velocity map. The black hole corresponding to the observed off-centered AGN may form a binary system with a black hole located at the stellar bulge center. However, it is also possible that the displaced black hole is the merged remnant of the binary system coalescence, after the ''kick'' caused by the asymmetric emission of gravitational waves. We propose that certain features in the stellar velocity dispersion map are the result of perturbations caused by the off-centered AGN.

  5. Structure of Tz = 3 / 2 , 33P Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubna, Rebeka Sultana; Tripathi, Vandana; Tabor, Samuel; Tai, Pei-Laun; Bender, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The excited states of the nucleus 33P were populated by the 18O(18O, p-2n γ)33P fusion evaporation reaction at Elab = 25 MeV.Gammasphere was used along with the particle detector Microball to detect the γ emissions in coincidence with the emitted charged particles from the compound nucleus 36S. The auxiliary detector Microball was used to select the charged particle channel and to determine the exact position and the energy of the emitted proton. The purpose of finding the position and energy of proton was to determine a more precise angle between the recoil nucleus and the emitted γ which was later employed to get a better Doppler correction. Along with the selection of the proton channel, the γ- γ coincidence technique helped to isolate 33P from the other phosphorus isotopes and also reduced the contaminations from the dominant pure neutron channels. A number of transitions and states was identified that were not observed before. The 4 π arrangement of Gammasphere offered an excellent opportunity to measure the angular distribution of the electromagnetic emissions leading to the assignment of the spins for most of the new states. The experimental observations were compared to the shell model calculation using Work supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1401574.

  6. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out at New Mexico State University in 1991 under a great from the US Department of Energy. Most of these studies have involved investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions. The work has been carried out both with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and with the cyclotron at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland. Part of the experimental work involves measurements of new data on double-charge-exchange scattering, using facilities at LAMPF which we helped modify, and on pion absorption, using a new detector system at PSI that covers nearly the full solid-angle region which we helped construct. Other work involved preparation for future experiments using polarized nuclear targets and a new high-resolution spectrometer system for detecting {pi}{sup 0} mesons. We also presented several proposals for works to be done in future years, involving studies related to pi-mesonic atoms, fundamental pion-nucleon interactions, studies of the difference between charged and neutral pion interactions with the nucleon, studies of the isospin structure of pion-nucleus interactions, and pion scattering from polarized {sup 3}He targets. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the pion-nucleon interaction, of the pion-nucleus interaction mechanism, and of nuclear structure.

  7. Relief memory consolidation requires protein synthesis within the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Bruning, Johann E A; Breitfeld, Tino; Kahl, Evelyn; Bergado-Acosta, Jorge R; Fendt, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Relief learning refers to the association of a stimulus with the relief from an aversive event. The thus-learned relief stimulus then can induce, e.g., an attenuation of the startle response or approach behavior, indicating positive valence. Previous studies revealed that the nucleus accumbens is essential for the acquisition and retrieval of relief memory. Here, we ask whether the nucleus accumbens is also the brain site for consolidation of relief memory into a long-term form. In rats, we blocked local protein synthesis within the nucleus accumbens by local infusions of anisomycin at different time points during a relief conditioning experiment. Accumbal anisomycin injections immediately after the relief conditioning session, but not 4 h later, prevented the consolidation into long-term relief memory. The retention of already consolidated relief memory was not affected by anisomycin injections. This identifies a time window and site for relief memory consolidation. These findings should complement our understanding of the full range of effects of adverse experiences, including cases of their distortion in humans such as post-traumatic stress disorder and/or phobias. PMID:26792192

  8. Examining the Structure of the Oxygen-16 Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Ethan; Aprahamian, Ani; Tan, Wanpeng; Gyurjinyan, Armen; Frentz, Bryce; Guerin, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    The intent of this work is to explore the structure of the nucleus of Oxygen-16 (16O), which consists of four alpha particles, each with two protons and two neutrons. 16O is generated via the fusion of helium and carbon during stellar nucleosynthesis. This reaction is crucial to the existence of life. By measuring the structure of the 16O nucleus, we hope to gain a better understanding of stellar evolution and processes. The theoretical state of most interest is a linear arrangement of the four alpha particles, proposed by Chevallier et al. in their 1967 paper to explain the surprisingly large moment of inertia of the nucleus they measured. The existence of this state can be most accurately observed through an analysis of the energy spectra of the decay products. This method has previously been implemented at Notre Dame by Freer et al. when a similar structure, that of Carbon-12 (12C), was analyzed, and a previously unknown state was observed. The data gathered is analyzed using the method of angular correlation, which makes use of the angles and energies of decay products relative to the center of mass frame to reconstruct possible spins of the initial state. Analysis is currently underway and results will be presented at CEU 2015. Supported by NSF Grant PHY-1419765.

  9. An Automatic Learning-Based Framework for Robust Nucleus Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fuyong; Xie, Yuanpu; Yang, Lin

    2016-02-01

    Computer-aided image analysis of histopathology specimens could potentially provide support for early detection and improved characterization of diseases such as brain tumor, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET), and breast cancer. Automated nucleus segmentation is a prerequisite for various quantitative analyses including automatic morphological feature computation. However, it remains to be a challenging problem due to the complex nature of histopathology images. In this paper, we propose a learning-based framework for robust and automatic nucleus segmentation with shape preservation. Given a nucleus image, it begins with a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) model to generate a probability map, on which an iterative region merging approach is performed for shape initializations. Next, a novel segmentation algorithm is exploited to separate individual nuclei combining a robust selection-based sparse shape model and a local repulsive deformable model. One of the significant benefits of the proposed framework is that it is applicable to different staining histopathology images. Due to the feature learning characteristic of the deep CNN and the high level shape prior modeling, the proposed method is general enough to perform well across multiple scenarios. We have tested the proposed algorithm on three large-scale pathology image datasets using a range of different tissue and stain preparations, and the comparative experiments with recent state of the arts demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed approach. PMID:26415167

  10. Magnetic dipole excitations of the 163Dy nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenginerler, Zemine; Tabar, Emre; Yakut, Hakan; Kuliev, Ali Akbar; Guliyev, Ekber

    2014-03-01

    In this study some properties of the magnetic dipole excitations of the deformed odd mass 163Dy nucleus were studied by using Quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model (QPNM). The several of the ground-state and low-lying magnetic dipole (M1) mode characteristics were calculated for deformed odd-mass nuclei using a separable Hamiltonian within the QPNM. The M1 excited states, reduced transition probabilities B(M1), the ground-state magnetic properties such as magnetic moment (μ), intrinsic magnetic moment (gK) , effective spin factor (gseff.) are the fundamental characteristics of the odd-mass nucleus and provide key information to understand nuclear structure. The theoretical results were compared with the available experimental data and other theoretical approaches. Calculations show that the spin-spin interaction in this isotopes leads to polarization effect influencing the magnetic moments. Furthermore we found a strong fragmentation of the M1 strength in 163Dy nucleus which was in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. Sakarya University, Project Number: 2012-50-02-007 and Z.Zenginerler acknowledge to TUBITAK-TURKEY 2013, fellowship No: 2219.

  11. By moonlighting in the nucleus, villin regulates epithelial plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Srinivas; George, Sudeep P.; Pham, Eric; Roy, Swati; Singh, Kanchan; Mariadason, John M.; Khurana, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Villin is a tissue-specific, actin-binding protein involved in the assembly and maintenance of microvilli in polarized epithelial cells. Conversely, villin is also linked with the loss of epithelial polarity and gain of the mesenchymal phenotype in migrating, invasive cells. In this study, we describe for the first time how villin can switch between these disparate functions to change tissue architecture by moonlighting in the nucleus. Our study reveals that the moonlighting function of villin in the nucleus may play an important role in tissue homeostasis and disease. Villin accumulates in the nucleus during wound repair, and altering the cellular microenvironment by inducing hypoxia increases the nuclear accumulation of villin. Nuclear villin is also associated with mouse models of tumorigenesis, and a systematic analysis of a large cohort of colorectal cancer specimens confirmed the nuclear distribution of villin in a subset of tumors. Our study demonstrates that nuclear villin regulates epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Altering the nuclear localization of villin affects the expression and activity of Slug, a key transcriptional regulator of EMT. In addition, we find that villin directly interacts with a transcriptional corepressor and ligand of the Slug promoter, ZBRK1. The outcome of this study underscores the role of nuclear villin and its binding partner ZBRK1 in the regulation of EMT and as potential new therapeutic targets to inhibit tumorigenesis. PMID:26658611

  12. Compound nucleus formation in reactions between massive nuclei: Fusion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, N.V.; Cherepanov, E.A.; Nasirov, A.K.; Permjakov, V.P.; Volkov, V.V.

    1995-05-01

    The evaporation residue cross sections {sigma}{sub ER} in reactions between massive nuclei have been analyzed within different models of complete fusion. The calculations in the framework of the optical model, the surface friction model, and the macroscopic dynamic model can give the results which are by few orders of magnitude different from experimental data. This takes place due to neglect of the competition between complete fusion and quasifission. A possible mechanism of compound nucleus formation in heavy-ion-induced reactions has been suggested. The analysis of the complete fusion of nuclei on the basis of dinuclear system approach has allowed one to reveal an important feature of the fusion process of massive nuclei, that is, the appearance of the fusion barrier during dinuclear system evolution to a compound nucleus. As a result, the competition between complete fusion and quasifission arises and strongly reduces the cross section of the compound nucleus formation. A model is proposed for calculation of this competition in a massive symmetric dinuclear system. This model is applied for collision energies above the Coulomb barrier. The {sigma}{sub ER} values calculated in the framework of dinuclear system approach seem to be close to the experimental data. For illustration the reactions {sup 100}Mo+{sup 100}Mo, {sup 110}Pd+{sup 110}Pd, and {sup 124}Sn+{sup 96}Zr have been considered.

  13. Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

    PubMed

    Pickard, Gary E; So, Kwok-Fai; Pu, Mingliang

    2015-10-01

    Retinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely what this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/escape responses, which dis-facilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26363667

  14. Growth behavior of cochlear nucleus neuronal cells on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Wasielewski, Natalia; Radeloff, Andreas; Scherzed, Agmal; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Auditory brainstem implants provide sound information by direct stimulation of the cochlear nucleus to patients with dysfunctional or absent cranial nerve VIII. In contrast to patients with cochlear implants, the use of the auditory brainstem implants is less successful. This cannot be fully explained by the difference location of stimulation but a rather unspecific neuronal stimulation. The aim of this study was to further examine neuronal cells of the cochlear nucleus and to test their interactions with semiconductor substrates as a potential electrode material for improved auditory brainstem implants. The cochlear nuclei of postnatal day 7 rats were microsurgically dissected. The tissue was dissociated enzymatically and plated on coverslips as control and on the semiconductor substrates silicon or silicon nitride. After 4 days in culture the morphology and growth of dissociated cells was determined by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Dissociated cells of the cochlear nucleus showed reduced cell growth on semiconductor substrates compared with controls. SEM analysis demonstrated close contact of neurons with supporting cells in culture and good adherence of neuronal growth cones on the used materials. These findings present basic knowledge for the development of neuron-electrode interfaces for future auditory brainstem implants. PMID:21370446

  15. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) studies of returned comet nucleus samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The most important objective of the Comet Nucleus Sample Returm Mission is to return samples which could reflect formation conditions and evolutionary processes in the early solar nebula. It is expected that the returned samples will consist of fine-grained silicate materials mixed with ices composed of simple molecules such as H2O, NH3, CH4 as well as organics and/or more complex compounds. Because of the exposure to ionizing radiation from cosmic-ray, gamma-ray, and solar wind protons at low temperature, free radicals are expected to be formed and trapped in the solid ice matrices. The kind of trapped radical species together with their concentration and thermal stability can be used as a dosimeter as well as a geothermometer to determine thermal and radiation histories as well as outgassing and other possible alternation effects since the nucleus material was formed. Since free radicals that are known to contain unpaired electrons are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected and characterized in their native form by the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) method. In fact, ESR has been shown to be a non-destructive, highly sensitive tool for the detection and characterization of paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, and radiation damage centers in terrestrial and extraterrestrial geological samples. The potential use of ESR as an effective method in the study of returned comet nucleus samples, in particular, in the analysis of fine-grained solid state icy samples is discussed.

  16. Action at a Distance in the Cell's Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondev, Jane

    Various functions performed by chromosomes involve long-range communication between DNA sequences that are tens of thousands of bases apart along the genome, and microns apart in the nucleus. In this talk I will discuss experiments and theory relating to two distinct modes of long-range communication in the nucleus, chromosome looping and protein hopping along the chromosome, both in the context of DNA-break repair in yeast. Yeast is an excellent model system for studies that link chromosome conformations to their function as there is ample experimental evidence that yeast chromosome conformations are well described by a simple, random-walk polymer model. Using a combination of polymer physics theory and experiments on yeast cells, I will demonstrate that loss of polymer entropy due to chromosome looping is the driving force for homology search during repair of broken DNA by homologous recombination. I will also discuss the spread of histone modifications along the chromosome and away from the DNA break point in the context of simple physics models based on chromosome looping and kinase hopping, and show how combining physics theory and cell-biology experiment can be used to dissect the molecular mechanism of the spreading process. These examples demonstrate how combined theoretical and experimental studies can reveal physical principles of long-range communication in the nucleus, which play important roles in regulation of gene expression, DNA recombination, and chromatin modification. This work was supported by the NSF DMR-1206146.

  17. Dielectron Cross Section Measurements in Nucleus-Nucleus Reactions at 1.0{ital A} GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, R.J.; Bossingham, R.; Gong, W.G.; Heilbronn, L.; Huang, H.Z.; Krebs, G.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Matis, H.S.; Miller, J.; Naudet, C.; Roche, G.; Schroeder, L.S.; Seidl, P.; Wilson, W.K.; Yegneswaran, A.; Beedoe, S.; Carroll, J.; Huang, H.Z.; Igo, G.; Bougteb, M.; Manso, F.; Prunet, M.; Roche, G.; Kirk, P.; Wang, Z.F.; Wilson, W.K.

    1997-08-01

    We present measured dielectron production cross sections for Ca+Ca, C+C, He+Ca, and d+Ca reactions at 1.0 A GeV . Statistical uncertainties and systematic effects are smaller than in previous dilepton spectrometer (DLS) nucleus-nucleus data. For pair mass M{le}0.35 GeV/c{sup 2} we obtain (1) the Ca+Ca cross section is larger than the previous DLS measurement and current model results, (2) the mass spectra suggest large contributions from {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} Dalitz decays, and (3) d{sigma}/dM{proportional_to}A{sub P}A{sub T}. For M{gt}0.5 GeV/c{sup 2} the Ca+Ca to C+C cross section ratio is significantly larger than the ratio of A{sub P}A{sub T} values. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Hadron multiplicities and chemical freeze-out conditions in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovchenko, V.; Begun, V. V.; Gorenstein, M. I.

    2016-06-01

    New results of the NA61/SHINE Collaboration at the CERN SPS on mean hadron multiplicities in proton-proton (p+p) interactions are analyzed within the transport models and the hadron resonance gas (HRG) statistical model. The chemical freeze-out parameters in p+p interactions and central Pb+Pb (or Au+Au) collisions are found and compared with each other in the range of the center-of-mass energy of the nucleon pair √{sN N}=3.2 -17.3 GeV. The canonical ensemble formulation of the HRG model is used to describe mean hadron multiplicities in p+p interactions and the grand canonical ensemble in central Pb+Pb and Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperatures in p+p interactions are found to be larger than the corresponding temperatures in central nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  19. Neuronal relationships between the dorsal periaqueductal nucleus and the inferior colliculus (nucleus commissuralis) in the cat. A Golgi study.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, M; Sánchez del Campo, F; Ruiz, A; Smith Agreda, V

    1988-01-01

    Cell types in the dorsal periaqueductal nucleus (PAGd) were studied with the aid of the rapid Golgi method in young cats. The neurons were subdivided into fusiform and stellate types with several varieties of the latter class according to the final destination of their axons. Fusiform neurons send their axons to the neuropil of the Ncom. In turn these neurons receive descending fibres from the nucleus commissuralis (Ncom) which seem to establish axo-dendritic contacts. Also commissural neurons receive contacts from ascending fibres of the PAGd. On the basis of Golgi material it is concluded that particular neuronal types of the PAGd could establish reciprocal connections with neuronal elements of the ventral part of the Ncom. The present study supports the hypothesis that the PAGd could be subdivided into discrete cell groups according to their afferent and efferent projections. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:3225218

  20. Superscaling in electron-nucleus scattering and its link to CC and NC QE neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, M. B.; Amaro, J. E.; Caballero, J. A.; González-Jiménez, R.; Donnelly, T. W.; Ivanov, M.; Udías, J. M.

    2015-05-15

    The superscaling approach (SuSA) to neutrino-nucleus scattering, based on the assumed universality of the scaling function for electromagnetic and weak interactions, is reviewed. The predictions of the SuSA model for bot CC and NC differential and total cross sections are presented and compared with the MiniBooNE data. The role of scaling violations, in particular the contribution of meson exchange currents in the two-particle two-hole sector, is explored.

  1. Pion yields and the nature of kaon-pion ratios in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisons: models versus measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; De, B.; Guptaroy, P.

    2001-08-01

    The pion densities and the nature of kaon-pion ratios offer two very prominent and crucial physical observables on which sufficient data for heavy nucleus collisions, to date, are available. In the light of two models - one purely phenomenological and the other with a sound dynamical basis - we would try to examine here the state of agreement between calculations and experimental results obtainable from the past and the latest measurements. Impact and implications of all these would also finally be spelt out.

  2. The Double Nucleus and Central Black Hole of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf

    1999-09-01

    New spectroscopy of M31 supports Tremaine's model in which both nuclei are parts of a single eccentric disk of stars orbiting the black hole (BH). The kinematics and Hubble Space Telescope photometry are used to measure the offset of the BH from the center of mass. This confirms that the BH mass is ~3×107 Msolar by a technique that is nearly independent of stellar-dynamical models. We present spectroscopy of the nucleus of M31 obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and Subarcsecond Imaging Spectrograph. Spectra at the Ca infrared triplet lines (seeing σ*=0.27") are used to measure the stellar kinematics, and spectra at the Mg I b lines (σ*=0.31") are used to measure metallicities. We also measure nonparametric line-of-sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs). All spectra confirm the steep rotation and velocity dispersion gradients that imply that M31 contains a 3.3×107 Msolar central dark object. At σ*=0.27", the maximum bulge-subtracted rotation velocity of the nucleus is 233+/-4 km s-1 on the P2 side, and the maximum velocity dispersion is 287+/-9 km s-1. The dispersion peak is displaced by 0.20"+/-0.03" from the velocity center in the direction opposite to P1, confirming a result by Bacon and coworkers. The higher surface brightness nucleus, P1, is colder than the bulge, with σ~=100 km s-1 at r~=1''. Cold light from P1 contributes at the velocity center; this explains part of the σ(r) asymmetry. The nucleus is cold at r>~1'' on both sides of the center. Our results are used to test Tremaine's model in which the double nucleus is a single eccentric disk of stars orbiting the BH. (1) The model predicts that the velocity center of the nucleus is displaced by 0.2" from P2 toward P1. Our observations show a displacement of 0.08"+/-0.01" before bulge subtraction and 0.10"+/-0.01" after bulge subtraction. (2) The model predicts a minimum σ~=135 km s-1 at P1. We observe σ=123+/-2 km s-1. Observations (1) and (2) may be reconciled with the model if its

  3. Nucleus Morphometry in Cultured Epithelial Cells Correlates with Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayyad Z; Utheim, Tor P; Jackson, Catherine J; Reppe, Sjur; Lyberg, Torstein; Eidet, Jon R

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype of cultured ocular epithelial transplants has been shown to affect clinical success rates following transplantation to the cornea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between cell nucleus morphometry and phenotype in three types of cultured epithelial cells. This study provides knowledge for the development of a non-invasive method of determining the phenotype of cultured epithelium before transplantation. Cultured human conjunctival epithelial cells (HCjE), human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK), and human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPE) were analyzed by quantitative immunofluorescence. Assessments of nucleus morphometry and nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio (N/C ratio) were performed using ImageJ. Spearman's correlation coefficient was employed for statistical analysis. Levels of the proliferation marker PCNA in HCjE, HEK, and HRPE correlated positively with nuclear area. Nuclear area correlated significantly with levels of the undifferentiated cell marker ABCG2 in HCjE. Bmi1 levels, but not p63α levels, correlated significantly with nuclear area in HEK. The N/C ratio did not correlate significantly with any of the immunomarkers in HCjE (ABCG2, CK7, and PCNA) and HRPE (PCNA). In HEK, however, the N/C ratio was negatively correlated with levels of the undifferentiated cell marker CK14 and positively correlated with Bmi1 expression. The size of the nuclear area correlated positively with proliferation markers in all three epithelia. Morphometric indicators of phenotype in cultured epithelia can be identified using ImageJ. Conversely, the N/C ratio did not show a uniform relationship with phenotype in HCjE, HEK, or HRPE. N/C ratio therefore, may not be a useful morphometric marker for in vitro assessment of phenotype in these three epithelia. PMID:27329312

  4. Spatiotemporal profiles of arginine vasopressin transcription in cultured suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Yoshiko; Enoki, Ryosuke; Watanabe, Kazuto; Yamazaki, Maya; Sakimura, Kenji; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2015-11-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP), a major neuropeptide in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is postulated to mediate the output of the circadian oscillation. Mice carrying a reporter gene of AVP transcription (AVP(ELuc)) were produced by knocking-in a cDNA of Emerald-luciferase (ELuc) in the translational initiation site. Homozygous mice did not survive beyond postnatal day 7. Using the heterozygous (AVP(ELuc/+)) mice, a bioluminescence reporter system was developed that enabled to monitor AVP transcription through AVP-ELuc measurement in real time for more than 10 cycles in the cultured brain slice. AVP(ELuc/+) mice showed circadian behaviour rhythms and light responsiveness indistinguishable from those of the wild-type. Robust circadian rhythms in AVP-ELuc were detected in the cultured SCN slice at a single cell as well as tissue levels. The circadian rhythm of the whole SCN slice was stable, with the peak at the mid-light phase of a light-dark cycle, while that of a single cell was more variable. By comparison, rhythmicity in the paraventricular nucleus and supraoptic nucleus in the hypothalamus was unstable and damped rapidly. Spatiotemporal profiles of AVP expression at the pixel level revealed significant circadian rhythms in the entire area of AVP-positive cells in the SCN, and at least two clusters that showed different circadian oscillations. Contour analysis of bioluminescence intensity in a cell-like region demonstrated the radiation area was almost identical to the cell size. This newly developed reporter system for AVP gene expression is a useful tool for the study of circadian rhythms. PMID:26342201

  5. Enhancement of forward suppression begins in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Neil J; Itatani, Naoya; Bleeck, Stefan; Winter, Ian M

    2016-05-15

    A neuron׳s response to a sound can be suppressed by the presentation of a preceding sound. It has been suggested that this suppression is a direct correlate of the psychophysical phenomenon of forward masking, however, forward suppression, as measured in the responses of the auditory nerve, was insufficient to account for behavioural performance. In contrast the neural suppression seen in the inferior colliculus and auditory cortex was much closer to psychophysical performance. In anaesthetised guinea-pigs, using a physiological two-interval forced-choice threshold tracking algorithm to estimate suppressed (masked) thresholds, we examine whether the enhancement of suppression can occur at an earlier stage of the auditory pathway, the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). We also compare these responses with the responses from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICc) using the same preparation. In both nuclei, onset-type neurons showed the greatest amounts of suppression (16.9-33.5dB) and, in the VCN, these recovered with the fastest time constants (14.1-19.9ms). Neurons with sustained discharge demonstrated reduced masking (8.9-12.1dB) and recovery time constants of 27.2-55.6ms. In the VCN the decrease in growth of suppression with increasing suppressor level was largest for chopper units and smallest for onset-type units. The threshold elevations recorded for most unit types are insufficient to account for the magnitude of forward masking as measured behaviourally, however, onset responders, in both the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus demonstrate a wide dynamic range of suppression, similar to that observed in human psychophysics. PMID:26944300

  6. Tractography patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Lauro, Peter M; Huang, Ling; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Lungu, Codrin

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation therapy is an effective symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic effects remain unclear. Although the targets of deep brain stimulation are grey matter structures, axonal modulation is known to play an important role in deep brain stimulation's therapeutic mechanism. Several white matter structures in proximity to the subthalamic nucleus have been implicated in the clinical benefits of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. We assessed the connectivity patterns that characterize clinically beneficial electrodes in Parkinson's disease patients, after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We evaluated 22 patients with Parkinson's disease (11 females, age 57 ± 9.1 years, disease duration 13.3 ± 6.3 years) who received bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at the National Institutes of Health. During an initial electrode screening session, one month after deep brain stimulation implantation, the clinical benefits of each contact were determined. The electrode was localized by coregistering preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative computer tomography images and the volume of tissue activated was estimated from stimulation voltage and impedance. Brain connectivity for the volume of tissue activated of deep brain stimulation contacts was assessed using probabilistic tractography with diffusion-tensor data. Areas most frequently connected to clinically effective contacts included the thalamus, substantia nigra, brainstem and superior frontal gyrus. A series of discriminant analyses demonstrated that the strength of connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus were positively associated with clinical effectiveness. The connectivity patterns observed in our study suggest that the modulation of white matter tracts directed to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus is associated with favourable clinical

  7. Lepton event rates in neutrino-nucleus DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, H.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Simo, I. Ruiz; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2011-10-06

    In this work we have studied the nuclear effect in F{sub 2}{sup A}(x) and F{sub 3}{sup A}(x) weak structure functions and calculated {nu}-nucleus cross section using them by taking into account Fermi motion, binding energy, pion and rho meson cloud contributions and shadowing and anti-shadowing effects. The numerical calculations have been performed in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations for nuclear matter. The results have been compared with the experimental results of NuTeV and CDHSW collaborations.

  8. Planetary camera observations of the double nucleus of M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Tod R.; Faber, S. M.; Groth, Edward J.; Shaya, Edward J.; Campbell, Bel; Code, Arthur; Currie, Douglas G.; Baum, William A.; Ewald, S. P.; Hester, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    HST Planetary Camera images obtained in the V and I band for M31 show its inner nucleus to consist of two components that are separated by 0.49 arcsec. The nuclear component with lower surface brightness closely coincides with the bulge photocenter and is argued to be at the kinematic center of the galaxy. It is surmised that, if dust absorption generates the asymmetric nuclear morphology observed, the dust grain size must either be exceptionally large, or the dust optical depth must be extremely high; the higher surface-brightness and off-center nuclear component may alternatively be a separate stellar system.

  9. Mineralogy and Petrology of COMET WILD2 Nucleus Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Bland, Phil; Bradley, John; Brearley, Adrian; Brennan, Sean; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald; Butterworth, Anna; Dai, Zurong; Ebel, Denton

    2006-01-01

    The sample return capsule of the Stardust spacecraft will be recovered in northern Utah on January 15, 2006, and under nominal conditions it will be delivered to the new Stardust Curation Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center two days later. Within the first week we plan to begin the harvesting of aerogel cells, and the comet nucleus samples they contain for detailed analysis. By the time of the LPSC meeting we will have been analyzing selected removed grains for more than one month. This presentation will present the first results from the mineralogical and petrological analyses that will have been performed.

  10. Magnetic Moment of Proton Drip-Line Nucleus (9)C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Tanigaki, M.; Minamisono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Mihara, M.; Onishi, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Harada, A.; Sasaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the proton drip-line nucleus C-9(I(sup (pi)) = 3/2, T(sub 1/2) = 126 ms) has been measured for the first time, using the beta-NMR detection technique with polarized radioactive beams. The measure value for the magnetic moment is 1mu(C-9)! = 1.3914 +/- 0.0005 (mu)N. The deduced spin expectation value of 1.44 is unusually larger than any other ones of even-odd nuclei.

  11. W-Z interference in ν-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusevic, R.; Smith, J.

    1988-05-01

    The creation of muon pairs by (anti)neutrinos in the Coulomb field of the nucleus provides a direct test of the interference between the intermediate-vector-boson amplitudes, as predicted by the weak-interaction theory. This paper summarizes the main features of the above process and discusses the feasibility of measuring the W-Z interference by searching for recoilless dimuon events using fine-grained counter neutrino detectors. The result from an earlier experiment which searched for this process is discussed in the context of the present calculation.

  12. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Clarke, T E; Sarazin, Craig L; Randall, Scott W; McNamara, Brian R

    2010-04-20

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves. PMID:20351250

  13. Improvement of sleep architecture in PD with subthalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Arnulf, I; Bejjani, B P; Garma, L; Bonnet, A M; Houeto, J L; Damier, P; Derenne, J P; Agid, Y

    2000-12-12

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was used to investigate the relationship of sleep disorders with motor handicap in PD. In 10 insomniac patients with PD, stimulation reduced nighttime akinesia by 60% and completely suppressed axial and early morning dystonia, but did not alleviate periodic leg movements (n = 3) or REM sleep behavior disorders (n = 5). Total sleep time increased by 47%; wakefulness after sleep onset decreased by 51 minutes. Insomnia in patients with PD may predominantly result from nighttime motor disability. PMID:11113233

  14. Sizing and shaping the nucleus: mechanisms and significance

    PubMed Central

    Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J.; Vuković, Lidija D.; Levy, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    The size and shape of the nucleus are tightly regulated, indicating the physiological significance of proper nuclear morphology, yet the mechanisms and functions of nuclear size and shape regulation remain poorly understood. Correlations between altered nuclear morphology and certain disease states have long been observed, most notably many cancers are diagnosed and staged based on graded increases in nuclear size. Here we review recent studies investigating the mechanisms regulating nuclear size and shape, how mitotic events influence nuclear morphology, and the role of nuclear size and shape in subnuclear chromatin organization and cancer progression. PMID:24503411

  15. Single-Nucleus Polycrystallization in Thin Film Epitaxial Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, J. T.; Nishikata, S.; Al-Mahboob, A.; Fujikawa, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Sakurai, T.; Sazaki, G.; Tromp, R. M.

    2007-01-26

    We have observed, by use of low-energy electron microscopy, the first direct evidence of self-driven polycrystallization evolved from a single nucleus in the case of epitaxial pentacene growth on the Si(111)-H terminated surface. In this Letter we demonstrate that such polycrystallization can develop in anisotropic systems (in terms of crystal structure and/or the intermolecular interactions) when kinetic growth conditions force the alignment of the intrinsic preferential growth directions along the density gradient of diffusing molecules. This finding gives new insight into the crystallization of complex molecular systems, elucidating the importance of nanoscale control of the growth conditions.

  16. Functional roles of HIV-1 Tat protein in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Musinova, Yana R; Sheval, Eugene V; Dib, Carla; Germini, Diego; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein is one of the most important regulatory proteins for viral gene expression in the host cell and can modulate different cellular processes. In addition, Tat is secreted by the infected cell and can be internalized by neighboring cells; therefore, it affects both infected and uninfected cells. Tat can modulate cellular processes by interacting with different cellular structures and signaling pathways. In the nucleus, Tat might be localized either in the nucleoplasm or the nucleolus depending on its concentration. Here we review the distinct functions of Tat in the nucleoplasm and the nucleolus in connection with viral infection and HIV-induced oncogenesis. PMID:26507246

  17. Arachnophobia alleviated by subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Allert, Niels; Gippert, Sabrina M; Sajonz, Bastian E A; Nelles, Christoph; Bewernick, Bettina; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Coenen, Volker A

    2016-06-01

    We report on a Parkinson patient with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias in whom deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) not only improved motor symptoms but also pre-existing arachnophobia. Arachnophobia had been unchanged by the course of Parkinson's disease but rapidly improved with STN-DBS. Both, motor effects and the improvement of arachnophobia were stable during 2 years follow-up. To our knowledge this is the first report on STN stimulation effects on a specific phobia. PMID:27198699

  18. Elongated shape isomers in the Ar36 nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseh, József; Darai, Judit; Sciani, Wagner; Otani, Yul; Lépine-Szily, Alinka; Benjamim, Elisangela A.; Chamon, Luiz Carlos; Filho, Rubens Lichtenthäler

    2009-09-01

    A recent analysis of the C12+Mg24 scattering [W. Sciani , Phys. Rev. C 80, 034319 (2009)] suggests the existence of a hyperdeformed band in the Ar36 nucleus, completely in line with the predictions of α [W. D. M. Rae and A. C. Merchant, Phys. Lett. B279, 207 (1992)] and binary cluster calculations [J. Cseh , Phys. Rev. C 70, 034311 (2004)]. Here we review the structural understanding of the superdeformed and the hyperdeformed states of Ar36 and present new results on the shape isomers as well. Special attention is paid to the clusterization of these states, which indicates the appropriate reaction channels for their formation.

  19. Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that were accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the workshop on the analysis of returned comet nucleus samples held in Milpitas, California, January 16 to 18, 1989. The abstracts deal with the nature of cometary ices, cryogenic handling and sampling equipment, origin and composition of samples, and spectroscopic, thermal and chemical processing methods of cometary nuclei. Laboratory simulation experimental results on dust samples are reported. Some results obtained from Halley's comet are also included. Microanalytic techniques for examining trace elements of cometary particles, synchrotron x ray fluorescence and instrument neutron activation analysis (INAA), are presented.

  20. Search for exotic cluster configurations in 14C nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkova, L. Yu; Chernyshev, B. A.; Gurov, Yu B.; Karpuhin, V. S.; Lapushkin, S. V.; Pritula, R. V.; Schurenkova, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of 2-dimentional Dalitz’ diagram, measured in 14C(π-, pd)X reaction, allowed to distinguish the pion absorption by p intranuclear cluster and to obtain an indication on the existence of 3p + 11Li configuration in 14C nucleus. Highly excited states of 12,13Be isotopes were found with the energy of Ex ≈ 30 MeV for the first time. It was shown that these states decay as follows 12Be*→p + 11Li and 13Be*→d + 11Li.

  1. Hyperfine Structure Constant of the Neutron Halo Nucleus Be+11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamine, A.; Wada, M.; Okada, K.; Sonoda, T.; Schury, P.; Nakamura, T.; Kanai, Y.; Kubo, T.; Katayama, I.; Ohtani, S.; Wollnik, H.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2014-04-01

    The hyperfine splittings of ground state Be+11 have been measured precisely by laser-microwave double resonance spectroscopy for trapped and laser cooled beryllium ions. The ions were produced at relativistic energies and subsequently slowed down and trapped at mK temperatures. The magnetic hyperfine structure constant of Be+11 was determined to be A11=-2677.302 988(72) MHz from the measurements of the mF-mF'=0-0 field independent transition. This measurement provides essential data for the study of the distribution of the halo neutron in the single neutron halo nucleus Be11 through the Bohr-Weisskopf effect.

  2. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Clarke, T. E.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Randall, Scott W.; McNamara, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves. PMID:20351250

  3. Thalamic reticular nucleus in Caiman crocodilus: Relationship with the dorsal thalamus.

    PubMed

    Pritz, M B

    2016-05-13

    The thalamic reticular nucleus was investigated in one group of crocodilians, Caiman crocodilus. This neuronal aggregate is composed of two parts: a compact portion and a diffuse region made up of scattered cells within the forebrain bundles. In Caiman, both the lateral and medial forebrain bundles project to the telencephalon and the thalamic reticular nucleus is associated with each fiber tract. In the lateral forebrain bundle, the compact area is termed the nucleus of the dorsal peduncle (dorsal peduncular nucleus) while the diffuse part is called the perireticular area. In the medial forebrain bundle, the interstitial nucleus comprises one part of the compact area while another region without a specific neuronal label is also present. Similar to the perireticular cells of the lateral forebrain bundle, scattered cells are also present in the medial forebrain bundle. Morphological features of the thalamic reticular nucleus are revealed with stains for the following: fibers; cells; succinic acid dehydrogenase; and acetylcholinesterase. Regardless of which dorsal thalamic nucleus was injected, a localized region of the thalamic reticular nucleus contained retrogradely labeled cells and anterogradely labeled axons and terminals. This grouping was termed clusters and was felt to represent the densest interconnection between the dorsal thalamus and the reticular nucleus. Using clusters as an index of interconnections, the reticular nucleus was divided into sectors, each of which was associated with a specific dorsal thalamic nucleus. An organization similar to that found in Caiman is present in other sauropsids as well as in mammals. These data suggest that a thalamic reticular nucleus is present in all amniotes and has morphological properties similar to those described in this analysis. Lastly, a hypothesis is presented to explain how the external shape of the reticular nucleus in Caiman might be transformed into the homologous area in a representative bird and

  4. Aberrant DNA Polymerase α Is Excluded from the Nucleus by Defective Import and Degradation in the Nucleus*

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Christian S.; Mizuno, Takeshi; Mizuno, Keiko; Miyake, Yasuyuki; Yanagi, Ken-ichiro; Imamoto, Naoko; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    DNA polymerase α is essential for the onset of eukaryotic DNA replication. Its correct folding and assembly within the nuclear replication pre-initiation complex is crucial for normal cell cycle progression and genome maintenance. Due to a single point mutation in the largest DNA polymerase α subunit, p180, the temperature-sensitive mouse cell line tsFT20 exhibits heat-labile DNA polymerase α activity and S phase arrest at restrictive temperature. In this study, we show that an aberrant form of endogenous p180 in tsFT20 cells (p180tsFT20) is strictly localized in the cytoplasm while its wild-type counterpart enters the nucleus. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy with enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged or photoactivatable green fluorescent protein-tagged p180tsFT20 variants and inhibitor analysis revealed that the exclusion of aberrant p180tsFT20 from the nucleus is due to two distinct mechanisms: first, the inability of newly synthesized (cytoplasmic) p180tsFT20 to enter the nucleus and second, proteasome-dependent degradation of nuclear-localized protein. The nuclear import defect seems to result from an impaired association of aberrant de novo synthesized p180tsFT20 with the second subunit of DNA polymerase α, p68. In accordance, we show that RNA interference of p68 results in a decrease of the overall p180 protein level and in a specific increase of cytoplasmic localized p180 in NIH3T3 cells. Taken together, our data suggest two mechanisms that prevent the nuclear expression of aberrant DNA polymerase α. PMID:19726690

  5. Investigation of a central nucleus of the amygdala/dorsal raphe nucleus serotonergic circuit implicated in fear-potentiated startle.

    PubMed

    Spannuth, B M; Hale, M W; Evans, A K; Lukkes, J L; Campeau, S; Lowry, C A

    2011-04-14

    Serotonergic systems are thought to play an important role in control of motor activity and emotional states. We used a fear-potentiated startle paradigm to investigate the effects of a motor-eliciting stimulus in the presence or absence of induction of an acute fear state on serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and cells in subdivisions of the central amygdaloid nucleus (CE), a structure that plays an important role in fear responses, using induction of the protein product of the immediate-early gene, c-Fos. In Experiment 1 we investigated the effects of fear conditioning training, by training rats to associate a light cue (conditioned stimulus, CS; 1000 lx, 2 s) with foot shock (0.5 s, 0.5 mA) in a single session. In Experiment 2 rats were given two training sessions identical to Experiment 1 on days 1 and 2, then tested in one of four conditions on day 3: (1) placement in the training context without exposure to either the CS or acoustic startle (AS), (2) exposure to 10 trials of the 2 s CS, (3) exposure to 40 110 dB AS trials, or (4) exposure to 40 110 dB AS trials with 10 of the trials preceded by and co-terminating with the CS. All treatments were conducted during a 20 min session. Fear conditioning training, by itself, increased c-Fos expression in multiple subdivisions of the CE and throughout the DR. In contrast, fear-potentiated startle selectively increased c-Fos expression in the medial subdivision of the CE and in serotonergic neurons in the dorsal part of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRD). These data are consistent with previous studies demonstrating that fear-related stimuli selectively activate DRD serotonergic neurons. Further studies of this mesolimbocortical serotonergic system could have important implications for understanding mechanisms underlying vulnerability to stress-related psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and affective disorders. PMID:21277950

  6. Gluon production from non-Abelian Weizsäcker-Williams fields in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovner, Alex; McLerran, Larry; Weigert, Heribert

    1995-12-01

    We consider the collisions of large nuclei using the theory of McLerran and Venugopalan. The two nuclei are ultrarelativistic and sources of non-Abelian Weizs¨acker-Williams fields. These sources are in the end averaged over all color orientations locally with a Gaussian weight. We show that there is a solution of the equations of motion for the two nucleus scattering problem where the fields are time and rapidity independent before the collision. After the collision the solution depends on proper time, but is independent of rapidity. We show how to extract the produced gluons from the classical evolution of the fields.

  7. Physical plasticity of the nucleus in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pajerowski, J. David; Dahl, Kris Noel; Zhong, Franklin L.; Sammak, Paul J.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2007-01-01

    Cell differentiation in embryogenesis involves extensive changes in gene expression structural reorganization within the nucleus, including chromatin condensation and nucleoprotein immobilization. We hypothesized that nuclei in naive stem cells would therefore prove to be physically plastic and also more pliable than nuclei in differentiated cells. Micromanipulation methods indeed show that nuclei in human embryonic stem cells are highly deformable and stiffen 6-fold through terminal differentiation, and that nuclei in human adult stem cells possess an intermediate stiffness and deform irreversibly. Because the nucleo-skeletal component Lamin A/C is not expressed in either type of stem cell, we knocked down Lamin A/C in human epithelial cells and measured a deformability similar to that of adult hematopoietic stem cells. Rheologically, lamin-deficient states prove to be the most fluid-like, especially within the first ≈10 sec of deformation. Nuclear distortions that persist longer than this are irreversible, and fluorescence-imaged microdeformation with photobleaching confirms that chromatin indeed flows, distends, and reorganizes while the lamina stretches. The rheological character of the nucleus is thus set largely by nucleoplasm/chromatin, whereas the extent of deformation is modulated by the lamina. PMID:17893336

  8. Eccentric-Disk Models for the Nucleus of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiris, Hiranya V.; Tremaine, Scott

    2003-12-01

    We construct dynamical models of the ``double'' nucleus of M31 in which the nucleus consists of an eccentric disk of stars orbiting a central black hole. The principal approximation in these models is that the disk stars travel in a Keplerian potential; i.e., we neglect the mass of the disk relative to the black hole. We consider both ``aligned'' models, in which the eccentric disk lies in the plane of the large-scale M31 disk, and ``nonaligned'' models, in which the orientation of the eccentric disk is fitted to the data. Both types of model can reproduce the double structure and overall morphology seen in Hubble Space Telescope photometry. In comparison with the best available ground-based spectroscopy, the models reproduce the asymmetric rotation curve, the peak height of the dispersion profile, and the qualitative behavior of the Gauss-Hermite coefficients h3 and h4. Aligned models fail to reproduce the observation that the surface brightness at P1 is higher than at P2 and yield significantly poorer fits to the kinematics; thus, we favor nonaligned models. Eccentric-disk models fitted to ground-based spectroscopy are used to predict the kinematics observed at much higher resolution by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, and we find generally satisfactory agreement.

  9. Neutrino-nucleus reactions based on recent structure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2015-05-15

    Neutrino-nucleus reactions are studied with the use of new shell model Hamiltonians, which have proper tensor components in the interactions and prove to be successful in the description of Gamow-Teller (GT) strengths in nuclei. The new Hamiltonians are applied to obtain new neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections in {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 56}Ni induced by solar and supernova neutrinos. The element synthesis by neutrino processes in supernova explosions is discussed with the new cross sections. The enhancement of the production yields of {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B and {sup 55}Mn is obtained while fragmented GT strength in {sup 56}Ni with two-peak structure is found to result in smaller e-capture rates at stellar environments. The monopole-based universal interaction with tensor force of π+ρ meson exchanges is used to evaluate GT strength in {sup 40}Ar and ν-induced reactions on {sup 40}Ar. It is found to reproduce well the experimental GT strength in {sup 40}Ar.

  10. Level structures in odd-odd deformed nucleus 184Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowrishankar, R.; Sood, P. C.

    2016-02-01

    A detailed low-energy level scheme of the odd-odd n-rich nucleus 184 73Ta111 is constructed using the well tested Two-Quasiparticle Rotor Model (TQRM) for calculating the bandhead energies of physically admissible 2qp configurations with the inclusion of residual n-p interaction contribution. The presently available data on this level scheme from 184Hf decay are shown to be in agreement with these calculations. Our analysis concludes that 184Hf ( Q_{β}=1340(30) keV) decay admits of 7 additional (to the 3 presently reported) β-branches to 184Ta with J = 0 or 1 and 8 more physically admissible weak ( 1fu β-branches populating J^{π}=2- levels in 184Ta. Further, a close examination of our level scheme clearly indicates the existence of a low-lying ( Ex = 260(40) keV) high-spin ( J^{π}=10-) long-lived isomer in this nucleus.

  11. Molecular gas in the starburt nucleus of M82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, K. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The 7" resolution CO observations of the central 1 kpc of M82 have resolved 2 components of molecular gas: (1) a high concentration in the central 700 pc x 200 pc, and (2) extended features that may be gas expelled from the central concentration. The central concentration of molecular gas falls in the same confines as the other tracers of recent star formation, and may be identified directly with the star burst region. The molecular gas in the star burst nucleus of M82 appears to be highly disturbed and has high kinetic temperature, likely consequences of the high density of young star clusters. Stellar winds and subsequent supernovae from the star clusters can effectively sweep up the interstellar medium. The spatial distribution and kinematics of the nuclear concentration of the molecular gas, as well as the 2 micron light distribution, suggest the presence of a stellar bar in M82. Comparisons of the M82 star burst nucleus to a sample of IR luminous galaxies suggest that star burst regions in general may have a higher gas temperature and much higher L sub IR/M sub H2 that the galactic disk, and that the L sub IR of the star burst regions may be essentially proportional to their area.

  12. Lesions of nucleus tractus solitarii globally impair cerebrovascular autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitsuka, T.; Iadecola, C.; Underwood, M.D.; Reis, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The authors studied the effects of acute bilateral electrolytic lesions of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and its autoregulation in rats anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. rCBF or regional cerebral glucose utilization (rCGU) was measured 30 min after NTS lesions, by the UC-iodoantipyrine technique or 2-deoxyglucose method, respectively. Cerebrovascular autoregulation was assessed in groups of 4-5 rats at three levels of arterial pressure (AP):90, 125, and 140 mmHg. AP was lowered by hemorrhage or elevated by intravenous infusion of phenylephrine. NTS lesions did not alter rCBF at 125 mmHg but resulted in loss of autoregulation. In contrast, lesions of the cuneate nucleus or transection of the baroreceptor afferents did not alter autoregulation. NTS lesions did not affect the reactivity of the cerebrovascular bed to hypercarbia or hypocarbia nor the rCGU in any brain regions. They conclude that lesions of the NTS impair cerebrovascular autoregulation. The effect is not due to changes in metabolism, nonspecific effects of the lesions, vasoparalysis, or interruption of the baroreceptor reflex arch. Neural pathways originating in or passing through the NTS can regulate the cerebrovascular autoregulation of the entire brain.

  13. Neutral current neutrino-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, T.; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Mosel, U.

    2006-12-15

    We have extended our model for charged current neutrino-nucleus interactions developed in Phys. Rev. C 73, 065502 (2006) to neutral current reactions. For the elementary neutrino-nucleon interaction, we take into account quasielastic scattering, {delta} excitation, and the excitation of the resonances in the second resonance region. Our model for the neutrino-nucleus collisions includes in-medium effects such as Fermi motion, Pauli blocking, nuclear binding, and final-state interactions. They are implemented by means of the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) coupled-channel transport model. This allows us to study exclusive channels, namely pion production and nucleon knockout. We find that final-state interactions modify considerably the distributions through rescattering, charge-exchange, and absorption. Side-feeding induced by charge-exchange scattering is important in both cases. In the case of pions, there is a strong absorption associated with the in-medium pionless decay modes of the {delta}, while nucleon knockout exhibits a considerable enhancement of low-energy nucleons because of rescattering. At neutrino energies above 1 GeV, we also obtain that the contribution to nucleon knockout from {delta} excitation is comparable to that from quasielastic scattering.

  14. The development of the Nucleus Freedom Cochlear implant system.

    PubMed

    Patrick, James F; Busby, Peter A; Gibson, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Cochlear Limited (Cochlear) released the fourth-generation cochlear implant system, Nucleus Freedom, in 2005. Freedom is based on 25 years of experience in cochlear implant research and development and incorporates advances in medicine, implantable materials, electronic technology, and sound coding. This article presents the development of Cochlear's implant systems, with an overview of the first 3 generations, and details of the Freedom system: the CI24RE receiver-stimulator, the Contour Advance electrode, the modular Freedom processor, the available speech coding strategies, the input processing options of Smart Sound to improve the signal before coding as electrical signals, and the programming software. Preliminary results from multicenter studies with the Freedom system are reported, demonstrating better levels of performance compared with the previous systems. The final section presents the most recent implant reliability data, with the early findings at 18 months showing improved reliability of the Freedom implant compared with the earlier Nucleus 3 System. Also reported are some of the findings of Cochlear's collaborative research programs to improve recipient outcomes. Included are studies showing the benefits from bilateral implants, electroacoustic stimulation using an ipsilateral and/or contralateral hearing aid, advanced speech coding, and streamlined speech processor programming. PMID:17172547

  15. Evolution of the red nucleus and rubrospinal tract.

    PubMed

    ten Donkelaar, H J

    1988-01-01

    A red nucleus, defined by its relative position in the tegmentum mesencephali, its contralateral rubrospinal or rubrobulbar projections and by crossed cerebellar afferents, is found in terrestrial vertebrates and certain rays. A crossed rubrospinal tract occurs in anurans, limbed urodeles and reptiles, birds and mammals, but is apparently absent in boid snakes, caecilians and sharks. A distinct rubrospinal tract is found in certain rays which use their enlarged pectoral fins for locomotion. A crossed tegmentospinal tract, possibly a rubrospinal tract, is found in lungfishes. Although evidence was presented for a rubrospinal tract in more advanced snakes, the available experimental data in lower vertebrates suggest that the presence of a rubrospinal tract is related to the presence of limbs or limb-like structures. In the connectivity of the red nucleus in terrestrial vertebrates, 'levels' of complexity can be distinguished, paralleled by the development of the cerebellum. These 'grades of organization' are probably related to the type of motor performance the particular terrestrial vertebrates are capable of. PMID:3289562

  16. Suppression of the swallowing reflex by stimulation of the red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Tsuji, Kojun; Tsujimura, Takanori; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Inoue, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    We study whether the red nucleus is involved in control of swallowing. The swallowing reflex was induced in anesthetized rats by repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. The electromyographic activities of the mylohyoid and thyrohyoid muscles were recorded in order to identify the swallowing reflex. Repetitive electrical stimulation applied to the red nucleus reduced the number of swallows. The onset latency of the first swallow was increased during repetitive electrical stimulation applied to the magnocellular part of the red nucleus. Microinjection of monosodium glutamate into the red nucleus also reduced the number of swallows. The onset latency of the first swallow was increased after microinjection of monosodium glutamate into the magnocellular part of the red nucleus. These results imply that the red nucleus is involved in the control of swallowing. PMID:26012722

  17. Role of adrenomedullin in the cerebrospinal fluid-contacting nucleus in the modulation of immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue-Hong; Song, Si-Yuan; Liu, He; Xing, Dan; Wang, Xin; Fei, Yan; Li, Guang-Ling; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Li-Cai

    2015-06-01

    The contribution of the cerebrospinal fluid-contacting nucleus (CSF-contacting nucleus) and adrenomedullin (ADM) to the developmental modulation of stressful events remains controversial. This study explored the effects of endogenous ADM in the CSF-contacting nucleus on immobilization of stress-induced physiological parameter disorders and glucocorticoid hormone releasing hormone (CRH), rat plasma corticosterone expression, and verification of such effects by artificially lowering ADM expression in the CSF-contacting nucleus by targeted ablation of the nucleus. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that ADM-like immunoreactivity and the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) marker were localized in the CSF-contacting nucleus. After 7 continuous days of chronic immobilization stress (CIS), animals exhibited anxiety-like behavior. Also, an increase in serum corticosterone, and enhanced expression of ADM in the CSF-contacting nucleus were observed, following activation by CIS. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the ADM receptor antagonist AM22-52 significantly reduced ADM in the CSF-contacting nucleus, additionally, blocked the effects of ADM, meaning the expression of CRH in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (Pa) and serum corticosterone level were increased, and the physiological parameters of the rats became correspondingly deteriorated. Additionally, the i.c.v. administration of cholera toxin subunit B-saporin (CB-SAP), a cytotoxin coupled to a cholera toxin subunit, completely eliminated the CSF-contacting nucleus, worsening the reaction of the body to CIS. The collective results demonstrated that ADM acted as a stress-related peptide in the CSF-contacting nucleus, and its lower expression and blocked effects in the nucleus contributed to the deterioration of stress-induced physiologic parameter disorders as well as the excessive expressions of stress-related hormones which were part of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis

  18. Effects of systemic L-tyrosine on dopamine release from rat corpus striatum and nucleus accumbens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    During, Matthew J.; Acworth, Ian N.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Intracerebral dialysis was used to monitor extracellular fluid from rat striatum and nucleus accumbens following the intraperitoneal administration of tyrosine. Dopamine concentrations in dialysates from both the striatum and the nucleus accumbens increased significantly in response to the tyrosine. The magnitude of the tyrosine effect was greater in the nucleus accumbens than in the striatum. Hence, mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons may be especially responsive to precursor availability.

  19. Three-hadron angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions from perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alejandro; Ortiz, Antonio; Paic, Guy; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Magnin, J.; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-08-15

    We study three-hadron azimuthal angular correlations in high-energy proton-proton and central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider at midrapidity. We use the leading-order parton matrix elements for 2{yields}3 processes and include the effect of parton energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma using the modified fragmentation function approach. For the case when the produced hadrons have either the same or not too different momenta, we observe two away-side peaks at 2{pi}/3 and 4{pi}/3. We consider the dependence of the angular correlations on energy loss parameters that have been used in studies of single inclusive hadron production at RHIC. Our results on the angular dependence of the cross section agree well with preliminary data by the PHENIX Collaboration. We comment on the possible contribution of 2{yields}3 processes to dihadron angular correlations and how a comparison of the two processes may help characterize the plasma further.

  20. Morphological and morphometric characterisation of Onuf's nucleus in the spinal cord in man

    PubMed Central

    PULLEN, A. H.; TUCKER, D.; MARTIN, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    In the absence of a systematic morphometric study of Onuf's nucleus in man, this investigation defines the limits of variation of segmental position and the range of length and volume of Onuf's nucleus in 6 normal humans displaying no neurological disease (2 males, 4 females). Serial section reconstruction methods in conjunction with the disector method provided information on the numbers, sizes and shapes of the constituent motor neurons of Onuf's nucleus. In contrast to previous descriptions, the cranial origin of Onuf's nucleus occurred in rostral S1 in 50% of subjects, and midcaudal S1 in the remaining subjects. Onuf's nucleus varied in length between 4 and 7 mm, and was 0.2–0.37 mm3 in volume. Differences in length or volume between males or females, or between the left and right side of the cord were not statistically significant. Neurons in Onuf's nucleus varied in diameter between 10 μm and 60 μm (mean 26 μm) and their mean number was 625±137. A higher density of neurons occurred at the cranial and caudal ends of the nucleus relative to the middle. While 37% of neurons were approximately spherical (shape index ∼1), 44% were ellipsoid and 19% fusiform (shape indices varying between 0.26 and 0.8). These findings are compared with previous studies of Onuf's nucleus in man and animals. The results form a basis for further studies on Onuf's nucleus in normality and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:9306197

  1. Kaon Nucleus Interaction Studied by the In-Flight (K-, n) Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Ajimura, S.; Minami, S.; Sakaguchi, A.; Shimizu, Y.; Chrien, R. E.; May, M.; Pile, P.; Rusek, A.; Sutter, R.; Noumi, H.; Tamura, H.; Ukai, M.; Miura, Y.; Tanida, K.

    2004-06-01

    The kaon-nucleus interaction was studied by the in-flight (K-, n) reaction. The reaction can place a kaon in a nucleus where the kaon is in an unbound region to deeply bound region depending on the kaon-nucleus potential. The observed missing mass spectra shows that the kaon-nucleus potential is strongly attractive. The interaction is so strong that it could realize the so-called kaon condensation in the core of neutron stars. Although it contradict to many theoretical predictions.

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptors destined for the nucleus are internalized via a clathrin-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    De Angelis Campos, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Andrade, Carolina de; Miranda de Goes, Alfredo; Nathanson, Michael H.; Gomes, Dawidson A.

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} EGF and its receptor translocates to the nucleus in liver cells. {yields} Real time imaging shows that EGF moves to the nucleus. {yields} EGF moves with its receptor to the nucleus. {yields} Dynamin and clathrin are necessary for EGFR nuclear translocation. -- Abstract: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) transduces its actions via the EGF receptor (EGFR), which can traffic from the plasma membrane to either the cytoplasm or the nucleus. However, the mechanism by which EGFR reaches the nucleus is unclear. To investigate these questions, liver cells were analyzed by immunoblot of cell fractions, confocal immunofluorescence and real time confocal imaging. Cell fractionation studies showed that EGFR was detectable in the nucleus after EGF stimulation with a peak in nuclear receptor after 10 min. Movement of EGFR to the nucleus was confirmed by confocal immunofluorescence and labeled EGF moved with the receptor to the nucleus. Small interference RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown clathrin in order to assess the first endocytic steps of EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells. A mutant dynamin (dynamin K44A) was also used to determine the pathways for this traffic. Movement of labeled EGF or EGFR to the nucleus depended upon dynamin and clathrin. This identifies the pathway that mediates the first steps for EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells.

  3. Recognition of Chewing Behavior from Electroencephalogram Recorded in the Rat's Nucleus Accumbens.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiaozhuo; Zhang, Hengyi; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2005-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens is used to be considered as the interface to motor nerve system. In this paper, our object is to study the relationship between the electro-activity of neurons in nucleus accumbens and the rat-behavior. We recorded neurons action potentials with multichannel microelectrodes, which were chronically implanted in a rat's nucleus accumbens, during rats-chewing behavior. Through digital signal processing, we found significant features associated with the chewing activity and we could recognize the chewing behavior easily from the electroencephalogram with these features. This study suggests that neurons action potentials in a nucleus accumbens are activated by specific animal actions. PMID:17282644

  4. Electrical microstimulation of the nucleus incertus induces forward locomotion and rotation in rats.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Usman; Kumar, Jigna Rajesh; Rajkumar, Ramamoorthy; Dawe, Gavin S

    2016-06-01

    Locomotion is essential for goal-oriented behavior. Theta frequency oscillations in the hippocampus have been associated with behavioral activation and initiation of movement. Recently, the nucleus incertus, a brainstem nucleus with widespread cortical and subcortical projections, has been reported to modulate the septo-hippocampal axis triggering theta activity in the hippocampus. This suggests that activation of the nucleus incertus would induce movement. In this study, we investigated the effects of electrical microstimulation of the nucleus incertus on locomotion in conscious rats. Rats chronically implanted with microelectrodes targeting the nucleus incertus were electrically stimulated while their behavior was tracked. High frequency electrical microstimulation of the nucleus incertus was sufficient to induce forward locomotion and rotation. The latencies of evoked locomotion were consistent with a role of the nucleus incertus in modulating premotor areas, possibly the septo-hippocampal axis. Electrical microstimulation of the nucleus incertus increased velocity, mobility and rotations during stimulation and post-stimulation. These results suggest that the nucleus incertus plays a role in behavioral activation and locomotion. PMID:27049117

  5. Central Pupillary Light Reflex Circuits in the Cat: I. The Olivary Pretectal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wensi; May, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The central pathways subserving the feline pupillary light reflex were examined by defining retinal input to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPt), the midbrain projections of this nucleus, and the premotor neurons within it. Unilateral intravitreal wheat germ agglutinin conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections revealed differences in the pattern of retinal OPt termination on the two sides. Injections of WGA-HRP into OPt labeled terminals bilaterally in the anteromedian nucleus, and to a lesser extent in the supraoculomotor area, centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus and nucleus of the posterior commissure. Labeled terminals, as well as retrogradely labeled multipolar cells, were present in the contralateral OPt, indicating a commissural pathway. Injections of WGA-HRP into the anteromedian nucleus labeled fusiform premotor neurons within the OPt, as well as multipolar cells in the nucleus of the posterior commissure. Connections between retinal terminals and the pretectal premotor neurons were characterized by combining vitreous chamber and anteromedian nucleus injections of WGA-HRP in the same animal. Fusiform shaped, retrogradely labeled cells fell within the anterogradely labeled retinal terminal field in OPt. Ultrastructural analysis revealed labeled retinal terminals containing clear spherical vesicles. They contacted labeled pretectal premotor neurons via asymmetric synaptic densities. These results provide an anatomical substrate for the pupillary light reflex in the cat. Pretectal premotor neurons receive direct retinal input via synapses suggestive of an excitatory drive, and project directly to nuclei containing preganglionic motoneurons. These projections are concentrated in the anteromedian nucleus, indicating its involvement in the pupillary light reflex. PMID:24706328

  6. Probing the Nucleus with Deuteron+Gold Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citron, Zvi Hirsh

    2011-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was built to produce and study Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), the phase of matter thought to exist under conditions sufficiently hot and dense to create a medium in which the degrees of freedom are quarks and gluons rather than color neutral hadrons. Already in its early years of running, the data from RHIC provided tantalizing evidence of QGP signatures in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. A crucial part of understanding the putative QGP in Au+Au collisions is to have both a well understood reference as well as a robust control experiment. Proton-proton collisions at the same sNN serve as the baseline for heavy ion collisions at RHIC, and play an invaluable role in setting our frame of reference in interactions that do not create any nuclear medium. For the control experiment, RHIC's ability to collide asymmetric beams is utilized and d+Au collisions are used. Unlike p+p collisions, in the d+Au system there is a nuclear medium present---the heavy Au nucleus---and so we may study this system to distinguish initial state cold nuclear matter effects from final state effects that occur in the hot dense medium of Au+Au collisions. Beyond its use as a control experiment, the d+Au collision system presents the opportunity for important study of nuclear and nucleonic structure, it is after all necessary for our colored parton theory to operate in the nucleus as well as in a QGP. Deuteron - gold collisions at RHIC are a powerful tool for shedding light on cold nuclear matter effects. This thesis describes two analyses of d+Au collisions measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The first is a measurement of the midrapidity yield of unidentified charged hadrons in the 2003 RHIC run. This is used a key baseline for understanding particle production in Au+Au collisions as well as a detailed look at the Cronin effect. The second analysis measures rapidity separated two-particle production where one of the particles is at either forward

  7. Characteristics of near response cells projecting to the oculomotor nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Mays, L E; Gamlin, P D

    1992-04-01

    1. Previous work has shown neurons just dorsal and lateral to the oculomotor nucleus that increase their firing rate with increases in the angle of ocular convergence. It has been suggested that the output of these midbrain near response cells might provide the vergence command needed by the medial rectus motoneurons. However, lens accommodation ordinarily accompanies convergence, and a subsequent study showed that only about one-half of these midbrain near response cells carried a signal related exclusively to vergence. One hypothesis suggested by this finding is that this subgroup of neurons might have a unique role in providing a "pure" vergence signal to the medial rectus motoneurons. 2. In the present study extracellular recordings were made from midbrain near response cells in monkeys while eye position and lens accommodation were measured. The monkeys viewed targets through an optical system that allowed the accommodative and ocular vergence demands to be manipulated independently. This approach was used to produce a partial dissociation of accommodative and vergence responses, so that an accommodative and vergence coefficient could be determined for each cell, by the use of the following equation FR = R0 + kda x AR + kdv x CR where FR is the firing rate of the near response cell, R0 is the predicted firing rate for a distant target, kda is the (dissociated) accommodation coefficient, AR is the accommodative response, kdv is the (dissociated) vergence coefficient, and CR is the convergence response. 3. The vergence and accommodation coefficients were determined for a large number of midbrain near response cells, including a subset that could be antidromically activated from the medial rectus subdivisions of the oculomotor nucleus. Some near response neurons were found with signals related exclusively to convergence (i.e., kdv greater than 0 and kda = 0), whereas several others had signals related exclusively to lens accommodation (i.e., kda greater than 0

  8. Probing the maximally deformed light rare-earth region around the drip-line nucleus 130Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, M.; Paul, E. S.; Nolan, P. J.; Boston, A. J.; Cooper, R. J.; Dimmock, M. R.; Gros, S.; McGuirk, B. M.; Scraggs, H. C.; Turk, G.; Rossé, B.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Schmitt, Ch; Stézowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph; DeFrance, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.; Rejmund, F.; Rejmund, M.; Savajols, H.; Scheurer, J. N.; Astier, A.; Deloncle, I.; Prévost, A.; Nyakó, B. M.; Gál, J.; Molnár, J.; Timár, J.; Zolnai, L.; Juhász, K.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Wadsworth, R.; Joshi, P.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Trotta, M.; Vardaci, E.; Hackman, G.; Ball, G.

    2006-07-01

    The neutron deficient rare-earth nuclei of the A~130 region are of particular interest since highly deformed prolate ground states are expected. Indeed these nuclei are predicted to show maximal ground-state deformations of β2 ~ 0.40 (axis ratio of 3:2), comparable to the deformation deduced for superdeformed cerium isotopes at high spin. A fusion-evaporation experiment was performed with radioactive ion beams at GANIL in October 2004 which had the goal to reach very proton-rich exotic nuclei located near the proton drip-line. A radioactive 76Kr beam, delivered by the SPIRAL facility, was used to bombard a thin 58Ni target. Emitted γ-rays were detected by the EXOGAM γ-ray spectrometer which was, for the first time, coupled with both the DIAMANT charged-particle array and the VAMOS spectrometer.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Nucleon-Nucleus Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiringa, R. B.; Nollett, Kenneth M.; Pieper, Steven C.; Brida, I.

    2009-10-01

    We report recent quantum Monte Carlo (variational and Green's function) calculations of elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering. We are adding the cases of proton-^4He, neutron-^3H and proton-^3He scattering to a previous GFMC study of neutron-^4He scattering [1]. To do this requires generalizing our methods to include long-range Coulomb forces and to treat coupled channels. The two four-body cases can be compared to other accurate four-body calculational methods such as the AGS equations and hyperspherical harmonic expansions. We will present results for the Argonne v18 interaction alone and with Urbana and Illinois three-nucleon potentials. [4pt] [1] K.M. Nollett, S. C. Pieper, R.B. Wiringa, J. Carlson, and G.M. Hale, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 022502 (2007)

  10. Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sherwood

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

  11. Nucleus accumbens core lesions enhance two-way active avoidance.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, N T; Kashtelyan, V; Burton, A C; Bissonette, G B; Roesch, M R

    2014-01-31

    The majority of work examining the nucleus accumbens core (NAc) has focused on functions pertaining to behaviors guided by appetitive outcomes. These studies have pointed to the NAc as being critical for motivating behavior toward desirable outcomes. For example, we have recently shown that lesions of the NAc impaired performance on a reward-guided decision-making task that required rats to choose between differently valued rewards. Unfortunately, much less is known about the role that the NAc plays in motivating behavior when aversive outcomes are predicted. To address this issue we asked if NAc lesions impact performance on a two-way active avoidance task in which rats must learn to shuttle back and forth in a behavioral training box in order to avoid a footshock predicted by an auditory tone. Although bilateral NAc lesions initially impaired reward-guided decision-making, we found that the same lesions improved acquisition and retention of two-way active avoidance. PMID:24275320

  12. The Subthalamic Nucleus During Decision-Making With Multiple Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Bogacz, Rafal; Schäfer, Andreas; Neumann, Jane; Turner, Robert; Forstmann, Birte U.

    2016-01-01

    Several prominent neurocomputational models predict that an increase of choice alternatives is modulated by increased activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). In turn, increased STN activity allows prolonged accumulation of information. At the same time, areas in the medial frontal cortex such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the pre-SMA are hypothesized to influence the information processing in the STN. This study set out to test concrete predictions of STN activity in multiple-alternative decision-making using a multimodal combination of 7 Tesla structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and ancestral graph (AG) modeling. The results are in line with the predictions in that increased STN activity was found with an increasing amount of choice alternatives. In addition, our study shows that activity in the ACC is correlated with activity in the STN without directly modulating it. This result sheds new light on the information processing streams between medial frontal cortex and the basal ganglia. PMID:26178078

  13. How to rule the nucleus: divide et impera.

    PubMed

    Solovei, Irina; Thanisch, Katharina; Feodorova, Yana

    2016-06-01

    Genome-wide molecular studies have provided new insights into the organization of nuclear chromatin by revealing the presence of chromatin domains of differing transcriptional activity, frequency of cis-interactions, proximity to scaffolding structures and replication timing. These studies have not only brought our understanding of genome function to a new level, but also offered functional insight for many phenomena observed in microscopic studies. In this review, we discuss the major principles of nuclear organization based on the spatial segregation of euchromatin and heterochromatin, as well as the dynamic genome rearrangements occurring during cell differentiation and development. We hope to unite the existing molecular and microscopic data on genome organization to get a holistic view of the nucleus, and propose a model, in which repeat repertoire together with scaffolding structures blueprint the functional nuclear architecture. PMID:26938331

  14. Isoperiodic neuronal activity in suprachiasmatic nucleus of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. D.; Fuller, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    A subpopulation of neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is shown here to exhibit isoperiodic bursting activity. The period of discharge in these cells may be lengthened or the periodicity may be transiently disrupted by photic stimulation. It is suggested that many, if not all, of these cells are vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) neurons. It is shown that the ultradian periodicity of these cells, estimates of the VIP neuron population size in the SCN, effects of partial lesions on tau (period), and estimates of the phase stability of SCN-driven circadian rhythms are consistent with a strongly coupled, multioscillator model of circadian rhythmicity, in which the oscillator population constitutes a restricted subset of the SCN neuronal population.

  15. Neuropsychological functioning following bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Morrison, C E; Borod, J C; Perrine, K; Beric, A; Brin, M F; Rezai, A; Kelly, P; Sterio, D; Germano, I; Weisz, D; Olanow, C W

    2004-03-01

    The cognitive effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been examined. However, there are no reported studies that evaluate, by incorporating a disease control group, whether neuropsychological performance in surgical patients changes beyond the variability of the assessment measures. To examine this issue, 17 PD patients were tested before and after bilateral STN stimulator implantation, both on and off stimulation. Eleven matched PD controls were administered the same repeatable neuropsychological test battery twice. Relative to changes seen in the controls, the surgery for electrode placement mildly adversely affected attention and language functions. STN stimulation, per se, had little effect on cognition. The STN DBS procedure as a whole resulted in a mild decline in delayed verbal recall and language functions. There were no surgery, stimulation, or procedure effects on depression scale scores. In contrast to these group findings, one DBS patient demonstrated significant cognitive decline following surgery. PMID:15010083

  16. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation reverses mediofrontal influence over decision threshold.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Wiecki, Thomas V; Cohen, Michael X; Figueroa, Christina M; Samanta, Johan; Sherman, Scott J; Frank, Michael J

    2011-11-01

    It takes effort and time to tame one's impulses. Although medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is broadly implicated in effortful control over behavior, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is specifically thought to contribute by acting as a brake on cortico-striatal function during decision conflict, buying time until the right decision can be made. Using the drift diffusion model of decision making, we found that trial-to-trial increases in mPFC activity (EEG theta power, 4-8 Hz) were related to an increased threshold for evidence accumulation (decision threshold) as a function of conflict. Deep brain stimulation of the STN in individuals with Parkinson's disease reversed this relationship, resulting in impulsive choice. In addition, intracranial recordings of the STN area revealed increased activity (2.5-5 Hz) during these same high-conflict decisions. Activity in these slow frequency bands may reflect a neural substrate for cortico-basal ganglia communication regulating decision processes. PMID:21946325

  17. Inclusive jet production in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepelitsa, Dennis V.

    High-pT processes in proton- and deuteron-nucleus collisions at TeV energies are the best presently available way to study the partonic structure of the nucleus in a high-density regime. Jet production over a wide range of phase space can significantly constrain the current knowledge of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs), which are substantially less well understood than the corresponding PDFs in protons and which have only recently begun to be treated in a spatially-dependent way. An accurate knowledge of nPDFs is crucial for a definitive control of perturbative processes in a cold nuclear environment, since high-pT probes are used to quantitatively investigate the hot QCD matter created in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Furthermore, jets from low Bjorken-x partons can probe the transition from the dilute to saturated nuclear regimes. Jet production is investigated in d+Au collisions at √s = 200 GeV with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and in p+Pb collisions at √s = 5.02 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The measurements shown here utilize ∫Ldt = 23 nb-1 and 0.2 pb-1 of 200 GeV d+Au and pp data, respectively, recorded in 2007-8 at RHIC and ∫Ldt = 31 nb -1 and 4.1 pb-1 of 5.02 TeV p+Pb and 2.76 TeV pp data, respectively, recorded in 2013 at the LHC. Jets are reconstructed using the sigma=0.3 Gaussian filter and R=0.4, 0.6 anti-kT algorithms. Inclusive, centrality-dependent jet yields within |eta| < 0.35 and 10 GeV < p T < 40 GeV in 200 GeV d+Au and pp collisions are presented. The jet yield in d+Au collisions relative to the geometric expectation is found to be slightly suppressed (≍0.9) in central events and moderately enhanced (≍1.3) in peripheral events, with no modification when averaged over all d+Au events. Separately, inclusive, centrality-dependent jet yields within |y *| < 4.4 and 25 GeV < pT < 800 GeV in 5.02 TeV p+Pb and 2.76 TeV pp collisions are

  18. The subthalamic nucleus during decision-making with multiple alternatives.

    PubMed

    Keuken, Max C; Van Maanen, Leendert; Bogacz, Rafal; Schäfer, Andreas; Neumann, Jane; Turner, Robert; Forstmann, Birte U

    2015-10-01

    Several prominent neurocomputational models predict that an increase of choice alternatives is modulated by increased activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). In turn, increased STN activity allows prolonged accumulation of information. At the same time, areas in the medial frontal cortex such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the pre-SMA are hypothesized to influence the information processing in the STN. This study set out to test concrete predictions of STN activity in multiple-alternative decision-making using a multimodal combination of 7 Tesla structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and ancestral graph (AG) modeling. The results are in line with the predictions in that increased STN activity was found with an increasing amount of choice alternatives. In addition, our study shows that activity in the ACC is correlated with activity in the STN without directly modulating it. This result sheds new light on the information processing streams between medial frontal cortex and the basal ganglia. PMID:26178078

  19. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  20. Semi-inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moreno, O.; Donnelly, T. W.; Van Orden, J. W.; Ford, W. P.

    2014-07-17

    The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case ofmore » the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. As a result, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.« less

  1. One-pion production in neutrino-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, E.; Nieves, J.; Vicente-Vacas, J. M.

    2015-05-15

    We use our model for neutrino pion production on the nucleon to study pion production on a nucleus. The model is conveniently modified to include in-medium corrections and its validity is extended up to 2 GeV neutrino energies by the inclusion of new resonant contributions in the production process. Our results are compared with recent MiniBooNE data measured in mineral oil. Our total cross sections are below data for neutrino energies above ≈ 1 GeV. As with other theoretical calculations, the agreement with data improves if we neglect pion final state interaction. This is also the case for differential cross sections convoluted over the neutrino flux.

  2. Mechanical and SEM analysis of artificial comet nucleus samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiel, K.; Kochan, H.; Roessler, K.; Gruen, E.; Schwehm, G.; Hellmann, H.; Hsiung, P.; Koelzer, G.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1987 experiments dealing with comet nucleus phenomena have been carried out in the DFVLR space simulation chambers. The main objective of these experiments is a better understanding of thermal behavior, surface phenomena and especially the gas dust interaction. As a function of different sample compositions and exposure to solar irradiation (xenon-bulbs) crusts of different hardness and thickness were measured. The measuring device consists of a motor driven pressure foot (5 mm diameter), which is pressed into the sample. The applied compressive force is electronically monitored. The microstructure of the crust and dust residuals is investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Stress-depth profiles of an unirradiated and an irradiated model comet are given.

  3. Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus encode reward signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Weixin; Wang, Daqing; Feng, Qiru; Liu, Zhixiang; Zhou, Jingfeng; Jia, Chunying; Hu, Fei; Zeng, Jiawei; Guo, Qingchun; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in organizing reward-related behaviours; however, it remains unclear how genetically defined neurons in the DRN of a freely behaving animal respond to various natural rewards. Here we addressed this question using fibre photometry and single-unit recording from serotonin (5-HT) neurons and GABA neurons in the DRN of behaving mice. Rewards including sucrose, food, sex and social interaction rapidly activate 5-HT neurons, but aversive stimuli including quinine and footshock do not. Both expected and unexpected rewards activate 5-HT neurons. After mice learn to wait for sucrose delivery, most 5-HT neurons fire tonically during waiting and then phasically on reward acquisition. Finally, GABA neurons are activated by aversive stimuli but inhibited when mice seek rewards. Thus, DRN 5-HT neurons positively encode a wide range of reward signals during anticipatory and consummatory phases of reward responses. Moreover, GABA neurons play a complementary role in reward processing. PMID:26818705

  4. Sensory Deviancy Detection Measured Directly Within the Human Nucleus Accumbens.

    PubMed

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Zaehle, Tino; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Voges, Jürgen; Garrido, Marta I; Dolan, Raymond J; Knight, Robert T

    2016-03-01

    Rapid changes in the environment evoke a comparison between expectancy and actual outcome to inform optimal subsequent behavior. The nucleus accumbens (NAcc), a key interface between the hippocampus and neocortical regions, is a candidate region for mediating this comparison. Here, we report event-related potentials obtained from the NAcc using direct intracranial recordings in 5 human participants while they listened to trains of auditory stimuli differing in their degree of deviation from repetitive background stimuli. NAcc recordings revealed an early mismatch signal (50-220 ms) in response to all deviants. NAcc activity in this time window was also sensitive to the statistics of stimulus deviancy, with larger amplitudes as a function of the level of deviancy. Importantly, this NAcc mismatch signal also predicted generation of longer latency scalp potentials (300-400 ms). The results provide direct human evidence that the NAcc is a key component of a network engaged in encoding statistics of the sensory environmental. PMID:25576536

  5. Models of chromatin spatial organisation in the cell nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicodemi, Mario

    2014-03-01

    In the cell nucleus chromosomes have a complex architecture serving vital functional purposes. Recent experiments have started unveiling the interaction map of DNA sites genome-wide, revealing different levels of organisation at different scales. The principles, though, which orchestrate such a complex 3D structure remain still mysterious. I will overview the scenario emerging from some classical polymer physics models of the general aspect of chromatin spatial organisation. The available experimental data, which can be rationalised in a single framework, support a picture where chromatin is a complex mixture of differently folded regions, self-organised across spatial scales according to basic physical mechanisms. I will also discuss applications to specific DNA loci, e.g. the HoxB locus, where models informed with biological details, and tested against targeted experiments, can help identifying the determinants of folding.

  6. The suprachiasmatic nucleus: age-related decline in biological rhythms.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takahiro J; Takasu, Nana N; Nakamura, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with changes in sleep duration and quality, as well as increased rates of pathologic/disordered sleep. While several factors contribute to these changes, emerging research suggests that age-related changes in the mammalian central circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) may be a key factor. Prior work from our group suggests that circadian output from the SCN declines because of aging. Furthermore, we have previously observed age-related infertility in female mice, caused by a mismatch between environmental light-dark cycles and the intrinsic, internal biological clocks. In this review, we address regulatory mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in mammals and summarize recent literature describing the effects of aging on the circadian system. PMID:26915078

  7. Reward and reinforcement activity in the nucleus accumbens during learning

    PubMed Central

    Gale, John T.; Shields, Donald C.; Ishizawa, Yumiko; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens core (NAcc) has been implicated in learning associations between sensory cues and profitable motor responses. However, the precise mechanisms that underlie these functions remain unclear. We recorded single-neuron activity from the NAcc of primates trained to perform a visual-motor associative learning task. During learning, we found two distinct classes of NAcc neurons. The first class demonstrated progressive increases in firing rates at the go-cue, feedback/tone and reward epochs of the task, as novel associations were learned. This suggests that these neurons may play a role in the exploitation of rewarding behaviors. In contrast, the second class exhibited attenuated firing rates, but only at the reward epoch of the task. These findings suggest that some NAcc neurons play a role in reward-based reinforcement during learning. PMID:24765069

  8. MINER{nu}A, a Neutrino--Nucleus Interaction Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Solano Salinas, C. J.; Chamorro, A.; Romero, C.

    2007-10-26

    With the fantastic results of KamLAND and SNO for neutrino physics, a new generation of neutrino experiments are being designed and build, specially to study the neutrino oscillations to resolve most of the incognita still we have in the neutrino physics. At FERMILAB we have the experiments MINOS and, in a near future, NO{nu}A, to study this kind of oscillations. One big problem these experiments will have is the lack of a good knowledge of the Physics of neutrino interactions with matter, and this will generate big systematic errors. MINER{nu}A, also at FERMILAB, will cover this space studying with high statistics and great precision the neutrino--nucleus interactions.

  9. Plastid-nucleus communication involves calcium-modulated MAPK signalling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hailong; Feng, Peiqiang; Chi, Wei; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Li, Yuan; Ren, Dongtao; Lu, Congming; David Rochaix, Jean; Leister, Dario; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signals play important roles in coordinating the plastid and nuclear gene expression and are critical for proper chloroplast biogenesis and for maintaining optimal chloroplast functions in response to environmental changes in plants. Until now, the signals and the mechanisms for retrograde signalling remain poorly understood. Here we identify factors that allow the nucleus to perceive stress conditions in the chloroplast and to respond accordingly by inducing or repressing specific nuclear genes encoding plastid proteins. We show that ABI4, which is known to repress the LHCB genes during retrograde signalling, is activated through phosphorylation by the MAP kinases MPK3/MPK6 and the activity of these kinases is regulated through 14-3-3ω-mediated Ca(2+)-dependent scaffolding depending on the chloroplast calcium sensor protein CAS. These findings uncover an additional mechanism in which chloroplast-modulated Ca(2+) signalling controls the MAPK pathway for the activation of critical components of the retrograde signalling chain. PMID:27399341

  10. Hadron dynamics in high-energy pion-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1992-12-31

    It is argued that pion-nucleus scattering at high energy (above 300 MeV) is likely to be easier to interpret than it has been at lower energies where the {Delta}{sub 33} resonance dominates. We establish this by examining the relative importance of various dynamic ingredients of scattering theory for high-energy pions and comparing different versions of the theory: a ``model-exact`` microscopic optical model and an eikonal approximation. For nuclei as heavy as Ca, the eikonal theory is an excellent approximation to the full theory for the angular distribution out to the position of the second minimum in the cross section. The prospects for using high-energy pions to examine modifications of nucleons and baryon resonances in nuclei, nuclear structure, exchange currents, short-range correlations, and to characterize pion propagation are discussed.

  11. Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus encode reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Weixin; Wang, Daqing; Feng, Qiru; Liu, Zhixiang; Zhou, Jingfeng; Jia, Chunying; Hu, Fei; Zeng, Jiawei; Guo, Qingchun; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in organizing reward-related behaviours; however, it remains unclear how genetically defined neurons in the DRN of a freely behaving animal respond to various natural rewards. Here we addressed this question using fibre photometry and single-unit recording from serotonin (5-HT) neurons and GABA neurons in the DRN of behaving mice. Rewards including sucrose, food, sex and social interaction rapidly activate 5-HT neurons, but aversive stimuli including quinine and footshock do not. Both expected and unexpected rewards activate 5-HT neurons. After mice learn to wait for sucrose delivery, most 5-HT neurons fire tonically during waiting and then phasically on reward acquisition. Finally, GABA neurons are activated by aversive stimuli but inhibited when mice seek rewards. Thus, DRN 5-HT neurons positively encode a wide range of reward signals during anticipatory and consummatory phases of reward responses. Moreover, GABA neurons play a complementary role in reward processing. PMID:26818705

  12. Laser-nucleus interactions: The quasi-adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálffy, Adriana; Buss, Oliver; Hoefer, Axel; Weidenmüller, Hans A.

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between nuclei and a strong zeptosecond laser pulse with coherent MeV photons is investigated theoretically. We provide a first semiquantitative study of the quasi-adiabatic regime where the photon absorption rate is comparable to the nuclear equilibration rate. In that regime, multiple photon absorption leads to the formation of a compound nucleus in the so-far unexplored regime of excitation energies several hundred MeV above the yrast line. The temporal dynamics of the process is investigated by means of a set of master equations that account for dipole absorption, stimulated dipole emission, neutron decay, and induced fission in a chain of nuclei. That set is solved numerically by means of state-of-the-art matrix exponential methods also used in nuclear fuel burn-up and radioactivity transport calculations. Our quantitative estimates predict the excitation path and range of nuclei reached by neutron decay and provide relevant information for the layout of future experiments.

  13. Elongated shape isomers in the {sup 36}Ar nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, Jozsef; Darai, Judit; Sciani, Wagner; Otani, Yul; Lepine-Szily, Alinka; Benjamim, Elisangela A.; Chamon, Luiz Carlos; Filho, Rubens Lichtenthaeler

    2009-09-15

    A recent analysis of the {sup 12}C+{sup 24}Mg scattering [W. Sciani et al., Phys. Rev. C 80, 034319 (2009)] suggests the existence of a hyperdeformed band in the {sup 36}Ar nucleus, completely in line with the predictions of {alpha}[W. D. M. Rae and A. C. Merchant, Phys. Lett. B279, 207 (1992)] and binary cluster calculations [J. Cseh et al., Phys. Rev. C 70, 034311 (2004)]. Here we review the structural understanding of the superdeformed and the hyperdeformed states of {sup 36}Ar and present new results on the shape isomers as well. Special attention is paid to the clusterization of these states, which indicates the appropriate reaction channels for their formation.

  14. Star formation in the nucleus of NGC 253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Beckwith, S. V.

    1984-01-01

    The B-alpha and B-gamma lines of atomic hydrogen have been observed at eight positions near the nucleus of NGC 253 with 6 arcsec spatial resolution. Most if not all of the bolometric luminosity of the central 200 pc of this galaxy is probably produced by O and B stars which have recently formed. The spatial distribution of the line fluxes is similar to that of the 10 microns flux, supporting the hypothesis that the 10 microns radiation is powered by the newly formed stars. The extinction to the ionized gas varies over small distances in this region, explaining the discrepancies between extinction and Lyman continuum luminosity derived separately from visual and infrared line observations.

  15. Semi-inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, O.; Donnelly, T. W.; Van Orden, J. W.; Ford, W. P.

    2014-07-17

    The general, universal formalism for semi-inclusive charged-current (anti)neutrino-nucleus reactions is given for studies of any hadronic system, namely, either nuclei or the nucleon itself. The detailed developments are presented with the former in mind and are further specialized to cases where the final-state charged lepton and an ejected nucleon are presumed to be detected. General kinematics for such processes are summarized and then explicit expressions are developed for the leptonic and hadronic tensors involved and for the corresponding responses according to the usual charge, longitudinal and transverse projections, keeping finite the masses of all particles involved. In the case of the hadronic responses, general symmetry principles are invoked to determine which contributions can occur. As a result, the general leptonic-hadronic tensor contraction is given as well as the cross section for the process.

  16. Synchronization of Cellular Clocks in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Shun; Isejima, Hiromi; Matsuo, Takuya; Okura, Ryusuke; Yagita, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Masaki; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2003-11-01

    Individual cellular clocks in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the circadian center, are integrated into a stable and robust pacemaker with a period length of about 24 hours. We used real-time analysis of gene expression to show synchronized rhythms of clock gene transcription across hundreds of neurons within the mammalian SCN in organotypic slice culture. Differentially phased neuronal clocks are topographically arranged across the SCN. A protein synthesis inhibitor set all cell clocks to the same initial phase and, after withdrawal, intrinsic interactions among cell clocks reestablished the stable program of gene expression across the assemblage. Na+-dependent action potentials contributed to establishing cellular synchrony and maintaining spontaneous oscillation across the SCN.

  17. Psychosis post corona radiata and lentiform nucleus infarction.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Khadijah Hasanah Abang; Saini, Suriati Mohamed; Sharip, Shalisah; Rahman, Abdul Hamid Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Complications of stroke can include neuropsychiatric symptoms. However, post-stroke psychosis is rare. We report a case where an acute presentation of psychosis, depression and fluctuating cognitive impairment in a middle-aged man turned out to be related to a silent brain infarction. The patient had a background of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus with glycated haemoglobin level of 9.0-11.0%, hypertension and ischaemic heart disease. His CT brain results showed multifocal infarct with hypodensities at bilateral lentiform nucleus and bilateral corona radiata. His strong genetic predisposition of psychosis and a history of brief psychotic disorder with complete remission 3 years prior to the current presentation might possibly contribute to his post-stroke atypical neuropsychiatric presentation, and posed diagnostic challenges. He showed marked improvement with risperidone 6 mg nocte, chlorpromazine 50 mg nocte and fluvoxamine of 200 mg nocte. The need of comprehensive treatments to modify his stroke risk factors was addressed. PMID:25837653

  18. Neutrino-nucleus interactions in the T2K experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, T.; Mosel, U.

    2010-09-15

    We present a study of neutrino-nucleus interactions at the T2K experiment based on the GiBUU transport model. The aim of T2K is to measure {nu}{sub e} appearance and {theta}{sub 13}, but it will also be able to do a precise measurement of {nu}{sub {mu}}disappearance. The former requires a good understanding of {pi}{sup 0} production, while the latter is closely connected with a good understanding of quasielastic scattering. For both processes we investigate the influence of nuclear effects and particular final-state interactions on the expected event rates, taking into account the T2K detector setup.

  19. Total absorption spectroscopy of N = 51 nucleus 85Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, K. C.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Karny, M.; Fialkowska, A.; Wolinska-Cichocka, M.; Rasco, B. C.; Zganjar, E. F.; Johnson, J. W.; Gross, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    An experimental campaign utilizing the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) was conducted at the HRIBF facility in January of 2012. The campaign studied 22 isotopes, many of which were identified as the highest priority for decay heat analysis during a nuclear fuel cycle, see the report by the OECD-IAEA Nuclear Energy Agency in 2007. The case of 85Se will be discussed. 85Se is a Z = 34, N = 51 nucleus with the valence neutron located in the positive parity sd single particle state. Therefore, its decay properties are determined by interplay between first forbidden decays of the valence neutron and Gamow-Teller decay of a 78Ni core. Analysis of the data obtained during the January 2012 run indicates a significant increase of the beta strength function when compared with previous measurements, see Ref..

  20. In-beam spectroscopic studies of the 44S nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cáceres, L.; Sohler, D.; Grévy, S.; Sorlin, O.; Dombrádi, Zs.; Bastin, B.; Achouri, N. L.; Angélique, J. C.; Azaiez, F.; Baiborodin, D.; Borcea, R.; Bourgeois, C.; Buta, A.; Bürger, A.; Chapman, R.; Dalouzy, J. C.; Dlouhy, Z.; Drouard, A.; Elekes, Z.; Franchoo, S.; Gaudefroy, L.; Iacob, S.; Laurent, B.; Lazar, M.; Liang, X.; Liénard, E.; Mrazek, J.; Nalpas, L.; Negoita, F.; Nowacki, F.; Orr, N. A.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Podolyák, Zs.; Pougheon, F.; Poves, A.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Saint-Laurent, M. G.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefan, I.

    2012-02-01

    The structure of the 44S nucleus has been studied at GANIL through the one proton knock-out reaction from a 45Cl secondary beam at 42 A·MeV. The γ rays following the de-excitation of 44S were detected in flight using the 70 BaF2 detectors of the Château de Cristal array. An exhaustive γγ-coincidence analysis allowed an unambiguous construction of the level scheme up to an excitation energy of 3301 keV. The existence of the spherical 22+ state is confirmed and three new γ-ray transitions connecting the prolate deformed 21+ level were observed. Comparison of the experimental results to shell model calculations further supports a prolate and spherical shape coexistence with a large mixing of states built on the ground state band in 44S.

  1. Excited states of the odd-odd nucleus 230Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotthaus, T.; Reiter, P.; Hess, H.; Kalkühler, M.; Wendt, A.; Wiens, A.; Hertenberger, R.; Morgan, T.; Thirolf, P. G.; Wirth, H.-F.; Faestermann, T.

    2013-04-01

    The completely unknown spectrum of excited states of the odd-odd nucleus 230Pa was studied employing the one-neutron transfer reaction 231Pa(d,t)230Pa at a beam energy of 22 MeV. The excitation energy and the cross section were measured for, in total, 81 states below 1.4 MeV. Level assignments of these states are based on a semiempirical model and comparison with theoretical predictions, based on distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) calculations for the cross sections. For 12 rotational bands the band-head energy and the rotational parameter are determined. The K quantum numbers and the Nilsson configurations are established. Empirical values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings and for Newby shifts are obtained.

  2. Hyperfine structure constant of the neutron halo nucleus (11)Be(+).

    PubMed

    Takamine, A; Wada, M; Okada, K; Sonoda, T; Schury, P; Nakamura, T; Kanai, Y; Kubo, T; Katayama, I; Ohtani, S; Wollnik, H; Schuessler, H A

    2014-04-25

    The hyperfine splittings of ground state Be+11 have been measured precisely by laser-microwave double resonance spectroscopy for trapped and laser cooled beryllium ions. The ions were produced at relativistic energies and subsequently slowed down and trapped at mK temperatures. The magnetic hyperfine structure constant of Be+11 was determined to be A11=-2677.302 988(72)  MHz from the measurements of the mF-mF'=0-0 field independent transition. This measurement provides essential data for the study of the distribution of the halo neutron in the single neutron halo nucleus Be11 through the Bohr-Weisskopf effect. PMID:24815642

  3. Structure and organization of chromatin fiber in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohong; Zhu, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are organized hierarchically into chromatin structures by histones. Despite extensive research for over 30 years, not only the fundamental structure of the 30-nm chromatin fiber is being debated, but the actual existence of such fiber remains hotly contested. In this review, we focus on the most recent progress in elucidating the structure of the 30-nm fiber upon in vitro reconstitution, and its possible organization inside the nucleus. In addition, we discuss the roles of linker histone H1 as well as the importance of specific nucleosome-nucleosome interactions in the formation of the 30-nm fiber. Finally, we discuss the involvement of structural variations and epigenetic mechanisms available for the regulation of this chromatin form. PMID:25913782

  4. Role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in cardiovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sapru, Hreday N.

    2012-01-01

    Recently the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. Both pressor and depressor responses can be elicited by the chemical stimulation of the Arc. The direction of cardiovascular responses (increase or decrease) elicited from the Arc depends on the baseline blood pressure. The pressor responses are mediated via increase in sympathetic nerve activity and involve activation of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors. Arc-stimulation elicits tachycardic responses which are mediated via inhibition of vagal input and excitation of sympathetic input to the heart. The pathways within the brain mediating the pressor and tachycardic responses elicited from the Arc have not been delineated. The depressor responses to the Arc-stimulation are mediated via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors, neuropeptide Y1 receptors, and opiate receptors in the PVN mediate the depressor responses elicited from the Arc. Some circulating hormones (e.g., leptin and insulin) may reach the Arc via the leaky blood-brain barrier and elicit their cardiovascular effects. Although the Arc is involved in mediating the cardiovascular responses to intravenously injected angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-12), these effects may not be due to leakage of these peptides across the blood-brain barrier in the Arc; instead, circulating angiotensins may act on neurons in the SFO and mediate cardiovascular actions via the projections of SFO neurons to the Arc. Cardiovascular responses elicited by acupuncture have been reported to be mediated by direct and indirect projections of the Arc to the RVLM. PMID:23260431

  5. Antibodies to human caudate nucleus neurons in Huntington's chorea.

    PubMed Central

    Husby, G; Li, L; Davis, L E; Wedege, E; Kokmen, E; Williams, R C

    1977-01-01

    Antibodies reacting with neuronal cytoplasmic antigens present in normal human caudate and subthalamic nuclei were detected in 37 of 80 probands afflicted with Huntington's disease (HD). IgG antibodies were detected by immunofluorescence using frozen sections of unfixed normal human and rat brain. Specificity of IgG binding was confirmed using pepsin F(ab')2 fragments of IgG isolated from positive sera. In vitro complement fixation of IgG antibody was detected in 22 of 31 sera tested. Neuronal cytoplasmic antigens reacting with positive HD sera were diminished after trypsin or RNAase treatment of tissue sections but were not removed by DNAase, neuraminidase, EDTA, or dithiothreitol treatment. Antibody staining of neurons could be removed after absorption with isolated caudate nucleus neurons or by using perchloroacetic acid extracts of caudate nucleus. Prevalence of antibody reacting with neuronal cytoplasm was 3% in 60 normal controls and 6% among a wide variety of patients with diverse neurological disorders. However, one-third of 33 patients with Parkinson's disease showed presence of antineuronal antibody. Among patients with HD, a significant association was noted between duration of clinical disease greater than 7 yr and titers of antibody of 1:2 or greater (P less than 0.001). When 115 family members of HD probands were tested, 30% of unaffected spouses showed presence of antineuronal antibody. 23.2% of first-degree relatives at risk for developing HD was also positive (P less than 0.001). 10.5% of second-degree relatives showed presence of antineuronal antibody. These data may support an environmental or infectious factor somehow involved in the ultimate expression of HD. Images PMID:140183

  6. Intrinsic properties and neuropharmacology of midline paraventricular thalamic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li; Hermes, Michael L. H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei are components of an interconnected brainstem, limbic and prefrontal cortex neural network that is engaged during arousal, vigilance, motivated and addictive behaviors, and stress. To better understand the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions, here we review some of the recently characterized electrophysiological and neuropharmacological properties of neurons in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT), derived from whole cell patch clamp recordings in acute rat brain slice preparations. PVT neurons display firing patterns and ionic conductances (IT and IH) that exhibit significant diurnal change. Their resting membrane potential (RMP) is maintained by various ionic conductances that include inward rectifier (Kir), hyperpolarization-activated nonselective cation (HCN) and TWIK-related acid sensitive (TASK) K+ channels. Firing patterns are regulated by high voltage-activated (HVA) and low voltage-activated (LVA) Ca2+ conductances. Moreover, transient receptor potential (TRP)-like nonselective cation channels together with Ca2+- and Na+-activated K+ conductances (KCa; KNa) contribute to unique slow afterhyperpolarizing potentials (sAHPs) that are generally not detectable in lateral thalamic or reticular thalamic nucleus neurons. The excitability of PVT neurons is also modulated by activation of neurotransmitter receptors associated with afferent pathways to PVT and other thalamic midline nuclei. We report on receptor-mediated actions of GABA, glutamate, monoamines and several neuropeptides: arginine vasopressin, gastrin-releasing peptide, thyrotropin releasing hormone and the orexins (hypocretins). This review represents an initial survey of intrinsic and transmitter-sensitive ionic conductances that are deemed to be unique to this population of midline thalamic neurons, information that is fundamental to an appreciation of the role these thalamic neurons may play in normal central nervous system

  7. The dolphin cochlear nucleus: topography, histology and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Malkemper, E P; Oelschläger, H H A; Huggenberger, S

    2012-02-01

    Despite the outstanding auditory capabilities of dolphins, there is only limited information available on the cytology of the auditory brain stem nuclei in these animals. Here, we investigated the cochlear nuclei (CN) of five brains of common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) and La Plata dolphins (Pontoporia blainvillei) using cell and fiber stain microslide series representing the three main anatomical planes. In general, the CN in dolphins comprise the same set of subnuclei as in other mammals. However, the volume ratio of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) in relation to the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) of dolphins represents a minimum among the mammals examined so far. Because, for example, in cats the DCN is necessary for reflexive orientation of the head and pinnae towards a sound source, the massive restrictions in head movability in dolphins and the absence of outer ears may be correlated with the reduction of the DCN. Moreover, the same set of main neuron types were found in the dolphin CN as in other mammals, including octopus and multipolar cells. Because the latter two types of neurons are thought to be involved in the recognition of complex sounds, including speech, we suggest that, in dolphins, they may be involved in the processing of their communication signals. Comparison of the toothed whale species studied here revealed that large spherical cells were present in the La Plata dolphin but absent in the common dolphin. These neurons are known to be engaged in the processing of low-frequency sounds in terrestrial mammals. Accordingly, in the common dolphin, the absence of large spherical cells seems to be correlated with a shift of its auditory spectrum into the high-frequency range above 20 kHz. The existence of large spherical cells in the VCN of the La Plata dolphin, however, is enigmatic asthis species uses frequencies around 130 kHz. PMID:21987441

  8. Role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Hreday N

    2013-04-01

    Recently the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. Both pressor and depressor responses can be elicited by the chemical stimulation of the Arc. The direction of cardiovascular responses (increase or decrease) elicited from the Arc depends on the baseline blood pressure. The pressor responses are mediated via increase in sympathetic nerve activity and involve activation of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors. Arc-stimulation elicits tachycardic responses which are mediated via inhibition of vagal input and excitation of sympathetic input to the heart. The pathways within the brain mediating the pressor and tachycardic responses elicited from the Arc have not been delineated. The depressor responses to the Arc-stimulation are mediated via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors, neuropeptide Y1 receptors, and opiate receptors in the PVN mediate the depressor responses elicited from the Arc. Some circulating hormones (e.g., leptin and insulin) may reach the Arc via the leaky blood-brain barrier and elicit their cardiovascular effects. Although the Arc is involved in mediating the cardiovascular responses to intravenously injected angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-12), these effects may not be due to leakage of these peptides across the blood-brain barrier in the Arc; instead, circulating angiotensins may act on neurons in the SFO and mediate cardiovascular actions via the projections of SFO neurons to the Arc. Cardiovascular responses elicited by acupuncture have been reported to be mediated by direct and indirect projections of the Arc to the RVLM. PMID:23260431

  9. Torsional ultrasound modality for hard nucleus phacoemulsification cataract extraction

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, M; Liu, X; Liu, Y; Xia, Y; Luo, L; Yuan, Z; Zeng, Y; Liu, Y

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of phacoemulsification using torsional modality with different parameter settings for hard nucleus cataract extraction. Design: A prospective, randomised clinical study. Methods: A clinical practice study conducted at the Cataract Service, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun-Yat-Sen University, and Guangzhou. One eye each from 198 consecutive patients with cataract density grade IV according to the Emery–Little system classification system, requiring phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation, was included. Eyes were randomly assigned to the Linear Torsional combined with Ultrasound power group (Linear Tor+US group, n = 66), 100% Fixed Torsional group (Fixed Tor group, n = 65) and conventional Ultrasound burst group (US group, n = 67). All surgeries were performed by a single experienced surgeon and outcomes evaluated by another surgeon masked to treatment. Intraoperative parameters were Ultrasound Time (UST), Cumulative Dissipated Energy (CDE) and surgical complications. Patients were examined on post-op days 1, 7 and 30. Postoperative outcomes were final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), average central and incisional corneal thickness and central endothelial cell counts. Results: The mean UST was lower in the Fixed Tor group than in the US group and in the Lin US+Tor group (p⩽0.0001). The mean CDE was lower in the Lin Tor+US group and in the Fixed Tor group than in the US group (p⩽0.0001). Comparing with the two Tor group, the US group had a lower average BCVA on post-op 1, 7 (p⩽0.0001) and 30 (p>0.01), greater average central corneal and incisional thickness on days 1, 7 (p⩽0.0001) and 30 (p>0.01), and higher average corneal endothelial cell losses on day 7 and 30 days (p⩽0.0001). Conclusions: Torsional combined with ultrasound power or high fixed torsional amplitude can yield more effective hard nucleus phacoemulsification than conventional ultrasound modality. PMID:18567650

  10. Afferent connections of the parabrachial nucleus in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Tokita, Kenichi; Inoue, Tomio; Boughter, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Although the mouse is an experimental model with an increasing importance in various fields of Neuroscience, the characteristics of its central gustatory pathways have not yet been well documented. Recent electrophysiological studies using the rat and hamster have revealed that taste processing in the brainstem gustatory relays is under the strong influence of inputs from forebrain gustatory structures. In the present study, we investigated the organization of afferent projections to the mouse parabrachial nucleus (PbN), which is located at a key site between the brainstem and gustatory, viscerosensory and autonomic centers in the forebrain. We made injections of the retrograde tracer Fluorogold centered around the “waist” area of the PbN, whose neurons are known to be highly responsive to taste stimuli. Retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the infralimbic, dysgranular and agranular insular cortex as well as the claustrum; the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the substantia innominata; the central nucleus of the amygdala; the lateral and medial preoptic areas, the paraventricular, the dorsomedial, the ventromedial, the arcuate, and the lateral hypothalamic areas; the periaqueductal gray, the substantia nigra pars compacta, and the ventral tegmental area; the supratrigeminal nucleus, rostral and caudal nucleus of the solitary tract; the parvicellular intermediate and gigantocellular reticular nucleus; the caudal and interpolar divisions of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, dorsomedial spinal trigeminal nucleus, and the area postrema. Numbers of labeled neurons in the main components of the gustatory system including the insular cortex, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central nucleus of the amygdala, lateral hypothalamus, and rostral nucleus of the solitary tract were quantified. These results are basically consistent with those of the previous rat and hamster studies, but some species differences were found. Functional implications of these

  11. The ascending projection of the nucleus of the lateral descending trigeminal tract: a nucleus in the infrared system of the rattlesnake, Crotalus viridis

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, L.R.; Schroeder, D.M.; Hartline, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    The efferent projections of the nucleus of the lateral descending trigeminal tract (LTTD) in the rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis) were studied by anterograde tracing techniques. The LTTD, a brainstem trigeminal nucleus, is the sole projection site of the infrared-sensitive trigeminal fibers that innervate the pit organs in these snakes. The efferent fibers exit from the ventromedial edge of the LTTD and course medially and caudally toward the central grey area of the medulla. Upon reaching the central region of the medulla these fibers turn and move laterally and rostrally, eventually forming a tract on the ventrolateral surface of the brainstem. Embedded in this tract and slightly overlapping the LTTD in the rostrocaudal axis, is a population of large (20-45 micrometer) multipolar neurons that forms the nucleus reticularis caloris. Heavy terminal and preterminal degeneration in this area indicates that many of the efferent fibers of the LTTD terminate in this nucleus. A small bundle of degenerating fibers turn dorsally from the ventrolateral tract and ascend to terminate in a nucleus associated with the cerebellum, the lateral tegmental nucleus. No projection was found to any other nuclei or areas in the brain. This study demonstrates that the infrared-sensitive snakes, along with developing peripheral specializations (the pit organs), have developed specialized nuclei to handle this additional sensory information. The direct projection from the LTTD to the nucleus reticularis caloris provides a pathway linking the infrared-sensitive neurons of the LTTD with neurons of the same modality in the optic tectum. The second LTTD projection, to the lateral tegmental nucleus, suggests a connection between the infrared system and the cerebellum in these animals.

  12. Antiproton Production in 11.5A GeV/c Au+Pb Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    De Cataldo, G.; Giglietto, N.; Raino, A.; Spinelli, P.; Huang, H.Z.; Hill, J.C.; Libby, B.; Wohn, F.K.; Rabin, M.S.; Haridas, P.; Pless, I.A.; Van Buren, G.; Armstrong, T.A.; Lewis, R.A.; Reid, J.D.; Smith, G.A.; Toothacker, W.S.; Davies, R.; Hirsch, A.S.; Porile, N.T.; Rimai, A.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Srivastava, B.K.; Tincknell, M.L.; Greene, S.V.; Bennett, S.J.; Cormier, T.M.; Dee, P.; Fachini, P.; Kim, B.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Munhoz, M.G.; Pruneau, C.A.; Wilson, W.K.; Zhao, K.; Barish, K.N.; Bennett, M.J.; Chikanian, A.; Coe, S.D.; Diebold, G.E.; Finch, L.E.; George, N.K.; Kumar, B.S.; Lajoie, J.G.; Majka, R.D.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Rotondo, F.S.; Sandweiss, J.; Slaughter, A.J.; Wolin, E.J.

    1997-11-01

    We present the first results from the E864 Collaboration on the production of antiprotons in 10{percent} central 11.5A GeV /c Au+Pb nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. We report invariant multiplicities for antiproton production in the kinematic region 1.4{lt}y{lt}2.2 and 50{lt} p{sub T}{lt} 300 MeV/c , and compare our data with a first collision scaling model and previously published results from the E878 Collaboration. The differences between the E864 and E878 antiproton measurements and the implications for antihyperon production are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. High precision elastic α scattering on the even-odd 115In nucleus at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Mohr, P.; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z.; Soha, R. F.; Somorjai, E.; Ornelas, A.; Galaviz, D.; Yalçın, C.; Güray, R. T.; Özkan, N.

    2016-01-01

    Elastic alpha scattering cross sections on the even-odd 115In nucleus have been measured at energies Elab. = 16.15 MeV and 19.50 MeV. The high precision experimental data are used to derive the parameters of a local a nucleus optical potential.

  14. Topography of the 81/P Wild 2 Nucleus Derived from Stardust Stereoimages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Duxbury, T. C.; Horz, F.; Brownlee, D. E.; Newburn, R. L.; Tsou, P.

    2005-01-01

    On 2 January, 2004, the Stardust spacecraft flew by the nucleus of comet 81P/Wild 2 with a closest approach distance of approx. 240 km. During the encounter, the Stardust Optical Navigation Camera (ONC) obtained 72 images of the nucleus with exposure times alternating between 10 ms (near-optimal for most of the nucleus surface) and 100 ms (used for navigation, and revealing additional details in the coma and dark portions of the surface. Phase angles varied from 72 deg. to near zero to 103 deg. during the encounter, allowing the entire sunlit portion of the surface to be imaged. As many as 20 of the images near closest approach are of sufficiently high resolution to be used in mapping the nucleus surface; of these, two pairs of short-exposure images were used to create the nucleus shape model and derived products reported here. The best image resolution obtained was approx. 14 m/pixel, resulting in approx. 300 pixels across the nucleus. The Stardust Wild 2 dataset is therefore markedly superior from a stereomapping perspective to the Deep Space 1 MICAS images of comet Borrelly. The key subset of the latter (3 images) covered only about a quarter of the surface at phase angles approx. 50 - 60 and less than 50 x 160 pixels across the nucleus, yet it sufficed for groups at the USGS and DLR to produce digital elevation models (DEMs) and study the morphology and photometry of the nucleus in detail.

  15. Redistribution of particles across the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.; Davidsson, B.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Fornasier, S.; Giacomini, L.; Gracia-Berná, A. G.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Keller, H. U.; Knollenberg, J.; Kührt, E.; La Forgia, F.; Lai, I. L.; Liao, Y.; Marschall, R.; Massironi, M.; Mottola, S.; Pajola, M.; Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Su, C. C.; Wu, J. S.; Vincent, J.-B.; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bertini, I.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Debei, S.; de Cecco, M.; Fulle, M.; Groussin, O.; Gutierrez, P. J.; Kramm, J.-R.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Lopez Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Michalik, H.; Naletto, G.; Agarwal, J.; Güttler, C.; Oklay, N.; Tubiana, C.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We present an investigation of the surface properties of areas on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Aims: We aim to show that transport of material from one part of the cometary nucleus to another is a significant mechanism that influences the appearance of the nucleus and the surface thermal properties. Methods: We used data from the OSIRIS imaging system onboard the Rosetta spacecraft to identify surface features on the nucleus that can be produced by various transport mechanisms. We used simple calculations based on previous works to establish the plausibility of dust transport from one part of the nucleus to another. Results: We show by observation and modeling that "airfall" as a consequence of non-escaping large particles emitted from the neck region of the nucleus is a plausible explanation for the smooth thin deposits in the northern hemisphere of the nucleus. The consequences are also discussed. We also present observations of aeolian ripples and ventifacts. We show by numerical modeling that a type of saltation is plausible even under the rarified gas densities seen at the surface of the nucleus. However, interparticle cohesive forces present difficulties for this model, and an alternative mechanism for the initiation of reptation and creep may result from the airfall mechanism. The requirements on gas density and other parameters of this alternative make it a more attractive explanation for the observations. The uncertainties and implications are discussed.

  16. Prospects for measuring coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering at a stopped-pion neutrino source

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, Kate

    2006-02-01

    Rates of coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering at a high-intensity stopped-pion neutrino source in various detector materials (relevant for novel low-threshold detectors) are calculated. Sensitivity of a coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering experiment to new physics is also explored.

  17. A Simple Method for Nucleon-Nucleon Cross Sections in a Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1999-01-01

    A simple reliable formalism is presented for obtaining nucleon-nucleon cross sections within a nucleus in nuclear collisions for a given projectile and target nucleus combination at a given energy for use in transport, Monte Carlo, and other calculations. The method relies on extraction of these values from experiments and has been tested and found to give excellent results.

  18. SF-1 in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus: A key regulator of homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) regulates food intake and body weight homeostasis. The nuclear receptor NR5A1 (steroidogenic factor 1; SF-1) is a transcription factor whose expression is highly restricted in the VMH and is required for the development of the nucleus. Neurons expressing...

  19. Compound-Nucleus Formation Following Direct Interactions to Highly-Excited Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F S

    2008-02-05

    When direct reactions populate highly excited, unbound configurations in the residual nucleus, the nucleus may further evolve into a compound nucleus. Alternatively, the residual system may decay by emitting particles into the continuum. Understanding the relative weights of these two processes as a function of the angular momentum and parity deposited in the nucleus is important for the surrogate-reaction technique. A particularly interesting case is compound-nucleus formation via the (d, p) reaction, which may be a useful tool for forming compound nuclei off the valley of stability in inverse-kinematics experiments. We present here a study of the compound formation probability for a closely-related direct reaction, direct-semidirect radiative neutron capture.

  20. Extended Glauber Model of Antiproton-Nucleus Annihilation for All Energies and Mass Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Previous analytical formulas in the Glauber model for high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions developed by Wong are utilized and extended to study Antiproton-nucleus annihilations for both high and low energies, after taking into account the effects of Coulomb and nuclear interactions, and the change of the antiproton momentum inside a nucleus. The extended analytical formulas capture the main features of the experimental antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross sections for all energies and mass numbers. At high antiproton energies, they exhibit the granular property for the lightest nuclei and the black-disk limit for the heavy nuclei. At low antiproton energies, they display the effect of the antiproton momentum increase due to the nuclear interaction for the light nuclei, and the effect of the magnification due to the attractive Coulomb interaction for the heavy nuclei.

  1. Visual discrimination in the pigeon (Columba livia): effects of selective lesions of the nucleus rotundus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laverghetta, A. V.; Shimizu, T.

    1999-01-01

    The nucleus rotundus is a large thalamic nucleus in birds and plays a critical role in many visual discrimination tasks. In order to test the hypothesis that there are functionally distinct subdivisions in the nucleus rotundus, effects of selective lesions of the nucleus were studied in pigeons. The birds were trained to discriminate between different types of stationary objects and between different directions of moving objects. Multiple regression analyses revealed that lesions in the anterior, but not posterior, division caused deficits in discrimination of small stationary stimuli. Lesions in neither the anterior nor posterior divisions predicted effects in discrimination of moving stimuli. These results are consistent with a prediction led from the hypothesis that the nucleus is composed of functional subdivisions.

  2. Electrophysiological registration of phonological perception in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    De Letter, M; Aerts, A; Van Borsel, J; Vanhoutte, S; De Taeye, L; Raedt, R; van Mierlo, P; Boon, P; Van Roost, D; Santens, P

    2014-11-01

    Phonological processing is usually associated with the activation of cortical areas, especially in the left cerebral hemisphere. This study examined if phonologically elicited evoked potentials can be recorded directly from the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Seven PD patients who had undergone implantation of deep brain electrodes for the stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus were included. Local field potentials were recorded in a pre-attentive auditory phonological task, an attentive auditory phonological discrimination task, and a word recognition task. Auditory evoked potentials related to phonological, but not lexical processing, could be demonstrated in the subthalamic nucleus for all three tasks. Only minor changes were found after levodopa administration. This study demonstrates that the subthalamic nucleus is involved in early phonological perception, which puts the subthalamic nucleus in a position to modify phonological perception in a larger cortico-subcortical network. PMID:25265552

  3. The Foxb1-expressing neurons of the ventrolateral hypothalamic parvafox nucleus project to defensive circuits.

    PubMed

    Bilella, Alessandro; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Celio, Marco R

    2016-10-15

    The parvafox nucleus is an elongated structure that is lodged within the ventrolateral hypothalamus and lies along the optic tract. It comprises axially located parvalbumin (Parv)-positive neurons and a peripheral cuff of Foxb1-expressing ones. In the present study, injections of Cre-dependent adenoviral constructs were targeted to the ventrolateral hypothalamus of Foxb1/Cre mice to label specifically and map the efferent connections of the Foxb1-expressing subpopulation of neurons of the parvafox nucleus. These neurons project more widely than do the Parv-positive ones and implicate a part of the axons known to emanate from the lateral hypothalamus. High labeling densities were found in the dorsolateral and the upper lateral portion of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the Su3 and PV2 nuclei of the ventrolateral PAG, the cuneiform nucleus, the mesencephalic reticular formation, and the superior colliculus. Intermediate densities of terminals were encountered in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, substantia innominata, various thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei, pedunculopontine nucleus, Barrington's nucleus, retrofacial nucleus, and retroambigual nucleus. Scattered terminals were observed in the olfactory bulbs, the prefrontal cortex and the lamina X of the cervical spinal cord. Because the terminals were demonstrated to express the glutamate transporter VGlut2, the projections are presumed to be excitatory. A common denominator of the main target sites of the Foxb1-positive axons of the parvafox nucleus appears to be an involvement in the defensive reactions to life-threatening situations. The hypothalamic parvafox nucleus may contribute to the autonomic manifestations that accompany the expression of emotions. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2955-2981, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27292133

  4. Human Disc Nucleus Properties and Vertebral Endplate Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Azucena G.; Slichter, Chloe K.; Acosta, Frank L.; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E.; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Lotz, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Study of human cadaveric discs quantifying endplate permeability and porosity and correlating these with measures of disc quality: cell density, proteoglycan content, and overall degeneration. Permeability and porosity increased with age and were not correlated with cell density or overall degeneration, suggesting that endplate calcification may not accelerate disc degeneration. Study Design Experimental quantification of relationships between vertebral endplate morphology, permeability, disc cell density, glycosaminoglycan content and degeneration in samples harvested from human cadaveric spines. Objective To test the hypothesis that variation in endplate permeability and porosity contribute to changes in intervertebral disc cell density and overall degeneration. Summary of Background Data Cells within the intervertebral disc are dependent on diffusive exchange with capillaries in the adjacent vertebral bone. Previous findings suggest that blocked routes of transport negatively affect disc quality, yet there are no quantitative relationships between human vertebral endplate permeability, porosity, cell density and disc degeneration. Such relationships would be valuable for clarifying degeneration risk factors, and patient features that may impede efforts at disc tissue engineering. Methods Fifty-one motion segments were harvested from 13 frozen cadaveric human lumbar spines (32 to 85 years) and classified for degeneration using the MRI-based Pfirrmann scale. A cylindrical core was harvested from the center of each motion segment that included vertebral bony and cartilage endplates along with adjacent nucleus tissue. The endplate mobility, a type of permeability, was measured directly using a custom-made permeameter before and after the cartilage endplate was removed. Cell density within the nucleus tissue was estimated using the picogreen method while the nuclear GAG content was quantified using the DMMB technique. Specimens were imaged at 8 μm resolution using

  5. The primordial nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsson, Bjorn; Sierks, Holger; Guettler, Carsten; Marzari, Francesco; Pajola, Maurizio; Rickman, Hans; A'Hearn, Michael; Auger, Anne-Therese; El-Maarry, Mohamed; Fornasier, Sonia; Gutierrez, Pedro; Keller, Horst Uwe; Massironi, Matteo; Snodgrass, Colin; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Barbieri, Cesare; Lamy, Philippe; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Barucci, Antonella; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Bertini, Ivano; Cremonese, Gabriele; Da Deppo, Vania; Debei, Stefano; De Cecco, Mariolino; Feller, Clement; Fulle, Marco; Groussin, Olivier; Hviid, Stubbe; Hoefner, Sebastian; Ip, Wing-Huen; Jorda, Laurent; Knollenberg, Joerg; Kovacs, Gabor; Kramm, Joerg-Rainer; Kuehrt, Ekkehard; Kueppers, Michael; La Forgia, Fiorangela; Lara, Luisa; Lazzarin, Monica; Lopez Moreno, Jose; Moissl-Fraund, Richard; Mottola, Stefano; Naletto, Giampiero; Oklay, Nilda; Thomas, Nicolas; Tubiana, Cecilia

    2015-11-01

    Observations of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by Rosetta show that the nucleus is bi-lobed, extensively layered, has a low bulk density, a high dust-to-ice mass ratio (implying high porosity), and weak strength except for a thin sintered surface layer. The comet is rich in supervolatiles (CO, CO2, N2), may contain amorphous water ice, and displays little to no signs of aqueous alteration. Lack of phyllosilicates in Stardust samples from Comet 81P/Wild 2 provides further support that comet nuclei did not contain liquid water.These properties differ from those expected for 50-200 km diameter bodies in the primordial disk. We find that thermal processing due to Al-26, combined with collisional compaction, creates a population of medium-sized bodies that are comparably dense, compacted, strong, heavily depleted in supervolatiles, containing little to no amorphous water ice, and that have experienced extensive aqueous alteration. Irregular satellites Phoebe and Himalia are potential representatives of this population. Collisional rubble piles inherit these properties from their parents. We therefore conclude that observed comet nuclei are primordial rubble piles, and not collisional rubble piles.We propose a concurrent comet and TNO formation scenario that is consistent with these observations. We argue that TNOs form due to streaming instabilities at sizes of about 50-400 km and that about 350 of these grow slowly in a low-mass primordial disk to the size of Triton, causing little viscous stirring during growth. We propose a dynamically cold primordial disk, that prevents medium-sized TNOs from breaking into collisional rubble piles, and allows for the survival of primordial rubble-pile comets. We argue that comets form by hierarchical agglomeration out of material that remains after TNO formation. This slow growth is necessary to avoid thermal processing by Al-26, and to allow comet nuclei to incorporate 3 Myr old material from the inner Solar System, found in

  6. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuropeptides and Their Control of Endogenous Glucose Production.

    PubMed

    Foppen, E; Tan, A A T; Ackermans, M T; Fliers, E; Kalsbeek, A

    2016-04-01

    Defective control of endogenous glucose production is an important factor responsible for hyperglycaemia in the diabetic individual. During the past decade, progressively more evidence has appeared indicating a strong and potentially causal relationship between disturbances of the circadian system and defects of metabolic regulation, including glucose metabolism. The detrimental effects of disturbed circadian rhythms may have their origin in disturbances of the molecular clock mechanisms in peripheral organs, such as the pancreas and liver, or in the central brain clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). To assess the role of SCN output per se on glucose metabolism, we investigated (i) the effect of several SCN neurotransmitters on endogenous glucose production and (ii) the effect of SCN neuronal activity on hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity. We show that silencing of SCN neuronal activity results in decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity and increased peripheral insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, both oxytocin neurones in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and orexin neurones in the lateral hypothalamus may be important targets for the SCN control of glucose metabolism. These data further highlight the role of the central clock in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance. PMID:26791158

  7. ELAV proteins along evolution: back to the nucleus?

    PubMed

    Colombrita, Claudia; Silani, Vincenzo; Ratti, Antonia

    2013-09-01

    The complex interplay of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms mediated by RNA-binding proteins (RBP) at different steps of RNA metabolism is pivotal for the development of the nervous system and the maintenance of adult brain activities. In this review, we will focus on the highly conserved ELAV gene family encoding for neuronal-specific RBPs which are necessary for proper neuronal differentiation and important for synaptic plasticity process. In the evolution from Drosophila to man, ELAV proteins seem to have changed their biological functions in relation to their different subcellular localization. While in Drosophila, they are localized in the nuclear compartment of neuronal cells and regulate splicing and polyadenylation, in mammals, the neuronal ELAV proteins are mainly present in the cytoplasm where they participate in regulating mRNA target stability, translation and transport into neurites. However, recent data indicate that the mammalian ELAV RBPs also have nuclear activities, similarly to their fly counterpart, being them able to continuously shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Here, we will review and comment on all the biological functions associated with neuronal ELAV proteins along evolution and will show that the post-transcriptional regulatory network mediated by these RBPs in the brain is highly complex and only at an initial stage of being fully understood. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'RNA and splicing regulation in neurodegeneration'. PMID:23439364

  8. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects incentive salience attribution in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Serranová, Tereza; Jech, Robert; Dušek, Petr; Sieger, Tomáš; Růžička, Filip; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen

    2011-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can induce nonmotor side effects such as behavioral and mood disturbances or body weight gain in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We hypothesized that some of these problems could be related to an altered attribution of incentive salience (ie, emotional relevance) to rewarding and aversive stimuli. Twenty PD patients (all men; mean age ± SD, 58.3 ± 6 years) in bilateral STN DBS switched ON and OFF conditions and 18 matched controls rated pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System according to emotional valence (unpleasantness/pleasantness) and arousal on 2 independent visual scales ranging from 1 to 9. Eighty-four pictures depicting primary rewarding (erotica and food) and aversive fearful (victims and threat) and neutral stimuli were selected for this study. In the STN DBS ON condition, the PD patients attributed lower valence scores to the aversive pictures compared with the OFF condition (P < .01) and compared with controls (P < .01). The difference between the OFF condition and controls was less pronounced (P < .05). Furthermore, postoperative weight gain correlated with arousal ratings from the food pictures in the STN DBS ON condition (P < .05 compensated for OFF condition). Our results suggest that STN DBS increases activation of the aversive motivational system so that more relevance is attributed to aversive fearful stimuli. In addition, STN DBS-related sensitivity to food reward stimuli cues might drive DBS-treated patients to higher food intake and subsequent weight gain. PMID:21780183

  9. On Parallel Streams through the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Denman, Daniel J.; Contreras, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The mouse visual system is an emerging model for the study of cortical and thalamic circuit function. To maximize the usefulness of this model system, it is important to analyze the similarities and differences between the organization of all levels of the murid visual system with other, better studied systems (e.g., non-human primates and the domestic cat). While the understanding of mouse retina and cortex has expanded rapidly, less is known about mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Here, we study whether parallel processing streams exist in mouse dLGN. We use a battery of stimuli that have been previously shown to successfully distinguish parallel streams in other species: electrical stimulation of the optic chiasm, contrast-reversing stationary gratings at varying spatial phase, drifting sinusoidal gratings, dense noise for receptive field reconstruction, and frozen contrast-modulating noise. As in the optic nerves of domestic cats and non-human primates, we find evidence for multiple conduction velocity groups after optic chiasm stimulation. As in so-called “visual mammals”, we find a subpopulation of mouse dLGN cells showing non-linear spatial summation. However, differences in stimulus selectivity and sensitivity do not provide sufficient basis for identification of clearly distinct classes of relay cells. Nevertheless, consistent with presumptively homologous status of dLGNs of all mammals, there are substantial similarities between response properties of mouse dLGN neurons and those of cats and primates. PMID:27065811

  10. GABAergic processes within the median preoptic nucleus promote NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Luciana; Chase, Michael H; Torterolo, Pablo

    2012-06-15

    GABAergic mechanisms in the preoptic region of the hypothalamus (POA) have been implicated in the generation and maintenance of NREM (quiet) sleep. We recently reported that neurons in the median peptic nucleus (MnPN) in the POA of the cat are selectively activated during NREM sleep. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that NREM sleep is controlled by GABAergic mechanisms within the MnPN. Consequently, adult cats were utilized to determine GABA immunorreactivity within the MnPN and to examine the effects on sleep of the microinjection of a GABA(A) agonist (muscimol) and a GABA(A) antagonist (bicuculline) into this area. GABAergic neurons were present throughout the MnPN. Compared with control microinjections, after the application of muscimol, the time spent in NREM sleep (59.8±7.5 min) and REM sleep (6.9±4.7 min) decreased compared with control microinjections (103.8±5.2 and 20.2±4.3 min, respectively; P<0.005). In contrast, bicuculline microinjections increased only NREM sleep time (103.0±23.0 vs 77.7±23.7 min; P<0.05). These results demonstrate that GABAergic processes within the MnPN are involved in the generation and maintenance of sleep, especially NREM sleep. PMID:22483998

  11. Nicotinic modulation of serotonergic activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Garduño, Julieta; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic signaling mediated by nicotinic receptors has been associated to a large number of physiological and behavioral processes such as learning, memory, attention, food-intake and mood disorders. Although it is well established that many nicotinic actions are mediated through an increase in serotonin (5-HT) release, the physiological mechanisms by which nicotine produces these effects are still unclear. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains the major amount of 5-HT neurons projecting to different parts of the brain. DRN also contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at somatic and presynaptic elements. Nicotine produces both inhibitory and excitatory effects on different subpopulations of 5-HT DRN neurons. In this review, we describe the presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms by which nicotine increases the excitability of DRN neurons as well as the subtypes of nAChRs involved. We also describe the inhibitory effects of nicotine and the role of 5-HT1A receptors in this effect. These nicotinic actions modulate the activity of different neuronal subpopulations in the DRN, changing the 5-HT tone in the brain areas where these groups of neurons project. Some of the physiological implications of nicotine-induced 5-HT release are discussed. PMID:24021594

  12. Coilin Shuttles between the Nucleus and Cytoplasm In Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Michel; Gall, Joseph G.

    1999-01-01

    Coiled bodies are discrete nuclear organelles often identified by the marker protein p80-coilin. Because coilin is not detected in the cytoplasm by immunofluorescence and Western blotting, it has been considered an exclusively nuclear protein. In the Xenopus germinal vesicle (GV), most coilin actually resides in the nucleoplasm, although it is highly concentrated in 50–100 coiled bodies. When affinity-purified anti-coilin antibodies were injected into the cytoplasm of oocytes, they could be detected in coiled bodies within 2–3 h. Coiled bodies were intensely labeled after 18 h, whereas other nuclear organelles remained negative. Because the nuclear envelope does not allow passive diffusion of immunoglobulins, this observation suggests that anti-coilin antibodies are imported into the nucleus as an antigen–antibody complex with coilin. Newly synthesized coilin is not required, because cycloheximide had no effect on nuclear import and subsequent targeting of the antibodies. Additional experiments with myc-tagged coilin and myc-tagged pyruvate kinase confirmed that coilin is a shuttling protein. The shuttling of Nopp140, NO38/B23, and nucleolin was easily demonstrated by the targeting of their respective antibodies to the nucleoli, whereas anti-SC35 did not enter the germinal vesicle. We suggest that coilin, perhaps in association with Nopp140, may function as part of a transport system between the cytoplasm and the coiled bodies. PMID:10512877

  13. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation improves balance control in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Colnat-Coulbois, S; Gauchard, G; Maillard, L; Barroche, G; Vespignani, H; Auque, J; Perrin, P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common basal ganglia degenerative disease, affects balance control, especially when patients change balance strategy during postural tasks. Bilateral chronic stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is therapeutically useful in advanced PD, and reduces the motor signs of patients. Nevertheless, the effects of STN stimulation on postural control are still debatable. Aims: To assess the impact of bilateral STN stimulation on balance control in PD and to determine how basal ganglia related sensorimotor modifications act on neurosensorial organisation of balance and motor postural programming. Methods: Twelve subjects aged 45–70 years underwent unified Parkinson's disease rating scale motor (part III) clinical tests, static and dynamic posturography, including sensory organisation and adaptation tests, shortly before and six months after bilateral implantation of electrodes into the STN. Results: The postoperative static test showed an improvement in postural control precision both in eyes open and eyes closed conditions. The dynamic test highlighted the decreased number of falls and the ability of the patients to develop more appropriate sensorimotor strategies when stimulated. The sensory organisation test showed an improvement of equilibrium score and, thus, a better resolution of sensorial conflicts. Conclusions: STN stimulation allowed a reduction in rigidity and therefore an improvement in the ability to use muscular proprioception as reliable information, resulting in vestibulo-proprioceptive conflict suppression. STN stimulation has a synergistic effect with levodopa for postural control. Accordingly, non-dopaminergic pathways could be involved in postural regulation and STN stimulation may influence the functioning of these pathways. PMID:15897498

  14. Implications of gamma band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, E; Luster, B; D'Onofrio, S; Mahaffey, S; Bisagno, V; Urbano, F J

    2016-07-01

    The fact that the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the reticular activating system places it in a unique position to modulate sensory input and fight-or-flight responses. Arousing stimuli simultaneously activate ascending projections of the PPN to the intralaminar thalamus to trigger cortical high-frequency activity and arousal, as well as descending projections to reticulospinal systems to alter posture and locomotion. As such, the PPN has become a target for deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, modulating gait, posture, and higher functions. This article describes the latest discoveries on PPN physiology and the role of the PPN in a number of disorders. It has now been determined that high-frequency activity during waking and REM sleep is controlled by two different intracellular pathways and two calcium channels in PPN cells. Moreover, there are three different PPN cell types that have one or both calcium channels and may be active during waking only, REM sleep only, or both. Based on the new discoveries, novel mechanisms are proposed for insomnia as a waking disorder. In addition, neuronal calcium sensor protein-1 (NCS-1), which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, may be responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in at least some patients with these diseases. Recent results suggest that NCS-1 modulates PPN gamma band activity and that lithium acts to reduce the effects of over expressed NCS-1, accounting for its effectiveness in bipolar disorder. PMID:26597124

  15. The Nucleus Accumbens: A Switchboard for Goal-Directed Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Patricio

    2009-01-01

    Reward intake optimization requires a balance between exploiting known sources of rewards and exploring for new sources. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) and associated basal ganglia circuits are likely candidates as neural structures responsible for such balance, while the hippocampus may be responsible for spatial/contextual information. Although studies have assessed interactions between hippocampus and PFC, and between hippocampus and the nucleus accumbens (NA), it is not known whether 3-way interactions among these structures vary under different behavioral conditions. Here, we investigated these interactions with multichannel recordings while rats explored an operant chamber and while they performed a learned lever-pressing task for reward in the same chamber shortly afterward. Neural firing and local field potentials in the NA core synchronized with hippocampal activity during spatial exploration, but during lever pressing they instead synchronized more strongly with the PFC. The latter is likely due to transient drive of NA neurons by bursting prefrontal activation, as in vivo intracellular recordings in anesthetized rats revealed that NA up states can transiently synchronize with spontaneous PFC activity and PFC stimulation with a bursting pattern reliably evoked up states in NA neurons. Thus, the ability to switch synchronization in a task-dependent manner indicates that the NA core can dynamically select its inputs to suit environmental demands, thereby contributing to decision-making, a function that was thought to primarily depend on the PFC. PMID:19352511

  16. The subthalamic nucleus contributes to post-error slowing.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Sanguinetti, Joseph L; Allen, John J B; Sherman, Scott J; Frank, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    pFC is proposed to implement cognitive control via directed "top-down" influence over behavior. But how is this feat achieved? The virtue of such a descriptive model is contingent on a mechanistic understanding of how motor execution is altered in specific circumstances. In this report, we provide evidence that the well-known phenomenon of slowed RTs following mistakes (post-error slowing) is directly influenced by the degree of subthalamic nucleus (STN) activity. The STN is proposed to act as a brake on motor execution following conflict or errors, buying time so a more cautious response can be made on the next trial. STN local field potentials from nine Parkinson disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery were recorded while they performed a response conflict task. In a 2.5- to 5-Hz frequency range previously associated with conflict and error processing, the degree phase consistency preceding the response was associated with increasingly slower RTs specifically following errors. These findings provide compelling evidence that post-error slowing is in part mediated by a corticosubthalamic "hyperdirect" pathway for increased response caution. PMID:24800632

  17. Functional Heterogeneity in the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Nur Zeynep; Paré, Denis

    2016-08-01

    Early work stressed the differing involvement of the central amygdala (CeA) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in the genesis of fear versus anxiety, respectively. In 2009, Walker, Miles, and Davis proposed a model of amygdala-BNST interactions to explain these functional differences. This model became extremely influential and now guides a new wave of studies on the role of BNST in humans. Here, we consider evidence for and against this model, in the process highlighting central principles of BNST organization. This analysis leads us to conclude that BNST's influence is not limited to the generation of anxiety-like responses to diffuse threats, but that it also shapes the impact of discrete threatening stimuli. It is likely that BNST-CeA interactions are involved in modulating responses to such threats. In addition, whereas current views emphasize the contributions of the anterolateral BNST region in anxiety, accumulating data indicate that the anteromedial and anteroventral regions also play a critical role. The presence of multiple functional subregions within the small volume of BNST raises significant technical obstacles for functional imaging studies in humans. PMID:27488624

  18. Jet-like features near the Nucleus of Chiron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Olkin, C. B.; Dunham, E. W.; Ford, C. H.; Gilmore, D. K.; Kurtz, D.; Lazzaro, D.; Rank, D. M.; Temi, P.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; Barroso, J.; Barrucci, A.; Bosh, A. S.; Buie, M. W.; Bus, S. J.; Dahn, C. C.; Foryta, D. W.; Hubbard, W. B.; Lopes, D. F.; Marcialis, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    Considered as a comet, the object 2060 Chiron is unusual in two respects: it exhibits outbursts at very large distances from the Sun, and its nucleus is much larger than that of any other known comet. It is, however, similar in size to the recently discovered Kuiper-belt objects - a population of objects with orbits beyond Neptune, which are a possible source of short-period comets. This has led to the conjecture that Chiron is related to these objects, but its chaotic orbit has brought it much closer to the Sun. Here we report observations of a recent stellar occultation by Chiron which permit the identification of several features associated with Chiron's coma. The observation of discrete, jet-like features provides evidence that the coma material originates from just few, small active areas, rather than from uniform sublimations, and that the particles in at least one of these features have radii greater than 0.25 microns. The observations also suggest the presence of material in the plane of Chiron's orbit and are consistent with a gravitationally bound coma. Finally, the present data, and those from a previous occultation, constrain the radius of Chiron to lie between 83 and 156 km.

  19. Ab initio description of the exotic unbound 7He nucleus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baroni, Simone; Navratil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2013-01-11

    In this study, the neutron-rich unbound 7He nucleus has been the subject of many experimental investigations. While the ground-state 3/2– resonance is well established, there is a controversy concerning the excited 1/2– resonance reported in some experiments as low lying and narrow (ER~1 MeV, Γ≤1 MeV) while in others as very broad and located at a higher energy. This issue cannot be addressed by ab initio theoretical calculations based on traditional bound-state methods. We introduce a new unified approach to nuclear bound and continuum states based on the coupling of the no-core shell model, a bound-state technique, with the no-coremore » shell model combined with the resonating-group method, a nuclear scattering technique. Our calculations describe the ground-state resonance in agreement with experiment and, at the same time, predict a broad 1/2– resonance above 2 MeV.« less

  20. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; Hill, Richard J.

    2016-06-23

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2 = 0.46(22)fm2, with a much larger uncertainty than determined inmore » the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ(νμn → μ-p)|Ev=1GeV = 10.1(0.9)×10-39cm2. The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. Furthermore, these techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.« less

  1. Solar Sail Application to Comet Nucleus Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Travis S.; Moton, Tryshanda T.; Robinson, Don; Anding, R. Charles; Matloff, Gregory L.; Garbe, Gregory; Montgomery, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Many comets have perihelions at distances within 1.0 Astronomical Unit (AU) from the sun. These comets typically are inclined out of the ecliptic. We propose that a solar sail spacecraft could be used to increase the inclination of the orbit to match that of these 1.0 AU comets. The solar sail spacecraft would match the orbit velocity for a short period of time, which would be long enough for a container to be injected into the comet's nucleus. The container would be extended from a long durable tether so that the solar sail would not be required to enter into the potentially degrading environment of the comet s atmosphere. Once the container has been filled with sample material, the tether is retracted. The solar sail would then lower its inclination and fly back to Earth for the sample return. In this paper, we describe the selection of cometary targets, the mission design, and the solar sailcraft design suitable for sail-comet rendezvous as well as possible rendezvous scenarios.

  2. Simultaneous Electrophysiological Recording and Calcium Imaging of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Robert P.; Allen, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and fluorescent imaging recording methods were used to study the role of changes of membrane potential or current in regulating the intracellular calcium concentration. Changing environmental conditions, such as the light-dark cycle, can modify neuronal and neural network activity and the expression of a family of circadian clock genes within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the location of the master circadian clock in the mammalian brain. Excitatory synaptic transmission leads to an increase in the postsynaptic Ca2+ concentration that is believed to activate the signaling pathways that shifts the rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes. Hypothalamic slices containing the SCN were patch clamped using microelectrodes filled with an internal solution containing the calcium indicator bis-fura-2. After a seal was formed between the microelectrode and the SCN neuronal membrane, the membrane was ruptured using gentle suction and the calcium probe diffused into the neuron filling both the soma and dendrites. Quantitative ratiometric measurements of the intracellular calcium concentration were recorded simultaneously with membrane potential or current. Using these methods it is possible to study the role of changes of the intracellular calcium concentration produced by synaptic activity and action potential firing of individual neurons. In this presentation we demonstrate the methods to simultaneously record electrophysiological activity along with intracellular calcium from individual SCN neurons maintained in brain slices. PMID:24335611

  3. Understanding the human pedunculopontine nucleus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fytagoridis, Anders; Silburn, Peter A; Coyne, Terry J; Thevathasan, Wesley

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the Brisbane experience of pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Clinical outcomes along with studies of the mechanisms and neurophysiology of PPN in PD patients with severe freezing of gait (FoG) and postural imbalance (PI) are summarised and presented. Our results indicate that PPN DBS improves FoG and falls in the relatively uncommon group of PD patients who respond well to medication other than for continuing on time FoG and falls. Our studies indicate that bilateral DBS is more beneficial than unilateral DBS, and that the more caudal region of the PPN seems preferable for stimulation. There is evidence that rapid-release programs for initiation and correction of gait and posture are modulated by the PPN, possibly to some extent independently of the cerebral cortex. These functions were found to be impaired in PD patients with severe FoG/PI, but to some extent corrected by bilateral PPN DBS. PMID:26780720

  4. High-spin structures in the 129Xe nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Zhu, S. J.; Qi, C.; Xu, Q.; Cheng, W. J.; Li, H. J.; Lyu, L. M.; Wang, R. S.; Yan, W. H.; Yi, H.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, Q. M.; He, C. Y.; Hu, S. P.; Li, C. B.; Li, H. W.; Luo, P. W.; Wu, X. G.; Wu, Y. H.; Zheng, Y.; Zhong, J.

    2016-06-01

    High-spin states in the 129Xe nucleus are studied with the reaction 124Sn(9Be,4 n ) at a beam energy of 36 MeV. The level scheme is extended significantly. For the positive-parity band, the α =+1 /2 and the α =-1 /2 signature components are combined to form a complete band structure based on the 3 /2+ state with spin and parity up to 21 /2+ . For the negative-parity band based on the 11 /2- state, the α =+1 /2 signature component is newly established and both the α =+1 /2 and the α =-1 /2 signature components also form a complete band structure up to the 35 /2- state. The positive- and negative-parity bands are proposed to originate from ν d3 /23 /2+[402 ] and ν h11 /211 /2-[505 ] Nilsson configurations, respectively. A backbending is observed in the negative-parity band, which originates from the alignments of two h11 /2 protons according to crank shell model calculations. Based on the total Routhian surface and quasiparticle triaxial rotor model calculations, the negative-parity band is interpreted as a triaxially deformed shape with γ ≈-30∘ , while the positive-parity band is associated with γ softness, in accordance with previous studies. In the high-spin states, three decoupled bands and one oblate band with γ ≈-60∘ are newly identified. The systematics and other characteristics of these bands are discussed.

  5. Neuronal Complexity in Subthalamic Nucleus is Reduced in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Saurabh; Huang, He; Gale, John T; Sarma, Sridevi V; Montgomery, Erwin B

    2016-01-01

    Several theories posit increased Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) activity is causal to Parkinsonism, yet in our previous study we showed that activity from 113 STN neurons from two epilepsy patients and 103 neurons from nine Parkinson's disease (PD) patients demonstrated no significant differences in frequencies or in the coefficients of variation of mean discharge frequencies per 1-s epochs. We continued our analysis using point process modeling to capture higher order temporal dynamics; in particular, bursting, beta-band oscillations, excitatory and inhibitory ensemble interactions, and neuronal complexity. We used this analysis as input to a logistic regression classifier and were able to differentiate between PD and epilepsy neurons with an accuracy of 92%. We also found neuronal complexity, i.e., the number of states in a neuron's point process model, and inhibitory ensemble dynamics, which can be interpreted as a reduction in complexity, to be the most important features with respect to classification accuracy. Even in a dataset with no significant differences in firing rate, we observed differences between PD and epilepsy for other single-neuron measures. Our results suggest PD comes with a reduction in neuronal "complexity," which translates to a neuron's ability to encode information; the more complexity, the more information the neuron can encode. This is also consistent with studies correlating disease to loss of variability in neuronal activity, as the lower the complexity, the less variability. PMID:26168436

  6. Morphological differences in the lateral geniculate nucleus associated with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Giraldo-Chica, Mónica; Hegarty, John P; Schneider, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a common learning disability characterized by normal intelligence but difficulty in skills associated with reading, writing and spelling. One of the most prominent, albeit controversial, theories of dyslexia is the magnocellular theory, which suggests that malfunction of the magnocellular system in the brain is responsible for the behavioral deficits. We sought to test the basis of this theory by directly measuring the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), the only location in the brain where the magnocellular and parvocellular streams are spatially disjoint. Using high-resolution proton-density weighted MRI scans, we precisely measured the anatomical boundaries of the LGN in 13 subjects with dyslexia (five female) and 13 controls (three female), all 22-26 years old. The left LGN was significantly smaller in volume in subjects with dyslexia and also differed in shape; no differences were observed in the right LGN. The functional significance of this asymmetry is unknown, but these results are consistent with the magnocellular theory and support theories of dyslexia that involve differences in the early visual system. PMID:26082892

  7. Whole transcriptome organisation in the dehydrated supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hindmarch, C C T; Franses, P; Goodwin, B; Murphy, D

    2013-12-01

    The supraoptic nucleus (SON) is part of the central osmotic circuitry that synthesises the hormone vasopressin (Avp) and transports it to terminals in the posterior lobe of the pituitary. Following osmotic stress such as dehydration, this tissue undergoes morphological, electrical and transcriptional changes to facilitate the appropriate regulation and release of Avp into the circulation where it conserves water at the level of the kidney. Here, the organisation of the whole transcriptome following dehydration is modelled to fit Zipf's law, a natural power law that holds true for all natural languages, that states if the frequency of word usage is plotted against its rank, then the log linear regression of this is -1. We have applied this model to our previously published euhydrated and dehydrated SON data to observe this trend and how it changes following dehydration. In accordance with other studies, our whole transcriptome data fit well with this model in the euhydrated SON microarrays, but interestingly, fit better in the dehydrated arrays. This trend was observed in a subset of differentially regulated genes and also following network reconstruction using a third-party database that mines public data. We make use of language as a metaphor that helps us philosophise about the role of the whole transcriptome in providing a suitable environment for the delivery of Avp following a survival threat like dehydration. PMID:24345907

  8. Lamination of the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus of Catarrhine Primates

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Alexandra A.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Hof, Patrick R.; Zilles, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of catarrhines – with the exception of gibbons – is typically described as a six-layered structure, comprised of two ventral magnocellular layers, and four dorsal parvocellular layers. The parvocellular layers of the LGN are involved in color vision. Therefore, it is hypothesized that a six-layered LGN is a shared-derived trait among catarrhines. This might suggest that in gibbons the lack of further subdivisions of the parvocellular layers is a recent change, and could be related to specializations of visual information processing in this taxon. To address these hypotheses, the lamination of the LGN was investigated in a range of catarrhine species, including several taxa not previously described, and the evolution of the LGN was reconstructed using phylogenetic information. The findings indicate that while all catarrhine species have four parvocellular leaflets, two main patterns of LGN parvocellular lamination occur: two undivided parvocellular layers in some species, and four parvocellular leaflets (with occasional subleaflets) in other species. LGN size was not found to be related to lamination pattern. Both patterns were found to occur in divergent clades, which is suggestive of homoplasy within the catarrhines in LGN morphology. PMID:23467282

  9. MESOPONTINE CHOLINERGIC PROJECTIONS TO THE HYPOGLOSSAL MOTOR NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Rukhadze, Irma; Kubin, Leszek

    2007-01-01

    Mesopontine cholinergic (ACh) neurons have increased discharge during wakefulness, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, or both. Hypoglossal (12) motoneurons, which play an important role in the control of upper airway patency, are postsynaptically excited by stimulation of nicotinic receptors, whereas muscarinic receptors presynaptically inhibit inputs to 12 motoneurons. These data suggest that ACh contributes to sleep/wake-related changes in the activity of 12 motoneurons by acting within the hypoglossal motor nucleus (Mo12), but the origins of ACh projections to Mo12 are not well established. We used retrograde tracers to assess the projections of ACh neurons of the mesopontine pedinculopontine tegmental (PPT) and laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) nuclei to the Mo12. In six Sprague-Dawley rats, Fluorogold or B subunit of cholera toxin, were pressure injected (5-20 nl) into the Mo12. Retrogradely labeled neurons, identified as ACh using nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunohistochemistry, were found bilaterally in discrete subregions of both PPT and LDT nuclei. Most retrogradely labeled PPT cells (96%) were located in the PPT pars compacta region adjacent to the ventrolateral tip of the superior cerebellar peduncle. In the LDT, retrogradely labeled neurons were located exclusively in its pars alpha region. Over twice as many ACh neurons projecting to the Mo12 were located in the PPT than LDT. The results demonstrate direct mesopontine ACh projections to the Mo12. These projections may contribute to the characteristic of wakefulness and REM sleep increases, as well as REM sleep-related decrements, of 12 motoneuronal activity. PMID:17174027

  10. Halo Nucleus Be11: A Spectroscopic Study via Neutron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, K. T.; Jones, K. L.; Bey, A.; Ahn, S. H.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Brown, S. M.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hahn, K. I.; Kolata, J. J.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J. F.; Matei, C.; Matoš, M.; Matyas, D.; Moazen, B.; Nesaraja, C.; Nunes, F. M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Roberts, A.; Shapira, D.; Shriner, J. F., Jr.; Smith, M. S.; Spassova, I.; Stracener, D. W.; Villano, A. N.; Wilson, G. L.

    2012-05-01

    The best examples of halo nuclei, exotic systems with a diffuse nuclear cloud surrounding a tightly bound core, are found in the light, neutron-rich region, where the halo neutrons experience only weak binding and a weak, or no, potential barrier. Modern direct-reaction measurement techniques provide powerful probes of the structure of exotic nuclei. Despite more than four decades of these studies on the benchmark one-neutron halo nucleus Be11, the spectroscopic factors for the two bound states remain poorly constrained. In the present work, the Be10(d,​p) reaction has been used in inverse kinematics at four beam energies to study the structure of Be11. The spectroscopic factors extracted using the adiabatic model were found to be consistent across the four measurements and were largely insensitive to the optical potential used. The extracted spectroscopic factor for a neutron in an nℓj=2s1/2 state coupled to the ground state of Be10 is 0.71(5). For the first excited state at 0.32 MeV, a spectroscopic factor of 0.62(4) is found for the halo neutron in a 1p1/2 state.

  11. Modulation of locomotor activation by the rostromedial tegmental nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lavezzi, Heather N; Parsley, Kenneth P; Zahm, Daniel S

    2015-02-01

    The rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) is a strong inhibitor of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) reported to influence neurobiological and behavioral responses to reward omission, aversive and fear-eliciting stimuli, and certain drugs of abuse. Insofar as previous studies implicate ventral mesencephalic dopamine neurons as an essential component of locomotor activation, we hypothesized that the RMTg also should modulate locomotion activation. We observed that bilateral infusions into the RMTg of the gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) agonist, muscimol, indeed activate locomotion. Alternatively, bilateral RMTg infusions of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, suppress robust activations of locomotion elicited in two distinct ways: (1) by disinhibitory stimulation of neurons in the lateral preoptic area and (2) by return of rats to an environment previously paired with amphetamine administration. The possibility that suppressive locomotor effects of RMTg bicuculline infusions were due to unintended spread of drug to the nearby VTA was falsified by a control experiment showing that bilateral infusions of bicuculline into the VTA produce activation rather than suppression of locomotion. These results objectively implicate the RMTg in the regulation of locomotor activation. The effect is important because much evidence reported in the literature suggests that locomotor activation can be an involuntary behavioral expression of expectation and/or want without which the willingness to execute adaptive behaviors is impaired. PMID:25164249

  12. Developmental Changes in Synaptic Distribution in Arcuate Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kirigiti, Melissa A.; Baquero, Karalee C.; Lee, Shin J.; Smith, M. Susan; Grove, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons coexpressing neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, and GABA (NAG) play an important role in ingestive behavior and are located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. NAG neurons receive both GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic inputs, however, the developmental time course of synaptic input organization of NAG neurons in mice is unknown. In this study, we show that these neurons have low numbers of GABAergic synapses and that GABA is inhibitory to NAG neurons during early postnatal period. In contrast, glutamatergic inputs onto NAG neurons are relatively abundant by P13 and are comparatively similar to the levels observed in the adult. As mice reach adulthood (9–10 weeks), GABAergic tone onto NAG neurons increases. At this age, NAG neurons received similar numbers of inhibitory and EPSCs. To further differentiate age-associated changes in synaptic distribution, 17- to 18-week-old lean and diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice were studied. Surprisingly, NAG neurons from lean adult mice exhibit a reduction in the GABAergic synapses compared with younger adults. Conversely, DIO mice display reductions in the number of GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs onto NAG neurons. Based on these experiments, we propose that synaptic distribution in NAG neurons is continuously restructuring throughout development to accommodate the animals' energy requirements. PMID:26041922

  13. Perceptual decision related activity in the lateral geniculate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yaoguang; Yampolsky, Dmitry; Purushothaman, Gopathy

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental to neuroscience is the understanding of how the language of neurons relates to behavior. In the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), cells show distinct properties such as selectivity for particular wavelengths, increments or decrements in contrast, or preference for fine detail versus rapid motion. No studies, however, have measured how LGN cells respond when an animal is challenged to make a perceptual decision using information within the receptive fields of those LGN cells. In this study we measured neural activity in the macaque LGN during a two-alternative, forced-choice (2AFC) contrast detection task or during a passive fixation task and found that a small proportion (13.5%) of single LGN parvocellular (P) and magnocellular (M) neurons matched the psychophysical performance of the monkey. The majority of LGN neurons measured in both tasks were not as sensitive as the monkey. The covariation between neural response and behavior (quantified as choice probability) was significantly above chance during active detection, even when there was no external stimulus. Interneuronal correlations and task-related gain modulations were negligible under the same condition. A bottom-up pooling model that used sensory neural responses to compute perceptual choices in the absence of interneuronal correlations could fully explain these results at the level of the LGN, supporting the hypothesis that the perceptual decision pool consists of multiple sensory neurons and that response fluctuations in these neurons can influence perception. PMID:26019309

  14. Anuran calling circuits: inhibition of pretrigeminal nucleus by prostaglandin.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R S

    1993-03-01

    Neural correlates of mating calling and pulmonary respiration were recorded from isolated brain stems of male Northern leopard frogs (Rana p. pipiens) before and after exposure of the brain stems to prostaglandin F2 alpha (PG) or saline. Diffusion of PG (but not saline) from a pipette directly over the pretrigeminal nuclei abolished "calling" temporarily. Similar application of PG nearby had no effect. Exposure of only the anterior 1/2 of the brain stem, containing the pretrigeminal nuclei but not the pulmonary respiration generator, to PG (but not saline) abolished generation of slow waves by the pretrigeminal nucleus portion of the mating calling pattern generator. Exposure of only the posterior 1/2 of the brain stem, containing the pulmonary respiration generator but not the pretrigeminal nuclei, to PG had no effect on the correlates of pulmonary respiration. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhibition of calling by PG is through an effect largely, perhaps exclusively, on the pretrigeminal nuclei. PMID:8440519

  15. Spontaneous fission of the superheavy nucleus 286Fl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    The decimal logarithm of spontaneous fission half-life of the superheavy nucleus 286Fl experimentally determined is log10Tfexp(s ) =-0.632 . We present a method to calculate the half-life based on the cranking inertia and the deformation energy, functions of two independent surface coordinates, using the best asymmetric two center shell model. Spherical shapes are assumed. In the first stage we study the statics. At a given mass asymmetry up to about η =0.5 the potential barrier has a two hump shape, but for larger η it has only one hump. The touching point deformation energy versus mass asymmetry shows the three minima, produced by shell effects, corresponding to three decay modes: spontaneous fission, cluster decay, and α decay. The least action trajectory is determined in the plane (R ,η ) , where R is the separation distance of the fission fragments and η is the mass asymmetry. We may find a sequence of several trajectories one of which gives the least action. The parametrization with two deformation coordinates (R ,η ) and the radius of the light fragment, R2, exponentially or linearly decreasing with R is compared with the simpler one, in which R2=constant and with a linearly decreasing or linearly increasing R2. The latter is closer to the reality and reminds us about the α or cluster preformation at the nuclear surface.

  16. Thermodynamic pathways to genome spatial organization in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nicodemi, Mario; Prisco, Antonella

    2009-03-18

    The architecture of the eukaryotic genome is characterized by a high degree of spatial organization. Chromosomes occupy preferred territories correlated to their state of activity and, yet, displace their genes to interact with remote sites in complex patterns requiring the orchestration of a huge number of DNA loci and molecular regulators. Far from random, this organization serves crucial functional purposes, but its governing principles remain elusive. By computer simulations of a statistical mechanics model, we show how architectural patterns spontaneously arise from the physical interaction between soluble binding molecules and chromosomes via collective thermodynamics mechanisms. Chromosomes colocalize, loops and territories form, and find their relative positions as stable thermodynamic states. These are selected by thermodynamic switches, which are regulated by concentrations/affinity of soluble mediators and by number/location of their attachment sites along chromosomes. Our thermodynamic switch model of nuclear architecture, thus, explains on quantitative grounds how well-known cell strategies of upregulation of DNA binding proteins or modification of chromatin structure can dynamically shape the organization of the nucleus. PMID:19289043

  17. Orientation-selective Responses in the Mouse Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Chen, Hui; Liu, Xiaorong

    2013-01-01

    The dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) receives visual information from the retina and transmits it to the cortex. In this study, we made extracellular recordings in the dLGN of both anesthetized and awake mice, and found that a surprisingly high proportion of cells were selective for stimulus orientation. The orientation selectivity of dLGN cells was unchanged after silencing the visual cortex pharmacologically, indicating that it is not due to cortical feedback. The orientation tuning of some dLGN cells correlated with their elongated receptive fields, while in others orientation selectivity was observed despite the fact that their receptive fields were circular, suggesting that their retinal input might already be orientation selective. Consistently, we revealed orientation/axis-selective ganglion cells in the mouse retina using multielectrode arrays in an in vitro preparation. Furthermore, the orientation tuning of dLGN cells was largely maintained at different stimulus contrasts, which could be sufficiently explained by a simple linear feedforward model. We also compared the degree of orientation selectivity in different visual structures under the same recording condition. Compared with the dLGN, orientation selectivity is greatly improved in the visual cortex, but is similar in the superior colliculus, another major retinal target. Together, our results demonstrate prominent orientation selectivity in the mouse dLGN, which may potentially contribute to visual processing in the cortex. PMID:23904611

  18. Structural Biology and Regulation of Protein Import into the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Christie, Mary; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Róna, Gergely; Smith, Kate M; Stewart, Alastair G; Takeda, Agnes A S; Fontes, Marcos R M; Stewart, Murray; Vértessy, Beáta G; Forwood, Jade K; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-05-22

    Proteins are translated in the cytoplasm, but many need to access the nucleus to perform their functions. Understanding how these nuclear proteins are transported through the nuclear envelope and how the import processes are regulated is therefore an important aspect of understanding cell function. Structural biology has played a key role in understanding the molecular events during the transport processes and their regulation, including the recognition of nuclear targeting signals by the corresponding receptors. Here, we review the structural basis of the principal nuclear import pathways and the molecular basis of their regulation. The pathways involve transport factors that are members of the β-karyopherin family, which can bind cargo directly (e.g., importin-β, transportin-1, transportin-3, importin-13) or through adaptor proteins (e.g., importin-α, snurportin-1, symportin-1), as well as unrelated transport factors such as Hikeshi, involved in the transport of heat-shock proteins, and NTF2, involved in the transport of RanGDP. Solenoid proteins feature prominently in these pathways. Nuclear transport factors recognize nuclear targeting signals on the cargo proteins, including the classical nuclear localization signals, recognized by the adaptor importin-α, and the PY nuclear localization signals, recognized by transportin-1. Post-translational modifications, particularly phosphorylation, constitute key regulatory mechanisms operating in these pathways. PMID:26523678

  19. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; Hill, Richard J.

    2016-06-01

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2=0.46 (22 ) fm2 , with a much larger uncertainty than determined in the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ (νμn →μ-p )|Eν=1GeV=10.1 (0.9 )×10-39 cm2 . The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. These techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.

  20. Left nucleus accumbens atrophy in deficit schizophrenia: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Pietro; Dacquino, Claudia; Piras, Fabrizio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2016-08-30

    A question that remains to be answered is whether schizophrenia can be characterized by a single etiopathophysiology or whether separate sub-syndromes should be differentiated to define specific mechanisms for each sub-type. Individuals affected by the deficit subtype of schizophrenia (DSZ) display avolitional/amotivational features that respond poorly to conventional treatments. Characterizing DSZ from a neuroanatomical point of view may help clarify this issue and develop new treatment strategies. To determine if DSZ is associated with structural alterations in specific deep grey matter structures linked to its key clinical features, 22 DSZ patients, 22 non-deficit schizophrenia (NDSZ) patients and 22 healthy controls (HC) were recruited for a case-control cross-sectional study. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging was performed in all subjects and volumes of deep grey matter structures were measured using FreeSurfer. DSZ patients displayed smaller left accumbens volumes compared to both NDSZ patients and HC. Moreover, age and duration of illness were significantly associated with lower volume of the left accumbens in DSZ but not in NDSZ. Findings indicate that DSZ is associated with lower volume of the nucleus accumbens in the dominant hemisphere. This is consistent with the psychopathological features and functional impairments present in DSZ and thus indicates a potential mechanism. PMID:27322868

  1. The Subthalamic Nucleus, Limbic Function, and Impulse Control.

    PubMed

    Rossi, P Justin; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    It has been well documented that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) to address some of the disabling motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) can evoke unintended effects, especially on non-motor behavior. This observation has catalyzed more than a decade of research concentrated on establishing trends and identifying potential mechanisms for these non-motor effects. While many issues remain unresolved, the collective result of many research studies and clinical observations has been a general recognition of the role of the STN in mediating limbic function. In particular, the STN has been implicated in impulse control and the related construct of valence processing. A better understanding of STN involvement in these phenomena could have important implications for treating impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs affect up to 40% of PD patients on dopamine agonist therapy and approximately 15% of PD patients overall. ICDs have been reported to be associated with STN DBS. In this paper we will focus on impulse control and review pre-clinical, clinical, behavioral, imaging, and electrophysiological studies pertaining to the limbic function of the STN. PMID:26577509

  2. Anterior nucleus of the thalamus: functional organization and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Child, Nicholas D; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2013-11-19

    The anterior nucleus of thalamus (ANT) is a key component of the hippocampal system for episodic memory. The ANT consist of 3 subnuclei with distinct connectivity with the subicular cortex, retrosplenial cortex, and mammillary bodies. Via its connections with the anterior cingulate and orbitomedial prefrontal cortex, the ANT may also contribute to reciprocal hippocampal-prefrontal interactions involved in emotional and executive functions. As in other thalamic nuclei, neurons of the ANT have 2 different state-dependent patterns of discharge, tonic and burst-firing; some ANT neurons also contribute to propagation of the theta rhythm, which is important for mechanisms of synaptic plasticity of the hippocampal circuit. Clinical and experimental evidence indicate that damage of the ANT or its inputs from the mammillary bodies are primarily responsible for the episodic memory deficit observed in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and thalamic stroke. Experimental models also indicate that the ANT may have a role in the propagation of seizure activity both in absence and in focal seizures. Because of its central connectivity and possible role in propagation of seizure activity, the ANT has become an attractive target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treatment of medically refractory epilepsy. The ANT is one of the nuclei preferentially affected in prion disorders, such as fatal familial insomnia, but the relationship between ANT involvement and the clinical manifestations of these disorders remains unclear. The connectivity patterns and electrophysiology of the ANT have been the subject of several reviews.(1-4.) PMID:24142476

  3. On Parallel Streams through the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Denman, Daniel J; Contreras, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The mouse visual system is an emerging model for the study of cortical and thalamic circuit function. To maximize the usefulness of this model system, it is important to analyze the similarities and differences between the organization of all levels of the murid visual system with other, better studied systems (e.g., non-human primates and the domestic cat). While the understanding of mouse retina and cortex has expanded rapidly, less is known about mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Here, we study whether parallel processing streams exist in mouse dLGN. We use a battery of stimuli that have been previously shown to successfully distinguish parallel streams in other species: electrical stimulation of the optic chiasm, contrast-reversing stationary gratings at varying spatial phase, drifting sinusoidal gratings, dense noise for receptive field reconstruction, and frozen contrast-modulating noise. As in the optic nerves of domestic cats and non-human primates, we find evidence for multiple conduction velocity groups after optic chiasm stimulation. As in so-called "visual mammals", we find a subpopulation of mouse dLGN cells showing non-linear spatial summation. However, differences in stimulus selectivity and sensitivity do not provide sufficient basis for identification of clearly distinct classes of relay cells. Nevertheless, consistent with presumptively homologous status of dLGNs of all mammals, there are substantial similarities between response properties of mouse dLGN neurons and those of cats and primates. PMID:27065811

  4. High-resolution neurometabolic coupling in the lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Li, Baowang; Freeman, Ralph D

    2007-09-19

    The relationships between neural and metabolic processes in activated brain regions are central to the interpretation of noninvasive imaging. To examine this relationship, we have used a specialized sensor to measure simultaneously tissue oxygen changes and neural activity in colocalized regions of the cat's lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). Previous work with this sensor has shown that a decrease or increase in tissue oxygen can be elicited by selective control of the location and extent of neural activation in the LGN. In the current study, to evaluate the temporal integration and homogeneity of neurometabolic coupling, we have determined the relationship between multiunit extracellular neural activity and tissue oxygen responses to visual stimuli of various durations and contrasts. Our results show that the negative but not the positive oxygen response changes in an approximately linear manner with stimulus duration. The relationship between the negative oxygen response and neural activity is relatively constant with stimulus duration. Moreover, both negative and positive oxygen responses saturate at high stimulus contrast levels. Coupling between neural activity and negative oxygen responses is well described by a power law function. These results help elucidate differences between the initial negative and subsequent positive metabolic responses and may be directly relevant to questions concerning brain mapping with functional magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:17881528

  5. Paraventricular Nucleus Modulates Excitatory Cardiovascular Reflexes during Electroacupuncture.

    PubMed

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Guo, Zhi-Ling; Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    2016-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) regulates sympathetic outflow and blood pressure. Somatic afferent stimulation activates neurons in the hypothalamic PVN. Parvocellular PVN neurons project to sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular regions of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM). Electroacupuncture (EA) stimulates the median nerve (P5-P6) to modulate sympathoexcitatory responses. We hypothesized that the PVN and its projections to the rVLM participate in the EA-modulation of sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular responses. Cats were anesthetized and ventilated. Heart rate and mean blood pressure were monitored. Application of bradykinin every 10-min on the gallbladder induced consistent pressor reflex responses. Thirty-min of bilateral EA stimulation at acupoints P5-P6 reduced the pressor responses for at least 60-min. Inhibition of the PVN with naloxone reversed the EA-inhibition. Responses of cardiovascular barosensitive rVLM neurons evoked by splanchnic nerve stimulation were reduced by EA and then restored with opioid receptor blockade in the PVN. EA at P5-P6 decreased splanchnic evoked activity of cardiovascular barosensitive PVN neurons that also project directly to the rVLM. PVN neurons labeled with retrograde tracer from rVLM were co-labeled with μ-opioid receptors and juxtaposed to endorphinergic fibers. Thus, the PVN and its projection to rVLM are important in processing acupuncture modulation of elevated blood pressure responses through a PVN opioid mechanism. PMID:27181844

  6. Ice Nucleus Characteristics of Mount St. Helens Effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Schnell, R.C.; Pueschel, R.F.; Wellman, D.L.

    1982-12-20

    Aerosols were studied in situ and captured on membrane filters from an aircraft flown around Mount St. Helens during its phreatic period in April 1980. Bulk samples of volcanic ash were collected at ground level 120 km downwind on May 19, 1980 and reaerosolized in a laboratory in ash cloud simulation studies. The aerosol and/or ash samples were tested for ice nucleus (IN) activity using four different IN measurement systems (NCAR acoustical counter, bulk drop freezing, NCAR dynamic thermal diffusion chamber, and filter drop freezing). Although threshold IN activity was observed at -8/sup 0/C in bulk ash, in aerosols there were few IN active at temperatures warmer than -12/sup 0/C. At -12/sup 0/C, IN concentrations were less than 0.4 l/sup -1/ (400 m/sup -3/) even when the aerosol concentrations were as high as 3000 ..mu..g m/sup -3/. At aerosol concentrations of 500 ..mu..g m/sup -3/ and less, the IN content of the ash was below background threshold temperatures of -18/sup 0/C.

  7. MOMENTUM DRIVING: WHICH PHYSICAL PROCESSES DOMINATE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK?

    SciTech Connect

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Choi, Ena; Novak, Gregory S.; Ciotti, Luca; Proga, Daniel

    2010-10-10

    The deposition of mechanical feedback from a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in an active galactic nucleus into the surrounding galaxy occurs via broad-line winds which must carry mass and radial momentum as well as energy. The effect can be summarized by the dimensionless parameter {eta}= M-dot{sub outf}/ M-dot{sub acc}=2{epsilon}{sub w}c{sup 2}/v{sub w}{sup 2} where {epsilon}{sub w} ({identical_to} E-dot{sub w}/(M-dot{sub acc}c{sup 2})) is the efficiency with which accreted matter is turned into wind energy in the disk surrounding the central SMBH. The outflowing mass and momentum are proportional to {eta}, and many prior treatments have essentially assumed that {eta} = 0. We perform one- and two-dimensional simulations and find that the growth of the central SMBH is very sensitive to the inclusion of the mass and momentum driving but is insensitive to the assumed mechanical efficiency. For example in representative calculations, the omission of momentum and mass feedback leads to a hundred-fold increase in the mass of the SMBH to over 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}. When allowance is made for momentum driving, the final SMBH mass is much lower and the wind efficiencies that lead to the most observationally acceptable results are relatively low with {epsilon}{sub w} {approx}< 10{sup -4}.

  8. Cellular Mechanosensing: Getting to the nucleus of it all

    PubMed Central

    Fedorchak, Gregory R.; Kaminski, Ashley; Lammerding, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical forces by activating specific genes and signaling pathways that allow the cells to adapt to their physical environment. Examples include muscle growth in response to exercise, bone remodeling based on their mechanical load, or endothelial cells aligning under fluid shear stress. While the involved downstream signaling pathways and mechanoresponsive genes are generally well characterized, many of the molecular mechanisms of the initiating ‘mechanosensing’ remain still elusive. In this review, we discuss recent findings and accumulating evidence suggesting that the cell nucleus plays a crucial role in cellular mechanotransduction, including processing incoming mechanoresponsive signals and even directly responding to mechanical forces. Consequently, mutations in the involved proteins or changes in nuclear envelope composition can directly impact mechanotransduction signaling and contribute to the development and progression of a variety of human diseases, including muscular dystrophy, cancer, and the focus of this review, dilated cardiomyopathy. Improved insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying nuclear mechanotransduction, brought in part by the emergence of new technologies to study intracellular mechanics at high spatial and temporal resolution, will not only result in a better understanding of cellular mechanosensing in normal cells but may also lead to the development of novel therapies in the many diseases linked to defects in nuclear envelope proteins. PMID:25008017

  9. Consolidation of altered associability information by amygdala central nucleus.

    PubMed

    Schiffino, Felipe L; Holland, Peter C

    2016-09-01

    The surprising omission of a reinforcer can enhance the associability of the stimuli that were present when the reward prediction error was induced, so that they more readily enter into new associations in the future. Previous research from this laboratory identified brain circuit elements critical to the enhancement of stimulus associability by the omission of an expected event and to the subsequent expression of that altered associability in more rapid learning. These elements include the amygdala, the midbrain substantia nigra, the basal forebrain substantia innominata, the dorsolateral striatum, the secondary visual cortex, and the posterior parietal cortex. Here, we found that consolidation of a surprise-enhanced associability memory in a serial prediction task depends on processing in the amygdala central nucleus (CeA) after completion of sessions that included the surprising omission of an expected event. Post-surprise infusions of anisomycin, lidocaine, or muscimol prevented subsequent display of surprise-enhanced associability. Because previous studies indicated that CeA function is unnecessary for the expression of associability enhancements that were induced previously when CeA function was intact (Holland & Gallagher, 2006), we interpreted these results as indicating that post-surprise activity of CeA ("surprise replay") is necessary for the consolidation of altered associability memories elsewhere in the brain, such as the posterior parietal cortex (Schiffino et al., 2014a). PMID:27427328

  10. Suppression of Subthalamic Nucleus Activity by Micromagnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Woo; Fried, Shelley I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic stimulation delivered via 0.5-mm diameter coils was recently shown to activate retinal neurons; the small coil size raises the possibility that micromagnetic stimulation (μMS) could underlie a new generation of implanted neural prosthetics. Such an approach has several inherent advantages over conventional electric stimulation, including the potential for selective activation of neuronal targets as well as less susceptibility to inflamma-tory responses. The viability of μMS for some applications, e.g., deep brain stimulation (DBS), may require suppression (rather than creation) of neuronal activity, however, and therefore we explore here whether (μMS) could, in fact, suppress activity. While single pulses elicited weak and inconsistent spiking in neurons of the mouse subthalamic nucleus (in vitro), repetitive stimulation effectively suppressed activity in ~70% of targeted neurons. This is the same percentage suppressed by conventional electric stimulation; with both modalities, suppression occurred only after an initial increase in spiking. The latency to the onset of suppression was inversely correlated to the energy of the stimulus waveform: larger amplitudes and lower frequencies had the fastest onset of suppression. These findings continue to support the viability of μMS as a next-generation implantable neural prosthetic. PMID:25163063

  11. Nuclear dot antigens may specify transcriptional domains in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Xie, K; Lambie, E J; Snyder, M

    1993-10-01

    A bank of 892 human autoimmune serum samples was screened by indirect immunofluorescence on human tissue culture HT-29 cells. Seven serum samples that stain 4 to 10 bright dots in cell lines of several different mammals, including humans, monkeys, rats, and pigs, were identified. Immunofluorescence experiments indicate that these antigens, called nuclear dot (ND) antigens, are distinct from splicing complexes, kinetochores, and other known nuclear structures. An ND antigen recognized by these sera was cloned by immunoscreening a human lambda gt11 expression library. Analysis of seven cDNA clones for the ND antigen indicates that several mRNAs exist, perhaps derived through alternative splicing mechanisms. One major form of the message has an open reading frame of 1,440 bp capable of encoding a 53,000-M(r) protein. Treatment of cells with detergent, salt, or RNase A fails to remove the ND antigen from the nucleus. However, incubation with DNase I obliterates ND staining, indicating that the ND protein directly or indirectly associates with nuclear DNA. Fusion of the ND protein to a LexA DNA binding domain activates transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 75-amino-acid domain that activates transcription in both yeast and primate cells has been identified. We suggest that ND antigens may participate in the activation of transcription of specific regions of the genome. PMID:8413218

  12. Dissecting the cell to nucleus, perinucleus and cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Shaiken, Tattym E.; Opekun, Antone R.

    2014-01-01

    Cells have been described under the microscope as organelles containing cytoplasm and the nucleus. However, an unnoted structure exists between the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm of eukaryotic cells. In addition to the nuclear envelope, there exists a perinuclear region (PNR or perinucleus) with unknown composition and function. Until now, an investigation of the role of the perinucleus has been restricted by the absence of a PNR isolation method. This manuscript describes a perinucleus isolation technique on the basis of its unique compact organization. The perinucleus was found to contain approximately 15 to 18% of the total proteins of the mammalian cell, almost half of the proteins of nuclei. Using four different normal and cancer cell lines, it was shown that the composition of PNR is highly dynamic. Application of the method showed that translocation of the p53 tumor-suppressor protein to the perinucleus in immortalized MEF cells is correlated with the translocation of p53-stabilizing protein, nucleophosmin (B23), to the PNR. Herein, the concept of the perinuclear region is advanced as a formal, identifiable structure. The roles of the perinucleus in maintaining genome integrity, regulation of gene expression and understanding of malignant transformation are discussed. PMID:24815916

  13. Paraventricular Nucleus Modulates Excitatory Cardiovascular Reflexes during Electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C.; Guo, Zhi-Ling; Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C.

    2016-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) regulates sympathetic outflow and blood pressure. Somatic afferent stimulation activates neurons in the hypothalamic PVN. Parvocellular PVN neurons project to sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular regions of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM). Electroacupuncture (EA) stimulates the median nerve (P5-P6) to modulate sympathoexcitatory responses. We hypothesized that the PVN and its projections to the rVLM participate in the EA-modulation of sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular responses. Cats were anesthetized and ventilated. Heart rate and mean blood pressure were monitored. Application of bradykinin every 10-min on the gallbladder induced consistent pressor reflex responses. Thirty-min of bilateral EA stimulation at acupoints P5-P6 reduced the pressor responses for at least 60-min. Inhibition of the PVN with naloxone reversed the EA-inhibition. Responses of cardiovascular barosensitive rVLM neurons evoked by splanchnic nerve stimulation were reduced by EA and then restored with opioid receptor blockade in the PVN. EA at P5-P6 decreased splanchnic evoked activity of cardiovascular barosensitive PVN neurons that also project directly to the rVLM. PVN neurons labeled with retrograde tracer from rVLM were co-labeled with μ-opioid receptors and juxtaposed to endorphinergic fibers. Thus, the PVN and its projection to rVLM are important in processing acupuncture modulation of elevated blood pressure responses through a PVN opioid mechanism. PMID:27181844

  14. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion. The 30 animals were divided into experimental groups according to the drug used. The drugs were administered for two weeks after the surgical procedure to induce hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated using the paw pressure test, von Frey electronic test and Hargreaves test, over a seven-week period. Results: The greatest reduction of hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals treated with morphine, followed by dexamethasone, indomethacin and atenolol. Reductions in hyperalgesia were observed after drug administration ceased, except for the group of animals treated with morphine, in which there was an increase in hyperalgesia after discontinuation of the treatment. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia induced by NP contact with the DRG can be reduced through administration of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs, but a greater reduction was observed with the administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27026966

  15. Nucleus as an Open System: New Effects and Theoretical Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    As nuclear science moves in the direction of nuclei far from stability, the studies of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions become more and more interrelated. The main theoretical challenge is to find a consistent description of the nucleus as an open mesoscopic system coupled with continuum through real decay channels and through virtual excitations. The method using the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian [see review article: N. Auerbach and V. Zelevinsky, Rep. Prog. Phys. 74, 106301 (2011)] is one of the most promising theoretical approaches; it can be strictly derived from quantum many-body theory, it allows for calculating bound states, resonances and reaction cross sections in the unified framework, and it is quite flexible in practical applications. After explaining the main features of this theory, I will show the method at work (continuum shell model with predictions recently confirmed by the experiments with exotic oxygen isotopes, phenomenon of super-radiance, relation to the idea of doorway states, quantum signal transmission through mesoscopic systems) and discuss new theoretical challenges.

  16. Motor task event detection using Subthalamic Nucleus Local Field Potentials.

    PubMed

    Niketeghad, Soroush; Hebb, Adam O; Nedrud, Joshua; Hanrahan, Sara J; Mahoor, Mohammad H

    2015-08-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) provides significant therapeutic benefit for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Current DBS devices lack real-time feedback (thus are open loop) and stimulation parameters are adjusted during scheduled visits with a clinician. A closed-loop DBS system may reduce power consumption and DBS side effects. In such systems, DBS parameters are adjusted based on patient's behavior, which means that behavior detection is a major step in designing such systems. Various physiological signals can be used to recognize the behaviors. Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) Local Field Potential (LFP) is a great candidate signal for the neural feedback, because it can be recorded from the stimulation lead and does not require additional sensors. A practical behavior detection method should be able to detect behaviors asynchronously meaning that it should not use any prior knowledge of behavior onsets. In this paper, we introduce a behavior detection method that is able to asynchronously detect the finger movements of Parkinson patients. As a result of this study, we learned that there is a motor-modulated inter-hemispheric connectivity between LFP signals recorded bilaterally from STN. We used non-linear regression method to measure this connectivity and use it to detect the finger movements. Performance of this method is evaluated using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC). PMID:26737550

  17. Microtubules contribute to maintain nucleus shape in epithelial cell monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Dominique; Andrzejewski, Lukasz; Pelling, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tissue strains can result in significant nuclear deformations and may regulate gene expression. However, the precise role of the cytoskeleton in regulating nuclear mechanics remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate the nuclear deformability of Madin-Darky canine kidney cells (MDCK) under various stretching conditions to clarify the role of the microtubules and actin network on the mechanical behavior of the nucleus. METHODS: A custom-built cell-stretching device allowing for real time imaging of MDCK nuclei was used. Cells were seeded on a silicone membrane coated with rat-tail collagen I. A nuclear stain, Hoechst-33342, was used to image nuclei during stretching. We exposed cells to a compressive and non-compressive stretching strain field of 25%. Nocodazole and cytochalasin-D were used to depolymerize the microtubules and actin network. RESULTS: Nuclei in control cells stretched more along their minor axis than major axis with a deformation of 5% and 2% respectively. This anisotropy vanished completely in microtubule-deprived cells and these cells showed a very high nuclear deformability along the minor axis when exposed to a compressive stretching strain field. CONCLUSIONS: The microtubules drive the anisotropic deformability of MDCK nuclei in a monolayer and maintain nuclear shape when exposed to compressive strain. Such intrinsic mechanical behavior indicates that microtubules are essential to maintain nuclear shape and may prevent down regulation of gene expression.

  18. Quantum memory in a single nucleus in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Solomon; Simmons, Stephanie; Laucht, Arne; Muhonen, Juha; Dehollain, Juan Pablo; Kalra, Rachpon; Hudson, Fay; Dzurak, Andrew; Itoh, Kohei; McCallum, Jeffrey; Jamieson, David; Morello, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Long coherence times and fast manipulation are two desirable qualities of a qubit that for many systems are mutually incompatible. Storing quantum information in an ancillary qubit, i.e. a `quantum memory', is a strategy to address this issue. It is a advantageous property of donor impurities in silicon to have qubits of both qualities in a single lattice site. Here we demonstrate storage and retrieval of quantum information from a single donor electron spin to its host phosphorus nucleus in isotopically-enriched 28Si. We demonstrate a high fidelity memory process characterised via both state and process tomography. We use dynamical decoupling sequences during the nuclear storage to extend the memory time, and demonstrate storage and retrieval of a single qubit of information multiple times before decay. These results underline the inherent versatility and high fidelity of our two qubit system. Funded by the Australian Research Council (CE11E000127) and the U.S. Army Research Office (W911NF-13-1-0024).

  19. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2014: Workshop for young scientists on the physics of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-05-01

    The 6th edition of the Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Hot Quarks 2014) was held in Las Negras, Spain from 21-28 September 2014. Following the traditions of the conference, this meeting gathered more than 70 participants in the first years of their scientific careers. The present issue contains the proceedings of this workshop. As in the past, the Hot Quarks workshop offered a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion and interpretation of the current measurements from high energy nuclear collisions. Recent results and upgrades at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) were presented. Recent theoretical developments were also extensively discussed as well as the perspectives for future facilities such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt and the Electron-Ion Collider at Brookhaven. The conference's goal to provide a platform for young researchers to learn and foster their interactions was successfully met. We wish to thank the sponsors of the Hot Quarks 2014 Conference, who supported the authors of this volume: Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), CPAN (Spain), Czech Science Foundation (GACR) under grant 13-20841S (Czech Republic), European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Switzerland), European Research Council under grant 259612 (EU), ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI (Germany), Helmholtz Association and GSI under grant VH-NG-822, Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (Germany), National Science Foundation under grant No.1359622 (USA), Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR (Czech Republic), Patronato de la Alhambra y Generalife (Spain) and the Universidad de Granada (Spain). Javier López Albacete, Universidad de Granada (Spain) Jana Bielcikova, Nuclear Physics Inst. and Academy of Sciences (Czech Republic) Rainer J. Fries, Texas A&M University (USA) Raphaël Granier de Cassagnac, CNRS-IN2P3 and École polytechnique (France

  20. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2012: Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, Markus; Caines, Helen; Calderón de la Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Fries, Rainer; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphaël; Hippolyte, Boris; Mischke, André; Mócsy, Ágnes; Petersen, Hannah; Ruan, Lijuan; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2013-09-01

    The 5th edition of the Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Hot Quarks 2012) was held in Copamarina, Puerto Rico from 14-20 October 2012. As in previous years, this meeting gathered more than 70 participants in the early years of their scientific careers. This issue contains the proceedings of the workshop. As in the past, the Hot Quarks workshop offered a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion and interpretation of the current measurements from high energy nuclear collisions. Recent results and upgrades at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) were presented. Measurements from the proton-led run at the CERN-LHC were shown for the first time at this meeting. Recent theoretical developments were also extensively discussed, as well as the proposals for future facilities such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, the Electron-Ion Collider at Brookhaven, and the LHeC. The conference's goal to provide a platform for young researchers to learn and foster their interactions was successfully met. We wish to thank the sponsors of the Hot Quarks 2012 Conference, who supported the authors of this volume: Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Switzerland), European Research Council (EU), ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI (Germany), Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (Germany), IN2P3/CNRS (France) and the European Research Council via grant #259612, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (USA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA), National Science Foundation (USA), and Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (Netherlands). Marcus BleicherAndré Mischke Goethe-University Frankfurt and HIC4FAIRUtrecht University and Nikhef Amsterdam GermanyThe Netherlands Helen CainesÁgnes Mócsy Yale UniversityPratt Institute and Brookhaven National

  1. Top-down-directed synchrony from medial frontal cortex to nucleus accumbens during reward anticipation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael X; Bour, Lo; Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Vink, Matthijs; Tijssen, Marina A J; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens and medial frontal cortex (MFC) are part of a loop involved in modulating behavior according to anticipated rewards. However, the precise temporal landscape of their electrophysiological interactions in humans remains unknown because it is not possible to record neural activity from the nucleus accumbens using noninvasive techniques. We recorded electrophysiological activity simultaneously from the nucleus accumbens and cortex (via surface EEG) in humans who had electrodes implanted as part of deep-brain-stimulation treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Patients performed a simple reward motivation task previously shown to activate the ventral striatum. Spectral Granger causality analyses were applied to dissociate "top-down" (cortex → nucleus accumbens)- from "bottom-up" (nucleus accumbens → cortex)-directed synchronization (functional connectivity). "Top-down"-directed synchrony from cortex to nucleus accumbens was maximal over medial frontal sites and was significantly stronger when rewards were anticipated. These findings provide direct electrophysiological evidence for a role of the MFC in modulating nucleus accumbens reward-related processing and may be relevant to understanding the mechanisms of deep-brain stimulation and its beneficial effects on psychiatric conditions. PMID:21547982

  2. Nucleus fingerprinting for the unique identification of Feulgen-stained nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, David; Brozio, Matthias; Bell, André; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Böcking, Alfred; Aach, Til

    2012-03-01

    DNA Image Cytometry is a method for non-invasive cancer diagnosis which measures the DNA content of Feulgen-stained nuclei. DNA content is measured using a microscope system equipped with a digital camera as a densitometer and estimating the DNA content from the absorption of light when passing through the nuclei. However, a DNA Image Cytometry measurement is only valid if each nucleus is only measured once. To assist the user in preventing multiple measurements of the same nucleus, we have developed a unique digital identifier for the characterization of Feulgen-stained nuclei, the so called Nucleus Fingerprint. Only nuclei with a new fingerprint can be added to the measurement. This fingerprint is based on basic nucleus features, the contour of the nucleus and the spatial relationship to nuclei in the vicinity. Based on this characterization, a classifier for testing two nuclei for identity is presented. In a pairwise comparison of ~40000 pairs of mutually different nuclei, 99.5% were classified as different. In another 450 tests, the fingerprints of the same nucleus recorded a second time were in all cases judged identical. We therefore conclude that our Nucleus Fingerprint approach robustly prevents the repeated measurement of nuclei in DNA Image Cytometry.

  3. Kleptochloroplast Enlargement, Karyoklepty and the Distribution of the Cryptomonad Nucleus in Nusuttodinium (= Gymnodinium) aeruginosum (Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Onuma, Ryo; Horiguchi, Takeo

    2015-05-01

    The unarmoured freshwater dinoflagellate Nusuttodinium (= Gymnodinium) aeruginosum retains a cryptomonad-derived kleptochloroplast and nucleus, the former of which fills the bulk of its cell volume. The paucity of studies following morphological changes to the kleptochloroplast with time make it unclear how the kleptochloroplast enlarges and why the cell ultimately loses the cryptomonad nucleus. We observed, both at the light and electron microscope level, morphological changes to the kleptochloroplast incurred by the enlargement process under culture conditions. The distribution of the cryptomonad nucleus after host cell division was also investigated. The volume of the kleptochloroplast increased more than 20-fold, within 120h of ingestion of the cryptomonad. Host cell division was not preceded by cryptomonad karyokinesis so that only one of the daughter cells inherited a cryptomonad nucleus. The fate of all daughter cells originating from a single cell through five generations was closely monitored, and this observation revealed that the cell that inherited the cryptomonad nucleus consistently possessed the largest kleptochloroplast for that generation. Therefore, this study suggests that some important cryptomonad nucleus division mechanism is lost during ingestion process, and that the cryptomonad nucleus carries important information for the enlargement of the kleptochloroplast. PMID:25771111

  4. Role of the RVM in Descending Pain Regulation Originating from the Cerebrospinal Fluid-Contacting Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yan; Wang, Xin; Chen, Songsong; Zhou, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ying; Sun, Lihong; Zhang, Licai

    2016-07-01

    Evidence has suggested that cerebrospinal fluid-contacting nucleus (CSF-contacting nucleus) is correlated with the development and recurrence of pain. A recent research showed that the CSF-contacting nucleus acts as a component of the descending 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system and plays a role in descending pain inhibition. However, limited studies are conducted to investigate the relationship between the CSF-contacting nucleus and pain. In present study, we explored the effect of CSF-contacting nucleus on nociceptive behaviors in both normal and neuropathic rats via targeted ablation of the CSF-contacting nucleus in the brainstem, using cholera toxin subunit B-saporin (CB-SAP), a cytotoxin coupled to cholera toxin subunit B. The CB-SAP-treated rats showed aggravated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Also, results from immunohistochemical experiments showed that rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) received fiber projection from the CSF-contacting nucleus, which disappeared after ablation of the CSF-contacting nucleus, and the CB-SAP treated rats showed downregulation of c-Fos expression in the RVM as compared with the rats receiving i.c.v. injection of phosphate buffer saline (PBS). A significant downregulation of 5-HT-labeled neurons and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) as the marker of 5-HT cells in the RVM, and 5-HT expression in spinal dorsal horn in both normal and chronic constriction injury (CCI) rats after i.c.v. injection of CB-SAP was observed. These results suggested that RVM may be involved in descending pain modulation originating from the CSF-contacting nucleus. PMID:26961890

  5. MRI localization of the subthalamic nucleus in normal adults and its relation with age.

    PubMed

    Lv, Huandi; Geng, Zuojun; Zhu, Qingfeng; Wang, Lixin; Song, Zhenhu; Chang, Ruiting; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-11

    The subthalamic nucleus regulates motor and neurocognitive functions. Because of its small size and close proximity to other small subcortical structures, it has been a challenge to localize and visualize it using MRI. Here, we sought to define the optimal MRI scan method and visualization plane for locating the subthalamic nucleus on MRI images and to further delineate the geometric dimensions of the subthalamic nucleus and their correlation with age, laterality, and sex. Healthy volunteers received axial, sagittal, and coronal T2_3D_DRIVE CLEAR, coronal T1-WI, coronal T2FLAIR, coronal T2, and coronal SWI sequence. The coronal T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR images were compared with the Schaltenbrand-Wahren Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain for localizing the subthalamic nucleus. The best visualization plane with the largest sectional area and the most distinct outline was obtained and region of interest was delineated manually on the basis of the contours of the bilateral subthalamic nuclei in T2-WI images. T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR in the coronal view showed optimal visualization of the subthalamic nucleus and indicated that the subthalamic nucleus showed three morphological types: the double convex lens type (172, 64%), the ram's horn type (62, 23%), and the willow leaf type (34, 13%). There were no statistically significant differences because of laterality, sex, and age in the sectional area, and maximal long and short diameter of the subthalamic nucleus. On the basis of our results, the current study has shown that T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR in the coronal view provides optimal visualization of the subthalamic nucleus, which shows three distinct morphological types on MRI images, and there is no statistically significant difference in the geometric dimensions of the subthalamic nucleus because of laterality, sex, and age in normal individuals. PMID:26379058

  6. Bradycardic effects mediated by activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor in rat nucleus ambiguus.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Oprea, Tudor I; Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2013-03-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) has been identified in several brain regions, including cholinergic neurons of the nucleus ambiguus, which are critical for parasympathetic cardiac regulation. Using calcium imaging and electrophysiological techniques, microinjection into the nucleus ambiguus and blood pressure measurement, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of GPER activation in nucleus ambiguus neurons. A GPER selective agonist, G-1, produced a sustained increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in a concentration-dependent manner in retrogradely labelled cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus. The increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) produced by G-1 was abolished by pretreatment with G36, a GPER antagonist. G-1 depolarized cultured cardiac vagal neurons of the nucleus ambiguus. The excitatory effect of G-1 was also identified by whole-cell visual patch-clamp recordings in nucleus ambiguus neurons, in medullary slices. To validate the physiological relevance of our in vitro studies, we carried out in vivo experiments. Microinjection of G-1 into the nucleus ambiguus elicited a decrease in heart rate; the effect was blocked by prior microinjection of G36. Systemic injection of G-1, in addition to a previously reported decrease in blood pressure, also reduced the heart rate. The G-1-induced bradycardia was prevented by systemic injection of atropine, a muscarinic antagonist, or by bilateral microinjection of G36 into the nucleus ambiguus. Our results indicate that GPER-mediated bradycardia occurs via activation of cardiac parasympathetic neurons of the nucleus ambiguus and support the involvement of the GPER in the modulation of cardiac vagal tone. PMID:23104934

  7. Thermodynamics of droplet formation around a soluble condensation nucleus in the atmosphere of a solvent vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchekin, A. K.; Shabaev, I. V.; Rusanov, A. I.

    2008-12-01

    An expression for the work of formation of a spherical droplet condensing on a soluble condensation nucleus out of a solvent vapor is derived. The dependence of the formation work on the solvent vapor chemical potential and the droplet and the nucleus residue sizes is analyzed. The balance of the solute matter between the liquid film and the nucleus residue and the effect of overlapping the surface layers of the thin film have been taken into account. It is shown that the equations of the chemical equilibrium of a solute and a solvent in the droplet, resulting from the generating properties of the formation work, coincide with the generalized Gibbs-Kelvin-Köhler and Ostwald-Freundlich equations. The numerical solution of these equations at a fixed number of molecules of the nucleus matter (at an initial size of the nucleus specified) has been performed in the case of the solvent vapor undersaturated over the bulk liquid solvent phase. The solution links the equilibrium sizes of the droplet and the soluble nucleus residue with the chemical potential or the pressure of the solvent vapor saturated over the droplet. It also determines the limiting sizes of the droplet with small nucleus residue above which the chemical equilibrium of the residue surface and the solution film does not exist. The existence of the limiting sizes is responsible for the specific behavior of the droplet thermodynamic characteristics and the work of droplet formation at deliquescence transition from the droplet state with a partly dissolved nucleus to the state of complete dissolution of the nucleus.

  8. Clinical evaluation of the Nucleus® 6 cochlear implant system: Performance improvements with SmartSound iQ

    PubMed Central

    Mauger, Stefan J; Warren, Chris D; Knight, Michelle R; Goorevich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This paper provides a detailed description of the Nucleus 6 system, and clinically evaluates user performance compared to the previous Nucleus 5 system in cochlear implant recipients. Additionally, it clinically evaluates a range of Nucleus 6 and Nucleus 5 programs to determine the performance benefits provided by new input processing technologies available in SmartSound iQ. Design Speech understanding tests were used to clinically validate the default Nucleus 6 program, by comparing performance outcomes against up to five custom Nucleus 5 or Nucleus 6 programs in a range of listening environments. Clinical comparisons between programs were conducted across the following listening environments; quiet, speech weighted noise (co-located and spatially separated noise), and 4-talker babble (co-located and spatially separated noise). Study sample Twenty-one adult cochlear implant recipients participated. Results Significant speech understanding benefits were found with the default Nucleus 6 program compared to the participants’ preferred program using their Nucleus 5 processor and compared to a range of custom Nucleus 6 programs. All participants successfully accepted and upgraded to the new default Nucleus 6 SmartSound iQ program. Conclusion This study demonstrates the acceptance and clinical benefits of the Nucleus 6 cochlear implant system and SmartSound iQ. PMID:25005776

  9. Conversion electron spectroscopy at the FMA focal plane: Decay studies of proton-rich N {approximately} 82 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    The FMA has proven to be an ideal instrument for the detailed study of the decay of microsecond isomers behind the focal plane following mass selection. In reactions leading to the population of nuclei with isomeric lifetimes longer than their flight time through the device, decay gamma rays and conversion electrons can be detected in an environment free from the backgrounds of prompt radiation and delta electrons. This was a very successful technique to study proton (h{sub 11/2}){sup n} seniority isomers in nuclei with Z > 64 and N {approximately} 82. Since isomeric decay gamma rays are emitted isotropically, conversion electrons are essential for the assignment of multipolarities in these nuclei. Furthermore, the low-energy transitions that depopulate isomeric states are typically highly converted and can escape gamma-ray detection, but they can be identified by their conversion electrons.

  10. Beta Decay of the Proton-Rich Nuclei 102Sn and 104Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Karny, M.; Batist, L.; Banu, A.; Becker, F.; Blazhev, A.; Brown, B. A.; Bruchle, W.; Doring, J.; Faestermann, T.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Janas, Z.; Jungclaus, A.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kirchner, R.; La Commara, M.; Mandal, S.; Mazzocchi, C.; Miernik, K.; Mukha, I.; Muralithar, S.; Plettner, C.; Plochocki, A.; Roeckl, E.; Romoli, M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Schadel, M.; Schmidt, K.; Schwengner, R.; Zylicz, J.

    2006-01-01

    The {beta} decays of {sup 102}Sn and {sup 104}Sn were studied by using high-resolution germanium detectors as well as a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). For {sup 104}Sn, with three new {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays identified, the total Gamow-Teller strength (BGT) value of 2.7(3) was obtained. For {sup 102}Sn, the {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence data were collected for the first time, allowing us to considerably extend the decay scheme. This scheme was used to unfold the TAS data and to deduce a BGT value of 4.2(8) for this decay. This result is compared to shell model predictions, yielding a hindrance factor of 3.6(7) in agreement with those obtained previously for {sup 98}Cd and {sup 100}In. Together with the latter two, {sup 102}Sn completes the triplet of Z {le} 50, N {ge} 50 nuclei with two proton holes, one proton hole and one neutron particle, and two neutron particles with respect to the doubly magic {sup 100}Sn core.

  11. Gamow-Teller Transitions in Proton-Rich pf-shell Nuclei-relevance to supernovae explosions-

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Rubio, B.; Gelletly, W.

    2008-05-21

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions starting from unstable pf-shell nuclei play important roles in neutrino-induced reactions that happen under the extremely high temperature conditions in core-collapse (type II) supernovae. In the {beta} decay, it is difficult to obtain GT strengths B(GT) to higher excited states, but accurate half-lives can be measured. On the other hand, high-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) charge-exchange reactions at 0 deg. and at 420 MeV yield cross-sections, that are proportional to B(GT) values, for individual transitions up to high excitation. Assuming isospin symmetry, we performed a unique analysis to determine absolute B(GT) values for the T{sub z} {+-}1{yields}0 analogous GT transitions. Further {beta}-decay studies for unstable pf-shell nuclei to obtain accurate half-lives and feeding ratios are in progress.

  12. Large-amplitude quadrupole collective dynamics of shape coexistence phenomena in proton-rich Se and Kr isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Sato, Koichi; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2010-06-01

    The five-dimensional quadrupole collective Hamiltonian for large-amplitude collective dynamics is microscopically constructed by the constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (CHFB) method and local quasiparticle random phase approximation (LQRPA). The excitation spectra and the electric quadrupole transitions between the low-lying states in {sup 68}Se are calculated by solving the collective Schroedinger equation.

  13. [Possibility of the morphometry of the neuronal body and nucleus in cryostat sections of nerve tissue].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, I B

    1982-02-01

    A method of fixation by the Carnoy liquid and of gallocyanine staining is proposed in order to obtain clear-cut boundaries of the neuron body, nucleus and nucleolus in cryostat sections of non-fixed frozen nerve tissue, for subsequent morphometry of the body and nucleus of nerve cells. In the resulting sections, the clearness of boundaries of the body and nucleus in a neuron is sufficient for measuring its diameter with the coefficient of variation not exceeding 2.5%. PMID:7041376

  14. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  15. Optical image of a cometary nucleus: 1980 flyby of Comet Encke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. C.; Benson, R. S.; Anderson, A. D.; Gal, G.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility was investigated of obtaining optical images of a cometary nucleus via a flyby of Comet Encke. A physical model of the dust cloud surrounding the nucleus was developed by using available physical data and theoretical knowledge of cometary physics. Using this model and a Mie scattering code, calculations were made of the absolute surface brightness of the dust in the line of sight of the on-board camera and the relative surface brightness of the dust compared to the nucleus. The brightness was calculated as a function of heliocentric distance and for different phase angles (sun-comet-spacecraft angle).

  16. Rotation states of the nucleus of Comet Halley compatible with spacecraft images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abergel, A.; Bertaux, J. L.

    1990-07-01

    The positions of the nucleus of Comet Halley have been interpreted, for the observations conducted by the flybys of Vegas 1 and 2 and Giotto, with a pure rotation motion and a period of about 54 hours. Comparisons with ground-based estimates of either the angular momentum or the instantaneous rotation axis of the nucleus indicate that the observed rotation axis during the three spacecraft encounters was moving; on this basis it is suggested that the rotation rate of the nucleus cannot be simple, for all that it may not be far from a pure rotation.

  17. Bilateral caudate nucleus infarction associated with a missing A1 segment.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Takuya; Osawa, Aiko; Ohe, Yasuko; Deguchi, Ichiro; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Tanahashi, Norio

    2012-11-01

    We describe a case of bilateral caudate nucleus infarction caused by cardioembolic stroke associated with a variant circle of Willis. The patient was an 81-year-old man with atrial fibrillation who presented with a sudden disturbance of consciousness. When he became more alert a few days later, he was abulic with no spontaneous speech or activity. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain revealed cerebral infarction of bilateral caudate nucleus heads and the left frontal lobe. The left A1 segment was absent on 3-dimensional computed tomography angiography. One year later, abulia had completely resolved. Bilateral caudate nucleus infarction with variant circle of Willis is rare. PMID:22177927

  18. The subthalamic nucleus exerts opposite control on cocaine and 'natural' rewards.

    PubMed

    Baunez, Christelle; Dias, Carine; Cador, Martine; Amalric, Marianne

    2005-04-01

    A challenge in treating drug addicts is preventing their pathological motivation for the drug without impairing their general affective state toward natural reinforcers. Here we have shown that discrete lesions of the subthalamic nucleus greatly decreased the motivation of rats for cocaine while increasing it for food reward. The subthalamic nucleus, a key structure controlling basal ganglia outputs, is therefore able to oppositely modulate the effect of 'natural' rewards and drugs of abuse on behavior. Modulating the activity of the subthalamic nucleus might prove to be a new target for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:15793577

  19. State-dependent control of breathing by the retrotrapezoid nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Peter GR; Kanbar, Roy; Basting, Tyler M; Hodges, Walter M; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-01-01

    Key points This study explores the state dependence of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex (HCVR). We simulated an instantaneous increase or decrease of central chemoreceptor activity by activating or inhibiting the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) by optogenetics in conscious rats. During quiet wake or non-REM sleep, hypercapnia increased both breathing frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) whereas, in REM sleep, hypercapnia increased VT exclusively. Optogenetic inhibition of RTN reduced VT in all sleep–wake states, but reduced fR only during quiet wake and non-REM sleep. RTN stimulation always increased VT but raised fR only in quiet wake and non-REM sleep. Phasic RTN stimulation produced active expiration and reduced early expiratory airflow (i.e. increased upper airway resistance) only during wake. We conclude that the HCVR is highly state-dependent. The HCVR is reduced during REM sleep because fR is no longer under chemoreceptor control and thus could explain why central sleep apnoea is less frequent in REM sleep. Abstract Breathing has different characteristics during quiet wake, non-REM or REM sleep, including variable dependence on . We investigated whether the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a proton-sensitive structure that mediates a large portion of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex, regulates breathing differently during sleep vs. wake. Electroencephalogram, neck electromyogram, blood pressure, respiratory frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) were recorded in 28 conscious adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. Optogenetic stimulation of RTN with channelrhodopsin-2, or inhibition with archaerhodopsin, simulated an instantaneous increase or decrease of central chemoreceptor activity. Both opsins were delivered with PRSX8-promoter-containing lentiviral vectors. RTN and catecholaminergic neurons were transduced. During quiet wake or non-REM sleep, hypercapnia (3 or 6% ) increased both fR and VT whereas, in REM sleep, hypercapnia increased VT exclusively. RTN

  20. Hypoxia Silences Retrotrapezoid Nucleus Respiratory Chemoreceptors via Alkalosis

    PubMed Central

    Basting, Tyler M.; Burke, Peter G.R.; Kanbar, Roy; Viar, Kenneth E.; Stornetta, Daniel S.; Stornetta, Ruth L.

    2015-01-01

    In conscious mammals, hypoxia or hypercapnia stimulates breathing while theoretically exerting opposite effects on central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs). We tested this theory by examining how hypoxia and hypercapnia change the activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a putative CRC and chemoreflex integrator. Archaerhodopsin-(Arch)-transduced RTN neurons were reversibly silenced by light in anesthetized rats. We bilaterally transduced RTN and nearby C1 neurons with Arch (PRSx8-ArchT-EYFP-LVV) and measured the cardiorespiratory consequences of Arch activation (10 s) in conscious rats during normoxia, hypoxia, or hyperoxia. RTN photoinhibition reduced breathing equally during non-REM sleep and quiet wake. Compared with normoxia, the breathing frequency reduction (ΔfR) was larger in hyperoxia (65% FiO2), smaller in 15% FiO2, and absent in 12% FiO2. Tidal volume changes (ΔVT) followed the same trend. The effect of hypoxia on ΔfR was not arousal-dependent but was reversed by reacidifying the blood (acetazolamide; 3% FiCO2). ΔfR was highly correlated with arterial pH up to arterial pH (pHa) 7.5 with no frequency inhibition occurring above pHa 7.53. Blood pressure was minimally reduced suggesting that C1 neurons were very modestly inhibited. In conclusion, RTN neurons regulate eupneic breathing about equally during both sleep and wake. RTN neurons are the first putative CRCs demonstrably silenced by hypocapnic hypoxia in conscious mammals. RTN neurons are silent above pHa 7.5 and increasingly active below this value. During hyperoxia, RTN activation maintains breathing despite the inactivity of the carotid bodies. Finally, during hypocapnic hypoxia, carotid body stimulation increases breathing frequency via pathways that bypass RTN. PMID:25589748