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Sample records for protozoan phylum apicomplexa

  1. Lateral gene transfer of family A DNA polymerases between thermophilic viruses, aquificae, and apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Thomas W; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Floyd, Sally; Lodes, Michael; Mead, David A; Hedlund, Brian P

    2013-07-01

    Bioinformatics and functional screens identified a group of Family A-type DNA Polymerase (polA) genes encoded by viruses inhabiting circumneutral and alkaline hot springs in Yellowstone National Park and the US Great Basin. The proteins encoded by these viral polA genes (PolAs) shared no significant sequence similarity with any known viral proteins but were remarkably similar to PolAs encoded by two of three families of the bacterial phylum Aquificae and by several apicoplast-targeted PolA-like proteins found in the eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa, which includes the obligate parasites Plasmodium, Babesia, and Toxoplasma. The viral gene products share signature elements previously associated only with Aquificae and Apicomplexa PolA-like proteins and were similar to proteins encoded by prophage elements of a variety of otherwise unrelated Bacteria, each of which additionally encoded a prototypical bacterial PolA. Unique among known viral DNA polymerases, the viral PolA proteins of this study share with the Apicomplexa proteins large amino-terminal domains with putative helicase/primase elements but low primary sequence similarity. The genomic context and distribution, phylogeny, and biochemistry of these PolA proteins suggest that thermophilic viruses transferred polA genes to the Apicomplexa, likely through secondary endosymbiosis of a virus-infected proto-apicoplast, and to the common ancestor of two of three Aquificae families, where they displaced the orthologous cellular polA gene. On the basis of biochemical activity, gene structure, and sequence similarity, we speculate that the xenologous viral-type polA genes may have functions associated with diversity-generating recombination in both Bacteria and Apicomplexa. PMID:23608703

  2. Lateral Gene Transfer of Family A DNA Polymerases between Thermophilic Viruses, Aquificae, and Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Thomas W.; Murugapiran, Senthil K.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Floyd, Sally; Lodes, Michael; Mead, David A.; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Bioinformatics and functional screens identified a group of Family A-type DNA Polymerase (polA) genes encoded by viruses inhabiting circumneutral and alkaline hot springs in Yellowstone National Park and the US Great Basin. The proteins encoded by these viral polA genes (PolAs) shared no significant sequence similarity with any known viral proteins but were remarkably similar to PolAs encoded by two of three families of the bacterial phylum Aquificae and by several apicoplast-targeted PolA-like proteins found in the eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa, which includes the obligate parasites Plasmodium, Babesia, and Toxoplasma. The viral gene products share signature elements previously associated only with Aquificae and Apicomplexa PolA-like proteins and were similar to proteins encoded by prophage elements of a variety of otherwise unrelated Bacteria, each of which additionally encoded a prototypical bacterial PolA. Unique among known viral DNA polymerases, the viral PolA proteins of this study share with the Apicomplexa proteins large amino-terminal domains with putative helicase/primase elements but low primary sequence similarity. The genomic context and distribution, phylogeny, and biochemistry of these PolA proteins suggest that thermophilic viruses transferred polA genes to the Apicomplexa, likely through secondary endosymbiosis of a virus-infected proto-apicoplast, and to the common ancestor of two of three Aquificae families, where they displaced the orthologous cellular polA gene. On the basis of biochemical activity, gene structure, and sequence similarity, we speculate that the xenologous viral-type polA genes may have functions associated with diversity-generating recombination in both Bacteria and Apicomplexa. PMID:23608703

  3. Molecular phylogenetics of eimeriid coccidia (Eimeriidae, Eimeriorina, Apicomplexa, Alveolata): A preliminary multi-gene and multi-genome approach.

    PubMed

    Ogedengbe, Joseph D; Ogedengbe, Mosun E; Hafeez, Mian A; Barta, John R

    2015-11-01

    Coccidia possess three distinct genomes: nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid. Sequences from five genes located on these three genomes were used to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of members of the phylum Apicomplexa: 18S rDNA sequences from the nuclear (nu) genome, partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I sequences from the mitochondrial (mt) genome, and partial 16S and 23S rDNA sequences and RNA polymerase B sequences from plastid (pl) genomes. Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference were used in conjunction with nuclear substitution models generated from data subsets in the analyses. Major groups within the Apicomplexa were well supported with the mitochondrial, nuclear, and a combination of mitochondrial, nuclear and concatenated plastid gene sequences. However, the genus Eimeria was paraphyletic in phylogenetic trees based on the nuclear gene. Analyses using the individual genes (18S rDNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I) resolved the various apicomplexan groups with high Bayesian posterior probabilities. The multi-gene, multi-genome analyses based on concatenated nu 18S rDNA, pl 16S, pl 23S, pl rPoB, pl rPoB1, and mt COI sequences appeared useful in resolving phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Apicomplexa. Genus-level relationships, or higher, appear best supported by 18S rDNA analyses, and species-level analyses are best investigated using mt COI sequences; for parasites for which both loci are available, nuclear 18S rDNA sequences combined with mitochondrial COI sequences provide a compact and informative molecular dataset for inferring the evolutionary relationships taxa in the Apicomplexa. PMID:26319519

  4. TWO NEW EIMERIANS (APICOMPLEXA) FROM INSECTIVOROUS MAMMALS IN MADAGASCAR

    E-print Network

    Jernvall, Jukka

    TWO NEW EIMERIANS (APICOMPLEXA) FROM INSECTIVOROUS MAMMALS IN MADAGASCAR Lee Couch, Juha Laakkonen The Journal of #12;#12;TWO NEW EIMERIANS (APICOMPLEXA) FROM INSECTIVOROUS MAMMALS IN MADAGASCAR Lee Couch insectivorous mammals in Madagascar were collected between spring 1999 and fall 2001. In the Afrosoricida, 21

  5. Foodborne protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Dawson, David

    2005-08-25

    This report addresses Cryptosporidium, Giardia, Cyclospora, and more briefly, Toxoplasma as the main parasitic protozoa of concern to food production worldwide. Other parasitic protozoa may be spread in food or water but are not considered as great a risk to food manufacture. The protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora have proven potential to cause waterborne and foodborne disease. Toxoplasma gondii has been considered a risk in specific cases, but humans are not its primary host. Cryptosporidium and Giardia are widespread in the environment, particularly the aquatic environment, and major outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis have occurred as a result of contaminated drinking water. Large outbreaks of waterborne cyclosporiasis have not been identified. Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora have potential significance in the preparation and consumption of fresh produce and in catering practice, in which ready-to-eat foods may be served that have not received heat treatment. None of the three organisms Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora has been shown to be a problem for heat processed food or tap water that has undergone appropriate treatment at a water treatment works. All three are sensitive to standard pasteurisation techniques. Although humans are not a primary host for T. gondii, the potential exists for both waterborne and foodborne toxoplasmosis. Parasitic protozoa do not multiply in foods, but they may survive in or on moist foods for months in cool, damp environments. Their ecology makes control of these parasites difficult. For general control of parasitic protozoa in the food chain, the following steps are necessary: - Follow good hygienic practice in food service and catering industries.- Minimise dissemination of cysts and oocysts in the farming environment and via human waste management.- Include these microorganisms in Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plans of water suppliers, industries or sectors that use fresh produce, and operations in which contaminated process or ingredient water could end up in the product (e.g., where water supplies may become contaminated). PMID:16083823

  6. The Ciliate Colpoda: "Instant" Protozoan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Anne Muller; Giese, Arthur C.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of Colpoda, a ciliated protozoan which is able to survive in a dry, encysted state for long periods of time. Outlines the procedures for culturing the organism and producing cyst preparations, and recommends its use in the high school biology laboratory. (JR)

  7. MFR PAPER 1342 Some Protozoan Diseases of

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1342 Some Protozoan Diseases of Decapod Crustaceans Thomas K. Sawyer and Sharon A. Mac protozoan parasites of decapod crustaceans into a brief summary of species which are deserving of con a bibliographic overview of the species of protozoans that are included here, but rather to summarize some of our

  8. Multigene eukaryote phylogeny reveals the likely protozoan ancestors of opisthokonts (animals, fungi, choanozoans) and Amoebozoa.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Chao, Ema E; Snell, Elizabeth A; Berney, Cédric; Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Lewis, Rhodri

    2014-12-01

    Animals and fungi independently evolved from the protozoan phylum Choanozoa, these three groups constituting a major branch of the eukaryotic evolutionary tree known as opisthokonts. Opisthokonts and the protozoan phylum Amoebozoa (amoebae plus slime moulds) were previously argued to have evolved independently from the little-studied, largely flagellate, protozoan phylum, Sulcozoa. Sulcozoa are a likely evolutionary link between opisthokonts and the more primitive excavate flagellates that have ventral feeding grooves and the most primitive known mitochondria. To extend earlier sparse evidence for the ancestral (paraphyletic) nature of Sulcozoa, we sequenced transcriptomes from six gliding flagellates (two apusomonads; three planomonads; Mantamonas). Phylogenetic analyses of 173-192 genes and 73-122 eukaryote-wide taxa show Sulcozoa as deeply paraphyletic, confirming that opisthokonts and Amoebozoa independently evolved from sulcozoans by losing their ancestral ventral groove and dorsal pellicle: Apusozoa (apusomonads plus anaerobic breviate amoebae) are robustly sisters to opisthokonts and probably paraphyletic, breviates diverging before apusomonads; Varisulca (planomonads, Mantamonas, and non-gliding flagellate Collodictyon) are sisters to opisthokonts plus Apusozoa and Amoebozoa, and possibly holophyletic; Glissodiscea (planomonads, Mantamonas) may be holophyletic, but Mantamonas sometimes groups with Collodictyon instead. Taxon and gene sampling slightly affects tree topology; for the closest branches in Sulcozoa and opisthokonts, proportionally reducing missing data eliminates conflicts between homogeneous-model maximum-likelihood trees and evolutionarily more realistic site-heterogeneous trees. Sulcozoa, opisthokonts, and Amoebozoa constitute an often-pseudopodial 'podiate' clade, one of only three eukaryotic 'supergroups'. Our trees indicate that evolution of sulcozoan dorsal pellicle, ventral pseudopodia, and ciliary gliding (probably simultaneously) generated podiate eukaryotes from Malawimonas-like excavate flagellates. PMID:25152275

  9. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of man infecting protozoans

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Vargas, H.

    1998-08-28

    In this paper the fundamentals of photothermal spectroscopy are presented, special emphasis is done in the obtention of the optical absorption spectra. It is shown that this spectroscopy can be used successfully for the monitoring of protozoans that could infect the human. The usefulness of the technique is illustrated in the special case of Leishmania, where it is possible to find that the stage when the protozoan infect vertebrate cells show important differences in relation to the protozoans infecting insects.

  10. Ionizing radiation promotes protozoan reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Luckey, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    This experiment was performed to determine whether ionizing radiation is essential for maximum growth rate in a ciliated protozoan. When extraneous ionizing radiation was reduced to 0.15 mrad/day, the reproduction rate of Tetrahymena pyriformis was significantly less (P less than 0.01) than it was at near ambient levels, 0.5 or 1.8 mrad/day. Significantly higher growth rates (P less than 0.01) were obtained when chronic radiation was increased. The data suggest that ionizing radiation is essential for optimum reproduction rate in this organism.

  11. Effects of Artemisia annua and Foeniculum vulgare on on chickens highly infected with Eimeria tenella (Phylum Apicomplexa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Intensive poultry production systems depend on chemoprophylaxis with anticoccidial drugs to combat infection. A floor-pen study was conducted to evaluate the anticoccidial effect of Artemisia annua and Foeniculum vulgare on Eimeria tenella infection. Five experimental groups were establi...

  12. Interferon effects on protozoan infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Wirth, J.; Kierszenbaum, F.; Degee, A. L. W.; Mansfield, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of interferon (IFN) on mice infected with two different parasitic protozoans, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, are investigated experimentally. The preparation of the cell cultures, IFN and assays, antibody, and the experimental procedures are described. It is observed that in cells treated with IFN-gamma there is an increased association of T. cruzi with murine macrophages and an increase in the killing of T. cruzi by IFN-gamma-treated murine macrophages. For spleen cells infected with T.b. rhodesiense in vitro, it is detected that live trypanosomes cannot induce IFN in cells from normal mice, but can in cells from immunized mice; and that trypanosome-lysates induce IFN in vitro in cells from normal mice. The data suggest that there is a two-step mechanism for mice against T. cruzi and T.b. rhodesiense.

  13. 2002 Nature Publishing Group Trypanosomatid protozoans are important parasites

    E-print Network

    Beverley, Stephen M.

    © 2002 Nature Publishing Group REVIEWS Trypanosomatid protozoans are important parasites of humans PARASITE GENETICS COMES OF AGE Stephen M. Beverley Trypanosomatid protozoans cause important diseases

  14. INTRODUCTION Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan parasite that

    E-print Network

    Morrissette, Naomi

    INTRODUCTION Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan parasite that infects a wide variety techniques to images of isolated, frozen-hydrated subpellicular microtubules from the protozoan parasite

  15. Phylum Arthropoda 1. Insecta, "Palaeoptera", pp. 184-186

    E-print Network

    Sikes, Derek S.

    1 INSECTA Phylum Arthropoda 1. Insecta, "Palaeoptera", pp. 184-186 Also see indicated `Boxes' on other pages 2. Evolution of wings pp. 208-211 #12;2 Phylum Arthropoda Arthropod Polyphyly? Sidnie Manton & others have argued that the Arthropoda are polyphyletic - i.e. the common ancestor was not an arthropod

  16. Using the Ciliate Protozoan Vorticella in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Alick R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes methods for collection, culture, observation, and making permanent stained preparations of the protozoan vorticella. Suggestions are made for experiments to investigate growth, reproduction, settlement, ecology, feeding, and osmoregulation. (CS)

  17. Biomass Control in Waste Air Biotrickling Filters by Protozoan Predation

    E-print Network

    Biomass Control in Waste Air Biotrickling Filters by Protozoan Predation Huub H. J. Cox, Marc A 1998; accepted 13 July 1998 Abstract: Two protozoan species as well as an unchar- acterized protozoan consortium were added to a toluene- degrading biotrickling filter to investigate protozoan pre- dation

  18. Immune response in the adipose tissue of lean mice infected with the protozoan parasite Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Luzia; Moreira, João; Melo, Joana; Bezerra, Filipa; Marques, Raquel M; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Correia, Alexandra; Monteiro, Mariana P; Ferreira, Paula G; Vilanova, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    The adipose tissue can make important contributions to immune function. Nevertheless, only a limited number of reports have investigated in lean hosts the immune response elicited in this tissue upon infection. Previous studies suggested that the intracellular protozoan Neospora caninum might affect adipose tissue physiology. Therefore, we investigated in mice challenged with this protozoan if immune cell populations within adipose tissue of different anatomical locations could be differently affected. Early in infection, parasites were detected in the adipose tissue and by 7 days of infection increased numbers of macrophages, regulatory T (Treg) cells and T-bet(+) cells were observed in gonadal, mesenteric, omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Increased expression of interferon-? was also detected in gonadal adipose tissue of infected mice. Two months after infection, parasite DNA was no longer detected in these tissues, but T helper type 1 (Th1) cell numbers remained above control levels in the infected mice. Moreover, the Th1/Treg cell ratio was higher than that of controls in the mesenteric and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, chronically infected mice presented a marked increase of serum leptin, a molecule that plays a role in energy balance regulation as well as in promoting Th1-type immune responses. Altogether, we show that an apicomplexa parasitic infection influences immune cellular composition of adipose tissue throughout the body as well as adipokine production, still noticed at a chronic phase of infection when parasites were already cleared from that particular tissue. This strengthens the emerging view that infections can have long-term consequences for the physiology of adipose tissue. PMID:25581844

  19. Deuterostome phylogeny reveals monophyletic chordates and the new phylum Xenoturbellida

    E-print Network

    Kirschner, Marc W.

    LETTERS Deuterostome phylogeny reveals monophyletic chordates and the new phylum Xenoturbellida vertebrates, the related invertebrate chordates (tunicates and cephalochordates) and three other inver- tebrate taxa: hemichordates, echinoderms and Xenoturbella1 . The relationships between invertebrate

  20. Phylogeny of Fish-Infecting Calyptospora species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous species of apicomplexans that infect poikilothermic vertebrates such as fishes, and possess unique morphological features that provide insight into the evolution of this important phylum of parasites. Here the relationship of the fish-infecting Calyptospora spe...

  1. Sarcocystosis of animals and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Species of Sarcocystosis, single-celled protozoan parasites in the Phylum Apicomplexa, are widespread in warm-blooded animals. Completion of the life cycle requires two host species: an intermediate (or prey) host and a definitive (or predator) host. Hosts can harbor more than one species of Sarcocy...

  2. INFLUENCE OF PROTOZOAN GRAZING ON CONTAMINANT BIODEGRADATION. (R825418)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of protozoan grazing on biodegradation rates in samples from contaminated aquifer sediment was evaluated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Predator¯prey biomass ratios suggested that protozoan grazing might be influencing bacterial populations....

  3. A Model of Protozoan Movement for Artificial Life.

    E-print Network

    Dorin, Alan

    ABSTRACT A Model of Protozoan Movement for Artificial Life. Alan Dorin, Justin Martin Department of of a Protozoan and a fluid with the density and viscosity of water have e_xtrernely small Reynolds numbers

  4. Culturing and Using Protozoans in the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummer, Paul J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Provides instructions for teachers and students to culture protozoans for use in science laboratories. Sections include setting up a culture area, basic culture media, amoeba culture technique, powdered milk-wheat-rice medium, alfalfa medium, and uses of the protozoa in the laboratory. (PR)

  5. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  6. The protozoan diseases of hatchery fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1935-01-01

    Following the somewhat bleak picture painted in the consideration of the bacterial diseases of hatchery fish in the last number of The Progressive Fish Culturist, it is a relief to turn to another large group of fish diseases caused by small, single-celled parasitic animals known as the protozoa. To the hatcheryman, the protozoan diseases of fish are just as important as the bacterial diseases for they are equally destructive if allowed to run unchecked. The protozoan diseases are just as common as those caused by bacteria, particularly at those hatcheries which depend upon lakes or streams for their water supplies. However, a very cheery point of difference exists between these two groups of diseases—the protozoan diseases are easier to recognize and, for the most part, they are exceedingly easy to eradicate. To the hatcheryman who has struggled day and night for weeks in an attempt to combat an epidemic wherein he is rewarded immediately by the satisfying sight of a complete recovery of his infected fish as the direct result of his labors.

  7. The phylum Cnidaria: A review of phylogenetic patterns and diversity 300 years after Linnaeus

    E-print Network

    Daly, Marymegan; Brugler, Mercer R.; Cartwright, Paulyn; Collins, Allen G.; Dawson, Michael N.; Fautin, Daphne G.; France, Scott C.; McFadden, Catherine; Opresko, Dennis M.; Rodriguez, Estefania; Romano, Sandra L.; Stake, Joel L.

    2007-12-21

    Systema Naturae includes representatives of every major lineage of the animal phylum Cnidaria. However, Linnaeus did not classify the members of the phylum as is now done, and the diversity of the group is not well ...

  8. Neuroparasitic Infections: Cestodes, Trematodes, and Protozoans

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M.D.; Zunt, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Parasitic infection of the nervous system can produce a variety of symptoms and signs. Because symptoms of infection are often mild or nonspecific, diagnosis can be difficult. Familiarity with basic epidemiological characteristics and distinguishing radiographic findings can increase the likelihood of detection and proper treatment of parasitic infection of the nervous system. This article discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for some of the more common infections of the nervous system caused by cestodes, trematodes and protozoans: Echinococcus spp., Spirometra spp. (sparganosis), Paragonimus spp., Schistosoma spp., Trypanosoma spp., Naegleria fowlerii, Acanthamoeba histolytica, and Balamuthia mandrillaris. PMID:16170739

  9. Chapter A7. Section 7.3. Protozoan Pathogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, Rebecca N.; Francy, Donna S.

    2003-01-01

    Protozoan pathogens are widely distributed in the aquatic environment. Cryptosporidium and Giardia are the principal protozoan pathogens that are known to affect the acceptability of water supplies for public use within the United States. A sampling program for protozoan pathogens should be conducted over an extended period of time because of cyclical and seasonal variations in their concentrations in the environment. This report provides information on the equipment, sampling protocols, and laboratory method that are in standard use by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel for the collection of data on protozoan pathogens.

  10. Genomewide analysis of phytochrome proteins in the phylum Basidiomycota.

    PubMed

    Lavín, José L; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Oguiza, José A

    2015-09-01

    Phytochromes are photoreceptor proteins involved in the detection of the red and far-red regions of the visible light spectrum. Fungal phytochromes are hybrid histidine kinases with a conserved domain architecture composed of an N-terminal photosensory module and a C-terminal regulatory output module that includes the histidine kinase and response regulator receiver domains. In this study, we have analyzed the distribution, domain architecture, and phylogenetic analysis of phytochrome proteins in 47 published genome sequences among the phylum Basidiomycota. Genome analysis revealed that almost every genome of basidiomycetes contained at least one gene encoding a phytochrome protein. Domain architecture of fungal phytochromes was completely conserved in the identified phytochromes of basidiomycetes, and phylogenetic analysis clustered these proteins into clades related with the phylogenetic classification of this fungal phylum. PMID:25847700

  11. An Expanded Genomic Representation of the Phylum Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Rochelle M.; Skennerton, Connor T.; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Imelfort, Michael; Paech, Samuel J.; Dennis, Paul G.; Steen, Jason A.; Parks, Donovan H.; Tyson, Gene W.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Molecular surveys of aphotic habitats have indicated the presence of major uncultured lineages phylogenetically classified as members of the Cyanobacteria. One of these lineages has recently been proposed as a nonphotosynthetic sister phylum to the Cyanobacteria, the Melainabacteria, based on recovery of population genomes from human gut and groundwater samples. Here, we expand the phylogenomic representation of the Melainabacteria through sequencing of six diverse population genomes from gut and bioreactor samples supporting the inference that this lineage is nonphotosynthetic, but not the assertion that they are strictly fermentative. We propose that the Melainabacteria is a class within the phylogenetically defined Cyanobacteria based on robust monophyly and shared ancestral traits with photosynthetic representatives. Our findings are consistent with theories that photosynthesis occurred late in the Cyanobacteria and involved extensive lateral gene transfer and extends the recognized functionality of members of this phylum. PMID:24709563

  12. Criteria For Evaluation of Proposed Protozoan Detection Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, the only EPA approved method for detection and quantitation of protozoan cysts and oöcysts in source and drinking water, is the “ICR Protozoan Method for Detecting Giardia Cysts and Cryptosporidium Oöcysts in Water by a Fluorescent Antibody Procedure (ICR Microbial La...

  13. Drug repurposing and human parasitic protozoan diseases

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Katherine T.; Fisher, Gillian; Skinner-Adams, Tina S.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic diseases have an enormous health, social and economic impact and are a particular problem in tropical regions of the world. Diseases caused by protozoa and helminths, such as malaria and schistosomiasis, are the cause of most parasite related morbidity and mortality, with an estimated 1.1 million combined deaths annually. The global burden of these diseases is exacerbated by the lack of licensed vaccines, making safe and effective drugs vital to their prevention and treatment. Unfortunately, where drugs are available, their usefulness is being increasingly threatened by parasite drug resistance. The need for new drugs drives antiparasitic drug discovery research globally and requires a range of innovative strategies to ensure a sustainable pipeline of lead compounds. In this review we discuss one of these approaches, drug repurposing or repositioning, with a focus on major human parasitic protozoan diseases such as malaria, trypanosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis and leishmaniasis. PMID:25057459

  14. Approaches to protozoan drug discovery: phenotypic screening.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Melissa L; Avery, Vicky M

    2013-10-24

    Determining the activity of a compound and the potential impact on a diseased state is frequently undertaken using phenotypic or target-based approaches. Phenotypic screens have the advantage of the whole organism being exposed to the compound and thus all the targets and biological pathways associated with it. Cell penetration and access to targets in their "natural" environment are taken into account. Unless utilizing a genetically modified organism with an additional target associated indicator, elucidation of specific target(s) of active compounds is necessary. Target discovery is desirable to allow development of chemical entities based upon knowledge of the target structure. Phenotypic drug discovery has successfully identified new molecular entities for neglected protozoan disease research. In this perspective, the phenotypic approaches used to identify chemical entities for drug discovery and for use as tools against the parasites Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi will be outlined. PMID:23927763

  15. Kinetoplastids: related protozoan pathogens, different diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Ken; Brun, Reto; Croft, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; McKerrow, Jim; Reed, Steve; Tarleton, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Kinetoplastids are a group of flagellated protozoans that include the species Trypanosoma and Leishmania, which are human pathogens with devastating health and economic effects. The sequencing of the genomes of some of these species has highlighted their genetic relatedness and underlined differences in the diseases that they cause. As we discuss in this Review, steady progress using a combination of molecular, genetic, immunologic, and clinical approaches has substantially increased understanding of these pathogens and important aspects of the diseases that they cause. Consequently, the paths for developing additional measures to control these “neglected diseases” are becoming increasingly clear, and we believe that the opportunities for developing the drugs, diagnostics, vaccines, and other tools necessary to expand the armamentarium to combat these diseases have never been better. PMID:18382742

  16. Chordate evolution and the three-phylum system

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Noriyuki; Rokhsar, Daniel; Nishikawa, Teruaki

    2014-01-01

    Traditional metazoan phylogeny classifies the Vertebrata as a subphylum of the phylum Chordata, together with two other subphyla, the Urochordata (Tunicata) and the Cephalochordata. The Chordata, together with the phyla Echinodermata and Hemichordata, comprise a major group, the Deuterostomia. Chordates invariably possess a notochord and a dorsal neural tube. Although the origin and evolution of chordates has been studied for more than a century, few authors have intimately discussed taxonomic ranking of the three chordate groups themselves. Accumulating evidence shows that echinoderms and hemichordates form a clade (the Ambulacraria), and that within the Chordata, cephalochordates diverged first, with tunicates and vertebrates forming a sister group. Chordates share tadpole-type larvae containing a notochord and hollow nerve cord, whereas ambulacrarians have dipleurula-type larvae containing a hydrocoel. We propose that an evolutionary occurrence of tadpole-type larvae is fundamental to understanding mechanisms of chordate origin. Protostomes have now been reclassified into two major taxa, the Ecdysozoa and Lophotrochozoa, whose developmental pathways are characterized by ecdysis and trochophore larvae, respectively. Consistent with this classification, the profound dipleurula versus tadpole larval differences merit a category higher than the phylum. Thus, it is recommended that the Ecdysozoa, Lophotrochozoa, Ambulacraria and Chordata be classified at the superphylum level, with the Chordata further subdivided into three phyla, on the basis of their distinctive characteristics. PMID:25232138

  17. Chordate evolution and the three-phylum system.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Noriyuki; Rokhsar, Daniel; Nishikawa, Teruaki

    2014-11-01

    Traditional metazoan phylogeny classifies the Vertebrata as a subphylum of the phylum Chordata, together with two other subphyla, the Urochordata (Tunicata) and the Cephalochordata. The Chordata, together with the phyla Echinodermata and Hemichordata, comprise a major group, the Deuterostomia. Chordates invariably possess a notochord and a dorsal neural tube. Although the origin and evolution of chordates has been studied for more than a century, few authors have intimately discussed taxonomic ranking of the three chordate groups themselves. Accumulating evidence shows that echinoderms and hemichordates form a clade (the Ambulacraria), and that within the Chordata, cephalochordates diverged first, with tunicates and vertebrates forming a sister group. Chordates share tadpole-type larvae containing a notochord and hollow nerve cord, whereas ambulacrarians have dipleurula-type larvae containing a hydrocoel. We propose that an evolutionary occurrence of tadpole-type larvae is fundamental to understanding mechanisms of chordate origin. Protostomes have now been reclassified into two major taxa, the Ecdysozoa and Lophotrochozoa, whose developmental pathways are characterized by ecdysis and trochophore larvae, respectively. Consistent with this classification, the profound dipleurula versus tadpole larval differences merit a category higher than the phylum. Thus, it is recommended that the Ecdysozoa, Lophotrochozoa, Ambulacraria and Chordata be classified at the superphylum level, with the Chordata further subdivided into three phyla, on the basis of their distinctive characteristics. PMID:25232138

  18. Role of Leukotrienes on Protozoan and Helminth Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rogerio, Alexandre P.; Anibal, Fernanda F.

    2012-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs), formed by the 5-lipoxygenase-(5-LO-) catalyzed oxidation of arachidonic acid, are lipid mediators that have potent proinflammatory activities. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of 5-LO biosynthesis in animals is associated with increased mortality and impaired clearance of bacteria, fungi, and parasites. LTs play a role in the control of helminth and protozoan infections by modulating the immune system and/or through direct cytotoxicity to parasites; however, LTs may also be associated with pathogenesis, such as in cerebral malaria and schistosomal granuloma. Interestingly, some proteins from the saliva of insect vectors that transmit protozoans and secreted protein from helminth could bind LTs and may consequently modulate the course of infection or pathogenesis. In addition, the decreased production of LTs in immunocompromised individuals might modulate the pathophysiology of helminth and protozoan infections. Herein, in this paper, we showed the immunomodulatory and pathogenic roles of LTs during the helminth and protozoan infections. PMID:22577251

  19. A photoactivatable green-fluorescent protein from the phylum Ctenophora.

    PubMed

    Haddock, Steven H D; Mastroianni, Nadia; Christianson, Lynne M

    2010-04-22

    Genes for the family of green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have been found in more than 100 species of animals, with some species containing six or more copies producing a variety of colours. Thus far, however, these species have all been within three phyla: Cnidaria, Arthropoda and Chordata. We have discovered GFP-type fluorescent proteins in the phylum Ctenophora, the comb jellies. The ctenophore proteins share the xYG chromophore motif of all other characterized GFP-type proteins. These proteins exhibit the uncommon property of reversible photoactivation, in which fluorescent emission becomes brighter upon exposure to light, then gradually decays to a non-fluorescent state. In addition to providing potentially useful optical probes with novel properties, finding a fluorescent protein in one of the earliest diverging metazoans adds further support to the possibility that these genes are likely to occur throughout animals. PMID:20018790

  20. A molecular phylogeny of the flagellated fungi (Chytridiomycota) and description of a new phylum (Blastocladiomycota)

    E-print Network

    Griffith, Gareth

    A molecular phylogeny of the flagellated fungi (Chytridiomycota) and description of a new phylum (chytrids) is the only phylum of true Fungi that reproduces with motile spores (zoospores). Chytrids orders and families and the majority of flagellated fungi. Within the core chytrid group 11 subclades can

  1. Comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete genomes reveals diversity and uniqueness of the phylum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37% of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprobes including wood decaying fungi. To better understand the diversity of this ...

  2. Intraerythrocytic merogony in Haemogregarina koppiensis (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina: Haemogregarinidae).

    PubMed

    Smit, Nico J; Davies, Angela J

    2005-09-01

    During October 2003, a specimen of Amblyrhynchotes honckenii (Bloch, 1795) was captured at low tide, with a hand net, in a rock pool at Koppie Alleen, De Hoop Nature Reserve, South Africa. This fish was heavily parasitized by unidentified gnathiid praniza larvae, caligid copepods identified as Caligus tetrodontis Barnard, 1948, cymothoid isopods identified as Cinusa tetrodontis (Schioedte et Meinert, 1884), and the blood protozoan Haemogregarina koppiensis Smit et Davies, 2001. Giemsa-stained blood smears from this fish revealed new and unusual stages of merogony for H. koppiensis that included small, rounded, likely intraerythrocytic merozoites arranged in circles of eight around the host nucleus. Host cells appeared ghost-like and enlarged compared with normal erythrocytes. Identical merozoites, usually in clusters of up to 16, were also observed free of host cells. The pattern of merogony seen in H. koppiensis is unusual for a fish haemogregarine. PMID:16270810

  3. Evolutionary origin of Plasmodium and other Apicomplexa based on rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, A A; Ayala, F J

    1995-01-01

    We have explored the evolutionary history of the Apicomplexa and two related protistan phyla, Dinozoa and Ciliophora, by comparing the nucleotide sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. We conclude that the Plasmodium lineage, to which the malarial parasites belong, diverged from other apicomplexan lineages (piroplasmids and coccidians) several hundred million years ago, perhaps even before the Cambrian. The Plasmodium radiation, which gave rise to several species parasitic to humans, occurred approximately 129 million years ago; Plasmodium parasitism of humans has independently arisen several times. The origin of apicomplexans (Plasmodium), dinoflagellates, and ciliates may be > 1 billion years old, perhaps older than the three multicellular kingdoms of animals, plants, and fungi. Digenetic parasitism independently evolved several times in the Apicomplexa. PMID:7597031

  4. Emerging human protozoan infections in the temperate European climate.

    PubMed

    Curry, A

    2004-04-01

    There has been a resurgence of interest in medical protozoology in the last twenty years or so mainly as a result of the recognition of HIV infection and the opportunistic protozoan infections associated with it. Many new species of microsporidia have been recognised as parasites causing human disease and several rare infections, such as isosporiasis, have become more commonly recognised, even in temperate climates. Some of the infections seen in temperate regions have arrived through foreign travel (tourism, work or immigration), sometimes exacerbated by immunosuppression (due to HIV, organ transplantation or malignancy). Importation of food from around the world and climate change (global warming) may also be contributing to the increase in previously rare protozoan infections now being seen in temperate regions. This article reviews the current status of these new and re-emerging human protozoan infections in temperate, rather than tropical locations. PMID:15554497

  5. Monitoring of stream pollution using protozoan communities on artificial substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Henebry, M.S.; Cairns, J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Monitoring of stream pollution using protozoan communities on artificial substrates. Protozoan communities were sampled in 1978 from the South River near Waynesboro, Virginia, and compared with a study carried out in 1972. Five study stations were located above and below sources of pollution. Species richness followed the same pattern as in the 1972 study except at Station 2 (just below a major source of pollution) where a marked improvement in water quality occurred. Numbers of species increased significantly downstream from a source of pollution. This study provides evidence that protozoan communities may be used effectively in the assessment of water pollution and that results compare favorably with those based on macroinvertebrates which are more expensive to collect.

  6. Pan-phylum Comparison of Nematode Metabolic Potential.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rahul; Rosa, Bruce A; Lewis, Warren G; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-05-01

    Nematodes are among the most important causative pathogens of neglected tropical diseases. The increased availability of genomic and transcriptomic data for many understudied nematode species provides a great opportunity to investigate different aspects of their biology. Increasingly, metabolic potential of pathogens is recognized as a critical determinant governing their development, growth and pathogenicity. Comparing metabolic potential among species with distinct trophic ecologies can provide insights on overall biology or molecular adaptations. Furthermore, ascertaining gene expression at pathway level can help in understanding metabolic dynamics over development. Comparison of biochemical pathways (or subpathways, i.e. pathway modules) among related species can also retrospectively indicate potential mistakes in gene-calling and functional annotation. We show with numerous illustrative case studies that comparisons at the level of pathway modules have the potential to uncover biological insights while remaining computationally tractable. Here, we reconstruct and compare metabolic modules found in the deduced proteomes of 13 nematodes and 10 non-nematode species (including hosts of the parasitic nematode species). We observed that the metabolic potential is, in general, concomitant with phylogenetic and/or ecological similarity. Varied metabolic strategies are required among the nematodes, with only 8 out of 51 pathway modules being completely conserved. Enzyme comparison based on topology of metabolic modules uncovered diversification between parasite and host that can potentially guide therapeutic intervention. Gene expression data from 4 nematode species were used to study metabolic dynamics over their life cycles. We report unexpected differential metabolism between immature and mature microfilariae of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi. A set of genes potentially important for parasitism is also reported, based on an analysis of gene expression in C. elegans and the human hookworm Necator americanus. We illustrate how analyzing and comparing metabolism at the level of pathway modules can improve existing knowledge of nematode metabolic potential and can provide parasitism related insights. Our reconstruction and comparison of nematode metabolic pathways at a pan-phylum and inter-phylum level enabled determination of phylogenetic restrictions and differential expression of pathways. A visualization of our results is available at http://nematode.net and the program for identification of module completeness (modDFS) is freely available at SourceForge. The methods reported will help biologists to predict biochemical potential of any organism with available deduced proteome, to direct experiments and test hypotheses. PMID:26000881

  7. Pan-phylum Comparison of Nematode Metabolic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Rahul; Rosa, Bruce A.; Lewis, Warren G.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are among the most important causative pathogens of neglected tropical diseases. The increased availability of genomic and transcriptomic data for many understudied nematode species provides a great opportunity to investigate different aspects of their biology. Increasingly, metabolic potential of pathogens is recognized as a critical determinant governing their development, growth and pathogenicity. Comparing metabolic potential among species with distinct trophic ecologies can provide insights on overall biology or molecular adaptations. Furthermore, ascertaining gene expression at pathway level can help in understanding metabolic dynamics over development. Comparison of biochemical pathways (or subpathways, i.e. pathway modules) among related species can also retrospectively indicate potential mistakes in gene-calling and functional annotation. We show with numerous illustrative case studies that comparisons at the level of pathway modules have the potential to uncover biological insights while remaining computationally tractable. Here, we reconstruct and compare metabolic modules found in the deduced proteomes of 13 nematodes and 10 non-nematode species (including hosts of the parasitic nematode species). We observed that the metabolic potential is, in general, concomitant with phylogenetic and/or ecological similarity. Varied metabolic strategies are required among the nematodes, with only 8 out of 51 pathway modules being completely conserved. Enzyme comparison based on topology of metabolic modules uncovered diversification between parasite and host that can potentially guide therapeutic intervention. Gene expression data from 4 nematode species were used to study metabolic dynamics over their life cycles. We report unexpected differential metabolism between immature and mature microfilariae of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi. A set of genes potentially important for parasitism is also reported, based on an analysis of gene expression in C. elegans and the human hookworm Necator americanus. We illustrate how analyzing and comparing metabolism at the level of pathway modules can improve existing knowledge of nematode metabolic potential and can provide parasitism related insights. Our reconstruction and comparison of nematode metabolic pathways at a pan-phylum and inter-phylum level enabled determination of phylogenetic restrictions and differential expression of pathways. A visualization of our results is available at http://nematode.net and the program for identification of module completeness (modDFS) is freely available at SourceForge. The methods reported will help biologists to predict biochemical potential of any organism with available deduced proteome, to direct experiments and test hypotheses. PMID:26000881

  8. Protozoan programmed cell death--insights from Blastocystis deathstyles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kevin S W; Nasirudeen, A M A

    2005-12-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an essential process in the growth and development of multicellular organisms. However, accumulating evidence indicates that unicellular eukaryotes can also undergo PCD with apoptosis-like features. The protozoan parasite Blastocystis hominis has been reported to exhibit both apoptotic and non-apoptotic features of PCD when exposed to a variety of stimuli. Recent observations of PCD pathways in Blastocystis suggest that this protozoan, as is the case with its multicellular counterparts, possesses complex cell-death mechanisms. PMID:16223601

  9. Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Unexpected Subgenomic Diversity of Magnetotactic Bacteria within the Phylum Nitrospirae ? †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Jogler, Christian; Schüler, Dirk; Pan, Yongxin

    2011-01-01

    A targeted metagenomic approach was applied to investigate magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) within the phylum Nitrospirae in Lake Miyun near Beijing, China. Five fosmids containing rRNA operons were identified. Comparative sequence analysis of a total of 172 kb provided new insights into their genome organization and revealed unexpected subgenomic diversity of uncultivated MTB in the phylum Nitrospirae. In addition, affiliation of two novel MTB with the phylum Nitrospirae was verified by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One of them was morphologically similar to “Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum,” but the other differed substantially in cell shape and magnetosome organization from all previously described “Ca. Magnetobacterium bavaricum”-like bacteria. PMID:21057016

  10. Metagenomic analysis reveals unexpected subgenomic diversity of magnetotactic bacteria within the phylum Nitrospirae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Jogler, Christian; Schüler, Dirk; Pan, Yongxin

    2011-01-01

    A targeted metagenomic approach was applied to investigate magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) within the phylum Nitrospirae in Lake Miyun near Beijing, China. Five fosmids containing rRNA operons were identified. Comparative sequence analysis of a total of 172 kb provided new insights into their genome organization and revealed unexpected subgenomic diversity of uncultivated MTB in the phylum Nitrospirae. In addition, affiliation of two novel MTB with the phylum Nitrospirae was verified by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One of them was morphologically similar to "Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum," but the other differed substantially in cell shape and magnetosome organization from all previously described "Ca. Magnetobacterium bavaricum"-like bacteria. PMID:21057016

  11. Number and regulation of protozoan aquaporins reflect environmental complexity.

    PubMed

    Von Bülow, Julia; Beitz, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Protozoa are a diverse group of unicellular eukaryotes. Evidence has accumulated that protozoan aquaporin water and solute channels (AQP) contribute to adaptation in changing environments. Intracellular protozoan parasites live a well-sheltered life. Plasmodium spp. express a single AQP, Toxoplasma gondii two, while Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishamnia spp. encode up to five AQPs. Their AQPs are thought to import metabolic precursors and simultaneously to dispose of waste and to help parasites survive osmotic stress during transmission to and from the insect vector or during kidney passages. Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that swims freely in the human blood. Expression and intracellular localization of the three T. brucei AQPs depend on the stage of differentiation during the life cycle, suggesting distinct roles in energy generation, metabolism, and cell motility. Free-living amoebae are in direct contact with the environment, encountering severe and sudden changes in the availability of nutrition, and in the osmotic conditions due to rainfall or drought. Amoeba proteus expresses a single AQP that is present in the contractile vacuole complex required for osmoregulation, whereas Dictyostelium discoideum expresses four AQPs, of which two are present in the single-celled amoeboidal stage and two more in the later multicellular stages preceding spore formation. The number and regulation of protozoan aquaporins may reflect environmental complexity. We highlight the gated AqpB from D. discoideum as an example of how life in the wild is challenged by a complex AQP structure-function relationship. PMID:26338868

  12. Biomass control in waste air biotrickling filters by protozoan predation

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, H.H.J.; Deshusses, M.A.

    1999-01-20

    Two protozoan species as well as an uncharacterized protozoan consortium were added to a toluene-degrading biotrickling filter to investigate protozoan predation as a means of biomass control. Wet biomass formation in 23.6-L reactors over a 77-day period was reduced from 13.875 kg in a control biotrickling filter to 11.795 kg in a biotrickling filter enriched with protozoa. The average toluene vapor elimination capacity at 1 g/m{sup 3} toluene and 64 m{sup 3}/(m{sup 3} {center_dot} h) was 31.1 g(m{sup 3} {center_dot} h) in the control and 32.2 g(m{sup 3} {center_dot} h) in the biotrickling filter enriched with protozoa. At higher toluene inlet concentrations, toluene degradation rates increased and were slightly higher in the biotrickling filter enriched with protozoa. The lower rate of biomass accumulation after the addition of protozoa was due to an increase of carbon mineralization. Apparent biomass yield coefficients in the control and enriched trickling filter were 0.72 and 0.59 g dry biomass/g toluene, respectively. The results show that protozoan predation may be a useful tool to control biomass in biotrickling filters, however, further stimulation of predation of the biomass immobilized in the reactor is required to ensure long-term stability of biotrickling filters.

  13. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION OF PROPOSED PROTOZOAN DETECTION METHODS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a proliferation of techniques and methods reported for analysis of water samples to determine the presence of the protozoan pathogens Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia. Many of the proposed methods are presented as complete procedures, which include sampli...

  14. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION OF PROPOSED PROTOZOAN DETECTION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a proliferation of techniques and methods reported for analysis of water samples to determine the presence of the protozoan pathogens Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia. Many of the proposed methods are presented as complete procedures, which include sampli...

  15. Phylogenetic placement of the enigmatic parasite, Polypodium hydriforme, within the Phylum Cnidaria

    E-print Network

    Evans, Nathaniel Michael; Linder, Alberto; Raikova, Ekaterina V.; Collins, Allen G.; Cartwright, Paulyn

    2008-05-09

    , the stinging structures characteristic of this phylum. However, recent molecular phylogenetic studies using 18S rDNA sequence data have challenged this interpretation, and have shown that Polypodium is a close relative to myxozoans and together they share a...

  16. BIOMASS CONTROL IN WASTE AIR BIOTRICKLING FILTERS BY PROTOZOAN PREDATION. (R825392)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two protozoan species as well as an uncharacterized protozoan consortium were added to a toluene-degrading biotrickling filter to investigate protozoan predation as a means of biomass control. Wet biomass formation in 23.6-L reactors over a 77-day period was reduced from 13.875 k...

  17. Assembly-History Dynamics of a Pitcher-Plant Protozoan Community in Experimental Microcosms

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Assembly-History Dynamics of a Pitcher-Plant Protozoan Community in Experimental Microcosms Kohmei independently in a two-way factorial design to follow community assembly in a three-species aquatic protozoan BD, Miller TE (2012) Assembly-History Dynamics of a Pitcher-Plant Protozoan Community in Experimental

  18. Phylogeny of gregarines (Apicomplexa) as inferred from small-subunit rDNA and b-tubulin

    E-print Network

    Keeling, Patrick

    Phylogeny of gregarines (Apicomplexa) as inferred from small-subunit rDNA and b-tubulin Brian SDNA sequences from derived taxa. This work examines the usefulness of SSU rDNA and b-tubulin sequences, Leidyana migrator Clopton and Gregarina polymorpha Dufour, as well as the b-tubulin gene from Leidyana

  19. Electing a candidate: a speculative history of the bacterial phylum OP10.

    PubMed

    Dunfield, Peter F; Tamas, Ivica; Lee, Kevin C; Morgan, Xochitl C; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2012-12-01

    In 1998, a cultivation-independent survey of the microbial community in Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, detected 12 new phyla within the Domain Bacteria. These were dubbed 'candidate divisions' OP1 to OP12. Since that time the OP10 candidate division has been commonly detected in various environments, usually as part of the rare biosphere, but occasionally as a predominant community component. Based on 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, OP10 comprises at least 12 class-level subdivisions. However, despite this broad ecological and evolutionary diversity, all OP10 bacteria have eluded cultivation until recently. In 2011, two reference species of OP10 were taxonomically validated, removing the phylum from its 'candidate' status. Construction of a highly resolved phylogeny based on 29 universally conserved genes verifies its standing as a unique bacterial phylum. In the following paper we summarize what is known and what is suspected about the newest described bacterial phylum, the Armatimonadetes. PMID:22497633

  20. Evidence for the widespread distribution of CRISPR-Cas system in the Phylum Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Fei; Axen, Seth D.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2013-01-01

    Members of the phylum Cyanobacteria inhabit ecologically diverse environments. However, the CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, CRISPR associated genes), an extremely adaptable defense system, has not been surveyed in this phylum. We analyzed 126 cyanobacterial genomes and, surprisingly, found CRISPR-Cas in the majority except the marine subclade (Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), in which cyanophages are a known force shaping their evolution. Multiple observations of CRISPR loci in the absence of cas1/cas2 genes may represent an early stage of losing a CRISPR-Cas locus. Our findings reveal the widespread distribution of their role in the phylum Cyanobacteria and provide a first step to systematically understanding CRISPR-Cas systems in cyanobacteria. PMID:23628889

  1. A Taxonomic Catalogue of the Nemerteans (Phylum Nemertea) of Spain and Portugal.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Bachiller, Alfonso; Fernández-Álvarez, Fernando Ángel; Junoy, Juan

    2015-12-01

    A literature-based taxonomic catalogue of nemerteans (phylum Nemertea) from Spain and Portugal is provided, listing 75 species (12 Palaeonemertea, 24 Pilidiophora, and 39 Hoplonemertea) belonging to 34 genera. This is a low species number compared with the approximately 400 species listed in Europe. This lack of knowledge is mainly due to the low number of researchers interested in the phylum and the well-known taxonomic difficulties of its study. Geographic records are indicated for each species, and for some, comments are included on certain biological and taxonomic aspects. PMID:26654034

  2. Vertebrate Cell Cycle Modulates Infection by Protozoan Parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, James A.; Crane, Mark St. J.

    1981-11-01

    Synchronized HeLa cell populations were exposed to Trypanosoma cruzi or Toxoplasma gondii, obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that cause Chagas' disease and toxoplasmosis, respectively, in humans. The ability of the two parasites to infect HeLa cells increased as the HeLa cells proceeded from the G1 phase to the S phase of their growth cycle and decreased as the cells entered G2-M. Characterization of the S-phase cell surface components responsible for this phenomenon could be beneficial in the development of vaccines against these parasitic diseases.

  3. Physiological Studies of the Rumen Protozoan Ophryoscolex caudatus Eberlein1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. P.; Davis, R. E.; Doetsch, R. N.; Gutierrez, J.

    1961-01-01

    The rumen ciliate Ophryoscolex caudatus fermented starch with the production of acetic, butyric, and lactic acids plus CO2 and H2. Cellulose was not significantly metabolized although pectin was rapidly attacked in the Warburg apparatus. The protein sources, cottonseed, soybean, and linseed oil meals, and the amino acids, dl-alanine, dl-valine, and dl-leucine, were utilized by the protozoan, whereas ammonia was demonstrated as an end product of nitrogenous metabolism. Methods for the separation of O. caudatus from mixed rumen contents are described. Images FIG. 1 PMID:13785488

  4. Disseminated granulomas caused by an unidentified protozoan in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Spraker, T.R.; Gardiner, C.H.; Novilla, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Oral granulomas were observed in 31 (33%) of 95 captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Necropsy of six of the afflicted cranes revealed granulomatous nodules throughout many of their organ systems. Intracellular protozoan organisms morphologically resembling schizogonic stages were observed within the granulomas by light and electron microscopy. Sexual and asexual stages of coccidia were seen in sections of the intestines of 4 of 5 cranes examined microscopically, and Eimerian oocysts were seen in fecal flotation specimens from 3 of 4 birds.

  5. Phylogenetic delineation of the novel phylum Armatimonadetes (former candidate division OP10) and definition of two novel candidate divisions.

    PubMed

    Lee, K C Y; Herbold, C W; Dunfield, P F; Morgan, X C; McDonald, I R; Stott, M B

    2013-04-01

    Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences associated with the phylum Armatimonadetes were analyzed using multiple phylogenetic methods, clarifying both the phylum boundary and the affiliation of previously ambiguous groupings. Here we define the Armatimonadetes as 10 class-level groups and reclassify two previously associated groups as candidate divisions WS1 and FBP. PMID:23377935

  6. Phylogenetic Delineation of the Novel Phylum Armatimonadetes (Former Candidate Division OP10) and Definition of Two Novel Candidate Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Herbold, C. W.; Dunfield, P. F.; Morgan, X. C.; McDonald, I. R.; Stott, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences associated with the phylum Armatimonadetes were analyzed using multiple phylogenetic methods, clarifying both the phylum boundary and the affiliation of previously ambiguous groupings. Here we define the Armatimonadetes as 10 class-level groups and reclassify two previously associated groups as candidate divisions WS1 and FBP. PMID:23377935

  7. Newly Isolated but Uncultivated Magnetotactic Bacterium of the Phylum Nitrospirae from Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhua; Pan, Yongxin

    2012-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) in the phylum Nitrospirae synthesize up to hundreds of intracellular bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes. In the present study, a watermelon-shaped magnetotactic bacterium (designated MWB-1) from Lake Beihai in Beijing, China, was characterized. This uncultivated microbe was identified as a member of the phylum Nitrospirae and represents a novel phylogenetic lineage with ?6% 16S rRNA gene sequence divergence from all currently described MTB. MWB-1 contained 200 to 300 intracellular bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes and showed a helical swimming trajectory under homogeneous magnetic fields; its magnetotactic velocity decreased with increasing field strength, and vice versa. A robust phylogenetic framework for MWB-1 and all currently known MTB in the phylum Nitrospirae was constructed utilizing maximum-likelihood and Bayesian algorithms, which yielded strong evidence that the Nitrospirae MTB could be divided into four well-supported groups. Considering its population densities in sediment and its high numbers of magnetosomes, MWB-1 was estimated to account for more than 10% of the natural remanent magnetization of the surface sediment. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that MTB in the phylum Nitrospirae are more diverse than previously realized and can make important contributions to the sedimentary magnetization in particular environments. PMID:22113917

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria sp. Strain UCD-OTCP (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Coil, David A.; Doctor, Jessica I.; Lang, Jenna M.; Darling, Aaron E.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Kocuria sp. strain UCD-OTCP, a member of the phylum Actinobacteria, isolated from a restaurant chair cushion. The assembly contains 3,791,485 bp (G+C content of 73%) and is contained in 68 scaffolds. PMID:23661474

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Endosymbiont “Candidatus Ruthia magnifica” UCD-CM (Phylum Proteobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ruth D.; Jospin, Guillaume; Coil, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of the endosymbiont “Candidatus Ruthia magnifica” UCD-CM, a member of the phylum Proteobacteria, found from the gills of a deep-sea giant clam, Calyptogena magnifica. The assembly consists of 1,160,249 bp contained in 18 contigs. PMID:25035337

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Planomicrobium glaciei UCD-HAM (Phylum Firmicutes)

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Makayla N.; Jospin, Guillaume; Coil, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Planomicrobium glaciei, a member of the phylum Firmicutes, found at the University of California Davis. Paired-end, 300-bp reads were generated on an Illumina MiSeq. The assembly consists of 3,925,122 bp, contained in 109 contigs, with a G+C content of 46.7%. PMID:26472846

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus vietnamensis Strain UCD-SED5 (Phylum Firmicutes)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ruth D.; Jospin, Guillaume; Lang, Jenna M.; Coil, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Bacillus vietnamensis UCD-SED5 (phylum Firmicutes). This strain was isolated from sediment surrounding Zostera marina roots near the UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory (Bodega, Bay, California) and represents the second genome of this species. The assembly consists of 4,325,707 bp, in 108 contigs. PMID:26586901

  12. Cancer in the parasitic protozoans Trypanosoma brucei and Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lai, De-Hua; Wen, Yan-Zi; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Shen, Ji-Long; Yang, Ting-Bo; Zhou, Wen-Liang; Qu, Liang-Hu; Hide, Geoff; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    Cancer is a general name for more than 100 malignant diseases. It is postulated that all cancers start from a single abnormal cell that grows out of control. Untreated cancers can cause serious consequences and deaths. Great progress has been made in cancer research that has significantly improved our knowledge and understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the disease, but the origins of cancer are far from being well understood due to the limitations of suitable model systems and to the complexities of the disease. In view of the fact that cancers are found in various species of vertebrates and other metazoa, here, we suggest that cancer also occurs in parasitic protozoans such as Trypanosoma brucei, a blood parasite, and Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular pathogen. Without treatment, these protozoan cancers may cause severe disease and death in mammals, including humans. The simpler genomes of these single-cell organisms, in combination with their complex life cycles and fascinating life cycle differentiation processes, may help us to better understand the origins of cancers and, in particular, leukemias. PMID:26195778

  13. Cancer in the parasitic protozoans Trypanosoma brucei and Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lai, De-Hua; Wen, Yan-Zi; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Shen, Ji-Long; Yang, Ting-Bo; Zhou, Wen-Liang; Qu, Liang-Hu; Hide, Geoff; Ayala, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a general name for more than 100 malignant diseases. It is postulated that all cancers start from a single abnormal cell that grows out of control. Untreated cancers can cause serious consequences and deaths. Great progress has been made in cancer research that has significantly improved our knowledge and understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the disease, but the origins of cancer are far from being well understood due to the limitations of suitable model systems and to the complexities of the disease. In view of the fact that cancers are found in various species of vertebrates and other metazoa, here, we suggest that cancer also occurs in parasitic protozoans such as Trypanosoma brucei, a blood parasite, and Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular pathogen. Without treatment, these protozoan cancers may cause severe disease and death in mammals, including humans. The simpler genomes of these single-cell organisms, in combination with their complex life cycles and fascinating life cycle differentiation processes, may help us to better understand the origins of cancers and, in particular, leukemias. PMID:26195778

  14. Protozoan HSP90-heterocomplex: molecular interaction network and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Figueras, Maria J; Echeverria, Pablo C; Angel, Sergio O

    2014-05-01

    The HSP90 chaperone is a highly conserved protein from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. In eukaryotes, this chaperone participates in different large complexes, such as the HSP90 heterocomplex, which has important biological roles in cell homeostasis and differentiation. The HSP90-heterocomplex is also named the HSP90/HSP70 cycle because different co-chaperones (HIP, HSP40, HOP, p23, AHA1, immunophilins, PP5) participate in this complex by assembling sequentially, from the early to the mature complex. In this review, we analyze the conservation and relevance of HSP90 and the HSP90-heterocomplex in several protozoan parasites, with emphasis in Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma spp., Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma spp. In the last years, there has been an outburst of studies based on yeast two-hybrid methodology, co-immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry and bioinformatics, which have generated a most comprehensive protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of HSP90 and its co-chaperones. This review analyzes the existing PPI networks of HSP90 and its co-chaperones of some protozoan parasites and discusses the usefulness of these powerful tools to analyze the biological role of the HSP90-heterocomplex in these parasites. The generation of a T. gondii HSP90 heterocomplex PPI network based on experimental data and a recent Plasmodium HSP90 heterocomplex PPI network are also included and discussed. As an example, the putative implication of nuclear transport and chromatin (histones and Sir2) as HSP90-heterocomplex interactors is here discussed. PMID:24694366

  15. Isospora dromaii n. sp. (Apicomplexa, Eimeriidae) isolated from emus, Dromaius novaehollandiae (Casuariiformes, Casuariidae).

    PubMed

    dos Santos Teixeira, Carina; Gallo, Samira Salim Mello; Ederli, Nicole Brand; Berto, Bruno Pereira; de Oliveira, Francisco Carlos Rodrigues

    2014-11-01

    A new species of Coccidia (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) isolated from emus, Dromaius novaehollandiae, which was observed in Brazil is described and named. Oocysts of Isospora dromaii n. sp. are subspheroidal to ovoid in shape, measure 21.6?×?19.8 ?m, and have a double and smooth wall thickness of approximately 1.4 ?m. In this species, micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granules are absent. The sporocysts are slightly ovoid in shape and measure 13.7?×?10.0 ?m. Nipple-like Stieda body and prominent sub-Stieda body are present. The sporocyst residuum is composed of small dispersed granules of varying sizes. The sporozoites are characterized by an oblong refractile body and one centrally located nucleus. This is the first description of isosporid coccidia infecting birds of the family Dromaiidae. PMID:25195056

  16. Armatimonas rosea gen. nov., sp. nov., of a novel bacterial phylum, Armatimonadetes phyl. nov., formally called the candidate phylum OP10.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Matsuzawa, Hiroaki; Muramatsu, Mizuho; Meng, Xian-Ying; Hanada, Satoshi; Mori, Kazuhiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2011-06-01

    A novel aerobic, chemoheterotrophic bacterium, strain YO-36(T), isolated from the rhizoplane of an aquatic plant (a reed, Phragmites australis) inhabiting a freshwater lake in Japan, was morphologically, physiologically and phylogenetically characterized. Strain YO-36(T) was Gram-negative and ovoid to rod-shaped, and formed pinkish hard colonies on agar plates. Strain YO-36(T) grew at 20-40 °C with optimum growth at 30-35 °C, whilst no growth was observed at 15 °C or 45 °C. The pH range for growth was 5.5-8.5 with an optimum at pH 6.5. Strain YO-36(T) utilized a limited range of substrates, such as sucrose, gentiobiose, pectin, gellan gum and xanthan gum. The strain contained C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1), C(14 : 0) and C(15 : 0) as the major cellular fatty acids and menaquinone-12 as the respiratory quinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 62.4 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain YO-36(T) belonged to the candidate phylum OP10 comprised solely of environmental 16S rRNA gene clone sequences except for two strains, P488 and T49 isolated from geothermal soil in New Zealand; strain YO-36(T) showed less than 80 % sequence similarity to strains P488 and T47. Based on the phylogetic and phenotypic findings, a new genus and species, Armatimonas rosea gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed for the isolate (type strain YO-36(T) ?=?NBRC 105658(T) ?=?DSM 23562(T)). In addition, a new bacterial phylum named Armatimonadetes phyl. nov. is proposed for the candidate phylum OP10 represented by A. rosea gen. nov., sp. nov. and Armatimonadaceae fam. nov., Armatimonadales ord. nov., and Armatimonadia classis nov. PMID:20622056

  17. Besnoitia neotomofelis n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) from the southern plains woodrat (Neotoma micropus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certain species of the protozoan genus Besnoitia cause clinical disease in livestock and wildlife. In the present paper a new species, Besnoitia neotomofelis is described from the southern planes woodrat (Neotoma micropus). The parasite was detected by bioassay of woodrat tissues in out bred Swiss W...

  18. Toxoplasmosis Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that can infect many animals, including humans. It belongs to

    E-print Network

    Wood, Marcelo A.

    Toxoplasmosis Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that can infect many animals, including or transplant therapy or individuals that are positive for HIV. Biology Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan

  19. Interferon in resistance to bacterial and protozoan infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Gould, Cheryl L.; Kierszenbaum, Felipe; Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of genetic differences in mouse strains on the modulation of protozoan infections by interferon (IFN) were investigated. In one set of experiments, three different strains of mice were injected with T. cruzi, and their sera were assayed at five time intervals for IFN titer. A greater quantity of IFN was produced by mouse strains that were susceptible to T. cruzi infection than by the more resistant strain. In another set of experiments, spleen cell cultures from inbred strains of mice were challenged with an antigen made from T.b. rhodesiense. The cells from mice resistant to infection, produced greater amounts of IFN-gamma than did cells from the susceptible mice. In a third set of experiments, it was found that mice injected with T.b. rhodesiense before being infected with a diabetogenic virus (EMC-D) were resistant to the effects of the virus and did not produce virus-specific antibody.

  20. Protozoan parasites of bivalve molluscs: literature follows culture.

    PubMed

    Fernández Robledo, José A; Vasta, Gerardo R; Record, Nicholas R

    2014-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are key components of the estuarine environments as contributors to the trophic chain, and as filter -feeders, for maintaining ecosystem integrity. Further, clams, oysters, and scallops are commercially exploited around the world both as traditional local shellfisheries, and as intensive or semi-intensive farming systems. During the past decades, populations of those species deemed of environmental or commercial interest have been subject to close monitoring given the realization that these can suffer significant decline, sometimes irreversible, due to overharvesting, environmental pollution, or disease. Protozoans of the genera Perkinsus, Haplosporidium, Marteilia, and Bonamia are currently recognized as major threats for natural and farmed bivalve populations. Since their identification, however, the variable publication rates of research studies addressing these parasitic diseases do not always appear to reflect their highly significant environmental and economic impact. Here we analyzed the peer- reviewed literature since the initial description of these parasites with the goal of identifying potential milestone discoveries or achievements that may have driven the intensity of the research in subsequent years, and significantly increased publication rates. Our analysis revealed that after initial description of the parasite as the etiological agent of a given disease, there is a time lag before a maximal number of yearly publications are reached. This has already taken place for most of them and has been followed by a decrease in publication rates over the last decade (20- to 30- year lifetime in the literature). Autocorrelation analyses, however, suggested that advances in parasite purification and culture methodologies positively drive publication rates, most likely because they usually lead to novel molecular tools and resources, promoting mechanistic studies. Understanding these trends should help researchers in prioritizing research efforts for these and other protozoan parasites, together with their development as model systems for further basic and translational research in parasitic diseases. PMID:24955977

  1. Protozoan Parasites of Bivalve Molluscs: Literature Follows Culture

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Robledo, José A.; Vasta, Gerardo R.; Record, Nicholas R.

    2014-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are key components of the estuarine environments as contributors to the trophic chain, and as filter –feeders, for maintaining ecosystem integrity. Further, clams, oysters, and scallops are commercially exploited around the world both as traditional local shellfisheries, and as intensive or semi–intensive farming systems. During the past decades, populations of those species deemed of environmental or commercial interest have been subject to close monitoring given the realization that these can suffer significant decline, sometimes irreversible, due to overharvesting, environmental pollution, or disease. Protozoans of the genera Perkinsus, Haplosporidium, Marteilia, and Bonamia are currently recognized as major threats for natural and farmed bivalve populations. Since their identification, however, the variable publication rates of research studies addressing these parasitic diseases do not always appear to reflect their highly significant environmental and economic impact. Here we analyzed the peer– reviewed literature since the initial description of these parasites with the goal of identifying potential milestone discoveries or achievements that may have driven the intensity of the research in subsequent years, and significantly increased publication rates. Our analysis revealed that after initial description of the parasite as the etiological agent of a given disease, there is a time lag before a maximal number of yearly publications are reached. This has already taken place for most of them and has been followed by a decrease in publication rates over the last decade (20– to 30– year lifetime in the literature). Autocorrelation analyses, however, suggested that advances in parasite purification and culture methodologies positively drive publication rates, most likely because they usually lead to novel molecular tools and resources, promoting mechanistic studies. Understanding these trends should help researchers in prioritizing research efforts for these and other protozoan parasites, together with their development as model systems for further basic and translational research in parasitic diseases. PMID:24955977

  2. Phylogenetic Framework and Molecular Signatures for the Main Clades of the Phylum Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Beile

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The phylum Actinobacteria harbors many important human pathogens and also provides one of the richest sources of natural products, including numerous antibiotics and other compounds of biotechnological interest. Thus, a reliable phylogeny of this large phylum and the means to accurately identify its different constituent groups are of much interest. Detailed phylogenetic and comparative analyses of >150 actinobacterial genomes reported here form the basis for achieving these objectives. In phylogenetic trees based upon 35 conserved proteins, most of the main groups of Actinobacteria as well as a number of their superageneric clades are resolved. We also describe large numbers of molecular markers consisting of conserved signature indels in protein sequences and whole proteins that are specific for either all Actinobacteria or their different clades (viz., orders, families, genera, and subgenera) at various taxonomic levels. These signatures independently support the existence of different phylogenetic clades, and based upon them, it is now possible to delimit the phylum Actinobacteria (excluding Coriobacteriia) and most of its major groups in clear molecular terms. The species distribution patterns of these markers also provide important information regarding the interrelationships among different main orders of Actinobacteria. The identified molecular markers, in addition to enabling the development of a stable and reliable phylogenetic framework for this phylum, also provide novel and powerful means for the identification of different groups of Actinobacteria in diverse environments. Genetic and biochemical studies on these Actinobacteria-specific markers should lead to the discovery of novel biochemical and/or other properties that are unique to different groups of Actinobacteria. PMID:22390973

  3. Assessing the global phylum level diversity within the bacterial domain: A review

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Noha H.; Couger, M.B.; McCully, Alexandra L.; Criado, Andrés Eduardo Guerrero; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial ecology is the study of microbes in the natural environment and their interactions with each other. Investigating the nature of microorganisms residing within a specific habitat is an extremely important component of microbial ecology. Such microbial diversity surveys aim to determine the identity, physiological preferences, metabolic capabilities, and genomic features of microbial taxa within a specific ecosystem. A comprehensive review of various aspects of microbial diversity (phylogenetic, functional, and genomic diversities) in the microbial (bacterial, archaeal, and microeukaryotic) world is clearly a daunting task that could not be aptly summarized in a single review. Here, we focus on one aspect of diversity (phylogenetic diversity) in one microbial domain (the Bacteria). We restrict our analysis to the highest taxonomic rank (phylum) and attempt to investigate the extent of global phylum level diversity within the Bacteria. We present a brief historical perspective on the subject and highlight how the adaptation of molecular biological and phylogenetic approaches has greatly expanded our view of global bacterial diversity. We also summarize recent progress toward the discovery of novel bacterial phyla, present evidences that the scope of phylum level diversity in nature has hardly been exhausted, and propose novel approaches that could greatly facilitate the discovery process of novel bacterial phyla within various ecosystems. PMID:26257925

  4. Crystal growth of bullet-shaped magnetite in magnetotactic bacteria of the Nitrospirae phylum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Menguy, Nicolas; Gatel, Christophe; Boureau, Victor; Snoeck, Etienne; Patriarche, Gilles; Leroy, Eric; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-02-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are known to produce single-domain magnetite or greigite crystals within intracellular membrane organelles and to navigate along the Earth's magnetic field lines. MTB have been suggested as being one of the most ancient biomineralizing metabolisms on the Earth and they represent a fundamental model of intracellular biomineralization. Moreover, the determination of their specific crystallographic signature (e.g. structure and morphology) is essential for palaeoenvironmental and ancient-life studies. Yet, the mechanisms of MTB biomineralization remain poorly understood, although this process has been extensively studied in several cultured MTB strains in the Proteobacteria phylum. Here, we show a comprehensive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of magnetic and structural properties down to atomic scales on bullet-shaped magnetites produced by the uncultured strain MYR-1 belonging to the Nitrospirae phylum, a deeply branching phylogenetic MTB group. We observed a multiple-step crystal growth of MYR-1 magnetite: initial isotropic growth forming cubo-octahedral particles (less than approx. 40 nm), subsequent anisotropic growth and a systematic final elongation along [001] direction. During the crystal growth, one major {111} face is well developed and preserved at the larger basal end of the crystal. The basal {111} face appears to be terminated by a tetrahedral-octahedral-mixed iron surface, suggesting dimensional advantages for binding protein(s), which may template the crystallization of magnetite. This study offers new insights for understanding magnetite biomineralization within the Nitrospirae phylum. PMID:25566884

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bacterium Aalborg_AAW-1, Representing a Novel Family within the Candidate Phylum SR1.

    PubMed

    Dueholm, Morten Simonsen; Albertsen, Mads; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; McIlroy, Simon J; Karst, Søren M; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the candidate phylum SR1 bacterium Aalborg_AAW-1. Its 16S rRNA gene is only 85.5% similar to that of the closest relative, RAAC1_SR1, and the genome of Aalborg_AAW-1 consequently represents the first of a novel family within the candidate phylum SR1. PMID:26067967

  6. Impact of water column acidification on protozoan bacterivory at the lake sediment-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, S.C.; Mills, A.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Although the impact of acidification on planktonic grazer food webs has been extensively studied, little is known about microbial food webs either in the water column or in the sediments. Protozoan-bacterium interactions were investigated in a chronically acidified (acid mine drainage) portion of a lake in Virginia. The authors determined the distribution, abundance, apparent specific grazing rate, and growth rate of protozoa over a pH range of 3.6 to 6.5. Protozoan abundance was lower at the most acidified site, while abundance, in general, was high compared with other systems. Specific grazing rates were uncorrelated with pH and ranged between 0.02 and 0.23 h{sup {minus}1}, values similar to those in unacidified systems. The protozoan community from an acidified station was not better adapted to low-pH conditions than a community from an unacidified site (multivariate analysis of variance on growth rates for each community incubated at pHs 4, 5, and 6). Both communities had significantly lower growth rates at pHs 4 and 5 than at pH 6. Reduced protozoan growth rates coupled with high grazing rates and relatively higher bacterial yields (ratio of bacterial-protozoan standing stock) at low pH indicate reduced net protozoan growth efficiency and a metabolic cost of acidification to the protozoan community. However, the presence of an abundant, neutrophilic protozoan community and high bacterial grazing rates indicates that acidification of Lake Anna has not inhibited the bacterium-protozoan link of the sediment microbial food web.

  7. Recent highlights in anti-protozoan drug development and resistance research

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Waters, Norman C.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the highlights of research presented in January, 2012, at the Keystone Symposium on “Drug Discovery for Protozoan Parasites” held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This symposium which convenes approximately every 2 years provides a forum for leading investigators around the world to present data covering basic sciences to clinical trials relating to anti-protozoan drug development and drug resistance. Many talks focused on malaria, but other protozoan diseases receiving attention included African sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis. The new research, most of it unpublished, provided insights into the latest developments in the field. PMID:24533285

  8. Hormonal actions in the Protozoan stress: A review.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2015-12-01

    In the higher ranked animals the alteration of the environment can provoke a uniform reaction named general adaptation system (GAS), which is a manifestation of stress, caused by different stressors. During GAS certain organs show typical reactions and two members of the hormonal system are activated: epinephine and glucocorticoids. As the unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena also synthesize most of the mammalian-like hormones (except steroids), it can respond to stress by a hormonal reaction. The main differences, related to the mammalian GAS hormonal reaction are, that 1) in Tetrahymena the level of all of the hormones studied significantly elevates under the effect of heat, osmotic or chemical stress and 2) the single stress effect is durable. It is manifested at least to the 100th generations, which means that it is inherited epigenetically. Not only hormone synthesis but the receptorial hormone binding is also elevated, which means that the whole hormonal system is activated. The stress reaction (GAS) phylogenetically can be deduced to a unicellular (Protozoan) level however, prokaryotes - which are also stress-reactive - are using another mechanisms. PMID:26689872

  9. Structure and mechanics of the spasmoneme, a biological spring within the protozoan Vorticella convallaria

    E-print Network

    France, Danielle Cook

    2007-01-01

    Molecular springs have recently emerged as the basis for the fastest and most powerful movements at the cellular level in biology. The spasmoneme of the protozoan, Vorticella convallaria, is a model molecular spring, relying ...

  10. megB1, a novel macroevolutionary genomic marker of the fungal phylum Basidiomycota.

    PubMed

    Babasaki, Katsuhiko; Neda, Hitoshi; Murata, Hitoshi

    2007-08-01

    Molecular studies on the evolution and systematics of fungi have been established primarily based on the neutral theory by analyzing neutral mutations in some defined segments of housekeeping genes as genetic markers. Such an approach is, however, hardly applicable for analyzing ancient evolutionary radiations. In the present study, we looked for DNA sequences characterizing higher taxa, and discovered a unique macroevolutionary genomic marker, megB1, that specifies the phylum Basidiomycota. megB1 is an approximately 500-bp DNA element, which is defined by terminal sequences and five internal segments conserved throughout the phylum. megB1 resides on the rDNA intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) from 27 species of 10 Basidiomycota genera examined. While megB1 was not found in IGS1 from the other 92 species of the 27 Basidiomycota genera, several genera representing them carry megB1 in some other genomic regions. No known taxonomic criteria fit into the classification on the basis of whether megB1 resides on rDNA. Neighbor-joining analysis of the megB1 sequence, however, properly assigned species to their respective genera. Thus far, megB1 has not been found in any genomic or genetic databases currently available for other phyla. These results suggest that megB1 may have emerged upon the occurrence of Basidiomycota, and that this phylum evolved thereafter leaving this element conserved throughout their further differentiation. megB1 may be a novel genomic marker useful in the analysis of ancient through the latest evolutionary radiation in Basidiomycota. PMID:17690473

  11. Eimeria pileata n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the rufous-capped brush finch Atlapetes pileatus Wagler (Passeriformes: Emberizidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo; Medina, Juan Pablo; Salgado-Miranda, Celene; García-Conejo, Michele; Galindo-Sánchez, Karla Patrícia; Janczur, Mariusz Krzysztof; Berto, Bruno Pereira; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2015-11-01

    A new coccidian species (Protista: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) collected from the rufous-capped brush finch Atlapetes pileatus Wagler in the Nevado de Toluca Natural Protected Area, Mexico. Oöcysts of Eimeria pileata n. sp. are ellipsoidal, measuring on average 16.5 × 14.1 ?m, with a smooth, bi-layered wall. Micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, measuring on average 9.0 × 5.4 ?m. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies are both present. A sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. This is the third description of an eimeriid coccidian infecting passerines. PMID:26446548

  12. Potential Conservation of Circadian Clock Proteins in the phylum Nematoda as Revealed by Bioinformatic Searches

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Andrés; Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Goya, María Eugenia; Ghiringhelli, Pablo Daniel; Golombek, Diego Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Although several circadian rhythms have been described in C. elegans, its molecular clock remains elusive. In this work we employed a novel bioinformatic approach, applying probabilistic methodologies, to search for circadian clock proteins of several of the best studied circadian model organisms of different taxa (Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Neurospora crassa, Arabidopsis thaliana and Synechoccocus elongatus) in the proteomes of C. elegans and other members of the phylum Nematoda. With this approach we found that the Nematoda contain proteins most related to the core and accessory proteins of the insect and mammalian clocks, which provide new insights into the nematode clock and the evolution of the circadian system. PMID:25396739

  13. Water-soluble ruthenium complexes bearing activity against protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Sarniguet, Cynthia; Toloza, Jeannette; Cipriani, Micaella; Lapier, Michel; Vieites, Marisol; Toledano-Magaña, Yanis; García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Moreno, Virtudes; Maya, Juan Diego; Azar, Claudio Olea; Gambino, Dinorah; Otero, Lucía

    2014-06-01

    Parasitic illnesses are major causes of human disease and misery worldwide. Among them, both amebiasis and Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasites, Entamoeba histolytica and Trypanosoma cruzi, are responsible for thousands of annual deaths. The lack of safe and effective chemotherapy and/or the appearance of current drug resistance make the development of novel pharmacological tools for their treatment relevant. In this sense, within the framework of the medicinal inorganic chemistry, metal-based drugs appear to be a good alternative to find a pharmacological answer to parasitic diseases. In this work, novel ruthenium complexes [RuCl2(HL)(HPTA)2]Cl2 with HL=bioactive 5-nitrofuryl containing thiosemicarbazones and PTA=1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane have been synthesized and fully characterized. PTA was included as co-ligand in order to modulate complexes aqueous solubility. In fact, obtained complexes were water soluble. Their activity against T. cruzi and E. histolytica was evaluated in vitro. [RuCl2(HL4)(HPTA)2]Cl2 complex, with HL4=N-phenyl-5-nitrofuryl-thiosemicarbazone, was the most active compound against both parasites. In particular, it showed an excellent activity against E. histolytica (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50)=5.2 ?M), even higher than that of the reference drug metronidazole. In addition, this complex turns out to be selective for E. histolytica (selectivity index (SI)>38). The potential mechanism of antiparasitic action of the obtained ruthenium complexes could involve oxidative stress for both parasites. Additionally, complexes could interact with DNA as second potential target by an intercalative-like mode. Obtained results could be considered a contribution in the search for metal compounds that could be active against multiple parasites. PMID:24740394

  14. First Cultivation and Ecological Investigation of a Bacterium Affiliated with the Candidate Phylum OP5 from Hot Springs ?

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Koji; Sunamura, Michinari; Yanagawa, Katsunori; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Miyoshi, Youko; Iino, Takao; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Urabe, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    The phylogenetic group termed OP5 was originally discovered in the Yellowstone National Park hot spring and proposed as an uncultured phylum; the group was afterwards analyzed by applying culture-independent approaches. Recently, a novel thermophilic chemoheterotrophic filamentous bacterium was obtained from a hot spring in Japan that was enriched through various isolation procedures. Phylogenetic analyses of the isolate have revealed that it is closely related to the OP5 phylum that has mainly been constructed with the environmental clones retrieved from thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic environments. It appears that the lineage is independent at the phylum level in the domain Bacteria. Therefore, we designed a primer set for the 16S rRNA gene to specifically target the OP5 phylum and performed quantitative field analysis by using the real-time PCR method. Thus, the 16S rRNA gene of the OP5 phylum was detected in some hot-spring samples with the relative abundance ranging from 0.2% to 1.4% of the prokaryotic organisms detected. The physiology of the above-mentioned isolate and the related environmental clones indicated that they are scavengers contributing to the sulfur cycle in nature. PMID:18776034

  15. Functional type 2 photosynthetic reaction centers found in the rare bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yonghui; Feng, Fuying; Medová, Hana; Dean, Jason; Koblížek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria emerged on Earth more than 3 Gyr ago. To date, despite a long evolutionary history, species containing (bacterio)chlorophyll-based reaction centers have been reported in only 6 out of more than 30 formally described bacterial phyla: Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Acidobacteria. Here we describe a bacteriochlorophyll a-producing isolate AP64 that belongs to the poorly characterized phylum Gemmatimonadetes. This red-pigmented semiaerobic strain was isolated from a freshwater lake in the western Gobi Desert. It contains fully functional type 2 (pheophytin-quinone) photosynthetic reaction centers but does not assimilate inorganic carbon, suggesting that it performs a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Full genome sequencing revealed the presence of a 42.3-kb–long photosynthesis gene cluster (PGC) in its genome. The organization and phylogeny of its photosynthesis genes suggests an ancient acquisition of PGC via horizontal transfer from purple phototrophic bacteria. The data presented here document that Gemmatimonadetes is the seventh bacterial phylum containing (bacterio)chlorophyll-based phototrophic species. To our knowledge, these data provide the first evidence that (bacterio)chlorophyll-based phototrophy can be transferred between distant bacterial phyla, providing new insights into the evolution of bacterial photosynthesis. PMID:24821787

  16. Functional type 2 photosynthetic reaction centers found in the rare bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yonghui; Feng, Fuying; Medová, Hana; Dean, Jason; Koblížek, Michal

    2014-05-27

    Photosynthetic bacteria emerged on Earth more than 3 Gyr ago. To date, despite a long evolutionary history, species containing (bacterio)chlorophyll-based reaction centers have been reported in only 6 out of more than 30 formally described bacterial phyla: Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Acidobacteria. Here we describe a bacteriochlorophyll a-producing isolate AP64 that belongs to the poorly characterized phylum Gemmatimonadetes. This red-pigmented semiaerobic strain was isolated from a freshwater lake in the western Gobi Desert. It contains fully functional type 2 (pheophytin-quinone) photosynthetic reaction centers but does not assimilate inorganic carbon, suggesting that it performs a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Full genome sequencing revealed the presence of a 42.3-kb-long photosynthesis gene cluster (PGC) in its genome. The organization and phylogeny of its photosynthesis genes suggests an ancient acquisition of PGC via horizontal transfer from purple phototrophic bacteria. The data presented here document that Gemmatimonadetes is the seventh bacterial phylum containing (bacterio)chlorophyll-based phototrophic species. To our knowledge, these data provide the first evidence that (bacterio)chlorophyll-based phototrophy can be transferred between distant bacterial phyla, providing new insights into the evolution of bacterial photosynthesis. PMID:24821787

  17. The first complete genome sequence of the class Fimbriimonadia in the phylum Armatimonadetes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zi-Ye; Wang, Yue-Zhu; Im, Wan-Taek; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Zheng, Hua-Jun; Quan, Zhe-Xue

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present the complete genome of Fimbriimonas ginsengisoli Gsoil 348T belonging to the class Fimbriimonadia of the phylum Armatimonadetes, formerly called as candidate phylum OP10. The complete genome contains a single circular chromosome of 5.23 Mb including a 45.5 kb prophage. Of the 4820 open reading frames (ORFs), 3,000 (62.2%) genes could be classified into Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) families. With the split of rRNA genes, strain Gsoil 348T had no typical 16S-23S-5S ribosomal RNA operon. In this genome, the GC skew inversion which was usually observed in archaea was found. The predicted gene functions suggest that the organism lacks the ability to synthesize histidine, and the TCA cycle is incomplete. Phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal proteins indicated that strain Gsoil 348T represents a deeply branching lineage of sufficient divergence with other phyla, but also strongly involved in superphylum Terrabacteria. PMID:24967843

  18. Distribution and Evolution of Nitrogen Fixation Genes in the Phylum Bacteroidetes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Jun-ichi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Iino, Takao; Noda, Satoko; Hongoh, Yuichi; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2015-01-01

    Diazotrophs had not previously been identified among bacterial species in the phylum Bacteroidetes until the rapid expansion of bacterial genome sequences, which revealed the presence of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes in this phylum. We herein determined the draft genome sequences of Bacteroides graminisolvens JCM 15093T and Geofilum rubicundum JCM 15548T. In addition to these and previously reported ‘Candidatus Azobacteroides pseudotrichonymphae’ and Paludibacter propionicigenes, an extensive survey of the genome sequences of diverse Bacteroidetes members revealed the presence of a set of nif genes (nifHDKENB) in strains of Dysgonomonas gadei, Dysgonomonas capnocytophagoides, Saccharicrinis fermentans, and Alkaliflexus imshenetskii. These eight species belonged to and were distributed sporadically within the order Bacteroidales. Acetylene reduction activity was detected in the five species examined, strongly suggesting their diazotrophic nature. Phylogenetic analyses showed monophyletic clustering of the six Nif protein sequences in the eight Bacteroidales species, implying that nitrogen fixation is ancestral to Bacteroidales and has been retained in these species, but lost in many other lineages. The identification of nif genes in Bacteroidales facilitates the prediction of the organismal origins of related sequences directly obtained from various environments. PMID:25736980

  19. Phylum-wide comparative genomics unravel the diversity of secondary metabolism in Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Calteau, Alexandra; Fewer, David P.; Latifi, Amel; Coursin, Thérèse; Laurent, Thierry; Jokela, Jouni; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Sivonen, Kaarina; Piel, Jörn; Gugger, Muriel

    2014-11-18

    Cyanobacteria are an ancient lineage of photosynthetic bacteria from which hundreds of natural products have been described, including many notorious toxins but also potent natural products of interest to the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries. Many of these compounds are the products of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) or polyketide synthase (PKS) pathways. However, current understanding of the diversification of these pathways is largely based on the chemical structure of the bioactive compounds, while the evolutionary forces driving their remarkable chemical diversity are poorly understood. We carried out a phylum-wide investigation of genetic diversification of the cyanobacterial NRPS and PKS pathways for the production of bioactive compounds. 452 NRPS and PKS gene clusters were identified from 89 cyanobacterial genomes, revealing a clear burst in late-branching lineages. Our genomic analysis further grouped the clusters into 286 highly diversified cluster families (CF) of pathways. Some CFs appeared vertically inherited, while others presented a more complex evolutionary history. Only a few horizontal gene transfers were evidenced amongst strongly conserved CFs in the phylum, while several others have undergone drastic gene shuffling events, which could result in the observed diversification of the pathways. In addition to toxin production, several NRPS and PKS gene clusters are devoted to important cellular processes of these bacteria such as nitrogen fixation and iron uptake. The majority of the biosynthetic clusters identified here have unknown end products, highlighting the power of genome mining for the discovery of new natural products.

  20. The First Complete Genome Sequence of the Class Fimbriimonadia in the Phylum Armatimonadetes

    PubMed Central

    Im, Wan-Taek; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Zheng, Hua-Jun; Quan, Zhe-Xue

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present the complete genome of Fimbriimonas ginsengisoli Gsoil 348T belonging to the class Fimbriimonadia of the phylum Armatimonadetes, formerly called as candidate phylum OP10. The complete genome contains a single circular chromosome of 5.23 Mb including a 45.5 kb prophage. Of the 4820 open reading frames (ORFs), 3,000 (62.2%) genes could be classified into Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) families. With the split of rRNA genes, strain Gsoil 348T had no typical 16S-23S-5S ribosomal RNA operon. In this genome, the GC skew inversion which was usually observed in archaea was found. The predicted gene functions suggest that the organism lacks the ability to synthesize histidine, and the TCA cycle is incomplete. Phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal proteins indicated that strain Gsoil 348T represents a deeply branching lineage of sufficient divergence with other phyla, but also strongly involved in superphylum Terrabacteria. PMID:24967843

  1. Phylum-wide comparative genomics unravel the diversity of secondary metabolism in Cyanobacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Calteau, Alexandra; Fewer, David P.; Latifi, Amel; Coursin, Thérèse; Laurent, Thierry; Jokela, Jouni; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Sivonen, Kaarina; Piel, Jörn; Gugger, Muriel

    2014-11-18

    Cyanobacteria are an ancient lineage of photosynthetic bacteria from which hundreds of natural products have been described, including many notorious toxins but also potent natural products of interest to the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries. Many of these compounds are the products of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) or polyketide synthase (PKS) pathways. However, current understanding of the diversification of these pathways is largely based on the chemical structure of the bioactive compounds, while the evolutionary forces driving their remarkable chemical diversity are poorly understood. We carried out a phylum-wide investigation of genetic diversification of the cyanobacterial NRPS and PKS pathways formore »the production of bioactive compounds. 452 NRPS and PKS gene clusters were identified from 89 cyanobacterial genomes, revealing a clear burst in late-branching lineages. Our genomic analysis further grouped the clusters into 286 highly diversified cluster families (CF) of pathways. Some CFs appeared vertically inherited, while others presented a more complex evolutionary history. Only a few horizontal gene transfers were evidenced amongst strongly conserved CFs in the phylum, while several others have undergone drastic gene shuffling events, which could result in the observed diversification of the pathways. In addition to toxin production, several NRPS and PKS gene clusters are devoted to important cellular processes of these bacteria such as nitrogen fixation and iron uptake. The majority of the biosynthetic clusters identified here have unknown end products, highlighting the power of genome mining for the discovery of new natural products.« less

  2. Phylum-Level Conservation of Regulatory Information in Nematodes despite Extensive Non-coding Sequence Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Kacy L.; Arthur, Robert K.; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory information guides development and shapes the course of evolution. To test conservation of gene regulation within the phylum Nematoda, we compared the functions of putative cis-regulatory sequences of four sets of orthologs (unc-47, unc-25, mec-3 and elt-2) from distantly-related nematode species. These species, Caenorhabditis elegans, its congeneric C. briggsae, and three parasitic species Meloidogyne hapla, Brugia malayi, and Trichinella spiralis, represent four of the five major clades in the phylum Nematoda. Despite the great phylogenetic distances sampled and the extensive sequence divergence of nematode genomes, all but one of the regulatory elements we tested are able to drive at least a subset of the expected gene expression patterns. We show that functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements have no more extended sequence similarity to their C. elegans orthologs than would be expected by chance, but they do harbor motifs that are important for proper expression of the C. elegans genes. These motifs are too short to be distinguished from the background level of sequence similarity, and while identical in sequence they are not conserved in orientation or position. Functional tests reveal that some of these motifs contribute to proper expression. Our results suggest that conserved regulatory circuitry can persist despite considerable turnover within cis elements. PMID:26020930

  3. From incipient to substantial: evolution of placentotrophy in a phylum of aquatic colonial invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrew N

    2013-05-01

    Matrotrophy has long been known in invertebrates, but it is still poorly understood and has never been reviewed. A striking example of matrotrophy (namely, placentotrophy) is provided by the Bryozoa, a medium-sized phylum of the aquatic colonial filter feeders. Here I report on an extensive anatomical study of placental analogues in 21 species of the bryozoan order Cheilostomata, offering the first review on matrotrophy among aquatic invertebrates. The first anatomical description of incipient placentotrophy in invertebrates is presented together with the evidence for multiple independent origins of placental analogues in this order. The combinations of contrasting oocytic types (macrolecithal or microlecithal) and various degrees of placental development and embryonic enlargement during incubation, found in different bryozoan species, are suggestive of a transitional series from the incipient to the substantial placentotrophy accompanied by an inverse change in oogenesis, a situation reminiscent of some vertebrates. It seems that matrotrophy could trigger the evolution of sexual zooidal polymorphism in some clades. The results of this study show that this phylum, with its wide variety of reproductive patterns, incubation devices, and types of the simple placenta-like systems, offers a promising model for studying parallel evolution of placentotrophy in particular, and matrotrophy in general. PMID:23617914

  4. FROM INCIPIENT TO SUBSTANTIAL: EVOLUTION OF PLACENTOTROPHY IN A PHYLUM OF AQUATIC COLONIAL INVERTEBRATES

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky, Andrew N; Fairbairn, D

    2013-01-01

    Matrotrophy has long been known in invertebrates, but it is still poorly understood and has never been reviewed. A striking example of matrotrophy (namely, placentotrophy) is provided by the Bryozoa, a medium-sized phylum of the aquatic colonial filter feeders. Here I report on an extensive anatomical study of placental analogues in 21 species of the bryozoan order Cheilostomata, offering the first review on matrotrophy among aquatic invertebrates. The first anatomical description of incipient placentotrophy in invertebrates is presented together with the evidence for multiple independent origins of placental analogues in this order. The combinations of contrasting oocytic types (macrolecithal or microlecithal) and various degrees of placental development and embryonic enlargement during incubation, found in different bryozoan species, are suggestive of a transitional series from the incipient to the substantial placentotrophy accompanied by an inverse change in oogenesis, a situation reminiscent of some vertebrates. It seems that matrotrophy could trigger the evolution of sexual zooidal polymorphism in some clades. The results of this study show that this phylum, with its wide variety of reproductive patterns, incubation devices, and types of the simple placenta-like systems, offers a promising model for studying parallel evolution of placentotrophy in particular, and matrotrophy in general. PMID:23617914

  5. Molecular phylogeny of the phylum Gastrotricha: new data brings together molecules and morphology.

    PubMed

    Paps, Jordi; Riutort, Marta

    2012-04-01

    Gastrotricha is a species-rich phylum of microscopical animals that contains two main orders, Chaetonotida and Macrodasyida. Gastrotrichs are important members of the aquatic environment and significant players in the study of animal evolution. In spite of their ecological and evolutionary importance, their internal relationships are not yet well understood. We have produced new sequences for the 18S rDNA gene to improve both the quality and quantity of taxon sampling for the gastrotrichs. Our phylogeny recovers the monophyly of the two main Gastrotricha clades, in contrast to recent studies with similar sampling, but in agreement with morphology based analyses. However, our topology is not able to resolve the first branches of the macrodasyidans or settle the position of the puzzling Neodasys, a controversial genus classified as a chaetonotidan on morphological grounds but placed within macrodasyidans by molecular studies. This analysis is the most exhaustive molecular phylogeny of the phylum to date, and significantly increases our knowledge of gastrotrich evolution. PMID:22198640

  6. Protozoan grazing on bacteria at the sediment-water interface of an acidified lake

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Protozoan grazing on bacteria has been hypothesized to link the detrital and grazer food chains in aquatic ecosystems. The current study of protozoan bacterivory, evaluated methods, quantified bacterivory, and evaluated the role of protozoa at the sediment-water interface of an acidified lake ecosystem, Lake Anna, Virginia. Three limnetic methods for determining protozoan bacterivory were tested for applicability at the sediment-water interface. The eucaryote inhibitor, cycloheximide, was found unsatisfactory because it did not uniformly inhibit growth of target eucaryotes, and because it inhibited non-target anaerobic procaryotes. The filtration method was found to have limited application in sediment systems due to filtrational loss of particle-associated bacteria. The dilution method was tested for violations of its critical assumptions: bacterial growth is exponential; grazing mortality is proportional to the dilution factor; and bacterial growth rates are unaltered under experimental conditions. These assumptions were found not to be violated, and this method was used in subsequent grazing experiments. Carbon loading to the acidified arm of Lake Anna was 41 {times} 10{sup 6} g C {times} y{sup {minus}1}. This appears to be adequate carbon loading to support bacterial production and, in turn, protozoan bacterivory and production. Though there is no direct evidence that zooplankton graze on protozoa in this system, however, there is sufficient protozoan production to support an additional trophic level.

  7. Prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among Orang Asli schoolchildren in Pos Senderut, Pahang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Harazi, Talal; Ghani, Mohamed Kamel Abd; Othman, Hidayatulfathi

    2013-12-01

    The current study determined the prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among the Orang Asli schoolchildren in Pos Senderut, Pahang, Malaysia. The overall intestinal protozoan infection rate was 85% (261 out of 307). The highest prevalence rates were due to Entamoeba coli (24.4%), Giardia lamblia (21.8%), Blastocystis hominis (21.2%) and Entamoeba histolytica (15.0%). The prevalence of Iodamoeba butschlii was only 2.9%. Among the positive samples, mixed infection with B. hominis and E. histolytica was 3.3%, B. hominis and G. lamblia was 2.9%, G. lamblia and E. histolytica was 2.0% and triple infections (B. hominis, G. lamblia and E. histolytica) was 1.0 %. The prevalence of the infection was high in all age groups (6-14 years old). Thus, we can conclude that intestinal protozoan infections are still representing a serious public health problem in aboriginal communities, especially among children. PMID:24640856

  8. Genomic analysis of Chthonomonas calidirosea, the first sequenced isolate of the phylum Armatimonadetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Morgan, Xochitl C; Dunfield, Peter F; Tamas, Ivica; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2014-07-01

    Most of the lineages of bacteria have remained unknown beyond environmental surveys using molecular markers. Until the recent characterisation of several strains, the phylum Armatimonadetes (formerly known as 'candidate division OP10') was a dominant and globally-distributed lineage within this 'uncultured majority'. Here we report the first Armatimonadetes genome from the thermophile Chthonomonas calidirosea T49(T) and its role as a saccharide scavenger in a geothermal steam-affected soil environment. Phylogenomic analysis indicates T49(T) to be related closely to the phylum Chloroflexi. The predicted genes encoding for carbohydrate transporters (27 carbohydrate ATP-binding cassette transporter-related genes) and carbohydrate-metabolising enzymes (including at least 55 putative enzymes with glycosyl hydrolase domains) within the 3.43?Mb genome help explain its ability to utilise a wide range of carbohydrates as well as its inability to break down extracellular cellulose. The presence of only a single class of branched amino acid transporter appears to be the causative step for the requirement of isoleucine for growth. The genome lacks many commonly conserved operons (for example, lac and trp). Potential causes for this, such as dispersion of functionally related genes via horizontal gene transfer from distant taxa or recent genome recombination, were rejected. Evidence suggests T49(T) relies on the relatively abundant ?-factors, instead of operonic organisation, as the primary means of transcriptional regulation. Examination of the genome with physiological data and environmental dynamics (including interspecific interactions) reveals ecological factors behind the apparent elusiveness of T49(T) to cultivation and, by extension, the remaining 'uncultured majority' that have so far evaded conventional microbiological techniques. PMID:24477196

  9. Genomic analysis of Chthonomonas calidirosea, the first sequenced isolate of the phylum Armatimonadetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Morgan, Xochitl C; Dunfield, Peter F; Tamas, Ivica; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    Most of the lineages of bacteria have remained unknown beyond environmental surveys using molecular markers. Until the recent characterisation of several strains, the phylum Armatimonadetes (formerly known as ‘candidate division OP10') was a dominant and globally-distributed lineage within this ‘uncultured majority'. Here we report the first Armatimonadetes genome from the thermophile Chthonomonas calidirosea T49T and its role as a saccharide scavenger in a geothermal steam-affected soil environment. Phylogenomic analysis indicates T49T to be related closely to the phylum Chloroflexi. The predicted genes encoding for carbohydrate transporters (27 carbohydrate ATP-binding cassette transporter-related genes) and carbohydrate-metabolising enzymes (including at least 55 putative enzymes with glycosyl hydrolase domains) within the 3.43?Mb genome help explain its ability to utilise a wide range of carbohydrates as well as its inability to break down extracellular cellulose. The presence of only a single class of branched amino acid transporter appears to be the causative step for the requirement of isoleucine for growth. The genome lacks many commonly conserved operons (for example, lac and trp). Potential causes for this, such as dispersion of functionally related genes via horizontal gene transfer from distant taxa or recent genome recombination, were rejected. Evidence suggests T49T relies on the relatively abundant ?-factors, instead of operonic organisation, as the primary means of transcriptional regulation. Examination of the genome with physiological data and environmental dynamics (including interspecific interactions) reveals ecological factors behind the apparent elusiveness of T49T to cultivation and, by extension, the remaining ‘uncultured majority' that have so far evaded conventional microbiological techniques. PMID:24477196

  10. Humanized HLA-DR4 Mice Fed with the Protozoan Pathogen of Oysters Perkinsus Marinus (Dermo) Do Not Develop Noticeable Pathology but Elicit Systemic Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kleschenko, Yuliya; Pow-Sang, Luis; Brumeanu, Teodor D.; Villasante, Eileen Franke; Vasta, Gerardo R.; Fernández-Robledo, José-Antonio; Casares, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Perkinsus marinus (Phylum Perkinsozoa) is a marine protozoan parasite responsible for “Dermo” disease in oysters, which has caused extensive damage to the shellfish industry and estuarine environment. The infection prevalence has been estimated in some areas to be as high as 100%, often causing death of infected oysters within 1–2 years post-infection. Human consumption of the parasites via infected oysters is thus likely to occur, but to our knowledge the effect of oral consumption of P. marinus has not been investigated in humans or other mammals. To address the question we used humanized mice expressing HLA-DR4 molecules and lacking expression of mouse MHC-class II molecules (DR4.EA0) in such a way that CD4 T cell responses are solely restricted by the human HLA-DR4 molecule. The DR4.EA0 mice did not develop diarrhea or any detectable pathology in the gastrointestinal tract or lungs following single or repeated feedings with live P. marinus parasites. Furthermore, lymphocyte populations in the gut associated lymphoid tissue and spleen were unaltered in the parasite-fed mice ruling out local or systemic inflammation. Notably, naïve DR4.EA0 mice had antibodies (IgM and IgG) reacting against P. marinus parasites whereas parasite specific T cell responses were undetectable. Feeding with P. marinus boosted the antibody responses and stimulated specific cellular (IFN?) immunity to the oyster parasite. Our data indicate the ability of P. marinus parasites to induce systemic immunity in DR4.EA0 mice without causing noticeable pathology, and support rationale grounds for using genetically engineered P. marinus as a new oral vaccine platform to induce systemic immunity against infectious agents. PMID:24498105

  11. Description of Fimbriimonas ginsengisoli gen. nov., sp. nov. within the Fimbriimonadia class nov., of the phylum Armatimonadetes.

    PubMed

    Im, Wan-Taek; Hu, Zi-Ye; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Rhee, Sung-Keun; Meng, Han; Lee, Sung-Taik; Quan, Zhe-Xue

    2012-08-01

    Strain Gsoil 348(T) was isolated from a ginseng field soil sample by selecting micro-colonies from one-fifth strength modified R2A agar medium after a long incubation period. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the strain is related to members of the phylum Armatimonadetes (formerly called candidate phylum OP10). Strain Gsoil 348(T) is mesophilic, strictly aerobic, non-motile and rod-shaped. It only grows in low nutrient media. The major respiratory quinones are menaquinones MK-11 and MK-10, and the main fatty acids are iso-C(15:0), iso-C(17:0), C(16:0) and C(16:1) ?11c. The G+C content is 61.4 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequences in public databases belonging to the phylum Armatimonadetes were clustered here into 6 groups. Five of these groups constituted a coherent cluster distinct from the sequences of other phyla in phylogenetic trees that were constructed using multiple-outgroup sequences from 49 different phyla. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomic analyses, it is proposed that strain Gsoil 348(T) (= KACC 14959(T) = JCM 17079(T)) should be placed in Fimbriimonas ginsengisoli gen. nov., sp. nov., as the cultured representative of the Fimbriimonadia class. nov., corresponding with Group 4 of the phylum Armatimonadetes. PMID:22527625

  12. Alpha-Tubulin in Early-Diverging Eukaryotes 1305 -. 1990. Phylum Microsporidia. Pp. 53-72 in L. MAR-

    E-print Network

    Keeling, Patrick

    #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Alpha-Tubulin in Early-Diverging Eukaryotes 1305 -. 1990. Phylum. S. VISVESVARA,M. H. VODKIN, G. L. MCLAUGHLIN, and S. K. KATIYAR. 1996. Phylogenetic analysis of b-tubulin. GOROVSKY. 1995. Acetylation of lysine 40 in alpha-tubulin is not essential in Tetruhymena thermophila. J

  13. DETECTION OF PROTOZOAN PARASITES IN SOURCE AND FINISHED WATER - 3RD EDITION ASM'S METHODS IN ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protozoans are eukaryotic organisms which can live either a free-living or parasitic existence. Some free-living forms, under the right conditions, can become opportunistic parasites. Enteric pathogenic protozoans, like Giardia and Cryptosporidium, which are now known to be tra...

  14. Effects of temporally persistent ant nests of soil protozoan communities and the abundance of morphological types of amoeba

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared soil protozoan communities near ant nests with soil protozoans in reference soils 5m from the edge of any mounds. We sampled three species of Chihuahuan Desert ants that construct nests that persist for more than a decade: a seed harvester, Pogonomymex rugosus, a liquid feeding honey-po...

  15. A Database of Plastid Protein Families from Red Algae and Apicomplexa and Expression Regulation of the moeB Gene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the database of plastid protein families from red algae, secondary and tertiary rhodophyte-derived plastids, and Apicomplexa constructed with the novel method to infer orthology. The families contain proteins with maximal sequence similarity and minimal paralogous content. The database contains 6509 protein entries, 513 families and 278 nonsingletons (from which 230 are paralog-free, and among the remaining 48, 46 contain at maximum two proteins per species, and 2 contain at maximum three proteins per species). The method is compared with other approaches. Expression regulation of the moeB gene is studied using this database and the model of RNA polymerase competition. An analogous database obtained for green algae and their symbiotic descendants, and applications based on it are published earlier. PMID:26114108

  16. Efficacy of some anticoccidial drugs for treating coccidial enteritis of the common carp caused by Goussia carpelli (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae).

    PubMed

    Molnár, K; Ostoros, Györgyi

    2007-03-01

    In this study, nine anticoccidial drugs commonly used in poultry were tested for efficacy for the prevention and treatment of Goussia carpelli (Apicomplexa) infection in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). To establish experimental infection with G. carpelli, paratenic host oligochaetes of the genera Tubifex and Limnodrilus were infected with oocysts, and laboratory-cultured parasite-free common carp fingerlings were infected by feeding to them oligochaetes containing sporozoites. The anticoccidial drugs (amprolium, narasin, maduramicin, salinomycin Na, lasalocid Na, diclazuril, robenidine HCl, monensin Na and toltrazuril), mixed in the food of the fish in a dose of 200 mg/kg, were fed for 12 days. Common carp fingerlings fed diclazuril, lasalocid, robenidine HCl or maduramicin and killed on day 14 after exposure were free from infection, while other groups treated with amprolium, toltrazuril, monensin Na, narasin or salinomycin Na harboured oocysts in the mucus and epithelium of the gut. PMID:17385557

  17. A new species of Isospora Schneider, 1881 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Morafka's desert tortoise Gopherus morafkai (Testudines: Testudinidae).

    PubMed

    Hnida, John A

    2015-11-01

    Isospora gopheri n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) is described from 5 of 28 (18%) Morafka's desert tortoise Gopherus morafkai Murphy, Berry, Edwards, Leviton, Lathrop & Readle, housed by the Phoenix Herpetological Society, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA. Sporulated oöcysts of this new species were spheroidal to subspheroidal, 20-27 × 19-27 (23.0 × 21.7) µm, with a smooth, bi-layered wall and 1-3 polar granules; an oöcyst residuum was absent. Sporocysts were elongate-ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 13-18 × 9-12 (15.9 × 10.2) µm, with a Stieda body, sub-Stieda body and sporocyst residuum; sporozoites were banana-shaped with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. This is both the first coccidian to be described from this host species and only the second reported from the host genus. PMID:26446544

  18. Bull. U. S.F. C.1893. On a Parasitic Protozoan. (To face page 173.) PLATE11, REPORT ON A PARASITIC PROTOZOANOBSERVED ON FISH IN THEAQUARIUM.

    E-print Network

    Bull. U. S.F. C.1893. On a Parasitic Protozoan. (To face page 173.) PLATE11, a .t: k #12;REPORT discovered to be seriously infested with a protozoan parasite. The geueral pressure of aquarium operations

  19. ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES, POTENTIAL VIRULENT FACTORS, IN DIFFERENT STRAINS OF THE OYSTER PROTOZOAN PARASITE, PERKINSUS MARINUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oyster protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus, is one of the two important parasites causing severe mortality in the eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) on the US east coast. Our recent study suggests that P. marinus cells and its extracellular products (ECP) could scaveng...

  20. The Meaning of Death: Evolution and Ecology of Apoptosis in Protozoan Parasites

    E-print Network

    Gardner, Andy

    Review The Meaning of Death: Evolution and Ecology of Apoptosis in Protozoan Parasites Sarah E, United Kingdom Abstract: The discovery that an apoptosis-like, pro- grammed cell death (PCD) occurs their proliferation, not death. The prevailing, and untest- ed, opinion in the literature is that parasites employ

  1. Parasitism by protozoan Ichthyophthirius enhanced invasion of Aeromonas hydrophila in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In aquaculture production mortality resulting from a single pathogen is rare. More likely, multiple disease agents are present and responsible for disease losses. The ciliated protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis is a common parasite of freshwater fish and frequently causes mass kills of culture...

  2. A Type III Protein Arginine Methyltransferase from the Protozoan Parasite Trypanosoma brucei*

    E-print Network

    Clarke, Steven

    A Type III Protein Arginine Methyltransferase from the Protozoan Parasite Trypanosoma brucei, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 Arginine methylation is a widespread post-translational mod- ification of proteins catalyzed by a family of protein arginine

  3. Protective Immunity Against the Protozoan Leishmania chagasi Is Induced by Subclinical Cutaneous Infection with Virulent

    E-print Network

    Beverley, Stephen M.

    Protective Immunity Against the Protozoan Leishmania chagasi Is Induced by Subclinical Cutaneous Filho, Stephen M. Beverley,§ and Mary E. Wilson* Protective immunity against Leishmania major is provided by s.c. immunization with a low dose of L. major promastigotes or with dihydrofolate

  4. 18.-NOTICE OF THE OCCURRENCE OF PROTOZOAN PARASITES (PSORO-SPERMS) ON CYPEINOID FISHES IN OHIO.

    E-print Network

    , with liiinute patches of black pigment belonging to the skin of the host. In No. 2 there is a botryoidal cluster18.-NOTICE OF THE OCCURRENCE OF PROTOZOAN PARASITES (PSORO- SPERMS) ON CYPEINOID FISHES IN OHIO in September, 1890, by the U. 8.Fish Commission. The fish were taken in Black River, Lorain County, Ohio, by Mr

  5. Lipophosphoglycan is a virulence factor distinct from related glycoconjugates in the protozoan parasite

    E-print Network

    Beverley, Stephen M.

    parasite Leishmania major Gerald F. Spa¨th*, Linda Epstein , Ben Leader , Steven M. Singer§ , Herbert A of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, June 5, 2000 (received for review April 26, 2000) Protozoan parasites of the genus tests to establish whether LPG itself is a virulence factor. To study truly lpg parasites, we generated

  6. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags from the ciliate protozoan parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ciliate protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is an important parasite of freshwater fish that causes 'white spot disease' leading to significant losses. A genomic resource for large-scale studies of this parasite has been lacking. To study gene expression involved in Ich pathogenesis and...

  7. Postinoculation protozoan establishment and association patterns of methanogenic archaea in the ovine rumen.

    PubMed

    Ohene-Adjei, Samuel; Teather, Ronald M; Ivan, Michael; Forster, Robert J

    2007-07-01

    Association patterns between archaea and rumen protozoa were evaluated by analyzing archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from ovine rumen inoculated with different protozoa. Five protozoan inoculation treatments, fauna free (negative control), holotrich and cellulolytic protozoa, Isotricha and Dasytricha spp., Entodinium spp., and total fauna (type A) were tested. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, quantitative PCR, and phylogenetic analysis to evaluate the impact of the protozoan inoculants on the respective archaeal communities. Protozoan 18S ribosomal DNA clone libraries were also evaluated to monitor the protozoal population that was established by the inoculation. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that archaeal clones associated with the fauna-free, the Entodinium, and the type A inoculations clustered primarily with uncultured phylotypes. Polyplastron multivesiculatum was the predominant protozoan strain established by the holotrich and cellulolytic protozoan treatment, and this resulted predominantly in archaeal clones affiliated with uncultured and cultured methanogenic phylotypes (Methanosphaera stadtmanae, Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, and Methanobacterium bryantii). Furthermore, the Isotricha and Dasytricha inoculation treatment resulted primarily in archaeal clones affiliated with Methanobrevibacter smithii. This report provides the first assessment of the influence of protozoa on archaea within the rumen microbial community and provides evidence to suggest that different archaeal phylotypes associate with specific groups of protozoa. The observed patterns may be linked to the evolution of commensal and symbiotic relationships between archaea and protozoa in the ovine rumen environment. This report further underscores the prevalence and potential importance of a rather large group of uncultivated archaea in the ovine rumen, probably unrelated to known methanogens and undocumented in the bovine rumen. PMID:17513586

  8. Postinoculation Protozoan Establishment and Association Patterns of Methanogenic Archaea in the Ovine Rumen?

    PubMed Central

    Ohene-Adjei, Samuel; Teather, Ronald M.; Ivan, Michael; Forster, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Association patterns between archaea and rumen protozoa were evaluated by analyzing archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from ovine rumen inoculated with different protozoa. Five protozoan inoculation treatments, fauna free (negative control), holotrich and cellulolytic protozoa, Isotricha and Dasytricha spp., Entodinium spp., and total fauna (type A) were tested. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, quantitative PCR, and phylogenetic analysis to evaluate the impact of the protozoan inoculants on the respective archaeal communities. Protozoan 18S ribosomal DNA clone libraries were also evaluated to monitor the protozoal population that was established by the inoculation. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that archaeal clones associated with the fauna-free, the Entodinium, and the type A inoculations clustered primarily with uncultured phylotypes. Polyplastron multivesiculatum was the predominant protozoan strain established by the holotrich and cellulolytic protozoan treatment, and this resulted predominantly in archaeal clones affiliated with uncultured and cultured methanogenic phylotypes (Methanosphaera stadtmanae, Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, and Methanobacterium bryantii). Furthermore, the Isotricha and Dasytricha inoculation treatment resulted primarily in archaeal clones affiliated with Methanobrevibacter smithii. This report provides the first assessment of the influence of protozoa on archaea within the rumen microbial community and provides evidence to suggest that different archaeal phylotypes associate with specific groups of protozoa. The observed patterns may be linked to the evolution of commensal and symbiotic relationships between archaea and protozoa in the ovine rumen environment. This report further underscores the prevalence and potential importance of a rather large group of uncultivated archaea in the ovine rumen, probably unrelated to known methanogens and undocumented in the bovine rumen. PMID:17513586

  9. Sex allocation and population structure in apicomplexan (protozoa) parasites

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart

    Sex allocation and population structure in apicomplexan (protozoa) parasites Stuart A. West* , Todd allocation theory across parasitic protozoa in the phylum Apicomplexa. This cosmopolitan phylum consists attention, the population structure of parasitic protozoa species, and in particular estimates of sel

  10. Sex allocation and population structure in apicomplexan (protozoa) parasites 

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart A; Smith, Todd G; Read, Andrew F

    2000-01-01

    parasitic protozoa in the phylum Apicomplexa. This cosmopolitan phylum consists entirely of parasites, and includes a number of species of medical and veterinary importance. We suggest that LMC theory should apply to eimeriorin intestinal parasites...

  11. Forest-to-pasture conversion increases the diversity of the phylum Verrucomicrobia in Amazon rainforest soils

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Kshitij; Paula, Fabiana S.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Jesus, Ederson da C.; Cenciani, Karina; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.; Nüsslein, Klaus; Rodrigues, Jorge L. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Amazon rainforest is well known for its rich plant and animal diversity, but its bacterial diversity is virtually unexplored. Due to ongoing and widespread deforestation followed by conversion to agriculture, there is an urgent need to quantify the soil biological diversity within this tropical ecosystem. Given the abundance of the phylum Verrucomicrobia in soils, we targeted this group to examine its response to forest-to-pasture conversion. Both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversities were higher for pasture in comparison to primary and secondary forests. The community composition of Verrucomicrobia in pasture soils was significantly different from those of forests, with a 11.6% increase in the number of sequences belonging to subphylum 3 and a proportional decrease in sequences belonging to the class Spartobacteria. Based on 99% operational taxonomic unit identity, 40% of the sequences have not been detected in previous studies, underscoring the limited knowledge regarding the diversity of microorganisms in tropical ecosystems. The abundance of Verrucomicrobia, measured with quantitative PCR, was strongly correlated with soil C content (r = 0.80, P = 0.0016), indicating their importance in metabolizing plant-derived carbon compounds in soils. PMID:26284056

  12. ‘Candidatus Thermochlorobacter aerophilum:' an aerobic chlorophotoheterotrophic member of the phylum Chlorobi defined by metagenomics and metatranscriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenfeng; Klatt, Christian G; Ludwig, Marcus; Rusch, Douglas B; Jensen, Sheila I; Kühl, Michael; Ward, David M; Bryant, Donald A

    2012-01-01

    An uncultured member of the phylum Chlorobi, provisionally named ‘Candidatus Thermochlorobacter aerophilum', occurs in the microbial mats of alkaline siliceous hot springs at the Yellowstone National Park. ‘Ca. T. aerophilum' was investigated through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approaches. ‘Ca. T. aerophilum' is a member of a novel, family-level lineage of Chlorobi, a chlorophototroph that synthesizes type-1 reaction centers and chlorosomes similar to cultivated relatives among the green sulfur bacteria, but is otherwise very different physiologically. ‘Ca. T. aerophilum' is proposed to be an aerobic photoheterotroph that cannot oxidize sulfur compounds, cannot fix N2, and does not fix CO2 autotrophically. Metagenomic analyses suggest that ‘Ca. T. aerophilum' depends on other mat organisms for fixed carbon and nitrogen, several amino acids, and other important nutrients. The failure to detect bchU suggests that ‘Ca. T. aerophilum' synthesizes bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) d, and thus it occupies a different ecological niche than other chlorosome-containing chlorophototrophs in the mat. Transcription profiling throughout a diel cycle revealed distinctive gene expression patterns. Although ‘Ca. T. aerophilum' probably photoassimilates organic carbon sources and synthesizes most of its cell materials during the day, it mainly transcribes genes for BChl synthesis during late afternoon and early morning, and it synthesizes and assembles its photosynthetic apparatus during the night. PMID:22456447

  13. Characterization of taxonomically restricted genes in a phylum-restricted cell type

    PubMed Central

    Milde, Sabine; Hemmrich, Georg; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Khalturin, Konstantin; Wittlieb, Jörg; Bosch, Thomas CG

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite decades of research, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the evolution of morphological diversity remain poorly understood. While current models assume that species-specific morphologies are governed by differential use of conserved genetic regulatory circuits, it is debated whether non-conserved taxonomically restricted genes are also involved in making taxonomically relevant structures. The genomic resources available in Hydra, a member of the early branching animal phylum Cnidaria, provide a unique opportunity to study the molecular evolution of morphological novelties such as the nematocyte, a cell type characteristic of, and unique to, Cnidaria. Results We have identified nematocyte-specific genes by suppression subtractive hybridization and find that a considerable portion has no homologues to any sequences in animals outside Hydra. By analyzing the transcripts of these taxonomically restricted genes and mining of the Hydra magnipapillata genome, we find unexpected complexity in gene structure and transcript processing. Transgenic Hydra expressing the green fluorescent protein reporter under control of one of the taxonomically restricted gene promoters recapitulate faithfully the described expression pattern, indicating that promoters of taxonomically restricted genes contain all elements essential for spatial and temporal control mechanisms. Surprisingly, phylogenetic footprinting of this promoter did not reveal any conserved cis-regulatory elements. Conclusions Our findings suggest that taxonomically restricted genes are involved in the evolution of morphological novelties such as the cnidarian nematocyte. The transcriptional regulatory network controlling taxonomically restricted gene expression may contain not yet characterized transcription factors or cis-regulatory elements. PMID:19161630

  14. A phylogenetic test of the Red Queen Hypothesis: outcrossing and parasitism in the Nematode phylum.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Amanda Kyle; Fuentes, Jesualdo Arturo

    2015-02-01

    Sexual outcrossing is costly relative to selfing and asexuality, yet it is ubiquitous in nature, a paradox that has long puzzled evolutionary biologists. The Red Queen Hypothesis argues that outcrossing is maintained by antagonistic interactions between host and parasites. Most tests of this hypothesis focus on the maintenance of outcrossing in hosts. The Red Queen makes an additional prediction that parasitic taxa are more likely to be outcrossing than their free-living relatives. We test this prediction in the diverse Nematode phylum using phylogenetic comparative methods to evaluate trait correlations. In support of the Red Queen, we demonstrate a significant correlation between parasitism and outcrossing in this clade. We find that this correlation is driven by animal parasites, for which outcrossing is significantly enriched relative to both free-living and plant parasitic taxa. Finally, we test hypotheses for the evolutionary history underlying the correlation of outcrossing and animal parasitism. Our results demonstrate that selfing and asexuality are significantly less likely to arise on parasitic lineages than on free-living ones. The findings of this study are consistent with the Red Queen Hypothesis. Moreover, they suggest that the maintenance of genetic variation is an important factor in the persistence of parasitic lineages. PMID:25403727

  15. Entorrhizomycota: A New Fungal Phylum Reveals New Perspectives on the Evolution of Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Garnica, Sigisfredo; Oberwinkler, Franz; Riess, Kai; Weiß, Michael; Begerow, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Entorrhiza is a small fungal genus comprising 14 species that all cause galls on roots of Cyperaceae and Juncaceae. Although this genus was established 130 years ago, crucial questions on the phylogenetic relationships and biology of this enigmatic taxon are still unanswered. In order to infer a robust hypothesis about the phylogenetic position of Entorrhiza and to evaluate evolutionary trends, multiple gene sequences and morphological characteristics of Entorrhiza were analyzed and compared with respective findings in Fungi. In our comprehensive five-gene analyses Entorrhiza appeared as a highly supported monophyletic lineage representing the sister group to the rest of the Dikarya, a phylogenetic placement that received but moderate maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony bootstrap support. An alternative maximum likelihood tree with the constraint that Entorrhiza forms a monophyletic group with Basidiomycota could not be rejected. According to the first phylogenetic hypothesis, the teliospore tetrads of Entorrhiza represent the prototype of the dikaryan meiosporangium. The alternative hypothesis is supported by similarities in septal pore structure, cell wall and spindle pole bodies. Based on the isolated phylogenetic position of Entorrhiza and its peculiar combination of features related to ultrastructure and reproduction mode, we propose a new phylum Entorrhizomycota, for the genus Entorrhiza, which represents an apparently widespread group of inconspicuous fungi. PMID:26200112

  16. Bacteria of the Candidate Phylum TM7 are Prevalent in Acidophilic Nitrifying Sequencing-Batch Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Akiko; Kurogi, Takashi; Giang, Nguyen Minh; Yamada, Takeshi; Kamimoto, Yuki; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Hiraishi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory-scale acidophilic nitrifying sequencing-batch reactors (ANSBRs) were constructed by seeding with sewage-activated sludge and cultivating with ammonium-containing acidic mineral medium (pH 4.0) with or without a trace amount of yeast extract. In every batch cycle, the pH varied between 2.7 and 4.0, and ammonium was completely converted to nitrate. Attempts to detect nitrifying functional genes in the fully acclimated ANSBRs by PCR with previously designed primers mostly gave negative results. 16S rRNA gene-targeted PCR and a subsequent denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that a marked change occurred in the bacterial community during the overall period of operation, in which members of the candidate phylum TM7 and the class Gammaproteobacteria became predominant at the fully acclimated stage. This result was fully supported by a 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis, as the major phylogenetic groups of clones detected (>5% of the total) were TM7 (33%), Gammaproteobacteria (37%), Actinobacteria (10%), and Alphaproteobacteria (8%). Fluorescence in situ hybridization with specific probes also demonstrated the prevalence of TM7 bacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. These results suggest that previously unknown nitrifying microorganisms may play a major role in ANSBRs; however, the ecophysiological significance of the TM7 bacteria predominating in this process remains unclear. PMID:25241805

  17. Genomic insights into the uncultured genus 'Candidatus Magnetobacterium' in the phylum Nitrospirae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Deng, Aihua; Wang, Zhang; Li, Ying; Wen, Tingyi; Wu, Long-Fei; Wu, Martin; Pan, Yongxin

    2014-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) of the genus 'Candidatus Magnetobacterium' in phylum Nitrospirae are of great interest because of the formation of hundreds of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes in multiple bundles of chains per cell. These bacteria are worldwide distributed in aquatic environments and have important roles in the biogeochemical cycles of iron and sulfur. However, except for a few short genomic fragments, no genome data are available for this ecologically important genus, and little is known about their metabolic capacity owing to the lack of pure cultures. Here we report the first draft genome sequence of 3.42?Mb from an uncultivated strain tentatively named 'Ca. Magnetobacterium casensis' isolated from Lake Miyun, China. The genome sequence indicates an autotrophic lifestyle using the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for CO2 fixation, which has not been described in any previously known MTB or Nitrospirae organisms. Pathways involved in the denitrification, sulfur oxidation and sulfate reduction have been predicted, indicating its considerable capacity for adaptation to variable geochemical conditions and roles in local biogeochemical cycles. Moreover, we have identified a complete magnetosome gene island containing mam, mad and a set of novel genes (named as man genes) putatively responsible for the formation of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes and the arrangement of multiple magnetosome chains. This first comprehensive genomic analysis sheds light on the physiology, ecology and biomineralization of the poorly understood 'Ca. Magnetobacterium' genus. PMID:24914800

  18. A history of the taxonomy and systematics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi belonging to the phylum Glomeromycota.

    PubMed

    Stürmer, Sidney Luiz

    2012-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are grouped in a monophyletic group, the phylum Glomeromycota. In this review, the history and complexity of the taxonomy and systematics of these obligate biotrophs is addressed by recognizing four periods. The initial discovery period (1845-1974) is characterized by description mainly of sporocarp-forming species and the proposal of a classification for these fungi. The following alpha taxonomy period (1975-1989) established a solid morphological basis for species identification and classification, resulting in a profuse description of new species and a need to standardize the nomenclature of spore subcellular structures. The cladistics period from 1990 to 2000 saw the first cladistic classification of AMF based on phenotypic characters only. At the end of this period, genetic characters played a role in defining taxa and elucidating evolutionary relationships within the group. The most recent phylogenetic synthesis period (2001 to present) started with the proposal of a new classification based on genetic characters using sequences of the multicopy rRNA genes. PMID:22391803

  19. Genomic insights into the uncultured genus ‘Candidatus Magnetobacterium' in the phylum Nitrospirae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Deng, Aihua; Wang, Zhang; Li, Ying; Wen, Tingyi; Wu, Long-Fei; Wu, Martin; Pan, Yongxin

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) of the genus ‘Candidatus Magnetobacterium' in phylum Nitrospirae are of great interest because of the formation of hundreds of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes in multiple bundles of chains per cell. These bacteria are worldwide distributed in aquatic environments and have important roles in the biogeochemical cycles of iron and sulfur. However, except for a few short genomic fragments, no genome data are available for this ecologically important genus, and little is known about their metabolic capacity owing to the lack of pure cultures. Here we report the first draft genome sequence of 3.42?Mb from an uncultivated strain tentatively named ‘Ca. Magnetobacterium casensis' isolated from Lake Miyun, China. The genome sequence indicates an autotrophic lifestyle using the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway for CO2 fixation, which has not been described in any previously known MTB or Nitrospirae organisms. Pathways involved in the denitrification, sulfur oxidation and sulfate reduction have been predicted, indicating its considerable capacity for adaptation to variable geochemical conditions and roles in local biogeochemical cycles. Moreover, we have identified a complete magnetosome gene island containing mam, mad and a set of novel genes (named as man genes) putatively responsible for the formation of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes and the arrangement of multiple magnetosome chains. This first comprehensive genomic analysis sheds light on the physiology, ecology and biomineralization of the poorly understood ‘Ca. Magnetobacterium' genus. PMID:24914800

  20. Insights into thermoadaptation and the evolution of mesophily from the bacterial phylum Thermotogae.

    PubMed

    Pollo, Stephen M J; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Nesbø, Camilla L

    2015-09-01

    Thermophiles are extremophiles that grow optimally at temperatures >45 °C. To survive and maintain function of their biological molecules, they have a suite of characteristics not found in organisms that grow at moderate temperature (mesophiles). At the cellular level, thermophiles have mechanisms for maintaining their membranes, nucleic acids, and other cellular structures. At the protein level, each of their proteins remains stable and retains activity at temperatures that would denature their mesophilic homologs. Conversely, cellular structures and proteins from thermophiles may not function optimally at moderate temperatures. These differences between thermophiles and mesophiles presumably present a barrier for evolutionary transitioning between the 2 lifestyles. Therefore, studying closely related thermophiles and mesophiles can help us determine how such lifestyle transitions may happen. The bacterial phylum Thermotogae contains hyperthermophiles, thermophiles, mesophiles, and organisms with temperature ranges wide enough to span both thermophilic and mesophilic temperatures. Genomic, proteomic, and physiological differences noted between other bacterial thermophiles and mesophiles are evident within the Thermotogae. We argue that the Thermotogae is an ideal group of organisms for understanding of the response to fluctuating temperature and of long-term evolutionary adaptation to a different growth temperature range. PMID:26211682

  1. First genomic insights into members of a candidate bacterial phylum responsible for wastewater bulking

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Akiko; Parks, Donovan H.; Yamauchi, Toshihiro; Tyson, Gene W.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous cells belonging to the candidate bacterial phylum KSB3 were previously identified as the causative agent of fatal filament overgrowth (bulking) in a high-rate industrial anaerobic wastewater treatment bioreactor. Here, we obtained near complete genomes from two KSB3 populations in the bioreactor, including the dominant bulking filament, using differential coverage binning of metagenomic data. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with 16S rRNA-targeted probes specific for the two populations confirmed that both are filamentous organisms. Genome-based metabolic reconstruction and microscopic observation of the KSB3 filaments in the presence of sugar gradients indicate that both filament types are Gram-negative, strictly anaerobic fermenters capable of non-flagellar based gliding motility, and have a strikingly large number of sensory and response regulator genes. We propose that the KSB3 filaments are highly sensitive to their surroundings and that cellular processes, including those causing bulking, are controlled by external stimuli. The obtained genomes lay the foundation for a more detailed understanding of environmental cues used by KSB3 filaments, which may lead to more robust treatment options to prevent bulking. PMID:25650158

  2. Forest-to-pasture conversion increases the diversity of the phylum Verrucomicrobia in Amazon rainforest soils.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Kshitij; Paula, Fabiana S; Mueller, Rebecca C; Jesus, Ederson da C; Cenciani, Karina; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Nüsslein, Klaus; Rodrigues, Jorge L M

    2015-01-01

    The Amazon rainforest is well known for its rich plant and animal diversity, but its bacterial diversity is virtually unexplored. Due to ongoing and widespread deforestation followed by conversion to agriculture, there is an urgent need to quantify the soil biological diversity within this tropical ecosystem. Given the abundance of the phylum Verrucomicrobia in soils, we targeted this group to examine its response to forest-to-pasture conversion. Both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversities were higher for pasture in comparison to primary and secondary forests. The community composition of Verrucomicrobia in pasture soils was significantly different from those of forests, with a 11.6% increase in the number of sequences belonging to subphylum 3 and a proportional decrease in sequences belonging to the class Spartobacteria. Based on 99% operational taxonomic unit identity, 40% of the sequences have not been detected in previous studies, underscoring the limited knowledge regarding the diversity of microorganisms in tropical ecosystems. The abundance of Verrucomicrobia, measured with quantitative PCR, was strongly correlated with soil C content (r = 0.80, P = 0.0016), indicating their importance in metabolizing plant-derived carbon compounds in soils. PMID:26284056

  3. Global Patterns of Abundance, Diversity and Community Structure of the Aminicenantes (Candidate Phylum OP8)

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Ibrahim F.; Davis, James P.; Youssef, Noha H.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the global patterns of abundance, diversity, and community structure of members of the Aminicenantes (candidate phylum OP8). Our aim was to identify the putative ecological role(s) played by members of this poorly characterized bacterial lineages in various ecosystems. Analysis of near full-length 16S rRNA genes identified four classes and eight orders within the Aminicenantes. Within 3,134 datasets comprising ?1.8 billion high throughput-generated partial 16S rRNA genes, 47,351 Aminicenantes-affiliated sequences were identified in 913 datasets. The Aminicenantes exhibited the highest relative abundance in hydrocarbon-impacted environments, followed by marine habitats (especially hydrothermal vents and coral-associated microbiome samples), and aquatic, non-marine habitats (especially in terrestrial springs and groundwater samples). While the overall abundance of the Aminicenantes was higher in low oxygen tension as well as non-saline and low salinity habitats, it was encountered in a wide range of oxygen tension, salinities, and temperatures. Analysis of the community structure of the Aminicenantes showed distinct patterns across various datasets that appear to be, mostly, driven by habitat variations rather than prevalent environmental parameters. We argue that the detection of the Aminicenantes across environmental extremes and the observed distinct community structure patterns reflect a high level of intraphylum metabolic diversity and adaptive capabilities that enable its survival and growth in a wide range of habitats and environmental conditions. PMID:24637619

  4. Global Habitat Suitability and Ecological Niche Separation in the Phylum Placozoa

    PubMed Central

    Paknia, Omid; Schierwater, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The enigmatic placozoans, which hold a key position in the metazoan Tree of Life, have attracted substantial attention in many areas of biological and biomedical research. While placozoans have become an emerging model system, their ecology and particularly biogeography remain widely unknown. In this study, we use modelling approaches to explore habitat preferences, and distribution pattern of the placozoans phylum. We provide hypotheses for discrete ecological niche separation between genetic placozoan lineages, which may also help to understand biogeography patterns in other small marine invertebrates. We, here, used maximum entropy modelling to predict placozoan distribution using 20 environmental grids of 9.2 km2 resolution. In addition, we used recently developed metrics of niche overlap to compare habitat suitability models of three genetic clades. The predicted distributions range from 55°N to 44°S and are restricted to regions of intermediate to warm sea surface temperatures. High concentrations of salinity and low nutrient concentrations appear as secondary factors. Tests of niche equivalency reveal the largest differences between placozoan clades I and III. Interestingly, the genetically well-separated clades I and V appear to be ecologically very similar. Our habitat suitability models predict a wider latitudinal distribution for placozoans, than currently described, especially in the northern hemisphere. With respect to biogeography modelling, placozoans show patterns somewhere between higher metazoan taxa and marine microorganisms, with the first group usually showing complex biogeographies and the second usually showing “no biogeography.” PMID:26580806

  5. Genomic Analysis of “Elusimicrobium minutum,” the First Cultivated Representative of the Phylum “Elusimicrobia” (Formerly Termite Group 1)? †

    PubMed Central

    Herlemann, D. P. R.; Geissinger, O.; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, W.; Kunin, V.; Sun, H.; Lapidus, A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Brune, A.

    2009-01-01

    Organisms of the candidate phylum termite group 1 (TG1) are regularly encountered in termite hindguts but are present also in many other habitats. Here, we report the complete genome sequence (1.64 Mbp) of “Elusimicrobium minutum” strain Pei191T, the first cultured representative of the TG1 phylum. We reconstructed the metabolism of this strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from a beetle larva gut, and we discuss the findings in light of physiological data. E. minutum has all genes required for uptake and fermentation of sugars via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, including several hydrogenases, and an unusual peptide degradation pathway comprising transamination reactions and leading to the formation of alanine, which is excreted in substantial amounts. The presence of genes encoding lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the presence of a pathway for peptidoglycan formation are consistent with ultrastructural evidence of a gram-negative cell envelope. Even though electron micrographs showed no cell appendages, the genome encodes many genes putatively involved in pilus assembly. We assigned some to a type II secretion system, but the function of 60 pilE-like genes remains unknown. Numerous genes with hypothetical functions, e.g., polyketide synthesis, nonribosomal peptide synthesis, antibiotic transport, and oxygen stress protection, indicate the presence of hitherto undiscovered physiological traits. Comparative analysis of 22 concatenated single-copy marker genes corroborated the status of “Elusimicrobia” (formerly TG1) as a separate phylum in the bacterial domain, which was so far based only on 16S rRNA sequence analysis. PMID:19270133

  6. Genome analysis of Elusimicrobium minutum, the first cultivated representative of the Elusimicrobia phylum (formerly Termite Group 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Herlemann, D. P. R.; Geissinger, O.; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, W.; Kunin, V.; Sun, H.; Lapidus, A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Brune, A.

    2009-02-01

    The candidate phylum Termite group 1 (TG1), is regularly 1 encountered in termite hindguts but is present also in many other habitats. Here we report the complete genome sequence (1.64 Mbp) of Elusimicrobium minutum strain Pei191{sup T}, the first cultured representative of the TG1 phylum. We reconstructed the metabolism of this strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from a beetle larva gut and discuss the findings in light of physiological data. E. minutum has all genes required for uptake and fermentation of sugars via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, including several hydrogenases, and an unusual peptide degradation pathway comprising transamination reactions and leading to the formation of alanine, which is excreted in substantial amounts. The presence of genes encoding lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the presence of a pathway for peptidoglycan formation are consistent with ultrastructural evidence of a Gram-negative cell envelope. Even though electron micrographs showed no cell appendages, the genome encodes many genes putatively involved in pilus assembly. We assigned some to a type II secretion system, but the function of 60 pilE-like genes remains unknown. Numerous genes with hypothetical functions, e.g., polyketide synthesis, non-ribosomal peptide synthesis, antibiotic transport, and oxygen stress protection, indicate the presence of hitherto undiscovered physiological traits. Comparative analysis of 22 concatenated single-copy marker genes corroborated the status of Elusimicrobia (formerly TG1) as a separate phylum in the bacterial domain, which was so far based only on 16S rRNA sequence analysis.

  7. Potent and selective hydroxynaphthoquinone inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport in Eimeria tenella (Apicomplexa: Coccidia).

    PubMed

    Fry, M; Hudson, A T; Randall, A W; Williams, R B

    1984-07-01

    Novel hydroxynaphthoquinones have been shown to be potent and selective inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport in the protozoan Eimeria tenella, inhibiting at concentrations of 10(-10) to 10(-11)M. The primary site of electron transport inhibition has been localized to the ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase span of the respiratory chain, whereas a secondary site of inhibition occurs in the NADH- and succinate-ubiquinone reductase complexes. Inhibition at the primary site is selective for the E. tenella enzyme; inhibition at the secondary sites is comparable in both E. tenella and chick (Gallus gallus) liver mitochondria. Hydroxynaphthoquinone inhibition of chick liver succinate-cyto-chrome c reductase was fully reversible by addition of the exogenous ubiquinone-2 analogue, 6-decyl-2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone; inhibition of the corresponding E. tenella enzyme was not reversed by this ubiquinone. E. tenella lines made resistant to the anticoccidial agents decoquinate or clopidol showed no cross-resistance to the hydroxynaphthoquinones, either at the level of electron transport or in vivo. PMID:6331460

  8. Visible-light-responsive ZnCuO nanoparticles: benign photodynamic killers of infectious protozoans.

    PubMed

    Nadhman, Akhtar; Nazir, Samina; Khan, Malik Ihsanullah; Ayub, Attiya; Muhammad, Bakhtiar; Khan, Momin; Shams, Dilawar Farhan; Yasinzai, Masoom

    2015-01-01

    Human beings suffer from several infectious agents such as viruses, bacteria, and protozoans. Recently, there has been a great interest in developing biocompatible nanostructures to deal with infectious agents. This study investigated benign ZnCuO nanostructures that were visible-light-responsive due to the resident copper in the lattice. The nanostructures were synthesized through a size-controlled hot-injection process, which was adaptable to the surface ligation processes. The nanostructures were then characterized through transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, diffused reflectance spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and photoluminescence analysis to measure crystallite nature, size, luminescence, composition, and band-gap analyses. Antiprotozoal efficiency of the current nanoparticles revealed the photodynamic killing of Leishmania protozoan, thus acting as efficient metal-based photosensitizers. The crystalline nanoparticles showed good biocompatibility when tested for macrophage toxicity and in hemolysis assays. The study opens a wide avenue for using toxic material in resident nontoxic forms as an effective antiprotozoal treatment. PMID:26604755

  9. Cellulase and other polymer-hydrolyzing activities of Trichomitopsis termopsidis, a symbiotic protozoan from termites

    SciTech Connect

    Odelson, D.A.; Breznak, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Crude extracts of the anaerobic, cellulolytic protozoan Trichomitopsis termopsidis possessed endo-..beta..-1,4-glucanase and cellobiase activities, as evidenced by hydrolytic action on carboxymethyl cellulose and cellobiose, respectively. Cell extracts also hydrolyzed microcrystalline cellulose. Hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose displayed optima at pH 5 and at 30 degrees C, and glucose was the sole product liberated. Cellulolytic activities of T. termopsidis appeared to be entirely cell associated. Hydrolytic activity was also detected against Douglas fir wood powder, xylan, starch, and protein, but not chitin. The importance of these enyzmes in the nutrition of T. termopsidis is discussed in terms of the natural habitat of this protozoan (the hindgut of wood-eating termites). 31 references.

  10. [Protozoan pathogens of genus Cryptosporidiumand Giardia. Part I. Occurrence in water environment and health risk].

    PubMed

    Matuszewska, Renata

    2007-01-01

    Contamination of water, first of all drinking water, by protozoan pathogens from genus Cryptosporidium and/or Giardia can pose significant threat for public health. These pathogens live in the intestine of humans or animals (infected or carriers). There are found in soil, food, water or on surfaces that have been contaminated with infected human or animal feces. Numerous waterborne Cryptosporidium and Giardia outbreaks have been reported worldwide in the last few years. These outbreaks resulted from consumption of water contaminated by protozoan pathogens. Their potential prevalence in faecal polluted water supplies, resistance to conventional water treatment and low effective disinfection, as well as imperfection techniques of detection of oocysts and cysts presence necessitates the need for consistent and effective removal of these parasites from drinking water supply. PMID:18246663

  11. Effect of Nutrient/Carbon Supplements on Biological Phosphate and Nitrate Uptake by Protozoan Isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpor, O. B.; Momba, M. N. B.; Okonkwo, J.

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of nine different nutrient/carbon supplements in mixed liquor on nutrient uptake ability of three wastewater protozoan isolates, which have previously been screened for phosphate and nitrate uptake efficiency. The results revealed that over 50% of phosphate was removed in the presence of sodium acetate, glucose or sucrose. Similarly, nitrate uptake of over 60% was observed in the presence of sodium acetate, sodium succinate, glucose or sucrose. These trends were common in all the isolates. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal in the mixed liquor was only found to be significantly removed in mixed liquors that were supplemented with glucose, sucrose or sodium succinate. In the presence of sodium acetate, COD was observed to increase. The findings of this investigation have revealed that nutrient uptake and COD removal by the test protozoan isolates may be dependent primarily on the initial nutrient supplement in mixed liquor.

  12. Visible-light-responsive ZnCuO nanoparticles: benign photodynamic killers of infectious protozoans

    PubMed Central

    Nadhman, Akhtar; Nazir, Samina; Khan, Malik Ihsanullah; Ayub, Attiya; Muhammad, Bakhtiar; Khan, Momin; Shams, Dilawar Farhan; Yasinzai, Masoom

    2015-01-01

    Human beings suffer from several infectious agents such as viruses, bacteria, and protozoans. Recently, there has been a great interest in developing biocompatible nanostructures to deal with infectious agents. This study investigated benign ZnCuO nanostructures that were visible-light-responsive due to the resident copper in the lattice. The nanostructures were synthesized through a size-controlled hot-injection process, which was adaptable to the surface ligation processes. The nanostructures were then characterized through transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, diffused reflectance spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and photoluminescence analysis to measure crystallite nature, size, luminescence, composition, and band-gap analyses. Antiprotozoal efficiency of the current nanoparticles revealed the photodynamic killing of Leishmania protozoan, thus acting as efficient metal-based photosensitizers. The crystalline nanoparticles showed good biocompatibility when tested for macrophage toxicity and in hemolysis assays. The study opens a wide avenue for using toxic material in resident nontoxic forms as an effective antiprotozoal treatment. PMID:26604755

  13. In Silico Analysis of the Metabolic Potential and Niche Specialization of Candidate Phylum "Latescibacteria" (WS3)

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Noha H.; Farag, Ibrahim F.; Rinke, Christian; Hallam, Steven J.; Woyke, Tanja; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2015-01-01

    The “Latescibacteria” (formerly WS3), member of the Fibrobacteres–Chlorobi–Bacteroidetes (FCB) superphylum, represents a ubiquitous candidate phylum found in terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Recently, single-cell amplified genomes (SAGs) representing the “Latescibacteria” were obtained from the anoxic monimolimnion layers of Sakinaw Lake (British Columbia, Canada), and anoxic sediments of a coastal lagoon (Etoliko lagoon, Western Greece). Here, we present a detailed in-silico analysis of the four SAGs to gain some insights on their metabolic potential and apparent ecological roles. Metabolic reconstruction suggests an anaerobic fermentative mode of metabolism, as well as the capability to degrade multiple polysaccharides and glycoproteins that represent integral components of green (Charophyta and Chlorophyta) and brown (Phaeophycaea) algae cell walls (pectin, alginate, ulvan, fucan, hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins), storage molecules (starch and trehalose), and extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). The analyzed SAGs also encode dedicated transporters for the uptake of produced sugars and amino acids/oligopeptides, as well as an extensive machinery for the catabolism of all transported sugars, including the production of a bacterial microcompartment (BMC) to sequester propionaldehyde, a toxic intermediate produced during fucose and rhamnose metabolism. Finally, genes for the formation of gas vesicles, flagella, type IV pili, and oxidative stress response were found, features that could aid in cellular association with algal detritus. Collectively, these results indicate that the analyzed “Latescibacteria” mediate the turnover of multiple complex organic polymers of algal origin that reach deeper anoxic/microoxic habitats in lakes and lagoons. The implications of such process on our understanding of niche specialization in microbial communities mediating organic carbon turnover in stratified water bodies are discussed. PMID:26039074

  14. In Silico Analysis of the Metabolic Potential and Niche Specialization of Candidate Phylum "Latescibacteria" (WS3).

    PubMed

    Youssef, Noha H; Farag, Ibrahim F; Rinke, Christian; Hallam, Steven J; Woyke, Tanja; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2015-01-01

    The "Latescibacteria" (formerly WS3), member of the Fibrobacteres-Chlorobi-Bacteroidetes (FCB) superphylum, represents a ubiquitous candidate phylum found in terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Recently, single-cell amplified genomes (SAGs) representing the "Latescibacteria" were obtained from the anoxic monimolimnion layers of Sakinaw Lake (British Columbia, Canada), and anoxic sediments of a coastal lagoon (Etoliko lagoon, Western Greece). Here, we present a detailed in-silico analysis of the four SAGs to gain some insights on their metabolic potential and apparent ecological roles. Metabolic reconstruction suggests an anaerobic fermentative mode of metabolism, as well as the capability to degrade multiple polysaccharides and glycoproteins that represent integral components of green (Charophyta and Chlorophyta) and brown (Phaeophycaea) algae cell walls (pectin, alginate, ulvan, fucan, hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins), storage molecules (starch and trehalose), and extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). The analyzed SAGs also encode dedicated transporters for the uptake of produced sugars and amino acids/oligopeptides, as well as an extensive machinery for the catabolism of all transported sugars, including the production of a bacterial microcompartment (BMC) to sequester propionaldehyde, a toxic intermediate produced during fucose and rhamnose metabolism. Finally, genes for the formation of gas vesicles, flagella, type IV pili, and oxidative stress response were found, features that could aid in cellular association with algal detritus. Collectively, these results indicate that the analyzed "Latescibacteria" mediate the turnover of multiple complex organic polymers of algal origin that reach deeper anoxic/microoxic habitats in lakes and lagoons. The implications of such process on our understanding of niche specialization in microbial communities mediating organic carbon turnover in stratified water bodies are discussed. PMID:26039074

  15. Nitrification expanded: discovery, physiology and genomics of a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium from the phylum Chloroflexi

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Lücker, Sebastian; Vejmelkova, Dana; Kostrikina, Nadezhda A; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Le Paslier, Denis; Muyzer, Gerard; Wagner, Michael; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Daims, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) catalyze the second step of nitrification, a major process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, but the recognized diversity of this guild is surprisingly low and only two bacterial phyla contain known NOB. Here, we report on the discovery of a chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidizer that belongs to the widespread phylum Chloroflexi not previously known to contain any nitrifying organism. This organism, named Nitrolancetus hollandicus, was isolated from a nitrifying reactor. Its tolerance to a broad temperature range (25–63?°C) and low affinity for nitrite (Ks=1?m?), a complex layered cell envelope that stains Gram positive, and uncommon membrane lipids composed of 1,2-diols distinguish N. hollandicus from all other known nitrite oxidizers. N. hollandicus grows on nitrite and CO2, and is able to use formate as a source of energy and carbon. Genome sequencing and analysis of N. hollandicus revealed the presence of all genes required for CO2 fixation by the Calvin cycle and a nitrite oxidoreductase (NXR) similar to the NXR forms of the proteobacterial nitrite oxidizers, Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus. Comparative genomic analysis of the nxr loci unexpectedly indicated functionally important lateral gene transfer events between Nitrolancetus and other NOB carrying a cytoplasmic NXR, suggesting that horizontal transfer of the NXR module was a major driver for the spread of the capability to gain energy from nitrite oxidation during bacterial evolution. The surprising discovery of N. hollandicus significantly extends the known diversity of nitrifying organisms and likely will have implications for future research on nitrification in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:22763649

  16. Phylogenetic placement of the enigmatic parasite, Polypodium hydriforme, within the Phylum Cnidaria

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Polypodium hydriforme is a parasite with an unusual life cycle and peculiar morphology, both of which have made its systematic position uncertain. Polypodium has traditionally been considered a cnidarian because it possesses nematocysts, the stinging structures characteristic of this phylum. However, recent molecular phylogenetic studies using 18S rDNA sequence data have challenged this interpretation, and have shown that Polypodium is a close relative to myxozoans and together they share a closer affinity to bilaterians than cnidarians. Due to the variable rates of 18S rDNA sequences, these results have been suggested to be an artifact of long-branch attraction (LBA). A recent study, using multiple protein coding markers, shows that the myxozoan Buddenbrockia, is nested within cnidarians. Polypodium was not included in this study. To further investigate the phylogenetic placement of Polypodium, we have performed phylogenetic analyses of metazoans with 18S and partial 28S rDNA sequences in a large dataset that includes Polypodium and a comprehensive sampling of cnidarian taxa. Results Analyses of a combined dataset of 18S and partial 28S sequences, and partial 28S alone, support the placement of Polypodium within Cnidaria. Removal of the long-branched myxozoans from the 18S dataset also results in Polypodium being nested within Cnidaria. These results suggest that previous reports showing that Polypodium and Myxozoa form a sister group to Bilateria were an artifact of long-branch attraction. Conclusion By including 28S rDNA sequences and a comprehensive sampling of cnidarian taxa, we demonstrate that previously conflicting hypotheses concerning the phylogenetic placement of Polypodium can be reconciled. Specifically, the data presented provide evidence that Polypodium is indeed a cnidarian and is either the sister taxon to Hydrozoa, or part of the hydrozoan clade, Leptothecata. The former hypothesis is consistent with the traditional view that Polypodium should be placed in its own cnidarian class, Polypodiozoa. PMID:18471296

  17. Correlation between the autotrophic index and protozoan colonization rates as indicators of pollution stress

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, J.; Buikema, A.L.; Yongue, W.H.

    1981-10-01

    The advantages of using microbial communities or multispecies in pollution assessment are discussed. Laboratory and field research assessing the effects of pollution on microbial community structure and function (that is, a ratio of autotrophy to total biomass, protozoan colonization rates, and species richness) indicates that the results are sensitive measures of pollution. The results of one test confirm the results of other tests. All the tests are quick, inexpensive, and reproducible.

  18. Effect of protozoan predation on relative abundance of fast- and slow-growing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, J.L.; Alexander, M.

    1989-01-01

    Survival of six bacterial species with different growth rates was tested in raw sewage and sewage rendered free of protozoa. When the six species were inoculated at the same densities into sewage containing protozoa, the three slow-growing species were rapidly eliminated, and two of the three fast-growing species survived in detectable numbers. It is suggested that in environments with intense protozoan predation, protozoa may alter composition of bacterial communities by eliminating slow-growing bacteria.

  19. Arsenic oxidation and bioaccumulation by the acidophilic protozoan, Euglena mutabilis, in acid mine drainage (Carnoulès, France).

    PubMed

    Casiot, Corinne; Bruneel, Odile; Personné, Jean-Christian; Leblanc, Marc; Elbaz-Poulichet, Françoise

    2004-03-29

    In the acid stream (pH 2.5-4.7) originating from the Carnoulès mine tailings, the acidophilic protozoan Euglena mutabilis grows with extremely high sulfate (1.9-4.9 g/l), iron (0.7-1.7 g/l) and arsenic concentrations (0.08-0.26 g/l). Strong variations in flow rate and high sulfate concentrations (up to 4.9 g/l) have been registered in early winter and might be the reason for the reduction in cell number of the protozoan from October to December 2001. No relation was established between arsenic concentration and/or speciation and abundance of the protozoan in the stream. Arsenite, which is the most toxic form, predominates in water. The oxidation of arsenite to arsenate occurred within a few days in laboratory experiments when E. mutabilis was present in Reigous Creek water and synthetic As(III)-rich culture medium. Methylated compounds (MMA, DMA) were not identified in the culture media. The protozoan bioaccumulated As in the cell (336 +/- 112 microg As/g dry wt.) as inorganic arsenite (105 +/- 52 microg As/g dry wt.) and arsenate (231 +/- 112 microg As/g dry wt.). Adsorption of As at the cell surface reached 57 mg/g dry wt. in the As(V) form for E. mutabilis grown in 250 mg/l As(III) synthetic medium. Both intracellular accumulation and adsorption at the cell surface increased for increasing As(III) concentration in the medium but the concentration factor in the cell relative to soluble As decreased. PMID:15016511

  20. Fatty Acids of Chthonomonas calidirosea, of a novel class Chthonomonadetes from a recently described phylum Armatimonadetes.

    PubMed

    Vyssotski, M; Lee, K C-Y; Lagutin, K; Ryan, J; Morgan, X C; Stott, M B

    2011-12-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, pink-pigmented, rod-shaped bacterium Chthonomonas calidirosea (strain T49(T)) with an optimal temperature for growth of 68 °C, isolated from soil samples from Hell's Gate in the Tikitere geothermal system (New Zealand), was the first cultivated bacterium of the novel phylum Armatimonadetes (formerly candidate division OP10). The lipid composition of C. calidirosea presents a number of unusual features both in the fatty acids and polar lipids. This contribution reports on the fatty acid profile of C. calidirosea. Transmethylation of bacterial biomass yielded fatty acid methyl esters and hydrocarbons, including squalene, partially hydrogenated squalenes, and diploptene. The only type of unsaturation found in C. calidirosea fatty acids was cis-?5, as revealed by GCMS of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) adducts, and the lack of trans-unsaturation absorbance at 960-980 cm(-1) in the IR spectrum of fatty acids methyl esters. An unidentified component X with ECL 16.86 (BP1) and ECL 17.27 (BP20) was also observed, with molecular ion at m/z 282 ("17:1"). X did not form DMDS adducts, nor was affected by mild hydrogenation conditions, indicating the likely presence of a ring rather than unsaturation. The presence of a cyclopropane ring with cis-stereochemistry was confirmed by the (1)H-NMR spectrum. Hydrogenation of X in acetic acid resulted in formation of straight chain 17:0, 5-methyl- and 6-methyl-16:0 fatty acid methyl esters, thus confirming the structure of a novel 5,6-methylene hexadecanoic acid. The major fatty acids of a solid media-grown C. calidirosea were as follows (in weight % of total fatty acids): 16:0 (25.8), i17:0 (19.3), ai17:0 (13.5), 16:1?5 (8.8), i17:1?5 (6.8), 5,6-methylene 16:0 (5.2), i16:0 (4.4), 18:0 (3.6), 18:1?5 (3.2). PMID:21805326

  1. Characterisation of Isospora lusitanensis n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula Linnaeus (Passeriformes: Turdidae) in mainland Portugal.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Sergian Vianna; Berto, Bruno Pereira; da Fonseca, Isabel Pereira; Tomás, André; Thode, Fátima Regina P B; Lopes, Carlos Wilson G

    2015-10-01

    A new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) is described from a specimen of the Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula Linnaeus held for rehabilitation and reintroduction into the wild in a centre for research and recovery of wild animals in Quinta de Marim, Olhão, Portugal. Isospora lusitanensis n. sp. has subspherical to ovoidal oöcysts, measuring on average 26.4 × 23.4 ?m, with smooth, bi-layered wall c.1.1 ?m thick. Micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, measuring on average 16.0 × 10.9 µm. Stieda body is knob-like and sub-Stieda body is prominent and rounded. Sporocyst residuum is composed of scattered spherules. Sporozoites are vermiform, with one refractile body and a nucleus. The morphological and morphometric data for the new species were compared with those for species parasitising birds of the Muscicapidae, Turdidae, Timaliidae, Troglodytidae and Cinclidae, which are considered phylogenetically close. The original histograms of Isospora turdi Schwalbach, 1959 were redrawn for comparison with I. lusitanensis n. sp. and a linear regression of width against length of the oöcysts is presented for characterisation. This is the first isosporoid coccidian described from T. merula in mainland Portugal. PMID:26358076

  2. Evidence of Intraflagellar Transport and Apical Complex Formation in a Free-Living Relative of the Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Portman, Neil; Foster, Christie; Walker, Giselle

    2014-01-01

    Since its first description, Chromera velia has attracted keen interest as the closest free-living relative of parasitic Apicomplexa. The life cycle of this unicellular alga is complex and involves a motile biflagellate form. Flagella are thought to be formed in the cytoplasm, a rare phenomenon shared with Plasmodium in which the canonical mode of flagellar assembly, intraflagellar transport, is dispensed with. Here we demonstrate the expression of intraflagellar transport components in C. velia, answering the question of whether this organism has the potential to assemble flagella via the canonical route. We have developed and characterized a culturing protocol that favors the generation of flagellate forms. From this, we have determined a marked shift in the mode of daughter cell production from two to four daughter cells per division as a function of time after passage. We conduct an ultrastructural examination of the C. velia flagellate form by using serial TEM and show that flagellar biogenesis in C. velia occurs prior to cytokinesis. We demonstrate a close association of the flagellar apparatus with a complex system of apical structures, including a micropore, a conoid, and a complex endomembrane system reminiscent of the apical complex of parasitic apicomplexans. Recent work has begun to elucidate the possible flagellar origins of the apical complex, and we show that in C. velia these structures are contemporaneous within a single cell and share multiple connections. We propose that C. velia therefore represents a vital piece in the puzzle of the origins of the apical complex. PMID:24058169

  3. The response of Gregarina niphandrodes (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Septatina) to host starvation in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) adults.

    PubMed

    Schawang, J E; Janovy, J

    2001-06-01

    Numerous studies of host starvation have emphasized pathological effects of parasites on their insect host, but little attention has been focused on the effects of host starvation on the parasites. This study addressed the possibility that parasite life-cycle events could be manipulated by withholding food from the host. The system used was Gregarina niphandrodes (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida) in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) adults. Gregarine gametocyst formation and shedding ceased after 1 day in starved beetles but continued in fed controls. There were no statistically significant differences between total lengths of associated (3 of 5 trials) or unassociated (5 of 5 trials) gregarines found between experimental and control groups, but average numbers of the 2 life cycle events were generally higher in fed hosts than in starved ones. If infected, fed control beetles continued to form gametocysts throughout the 7-day trial periods, and gametocysts could be observed in the gut. Starved experimental beetles had no gametocysts in their guts. Refeeding of starved beetles after 4 days resulted in resumption of gametocyst formation and shedding. The studies demonstrated that the gregarine life cycle could be stopped and then started at the gametocyst formation stage like an off/on switch, simply by withholding food from, then refeeding, the host. PMID:11426724

  4. Measurement of the effects of cadmium stress on protozoan grazing of bacteria (bacterivory) in activated sludge by fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R.L.; Atlas, R.M.

    1987-10-01

    The effect of cadmium stress on protozoan bacterivory in sewage sludge was measured by experimentally exposing sludge communities to 0 to 150 mg of Cd per liter for up to 6 h and then determining the rates of protozoan grazing on bacteria, using a double-staining technique and epifluorescence microscopy. Bacterivory was measured by incubating the sludge with fluorescently labeled bacterium-sized latex beads and directly observing ingestion of the beads and bacterial cells in the sludge by epifluorescence microscopy of preserved samples. Staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and acridine orange permitted the simultaneous determination of protozoan numbers and bacterivory activity as estimated by the number of bacterial cells and bacterium-sized latex beads ingested by the representative ciliate Aspidisca costata. Enumeration with latex beads proved to be an effective way of estimating bacterivory in sludges subjected to heavy-metal stress. This technique should prove useful for determining the effects of other chemical stresses on protozoan numbers and bacterivory in organic-rich environments. Although the number of protozoa declined significantly only after exposure to 100 mg of Cd per liter for 4 h, grazing, as indicated by bead ingestion, was significantly inhibited by Cd concentrations of > 25 mg/liter in < 1 h, and exposure to 100 mg of Cd per liter effectively stopped protozoan grazing within 1 h of exposure. Protozoan ingestion of latex beads and bacteria was inversely correlated to Cd concentration and exposure time. The reduction of protozoan bacterivory by Cd provides a possible explanation for the increase in suspended bacteria in the effluents of metal-stressed treatment facilities.

  5. Bioinformatic analysis of beta carbonic anhydrase sequences from protozoans and metazoans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the high prevalence of parasitic infections, and their impact on global health and economy, the number of drugs available to treat them is extremely limited. As a result, the potential consequences of large-scale resistance to any existing drugs are a major concern. A number of recent investigations have focused on the effects of potential chemical inhibitors on bacterial and fungal carbonic anhydrases. Among the five classes of carbonic anhydrases (alpha, beta, gamma, delta and zeta), beta carbonic anhydrases have been reported in most species of bacteria, yeasts, algae, plants, and particular invertebrates (nematodes and insects). To date, there has been a lack of knowledge on the expression and molecular structure of beta carbonic anhydrases in metazoan (nematodes and arthropods) and protozoan species. Methods Here, the identification of novel beta carbonic anhydrases was based on the presence of the highly-conserved amino acid sequence patterns of the active site. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on codon-aligned DNA sequences. Subcellular localization prediction for each identified invertebrate beta carbonic anhydrase was performed using the TargetP webserver. Results We verified a total of 75 beta carbonic anhydrase sequences in metazoan and protozoan species by proteome-wide searches and multiple sequence alignment. Of these, 52 were novel, and contained highly conserved amino acid residues, which are inferred to form the active site in beta carbonic anhydrases. Mitochondrial targeting peptide analysis revealed that 31 enzymes are predicted with mitochondrial localization; one was predicted to be a secretory enzyme, and the other 43 were predicted to have other undefined cellular localizations. Conclusions These investigations identified 75 beta carbonic anhydrases in metazoan and protozoan species, and among them there were 52 novel sequences that were not previously annotated as beta carbonic anhydrases. Our results will not only change the current information in proteomics and genomics databases, but will also suggest novel targets for drugs against parasites. PMID:24447594

  6. Protozoan colonization on artificial substrates in relation to water quality in a tropical Indian harbour.

    PubMed

    Bharati, V R; Khan, R N; Kalavati, C; Raman, A V

    2001-04-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the protozoan colonization patterns on artificial substrates in relation to organic pollution within a tropical harbour. The composition of protozoans and their succession rates on artificial substrates(polyurethane foam units) were compared between two field stations(A and B), and their presence were considered with regards to the prevailing water quality conditions at the study sites. Altogether 44 genera of flagellates and ciliates were documented. The common genera of flagellates encountered included Monas, Polytoma, and Chromalina. Among the ciliates, the predominant genera were Tetrahymena, Vorticella, Lagymophyra, and Heloiphyra. These groups exhibited characteristic successional patterns in relation to ambient water quality. At Station A, located close to the sewage outfall, the water quality parameters included poor Secchi-disc transparency(0.48 m), dissolved oxygen of 1.93 mg/ml, salinity of 18 psu, and temperature 31.3 degrees C. Here, the nanoflagellates (spumella) colonized first, followed by microcilliate(Tetrahymena) and sessile form(Vorticella). Station B, located on the seaward side, was characterized by relatively less-stressed environmental conditions with transparency 1.85 m and dissolved oxygen value of 6.04 mg/ml. Salinity of 27.27 psu, and mean temperature of 30 degrees C were recorded at "B". At this station, the nanoflagellate Polytoma was first documented to colonize on the substrates, followed by microcilliate(Lagynophrya) and suctorid(Heliophyra). These findings support the use of protozoans as indicator species for evaluating the hazards posed by organic pollution to natural estuarine communities. PMID:11590731

  7. Developing vaccines to control protozoan parasites in ruminants: dead or alive?

    PubMed

    Innes, Elisabeth A; Bartley, Paul M; Rocchi, Mara; Benavidas-Silvan, Julio; Burrells, Alison; Hotchkiss, Emily; Chianini, Francesca; Canton, German; Katzer, Frank

    2011-08-01

    Protozoan parasites are among some of the most successful organisms worldwide, being able to live and multiply within a very wide range of hosts. The diseases caused by these parasites cause significant production losses in the livestock sector involving reproductive failure, impaired weight gain, contaminated meat, reduced milk yields and in severe cases, loss of the animal. In addition, some protozoan parasites affecting livestock such as Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum may also be transmitted to humans where they can cause serious disease. Data derived from experimental models of infection in ruminant species enables the study of the interactions between parasite and host. How the parasite initiates infection, becomes established and multiplies within the host and the critical pathways that may lead to a disease outcome are all important to enable the rational design of appropriate intervention strategies. Once the parasites invade the hosts they induce both innate and adaptive immune responses and the induction and function of these immune responses are critical in determining the outcome of the infection. Vaccines offer green solutions to control disease as they are sustainable, reducing reliance on pharmacological drugs and pesticides. The use of vaccines has multiple benefits such as improving animal health and welfare by controlling animal infections and infestations; improving public health by controlling zoonoses and food borne pathogens in animals; solving problems associated with resistance to acaricides, antibiotics and anthelmintics; keeping animals and the environment free of chemical residues and maintaining biodiversity. All of these attributes should lead to improved sustainability of animal production and economic benefit. Using different protozoan parasitic diseases as examples this paper will discuss various approaches used to develop vaccines to protect against disease in livestock and discuss the relative merits of using live versus killed vaccine preparations. A range of different vaccination targets and strategies will be discussed to help protect against: acute disease, congenital infection and abortion, persistence of zoonotic pathogens in tissues of food animals and passive transfer of immunity to neonates. PMID:21680094

  8. Conservation of proteobacterial magnetosome genes and structures in an uncultivated member of the deep-branching Nitrospira phylum

    PubMed Central

    Jogler, Christian; Wanner, Gerhard; Kolinko, Sebastian; Niebler, Martina; Amann, Rudolf; Petersen, Nikolai; Kube, Michael; Schüler, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a phylogenetically diverse group which uses intracellular membrane-enclosed magnetite crystals called magnetosomes for navigation in their aquatic habitats. Although synthesis of these prokaryotic organelles is of broad interdisciplinary interest, its genetic analysis has been restricted to a few closely related members of the Proteobacteria, in which essential functions required for magnetosome formation are encoded within a large genomic magnetosome island. However, because of the lack of cultivated representatives from other phyla, it is unknown whether the evolutionary origin of magnetotaxis is monophyletic, and it has been questioned whether homologous mechanisms and structures are present in unrelated MTB. Here, we present the analysis of the uncultivated “Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum” from the deep branching Nitrospira phylum by combining micromanipulation and whole genome amplification (WGA) with metagenomics. Target-specific sequences obtained by WGA of cells, which were magnetically collected and individually sorted from sediment samples, were used for PCR screening of metagenomic libraries. This led to the identification of a genomic cluster containing several putative magnetosome genes with homology to those in Proteobacteria. A variety of advanced electron microscopic imaging tools revealed a complex cell envelope and an intricate magnetosome architecture. The presence of magnetosome membranes as well as cytoskeletal magnetosome filaments suggests a similar mechanism of magnetosome formation in “Cand. M. bavaricum” as in Proteobacteria. Altogether, our findings suggest a monophyletic origin of magnetotaxis, and relevant genes were likely transferred horizontally between Proteobacteria and representatives of the Nitrospira phylum. PMID:21191098

  9. Mannosylglucosylglycerate biosynthesis in the deep-branching phylum Planctomycetes: characterization of the uncommon enzymes from Rhodopirellula baltica

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Sofia; d'Avó, Ana Filipa; Mingote, Ana; Lamosa, Pedro; da Costa, Milton S.; Costa, Joana

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway for the rare compatible solute mannosylglucosylglycerate (MGG) accumulated by Rhodopirellula baltica, a marine member of the phylum Planctomycetes, has been elucidated. Like one of the pathways used in the thermophilic bacterium Petrotoga mobilis, it has genes coding for glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (GpgS) and mannosylglucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (MGPG) synthase (MggA). However, unlike Ptg. mobilis, the mesophilic R. baltica uses a novel and very specific MGPG phosphatase (MggB). It also lacks a key enzyme of the alternative pathway in Ptg. mobilis – the mannosylglucosylglycerate synthase (MggS) that catalyses the condensation of glucosylglycerate with GDP-mannose to produce MGG. The R. baltica enzymes GpgS, MggA, and MggB were expressed in E. coli and characterized in terms of kinetic parameters, substrate specificity, temperature and pH dependence. This is the first characterization of genes and enzymes for the synthesis of compatible solutes in the phylum Planctomycetes and for the synthesis of MGG in a mesophile. PMID:23921581

  10. Coraliomargarita akajimensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel member of the phylum 'Verrucomicrobia' isolated from seawater in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Yasumoto-Hirose, Mina; Katsuta, Atsuko; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Satoru; Kasai, Hiroaki; Yokota, Akira

    2007-05-01

    An obligately aerobic, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile, spherical bacterium, designated strain 04OKA010-24(T), was isolated from seawater surrounding the hard coral Galaxea fascicularis L., collected at Majanohama, Akajima, Japan, and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the new strain represented a member of the phylum 'Verrucomicrobia' and shared 84-95 % sequence similarity with cultivated strains of 'Verrucomicrobia' subdivision 4. Amino acid analysis of the cell-wall hydrolysate indicated the absence of muramic acid and diaminopimelic acid, which suggested that the strain did not contain peptidoglycan in the cell wall. The G+C content of the DNA was 53.9 mol%. MK-7 was the major menaquinone and C(14 : 0), C(18 : 1)omega9c and C(18 : 0) were the major fatty acids. On the basis of these data, it was concluded that strain 04OKA010-24(T) represents a novel species in a new genus in subdivision 4 of the phylum 'Verrucomicrobia', for which the name Coraliomargarita akajimensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Coraliomargarita akajimensis is 04OKA010-24(T) (=MBIC06463(T)=IAM 15411(T)=KCTC 12865(T)). PMID:17473241

  11. The Bacillus subtilis spore coat provides "eat resistance" during phagocytic predation by the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Klobutcher, Lawrence A; Ragkousi, Katerina; Setlow, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus spores are highly resistant to many environmental stresses, owing in part to the presence of multiple "extracellular" layers. Although the role of some of these extracellular layers in resistance to particular stresses is known, the function of one of the outermost layers, the spore coat, is not completely understood. This study sought to determine whether the spore coat plays a role in resistance to predation by the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena, which uses phagocytosis to ingest and degrade other microorganisms. Wild-type dormant spores of Bacillus subtilis were efficiently ingested by the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila but were neither digested nor killed. However, spores with various coat defects were killed and digested, leaving only an outer shell termed a rind, and supporting the growth of Tetrahymena. A similar rind was generated when coat-defective spores were treated with lysozyme alone. The sensitivity of spores with different coat defects to predation by T. thermophila paralleled the spores' sensitivities to lysozyme. Spore killing by T. thermophila was by means of lytic enzymes within the protozoal phagosome, not by initial spore germination followed by killing. These findings suggest that a major function of the coat of spores of Bacillus species is to protect spores against predation. We also found that indigestible rinds were generated even from spores in which cross-linking of coat proteins was greatly reduced, implying the existence of a coat structure that is highly resistant to degradative enzymes. PMID:16371471

  12. Extracellular conversion of silver ions into silver nanoparticles by protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Juganson, Katre; Mortimer, Monika; Ivask, Angela; Kasemets, Kaja; Kahru, Anne

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, cell-free exudates of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila were shown to progressively convert silver nitrate to silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) under illumination at ambient temperature. The formation of Ag NPs in the reaction mixture was evidenced by gradual colour changes, appearance of a specific absorbance peak (420–450 nm) and visualization using scanning electron microscopy coupled to an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. After 2 h of incubation the mean hydrodynamic size of the Ag NPs was 70 nm. Seven days of incubation resulted in larger agglomerates and a significant decrease in silver toxicity to T. thermophila, accompanied by about 100-fold reduction in the silver ion concentration. Protein analysis indicated an extensive extracellular protein binding by the Ag NPs formed in the protozoan exudates. As protozoa are important components in wastewater treatment, their ability to sequester silver ions into a less bioavailable and less toxic form of silver (e.g. NPs) may be one of the adaption mechanisms of ciliate survival in contaminated environments. PMID:24592441

  13. Breast-Feeding Protects Infantile Diarrhea Caused by Intestinal Protozoan Infections

    PubMed Central

    Belal, Usama Salah; Abdellatif, Manal Zaki Mohamed; Naoi, Koji; Norose, Kazumi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of breast-feeding in protection against protozoan infection in infants with persistent diarrhea. Infants were classified into 2 groups; 161 breast-fed infants and the same number of non-breast-fed infants. Microscopic examinations of stool were done for detection of parasites and measuring the intensity of infection. Moreover, serum levels of IgE and TNF-? were measured by ELISA. Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar, Giardia lamblia, and Blastocystis sp. were demonstrated in infants with persistent diarrhea. The percentage of protozoan infections was significantly lower in breast-fed infants than that in the non-breast-fed infants. The levels of IgE and TNF-? were significantly lower in the breast-fed group than in the non-breast-fed group. There were significant positive associations between the serum levels of IgE and TNF-? and the intensity of parasite infection in the breast-fed group. It is suggested that breast-feeding has an attenuating effect on the rate and intensity of parasite infection. PMID:24327776

  14. Isospora streperae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from a grey currawong (Strepera versicolour plumbea) (Passeriformes: Artamidae) in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Habsi, Khalid Al; Elliot, Aileen; Ryan, Una

    2015-01-01

    A new species, Isospora streperae n. sp., (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) is described from a single grey currawong bird (Strepera versicolour) (subspecies S. v. plumbea) in Western Australia. Sporulated oocysts (n?=?32) are spherical to subspherical, with smooth colourless bilayered oocyst wall, 1.0?µm thick (outer layer 0?8?µm, inner 0.2?µm thick). Oocyst with a polar granule, an oocyst residuum and two spheroidal to subspheroidal sporocysts. Oocyst length, 23.8 (20.4-25.0) µm; oocyst width, 22.5 (20.0-24.6) µm; a shape index of 1.06, with Stieda, substieda bodies. Micropyle is absent. Sporocysts with compressed sporocyst residuum and four sporozoites. Sporocyst length, 14.4 (12.5-15.2) µm; sporocyst width, 11.2 (10.6-14.0) µm, sporocyst L/W ratio, 1.29. Necropsy of the bird identified haemorrhaging along the ileum and jejunum, which is where Isospora oocysts were also mostly detected. Molecular analysis was conducted at three loci; the 18S, 28S ribosomal RNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COI) gene. At the 18S locus, I. streperae n. sp. exhibited 99.5% and 99.4% similarity respectively to an Isospora sp. (MS-2003) from a Southern cape sparrow (Passer melanurus melanurus) and Isospora dovati from a domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica). At the 28S locus, I. streperae n. sp. exhibited 96.9% similarity to an Isospora sp. (MS-2003) from a grosbeak starling (Scissirostrum dubium) and 95.8% similarity with the Isospora sp. (MS-2003) from a Southern cape sparrow. At the COI locus, I. streperae n. sp. exhibited 95.0% similarity to Isospora sp. from a yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) from the Czech Republic. Based on morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of Isospora, which is named Isospora streperae n. sp. after its host, the grey currawong (Strepera versicolour plumbea). PMID:25620542

  15. Recurrent wheezing is associated with intestinal protozoan infections in Warao Amerindian children in Venezuela: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While in developed countries the prevalence of allergic diseases is rising, inflammatory diseases are relatively uncommon in rural developing areas. High prevalence rates of helminth and protozoan infections are commonly found in children living in rural settings and several studies suggest an inverse association between helminth infections and allergies. No studies investigating the relationship between parasitic infections and atopic diseases in rural children of developing countries under the age of 2 years have been published so far. We performed a cross-sectional survey to investigate the association of helminth and protozoan infections and malnutrition with recurrent wheezing and atopic eczema in Warao Amerindian children in Venezuela. Methods From August to November 2012, 229 children aged 0 to 2 years residing in the Orinoco Delta in Venezuela were enrolled. Data were collected through standardized questionnaires and physical examination, including inspection of the skin and anthropometric measurements. A stool sample was requested from all participants and detection of different parasites was performed using microscopy and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results We observed high prevalence rates of atopic eczema and recurrent wheezing, respectively 19% and 23%. The prevalence of helminth infections was 26% and the prevalence of protozoan infections was 59%. Atopic eczema and recurrent wheezing were more frequently observed in stunted compared with non-stunted children in multivariable analysis (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.3 – 13.6, p?=?0.015 and OR 4.5, 95% CI 0.97 – 21.2, p?=?0.055). Furthermore, recurrent wheezing was significantly more often observed in children with protozoan infections than in children without protozoan infections (OR 6.7, 95% CI 1.5 – 30.5). Conclusions High prevalence rates of atopic eczema and recurrent wheezing in Warao Amerindian children under 2 years of age were related to stunting and intestinal protozoan infections respectively. Helminth infections were not significantly associated with either atopic eczema or recurrent wheezing. PMID:24885094

  16. Survey for protozoan parasites in Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from the Gulf of Maine using PCR-based assays.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Nicholas D; Record, Nicholas R; Robledo, José A Fernández

    2015-10-01

    Protozoan pathogens represent a serious threat to oyster aquaculture, since they can lead to significant production loses. Moreover, oysters can concentrate human pathogens through filter feeding, thus putting at risk raw oyster consumers' health. Using PCR-based assays in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Maine, we expand the Northeast range in the USA for the protozoans Perkinsus marinus, Perkinsus chesapeaki, and Haplosporidium nelsoni, and report for the first time the detection of the human pathogens Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. Oysters hosting both P. marinus and P. chesapeaki were more than three times as likely to be infected by a non-Perkinsus than those free of Perkinsus infections. PMID:25889457

  17. The Deinococcus-Thermus phylum and the effect of rRNA composition on phylogenetic tree construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisburg, W. G.; Giovannoni, S. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    Through comparative analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA sequences, it can be shown that two seemingly dissimilar types of eubacteria Deinococcus and the ubiquitous hot spring organism Thermus are distantly but specifically related to one another. This confirms an earlier report based upon 16S rRNA oligonucleotide cataloging studies (Hensel et al., 1986). Their two lineages form a distinctive grouping within the eubacteria that deserved the taxonomic status of a phylum. The (partial) sequence of T. aquaticus rRNA appears relatively close to those of other thermophilic eubacteria. e.g. Thermotoga maritima and Thermomicrobium roseum. However, this closeness does not reflect a true evolutionary closeness; rather it is due to a "thermophilic convergence", the result of unusually high G+C composition in the rRNAs of thermophilic bacteria. Unless such compositional biases are taken into account, the branching order and root of phylogenetic trees can be incorrectly inferred.

  18. Evidence of Carbon Fixation Pathway in a Bacterium from Candidate Phylum SBR1093 Revealed with Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiping; Guo, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Autotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30?50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30?80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere. PMID:25310003

  19. Evidence of carbon fixation pathway in a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 revealed with genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiping; Guo, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Autotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30?50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30?80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere. PMID:25310003

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Endomicrobium proavitum, a Free-Living Relative of the Intracellular Symbionts of Termite Gut Flagellates (Phylum Elusimicrobia)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced the complete genome of Endomicrobium proavitum strain Rsa215, the first isolate of the class Endomicrobia (phylum Elusimicrobia). It is the closest free-living relative of the endosymbionts of termite gut flagellates and thereby provides an excellent model for studying the evolutionary processes during the establishment of an intracellular symbiosis. PMID:26184928

  1. Rapid Simultaneous Detection of Anti-protozoan Drugs Using a Lateral-Flow Immunoassay Format.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Jenny; Leonard, Paul; Danaher, Martin; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2015-05-01

    This research describes the development of a multi-analyte lateral-flow immunoassay intended for the simultaneous detection of three anti-protozoan drugs (coccidiostats). These drugs, namely, halofuginone, toltrazuril and diclazuril, are used in the treatment of Eimeria spp. infections in cattle, pigs, chickens and turkeys. Coloured carboxylated microspheres were coated with each of the detection antibodies and employed in a lateral-flow assay format for detection of these residues in eggs. Using this approach, halofuginone was detectable at a limit of 10 ng/mL or greater, toltrazuril at 100 ng/mL and, similarly, diclazuril had a detection limit of 100 ng/mL, which is below the maximum allowed residue limit for all three as outlined by EU regulation. This simple cost-efficient assay and analysis method could pave the way for more efficient simultaneous monitoring of small-molecule residues in the future. PMID:25832180

  2. Proteasome activity is required for the stage-specific transformation of a protozoan parasite

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A prominent feature of the life cycle of intracellular parasites is the profound morphological changes they undergo during development in the vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In eukaryotic cells, most cytoplasmic proteins are degraded in proteasomes. Here, we show that the transformation in axenic medium of trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi into amastigote-like organisms, and the intracellular development of the parasite from amastigotes into trypomastigotes, are prevented by lactacystin, or by a peptide aldehyde that inhibits proteasome function. Clasto-lactacystin, an inactive analogue of lactacystin, and cell-permeant peptide aldehyde inhibitors of T. cruzi cysteine proteinases have no effect. We have also identified the 20S proteasomes from T. cruzi as a target of lactacystin in vivo. Our results document the essential role of proteasomes in the stage-specific transformation of a protozoan. PMID:8920878

  3. Role of extracellular nucleotides in the immune response against intracellular bacteria and protozoan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ojcius, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are danger signals involved in recognition and control of intracellular pathogens. They are an important component of the innate immune response against intracellular pathogens, inducing the recruitment of inflammatory cells, stimulating secretion of cytokines, and producing inflammatory mediators such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). In the case of extracellular ATP, some of the immune responses are mediated through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and secretion of the cytokine, interleukin-1? (IL-1?), through a mechanism dependent on ligation of the P2X7 receptor. Here we review the role of extracellular nucleotides as sensors of intracellular bacteria and protozoan parasites, and discuss how these pathogens manipulate purinergic signaling to diminish the immune response against infection. PMID:22634346

  4. Metronidazole induces programmed cell death in the protozoan parasite Blastocystis hominis.

    PubMed

    Nasirudeen, A M A; Hian, Yap Eu; Singh, Mulkit; Tan, Kevin S W

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies by the authors have shown that the protozoan parasite Blastocystis hominis succumbed to a cytotoxic monoclonal antibody with a number of cellular and biochemical features characteristic of apoptosis in higher eukaryotes. The present study reports that apoptosis-like features are also observed in growing cultures of axenic B. hominis upon exposure to metronidazole, a drug commonly used for the treatment of blastocystosis. Upon treatment with the drug, B. hominis cells displayed key morphological and biochemical features of programmed cell death (PCD), viz. nuclear condensation and nicked DNA in nucleus, reduced cytoplasmic volume, externalization of phosphatidylserine and maintenance of plasma membrane integrity with increasing permeability. This present study also supports the authors' previously postulated novel function for the B. hominis central vacuole in PCD; it acts as a repository where apoptotic bodies are stored before being released into the extracellular space. The implications and possible roles of PCD in B. hominis are discussed. PMID:14702395

  5. Legionella pneumophila kills human phagocytes but not protozoan host cells by inducing apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Hägele, S; Hacker, J; Brand, B C

    1998-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular parasite able to replicate within and to kill a variety of eukaryotic cells. One possible killing mechanism is the induction of programmed cell death. Based on electron microscopy and flow cytometry studies using the phosphatidylserine binding protein annexin V, we could demonstrate that L. pneumophila is able to induce apoptosis in human monocytes which was clearly dependent on the multiplicity of infection, the time postinfection and the intracellular location of the bacteria. Furthermore, it became evident that Legionella-induced apoptosis does not require the TNF-alpha mediated signal-transduction pathway. By studying infection in Acanthamoeba castellanii, we found that L. pneumophila is not able to induce programmed cell death in their natural host cells indicating that different mechanisms are responsible for host cell killing in protozoan and human cells. PMID:9851034

  6. Sampling frequency of ciliated protozoan microfauna for seasonal distribution research in marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Henglong; Yong, Jiang; Xu, Guangjian

    2015-12-30

    Sampling frequency is important to obtain sufficient information for temporal research of microfauna. To determine an optimal strategy for exploring the seasonal variation in ciliated protozoa, a dataset from the Yellow Sea, northern China was studied. Samples were collected with 24 (biweekly), 12 (monthly), 8 (bimonthly per season) and 4 (seasonally) sampling events. Compared to the 24 samplings (100%), the 12-, 8- and 4-samplings recovered 94%, 94%, and 78% of the total species, respectively. To reveal the seasonal distribution, the 8-sampling regime may result in >75% information of the seasonal variance, while the traditional 4-sampling may only explain <65% of the total variance. With the increase of the sampling frequency, the biotic data showed stronger correlations with seasonal variables (e.g., temperature, salinity) in combination with nutrients. It is suggested that the 8-sampling events per year may be an optimal sampling strategy for ciliated protozoan seasonal research in marine ecosystems. PMID:26497257

  7. Ultrastructural modification of the ciliate protozoan, Colpidium colpoda following chronic exposure to partially degraded crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Rogerson, A.; Berger, J.

    1982-06-01

    Protozoa are important consumers of the microflora that biodegrade oil spills. In the study presented, the ultrastructural effects induced by chronic oil stress in the ciliate protozoan, Colpidium colpoda are discussed. Colpidia were grown in control cultures containing a dilute organic medium and a dense suspension of prey bacteria. After 20 days' oil exposure, C. colpoda contained more stained cytoplasmic inclusions than ciliates grown in the control media. Although the extent of Sudan Black staining in the oil-stressed cells indicates the presence of lipids, these droplets are better termed lipid-hydrocarbon (LH) inclusions until their definitive composition is known. C. colpoda accumulated significant quantities of lipid-hydrocarbons accounting for up to 20% of their cellular volume. Studies are currently being conducted to characterized these inclusions and to evaluate the effects of feeding these ''oil-labeled'' prey to predators, an important issue with the increasing concern about the biomagnification of environmental pollutants. (JMT)

  8. Adaptation-induced collective dynamics of a single-cell protozoan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Maiko; Hondou, Tsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yoshikatsu; Sugawara, Ken

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of a single-cell protozoan in a narrow tubular ring. This environment forces them to swim under a one-dimensional periodic boundary condition. Above a critical density, single-cell protozoa aggregate spontaneously without external stimulation. The high-density zone of swimming cells exhibits a characteristic collective dynamics including translation and boundary fluctuation. We analyzed the velocity distribution and turn rate of swimming cells and found that the regulation of the turing rate leads to a stable aggregation and that acceleration of velocity triggers instability of aggregation. These two opposing effects may help to explain the spontaneous dynamics of collective behavior. We also propose a stochastic model for the mechanism underlying the collective behavior of swimming cells.

  9. Changes in trophic structure of a freshwater protozoan community subjected to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Leborans, G; Novillo-Villajos, A

    1993-06-01

    The development of protozoan communities in laboratory microecosystems has been studied in order to observe the effect of cadmium on the trophic structure and dynamics of these communities. The effect of cadmium was evident on the species richness, density, and biomass. The most sensitive parameters seem to be biomass and species richness. In the controls, the trophic structure of the community was defined for bacterivore-detritivore, photautotroph, algivore, and in low proportion for nonselective species. In the fractions with cadmium there was a decrease in diversity in each trophic group; the bacterivore-detritivore and photosynthetic species were the most affected. Also, there was an appearance of saprotroph species. Species belonging to the control and others exclusively pertaining to microecosystems with cadmium were observed. PMID:7691521

  10. Molecular characteristics of an immobilization antigen gene of the fish-parasitic protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis strain ARS-6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, a ciliated protozoan parasite of fish, expresses surface antigens (i-antigens), which react with host antibodies that render them immobile. The nucleotide sequence of an i-antigen gene of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis strain ARS-6 was deduced. The predicted protein of 47...

  11. Benthic bacterial production and protozoan predation in a silty freshwater environment.

    PubMed

    Wieltschnig, C; Fischer, U R; Kirschner, A K T; Velimirov, B

    2003-07-01

    The interrelation of heterotrophic bacteria with bacterivorous protists has been widely studied in pelagic environments, but data on benthic habitats, especially in freshwater systems, are still scarce. We present a seasonal study focusing on bacterivory by heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) and ciliates in the silty sediment of a temperate macrophyte-dominated oxbow lake. From January 2001 to February 2002 we monitored the standing stock of bacteria and protozoa, bacterial secondary production (BSP, (3)H-thymidine, and (14)C-leucine incorporation), and grazing rates of HNF and ciliates on bacteria (FLB uptake) in the oxic sediment of the investigated system. BSP ranged from 470 to 4050 micro g C L(-1) wet sediment h(-1). The bacterial compartment turned out to be highly dynamic, indicated by population doubling times (0.6-10.0 d), which were comparable to those in the water column of the investigated system. Yet, the control mechanisms acting upon the bacterial population led to a relative constancy of bacterial standing stock during a year. Ingestion rates of protozoan grazers were 0-20.0 bacteria HNF(-1) h(-1) and 0-97.6 bacteria ciliate(-1) h(-1). HNF and ciliates together cropped 0-14 (mean 4)% of BSP, indicating that they did not significantly contribute to benthic bacterial mortality during any period of the year. The low impact of protozoan grazing was due to the low numbers of HNF and ciliates in relation to bacteria (1.8-3.5 x 10(4) bacteria HNF(-1), 0.9-3.1 x 10(6) bacteria ciliate(-1)). Thus, grazing by HNF and ciliates could be ruled out as a parameter regulating bacterial standing stock or production in the sediment of the investigated system, but the factors responsible for the limitation of benthic protistan densities and the fate of benthic BSP remained unclear. PMID:12739079

  12. Enrichment of specific protozoan populations during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Dawn E; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Williams, Kenneth H; Wrighton, Kelly C; Wilkins, Michael J; Thompson, Courtney A; Roper, Thomas J; Long, Philip E; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-01-01

    The importance of bacteria in the anaerobic bioremediation of groundwater polluted with organic and/or metal contaminants is well recognized and in some instances so well understood that modeling of the in situ metabolic activity of the relevant subsurface microorganisms in response to changes in subsurface geochemistry is feasible. However, a potentially significant factor influencing bacterial growth and activity in the subsurface that has not been adequately addressed is protozoan predation of the microorganisms responsible for bioremediation. In field experiments at a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, CO, USA, acetate amendments initially promoted the growth of metal-reducing Geobacter species, followed by the growth of sulfate reducers, as observed previously. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences revealed a broad diversity of sequences closely related to known bacteriovorous protozoa in the groundwater before the addition of acetate. The bloom of Geobacter species was accompanied by a specific enrichment of sequences most closely related to the ameboid flagellate, Breviata anathema, which at their peak accounted for over 80% of the sequences recovered. The abundance of Geobacter species declined following the rapid emergence of B. anathema. The subsequent growth of sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae was accompanied by another specific enrichment of protozoa, but with sequences most similar to diplomonadid flagellates from the family Hexamitidae, which accounted for up to 100% of the sequences recovered during this phase of the bioremediation. These results suggest a prey–predator response with specific protozoa responding to increased availability of preferred prey bacteria. Thus, quantifying the influence of protozoan predation on the growth, activity and composition of the subsurface bacterial community is essential for predictive modeling of in situ uranium bioremediation strategies. PMID:23446832

  13. Structure of a Protozoan Virus from the Human Genitourinary Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Kristin N.; Takagi, Yuko; Cardone, Giovanni; Olson, Norman H.; Ericsson, Maria; Yang, May; Lee, Yujin; Asara, John M.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Baker, Timothy S.; Nibert, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The flagellated protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis is an obligate human genitourinary parasite and the most frequent cause of sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Most clinical isolates of T. vaginalis are persistently infected with one or more double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses from the genus Trichomonasvirus, family Totiviridae, which appear to influence not only protozoan biology but also human disease. Here we describe the three-dimensional structure of Trichomonas vaginalis virus 1 (TVV1) virions, as determined by electron cryomicroscopy and icosahedral image reconstruction. The structure reveals a T = 1 capsid comprising 120 subunits, 60 in each of two nonequivalent positions, designated A and B, as previously observed for fungal Totiviridae family members. The putative protomer is identified as an asymmetric AB dimer consistent with either decamer or tetramer assembly intermediates. The capsid surface is notable for raised plateaus around the icosahedral 5-fold axes, with canyons connecting the 2- and 3-fold axes. Capsid-spanning channels at the 5-fold axes are unusually wide and may facilitate release of the viral genome, promoting dsRNA-dependent immunoinflammatory responses, as recently shown upon the exposure of human cervicovaginal epithelial cells to either TVV-infected T. vaginalis or purified TVV1 virions. Despite extensive sequence divergence, conservative features of the capsid reveal a helix-rich fold probably derived from an ancestor shared with fungal Totiviridae family members. Also notable are mass spectrometry results assessing the virion proteins as a complement to structure determination, which suggest that translation of the TVV1 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in fusion with its capsid protein involves ?2, and not +1, ribosomal frameshifting, an uncommonly found mechanism to date. PMID:23549915

  14. Enrichment of specific protozoan populations during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Dawn; Giloteaux, L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Thompson, Courtney A.; Roper, Thomas J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek

    2013-07-28

    The importance of bacteria in the anaerobic bioremediation of groundwater polluted with organic and/or metal contaminants is well-recognized and in some instances so well understood that modeling of the in situ metabolic activity of the relevant subsurface microorganisms in response to changes in subsurface geochemistry is feasible. However, a potentially significant factor influencing bacterial growth and activity in the subsurface that has not been adequately addressed is protozoan predation of the microorganisms responsible for bioremediation. In field experiments at a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, CO, acetate amendments initially promoted the growth of metal-reducing Geobacter species followed by the growth of sulfate-reducers, as previously observed. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences revealed a broad diversity of sequences closely related to known bacteriovorous protozoa in the groundwater prior to the addition of acetate. The bloom of Geobacter species was accompanied by a specific enrichment of sequences most closely related to the amoeboid flagellate, Breviata anathema, which at their peak accounted for over 80% of the sequences recovered. The abundance of Geobacter species declined following the rapid emergence of B. anathema. The subsequent growth of sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae was accompanied by another specific enrichment of protozoa, but with sequences most similar to diplomonadid flagellates from the family Hexamitidae, which accounted for up to 100% of the sequences recovered during this phase of the bioremediation. These results suggest a prey-predator response with specific protozoa responding to increased availability of preferred prey bacteria. Thus, quantifying the influence of protozoan predation on the growth, activity, and composition of the subsurface bacterial community is essential for predictive modeling of in situ uranium bioremediation strategies.

  15. Contribution of virus-induced lysis and protozoan grazing to benthic bacterial mortality estimated simultaneously in microcosms.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ulrike R; Wieltschnig, Claudia; Kirschner, Alexander K T; Velimirov, Branko

    2006-08-01

    In contrast to the water column, the fate of bacterial production in freshwater sediments is still a matter of debate. Thus, the importance of virus-induced lysis and protozoan grazing of bacteria was investigated for the first time simultaneously in a silty sediment layer of a mesotrophic oxbow lake. Microcosms were installed in the laboratory in order to study the dynamics of these processes over 15 days. All microbial and physicochemical parameters showed acceptable resemblance to field data observed during a concomitant in situ study, and similar conclusions can be drawn with respect to the quantitative impact of viruses and protozoa on the bacterial compartment. Viral decay rates ranged from undetectable to 0.078 h(-1) (average, 0.033 h(-1)), and the control of bacterial production from below the detection limit to 36% (average, 12%). The contribution of virus-induced lysis of bacteria to the dissolved organic matter pool as well as to benthic bacterial nutrition was low. Ingestion rates of protozoan grazers ranged from undetectable to 24.7 bacteria per heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNF) per hour (average, 4.8 bacteria HNF(-1) h(-1)) and from undetectable to 73.3 bacteria per ciliate per hour (average, 11.2 bacteria ciliate(-1) h(-1)). Heterotrophic nanoflagellate and ciliates together cropped up to 5% (average, 1%) of bacterial production. The viral impact on bacteria prevailed over protozoan grazing by a factor of 2.5-19.9 (average, 9.5). In sum, these factors together removed up to 36% (average, 12%) of bacterial production. The high number of correlations between viral and protozoan parameters is discussed in view of a possible relationship between virus removal and the presence of protozoan grazers. PMID:16872403

  16. Isospora serinuse n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from a domestic canary (Serinus canaria forma domestica) (Passeriformes: Fringillidae) in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Elliot, Aileen; Ryan, Una

    2015-12-01

    A new species, Isospora serinuse n. sp., (Apicomplexa:Eimeriidae) is described from a single domestic canary (Serinus canaria forma domestica) (subspecies S. c. domestica) in Western Australia. Sporulated oocysts of Isospora serinuse n. sp. are spherical or subspherical, 25.5 (24.4-27.0) × 23.5 (22.0-24.8) ?m, with a shape index (length/width) of 1.09; and a smooth bilayered oocyst wall, 1.2 ?m thick (outer layer 0.9 ?m, inner 0.3 ?m). A polar granule is present, but a micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent. The sporocysts are lemon-shaped, 18.9 (17.8-20.2) × 11.8 (10.6-13.0) ?m, with a shape index of 1.6. Stieda and substieda bodies are present, the Stieda body being a small crescent shape and the substieda being indistinct. Each sporocyst with four vermiform sporozoites arranged head to tail. A sporocyst residuum is present and composed of numerous granules of different sizes that are scattered among the sporozoites. Morphologically, the oocysts of Isospora serinuse n. sp. were different from those of all known valid Isospora spp. Molecular analysis was conducted at 3 loci: the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA and two separate regions of subunit I of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COI) gene (designated COIa and COIb). At the 18S locus, Isospora serinuse n. sp. exhibited 97.5% similarity to Isospora sp. Tokyo from a domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica) in Japan. At the 28S locus, I. serinuse n. sp. exhibited 94.9% similarity to Isospora anthochaerae n. sp. from a red wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata) in Australia. At the COIa locus, I. serinuse n. sp. exhibited 95.7% similarity to Isospora sospora sp. ex Apodemus flavicollis from a yellow-necked mouse and Isospora gryphoni from an American goldfinch (Carduelis tristis) respectively. At the COIb locus, I. serinuse n. sp. exhibited 96.7% similarity to an Isospora (iSAT4) from a European pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca). Based on morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of Isospora, which is named Isospora serinuse n. sp. after its host, the domestic canary (S. canaria forma domestica). PMID:26325434

  17. Aggregata (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) infection in the common octopus Octopus vulgaris from the West Mediterranean Sea: The infection rates and possible effect of faunistic, environmental and ecological factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo-Hernández, E.; Barcala, E.; Berriatua, E.; García-Ayala, A.; Muñoz, P.

    2013-10-01

    Prevalence and distribution of the coccidian parasite Aggregata octopiana (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) in common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in the Mediterranean Spanish coasts were studied. A total of 114 octopuses were sampled from 30 geographic sectors by trawl fleet, and whitish macroscopic oocysts typical of A. octopiana infection were recorded in 96% of octopuses in the digestive tract and mainly in intestine and spiral caecum. The univariate analysis showed that lesion extension varied according to specific octopus, environmental and faunistic variables. A subsequent multivariable analysis indicated that the risk of macroscopic lesions in the caecum was greater in males compared to females, in octopuses living in deeper compared to shallower waters and in hauls where the crustacean Pagurus excavatus was present. The study provides further evidence of the abundance of A. octopiana in octopus ecosystems urging for further studies to evaluate its health impact. The combined abundance of infected octopuses and P. excavatus merits attention.

  18. Coccidia of New World psittaciform birds (Aves: Psittaciformes): Eimeria ararae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the blue-and-yellow macaw Ara ararauna (Linnaeus).

    PubMed

    do Bomfim Lopes, Bruno; Berto, Bruno Pereira; de Carvalho Balthazar, Lianna Maria; Coelho, Cleide Domingues; Neves, Daniel Medeiros; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In the New World, the avian order Psittaciformes comprises 142 species, yet to date only 3 (2%) of the species have been examined for coccidia, and from these only four species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 have been described. In this study, a new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) obtained from the blue-and-yellow macaw Ara ararauna (Linnaeus) is reported from Brazil. Oöcysts of Eimeria ararae n. sp. are ovoidal, measure 28.7 × 20.2 ?m and have a smooth, bi-layered wall c.1.1 ?m thick. Both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal and measure 17.0 × 8.3 µm, with knob-like, prominent Stieda body and sporocyst residuum is composed of granules; sub-Stieda body is absent. Sporozoites are vermiform with one refractile body and a nucleus. This is the fifth description of an eimerid coccidian infecting a New World psittaciform bird. PMID:24832188

  19. A Comparative Study of the Common Protozoan Parasites of Clarias gariepinus from the Wild and Cultured Environments in Benue State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Omeji, S.; Solomon, S. G.; Idoga, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    A total of one hundred and twenty Clarias gariepinus comprising 30 dead and 30 live fishes were examined for protozoan parasites infestation, sixty each from the wild and a pond (cultured environment) over a period of six months. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis was the most common protozoan parasites found in C. gariepinus from the wild (River Benue) and cultured (pond) environments. These protozoan parasites constitute 37.08% of the total parasites encountered for fishes in the pond and 42.51% of fishes in the wild. Among the body parts of the sampled fishes from the pond, the gills had the highest parasite load (38.86%). Also, the gills had the highest parasite load (40.54%) among the body parts of the fishes sampled from the wild. Fishes not infested with any protozoan parasites from the pond constituted 36.70% of the total fish sampled. On the other hand, fishes not infested with any protozoan parasites from the wild constituted 31.65% of the total fish sampled. Female fishes had more protozoan parasites than the male fishes. Bigger fishes of total length (25–48?cm) had more parasite load than the smaller ones (19–24?cm). Also, fishes between 150–750?g had more parasite load than the smaller ones of less than 150?g. Protozoan parasite load of fish from the cultured environment (pond) did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) from those from River Benue (wild). PMID:22028952

  20. Factors related to occurrence and distribution of selected bacterial and protozoan pathogens in Pennsylvania streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duris, Joseph W.; Reif, Andrew G.; Donna A. Crouse; Isaacs, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and bacterial and protozoan pathogens are controlled by diverse factors. To investigate these factors in Pennsylvania streams, 217 samples were collected quarterly from a 27-station water-quality monitoring network from July 2007 through August 2009. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) indicator bacteria, concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, and the presence of four genes related to pathogenic types of EC (eaeA, stx2, stx1, rfbO157) plus three microbial source tracking (MST) gene markers that are also associated with pathogenic ENT and EC (esp, LTIIa, STII). Water samples were concurrently analyzed for basic water chemistry, physical measures of water quality, nutrients, metals, and a suite of 79 organic compounds that included hormones, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotics. For each sample location, stream discharge was measured by using standardized methods at the time of sample collection, and ancillary sample site information, such as land use and geological characteristics, was compiled. Samples exceeding recreational water quality criteria were more likely to contain all measured pathogen genes but notCryptosporidium or Giardia (oo)cysts. FIB and Giardia density and frequency of eaeA gene occurrence were significantly related to season. When discharge at a sampling location was high (>75th percentile of daily mean discharge), there were greater densities of FIB and Giardia, and the stx2, rfbO157, STII, and esp genes were found more frequently than at other discharge conditions. Giardia occurrence was likely related to nonpoint sources, which are highly influential during seasonal overland transport resulting from snowmelt and elevated precipitation in late winter and spring in Pennsylvania. When MST markers of human, swine, or bovine origin were present, samples more frequently carried the eaeA, stx2, stx1, and rfbO157 genes, but no genes were related exclusively to an individual MST marker. The human source pharmaceuticals (HSPs) acetaminophen and caffeine were correlated with Giardia, and the presence of HSPs proved to be more useful than MST markers in distinguishing the occurrence of Giardia. The HSPs caffeine and carbamazepine were correlated with the sum total of pathogen genes detected in a sample, demonstrating the value of using HSPs as an indicator of fecally derived pathogens. Sites influenced by urban land use with less forest were more likely to have greater FIB and Giardia densities and sum of the array of pathogen genes. Sites dominated by shallow carbonate bedrock in the upstream catchment were likely to have greater FIB densities and higher sum totals of pathogen genes but no correlation with Giardia detection. Our study provides a range of specific environmental, chemical, geologic, and land-use variables related to occurrence and distribution of FIB and selected bacterial and protozoan pathogens in Pennsylvania streams. The information presented could be useful for resource managers in understanding bacterial and protozoan pathogen occurrence and their relation to fecal indicator bacteria in similar settings.

  1. Protozoan Bacterivory and Escherichia coli Survival in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sibille, I.; Sime-Ngando, T.; Mathieu, L.; Block, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    The development of bacterial communities in drinking water distribution systems leads to a food chain which supports the growth of macroorganisms incompatible with water quality requirements and esthetics. Nevertheless, very few studies have examined the microbial communities in drinking water distribution systems and their trophic relationships. This study was done to quantify the microbial communities (especially bacteria and protozoa) and obtain direct and indirect proof of protozoan feeding on bacteria in two distribution networks, one of GAC water (i.e., water filtered on granular activated carbon) and the other of nanofiltered water. The nanofiltered water-supplied network contained no organisms larger than bacteria, either in the water phase (on average, 5 × 107 bacterial cells liter?1) or in the biofilm (on average, 7 × 106 bacterial cells cm?2). No protozoa were detected in the whole nanofiltered water-supplied network (water plus biofilm). In contrast, the GAC water-supplied network contained bacteria (on average, 3 × 108 cells liter?1 in water and 4 × 107 cells cm?2 in biofilm) and protozoa (on average, 105 cells liter?1 in water and 103 cells cm?2 in biofilm). The water contained mostly flagellates (93%), ciliates (1.8%), thecamoebae (1.6%), and naked amoebae (1.1%). The biofilm had only ciliates (52%) and thecamoebae (48%). Only the ciliates at the solid-liquid interface of the GAC water-supplied network had a measurable grazing activity in laboratory test (estimated at 2 bacteria per ciliate per h). Protozoan ingestion of bacteria was indirectly shown by adding Escherichia coli to the experimental distribution systems. Unexpectedly, E. coli was lost from the GAC water-supplied network more rapidly than from the nanofiltered water-supplied network, perhaps because of the grazing activity of protozoa in GAC water but not in nanofiltered water. Thus, the GAC water-supplied network contained a functional ecosystem with well-established and structured microbial communities, while the nanofiltered water-supplied system did not. The presence of protozoa in drinking water distribution systems must not be neglected because these populations may regulate the autochthonous and allochthonous bacterial populations. PMID:9435076

  2. Genomic distribution of B-vitamin auxotrophy and uptake transporters in environmental bacteria from the Chloroflexi phylum.

    PubMed

    Rodionova, Irina A; Li, Xiaoqing; Plymale, Andrew E; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Konopka, Allan E; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria from the Chloroflexi phylum are dominant members of phototrophic microbial mat communities in terrestrial thermal environments. Vitamins of B group are key intermediates (precursors) in the biosynthesis of indispensable enzyme cofactors driving numerous metabolic processes in all forms of life. A genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of respective biosynthetic and salvage pathways and riboswitch regulons in over 20 representative Chloroflexi genomes revealed a widespread auxotrophy for some of the vitamins. The most prominent predicted phenotypic signature, auxotrophy for vitamins B1 and B7 was experimentally confirmed for the best studied model organism Chloroflexus aurantiacus. These observations along with identified candidate genes for the respective uptake transporters pointed to B vitamin cross-feeding as an important aspect of syntrophic metabolism in microbial communities. Inferred specificities of homologous substrate-binding components of ABC transporters for vitamins B1 (ThiY) and B2 (RibY) were verified by thermofluorescent shift approach. A functional activity of the thiamine-specific transporter ThiXYZ from C. aurantiacus was experimentally verified by genetic complementation in E. coli. Expanding the integrative approach, which was applied here for a comprehensive analysis of B-vitamin metabolism in Chloroflexi would allow reconstruction of metabolic interdependencies in microbial communities. PMID:25345570

  3. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Kozubal, Mark A; Romine, Margaret; Jennings, Ryan deM; Jay, Zack J; Tringe, Susannah G; Rusch, Doug B; Beam, Jacob P; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicates that the replicate assemblies represent a new candidate phylum within the domain Archaea referred to here as 'Geoarchaeota' or 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in the metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen-sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron-oxide mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogs active in YNP today. PMID:23151644

  4. Genomic distribution of B-vitamin auxotrophy and uptake transporters in environmental bacteria from the Chloroflexi phylum

    SciTech Connect

    Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Plymale, Andrew E.; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Konopka, Allan; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Osterman, Andrei; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria from the Chloroflexi phylum are dominant members of phototrophic microbial mat communities in terrestrial thermal environments. Vitamins of B-group are key intermediates (precursors) in the biosynthesis of indispensable enzyme cofactors driving numerous metabolic processes in all forms of life. A genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of respective biosynthetic and salvage pathways and riboswitch regulons in over 20 representative Chloroflexi genomes revealed a widespread auxotrophy for some of the vitamins. The most prominent predicted phenotypic signature, auxotrophy for vitamins B1 and B7 was experimentally confirmed for the best studied model organism Chloroflexus aurantiacus. These observations along with identified candidate genes for the respective uptake transporters pointed to B vitamin exchange as an important aspect of syntrophic metabolism in microbial communities. Inferred specificities of homologous substrate-binding components of ABC transporters for vitamins B1 (ThiY) and B2 (RibY) were verified by thermofluorescent shift approach. A functional activity of the thiamine-specific transporter ThiXYZ from C. aurantiacus was experimentally verified by genetic complementation in E. coli. Expanding the integrative approach, which was applied here for a comprehensive analysis of B-vitamin metabolism in Chloroflexi would allow reconstruction of metabolic interdependencies in microbial communities.

  5. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, Mark; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan; Jay, Z.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Beam, Jake; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P.

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicate that the replicate assemblies represent a new phylum-level lineage referred to here as 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I CO dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogues active in YNP today.

  6. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    PubMed Central

    Kozubal, Mark A; Romine, Margaret; Jennings, Ryan deM; Jay, Zack J; Tringe, Susannah G; Rusch, Doug B; Beam, Jacob P; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicates that the replicate assemblies represent a new candidate phylum within the domain Archaea referred to here as ‘Geoarchaeota' or ‘novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in the metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen-sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron-oxide mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogs active in YNP today. PMID:23151644

  7. Rubritalea marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine representative of the phylum 'Verrucomicrobia', isolated from a sponge (Porifera).

    PubMed

    Scheuermayer, Matthias; Gulder, Tobias A M; Bringmann, Gerhard; Hentschel, Ute

    2006-09-01

    A marine bacterium, strain Pol012(T), was isolated from the Mediterranean sponge Axinella polypoides and subsequently characterized as belonging to subphylum 1 of the phylum 'Verrucomicrobia'. Strain Pol012(T) was non-motile, Gram-negative, coccoid or rod-shaped and red in colour. The menaquinones MK-8 and MK-9 were detected. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 50.9 mol%. Growth was possible at temperatures between 8 and 30 degrees C and at pH values between 6.8 and 8.2. The closest cultured relative of strain Pol012(T) was Akkermansia muciniphila (83 % sequence similarity), while the closest environmental 16S rRNA gene sequence was the marine clone Arctic96BD-2 (95 % sequence similarity). Strain Pol012(T) is the first marine pure-culture representative of 'Verrucomicrobia' subphylum 1 and represents a novel genus and species, for which the name Rubritalea marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Pol012(T) (=DSM 177716(T)=CIP 108984(T)). PMID:16957108

  8. Water used to moisten vegetables is a source of Escherichia coli and protozoan parasite contamination at markets in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tram, Nguyen Thuy; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2014-12-01

    The study was done to assess the level of fecal (Escherichia coli) and protozoan parasite (Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp.) contamination in water used by traders to moisten vegetables at markets in Hanoi, Vietnam. A total of 200 splashing water samples from markets located within eight districts were analyzed for E. coli and Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. (oo)cysts. Giardia cysts were found in 17 splashing water samples and Cryptosporidium oocysts in nine samples, with median values of 20 cysts ml(-1) and 10 oocysts ml(-1), respectively. E. coli was found with a median concentration of 636 cfu ml(-1) and its occurrence was negatively correlated with the numbers of protozoan parasites. The splashing water was kept in buckets that were rarely cleaned and often used for handwashing. The finding of these pathogens in splashing water is likely to represent real food safety hazards. PMID:25473999

  9. Virulence of a Legionella anisa strain associated with Pontiac fever: an evaluation using protozoan, cell culture, and guinea pig models.

    PubMed

    Fields, B S; Barbaree, J M; Sanden, G N; Morrill, W E

    1990-09-01

    Legionella anisa and the amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis were isolated from an indoor fountain implicated as the infectious reservoir in an outbreak of Pontiac fever. We evaluated the ability of this strain of L. anisa to multiply in cultures of an amoeba (H. vermiformis), a ciliated protozoan (Tetrahymena pyriformis), and human mononuclear cells and to infect guinea pigs. These bacteria multiplied in the culture of H. vermiformis but failed to infect guinea pigs or the cultures of T. pyriformis and human mononuclear cells. These findings suggest that some Legionella spp. may multiply only in specific protozoan hosts. The inability of this strain of L. anisa to multiply in human phagocytic cells may be related to the development of Pontiac fever rather than pneumonic legionellosis in exposed individuals. Further studies are necessary to determine whether the ability of legionellae to infect certain host cells can be correlated to differences in human disease. PMID:2117580

  10. Whole-genome amplification: a useful approach to characterize new genes in unculturable protozoan parasites such as Bonamia exitiosa.

    PubMed

    Prado-Alvarez, Maria; Couraleau, Yann; Chollet, Bruno; Tourbiez, Delphine; Arzul, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    Bonamia exitiosa is an intracellular parasite (Haplosporidia) that has been associated with mass mortalities in oyster populations in the Southern hemisphere. This parasite was recently detected in the Northern hemisphere including Europe. Some representatives of the Bonamia genus have not been well categorized yet due to the lack of genomic information. In the present work, we have applied Whole-Genome Amplification (WGA) technique in order to characterize the actin gene in the unculturable protozoan B. exitiosa. This is the first protein coding gene described in this species. Molecular analysis revealed that B. exitiosa actin is more similar to Bonamia ostreae actin gene-1. Actin phylogeny placed the Bonamia sp. infected oysters in the same clade where the herein described B. exitiosa actin resolved, offering novel information about the classification of the genus. Our results showed that WGA methodology is a promising and valuable technique to be applied to unculturable protozoans whose genomic material is limited. PMID:26282916

  11. Methane production from protozoan endosymbionts following stimulation of microbial metabolism within subsurface sediments

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Dawn E.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Orellana, Roberto; Williams, Kenneth H.; Robbins, Mark J.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that protozoa prey on Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria that are enriched when acetate is added to uranium contaminated subsurface sediments to stimulate U(VI) reduction. In order to determine whether protozoa continue to impact subsurface biogeochemistry after these acetate amendments have stopped, 18S rRNA and ß-tubulin sequences from this phase of an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were analyzed. Sequences most similar to Metopus species predominated, with the majority of sequences most closely related to M. palaeformis, a cilitated protozoan known to harbor methanogenic symbionts. Quantification of mcrA mRNA transcripts in the groundwater suggested that methanogens closely related to Metopus endosymbionts were metabolically active at this time. There was a strong correlation between the number of mcrA transcripts from the putative endosymbiotic methanogen and Metopus ß-tubulin mRNA transcripts during the course of the field experiment, suggesting that the activity of the methanogens was dependent upon the activity of the Metopus species. Addition of the eukaryotic inhibitors cyclohexamide and colchicine to laboratory incubations of acetate-amended subsurface sediments significantly inhibited methane production and there was a direct correlation between methane concentration and Metopus ß-tubulin and putative symbiont mcrA gene copies. These results suggest that, following the stimulation of subsurface microbial growth with acetate, protozoa harboring methanogenic endosymbionts become important members of the microbial community, feeding on moribund biomass and producing methane. PMID:25147543

  12. Development of an Aeromonas hydrophila? infection model using the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Jie; Lu, Cheng-Ping

    2011-03-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a motile bacterium present in numerous freshwater habitats worldwide and is frequently the cause of infections in fish and numerous terrestrial vertebrates including humans. Because A. hydrophila is also a component of the normal intestinal flora of healthy fish, virulence mechanisms are not well understood. Considering that fish models used for the examination of A. hydrophila genes associated with virulence have not been well defined, we established an infection model using the free-living, ciliate protozoa Tetrahymena thermophila. The expression of A. hydrophila virulence genes following infection of T. thermophila was assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and demonstrated that the aerolysin (aerA) and Ahe2 serine protease (ahe2) genes (not present in the avirulent A. hydrophila NJ-4 strain) in the virulent J-1 strain were upregulated 4-h postinfection. Furthermore, the presence of intact A. hydrophila J-1 within T. thermophila suggested that these bacteria could interfere with phagocytosis, resulting in the death of the infected protozoan 48-h postinfection. Conversely, A. hydrophila NJ-4-infected T. thermophila survived the infection. This study established a novel T. thermophila infection model that will provide a novel means of examining virulence mechanisms of A. hydrophila. PMID:21204941

  13. Nitazoxanide for the treatment of intestinal protozoan and helminthic infections in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Romero Cabello, R; Guerrero, L R; Muñóz García, M R; Geyne Cruz, A

    1997-01-01

    A study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nitazoxanide as a single agent for the treatment of a broad spectrum of mixed parasitic infections, both protozoa and helminths, was conducted at a primary school in San Pedro Tolimán, Querétaro, Mexico. Three faecal samples from 1824 adults and children were screened for the presence of oocysts, cysts, trophozoites, eggs or larvae of intestinal protozoa or helminths. Two hundred and forty-six adults and children infected with at least one protozoan and 2 helminths were given 7.5 mg/kg of nitazoxanide (500 mg to adults and 200 mg to children less than 12 years old) every 12 h for 3 consecutive days. Faecal samples were examined on days 6, 7, 8, 13, 14 and 15 (+/- 1) following initiation of treatment, using formalin-ether concentration and Kato-Katz egg counting. Treatment with nitazoxanide was 71-100% effective in eliminating evidence of infection with Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, Giardia duodenalis, Blastocystis hominis, Isospora belli, Enterobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and Hymenolepis nana. Haematology and clinical chemistry values obtained before and after treatment remained unaffected by nitazoxanide. The drug was well tolerated, with only 15 patients (6.1%) reporting mild abdominal pain that lasted less than 24 h. PMID:9580117

  14. Epidemiology of parasitic protozoan infections in Soay sheep (Ovis aries L.) on St Kilda.

    PubMed

    Craig, B H; Pilkington, J G; Kruuk, L E B; Pemberton, J M

    2007-01-01

    The feral Soay sheep (Ovis aries L.) population on Hirta, St Kilda, is host to a diverse component parasite community, but previous parasitological studies of the population have only focussed on the metazoan species. This paper reports the first epidemiological study of the protozoan species comprising Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia duodenalis and 11 species of Eimeria in Soay sheep across 3 years of varying host population density. Prevalence and intensity of almost all species of protozoa significantly decreased with host age, with the exception of E. granulosa, which increased in prevalence with host age. The prevalence of C. parvum appeared to vary positively with host population density but that of G. duodenalis did not vary significantly with density. Most species of Eimeria showed a distinct lag in infection level following the host population crash of 2002, taking up to 2 years to decrease. Mixed Eimeria species intensity and diversity were highest in 2002, a year of low host density. Parasite diversity decreased with host age and was higher in males. There were 5 positive pair-wise associations between protozoa species in terms of prevalence. The results of this study highlight the potential for protozoal infection to shape the evolution of parasite resistance in wild host populations harbouring diverse parasite species. PMID:16978448

  15. Genetic variation in resistance, but not tolerance, to a protozoan parasite in the monarch butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Williams, Amanda Jo; de Roode, Jacobus C.

    2011-01-01

    Natural selection should strongly favour hosts that can protect themselves against parasites. Most studies on animals so far have focused on resistance, a series of mechanisms through which hosts prevent infection, reduce parasite growth or clear infection. However, animals may instead evolve tolerance, a defence mechanism by which hosts do not reduce parasite infection or growth, but instead alleviate the negative fitness consequences of such infection and growth. Here, we studied genetic variation in resistance and tolerance in the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) to its naturally occurring protozoan parasite, Ophryocystis elektroscirrha. We exposed 560 monarch larvae of 19 different family lines to one of five different parasite inoculation doses (0, 1, 5, 10 and 100 infective spores) to create a range of parasite loads in infected butterflies. We then used two proxies of host fitness (adult lifespan and body mass) to quantify: (i) qualitative resistance (the ability to prevent infection; also known as avoidance or anti-infection resistance); (ii) quantitative resistance (the ability to limit parasite growth upon infection; also known as control or anti-growth resistance); and (iii) tolerance (the ability to maintain fitness with increasing parasite infection intensity). We found significant differences among host families in qualitative and quantitative resistance, indicating genetic variation in resistance. However, we found no genetic variation in tolerance. This may indicate that all butterflies in our studied population have evolved maximum tolerance, as predicted by some theoretical models. PMID:20843849

  16. New drug target in protozoan parasites: the role of thioredoxin reductase

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rosa M.; Reed, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis causes approximately 70,000 deaths annually and is the third cause of death due to parasites worldwide. It is treated primarily with metronidazole, which has adverse side effects, is mutagenic and carcinogenic, and emergence of resistance is an increasing concern. Unfortunately, better therapeutic alternatives are lacking. Re-purposing of older FDA approved drugs is advantageous to drug discovery since safety and pharmacokinetic effects in humans are already known. In high throughput screening studies, we recently demonstrated that auranofin, a gold containing compound originally approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis, has activity against trophozoites of E. histolytica, the causative agent of amebiasis. Auranofin's anti-parasitic activity is attributed to its monovalent gold molecule that readily inhibits E. histolytica thioredoxin reductase. This anti-oxidant enzyme is the only thiol-dependent flavo-reductase present in E. histolytica. Auranofin has also shown promising activity against other protozoans of significant public health importance. Altogether, this evidence suggests that auranofin has the potential to become a broad spectrum alternative therapeutic agent for diseases with a large global burden. PMID:26483758

  17. Assembly-History Dynamics of a Pitcher-Plant Protozoan Community in Experimental Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Kohmei; Inouye, Brian D.; Miller, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Background History drives community assembly through differences both in density (density effects) and in the sequence in which species arrive (sequence effects). Density effects arise from predictable population dynamics, which are free of history, but sequence effects are due to a density-free mechanism, arising solely from the order and timing of immigration events. Few studies have determined how components of immigration history (timing, number of individuals, frequency) alter local dynamics to determine community assembly, beyond addressing when immigration history produces historically contingent assembly. Methods/Findings We varied density and sequence effects independently in a two-way factorial design to follow community assembly in a three-species aquatic protozoan community. A superior competitor, Colpoda steinii, mediated alternative community states; early arrival or high introduction density allowed this species to outcompete or suppress the other competitors (Poterioochromonas malhamensis and Eimeriidae gen. sp.). Multivariate analysis showed that density effects caused greater variation in community states, whereas sequence effects altered the mean community composition. Conclusions A significant interaction between density and sequence effects suggests that we should refine our understanding of priority effects. These results highlight a practical need to understand not only the “ingredients” (species) in ecological communities but their “recipes” as well. PMID:22880069

  18. The first suicides: a legacy inherited by parasitic protozoans from prokaryote ancestors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is more than 25 years since the first report that a protozoan parasite could die by a process resulting in a morphological phenotype akin to apoptosis. Since then these phenotypes have been observed in many unicellular parasites, including trypanosomatids and apicomplexans, and experimental evidence concerning the molecular pathways that are involved is growing. These observations support the view that this form of programmed cell death is an ancient one that predates the evolution of multicellularity. Here we review various hypotheses that attempt to explain the origin of apoptosis, and look for support for these hypotheses amongst the parasitic protists as, with the exception of yeast, most of the work on death mechanisms in unicellular organisms has focussed on them. We examine the role that addiction modules may have played in the original eukaryote cell and the part played by mitochondria in the execution of present day cells, looking for examples from Leishmania spp. Trypanosoma spp. and Plasmodium spp. In addition, the expanding knowledge of proteases, nucleases and other molecules acting in protist execution pathways has enabled comparisons to be made with extant Archaea and bacteria and with biochemical pathways that evolved in metazoans. These comparisons lend support to the original sin hypothesis but also suggest that present-day death pathways may have had multifaceted beginnings. PMID:23597031

  19. Inferring host range dynamics from comparative data: the protozoan parasites of new world monkeys.

    PubMed

    Waxman, David; Weinert, Lucy A; Welch, John J

    2014-07-01

    Uncovering the ecological determinants of parasite host range is a central goal of comparative parasitology and infectious disease ecology. But while parasites are often distributed nonrandomly across the host phylogeny, such patterns are difficult to interpret without a genealogy for the parasite samples and without knowing what sorts of ecological dynamics might lead to what sorts of nonrandomness. We investigated inferences from comparative data, using presence/absence records from protozoan parasites of the New World monkeys. We first demonstrate several distinct types of phylogenetic signal in these data, showing, for example, that parasite species are clustered on the host tree and that closely related host species harbor similar numbers of parasite species. We then show that all of these patterns can be generated by a single, simple dynamical model, in which parasite host range changes more rapidly than host speciation/extinction and parasites preferentially colonize uninfected host species that are closely related to their existing hosts. Fitting this model to data, we then estimate its parameters. Finally, we caution that quite different ecological processes can lead to similar signatures but show how phylogenetic variation in host susceptibility can be distinguished from a tendency for parasites to colonize closely related hosts. Our new process-based analyses, which estimate meaningful parameters, should be useful for inferring the determinants of parasite host range and transmission success. PMID:24921601

  20. Bax function in the absence of mitochondria in the primitive protozoan Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Hehl, Adrian B; Regos, Attila; Schraner, Elisabeth; Schneider, André

    2007-01-01

    Bax-induced permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane and release of cytochrome c are key events in apoptosis. Although Bax can compromise mitochondria in primitive unicellular organisms that lack a classical apoptotic machinery, it is still unclear if Bax alone is sufficient for this, or whether additional mitochondrial components are required. The protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia is one of the earliest branching eukaryotes and harbors highly degenerated mitochondrial remnant organelles (mitosomes) that lack a genome. Here we tested whether human Bax expressed in Giardia can be used to ablate mitosomes. We demonstrate that these organelles are neither targeted, nor compromised, by Bax. However, specialized compartments of the regulated secretory pathway are completely ablated by Bax. As a consequence, maturing cyst wall proteins that are sorted into these organelles are released into the cytoplasm, causing a developmental arrest and cell death. Interestingly, this ectopic cargo release is dependent on the carboxy-terminal 22 amino acids of Bax, and can be prevented by the Bax-inhibiting peptide Ku70. A C-terminally truncated Bax variant still localizes to secretory organelles, but is unable to permeabilize these membranes, uncoupling membrane targeting and cargo release. Even though mitosomes are too diverged to be recognized by Bax, off-target membrane permeabilization appears to be conserved and leads to cell death completely independently of mitochondria. PMID:17534438

  1. Metazoan-protozoan parasite co-infections and host body weight in St Kilda Soay sheep.

    PubMed

    Craig, B H; Tempest, L J; Pilkington, J G; Pemberton, J M

    2008-04-01

    For hundreds of years, the unmanaged Soay sheep population on St Kilda has survived despite enduring presumably deleterious co-infections of helminth, protozoan and arthropod parasites and intermittent periods of starvation. Important parasite taxa in young Soay sheep are strongyles (Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus vitrinus and Teladorsagia circumcincta), coccidia (11 Eimeria species) and keds (Melophagus ovinus) and in older animals, Teladorsagia circumcincta. In this research, associations between the intensity of different parasite taxa were investigated. Secondly, the intensities of different parasite taxa were tested for associations with variation in host weight, which is itself a determinant of over-winter survival in the host population. In lambs, the intensity of strongyle eggs was positively correlated with that of Nematodirus spp. eggs, while in yearlings and adults strongyle eggs and coccidia oocysts were positively correlated. In lambs and yearlings, of the parasite taxa tested, only strongyle eggs were significantly and negatively associated with host weight. However, in adult hosts, strongyles and coccidia were independently and negatively associated with host weight. These results are consistent with the idea that strongyles and coccidia are exerting independent selection on Soay sheep. PMID:18215336

  2. Role of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems in the Biology and Virulence of Protozoan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Christian; San Francisco, Juan; Gutiérrez, Bessy; González, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, proteasomes perform crucial roles in many cellular pathways by degrading proteins to enforce quality control and regulate many cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, cell death, immune responses, metabolism, protein-quality control, and development. The catalytic heart of these complexes, the 20S proteasome, is highly conserved in bacteria, yeast, and humans. However, until a few years ago, the role of proteasomes in parasite biology was completely unknown. Here, we summarize findings about the role of proteasomes in protozoan parasites biology and virulence. Several reports have confirmed the role of proteasomes in parasite biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, and encystation. Proliferation and cell differentiation are key steps in host colonization. Considering the importance of proteasomes in both processes in many different parasites such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, and Entamoeba, parasite proteasomes might serve as virulence factors. Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is also a viable parasitic therapeutic target. Research in recent years has shown that the proteasome is a valid drug target for sleeping sickness and malaria. Then, proteasomes are a key organelle in parasite biology and virulence and appear to be an attractive new chemotherapeutic target. PMID:26090380

  3. Role of the Cytosolic Heat Shock Protein 70 Ssa5 in the Ciliate Protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Akematsu, Takahiko; Attiq, Rizwan; Tada, Chika; Nakai, Yutaka; Pearlman, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a member of a family of conserved chaperone proteins whose function is well investigated in many model organisms. Here we focus on an Hsp70 called Ssa5 in the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila, and reveal that its translation is heat inducible as for general Hsps. Moreover, the protein is abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm during sexual reproduction (conjugation) as well as in response to heat-stress. Knocking out of SSA5 (?SSA5) does not affect the survival of the cell under heat-stress, likely due to other Hsp70 paralogs compensating for the defect. During conjugation, ?SSA5 leads to a fertilization defect in which the two pronuclei are in close proximity but never fuse. The unfertilized pronuclei differentiate, resulting in a heterokaryon with developed haploid germline and somatic nuclei. In addition, degeneration of the parental somatic nucleus is not affected. These results suggest a specific involvement of Ssa5 in pronuclear fusion and fertilization. PMID:25586926

  4. Identification and characterization of the arsenite methyltransferase from a protozoan, Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Chang, Yue; Yan, Yu; Xiong, Jie; Xue, Xi-Mei; Yuan, Dongxia; Sun, Guo-Xin; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Miao, Wei

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic (As) methylation in aquatic microbes plays a major role in the biogeochemistry of As. Protozoa, especially the free-living freshwater species, are important players in aquatic ecological health. In this study, an arsenite (As(III)) methyltransferase, TpyArsM, was identified and characterized in a free-living protozoan, Tetrahymena pyriformis. In order to confirm its function, TpyarsM gene was knocked-out in Tetrahymena and was also heterologously expressed in hypersensitive E. coli; these events resulted in expected decreases in As tolerance and methylation ability, respectively. In-vitro tests revealed that purified TpyArsM protein methylated inorganic As to mono- and di- methylarsenate, and also had the novel property of producing trimethylarsenite (TMA(III)) and dimethylarsine (Me2AsH) gases. This new methyltransferase gene, identified in a species near the base of the food web, has enriched our knowledge of As methyltransferases and has great potential for bioremediation of As-contaminated environments. PMID:24561426

  5. Global Distribution, Public Health and Clinical Impact of the Protozoan Pathogen Cryptosporidium

    PubMed Central

    Putignani, Lorenza; Menichella, Donato

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are coccidians, oocysts-forming apicomplexan protozoa, which complete their life cycle both in humans and animals, through zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission, causing cryptosporidiosis. The global burden of this disease is still underascertained, due to a conundrum transmission modality, only partially unveiled, and on a plethora of detection systems still inadequate or only partially applied for worldwide surveillance. In children, cryptosporidiosis encumber is even less recorded and often misidentified due to physiological reasons such as early-age unpaired immunological response. Furthermore, malnutrition in underdeveloped countries or clinical underestimation of protozoan etiology in developed countries contribute to the underestimation of the worldwide burden. Principal key indicators of the parasite distribution were associated to environmental (e.g., geographic and temporal clusters, etc.) and host determinants of the infection (e.g., age, immunological status, travels, community behaviours). The distribution was geographically mapped to provide an updated picture of the global parasite ecosystems. The present paper aims to provide, by a critical analysis of existing literature, a link between observational epidemiological records and new insights on public health, and diagnostic and clinical impact of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:20706669

  6. New drug target in protozoan parasites: the role of thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Rosa M; Reed, Sharon L

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis causes approximately 70,000 deaths annually and is the third cause of death due to parasites worldwide. It is treated primarily with metronidazole, which has adverse side effects, is mutagenic and carcinogenic, and emergence of resistance is an increasing concern. Unfortunately, better therapeutic alternatives are lacking. Re-purposing of older FDA approved drugs is advantageous to drug discovery since safety and pharmacokinetic effects in humans are already known. In high throughput screening studies, we recently demonstrated that auranofin, a gold containing compound originally approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis, has activity against trophozoites of E. histolytica, the causative agent of amebiasis. Auranofin's anti-parasitic activity is attributed to its monovalent gold molecule that readily inhibits E. histolytica thioredoxin reductase. This anti-oxidant enzyme is the only thiol-dependent flavo-reductase present in E. histolytica. Auranofin has also shown promising activity against other protozoans of significant public health importance. Altogether, this evidence suggests that auranofin has the potential to become a broad spectrum alternative therapeutic agent for diseases with a large global burden. PMID:26483758

  7. An improved general approach for cloning and characterizing telomeres: the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi as model organism.

    PubMed

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Santos, Marcia R M; Franco Da Silveira, Jose; Ramírez, Jose Luis

    2002-07-10

    We here describe a general strategy for cloning and characterizing telomeric and sub-telomeric regions of the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The use of a bacterial artificial chromosome vector and a telomeric adaptor produced stable telomeric recombinant clones with inserts ranging from 5 to 25 kb. Analysis of these recombinants provided unique landmarks for chromosomal mapping and sequencing and enabled us to derive a more accurate picture of T. cruzi telomeric organization. PMID:12234681

  8. The Interplay of Host Microbiota and Parasitic Protozoans at Mucosal Interfaces: Implications for the Outcomes of Infections and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Jully; Simoes-Barbosa, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Infections by parasitic protozoans are largely neglected, despite threatening millions of people, particularly in developing countries. With descriptions of the microbiota in humans, a new frontier of investigation is developing to decipher the complexity of host–parasite–microbiota relationships, instead of the classic reductionist approach, which considers host–parasite in isolation. Here, we review with specific examples the potential roles that the resident microbiota can play at mucosal interfaces in the transmission of parasitic protozoans and in the progress of infection and disease. Although the mechanisms underlying these relationships remain poorly understood, some examples provide compelling evidence that specific components of the microbiota can potentially alter the outcomes of parasitic infections and diseases in humans. Most findings suggest a protective role of the microbiota, which might lead to exploratory research comprising microbiota-based interventions to prevent and treat protozoal infections in the future. However, these infections are often accompanied by an unbalanced microbiota and, in some specific cases, apparently, these bacteria may contribute synergistically to disease progression. Taken together, these findings provide a different perspective on the ecological nature of protozoal infections. This review focuses attention on the importance of considering polymicrobial associations, i.e., parasitic protozoans and the host microbiota, for understanding these human infections in their natural microbial context. PMID:26658061

  9. The Interplay of Host Microbiota and Parasitic Protozoans at Mucosal Interfaces: Implications for the Outcomes of Infections and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bär, Ann-Katrein; Phukan, Niha; Pinheiro, Jully; Simoes-Barbosa, Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Infections by parasitic protozoans are largely neglected, despite threatening millions of people, particularly in developing countries. With descriptions of the microbiota in humans, a new frontier of investigation is developing to decipher the complexity of host-parasite-microbiota relationships, instead of the classic reductionist approach, which considers host-parasite in isolation. Here, we review with specific examples the potential roles that the resident microbiota can play at mucosal interfaces in the transmission of parasitic protozoans and in the progress of infection and disease. Although the mechanisms underlying these relationships remain poorly understood, some examples provide compelling evidence that specific components of the microbiota can potentially alter the outcomes of parasitic infections and diseases in humans. Most findings suggest a protective role of the microbiota, which might lead to exploratory research comprising microbiota-based interventions to prevent and treat protozoal infections in the future. However, these infections are often accompanied by an unbalanced microbiota and, in some specific cases, apparently, these bacteria may contribute synergistically to disease progression. Taken together, these findings provide a different perspective on the ecological nature of protozoal infections. This review focuses attention on the importance of considering polymicrobial associations, i.e., parasitic protozoans and the host microbiota, for understanding these human infections in their natural microbial context. PMID:26658061

  10. ApiEST-DB: analyzing clustered EST data of the apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Crabtree, Jonathan; Fischer, Steve; Pinney, Deborah; Stoeckert, Christian J; Sibley, L David; Roos, David S

    2004-01-01

    ApiEST-DB (http://www.cbil.upenn.edu/paradbs-servlet/) provides integrated access to publicly available EST data from protozoan parasites in the phylum Apicomplexa. The database currently incorporates a total of nearly 100,000 ESTs from several parasite species of clinical and/or veterinary interest, including Eimeria tenella, Neospora caninum, Plasmodium falciparum, Sarcocystis neurona and Toxoplasma gondii. To facilitate analysis of these data, EST sequences were clustered and assembled to form consensus sequences for each organism, and these assemblies were then subjected to automated annotation via similarity searches against protein and domain databases. The underlying relational database infrastructure, Genomics Unified Schema (GUS), enables complex biologically based queries, facilitating validation of gene models, identification of alternative splicing, detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms, identification of stage-specific genes and recognition of phylogenetically conserved and phylogenetically restricted sequences. PMID:14681425

  11. Functional Analyses of the Toxoplasma gondii DNA Gyrase Holoenzyme: A Janus Topoisomerase with Supercoiling and Decatenation Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Nagano, Soshichiro; Gardiner Heddle, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A number of important protozoan parasites including those responsible for toxoplasmosis and malaria belong to the phylum Apicomplexa and are characterised by their possession of a relict plastid, the apicoplast. Being required for survival, apicoplasts are potentially useful drug targets and their attractiveness is increased by the fact that they contain “bacterial” gyrase, a well-established antibacterial drug target. We have cloned and purified the gyrase proteins from the apicoplast of Toxoplasma gondii (the cause of toxoplasmosis), reconstituted the functional enzyme and succeeded in characterising it. We discovered that the enzyme is inhibited by known gyrase inhibitors and that, as well as the expected supercoiling activity, it is also able to decatenate DNA with high efficiency. This unusual dual functionality may be related to the apparent lack of topoisomerase IV in the apicoplast. PMID:26412236

  12. Noncanoncial signal recognition particle RNAs in a major eukaryotic phylum revealed by purification of SRP from the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Dumesic, Phillip A; Rosenblad, Magnus A; Samuelsson, Tore; Nguyen, Tiffany; Moresco, James J; Yates, John R; Madhani, Hiten D

    2015-10-15

    Despite conservation of the signal recognition particle (SRP) from bacteria to man, computational approaches have failed to identify SRP components from genomes of many lower eukaryotes, raising the possibility that they have been lost or altered in those lineages. We report purification and analysis of SRP in the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, providing the first description of SRP in basidiomycetous yeast. The C. neoformans SRP RNA displays a predicted structure in which the universally conserved helix 8 contains an unprecedented stem-loop insertion. Guided by this sequence, we computationally identified 152 SRP RNAs throughout the phylum Basidiomycota. This analysis revealed additional helix 8 alterations including single and double stem-loop insertions as well as loop diminutions affecting RNA structural elements that are otherwise conserved from bacteria to man. Strikingly, these SRP RNA features in Basidiomycota are accompanied by phylum-specific alterations in the RNA-binding domain of Srp54, the SRP protein subunit that directly interacts with helix 8. Our findings reveal unexpected fungal SRP diversity and suggest coevolution of the two most conserved SRP features-SRP RNA helix 8 and Srp54-in basidiomycetes. Because members of this phylum include important human and plant pathogens, these noncanonical features provide new targets for antifungal compound development. PMID:26275773

  13. Molecular and parasitological survey of Hepatozoon canis (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) in dogs from rural area of Sao Paulo state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Adriano Stefani; dos Santos Paduan, Karina; Von Ah Lopes, Viviane; O'Dwyer, Lucia Helena

    2008-04-01

    Hepatozoon canis is a protozoan that infects dogs and is transmitted by the ingestion of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Two distinct species of Hepatozoon genus can infect dogs, H. canis and H. americanum. Routine tests to detect the disease are based on direct examination of gametocytes on Giemsa-stained blood smears. The objectives of this study were the investigation of infection prevalence in rural area dogs, the comparison of diagnostics by blood smear examination and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the association of infection with tick infestation. Blood smears, collected by puncture of the cephalic vein and ear margin capillary bed from 150 dogs, were examined. This technique detected 17 positive animals (11.3%), with 14 (9.3%) in peripheral blood and seven (4.7%) in cephalic vein blood. PCR tests detected 80 (53.3%) positive animals. R. sanguineus and Amblyomma spp. were found in 36 of the dogs (24%), in equal proportions. The identified species for Amblyomma genus were A. cajennense and A. ovale. Data analysis showed that PCR was much more sensitive when compared to blood smear examination. Hepatozoon species was previously identified as closely related to H. canis. PMID:18188597

  14. Quantifying 3H-thymidine incorporation rates by a phylogenetically defined group of marine planktonic bacteria (Bacteriodetes phylum).

    PubMed

    van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Devol, Allan H; Keil, Richard G

    2004-10-01

    The rate of [(3)H-methyl] thymidine ((3)H-TdR) incorporation into DNA has been applied extensively to measure cell production by bacterial communities in aquatic environments. Here we describe a method to quantify (3)H-TdR incorporation by specific, phylogenetically defined members of the bacterial community. The method involves selectively capturing DNA from targeted groups of bacteria and then quantifying its (3)H radioactivity. The method was applied to measure (3)H-TdR incorporation by the members of the phylum Bacteriodetes whose members, which include the Cytophaga-Flavobacter cluster, are ubiquitous in coastal waters. (3)H-labelled DNA from Bacteriodetes was selectively biotinylated in PCR-like reactions that contained a Bacteriodetes-specific 16S rRNA gene primer, thermostable DNA polymerase and biotinylated dUTP. The biotinylated DNA was then captured on streptavidin-coated beads and its (3)H radioactivity determined by scintillation counting. We have termed this method 'selective nucleic acid polymerase-biotinylation and capture' or 'SNAP-BAC'. Internal (33)P-labelled DNA standards were used to quantify the recovery of (3)H-labelled DNA from the SNAP-BAC reactions. The method was verified by successfully targeting Bacteriodetes in simple laboratory mixtures of (3)H-labelled DNA extracted from pure cultures of Bacteriodetes and gamma-proteobacteria. Field application of this method in Puget Sound and off the Washington coast determined that Bacteriodetes were responsible for 56 +/- 17% and 32 +/- 5% of community (3)H-TdR incorporation (1.3 +/- 0.3 and 9.9 +/- 1.7 pmol l(-1) h(-1)) at these two locations. PMID:15344931

  15. Screening of antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate extracts of phylum Mollusca from South East Coast of India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Arumugam, Muthuvel; Azad, Raj Vardhan; Saxena, Rohit; Ghose, Supriyo; Biswas, Nihar Ranjan; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antiangiogenic potential of twenty two marine invertebrate species of Phylum Mollusca from south east coast of India. Methods Live specimens of molluscan species were collected and their methanolic extracts were evaluated for preliminary antiangiogenic activity using the in ovo chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay. The extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity using chemical cautery induced corneal neovascularization assay in rats and oxygen induced retinopathy assay in rat pups. Results In the chick chorio-allantoic membrane assay, four methanolic extracts of marine molluscan species viz. Meretrix meretrix, Meretrix casta, Telescopium telescopium and Bursa crumena methanolic extracts exhibited noticeable antiangiogenic activity at the tested concentration of 200 µg whereby they significantly inhibited the VEGF induced proliferation of new blood vessels. Among these four extracts, the methanolic extract of Meretrix casta exhibited relatively higher degree of antiangiogenic activity with an inhibitiory percentage (64.63%) of the VEGF induced neovascularization followed by the methanolic extracts of Telescopium telescopium (62.02%), Bursa crumena (60.48%) and Meretrix meretrix (47.01%). These four methanolic extracts were further evaluated for in vivo antiangiogenic activity whereby the methanolic extract of Telescopium telescopium exhibited most noticeable inhibition (42.58%) of the corneal neovascularization in rats in comparison to the sham treated group, and also exhibited most noticeable inhibition (31.31%) of the oxygen induced retinal neovascularization in rat pups in comparison to the hyperoxia group that was observed for considerable retinal neovascularization. Conclusions The significant antiangiogenic activity evinced by the extract of Telescopium telescopium merits further investigation for ocular neovascular diseases. PMID:25183067

  16. Community genomic analyses constrain the distribution of metabolic traits across the Chloroflexi phylum and indicate roles in sediment carbon cycling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sediments are massive reservoirs of carbon compounds and host a large fraction of microbial life. Microorganisms within terrestrial aquifer sediments control buried organic carbon turnover, degrade organic contaminants, and impact drinking water quality. Recent 16S rRNA gene profiling indicates that members of the bacterial phylum Chloroflexi are common in sediment. Only the role of the class Dehalococcoidia, which degrade halogenated solvents, is well understood. Genomic sampling is available for only six of the approximate 30 Chloroflexi classes, so little is known about the phylogenetic distribution of reductive dehalogenation or about the broader metabolic characteristics of Chloroflexi in sediment. Results We used metagenomics to directly evaluate the metabolic potential and diversity of Chloroflexi in aquifer sediments. We sampled genomic sequence from 86 Chloroflexi representing 15 distinct lineages, including members of eight classes previously characterized only by 16S rRNA sequences. Unlike in the Dehalococcoidia, genes for organohalide respiration are rare within the Chloroflexi genomes sampled here. Near-complete genomes were reconstructed for three Chloroflexi. One, a member of an unsequenced lineage in the Anaerolinea, is an aerobe with the potential for respiring diverse carbon compounds. The others represent two genomically unsampled classes sibling to the Dehalococcoidia, and are anaerobes likely involved in sugar and plant-derived-compound degradation to acetate. Both fix CO2 via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, a pathway not previously documented in Chloroflexi. The genomes each encode unique traits apparently acquired from Archaea, including mechanisms of motility and ATP synthesis. Conclusions Chloroflexi in the aquifer sediments are abundant and highly diverse. Genomic analyses provide new evolutionary boundaries for obligate organohalide respiration. We expand the potential roles of Chloroflexi in sediment carbon cycling beyond organohalide respiration to include respiration of sugars, fermentation, CO2 fixation, and acetogenesis with ATP formation by substrate-level phosphorylation. PMID:24450983

  17. Exploring the potential of small RNA subunit and ITS sequences for resolving phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Ctenophora.

    PubMed

    Simion, Paul; Bekkouche, Nicolas; Jager, Muriel; Quéinnec, Eric; Manuel, Michaël

    2015-04-01

    Ctenophores are a phylum of non-bilaterian marine (mostly planktonic) animals, characterised by several unique synapomorphies (e.g., comb rows, apical organ). Relationships between and within the nine recognised ctenophore orders are far from understood, notably due to a paucity of phylogenetically informative anatomical characters. Previous attempts to address ctenophore phylogeny using molecular data (18S rRNA) led to poorly resolved trees but demonstrated the paraphyly of the order Cydippida. Here we compiled an updated 18S rRNA data set, notably including a few newly sequenced species representing previously unsampled families (Lampeidae, Euryhamphaeidae), and we constructed an additional more rapidly evolving ITS1 + 5.8S rRNA + ITS2 alignment. These data sets were analysed separately and in combination under a probabilistic framework, using different methods (maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference) and models (e.g., doublet model to accommodate secondary structure; data partitioning). An important lesson from our exploration of these datasets is that the fast-evolving internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions are useful markers for reconstructing high-level relationships within ctenophores. Our results confirm the paraphyly of the order Cydippida (and thus a "cydippid-like" ctenophore common ancestor) and suggest that the family Mertensiidae could be the sister group of all other ctenophores. The family Lampeidae (also part of the former "Cydippida") is probably the sister group of the order Platyctenida (benthic ctenophores). The order Beroida might not be monophyletic, due to the position of Beroe abyssicola outside of a clade grouping the other Beroe species and members of the "Cydippida" family Haeckeliidae. Many relationships (e.g. between Pleurobrachiidae, Beroida, Cestida, Lobata, Thalassocalycida) remain unresolved. Future progress in understanding ctenophore phylogeny will come from the use of additional rapidly evolving markers and improvement of taxonomic sampling. PMID:25440713

  18. Drug repurposing: mining protozoan proteomes for targets of known bioactive compounds

    PubMed Central

    Sateriale, Adam; Bessoff, Kovi; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Huston, Christopher D

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify potential opportunities for drug repurposing by developing an automated approach to pre-screen the predicted proteomes of any organism against databases of known drug targets using only freely available resources. Materials and methods We employed a combination of Ruby scripts that leverage data from the DrugBank and ChEMBL databases, MySQL, and BLAST to predict potential drugs and their targets from 13 published genomes. Results from a previous cell-based screen to identify inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum growth were used to validate our in-silico prediction method. Results In-vitro validation of these results, using a cell-based C parvum growth assay, showed that the predicted inhibitors were significantly more likely than expected by chance to have confirmed activity, with 8.9–15.6% of predicted inhibitors confirmed depending on the drug target database used. This method was then used to predict inhibitors for the following 13 disease-causing protozoan parasites, including: C parvum, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis, Leishmania braziliensis, Leishmania donovani, Leishmania major, Naegleria gruberi (in proxy of Naegleria fowleri), Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, Toxoplasma gondii, Trichomonas vaginalis, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi. Conclusions Although proteome-wide screens for drug targets have disadvantages, in-silico methods can be developed that are fast, broad, inexpensive, and effective. In-vitro validation of our results for C parvum indicate that the method presented here can be used to construct a library for more directed small molecule screening, or pipelined into structural modeling and docking programs to facilitate target-based drug development. PMID:23757409

  19. Experimental studies of protozoan response to intense magnetic fields and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    Intense static magnetic fields of up to 31 Tesla were used as a novel tool to manipulate the swimming mechanics of unicellular organisms. It is shown that homogenous magnetic fields alter the swimming trajectories of the single cell protozoan Paramecium caudatum, by aligning them parallel to the applied field. Immobile neutrally buoyant paramecia also oriented in magnetic fields with similar rates as the motile ones. It was established that the magneto-orientation is mostly due to the magnetic torques acting on rigid structures in the cell body and therefore the response is a non-biological, passive response. From the orientation rate of paramecia in various magnetic field strengths, the average anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the cell was estimated. It has also been demonstrated that magnetic forces can be used to create increased, decreased and even inverted simulated gravity environments for the investigation of the gravi-responses of single cells. Since the mechanisms by which Earth's gravity affects cell functioning are still not fully understood, a number of methods to simulate different strength gravity environments, such as centrifugation, have been employed. Exploiting the ability to exert magnetic forces on weakly diamagnetic constituents of the cells, we were able to vary the gravity from -8 g to 10 g, where g is Earth's gravity. Investigations of the swimming response of paramecia in these simulated gravities revealed that they actively regulate their swimming speed to oppose the external force. This result is in agreement with centrifugation experiments, confirming the credibility of the technique. Moreover, the Paramecium's swimming ceased in simulated gravity of 10 g, indicating a maximum possible propulsion force of 0.7 nN. The magnetic force technique to simulate gravity is the only earthbound technique that can create increased and decreased simulated gravities in the same experimental setup. These findings establish a general technique for applying continuously variable forces to cells or cell populations suitable for exploring their force transduction mechanisms.

  20. Functional Characterization of Peroxiredoxins from the Human Protozoan Parasite Giardia intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Fabrizio; Pucillo, Leopoldo Paolo; Teixeira, Miguel; Sarti, Paolo; Saraiva, Lígia M.; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The microaerophilic protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis, causative of one of the most common human intestinal diseases worldwide, infects the mucosa of the proximal small intestine, where it has to cope with O2 and nitric oxide (NO). Elucidating the antioxidant defense system of this pathogen lacking catalase and other conventional antioxidant enzymes is thus important to unveil novel potential drug targets. Enzymes metabolizing O2, NO and superoxide anion (O2?•) have been recently reported for Giardia, but it is yet unknown how the parasite copes with H2O2 and peroxynitrite (ONOO?). Giardia encodes two yet uncharacterized 2-cys peroxiredoxins (Prxs), GiPrx1a and GiPrx1b. Peroxiredoxins are peroxidases implicated in virulence and drug resistance in several parasitic protozoa, able to protect from nitroxidative stress and repair oxidatively damaged molecules. GiPrx1a and a truncated form of GiPrx1b (deltaGiPrx1b) were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and functionally characterized. Both Prxs effectively metabolize H2O2 and alkyl-hydroperoxides (cumyl- and tert-butyl-hydroperoxide) in the presence of NADPH and E. coli thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin as the reducing system. Stopped-flow experiments show that both proteins in the reduced state react with ONOO? rapidly (k?=?4×105 M?1 s?1 and 2×105 M?1 s?1 at 4°C, for GiPrx1a and deltaGiPrx1b, respectively). Consistent with a protective role against oxidative stress, expression of GiPrx1a (but not deltaGiPrx1b) is induced in parasitic cells exposed to air O2 for 24 h. Based on these results, GiPrx1a and deltaGiPrx1b are suggested to play an important role in the antioxidant defense of Giardia, possibly contributing to pathogenesis. PMID:24416465

  1. Elongation Factor-1a is a novel protein associated with host cell invasion and a potential protective antigen of Cryptosporidium parvum*

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phylum Apicomplexa comprises obligate intracellular parasites that infect vertebrates. All invasive forms of Apicomplexa possess a unique complex of organelles at the anterior end, referred to as the apical complex, which is involved in host cell invasion. Previously, we generated the chicken m...

  2. Polymorphic family of injected pseudokinases is paramount in Toxoplasma virulence

    E-print Network

    Reese, Michael L.

    Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, has the unusual ability to infect virtually any warm-blooded animal. It is an extraordinarily successful parasite, infecting an estimated 30% ...

  3. EUKARYOTIC CELL, Dec. 2005, p. 20572065 Vol. 4, No. 12 1535-9778/05/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/EC.4.12.20572065.2005

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    modifying machinery in parasitic protozoa. We have previously identified GNAT family HATs expression in pathogenic protozoa and provides evolutionary insight into how these processes operate in eukaryotic cells in general. The phylum Apicomplexa includes an assortment of para- sitic protozoa

  4. Circadian variation in shedding of the oocysts of Isospora turdi (Apicomplexa) in blackbirds (Turdusmerula): an adaptative trait against desiccation and ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Martinaud, G; Billaudelle, M; Moreau, J

    2009-05-01

    Many parasite species spend part of their life cycle in the external environment waiting for a new host. Emergence of parasites often occurs once a day, which may help to minimise mortality in an inhospitable environment and increase transition rates. Many intestinal parasites in birds are released in faeces only in the late afternoon. However, the adaptative significance of this pattern is unclear. One hypothesis is that a particular time of emergence may prevent parasite desiccation and therefore increase the parasite's life expectancy in the external environment. We tested this hypothesis experimentally using the blackbird (Turdus merula) infected with Isospora turdi (Protozoa: Apicomplexa). We found that short exposure of faeces to natural sunlight has a dramatic effect on oocyst survival. This appears to be due to the effect of warmth and ultraviolet (UV) radiation with UVB waves being more damaging than UVA. Oocysts contained in faeces shed in water are protected from the effect of sunlight. Together, these results suggest that the release of oocysts in the late afternoon is an adaptative trait to avoid desiccation and UV radiation, thus reducing mortality of the oocysts in the external environment. PMID:19100268

  5. Crystal structures of three protozoan homologs of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, Robert; Napuli, Alberto J; Kim, Jessica E; Buckner, Frederick S; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G J

    2011-01-01

    Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) is an essential enzyme that is recognizably conserved across all forms of life. It is responsible for activating and attaching tryptophan to a cognate tRNATrp molecule for use in protein synthesis. In some eukaryotes this original core function has been supplemented or modified through the addition of extra domains or the expression of variant TrpRS isoforms. The three TrpRS structures from pathogenic protozoa described here represent three illustrations of this malleability in eukaryotes. The Cryptosporidium parvum genome contains a single TrpRS gene, which codes for an N-terminal domain of uncertain function in addition to the conserved core TrpRS domains. Sequence analysis indicates that this extra domain, conserved among several apicomplexans, is related to the editing domain of some AlaRS and ThrRS. The C. parvum enzyme remains fully active in charging tRNATrp after truncation of this extra domain. The crystal structure of the active, truncated enzyme is presented here at 2.4 Å resolution. The Trypanosoma brucei genome contains separate cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of TrpRS that have diverged in their respective tRNA recognition domains. The crystal structure of the T. brucei cytosolic isoform is presented here at 2.8 Å resolution. The Entamoeba histolytica genome contains three sequences that appear to be TrpRS homologs. However one of these, whose structure is presented here at 3.0 Å resolution, has lost the active site motifs characteristic of the Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic domain while retaining the conserved features of a fully formed tRNATrp recognition domain. The biological function of this variant E. histolytica TrpRS remains unknown, but, on the basis of a completely conserved tRNA recognition region and evidence for ATP but not tryptophan binding, it is tempting to speculate that it may perform an editing function. Together with a previously reported structure of an unusual TrpRS from Giardia, these protozoan structures broaden our perspective on the extent of structural variation found in eukaryotic TrpRS homologs. PMID:21255615

  6. Crystal structures of three protozoan homologs of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Ethan A; Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, Robert; Napuli, Alberto J; Kim, Jessica E; Buckner, Frederick S; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G J

    2011-05-01

    Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) is an essential enzyme that is recognizably conserved across all forms of life. It is responsible for activating and attaching tryptophan to a cognate tRNA(Trp) molecule for use in protein synthesis. In some eukaryotes this original core function has been supplemented or modified through the addition of extra domains or the expression of variant TrpRS isoforms. The three TrpRS structures from pathogenic protozoa described here represent three illustrations of this malleability in eukaryotes. The Cryptosporidium parvum genome contains a single TrpRS gene, which codes for an N-terminal domain of uncertain function in addition to the conserved core TrpRS domains. Sequence analysis indicates that this extra domain, conserved among several apicomplexans, is related to the editing domain of some AlaRS and ThrRS. The C. parvum enzyme remains fully active in charging tRNA(Trp) after truncation of this extra domain. The crystal structure of the active, truncated enzyme is presented here at 2.4? resolution. The Trypanosoma brucei genome contains separate cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of TrpRS that have diverged in their respective tRNA recognition domains. The crystal structure of the T. brucei cytosolic isoform is presented here at 2.8? resolution. The Entamoeba histolytica genome contains three sequences that appear to be TrpRS homologs. However one of these, whose structure is presented here at 3.0? resolution, has lost the active site motifs characteristic of the Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic domain while retaining the conserved features of a fully formed tRNA(Trp) recognition domain. The biological function of this variant E. histolytica TrpRS remains unknown, but, on the basis of a completely conserved tRNA recognition region and evidence for ATP but not tryptophan binding, it is tempting to speculate that it may perform an editing function. Together with a previously reported structure of an unusual TrpRS from Giardia, these protozoan structures broaden our perspective on the extent of structural variation found in eukaryotic TrpRS homologs. PMID:21255615

  7. Epidemiology and Geographical Distribution of Enteric Protozoan Infections in Sydney, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Stephanie; Caprarelli, Graziella; Merif, Juan; Andresen, David; Hal, Sebastian Van; Stark, Damien; Ellis, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Enteric protozoa are associated with diarrhoeal illnesses in humans; however there are no recent studies on their epidemiology and geographical distribution in Australia. This study describes the epidemiology of enteric protozoa in the state of New South Wales and incorporates spatial analysis to describe their distribution. Design and methods Laboratory and clinical records from four public hospitals in Sydney for 910 patients, who tested positive for enteric protozoa over the period January 2007 - December 2010, were identified, examined and analysed. We selected 580 cases which had residence post code data available, enabling us to examine the geographic distribution of patients, and reviewed the clinical data of 252 patients to examine possible links between protozoa, demographic and clinical features. Results Frequently detected protozoa were Blastocystis spp. (57%), Giardia intestinalis (27%) and Dientamoeba fragilis (12%). The age distribution showed that the prevalence of protozoa decreased with age up to 24 years but increasing with age from 25 years onwards. The geographic provenance of the patients indicates that the majority of cases of Blastocystis (53.1%) are clustered in and around the Sydney City Business District, while pockets of giardiasis were identified in regional/rural areas. The distribution of cases suggests higher risk of protozoan infection may exist for some communities. Conclusions These findings provide useful information for policy makers to design and tailor interventions to target high risk communities. Follow-up investigation into the risk factors for giardiasis in regional/rural areas is needed. Significance for public health This research is significant since it provides the most recent epidemiological update on the common enteric protozoa affecting Australians. It reveals that enteric protozoa cause considerable disease burden in high risk city dwellers, and provides the evidence base for development of targeted interventions for their prevention and control in high risk populations. The prevalence of enteric protozoa in this metropolitan setting underscores that microorganisms do not respect borders and that a collaborative approach is needed to contain the global spread of infectious diseases. Incorporating spatial analysis is valuable in providing a compelling picture of the geographical distribution of these often neglected diseases. Local and State Public Health departments can use this information to support further inves- PMID:25343139

  8. Identification of a surface membrane proton-translocating ATPase in promastigotes of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed Central

    Zilberstein, D; Dwyer, D M

    1988-01-01

    ATPase activities were measured in surface membranes and mitochondria isolated from promastigotes of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania donovani. The two enzymes were differentiated on the basis of pH optima, inhibitor sensitivity and by immunochemical methods. The surface-membrane (SM-) ATPase had an activity of 100 nmol/min per mg of protein, which was optimal at pH 6.5. The enzyme was Mg2+-dependent, partially inhibited by Ca2+, and unaffected by Na+ or K+. The SM-ATPase was inhibited by orthovanadate, NN'-dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide, and N-ethylmaleimide [IC50 (concentration causing half-maximal inhibition) 7.5, 25 and 520 microM respectively]; however, it was unaffected by ouabain, azide or oligomycin. The SM-ATPase demonstrated a Km of 1.05 mM and a Vmax. of 225 nmol/min per mg of protein. Moreover, fine-structure cytochemical results demonstrated that the SM-ATPase was localized to the cytoplasmic lamina of the parasite SM. A method was devised for the isolation of SM-derived vesicles. These were used to demonstrate the proton-pumping capacity of the SM-ATPase. Cumulatively, these results constitute the first demonstration of a surface-membrane proton-translocating ATPase in a parasitic protozoan. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:2906239

  9. Spironucleus meleagridis, an enteric diplomonad protozoan of cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus): preliminary molecular characterization and association with clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, M G; Powers, L V; Gore, K C; Marr, H S

    2015-03-15

    A flagellated enteric diplomonad protozoan consistent with Spironucleus meleagridis (formerly Hexamita meleagridis) associated with gastrointestinal disease and mortality in psittacine birds including cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) has been sporadically described in the literature. However, molecular characterization of psittacine protozoal isolates had not yet been performed. The 16S rRNA gene from a protozoan persistently shed in the feces in a small group of cockatiels demonstrated a 98% molecular identity with S. meleagridis isolated from turkeys. Based on these sequence data, a diagnostic PCR assay was developed to detect the presence of S. meleagridis. Nineteen privately owned pet cockatiels from unrelated households were clinically evaluated. All birds microscopically positive for this organism were PCR positive, with several additional birds microscopically negative but PCR positive. Many of the birds identified as positive for S. meleagridis by fecal PCR had signs of gastrointestinal disease such as diarrhea, soft feces, and melena, whereas none of the birds that tested negative had gastrointestinal signs. Examination of feces from two unrelated cockatiel breeding facilities revealed 70% and 86% PCR positive rates. Prevalence of infection and incidence of clinical disease, including factors that lead to clinical manifestation such as viral, bacterial, or mycotic coinfections, are not yet known and warrant further study, but spironucleosis is likely an under-recognized disease in cockatiels. PMID:25595477

  10. Protozoan Fauna and Abundance in Aeration Tanks of Three Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibewu, M.; Momba, M. N. B.; Okoh, A. L.

    This study focuses on the assessment of the protozoan fauna and abundance in the mixed liquors of aeration tanks of the three municipal wastewater treatment plants located in Fort Beaufort, Dimbaza and East London in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa and their implication to the production of effluents of good quality. The samples were collected between September and December 2005 and protozoa species were identified by direct microscopic observations at x400 magnification by comparison with existing protozoa gallery collections. A total of 68 protozoan genera made up of 44 ciliates, 16 flagellates and 8 others were identified in wastewater treatment plants. Although in all aerobic zones the average density of ciliates was 104 cells mL-1, which indicated that these plants were able to produce clear effluent of good quality, a better performance was found in Dimbaza and East London, which had total protozoan genera of 27 and 26, respectively.

  11. Protozoan infections (Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Sarcocystis spp.) in sheep and goats: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Buxton, D

    1998-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is a serious cause of fetal mortality in sheep and goats. Oocysts, the parasite stage responsible for initiating infection, are produced following a primary infection in cats. A primary infection in pregnant sheep and goats can establish a placental and fetal infection which may result in fetal death and resorption, abortion or stillbirth. Diagnosis is aided by the clinical picture, the presence of characteristic small white necrotic foci in placental cotyledons, the possible presence of a mummified fetus and on fetal serology and histopathology. Development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) specific for T. gondii may also provide a valuable diagnostic tool. Measures to control abortion include improved management of farm cats, fodder and water. Vaccination of sheep with the live vaccine is an effective preventive measure and the use of decoquinate in feed may be useful in some situations. Neospora caninum is related to T. gondii and while its asexual life cycle is similar to that of the latter it is currently not known whether it has a similar sexual life cycle in a definitive host. Neospora is an important cause of fetal loss in cattle and parallels that of T. gondii infection in sheep and goats. While it does not appear to cause frequent losses in these latter animals, experimental infection is readily induced in them and if initiated during pregnancy provides a very good model of the bovine infection. Furthermore clinical signs and pathological lesions in sheep and goats are similar to those induced in them by T. gondii, although there are subtle histopathological differences. These changes will aid possible diagnosis as will specific serological tests such as the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test and the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and the PCR. Sarcocystis, which exists as numerous species, undergoes a coccidian-like life cycle with each having a distinctive definitive (usually carnivore) host which excretes sporocysts into the environment. Clinical sarcocystiosis is much less commonly diagnosed than toxoplasmosis and neither is it normally associated with fetal infection or abortion in either sheep or goats. However, infection is extremely common throughout the world and follows ingestion of food or water contaminated with sporocysts. Clinical signs, when seen, include fever, anaemia, inappetance and weight loss or reduced weight gain. Central nervous signs (hind limb weakness, ataxia, paresis), acute myopathy and death may occur. Diagnosis is difficult as infection is so common and clinical signs absent, mild or non-specific. Serology may be useful in some situations and histopathology/immunohistochemistry is valuable for confirming the cause of death. Control relies on preventing contamination of pasture and water with faeces of dogs, foxes and cats or by controlling access of young susceptible stock to contaminated land. Relatively little is known of the immunity induced by infection with Sarcocystis spp. but research indicates that protective immunity does develop and that cell-mediated mechanisms are probably important. It is likely that sarcocystiosis is underdiagnosed as a problem and that better diagnostic methods are needed to show the true extent of the losses caused. Neosporosis on the other hand would appear not to be so common in sheep and goats. The value of experimental infections in these animals may be to provide a comparative model of the infection in cattle in the same way that our understanding of toxoplasmosis in sheep provides a superior model of human toxoplasmosis. PMID:9689743

  12. The Candidate Phylum Poribacteria by Single-Cell Genomics: New Insights into Phylogeny, Cell-Compartmentation, Eukaryote-Like Repeat Proteins, and Other Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Kamke, Janine; Rinke, Christian; Schwientek, Patrick; Mavromatis, Kostas; Ivanova, Natalia; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The candidate phylum Poribacteria is one of the most dominant and widespread members of the microbial communities residing within marine sponges. Cell compartmentalization had been postulated along with their discovery about a decade ago and their phylogenetic association to the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae superphylum was proposed soon thereafter. In the present study we revised these features based on genomic data obtained from six poribacterial single cells. We propose that Poribacteria form a distinct monophyletic phylum contiguous to the PVC superphylum together with other candidate phyla. Our genomic analyses supported the possibility of cell compartmentalization in form of bacterial microcompartments. Further analyses of eukaryote-like protein domains stressed the importance of such proteins with features including tetratricopeptide repeats, leucin rich repeats as well as low density lipoproteins receptor repeats, the latter of which are reported here for the first time from a sponge symbiont. Finally, examining the most abundant protein domain family on poribacterial genomes revealed diverse phyH family proteins, some of which may be related to dissolved organic posphorus uptake. PMID:24498082

  13. Development of single-nucleotide polymorphism-based phylum-specific PCR amplification technique: application to the community analysis using ciliates as a reference organism.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Ho; Kim, Sanghee; Ryu, Seongho; Kim, Min-Seok; Baek, Ye-Seul; Kim, Se-Joo; Choi, Joong-Ki; Park, Joong-Ki; Min, Gi-Sik

    2012-10-01

    Despite recent advance in mass sequencing technologies such as pyrosequencing, assessment of culture-independent microbial eukaryote community structures using universal primers remains very difficult due to the tremendous richness and complexity of organisms in these communities. Use of a specific PCR marker targeting a particular group would provide enhanced sensitivity and more in-depth evaluation of microbial eukaryote communities compared to what can be achieved with universal primers. We discovered that many phylum- or group-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exist in small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes from diverse eukaryote groups. By applying this discovery to a known simple allele-discriminating (SAP) PCR method, we developed a technique that enables the identification of organisms belonging to a specific higher taxonomic group (or phylum) among diverse types of eukaryotes. We performed an assay using two complementary methods, pyrosequencing and clone library screening. In doing this, specificities for the group (ciliates) targeted in this study in bulked environmental samples were 94.6% for the clone library and 99.2% for pyrosequencing, respectively. In particular, our novel technique showed high selectivity for rare species, a feature that may be more important than the ability to identify quantitatively predominant species in community structure analyses. Additionally, our data revealed that a target-specific library (or ciliate-specific one for the present study) can better explain the ecological features of a sampling locality than a universal library. PMID:22965748

  14. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Sara B.; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to.

  15. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sara B.; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to. PMID:26437902

  16. Molecular assessment of Hepatozoon (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) infections in wild canids and rodents from north Africa, with implications for transmission dynamics across taxonomic groups.

    PubMed

    Maia, João P; Alvares, Francisco; Boraty?ski, Zbyszek; Brito, José C; Leite, João V; Harris, D James

    2014-10-01

    Parasites play a major role in ecosystems, and understanding of host-parasite interactions is important for predicting parasite transmission dynamics and epidemiology. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about the distribution, diversity, and impact of parasites in wildlife, especially from remote areas. Hepatozoon is a genus of apicomplexan parasites that is transmitted by ingestion of infected arthropod vectors. However, alternative modes of transmission have been identified such as trophic transmission. Using the 18S rRNA gene as a marker, we provide an assessment of Hepatozoon prevalence in six wild canid and two rodent species collected between 2003 and 2012 from remote areas in North Africa. By combining this with other predator-prey systems in a phylogenetic framework, we investigate Hepatozoon transmission dynamics in distinct host taxa. Prevalence was high overall among host species (African jerboa Jaculus jaculus [17/47, 36%], greater Egyptian jerboa Jaculus orientalis [5/7, 71%], side-striped jackal Canis adustus [1/2, 50%], golden jackal Canis aureus [6/32, 18%], pale fox Vulpes pallida [14/28, 50%], Rüppell's fox Vulpes rueppellii [6/11, 55%], red fox Vulpes vulpes [8/16, 50%], and fennec fox Vulpes zerda [7/11, 42%]). Phylogenetic analysis showed further evidence of occasional transmission of Hepatozoon lineages from prey to canid predators, which seems to occur less frequently than in other predator-prey systems such as between snakes and lizards. Due to the complex nature of the Hepatozoon lifecycle (heteroxenous and vector-borne), future studies on these wild host species need to clarify the dynamics of alternative modes of Hepatozoon transmission and identify reservoir and definitive hosts in natural populations. We also detected putative Babesia spp. (Apicomplexa: Piroplasmida) infections in two canid species from this region, V. pallida (1/28) and V. zerda (1/11). PMID:25050803

  17. Control of malaria and other vector-borne protozoan diseases in the tropics: enduring challenges despite considerable progress and achievements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne protozoan diseases represent a serious public health challenge, especially in the tropics where poverty together with vector-favorable climates are the aggravating factors. Each of the various strategies currently employed to face these scourges is seriously inadequate. Despite enormous efforts, vaccines—which represent the ideal weapon against these parasitic diseases—are yet to be sufficiently developed and implemented. Chemotherapy and vector control are therefore the sole effective attempts to minimize the disease burden. Nowadays, both strategies are also highly challenged by the phenomenon of drug and insecticide resistance, which affects virtually all interventions currently used. The recently growing support from international organizations and governments of some endemic countries is warmly welcome, and should be optimally exploited in the various approaches to drug and insecticide research and development to overcome the burden of these prevalent diseases, especially malaria, leishmaniasis, Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), and Chagas disease. PMID:24401663

  18. Use of GenMAPP and MAPPFinder to analyse pathways involved in chickens infected with the protozoan parasite Eimeria

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, Dennis; Watson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarrays allow genome-wide assays of gene expression. There is a need for user-friendly software to visualise and analyse these data. Analysing microarray data in the context of biological pathways is now common, and several tools exist. Results We describe the use of MAPPFinder, a component of GenMAPP to characterise the biological pathways affected in chickens infected with the protozoan parasite Eimeria. Several pathways were significantly affected based on the unadjusted p-value, including several immune-system pathways. Conclusion GenMAPP/MAPPFinder provides a means to rapidly visualise pathways affected in microarray studies. However, it relies on good genome annotation and having genes reliably linked to pathway objects. We show that GenMAPP/MAPPFinder can produce useful results, and as the annotation of the chicken genome improves, so will the level of information gained. PMID:19615120

  19. Protozoan and myxozoan infections in wild gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) from North Lake of Tunis, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Bahri, Sihem

    2012-06-01

    A total of 150 gilthead seabream Sparus aurata L., from North Lake of Tunis, Tunisia, were studied for protozoan and myxozoan parasites. The parasitological survey revealed the presence of ectoparasites (Amyloodinium ocellatum Brown, 1931, Trichodina lepsii Lom, 1962 on the gills) and endoparasites (Ceratomyxa sparusaurati Sitjà-Bobadilla, Palenzuela et Alvarez-Pellitero, 1995 infecting the gallbladder, and Eimeria sparis Sitjà-Bobadilla, Palenzuela et Alvarez-Pellitero, 1996 parasitizing the intestine). This is the first record of Amyloodinium ocellatum, Trichodina lepsii, Ceratomyxa sparusaurati, and Eimeria sparis in S. aurata from Tunisian waters. Data on prevalence and intensity of infection are provided. A comparison of the present species with previously described species in cultured gilthead seabream from other Mediterranean countries is also presented. In this study Trichodina lepsii is identified for the first time in Sparus aurata. A taxonomic description of this species based on silver nitrate method is provided. PMID:22807047

  20. Application of magnetically induced hyperthermia on the model protozoan Crithidia fasciculata as a potential therapy against parasitic infections

    E-print Network

    Grazú, V; Moros, M; Asín, L; Torres, T E; Marquina, C; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F; 10.2147/IJN.S35510

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia is currently an EU-approved clinical therapy against tumor cells that uses magnetic nanoparticles under a time varying magnetic field (TVMF). The same basic principle seems promising against trypanosomatids causing Chagas disease and sleeping sickness, since therapeutic drugs available display severe side effects and drug-resistant strains. However, no applications of this strategy against protozoan-induced diseases have been reported so far. In the present study, Crithidia fasciculata, a widely used model for therapeutic strategies against pathogenic trypanosomatids, was targeted with Fe_{3}O_{4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in order to remotely provoke cell death using TVMFs. The MNPs with average sizes of d approx. 30 nm were synthesized using a precipitation of FeSO_{4}4 in basic medium. The MNPs were added to Crithidia fasciculata choanomastigotes in exponential phase and incubated overnight. The amount of uploaded MNPs per cell was determined by magnetic measurements. Cell viabili...

  1. Application of magnetically induced hyperthermia on the model protozoan Crithidia fasciculata as a potential therapy against parasitic infections

    E-print Network

    V. Grazú; A. M. Silber; M. Moros; L. Asín; T. E. Torres; C. Marquina; M. R. Ibarra; G. F. Goya

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia is currently an EU-approved clinical therapy against tumor cells that uses magnetic nanoparticles under a time varying magnetic field (TVMF). The same basic principle seems promising against trypanosomatids causing Chagas disease and sleeping sickness, since therapeutic drugs available display severe side effects and drug-resistant strains. However, no applications of this strategy against protozoan-induced diseases have been reported so far. In the present study, Crithidia fasciculata, a widely used model for therapeutic strategies against pathogenic trypanosomatids, was targeted with Fe_{3}O_{4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in order to remotely provoke cell death using TVMFs. The MNPs with average sizes of d approx. 30 nm were synthesized using a precipitation of FeSO_{4}4 in basic medium. The MNPs were added to Crithidia fasciculata choanomastigotes in exponential phase and incubated overnight. The amount of uploaded MNPs per cell was determined by magnetic measurements. Cell viability using the MTT colorimetric assay and flow cytometry showed that the MNPs were incorporated by the cells with no noticeable cell-toxicity effects. When a TVMF (f = 249 kHz, H = 13 kA/m) was applied to MNP-bearing cells, massive cell death was induced via a non-apoptotic mechanism. No effects were observed by applying a TVMF on control (without loaded MNPs) cells. No macroscopic rise in temperature was observed in the extracellular medium during the experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy showed morphological changes after TVMF experiments. These data indicate (as a proof of principle) that intracellular hyperthermia is a suitable technology to induce the specific death of protozoan parasites bearing MNPs. These findings expand the possibilities for new therapeutic strategies that combat parasitic infections.

  2. Detection of protozoan hosts for Legionella pneumophila in engineered water systems by using a biofilm batch test.

    PubMed

    Valster, Rinske M; Wullings, Bart A; van der Kooij, Dick

    2010-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila proliferates in aquatic habitats within free-living protozoa, 17 species of which have been identified as hosts by using in vitro experiments. The present study aimed at identifying protozoan hosts for L. pneumophila by using a biofilm batch test (BBT). Samples (600 ml) collected from 21 engineered freshwater systems, with added polyethylene cylinders to promote biofilm formation, were inoculated with L. pneumophila and subsequently incubated at 37°C for 20 days. Growth of L. pneumophila was observed in 16 of 18 water types when the host protozoan Hartmannella vermiformis was added. Twelve of the tested water types supported growth of L. pneumophila or indigenous Legionella anisa without added H. vermiformis. In 12 of 19 BBT flasks H. vermiformis was indicated as a host, based on the ratio between maximum concentrations of L. pneumophila and H. vermiformis, determined with quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), and the composition of clone libraries of partial 18S rRNA gene fragments. Analyses of 609 eukaryotic clones from the BBTs revealed that 68 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed the highest similarity to free-living protozoa. Forty percent of the sequences clustering with protozoa showed ?99.5% similarity to H. vermiformis. None of the other protozoa serving as hosts in in vitro studies were detected in the BBTs. In several tests with growth of L. pneumophila, the protozoa Diphylleia rotans, Echinamoeba thermarum, and Neoparamoeba sp. were identified as candidate hosts. In vitro studies are needed to confirm their role as hosts for L. pneumophila. Unidentified protozoa were implicated as hosts for uncultured Legionella spp. grown in BBT flasks at 15°C. PMID:20851993

  3. Physiology and phylogeny of the candidate phylum "Atribacteria" (formerly OP9/JS1) inferred from single-cell genomics and metagenomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodsworth, J. A.; Murugapiran, S.; Blainey, P. C.; Nobu, M.; Rinke, C.; Schwientek, P.; Gies, E.; Webster, G.; Kille, P.; Weightman, A.; Liu, W. T.; Hallam, S.; Tsiamis, G.; Swingley, W.; Ross, C.; Tringe, S. G.; Chain, P. S.; Scholz, M. B.; Lo, C. C.; Raymond, J.; Quake, S. R.; Woyke, T.; Hedlund, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Single-cell sequencing and metagenomics have extended the genomics revolution to yet-uncultivated microorganisms and provided insights into the coding potential of this so-called "microbial dark matter", including microbes belonging candidate phyla with no cultivated representatives. As more datasets emerge, comparison of individual genomes from different lineages and habitats can provide insight into the phylogeny, conserved features, and potential metabolic diversity of candidate phyla. The candidate bacterial phylum OP9 was originally found in Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, and it has since been detected in geothermal springs, petroleum reservoirs, and engineered thermal environments worldwide. JS1, another uncultivated bacterial lineage affiliated with OP9, is often abundant in marine sediments associated with methane hydrates, hydrocarbon seeps, and on continental margins and shelves, and is found in other non-thermal marine and subsurface environments. The phylogenetic relationship between OP9, JS1, and other Bacteria has not been fully resolved, and to date no axenic cultures from these lineages have been reported. Recently, 31 single amplified genomes (SAGs) from six distinct OP9 and JS1 lineages have been obtained using flow cytometric and microfluidic techniques. These SAGs were used to inform metagenome binning techniques that identified OP9/JS1 sequences in several metagenomes, extending genomic coverage in three of the OP9 and JS1 lineages. Phylogenomic analyses of these SAG and metagenome bin datasets suggest that OP9 and JS1 constitute a single, deeply branching phylum, for which the name "Atribacteria" has recently been proposed. Overall, members of the "Atribacteria" are predicted to be heterotrophic anaerobes without the capacity for respiration, with some lineages potentially specializing in secondary fermentation of organic acids. A set of signature "Atribacteria" genes was tentatively identified, including components of a bacterial microcompartments gene cluster that may be involved in carbohydrate catabolism. The "Atribacteria" may play important roles in biomass processing in anaerobic geothermal and subsurface environments.

  4. Morpho-functional characterization and esterase patterns of the midgut of Tribolium castaneum Herbst, 1797 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) parasitized by Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinidae).

    PubMed

    Gigliolli, Adriana A Sinópolis; Lapenta, Ana Silva; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, Maria Claudia Colla; Abrahão, Josielle; Conte, Hélio

    2015-09-01

    Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) is a common pest of stored grains and byproducts and is normally infected by Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinidae). The life cycle of this parasite includes the sporozoite, trophozoite, gamont, gametocyte, and oocyst stages, which occur between the epithelium and lumen of the host's midgut. This study aims to describe the morphofunctional alterations in the midgut and determine the esterase patterns in T. castaneum when parasitized by gregarines. To achieve this purpose, midguts of adult insects were isolated, processed, and analysed using light and electron microscopy. We determined total protein content, amylase activity, and the expression and related activities of the esterases by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The midgut of T. castaneum is formed by digestive, regenerative, and endocrine cells. The effects of parasitism on the digestive cells are severe, because the gregarines remain attached to these cells to absorb all the nutrients they need throughout their development. In these cells, the most common alterations observed include expansion and fragmentation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, development of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, changes in mitochondrial cristae, cytoplasmic vacuolization, formation of myelin structures, spherites, large intercellular spaces, autophagic vesicles, expansion of the basal labyrinth, and cytoplasmic protrusions. Deposits of glycogen granules were also observed. Amylase activity was reduced in parasitized insects. Regenerative cells were found in disorganized crypts and did not differentiate into new cells, thus, compromising the restoration of the damaged epithelium. Though few morphological alterations were observed in the endocrine cells, results suggest that the synthesis and/or release of hormones might be impaired. Nine esterases (EST-1 to 9) were identified in the midgut of T. castaneum and were expressed in varying levels in response to parasitism. Two additional isoforms of esterases were exclusively identified in the parasitized insects. The results of this study suggest that gregarines alter the morphology and physiology of the midgut. The changes may result in nutritional depletion and the impairment of other physiological processes, such as reproduction and development of the host. Thus, further studies are needed to uncover the possibility of utilizing gregarines as biological controllers of the insect pest population. PMID:26072335

  5. Temporal population dynamics of dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum in a semi-enclosed mariculture pond and its relationship to environmental factors and protozoan grazers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Henglong; Min, Gi-Sik; Choi, Joong-Ki; Zhu, Mingzhuang; Jiang, Yong; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.

    2010-01-01

    The ecological processes and interrelationships between protists, either autotrophic or heterotrophic, and environmental factors in mariculture ponds are largely unknown. This study investigated the temporal dynamics of potentially harmful dinoflagellate, Prorocentrum minimum (Pavillard) Schiller, and its relationship to physico-chemical factors and protozoan grazers over a complete cycle in a semi-enclosed shrimp-farming pond near Qingdao, Northern China. P. minimum occurred frequently in low numbers from June to August, followed by a sharp increase from the middle of August, reaching a single maximum peak value of 2.2×105 cells L-1 in October. Temporal variation in abundance was positively correlated with dissolved nitrogen, but showed a significant inverse relationship to abundance of the dominant ciliates, Tintinnopsis lohmanni and Askenasia stellaris. The results provide statistical evidence that the number of P. minimum increased with increasing nitrogen, and the suppression or shortening of algal bloom may be associated with protozoan grazers, such as Tintinnopsis lohmanni, in mariculture ponds.

  6. Styrax japonica supplementation diet enhances the innate immune response in Epinephelus bruneus against bacterial and protozoan infections.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Kim, Ju-Sang; Kim, Man-Chul; Balasundaram, Chellam; Heo, Moon-Soo

    2011-11-01

    Kelp grouper, Epinephelus bruneus, fed for 30 days with 0% (control), 0.1%, 1.0%, and 2.0% of Styrax japonica supplementation diets, led to reductions in mortality after being challenged with a bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) and a ciliate protozoan (Uronema marinum). The enriched diets significantly increased the survival rate as compared to the controls. The phagocytic and respiratory activities were significantly increased in kelp groupers given 1.0% and 2.0% enriched diets. The complement activity, lysozyme activity, serum bactericidal activity, and total protein level significantly increased with any enriched diet against the pathogens; however antiprotease activity and myeloperoxidase levels significantly increased only with 1.0% and 2.0% enriched diets while the ?2-macroglobulin level was significantly enhanced with 1.0% enriched diet. The study suggests that incorporation of S. japonica at 1.0% and 2.0% level in the diet significantly enhances the immune responses in the kelp grouper E. bruneus against V. harveyi and U. marinum. PMID:21824474

  7. Incidence of adult brain cancers is higher in countries where the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Frédéric; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Brodeur, Jacques; Elguero, Eric; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Missé, Dorothée

    2012-01-01

    We explored associations between the common protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and brain cancers in human populations. We predicted that T. gondii could increase the risk of brain cancer because it is a long-lived parasite that encysts in the brain, where it provokes inflammation and inhibits apoptosis. We used a medical geography approach based on the national incidence of brain cancers and seroprevalence of T. gondii. We corrected reports of incidence for national gross domestic product because wealth probably increases the ability to detect cancer. We also included gender, cell phone use and latitude as variables in our initial models. Prevalence of T. gondii explained 19 per cent of the residual variance in brain cancer incidence after controlling for the positive effects of gross domestic product and latitude among nations. Infection with T. gondii was associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of brain cancers across the range of T. gondii prevalence in our dataset (4–67%). These results, though correlational, suggest that T. gondii should be investigated further as a possible oncogenic pathogen of humans.

  8. Lipidomic Analysis Reveals That Phosphatidylglycerol and Phosphatidylethanolamine are Newly Generated Phospholipids in an Early-Divergent Protozoan, Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Yichoy, Mayte; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Shpak, Max; Aguilar, Clemente; Aley, Stephen B.; Almeida, Igor C.; Das, Siddhartha

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenic protozoan Giardia lamblia is known to not synthesize membrane lipids de novo. Therefore, it is possible that lipids in the small intestine, where trophozoites colonize, play key roles in regulating the growth and differentiation of this important pathogen. The focus of the current study is to conduct a complete lipidomic analysis and to test the hypothesis that Giardia has some ability to generate new phospholipids (PLs). Using mass spectrometry, now we show that phosphatidylglycerols (PGs) are major PLs followed by phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs) in non-encysting and encysting trophozoites, as well in cysts. The fatty acids attached to these PLs consist mostly of palmitate, palmitoleate, oleate, and linoleate. Results also indicate that PGs and PEs, unlike PCs, are not present in bovine bile and serum, the major sources of lipids of the culture medium, and that they could therefore be produced by fatty acid and headgroup remodeling reactions, circumventing the synthesis of entirely new PLs via de novo pathways. Genomic and transcriptional analyses show the presence of giardial phosphatidylglycerolphosphate synthase (gpgs) and phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (gpsd) genes, which are expressed throughout the life cycle. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses further indicated that both genes are of prokaryotic origin and that they have undergone duplication in the course of the evolution. Our studies suggest that the abundance of PG in Giardia is unique among eukaryotes and that its synthesis thus could serve as a potential target for developing new therapies against this waterborne parasite. PMID:19393163

  9. 2-acylamino-5-nitro-1,3-thiazoles: preparation and in vitro bioevaluation against four neglected protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Nava-Zuazo, Carlos; Chávez-Silva, Fabiola; Moo-Puc, Rosa; Chan-Bacab, Manuel Jesús; Ortega-Morales, Benjamín Otto; Moreno-Díaz, Hermenegilda; Díaz-Coutiño, Daniel; Hernández-Núñez, Emanuel; Navarrete-Vázquez, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    The 2-acylamino-5-nitro-1,3-thiazole derivatives (1-14) were prepared using a one step reaction. All compounds were tested in vitro against four neglected protozoan parasites (Giardia intestinalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi). Acetamide (9), valeroylamide (10), benzamide (12), methylcarbamate (13) and ethyloxamate (14) derivatives were the most active compounds against G. intestinalis and T. vaginalis, showing nanomolar inhibition. Compound 13 (IC50=10nM), was 536-times more active than metronidazole, and 121-fold more effective than nitazoxanide against G. intestinalis. Compound 14 was 29-times more active than metronidazole and 6.5-fold more potent than nitazoxanide against T. vaginalis. Ureic derivatives 2, 3 and 5 showed moderate activity against L. amazonensis. None of them were active against T. cruzi. Ligand efficiency indexes analysis revealed higher intrinsic quality of the most active 2-acylamino derivatives than nitazoxanide and metronidazole. In silico toxicity profile was also computed for the most active compounds. A very low in vitro mammalian cytotoxicity was obtained for 13 and 14, showing selectivity indexes (SI) of 246,300 and 141,500, respectively. Nitazoxanide showed an excellent leishmanicidal and trypanocidal effect, repurposing this drug as potential new antikinetoplastid parasite compound. PMID:24529307

  10. The water-born protein pheromones of the polar protozoan ciliate, Euplotes nobilii: Coding genes and molecular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallesi, Adriana; Alimenti, Claudio; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Dini, Fernando; Pedrini, Bill; Wüthrich, Kurt; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2010-08-01

    The protozoan ciliate Euplotes nobilii found in Antarctic and Arctic coastal waters relies on secretion of water-soluble cell type-specific signal proteins (pheromones) to regulate its vegetative growth and sexual mating. For three of these psychrophilic pheromones we previously determined the three-dimensional structures by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with protein solutions purified from the natural sources, which led to evidence that their adaptation to cold is primarily achieved by increased flexibility through an extension of regions free of regular secondary structures, and by increased exposure of negative charges on the protein surface. Then we cloned the coding genes of these E. nobilii pheromones from the transcriptionally active cell somatic nucleus (macronucleus) and characterized the full-length sequences. These sequences all contain an open reading frame of 252-285 nucleotides, which is specific for a cytoplasmic pheromone precursor that requires two proteolytic cleavages to remove a signal peptide and a pro segment before release of the mature protein into the extracellular environment. The 5? and 3? non-coding regions are two- to three-fold longer than the coding region and appear to be tightly conserved, probably in relation to the inclusion of intron sequences destined to be alternatively removed to play key regulatory roles in the mechanism of the pheromone gene expression.

  11. Glycoproteins, antigens, and regulation of complement activation on the surface of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma lewisi: implications for immune evasion

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The surface antigens and glycoproteins of the rat parasitic protozoan, Trypanosoma lewisi were characterized. Radioiodination with /sup 125/I identified 10 out of more 40 polypeptides separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All of these components were identified as glycoproteins by peroxidase-conjugated Conconavalin A (HR-Con A) lectin affinoblotting. This analysis detected that quantitative but not qualitative changes occurred during infection. Localization of most of the reactive determinants was indicated by immunoblotting extracts of radioiodinated T. lewisi. Changes in the antigenicity as related to survival in the host are discussed. The presence of IgG and IgM on the surface of T. lewisi isolated from intact and ..gamma..-irradiated rats (irr.) and that determinants bind Ig from uninfected rat sera (NRS) was indicated by flow cytometric analysis. Immunoblotting identified the major NRS IgG binding component as the 74 kd surface glycoprotein. Complement component C3 deposition during infection was indicated by flow cytometric analysis and immunoblotting. Incubation of intact T. lewisi with normal human sera indicated that C3, C5, and factor B deposition was Mg/sup 2 +/ dependent, Ca/sup 2 +/ independent and deposited C3 was rapidly processed to hemolytically inactive fragments. Radioiodination of intact and protease T. lewisi after cultivation identified three components which correlate with resistance to lysis. This suggests that surface moieties on intact T. lewisi modulate host complement activity by restricting C3/C5 convertase activity.

  12. Involvement of a putative intercellular signal-recognizing G protein-coupled receptor in the engulfment of Salmonella by the protozoan Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    Agbedanu, P.N.; Brewer, M.T.; Day, T.A.; Kimber, M.J.; Anderson, K.L.; Rasmussen, S.K.; Rasmussen, M.A.; Carlson, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to investigate the molecular basis of protozoa engulfment-mediated hypervirulence of Salmonella in cattle, we evaluated protozoan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as transducers of Salmonella engulfment by the model protozoan Tetrahymena. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that non-pathogenic protozoa (including Tetrahymena) engulf Salmonella and then exacerbate its virulence in cattle, but the mechanistic details of the phenomenon are not fully understood. GPCRs were investigated since these receptors facilitate phagocytosis of particulates by Tetrahymena, and a GPCR apparently modulates bacterial engulfment for the pathogenic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. A database search identified three putative Tetrahymena GPCRs, based on sequence homologies and predicted transmembrane domains, that were the focus of this study. Salmonella engulfment by Tetrahymena was assessed in the presence of suramin, a non-specific GPCR inhibitor. Salmonella engulfment was also assessed in Tetrahymena in which expression of putative GPCRs was knocked-down using RNAi. A candidate GPCR was then expressed in a heterologous yeast expression system for further characterization. Our results revealed that Tetrahymena were less efficient at engulfing Salmonella in the presence of suramin. Engulfment was reduced concordantly with a reduction in the density of protozoa. RNAi-based studies revealed that knock-down of one the Tetrahymena GPCRs caused diminished engulfment of Salmonella. Tetrahymena lysates activated this receptor in the heterologous expression system. These data demonstrate that the Tetrahymena receptor is a putative GPCR that facilitates bacterial engulfment by Tetrahymena. Activation of the putative GPCR seemed to be related to protozoan cell density, suggesting that its cognate ligand is an intercellular signaling molecule.

  13. Reconstruction of ancestral 16S rRNA reveals mutation bias in the evolution of optimal growth temperature in the Thermotogae phylum.

    PubMed

    Green, Anna G; Swithers, Kristen S; Gogarten, Jan F; Gogarten, Johann Peter

    2013-11-01

    Optimal growth temperature is a complex trait involving many cellular components, and its physiology is not yet fully understood. Evolution of continuous characters, such as optimal growth temperature, is often modeled as a one-dimensional random walk, but such a model may be an oversimplification given the complex processes underlying the evolution of continuous characters. Recent articles have used ancestral sequence reconstruction to infer the optimal growth temperature of ancient organisms from the guanine and cytosine content of the stem regions of ribosomal RNA, allowing inferences about the evolution of optimal growth temperature. Here, we investigate the optimal growth temperature of the bacterial phylum Thermotogae. Ancestral sequence reconstruction using a nonhomogeneous model was used to reconstruct the stem guanine and cytosine content of 16S rRNA sequences. We compare this sequence reconstruction method with other ancestral character reconstruction methods, and show that sequence reconstruction generates smaller confidence intervals and different ancestral values than other reconstruction methods. Unbiased random walk simulation indicates that the lower temperature members of the Thermotogales have been under directional selection; however, when a simulation is performed that takes possible mutations into account, it is the high temperature lineages that are, in fact, under directional selection. We find that the evolution of Thermotogales optimal growth temperatures is best fit by a biased random walk model. These findings suggest that it may be easier to evolve from a high optimal growth temperature to a lower one than vice versa. PMID:23966548

  14. Phylogenetic and taxonomic analysis of Neptunitalea chrysea gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the phylum Bacteroidetes isolated from seawater by using an in situ cultivation technique.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Kasai, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    A novel pale-yellow coloured bacterial strain, designated AM327(T), was isolated by using an in situ cultivation technique from seawater from the coastal zone around a shipyard located in Otsuchi Bay, Japan. The strain was found to be facultatively anaerobic, Gram-stain negative, chemoheterotrophic, non-motile and rod-shaped. Preliminary analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the novel isolate is affiliated with the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes and that it shows high sequence similarity (94.7 %) to Frondibacter aureus A5Q-67(T). The strain can be differentiated phenotypically from recognised members of the family Flavobacteriaceae. The DNA G+C content of strain AM327(T) was determined to be 36.2 mol%; MK-6 was identified as the major menaquinone; iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0 3-OH were identified as the major (>10 %) cellular fatty acids. The polar lipid profile was found to consist of phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified aminophospholipid, an unidentified glycolipid and two unidentified lipids. From the distinct phylogenetic position and combination of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, strain AM327(T) is considered to represent a novel genus for which the name Neptunitalea chrysea gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of N. chrysea is AM327(T) (=KCTC 32989(T) = NBRC 110019(T)). PMID:26089031

  15. Development and application of primers for the class Dehalococcoidia (phylum Chloroflexi) enables deep insights into diversity and stratification of subgroups in the marine subsurface.

    PubMed

    Wasmund, Kenneth; Algora, Camelia; Müller, Josefine; Krüger, Martin; Lloyd, Karen G; Reinhardt, Richard; Adrian, Lorenz

    2015-10-01

    Bacteria of the class Dehalococcoidia (DEH) (phylum Chloroflexi) are widely distributed in the marine subsurface and are especially prevalent in deep marine sediments. Nevertheless, little is known about the specific distributions of DEH subgroups at different sites and depths. This study therefore specifically examined the distributions of DEH through depths of various marine sediment cores by quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing using newly designed DEH 16S rRNA gene targeting primers. Quantification of DEH showed populations may establish in shallow sediments (i.e. upper centimetres), although as low relative proportions of total Bacteria, yet often became more prevalent in deeper sediments. Pyrosequencing revealed pronounced diversity co-exists within single biogeochemical zones, and that clear and sometimes abrupt shifts in relative proportions of DEH subgroups occur with depth. These shifts indicate varying metabolic properties exist among DEH subgroups. The distributional changes in DEH subgroups with depth may be related to a combination of biogeochemical factors including the availability of electron acceptors such as sulfate, the composition of organic matter and depositional regimes. Collectively, the results suggest DEH exhibit wider metabolic and genomic diversity than previously recognized, and this contributes to their widespread occurrence in the marine subsurface. PMID:24889097

  16. Molecular and phylogenetic characterization of honey bee viruses, Nosema microsporidia, protozoan parasites, and parasitic mites in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bu; Peng, Guangda; Li, Tianbang; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2013-02-01

    China has the largest number of managed honey bee colonies, which produce the highest quantity of honey and royal jelly in the world; however, the presence of honey bee pathogens and parasites has never been rigorously identified in Chinese apiaries. We thus conducted a molecular survey of honey bee RNA viruses, Nosema microsporidia, protozoan parasites, and tracheal mites associated with nonnative Apis mellifera ligustica and native Apis cerana cerana colonies in China. We found the presence of black queen cell virus (BQCV), chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV), deformed wing virus (DWV), Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), and sacbrood virus (SBV), but not that of acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) or Kashmir bee virus (KBV). DWV was the most prevalent in the tested samples. Phylogenies of Chinese viral isolates demonstrated that genetically heterogeneous populations of BQCV, CBPV, DWV, and A. cerana-infecting SBV, and relatively homogenous populations of IAPV and A. meliifera-infecting new strain of SBV with single origins, are spread in Chinese apiaries. Similar to previous observations in many countries, Nosema ceranae, but not Nosema apis, was prevalent in the tested samples. Crithidia mellificae, but not Apicystis bombi was found in five samples, including one A. c. cerana colony, demonstrating that C. mellificae is capable of infecting multiple honey bee species. Based on kinetoplast-encoded cytochrome b sequences, the C. mellificae isolate from A. c. cerana represents a novel haplotype with 19 nucleotide differences from the Chinese and Japanese isolates from A. m. ligustica. This suggests that A. c. cerana is the native host for this specific haplotype. The tracheal mite, Acarapis woodi, was detected in one A. m. ligustica colony. Our results demonstrate that honey bee RNA viruses, N. ceranae, C. mellificae, and tracheal mites are present in Chinese apiaries, and some might be originated from native Asian honey bees. PMID:23467539

  17. Molecular and phylogenetic characterization of honey bee viruses, Nosema microsporidia, protozoan parasites, and parasitic mites in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bu; Peng, Guangda; Li, Tianbang; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    China has the largest number of managed honey bee colonies, which produce the highest quantity of honey and royal jelly in the world; however, the presence of honey bee pathogens and parasites has never been rigorously identified in Chinese apiaries. We thus conducted a molecular survey of honey bee RNA viruses, Nosema microsporidia, protozoan parasites, and tracheal mites associated with nonnative Apis mellifera ligustica and native Apis cerana cerana colonies in China. We found the presence of black queen cell virus (BQCV), chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV), deformed wing virus (DWV), Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), and sacbrood virus (SBV), but not that of acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) or Kashmir bee virus (KBV). DWV was the most prevalent in the tested samples. Phylogenies of Chinese viral isolates demonstrated that genetically heterogeneous populations of BQCV, CBPV, DWV, and A. cerana-infecting SBV, and relatively homogenous populations of IAPV and A. meliifera-infecting new strain of SBV with single origins, are spread in Chinese apiaries. Similar to previous observations in many countries, Nosema ceranae, but not Nosema apis, was prevalent in the tested samples. Crithidia mellificae, but not Apicystis bombi was found in five samples, including one A. c. cerana colony, demonstrating that C. mellificae is capable of infecting multiple honey bee species. Based on kinetoplast-encoded cytochrome b sequences, the C. mellificae isolate from A. c. cerana represents a novel haplotype with 19 nucleotide differences from the Chinese and Japanese isolates from A. m. ligustica. This suggests that A. c. cerana is the native host for this specific haplotype. The tracheal mite, Acarapis woodi, was detected in one A. m. ligustica colony. Our results demonstrate that honey bee RNA viruses, N. ceranae, C. mellificae, and tracheal mites are present in Chinese apiaries, and some might be originated from native Asian honey bees. PMID:23467539

  18. Incidence and persistence of zoonotic bacterial and protozoan pathogens in a beef cattle feedlot runoff control vegetative treatment system.

    PubMed

    Berry, Elaine D; Woodbury, Bryan L; Nienaber, John A; Eigenberg, Roger A; Thurston, Jeanette A; Wells, James E

    2007-01-01

    Determining the survival of zoonotic pathogens in livestock manure and runoff is critical for understanding the environmental and public health risks associated with these wastes. The occurrence and persistence of the bacterial pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter spp. in a passive beef cattle feedlot runoff control-vegetative treatment system were examined over a 26-mo period. Incidence of the protozoans Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. was also assessed. The control system utilizes a shallow basin to collect liquid runoff and accumulate eroded solids from the pen surfaces; when an adequate liquid volume is attained, the liquid is discharged from the basin onto a 4.5-ha vegetative treatment area (VTA) of bromegrass which is harvested as hay. Basin discharge transported E. coli O157, Campylobacter spp., and generic E. coli into the VTA soil, but without additional discharge from the basin, the pathogen prevalences decreased over time. Similarly, the VTA soil concentrations of generic E. coli initially decreased rapidly, but lower residual populations persisted. Isolation of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts from VTA samples was infrequent, indicating differences in sedimentation and/or transport in comparison to bacteria. Isolation of generic E. coli from freshly cut hay from VTA regions that received basin discharge (12 of 30 vs. 1 of 30 control samples) provided evidence for the risk of contamination; however, neither E. coli O157 or Campylobacter spp. were recovered from the hay following baling. This work indicates that the runoff control system is effective for reducing environmental risk by containing and removing pathogens from feedlot runoff. PMID:17965390

  19. A genomewide overexpression screen identifies genes involved in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway in the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Koushik, Amrita B; Welter, Brenda H; Rock, Michelle L; Temesvari, Lesly A

    2014-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes amoebic dysentery and liver abscess. E. histolytica relies on motility, phagocytosis, host cell adhesion, and proteolysis of extracellular matrix for virulence. In eukaryotic cells, these processes are mediated in part by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Thus, PI3K may be critical for virulence. We utilized a functional genomics approach to identify genes whose products may operate in the PI3K pathway in E. histolytica. We treated a population of trophozoites that were overexpressing genes from a cDNA library with a near-lethal dose of the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. This screen was based on the rationale that survivors would be overexpressing gene products that directly or indirectly function in the PI3K pathway. We sequenced the overexpressed genes in survivors and identified a cDNA encoding a Rap GTPase, a protein previously shown to participate in the PI3K pathway. This supports the validity of our approach. Genes encoding a coactosin-like protein, EhCoactosin, and a serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP) were also identified. Cells overexpressing EhCoactosin or SREHP were also less sensitive to a second PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. This corroborates the link between these proteins and PI3K. Finally, a mutant cell line with an increased level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, the product of PI3K activity, exhibited increased expression of SREHP and EhCoactosin. This further supports the functional connection between these proteins and PI3K in E. histolytica. To our knowledge, this is the first forward-genetics screen adapted to reveal genes participating in a signal transduction pathway in this pathogen. PMID:24442890

  20. Present status of protozoan pathogens causing water-borne disease in northern part of El-Minia Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Refaat M A; Ahmad, Azza K; Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Mosllem, Fadia A

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the role of different water supplies in the diversity and public health significance of pathogenic protozoan parasites. Most of these organisms have been ubiquitous in waters worldwide. The numbers of waterborne infections indicate a significant risk for their transmission even by drinking water. Hence, a total of 336 water samples were collected during 2009-2013 from different water sources from different areas of northern part of El-Minia Govemnorate, Egypt and were investigated for pathogenic protozoa. They were examined by direct microscopy followed by Modified Ziehl- Neelsen and Giemsa stains. 140 samples (41.7 %) were positive (statistically significant; P value P<0.0003). Prevalence rates were in Summer (66.7%/), Spring (51.1%), Fall (26.2 %) and Winter (22.6%). These data were statistically significant (P<0.0001). The commonest protozoa detected as a single infection was Cryptosporidium sp. (53.17%) found in all water supplies, followed by Blastocystis hominis (15.87%), Cyclospora caytenensis (11.9%), Entamoeba hiseolytica/dispar (8.73%) Giardia lamblia (6.35%() and Naegleria sp., (3.97%). Moreover, there were 14 samples with mixed parsitic infection: they were Cryptosporidium sp. and B. hominis in six samples, Cryptosporidum sp. and C. caytenenisin five samples and Cryptosporidium sp. and E histolytica/dispar in three samples. The most common contamninated water source was ponds where 32 samples (66.7%) were-positive followed by canal water 30 samples (62.5%). The results were discussed and the recommendations were offered. PMID:25643498

  1. Novel Insights into the Molecular Events Linking to Cell Death Induced by Tetracycline in the Amitochondriate Protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ku, Fu-Man; Cheng, Wei-Hung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Huang, Po-Jung; Chu, Lichieh Julie; Cheng, Chih-Chieh; Fang, Yi-Kai; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia; Tang, Petrus

    2015-11-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis colonizes the human urogenital tract and causes trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease. Currently, 5-nitroimidazoles are the only recommended drugs for treating trichomoniasis. However, increased resistance of the parasite to 5-nitroimidazoles has emerged as a highly problematic public health issue. Hence, it is essential to identify alternative chemotherapeutic agents against refractory trichomoniasis. Tetracycline (TET) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against several protozoan parasites, but the mode of action of TET in parasites remains poorly understood. The in vitro effect of TET on the growth of T. vaginalis was examined, and the mode of cell death was verified by various apoptosis-related assays. Next-generation sequencing-based RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was employed to elucidate the transcriptome of T. vaginalis in response to TET. We show that TET has a cytotoxic effect on both metronidazole (MTZ)-sensitive and -resistant T. vaginalis isolates, inducing some features resembling apoptosis. RNA-seq data reveal that TET significantly alters the transcriptome via activation of specific pathways, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and carbohydrate metabolism. Functional analyses demonstrate that TET disrupts the hydrogenosomal membrane potential and antioxidant system, which concomitantly elicits a metabolic shift toward glycolysis, suggesting that the hydrogenosomal function is impaired and triggers cell death. Collectively, we provide in vitro evidence that TET is a potential alternative therapeutic choice for treating MTZ-resistant T. vaginalis. The in-depth transcriptomic signatures in T. vaginalis upon TET treatment presented here will shed light on the signaling pathways linking to cell death in amitochondriate organisms. PMID:26303799

  2. Seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton and planktonic protozoan communities in a northern temperate humic lake: diversity in a dinoflagellate dominated system.

    PubMed

    Graham, J M; Kent, A D; Lauster, G H; Yannarell, A C; Graham, L E; Triplett, E W

    2004-11-01

    Species diversity and richness, and seasonal population dynamics of phytoplankton, planktonic protozoa, and bacterioplankton sampled from the epilimnion of Crystal Bog in 2000, were examined in order to test the hypothesis that these groups' diversity and abundance patterns might be linked. Crystal Bog, a humic lake in Vilas County, Wisconsin, is part of the North Temperate Lakes Long-Term Ecological Research Site. Phytoplankton and planktonic protozoa were identified and enumerated in a settling chamber with an inverted microscope. Bacterial cells were enumerated with the use of fluorescence 4', 6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-staining procedures, and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was used to assess bacterioplankton diversity. Bacterial cell counts showed little seasonal variation and averaged 2.6 x 10(6) cells/mL over the ice-free season. Phytoplankton and planktonic protozoan numbers varied by up to two orders of magnitude and were most numerous in late spring and summer. Dinoflagellates largely dominated Crystal Bog throughout the ice-free period, specifically Peridiniopsis quadridens in the spring, Peridinium limbatum in summer, and Gymnodinium fuscum and P. quadridens in fall. Brief blooms of Cryptomonas, Dinobryon, and Synura occurred between periods of dinoflagellate domination. The dominant dinoflagellate, Peridinium limbatum, was calculated to have a growth rate of 0.065 day(-1) and a doubling time of 10.7 days. Heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNFs) were a consistent component of the planktonic protozoa; seasonal patterns were determined for three genera of HNFs (Monosiga, Bicosoeca, and Desmarella moniliformis). Three genera of ciliates (Coleps, Strobilidium, and Strombidium) comprised the greater part of the planktonic protozoa in Crystal Bog. The number of species of planktonic protozoa was too low to calculate a diversity index. Shannon-Weaver diversity indices for phytoplankton and bacterioplankton in the epilimnion followed very similar seasonal patterns in this lake, supporting the hypothesis that in freshwaters, diversity patterns of these groups are linked. PMID:15696386

  3. A novel protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is involved in the transformation of human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    González, Jorge; Cornejo, Alberto; Santos, Marcia R M; Cordero, Esteban M; Gutiérrez, Bessy; Porcile, Patricio; Mortara, Renato A; Sagua, Hernán; Da Silveira, José Franco; Araya, Jorge E

    2003-01-01

    Here we provide evidence for a critical role of PP2As (protein phosphatase 2As) in the transformation of Trypanosoma cruzi. In axenic medium at pH 5.0, trypomastigotes rapidly transform into amastigotes, a process blocked by okadaic acid, a potent PP2A inhibitor, at concentrations as low as 0.1 microM. 1-Norokadaone, an inactive okadaic acid analogue, did not affect the transformation. Electron microscopy studies indicated that okadaic acid-treated trypomastigotes had not undergone ultrastructural modifications, reinforcing the idea that PP2A inhibits transformation. Using a microcystin-Sepharose affinity column we purified the native T. cruzi PP2A. The enzyme displayed activity against 32P-labelled phosphorylase a that was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by okadaic acid. The protein was also submitted to MS and, from the peptides obtained, degenerate primers were used to clone a novel T. cruzi PP2A enzyme by PCR. The isolated gene encodes a protein of 303 amino acids, termed TcPP2A, which displayed a high degree of homology (86%) with the catalytic subunit of Trypanosoma brucei PP2A. Northern-blot analysis revealed the presence of a major 2.1-kb mRNA hybridizing in all T. cruzi developmental stages. Southern-blot analysis suggested that the TcPP2A gene is present in low copy number in the T. cruzi genome. These results are consistent with the mapping of PP2A genes in two chromosomal bands by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and chromoblot hybridization. Our studies suggest that in T. cruzi PP2A is important for the complete transformation of trypomastigotes into amastigotes during the life cycle of this protozoan parasite. PMID:12737627

  4. Burden of major diarrheagenic protozoan parasitic co-infection among amoebic dysentery cases from North East India: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nath, Joyobrato; Hussain, Gulzar; Singha, Baby; Paul, Jaishree; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal diarrheagenic polyparasitic infections are among the major public health concerns in developing countries. Here we examined stool specimens by microscopy, DNA dot blot and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to evaluate the co-infection of four principal protozoans among amoebic dysentery cases from Northeast Indian population. The multiplex PCR confirmed Entamoeba histolytica (8.1%), Entamoeba dispar (4.8%) and mixed infection of both the parasites (3.4%) in 68 of 356 stool specimens that were positive in microscopy and/or HMe probe based DNA dot blot screening. The prevailing parasite that co-exists with E. histolytica was Giardia duodenalis (34.1%), followed by Enterocytozoon bieneusi (22.0%), Cryptosporidium parvum (14.6%) and Cyclospora cayetanensis (7.3%, P = 0.017). Symptomatic participants (odds ratio (OR) = 4.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06, 15.68; P = 0.041), monsoon season (OR = 7.47; 95% CI = 1.40, 39.84; P = 0.046) and participants with family history of parasitic infection (OR = 4.50; 95% CI = 1.16, 17.51; P = 0.030) have significant association with overall co-infection rate. According to molecular consensus, comprehensive microscopy yielded 3.4% (12/356) false-negative and 7.6% (27/356) false-positive outcome, suggesting an improved broad-spectrum PCR-based diagnostic is required to scale down the poor sensitivity and specificity as well as implementation of integrated control strategy. PMID:26099490

  5. Evidence for the induction of casein kinase II in bovine lymphocytes transformed by the intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria parva.

    PubMed Central

    ole-MoiYoi, O K; Brown, W C; Iams, K P; Nayar, A; Tsukamoto, T; Macklin, M D

    1993-01-01

    Theileria parva is an obligate, intracellular, parasitic protozoan that causes East Coast fever, an acute leukemia-like disease of cattle. T. parva and the related parasite, Theileria annulata, are unique among protozoa in that their intralymphocytic stages induce transformation of bovid lymphocytes. Comparison of in vitro protein kinase activities between uninfected IL-2-dependent T lymphoblasts and T. parva-infected lymphocytes revealed a 4.7- to 12-fold increase in total phosphorylation and the induction of a group of Theileria infection-specific phosphoproteins. The enzyme that phosphorylates these substrates is a serine/threonine kinase with substrate and effector specificities of casein kinase (CK) II. Northern blot analyses revealed a 3.9- to 6.0-fold increase in CKII alpha mRNA in the infected cells relative to the controls. Furthermore, a marked increase of CKII antigen was observed on Western blots of materials prepared from the infected cell lines. The antibovine CKII antibody used in these studies immunoprecipitated a protein kinase that phosphorylated casein in a reaction that was inhibited by low (nM) quantities of heparin. Our data show marked increases of bovine CKII at the transcriptional, translational and functional levels in T. parva-infected lymphocytes, relative to quiescent cells or IL-2-dependent parental lymphoblasts. Bovine CKII thus appears to be constitutively activated in these cells and we propose that this kinase may be an important element in the signal-transducing pathways activated by Theileria in bovid lymphocytes and perhaps in some leukemic cells. Images PMID:8467809

  6. Microbial community analysis in the roots of aquatic plants and isolation of novel microbes including an organism of the candidate phylum OP10.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Matsuzawa, Hiroaki; Nigaya, Masahiro; Mori, Kazuhiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    A number of molecular ecological studies have revealed complex and unique microbial communities in various terrestrial plant roots; however, little is known about the microbial communities of aquatic plant roots in spite of their potential use for water quality improvement in aquatic environments (e.g. floating treatment wetland system). Here, we report the microbial communities inhabiting the roots of emerged plants, reed (Phragmites australis) and Japanese loosestrife (Lythrum anceps), collected from a floating treatment wetland in a pond by both culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches. Culture-independent analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the microbial compositions between the two aquatic plant roots were clearly different (e.g. the predominant microbe was Betaproteobacteria for reed and Alphaproteobacteria for Japanese loosestrife). In comparisons of microbial communities between the plant roots and pond water taken from near the plants, the microbial diversity in the plant roots (e.g. 4.40-4.26 Shannon-Weiner index) were higher than that of pond water (e.g. 3.15 Shannon-Weiner index). Furthermore, the plant roots harbored 2.5-3.5 times more phylogenetically novel clone phylotypes than pond water. The culture-dependent approach also revealed differences in the microbial composition and diversity among the two plant roots and pond water. More importantly, compared to pond water, we succeeded in isolating approximately two times more novel isolate phylotypes, including a bacterium of candidate phylum OP10 (recently named Armatimonadetes) from the plant roots. These findings suggest that aquatic plants roots are significant sources for a variety of novel organisms. PMID:22791047

  7. Nitrososphaera viennensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic and mesophilic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from soil and a member of the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Klingl, Andreas; Alves, Ricardo J. E.; Rittmann, Simon K.-M. R.; Melcher, Michael; Leisch, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    A mesophilic, neutrophilic and aerobic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, strain EN76T, was isolated from garden soil in Vienna (Austria). Cells were irregular cocci with a diameter of 0.6–0.9 µm and possessed archaella and archaeal pili as cell appendages. Electron microscopy also indicated clearly discernible areas of high and low electron density, as well as tubule-like structures. Strain EN76T had an S-layer with p3 symmetry, so far only reported for members of the Sulfolobales. Crenarchaeol was the major core lipid. The organism gained energy by oxidizing ammonia to nitrite aerobically, thereby fixing CO2, but growth depended on the addition of small amounts of organic acids. The optimal growth temperature was 42 °C and the optimal pH was 7.5, with ammonium and pyruvate concentrations of 2.6 and 1 mM, respectively. The genome of strain EN76T had a DNA G+C content of 52.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA genes showed that strain EN76T is affiliated with the recently proposed phylum Thaumarchaeota, sharing 85?% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with the closest cultivated relative ‘Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus’ SCM1, a marine ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, and a maximum of 81?% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with members of the phyla Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota and any of the other recently proposed phyla (e.g. ‘Korarchaeota’ and ‘Aigarchaeota’). We propose the name Nitrososphaera viennensis gen. nov., sp. nov. to accommodate strain EN76T. The type strain of Nitrososphaera viennensis is strain EN76T (?=?DSM 26422T?=?JMC 19564T). Additionally, we propose the family Nitrososphaeraceae fam. nov., the order Nitrososphaerales ord. nov. and the class Nitrososphaeria classis nov. PMID:24907263

  8. Analysis of genome content evolution in pvc bacterial super-phylum: assessment of candidate genes associated with cellular organization and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Kamneva, Olga K; Knight, Stormy J; Liberles, David A; Ward, Naomi L

    2012-01-01

    The Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae (PVC) super-phylum contains bacteria with either complex cellular organization or simple cell structure; it also includes organisms of different lifestyles (pathogens, mutualists, commensal, and free-living). Genome content evolution of this group has not been studied in a systematic fashion, which would reveal genes underlying the emergence of PVC-specific phenotypes. Here, we analyzed the evolutionary dynamics of 26 PVC genomes and several outgroup species. We inferred HGT, duplications, and losses by reconciliation of 27,123 gene trees with the species phylogeny. We showed that genome expansion and contraction have driven evolution within Planctomycetes and Chlamydiae, respectively, and balanced each other in Verrucomicrobia and Lentisphaerae. We also found that for a large number of genes in PVC genomes the most similar sequences are present in Acidobacteria, suggesting past and/or current ecological interaction between organisms from these groups. We also found evidence of shared ancestry between carbohydrate degradation genes in the mucin-degrading human intestinal commensal Akkermansia muciniphila and sequences from Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes, suggesting that glycoside hydrolases are transferred laterally between gut microbes and that the process of carbohydrate degradation is crucial for microbial survival within the human digestive system. Further, we identified a highly conserved genetic module preferentially present in compartmentalized PVC species and possibly associated with the complex cell plan in these organisms. This conserved machinery is likely to be membrane targeted and involved in electron transport, although its exact function is unknown. These genes represent good candidates for future functional studies. PMID:23221607

  9. Synthesis, Solution Structure, and Phylum Selectivity of a Spider ?-Toxin That Slows Inactivation of Specific Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Subtypes*

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Nahoko; Little, Michelle J.; Nishio, Hideki; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Tytgat, Jan; Nicholson, Graham M.; Corzo, Gerardo

    2009-01-01

    Magi 4, now renamed ?-hexatoxin-Mg1a, is a 43-residue neurotoxic peptide from the venom of the hexathelid Japanese funnel-web spider (Macrothele gigas) with homology to ?-hexatoxins from Australian funnel-web spiders. It binds with high affinity to receptor site 3 on insect voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels but, unlike ?-hexatoxins, does not compete for the related site 3 in rat brain despite being previously shown to be lethal by intracranial injection. To elucidate differences in NaV channel selectivity, we have undertaken the first characterization of a peptide toxin on a broad range of mammalian and insect NaV channel subtypes showing that ?-hexatoxin-Mg1a selectively slows channel inactivation of mammalian NaV1.1, NaV1.3, and NaV1.6 but more importantly shows higher affinity for insect NaV1 (para) channels. Consequently, ?-hexatoxin-Mg1a induces tonic repetitive firing of nerve impulses in insect neurons accompanied by plateau potentials. In addition, we have chemically synthesized and folded ?-hexatoxin-Mg1a, ascertained the bonding pattern of the four disulfides, and determined its three-dimensional solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Despite modest sequence homology, we show that key residues important for the activity of scorpion ?-toxins and ?-hexatoxins are distributed in a topologically similar manner in ?-hexatoxin-Mg1a. However, subtle differences in the toxin surfaces are important for the novel selectivity of ?-hexatoxin-Mg1a for certain mammalian and insect NaV channel subtypes. As such, ?-hexatoxin-Mg1a provides us with a specific tool with which to study channel structure and function and determinants for phylum- and tissue-specific activity. PMID:19592486

  10. Analysis of Genome Content Evolution in PVC Bacterial Super-Phylum: Assessment of Candidate Genes Associated with Cellular Organization and Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Kamneva, Olga K.; Knight, Stormy J.; Liberles, David A.; Ward, Naomi L.

    2012-01-01

    The Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae (PVC) super-phylum contains bacteria with either complex cellular organization or simple cell structure; it also includes organisms of different lifestyles (pathogens, mutualists, commensal, and free-living). Genome content evolution of this group has not been studied in a systematic fashion, which would reveal genes underlying the emergence of PVC-specific phenotypes. Here, we analyzed the evolutionary dynamics of 26 PVC genomes and several outgroup species. We inferred HGT, duplications, and losses by reconciliation of 27,123 gene trees with the species phylogeny. We showed that genome expansion and contraction have driven evolution within Planctomycetes and Chlamydiae, respectively, and balanced each other in Verrucomicrobia and Lentisphaerae. We also found that for a large number of genes in PVC genomes the most similar sequences are present in Acidobacteria, suggesting past and/or current ecological interaction between organisms from these groups. We also found evidence of shared ancestry between carbohydrate degradation genes in the mucin-degrading human intestinal commensal Akkermansia muciniphila and sequences from Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes, suggesting that glycoside hydrolases are transferred laterally between gut microbes and that the process of carbohydrate degradation is crucial for microbial survival within the human digestive system. Further, we identified a highly conserved genetic module preferentially present in compartmentalized PVC species and possibly associated with the complex cell plan in these organisms. This conserved machinery is likely to be membrane targeted and involved in electron transport, although its exact function is unknown. These genes represent good candidates for future functional studies. PMID:23221607

  11. Oligosphaera ethanolica gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, carbohydrate-fermenting bacterium isolated from methanogenic sludge, and description of Oligosphaeria classis nov. in the phylum Lentisphaerae.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yan-Ling; Muramatsu, Mizuho; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Guo, Rong-Bo; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2013-02-01

    A mesophilic, obligately anaerobic, carbohydrate-fermenting bacterium, designated 8KG-4(T), was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating high-strength organic wastewater from salted vegetable production processes. Cells of strain 8KG-4(T) were non-motile, spherical and 0.7-1.5 µm in diameter (mean, 1.0 µm). Spore formation was not observed under any culture conditions tested. The strain grew optimally at 37 °C (range for growth 25-40 °C) and pH 7.0 (range, pH 6.5-7.5), and could grow fermentatively on glucose, ribose, xylose, galactose and sucrose. The main end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. Organic acids, alcohols and amino acids were not utilized for growth. Yeast extract was not required for growth. Nitrate, sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite and Fe(III) nitrilotriacetate were not used as terminal electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 61.1 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate represented a previously uncultured lineage at the subphylum level within the phylum Lentisphaerae known as 'WWE2 subgroup I'. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15?:?0), iso-C(16?:?0), C(16?:?0) and anteiso-C(17?:?0). Respiratory quinones were not detected. The most abundant polar lipid of strain 8KG-4(T) was phosphatidylethanolamine. A novel genus and species, Oligosphaera ethanolica gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate strain 8KG-4(T) (?=?JCM 17152(T)?=?DSM 24202(T) ?=?CGMCC 1.5160(T)). In addition, we formally propose Oligosphaeria classis nov. and the subordinate taxa Oligosphaerales order nov. and Oligosphaeraceae fam. nov. PMID:22523166

  12. Chthoniobacter flavus gen. nov., sp. nov., the first pure-culture representative of subdivision two, spartobacteria classis nov., of the phylum verrucomicrobia

    SciTech Connect

    Sangwan, Parveen; Chen, Xiaolei; Hugenholtz, Philip; Janssen, Peter H.

    2004-03-15

    The phylum Verrucomicrobia is increasingly recognized as an environmentally significant group of bacteria, particularly in soil habitats. At least six subdivisions of the Verrucomicrobia are resolved by comparative analysis of 16S rRNA genes, mostly obtained directly from environmental samples. To date, only two of these subdivisions (1 and 4) have characterized pure-culture representatives. We have isolated and characterized the first known pure-culture representative of subdivision 2. Strain Ellin428 is an aerobic heterotrophic bacterium that is able to grow with many of the saccharide components of plant biomass but does not grow with amino acids or organic acids other than pyruvate. Cells are yellow, rod-shaped, nonmotile, and gram-stain negative, and they contain peptidoglycan with direct cross-linkages of the A1{gamma} meso-Dpm type. The isolate grows well at 25 C on a variety of standard biological media, including some used in the routine cultivation of bacteria from soil. The pH range for growth is 4.0 to 7.0. Low levels of menaquinones MK-10 and MK-11 were detected. The major cellular fatty acids are C{sub 14:0}, a-C{sub 15:0}, C{sub 16:1{omega}7c}, and/or 2OH i-C{sub 15:0}, and C{sub 16:0}. The G+C content of the genomic DNA is 61 mol percent. We propose a new genus and species, Chthoniobacter flavus gen. nov., sp. nov., with isolate Ellin428 as the type strain, and a new class for the subdivision to which it belongs, Spartobacteria classis nov. Environmental sequences indicate that the class Spartobacteria is largely represented by globally distributed, abundant, and active soil bacteria.

  13. Microbial Community Analysis in the Roots of Aquatic Plants and Isolation of Novel Microbes Including an Organism of the Candidate Phylum OP10

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Matsuzawa, Hiroaki; Nigaya, Masahiro; Mori, Kazuhiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    A number of molecular ecological studies have revealed complex and unique microbial communities in various terrestrial plant roots; however, little is known about the microbial communities of aquatic plant roots in spite of their potential use for water quality improvement in aquatic environments (e.g. floating treatment wetland system). Here, we report the microbial communities inhabiting the roots of emerged plants, reed (Phragmites australis) and Japanese loosestrife (Lythrum anceps), collected from a floating treatment wetland in a pond by both culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches. Culture-independent analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the microbial compositions between the two aquatic plant roots were clearly different (e.g. the predominant microbe was Betaproteobacteria for reed and Alphaproteobacteria for Japanese loosestrife). In comparisons of microbial communities between the plant roots and pond water taken from near the plants, the microbial diversity in the plant roots (e.g. 4.40–4.26 Shannon-Weiner index) were higher than that of pond water (e.g. 3.15 Shannon-Weiner index). Furthermore, the plant roots harbored 2.5–3.5 times more phylogenetically novel clone phylotypes than pond water. The culture-dependent approach also revealed differences in the microbial composition and diversity among the two plant roots and pond water. More importantly, compared to pond water, we succeeded in isolating approximately two times more novel isolate phylotypes, including a bacterium of candidate phylum OP10 (recently named Armatimonadetes) from the plant roots. These findings suggest that aquatic plants roots are significant sources for a variety of novel organisms. PMID:22791047

  14. Assessing the resistance and bioremediation ability of selected bacterial and protozoan species to heavy metals in metal-rich industrial wastewater

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heavy-metals exert considerable stress on the environment worldwide. This study assessed the resistance to and bioremediation of heavy-metals by selected protozoan and bacterial species in highly polluted industrial-wastewater. Specific variables (i.e. chemical oxygen demand, pH, dissolved oxygen) and the growth/die-off-rates of test organisms were measured using standard methods. Heavy-metal removals were determined in biomass and supernatant by the Inductively Couple Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer. A parallel experiment was performed with dead microbial cells to assess the biosorption ability of test isolates. Results The results revealed that the industrial-wastewater samples were highly polluted with heavy-metal concentrations exceeding by far the maximum limits (in mg/l) of 0.05-Co, 0.2-Ni, 0.1-Mn, 0.1-V, 0.01-Pb, 0.01-Cu, 0.1-Zn and 0.005-Cd, prescribed by the UN-FAO. Industrial-wastewater had no major effects on Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus licheniformis and Peranema sp. (growth rates up to 1.81, 1.45 and 1.43 d-1, respectively) compared to other test isolates. This was also revealed with significant COD increases (p?protozoan isolates (up to 24% increase). Living Pseudomonas putida demonstrated the highest removal rates of heavy metals (Co-71%, Ni-51%, Mn-45%, V-83%, Pb-96%, Ti-100% and Cu-49%) followed by Bacillus licheniformis (Al-23% and Zn-53%) and Peranema sp. (Cd-42%). None of the dead cells were able to remove more than 25% of the heavy metals. Bacterial isolates contained the genes copC, chrB, cnrA3 and nccA encoding the resistance to Cu, Cr, Co-Ni and Cd-Ni-Co, respectively. Protozoan isolates contained only the genes encoding Cu and Cr resistance (copC and chrB genes). Peranema sp. was the only protozoan isolate which had an additional resistant gene cnrA3 encoding Co-Ni resistance. Conclusion Significant differences (p?

  15. Lactivibrio alcoholicus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, mesophilic, lactate-, alcohol-, carbohydrate- and amino-acid-degrading bacterium in the phylum Synergistetes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yan-Ling; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Guo, Rong-Bo; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2014-06-01

    A mesophilic, obligately anaerobic, lactate-, alcohol-, carbohydrate- and amino-acid- degrading bacterium, designated strain 7WAY-8-7(T), was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating high-strength organic wastewater from isomerized sugar production processes. Cells of strain 7WAY-8-7(T) were motile, curved rods (0.7-1.0×5.0-8.0 µm). Spore formation was not observed. The strain grew optimally at 37 °C (range for growth was 25-40 °C) and pH 7.0 (pH 6.0-7.5), and could grow fermentatively on yeast extract, glucose, ribose, xylose, malate, tryptone, pyruvate, fumarate, Casamino acids, serine and cysteine. The main end-products of glucose fermentation were acetate and hydrogen. In co-culture with the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanospirillum hungatei DSM 864(T), strain 7WAY-8-7(T) could utilize lactate, glycerol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, L-glutamate, alanine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, histidine, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, lysine, threonine, 2-oxoglutarate, aspartate and methionine. A Stickland reaction was not observed with some pairs of amino acids. Yeast extract was required for growth. Nitrate, sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite and Fe (III) were not used as terminal electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 61.4 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate belongs to the uncultured environmental clone clade (called 'PD-UASB-13' in the Greengenes database) in the bacterial phylum Synergistetes, showing less than 90% sequence similarity with closely related described species such as Aminivibrio pyruvatiphilus and Aminobacterium colombiense (89.7% and 88.7%, respectively). The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(13?:?0), iso-C(15?:?0), anteiso-C(15?:?0), C(18?:?1), C(19?:?1), C(20?:?1) and C(21?:?1). A novel genus and species, Lactivibrio alcoholicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate strain 7WAY-8-7(T) (?=?JCM 17151(T)?=?DSM 24196(T)?=?CGMCC 1.5159(T)). PMID:24676730

  16. Prevalence of a protozoan parasite Cristigera sp. (Ciliophora:Ciliatea) from edible oysters (Mollusca:Bivalvia) of Sundarbans, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tanima; Bandyopadhyay, Probir Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The coastal region of West Bengal is bestowed with a wide range of natural forest and aquatic resources. The estuarine complex is a culmination of the interaction of land, sea and freshwater. It offers diverse specialised habitats such as mangroves, non vegetated mudflats, inter tidal zones and reclaimed areas. Such areas are home to a number of terrestrial, freshwater and marine communities. Edible oyster resources in these regions are Crassostrea gryphoides and Saccostrea cucullata, which are the keystone species found in the intertidal zone and can tolerate huge variation of salinity. These are used as food by local people and marketed to earn cash. The population of this species has been declined due to parasitic infection and pollution. There are many protozoan parasites which infect these oysters causing diseases. During survey period, a protozoan parasite of the genus Cristigera have been observed only from the edible oyster Crassostrea gryphoides collected from Kaikhali and Frasergunj among three selected sites namely Kaikhali, Frasergunj and Digha of West Bengal mainly during monsoon and post-monsoon season. Considering such rare and specific prevalence of Cristigera sp, it may be considered as potential bio-indicator. PMID:25035589

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi TcSRPK, the first protozoan member of the SRPK family, is biochemically and functionally conserved with metazoan SR protein-specific kinases.

    PubMed

    Portal, Daniel; Lobo, Guillermo S; Kadener, Sebastián; Prasad, Jayendra; Espinosa, Joaquín M; Pereira, Claudio A; Tang, Zhaohua; Lin, Ren-Jang; Manley, James L; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Torres, Héctor N

    2003-03-01

    A novel SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK) from the SRPK family was identified for the first time in a protozoan organism. The primary structure of the protein, named TcSRPK, presents a significant degree of identity with other metazoan members of the family. In vitro phosphorylation experiments showed that TcSRPK has the same substrate specificity relative to other SRPKs. TcSRPK was able to generate a mAb104-recognized phosphoepitope, a SRPK landmark. Expression of TcSRPK in different Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains lead to conserved phenotypes, indicating that TcSRPK is a functional homologue of metazoan SRPKs. In functional alternative splicing assays in vivo in HeLa cells, TcSRPK enhanced SR protein-dependent inclusion of the EDI exon of the fibronectin minigene. When tested in vitro, it inhibited splicing either on nuclear extracts or on splicing-deficient S100 extracts complemented with ASF/SF2. This inhibition was similar to that observed with human SRPK1. This work constitutes the first report of a member of this family of proteins and the existence of an SR-network in a protozoan organism. The implications in the origins and control of splicing are discussed. PMID:12615332

  18. Characterization of XYN10B, a modular xylanase from the ruminal protozoan Polyplastron multivesiculatum, with a family 22 carbohydrate-binding module that binds to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Devillard, Estelle; Bera-Maillet, Christel; Flint, Harry J; Scott, Karen P; Newbold, C James; Wallace, R John; Jouany, Jean-Pierre; Forano, Evelyne

    2003-01-01

    A new xylanase gene, xyn10B, was isolated from the ruminal protozoan Polyplastron multivesiculatum and the gene product was characterized. XYN10B is the first protozoan family 10 glycoside hydrolase characterized so far and is a modular enzyme comprising a family 22 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) preceding the catalytic domain. The CBM22 was shown to be a true CBM. It showed high affinity for soluble arabinoxylan and is the first example of a CBM22 that binds strongly to celluloses of various crystallinities. The enzymic properties of XYN10B were also analysed. Its optimal temperature and pH for activity were 39 degrees C and 7.0 respectively; these values being close to those of the ruminal ecosystem. The phylogenetic relationships between the XYN10B CBM22 or catalytic domain and related sequences from ruminal and non-ruminal bacteria and eukaryotes are reported. The xyn10B gene is shown to lack introns. PMID:12693992

  19. Tomaculocystis corpulenta n. gen., n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinorida) parasitizing the little yellow cockroach, Cariblatta lutea (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), in Alabama and Florida with recognition of Tomaculocystis cylindrosa n. comb. and Tomaculocystis mukundai n. comb. parasitizing ectobiid cockroaches in India.

    PubMed

    Clopton, Richard E

    2015-02-01

    Tomaculocystis corpulenta n. gen., n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinorida: Septatorina: Gregarinidae) is described from populations of the little yellow cockroach, Cariblatta lutea (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), established in laboratory culture from samples collected in Alabama and Florida. Tomaculocystis n. gen. are differentiated from other members of Gregarina by a markedly elliptoid gametocyst inside a persistent, lomentiform hyaline epicyst; developmental organization and growth of the spore tubes from gametocyst surface tumidi; and dehiscence by extrusion of non-chain forming oocysts through spore tubes that barely extend beyond the epicyst wall. Gregarina cylindrosa, Gregarina discocephala, and Gregarina mukundai are recognized as members of Tomaculocystis, and G. cylindrosa is recognized as the senior synonym of G. discocephala. Thus, Tomaculocystis cylindrosa n. comb. and Tomaculocystis mukundai n. comb. are formed. Species of Tomaculocystis are distinguished based on gamont deutomerite and oocyst shape and size. The oocysts of T. corpulenta are broadly dolioform, lack 4 polar knobs, and possess distinct, unique polar plates. Oocysts of all other known species in the genus are more oblong in shape, possess 4 polar knobs, and lack the distinct polar plates observed in the oocysts of T. corpulenta. Host utilization and geographic distribution among gregarine genera parasitizing the cockroach family Ectobiidae reveal a pattern of host-parasite specificity linking gregarine genera with ectobiidid subfamilies. Overall patterns suggest a hypothesis of European endemicy for Gamocystis, but hypotheses for the origin and radiation of Tomaculocystis or species of Gregarina infecting cockroaches are confounded by the cosmopolitan spread of pest cockroach species among humans. PMID:25153145

  20. Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, pigmented, thermophilic micro-organism of a novel bacterial class, Chthonomonadetes classis nov., of the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes originally designated candidate division OP10.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Dunfield, Peter F; Morgan, Xochitl C; Crowe, Michelle A; Houghton, Karen M; Vyssotski, Mikhail; Ryan, Jason L J; Lagutin, Kirill; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2011-10-01

    An aerobic, saccharolytic, obligately thermophilic, motile, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain T49(T), was isolated from geothermally heated soil at Hell's Gate, Tikitere, New Zealand. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, T49(T) is the first representative of a new class in the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes, formerly known as candidate division OP10. Cells of strain T49(T) stained Gram-negative and were catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Cells possessed a highly corrugated outer membrane. The major fatty acids were 16?:?0, i17?:?0 and ai17?:?0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 54.6 mol%. Strain T49(T) grew at 50-73 °C with an optimum temperature of 68 °C, and at pH 4.7-5.8 with an optimum growth pH of 5.3. A growth rate of 0.012 h(-1) was observed under optimal temperature and pH conditions. The primary respiratory quinone was MK-8. Optimal growth was achieved in the absence of NaCl, although growth was observed at NaCl concentrations as high as 2?% (w/v). Strain T49(T) was able to utilize mono- and disaccharides such as cellobiose, lactose, mannose and glucose, as well as branched or amorphous polysaccharides such as starch, CM-cellulose, xylan and glycogen, but not highly linear polysaccharides such as crystalline cellulose or cotton. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and phenotypic characteristics, we propose that strain T49(T) represents a novel bacterial genus and species within the new class Chthonomonadetes classis nov. of the phylum Armatimonadetes. The type strain of Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov. is T49(T) (?=?DSM 23976(T)?=?ICMP 18418(T)). PMID:21097641

  1. Species concepts and malaria parasites: detecting a cryptic species of Plasmodium.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, S L

    2000-01-01

    Species of malaria parasite (phylum Apicomplexa: genus Plasmodium) have traditionally been described using the similarity species concept (based primarily on differences in morphological or life-history characteristics). The biological species concept (reproductive isolation) and phylogenetic species concept (based on monophyly) have not been used before in defining species of Plasmodium. Plasmodium azurophilum, described from Anolis lizards in the eastern Caribbean, is actually a two-species cryptic complex. The parasites were studied from eight islands, from Puerto Rico in the north to Grenada in the south. Morphology of the two species is very similar (differences are indistinguishable to the eye), but one infects only erythrocytes and the other only white blood cells. Molecular data for the cytochrome b gene reveal that the two forms are reproductively isolated; distinct haplotypes are present on each island and are never shared between the erythrocyte-infecting and leucocyte-infecting species. Each forms a monophyletic lineage indicating that they diverged before becoming established in the anoles of the eastern Caribbean. This comparison of the similarity, biological and phylogenetic species concepts for malaria parasites reveals the limited value of using only similarity measures in defining protozoan species. PMID:11413654

  2. Population, genetic, and antigenic diversity of the apicomplexan Eimeria tenella and their relevance to vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Damer P.; Clark, Emily L.; Macdonald, Sarah E.; Thenmozhi, Venkatachalam; Kundu, Krishnendu; Garg, Rajat; Jatau, Isa D.; Ayoade, Simeon; Kawahara, Fumiya; Moftah, Abdalgader; Reid, Adam James; Adebambo, Ayotunde O.; Álvarez Zapata, Ramón; Srinivasa Rao, Arni S. R.; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Banerjee, Partha S.; Dhinakar-Raj, G.; Raman, M.; Tomley, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa includes serious pathogens of humans and animals. Understanding the distribution and population structure of these protozoan parasites is of fundamental importance to explain disease epidemiology and develop sustainable controls. Predicting the likely efficacy and longevity of subunit vaccines in field populations relies on knowledge of relevant preexisting antigenic diversity, population structure, the likelihood of coinfection by genetically distinct strains, and the efficiency of cross-fertilization. All four of these factors have been investigated for Plasmodium species parasites, revealing both clonal and panmictic population structures with exceptional polymorphism associated with immunoprotective antigens such as apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1). For the coccidian Toxoplasma gondii only genomic diversity and population structure have been defined in depth so far; for the closely related Eimeria species, all four variables are currently unknown. Using Eimeria tenella, a major cause of the enteric disease coccidiosis, which exerts a profound effect on chicken productivity and welfare, we determined population structure, genotype distribution, and likelihood of cross-fertilization during coinfection and also investigated the extent of naturally occurring antigenic diversity for the E. tenella AMA1 homolog. Using genome-wide Sequenom SNP-based haplotyping, targeted sequencing, and single-cell genotyping, we show that in this coccidian the functionality of EtAMA1 appears to outweigh immune evasion. This result is in direct contrast to the situation in Plasmodium and most likely is underpinned by the biology of the direct and acute coccidian life cycle in the definitive host. PMID:26354122

  3. Population, genetic, and antigenic diversity of the apicomplexan Eimeria tenella and their relevance to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Blake, Damer P; Clark, Emily L; Macdonald, Sarah E; Thenmozhi, Venkatachalam; Kundu, Krishnendu; Garg, Rajat; Jatau, Isa D; Ayoade, Simeon; Kawahara, Fumiya; Moftah, Abdalgader; Reid, Adam James; Adebambo, Ayotunde O; Álvarez Zapata, Ramón; Srinivasa Rao, Arni S R; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Banerjee, Partha S; Dhinakar-Raj, G; Raman, M; Tomley, Fiona M

    2015-09-22

    The phylum Apicomplexa includes serious pathogens of humans and animals. Understanding the distribution and population structure of these protozoan parasites is of fundamental importance to explain disease epidemiology and develop sustainable controls. Predicting the likely efficacy and longevity of subunit vaccines in field populations relies on knowledge of relevant preexisting antigenic diversity, population structure, the likelihood of coinfection by genetically distinct strains, and the efficiency of cross-fertilization. All four of these factors have been investigated for Plasmodium species parasites, revealing both clonal and panmictic population structures with exceptional polymorphism associated with immunoprotective antigens such as apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1). For the coccidian Toxoplasma gondii only genomic diversity and population structure have been defined in depth so far; for the closely related Eimeria species, all four variables are currently unknown. Using Eimeria tenella, a major cause of the enteric disease coccidiosis, which exerts a profound effect on chicken productivity and welfare, we determined population structure, genotype distribution, and likelihood of cross-fertilization during coinfection and also investigated the extent of naturally occurring antigenic diversity for the E. tenella AMA1 homolog. Using genome-wide Sequenom SNP-based haplotyping, targeted sequencing, and single-cell genotyping, we show that in this coccidian the functionality of EtAMA1 appears to outweigh immune evasion. This result is in direct contrast to the situation in Plasmodium and most likely is underpinned by the biology of the direct and acute coccidian life cycle in the definitive host. PMID:26354122

  4. Structural Evidence for Actin-like Filaments in Toxoplasma gondii Using High-Resolution Low-Voltage Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Heide; Sibley, L. David; Ris, Hans

    2003-08-01

    The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is representative of a large group of parasites within the phylum Apicomplexa, which share a highly unusual motility system that is crucial for locomotion and active host cell invasion. Despite the importance of motility in the pathology of these unicellular organisms, the motor mechanisms for locomotion remain uncertain, largely because only limited data exist about composition and organization of the cytoskeleton. By using cytoskeleton stabilizing protocols on membrane-extracted parasites and novel imaging with high-resolution low-voltage field emission scanning electron microscopy (LVFESEM), we were able to visualize for the first time a network of actin-sized filaments just below the cell membrane. A complex cytoskeletal network remained after removing the actin-sized fibers with cytochalasin D, revealing longitudinally arranged, subpellicular microtubules and intermediate-sized fibers of 10 nm, which, in stereo images, are seen both above and below the microtubules. These approaches open new possibilities to characterize more fully the largely unexplored and unconventional cytoskeletal motility complex in apicomplexan parasites.

  5. Composite genome map and recombination parameters derived from three archetypal lineages of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asis; Taylor, Sonya; Su, Chunlei; Mackey, Aaron J.; Boyle, Jon; Cole, Robert; Glover, Darius; Tang, Keliang; Paulsen, Ian T.; Berriman, Matt; Boothroyd, John C.; Pfefferkorn, Elmer R.; Dubey, J. P.; Ajioka, James W.; Roos, David S.; Wootton, John C.; Sibley, L. David

    2005-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a highly successful protozoan parasite in the phylum Apicomplexa, which contains numerous animal and human pathogens. T.gondii is amenable to cellular, biochemical, molecular and genetic studies, making it a model for the biology of this important group of parasites. To facilitate forward genetic analysis, we have developed a high-resolution genetic linkage map for T.gondii. The genetic map was used to assemble the scaffolds from a 10X shotgun whole genome sequence, thus defining 14 chromosomes with markers spaced at ?300 kb intervals across the genome. Fourteen chromosomes were identified comprising a total genetic size of ?592 cM and an average map unit of ?104 kb/cM. Analysis of the genetic parameters in T.gondii revealed a high frequency of closely adjacent, apparent double crossover events that may represent gene conversions. In addition, we detected large regions of genetic homogeneity among the archetypal clonal lineages, reflecting the relatively few genetic outbreeding events that have occurred since their recent origin. Despite these unusual features, linkage analysis proved to be effective in mapping the loci determining several drug resistances. The resulting genome map provides a framework for analysis of complex traits such as virulence and transmission, and for comparative population genetic studies. PMID:15911631

  6. Prevalence and risk factors of intestinal protozoan and helminth infections among pulmonary tuberculosis patients without HIV infection in a rural county in P. R. China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-09-01

    Although co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites, including protozoa and helminths, in humans has been widely studied globally, very little of this phenomenon is known in China. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural county of China to investigate such co-infections. Patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) undergoing anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (anti-MTB) treatment were surveyed by questionnaires, and their feces and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal protozoa and helminths, routine blood examination and HIV detection. The ?(2) test and multivariate logistic regression model were used to identify risk factors. A total of 369 patients with PTB were included and all of them were HIV negative. Overall, only 7.3% of participants were infected with intestinal protozoa, among which prevalence of Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba spp. and Trichomonas hominis were 6.0%, 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively; 7.0% were infected with intestinal helminths, among which prevalence of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides and Clonorchis sinensis were 4.3%, 1.9%, 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively; and 0.5% were simultaneously infected with intestinal protozoa and helminths. Among patients with PTB, body mass index (BMI)?18 (OR=3.30, 95% CI=1.44-7.54) and raised poultry or livestock (e.g., chicken, duck, pig) (OR=3.96, 95% CI=1.32-11.89) were significantly associated with harboring intestinal protozoan infection, while BMI?18 (OR=3.32, 95% CI=1.39-7.91), anemia (OR=3.40, 95% CI=1.44-8.02) and laboring barefoot in farmlands (OR=4.54, 95% CI=1.88-10.92) were significantly associated with having intestinal helminth infection. Additionally, there was no significant relationship between duration of anti-MTB treatment and infection rates of intestinal parasites including protozoa and helminths. Therefore, preventing malnutrition, avoiding unprotected contact with reservoirs of protozoa, and improving health education for good hygiene habits, particularly wearing shoes while outdoors, are beneficial in the prevention of intestinal protozoan and helminth infection among patients with PTB. PMID:25976412

  7. Cytokine and chemokine responses to helminth and protozoan parasites and to fungus and mite allergens in neonates, children, adults, and the elderly

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In rural sub-Saharan Africa, endemic populations are often infected concurrently with several intestinal and intravascular helminth and protozoan parasites. A specific, balanced and, to an extent, protective immunity will develop over time in response to repeated parasite encounters, with immune responses initially being poorly adapted and non-protective. The cellular production of pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines and chemokines in response to helminth, protozoan antigens and ubiquitous allergens were studied in neonates, children, adults and the elderly. Results In children schistosomiasis prevailed (33%) while hookworm and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar was found in up to half of adults and the elderly. Mansonella perstans filariasis was only present in adults (24%) and the elderly (25%). Two or more parasite infections were diagnosed in 41% of children, while such polyparasitism was present in 34% and 38% of adults and the elderly. Cytokine and chemokine production was distinctively inducible by parasite antigens; pro-inflammatory Th2-type cytokine IL-19 was activated by Entamoeba and Ascaris antigens, being low in neonates and children while IL-19 production enhanced “stepwise” in adults and elderly. In contrast, highest production of MIP-1delta/CCL15 was present in neonates and children and inducible by Entamoeba-specific antigens only. Adults and the elderly had enhanced regulatory IL-27 cytokine responses, with Th2-type chemokines (MCP-4/CCL13, Eotaxin-2/CCL24) and cytokines (IL-33) being notably inducible by helminth- and Entamoeba-specific antigens and fungus-derived allergens. The lower cellular responsiveness in neonates and children highlighted the development of a parasite-specific cellular response profile in response to repeated episodes of exposure and re-infection. Conclusions Following repeated exposure to parasites, and as a consequence of host inability to prevent or eliminate intestinal helminth or protozoa infections, a repertoire of immune responses will evolve with lessened pro-inflammatory and pronounced regulatory cytokines and chemokines; this is required for partial parasite control as well as for preventing inadequate and excessive host tissue and organ damage. PMID:23855879

  8. Characterization of a defensin from the sand fly Phlebotomus duboscqi induced by challenge with bacteria or the protozoan parasite Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Nathalie; Lowenberger, Carl; Volf, Petr; Ursic, Raul; Sigutova, Lucie; Sabatier, Laurence; Svobodova, Milena; Beverley, Stephen M; Späth, Gerald; Brun, Reto; Pesson, Bernard; Bulet, Philippe

    2004-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are major components of the innate immune response of epithelial cells. In insect vectors, these peptides may play a role in the control of gut pathogens. We have analyzed antimicrobial peptides produced by the sand fly Phlebotomus duboscqi, after challenge by injected bacteria or feeding with bacteria or the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. A new hemolymph peptide with antimicrobial activity was identified and shown to be a member of the insect defensin family. Interestingly, this defensin exhibits an antiparasitic activity against the promastigote forms of L. major, which reside normally within the sand fly midgut. P. duboscqi defensin could be induced by both hemolymph or gut infections. Defensin mRNA was induced following infection by wild-type L. major, and this induction was much less following infections with L. major knockout mutants that survive poorly in sand flies, due to specific deficiencies in abundant cell surface glycoconjugates containing phosphoglycans (including lipophosphoglycan). The ability of gut pathogens to induce gut as well as fat body expression of defensin raises the possibility that this antimicrobial peptide might play a key role in the development of parasitic infections. PMID:15557638

  9. Current Therapeutics, Their Problems, and Sulfur-Containing-Amino-Acid Metabolism as a Novel Target against Infections by “Amitochondriate” Protozoan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Vahab; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The “amitochondriate” protozoan parasites of humans Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis, and Trichomonas vaginalis share many biochemical features, e.g., energy and amino acid metabolism, a spectrum of drugs for their treatment, and the occurrence of drug resistance. These parasites possess metabolic pathways that are divergent from those of their mammalian hosts and are often considered to be good targets for drug development. Sulfur-containing-amino-acid metabolism represents one such divergent metabolic pathway, namely, the cysteine biosynthetic pathway and methionine ?-lyase-mediated catabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, which are present in T. vaginalis and E. histolytica but absent in G. intestinalis. These pathways are potentially exploitable for development of drugs against amoebiasis and trichomoniasis. For instance, l-trifluoromethionine, which is catalyzed by methionine ?-lyase and produces a toxic product, is effective against T. vaginalis and E. histolytica parasites in vitro and in vivo and may represent a good lead compound. In this review, we summarize the biology of these microaerophilic parasites, their clinical manifestation and epidemiology of disease, chemotherapeutics, the modes of action of representative drugs, and problems related to these drugs, including drug resistance. We further discuss our approach to exploit unique sulfur-containing-amino-acid metabolism, focusing on development of drugs against E. histolytica. PMID:17223627

  10. An assessment of the use of drug and non-drug interventions in the treatment of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet, 1876, a protozoan parasite of freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Picón-Camacho, S M; Marcos-Lopez, M; Bron, J E; Shinn, A P

    2012-02-01

    Infection by the ciliate protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet, 1876 causes significant economic losses in freshwater aquaculture worldwide. Following the ban on the use of malachite green for treating food fish, there has been extensive research aimed at identifying suitable replacements. In this paper we critically assess drug and non-drug interventions, which have been tested for use or have been employed against this parasite and evaluate possibilities for their application in farm systems. Current treatments include the administration of formaldehyde, sodium chloride (salt), copper sulphate and potassium permanganate. However, purportedly more environmentally friendly drugs such as humic acid, potassium ferrate (VI), bronopol and the peracetic acid-based products have recently been tested and represent promising alternatives. Further investigation, is required to optimize the treatments and to establish precise protocols in order to minimize the quantity of drug employed whilst ensuring the most efficacious performance. At the same time, there needs to be a greater emphasis placed on the non-drug aspects of management strategies, including the use of non-chemical interventions focusing on the removal of free-swimming stages and tomocysts of I. multifiliis from farm culture systems. Use of such strategies provides the hope of more environmentally friendly alternatives for the control of I. multifiliis infections. PMID:22078025

  11. Current therapeutics, their problems, and sulfur-containing-amino-acid metabolism as a novel target against infections by "amitochondriate" protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Ali, Vahab; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The "amitochondriate" protozoan parasites of humans Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis, and Trichomonas vaginalis share many biochemical features, e.g., energy and amino acid metabolism, a spectrum of drugs for their treatment, and the occurrence of drug resistance. These parasites possess metabolic pathways that are divergent from those of their mammalian hosts and are often considered to be good targets for drug development. Sulfur-containing-amino-acid metabolism represents one such divergent metabolic pathway, namely, the cysteine biosynthetic pathway and methionine gamma-lyase-mediated catabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, which are present in T. vaginalis and E. histolytica but absent in G. intestinalis. These pathways are potentially exploitable for development of drugs against amoebiasis and trichomoniasis. For instance, L-trifluoromethionine, which is catalyzed by methionine gamma-lyase and produces a toxic product, is effective against T. vaginalis and E. histolytica parasites in vitro and in vivo and may represent a good lead compound. In this review, we summarize the biology of these microaerophilic parasites, their clinical manifestation and epidemiology of disease, chemotherapeutics, the modes of action of representative drugs, and problems related to these drugs, including drug resistance. We further discuss our approach to exploit unique sulfur-containing-amino-acid metabolism, focusing on development of drugs against E. histolytica. PMID:17223627

  12. BiochemicalSocietyAnnualSymposiumNo.77 Malaria, Plasmodium falciparum and its

    E-print Network

    McFadden, Geoff

    BiochemicalSocietyAnnualSymposiumNo.77 Malaria, Plasmodium falciparum and its apicoplast Ming, Australia Abstract Malaria, which is caused by species of the parasite genus Plasmodium, remains a major was discovered in malaria and related parasites from the phylum Apicomplexa and has radically changed our view

  13. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies that recognize the Eimeria tenella microneme protein MIC2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Apicomplexan pathogens of the species Eimeria cause coccidiosis, an intestinal disease of chickens, which has a major economic impact on the poultry industry. Members of the phylum Apicomplexa share an assortment of unique secretory organelles (rhoptries, micronemes and dense granules) that me...

  14. Gemmatimonas aurantiaca gen. nov., sp. nov., a gram-negative, aerobic, polyphosphate-accumulating micro-organism, the first cultured representative of the new bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes phyl. nov.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Hanada, Satoshi; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kim, Hongik; Kamagata, Yoichi; Nakamura, Kazunori

    2003-07-01

    A phylogenetically novel aerobic bacterium was isolated from an anaerobic-aerobic sequential batch reactor operated under enhanced biological phosphorus removal conditions for wastewater treatment. The isolation strategy used targeted slowly growing polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria by combining low-speed centrifugations and prolonged incubation on a low-nutrient medium. The isolate, designated strain T-27T, was a gram-negative, rod-shaped aerobe. Cells often appeared to divide by budding replication. Strain T-27T grew at 25-35 degrees C with an optimum growth temperature of 30 degrees C, whilst no growth was observed below 20 degrees C or above 37 degrees C within 20 days incubation. The pH range for growth was 6.5-9.5, with an optimum at pH 7.0. Strain T-27T was able to utilize a limited range of substrates, such as yeast extract, polypepton, succinate, acetate, gelatin and benzoate. Neisser staining was positive and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained cells displayed a yellow fluorescence, indicative of polyphosphate inclusions. Menaquinone 9 was the major respiratory quinone. The cellular fatty acids of the strain were mainly composed of iso-C15:0, C16:1 and C14:0. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 66 mol%. Comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain T-27T belongs to candidate division BD (also called KS-B), a phylum-level lineage in the bacterial domain, to date comprised exclusively of environmental 16S rDNA clone sequences. Here, a new genus and species are proposed, Gemmatimonas aurantiaca (type strain T-27T=JCM 11422T=DSM 14586T) gen. nov., sp. nov., the first cultivated representative of the Gemmatimonadetes phyl. nov. Environmental sequence data indicate that this phylum is widespread in nature and has a phylogenetic breadth (19% 16S rDNA sequence divergence) that is greater than well-known phyla such as the Actinobacteria (18% divergence). PMID:12892144

  15. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of l-Cysteine Metabolism: Physiological Role and Fate of l-Cysteine in the Enteric Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Sato, Dan; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Watanabe, Haruo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT l-Cysteine is essential for virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Besides having a role in the synthesis of virtually all proteins and of taurine, cysteamine, glutathione, and other redox-regulating proteins, l-cysteine has important functions under anaerobic/microaerophilic conditions. In anaerobic or microaerophilic protozoan parasites, such as Entamoeba histolytica, l-cysteine has been implicated in growth, attachment, survival, and protection from oxidative stress. However, a specific role of this amino acid or related metabolic intermediates is not well understood. In this study, using stable-isotope-labeled l-cysteine and capillary electrophoresis-time of flight mass spectrometry, we investigated the metabolism of l-cysteine in E. histolytica. [U-13C3, 15N]l-cysteine was rapidly metabolized into three unknown metabolites, besides l-cystine and l-alanine. These metabolites were identified as thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (T4C), 2-methyl thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (MT4C), and 2-ethyl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (ET4C), the condensation products of l-cysteine with aldehydes. We demonstrated that these 2-(R)-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids serve for storage of l-cysteine. Liberation of l-cysteine occurred when T4C was incubated with amebic lysates, suggesting enzymatic degradation of these l-cysteine derivatives. Furthermore, T4C and MT4C significantly enhanced trophozoite growth and reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels when it was added to cultures, suggesting that 2-(R)-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids are involved in the defense against oxidative stress. PMID:25370494

  16. Heliophrya sp. , a new protozoan biomonitor of pollution: culture techniques, toxin uptake and elimination, and field studies in an oil-polluted stream

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    The stalkless suctorian Heliophyra sp., a sessile ciliated protozoan, was used as a pollution biomonitor. The research objectives were to determine: (1) optimal culture conditions and techniques for biotoxicity testing; (2) ability of Helipophrya to incorporate and eliminate a /sup 14/C oil component and other organic toxins; (3) suitability of Heliophrya as a biomonitor of oil pollution. Selection of culture conditions for Heliophrya were based on survival over a three week period and ability to divide when fed after three weeks. The LC50 (lethal concentration for 50% of the population) for 96 h was 12.4 ppt salinity. Heliophrya were exposed to /sup 14/C toxins for 48 h, then organisms were transferred to nonradioactive water for 96 h. The uptake rate of /sup 14/C octachlorostyrene was higher than /sup 14/C phenanthrene or /sup 14/C diisononyl phthalate. Elimination rates were comparable to other test organisms. Heliophrya and d. pulex were placed at three stations, in a stream which received chronic oil pollution, for periods of 48 h and seven days. A 48 h lab test with dilutions of field water was performed. Water samples were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Death of Heliophrya at the three polluted stations over 48 h was not significantly greater than at a less polluted tributary; however, all the Daphnia in the polluted stream stations were killed. In the seven day field study, Heliophrya had an estimated LC50 of 1 ppm for the aromatic and 29 ppm for the total hydrocarbons. Compared to other species, Heliophrya is moderately sensitive to oil pollution, and is a good companion biomonitor to the more sensitive Daphnia.

  17. Long-term exposure of bacterial and protozoan communities to TiO2 nanoparticles in an aerobic-sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supha, Chitpisud; Boonto, Yuphada; Jindakaraked, Manee; Ananpattarachai, Jirapat; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat

    2015-06-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopowders at different concentrations (0-50 mg L-1) were injected into an aerobic-sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to nanoparticles on bacterial and protozoan communities. The detection of nanoparticles in the bioflocs was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The SBR wastewater experiments were conducted under the influence of ultraviolet light with photocatalytic TiO2. The intrusion of TiO2 nanoparticles was found both on the surface and inside of the bioflocs. The change of microbial population in terms of mixed liquor-suspended solids and the sludge volume index was monitored. The TiO2 nanoparticles tentatively exerted an adverse effect on the microbial population, causing the reduction of microorganisms (both bacteria and protozoa) in the SBR. The respiration inhibition rate of the bacteria was increased, and the viability of the microbial population was reduced at the high concentration (50 mg L-1) of TiO2. The decreasing number of protozoa in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles during 20 days of treatment with 0.5 and 1.0 mg L-1 TiO2 is clearly demonstrated. The measured chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the effluent tends to increase with a long-term operation. The increase of COD in the system suggests a decrease in the efficiency of the wastewater treatment plant. However, the SBR can effectively remove the TiO2 nanoparticles (up to 50 mg L-1) from the effluent.

  18. Phylum Level Change in the Cecal and Fecal Gut Communities of Rats Fed Diets Containing Different Fermentable Substrates Supports a Role for Nitrogen as a Factor Contributing to Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kalmokoff, Martin; Franklin, Jeff; Petronella, Nicholas; Green, Judy; Brooks, Stephen P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fermentation differs between the proximal and distal gut but little is known regarding how the bacterial communities differ or how they are influenced by diet. In order to investigate this, we compared community diversity in the cecum and feces of rats by 16S rRNA gene content and DNA shot gun metagenomics after feeding purified diets containing different fermentable substrates. Gut community composition was dependent on the source of fermentable substrate included in the diet. Cecal communities were dominated by Firmicutes, and contained a higher abundance of Lachnospiraceae compared to feces. In feces, community structure was shifted by varying degrees depending on diet towards the Bacteroidetes, although this change was not always evident from 16S rRNA gene data. Multi-dimensional scaling analysis (PCoA) comparing cecal and fecal metagenomes grouped by location within the gut rather than by diet, suggesting that factors in addition to substrate were important for community change in the distal gut. Differentially abundant genes in each environment supported this shift away from the Firmicutes in the cecum (e.g., motility) towards the Bacteroidetes in feces (e.g., Bacteroidales transposons). We suggest that this phylum level change reflects a shift to ammonia as the primary source of nitrogen used to support continued microbial growth in the distal gut. PMID:25954902

  19. Phylum level change in the cecal and fecal gut communities of rats fed diets containing different fermentable substrates supports a role for nitrogen as a factor contributing to community structure.

    PubMed

    Kalmokoff, Martin; Franklin, Jeff; Petronella, Nicholas; Green, Judy; Brooks, Stephen P J

    2015-05-01

    Fermentation differs between the proximal and distal gut but little is known regarding how the bacterial communities differ or how they are influenced by diet. In order to investigate this, we compared community diversity in the cecum and feces of rats by 16S rRNA gene content and DNA shot gun metagenomics after feeding purified diets containing different fermentable substrates. Gut community composition was dependent on the source of fermentable substrate included in the diet. Cecal communities were dominated by Firmicutes, and contained a higher abundance of Lachnospiraceae compared to feces. In feces, community structure was shifted by varying degrees depending on diet towards the Bacteroidetes, although this change was not always evident from 16S rRNA gene data. Multi-dimensional scaling analysis (PCoA) comparing cecal and fecal metagenomes grouped by location within the gut rather than by diet, suggesting that factors in addition to substrate were important for community change in the distal gut. Differentially abundant genes in each environment supported this shift away from the Firmicutes in the cecum (e.g., motility) towards the Bacteroidetes in feces (e.g., Bacteroidales transposons). We suggest that this phylum level change reflects a shift to ammonia as the primary source of nitrogen used to support continued microbial growth in the distal gut. PMID:25954902

  20. Reprofiled drug targets ancient protozoans

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Anjan; Ndao, Momar; Reed, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel automated, high throughput screening (HTS) methodology for the anaerobic intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We validated this HTS platform by screening a chemical library containing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and bioactive compounds. We identified an FDA-approved drug, auranofin, as most active against E. histolytica both in vitro and in vivo. Our cell culture and animal studies indicated that thioredoxin reductase, an enzyme involved in reactive oxygen species detoxification, was the target for auranofin in E. histolytica. Here, we discuss the rationale for drug development for three parasites which are major causes of diarrhea worldwide, E. histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum and extend our current finding of antiparasitic activity of auranofin to Entamoeba cysts, G. lamblia and C. parvum. These studies support the use of HTS assays and reprofiling FDA-approved drugs for new therapy for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:23137963

  1. Mooreia alkaloidigena gen. nov., sp. nov. and Catalinimonas alkaloidigena gen. nov., sp. nov., alkaloid-producing marine bacteria in the proposed families Mooreiaceae fam. nov. and Catalimonadaceae fam. nov. in the phylum Bacteroidetes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Ju; Beatty, Deanna S.; Paul, Lauren A.; Fenical, William

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial strains CNX-216T and CNU-914T were isolated from marine sediment samples collected from Palmyra Atoll and off Catalina Island, respectively. Both strains were Gram-negative and aerobic and produce deep-orange to pink colonies and alkaloid secondary metabolites. Cells of strain CNX-216T were short, non-motile rods, whereas cells of strain CNU-914T were short, curved rods with gliding motility. The DNA G+C contents of CNX-216T and CNU-914T were respectively 57.7 and 44.4 mol%. Strains CNX-216T and CNU-914T contained MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and iso-C15?:?0 and C16?:?1?5c as the major fatty acids. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that both strains belong to the order Cytophagales in the phylum Bacteroidetes. Strain CNX-216T exhibited low 16S rRNA gene sequence identity (87.1?%) to the nearest type strain, Cesiribacter roseus 311T, and formed a well-supported lineage that is outside all currently described families in the order Cytophagales. Strain CNU-914T shared 97.6?% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with ‘Porifericola rhodea’ N5EA6-3A2B and, together with ‘Tunicatimonas pelagia’ N5DB8-4 and four uncharacterized marine bacteria isolated as part of this study, formed a lineage that is clearly distinguished from other families in the order Cytophagales. Based on our polyphasic taxonomic characterization, we propose that strains CNX-216T and CNU-914T represent novel genera and species, for which we propose the names Mooreia alkaloidigena gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain CNX-216T ?=?DSM 25187T ?=?KCCM 90102T) and Catalinimonas alkaloidigena gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain CNU-914T ?=?DSM 25186T ?=?KCCM 90101T) within the new families Mooreiaceae fam. nov. and Catalimonadaceae fam. nov. PMID:22753528

  2. Tepidisphaera mucosa gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic member of the class Phycisphaerae in the phylum Planctomycetes, and proposal of a new family, Tepidisphaeraceae fam. nov., and a new order, Tepidisphaerales ord. nov.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, O L; Merkel, A Yu; Novikov, A A; Baslerov, R V; Toshchakov, S V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A

    2015-02-01

    Three strains of facultatively aerobic, moderately thermophilic bacteria were isolated from terrestrial hot springs in Baikal Lake region and Kamchatka (Russia). Cells of the new isolates were cocci reproducing by binary fission. The temperature range for growth was between 20 and 56 °C and the pH range for growth from pH 4.5 to 8.5, with optimal growth at 47-50 °C and pH 7.0-7.5. The organisms were chemoheterotrophs preferring sugars and polysaccharides as growth substrates. 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains 2842, 2813 and 2918Kr were nearly identical (99.7-100 % similarity) and indicated that the strains belonged to the phylum Planctomycetes. The phylogenetically closest cultivated relatives were Algisphaera agarilytica 06SJR6-2(T) and Phycisphaera mikurensis FYK2301M01(T) with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 82.4 and 80.3 %, respectively. The novel strains differed from them by higher growth temperature, sensitivity to NaCl concentration above 3.0 % and by their cellular fatty acids profile. On the basis of phylogenetic and physiological data, strains 2842(T), 2813 and 2918Kr represent a novel genus and species for which we propose the name Tepidisphaera mucosa sp. nov. The type strain is 2842(T) (?= VKM B-2832(T)?= JCM 19875(T)). We also propose that Tepidisphaera gen. nov. is the type genus of a novel family, Tepidisphaeraceae fam. nov. and a novel order, Tepidisphaerales ord. nov. PMID:25404483

  3. INTRODUCTION The phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms) consists of

    E-print Network

    Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    (Newmark and Sánchez Alvarado, 2002). For example, the ability of freshwater planarians to regenerate the freshwater planarian as an experimental model. We report the establishment of a clonal line of a diploid, asexual form of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (Turbellaria, Tricladida), along with the isolation

  4. LIFE CYCLE OF CALYPTOSPORA FUNDULI (APICOMPLEXA: CALYPTOSPORIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The taxonomic status of the extraintestinal piscine coccidium Calyptospora funduli is based in part on its requirement of an intermediate host (the daggerblade grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio). In this study, grass shrimp fed livers of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) infected ...

  5. CALYPTOSPORA FUNDULI (APICOMPLEXA): LIFE CYCLE AND TAXONOMY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The taxonomic status of the extraintestinal piscine coccidium Calyptospora funduli is based in part on its requirement of an intermediate host (the daggerblade grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio). Grass shrimp fed livers of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) infected with sporulated...

  6. DNA topoisomerases in apicomplexan parasites: promising targets for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Prada, Christopher Fernández; Fernández-Rubio, Celia; Rojo-Vázquez, Francisco; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael

    2010-06-22

    The phylum Apicomplexa includes a large group of protozoan parasites responsible for a wide range of animal and human diseases. Destructive pathogens, such as Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, causative agents of human malaria, Cryptosporidium parvum, responsible of childhood diarrhoea, and Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for miscarriages and abortions in humans, are frequently associated with HIV immunosuppression in AIDS patients. The lack of effective vaccines, along with years of increasing pressure to eradicate outbreaks with the use of drugs, has favoured the formation of multi-drug resistant strains in endemic areas. Almost all apicomplexan of medical interest contain two endosymbiotic organelles that contain their own mitochondrial and apicoplast DNA. Apicoplast is an attractive target for drug testing because in addition to harbouring singular metabolic pathways absent in the host, it also has its own transcription and translation machinery of bacterial origin. Accordingly, apicomplexan protozoa contain an interesting mixture of enzymes to unwind DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic origins. On the one hand, the main mechanism of DNA unwinding includes the scission of one-type I-or both DNA strands-type II eukaryotic topoisomerases, establishing transient covalent bonds with the scissile end. These enzymes are targeted by camptothecin and etoposide, respectively, two natural drugs whose semisynthetic derivatives are currently used in cancer chemotherapy. On the other hand, DNA gyrase is a bacterial-borne type II DNA topoisomerase that operates within the apicoplast and is effectively targeted by bacterial antibiotics like fluoroquinolones and aminocoumarins. The present review is an update on the new findings concerning topoisomerases in apicomplexan parasites and the role of these enzymes as targets for therapeutic agents. PMID:20200034

  7. Cats and Toxoplasma gondii: A systematic review and meta-analysis in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mohammad T; Daryani, Ahmad; Sarvi, Shahabeddin; Shokri, Azar; Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Teshnizi, Saeed H; Mizani, Azade; Sharif, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a cosmopolitan zoonotic intracellular coccidian of the phylum Apicomplexa infecting warm-blooded animals and human beings. This protozoan causes a significant public health problem in humans and imposes considerable economic losses and damages to husbandry industries. The final host, cats, accounts for all of these significant burdens. Hence the present study was designed to analyse and review the overall prevalence rate of T. gondii infection in cats in Iran for the first time. In the present study data collection (published and unpublished papers, abstracts of proceedings of national parasitology congresses and dissertations) was systematically undertaken on electronic databases including PubMed, Google Scholar, Ebsco, Science Direct, Scopus, Magiran, Irandoc, IranMedex and Scientific Information Database. A total of 21 studies from 1975 to 2013 reporting prevalence of Toxoplasma infection in cats from different areas in Iran met the eligibility criteria. The pooled proportion of toxoplasmosis using the random-effect model amongst cats was estimated at 33.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 22.05-46.41). The prevalence rate of cat toxoplasmosis in various regions of Iran ranged from 1.2% to 89.2%. Firstly, this study establishes a crude prevalence rate of T. gondii infection in cats. Secondly, it discusses the role of significant risk factors including sex, age and being either household or stray cats, in the epidemiology of the disease. Furthermore, the current study determines gaps and drawbacks in the prior studies that are useful to keep in mind to assist in designing more accurate investigations in future. PMID:26017063

  8. Mice with a selective impairment of IFN-? signaling in macrophage lineage cells demonstrate the critical role of IFN-? activated macrophages for the control of protozoan parasitic infections in vivo1, 2

    PubMed Central

    Lykens, Jennifer E.; Terrell, Catherine E.; Zoller, Erin E.; Divanovic, Senad; Trompette, Aurelien; Karp, Christopher L.; Aliberti, Julio; Flick, Matthew J.; Jordan, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    IFN-? has long been recognized as a cytokine with potent and varied effects in the immune response. While its effects on specific cell types have been well studied in vitro, its in vivo effects are less clearly understood because of its diverse actions on many different cell types. While control of multiple protozoan parasites is thought to depend critically on the direct action of IFN-? on macrophages, this premise has never been directly proven in vivo. In order to more directly examine the effects of IFN-? on cells of the macrophage lineage in vivo, we generated mice called the ‘Macrophages Insensitive to Interferon Gamma’ (MIIG) mice, which express a dominant negative mutant IFN-? receptor in CD68+ cells: monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and mast cells. Macrophage lineage cells and mast cells from these mice are unable to respond to IFN-? while other cells are able to produce and respond to this cytokine normally. When challenged in vitro, macrophages from MIIG mice were unable produce NO or kill Trypanosoma cruzi or Leishmania major after priming with IFN-?. Furthermore, MIIG mice demonstrated impaired parasite control and heightened mortality after T. cruzi, L. major, and Toxoplasma gondii infection, despite an appropriate IFN-? response. In contrast, MIIG mice displayed normal control of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, despite persistent insensitivity of macrophages to IFN-?. Thus, the MIIG mouse formally demonstrates for the first time in vivo, the specific importance of direct, IFN-? mediated activation of macrophages for controlling infection with multiple protozoan parasites. “This is an author-produced version of a manuscript accepted for publication in The Journal of Immunology (The JI). The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. (AAI), publisher of The JI, holds the copyright to this manuscript. This version of the manuscript has not yet been copyedited or subjected to editorial proofreading by The JI; hence, it may differ from the final version published in The JI (online and in print). AAI (The JI) is not liable for errors or omissions in this author-produced version of the manuscript or in any version derived from it by the U.S. National Institutes of Health or any other third party. The final, citable version of record can be found at www.jimmunol.org.” PMID:20018611

  9. Macropinocytosis: a pathway to protozoan infection

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Tecia M. U.; Barrias, Emile S.; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-01-01

    Among the various endocytic mechanisms in mammalian cells, macropinocytosis involves internalization of large amounts of plasma membrane together with extracellular medium, leading to macropinosome formation. These structures are formed when plasma membrane ruffles are assembled after actin filament rearrangement. In dendritic cells, macropinocytosis has been reported to play a role in antigen presentation. Several intracellular pathogens are internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways and macropinocytosis has been described as an important entry site for various organisms. Some bacteria, such as Legionella pneumophila, as well as various viruses, use this pathway to penetrate and subvert host cells. Some protozoa, which are larger than bacteria and virus, can also use this pathway to invade host cells. As macropinocytosis is characterized by the formation of large uncoated vacuoles and is triggered by various signaling pathways, which is similar to what occurs during the formation of the majority of parasitophorous vacuoles, it is believed that this phenomenon may be more widely used by parasites than is currently appreciated. Here we review protozoa host cell invasion via macropinocytosis. PMID:25914647

  10. Emerging Food- and Waterborne Protozoan Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora and Toxoplasma are related apicomplexan parasites transmitted to humans worldwide through ingestion of contaminated food and drinking water. Of 15 species of Cryptosporidium- C parvum, C. hominis, C and C. meleagridis are the most prevalent infections in humans and the la...

  11. p63 gene structure in the phylum mollusca.

    PubMed

    Bari?evi?, Ana; Štifani?, Mauro; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato

    2015-08-01

    Roles of p53 family ancestor (p63) in the organisms' response to stressful environmental conditions (mainly pollution) have been studied among molluscs, especially in the genus Mytilus, within the last 15 years. Nevertheless, information about gene structure of this regulatory gene in molluscs is scarce. Here we report the first complete genomic structure of the p53 family orthologue in the mollusc Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and confirm its similarity to vertebrate p63 gene. Our searches within the available molluscan genomes (Aplysia californica, Lottia gigantea, Crassostrea gigas and Biomphalaria glabrata), found only one p53 family member present in a single copy per haploid genome. Comparative analysis of those orthologues, additionally confirmed the conserved p63 gene structure. Conserved p63 gene structure can be a helpful tool to complement or/and revise gene annotations of any future p63 genomic sequence records in molluscs, but also in other animal phyla. Knowledge of the correct gene structure will enable better prediction of possible protein isoforms and their functions. Our analyses also pointed out possible mis-annotations of the p63 gene in sequenced molluscan genomes and stressed the value of manual inspection (based on alignments of cDNA and protein onto the genome sequence) for a reliable and complete gene annotation. PMID:25936268

  12. Evolution of the Sox gene family within the chordate phylum.

    PubMed

    Heenan, Phoebe; Zondag, Lisa; Wilson, Megan J

    2016-01-10

    The ancient Sox gene family is a group of related transcription factors that perform a number of essential functions during embryonic development. During evolution, this family has undergone considerable expansion, particularly within the vertebrate lineage. In vertebrates SOX proteins are required for the specification, development and/or morphogenesis of most vertebrate innovations. Tunicates and lancelets are evolutionarily positioned as the closest invertebrate relatives to the vertebrate group. By identifying their Sox gene complement we can begin to reconstruct the gene set of the last common chordate ancestor before the split into invertebrates and vertebrate groups. We have identified core SOX family members from the genomes of six invertebrate chordates. Using phylogenetic analysis we determined their evolutionary relationships. We propose that the last common ancestor of chordates had at least seven Sox genes, including the core suite of SoxB, C, D, E and F as well as SoxH. PMID:26361847

  13. Considerations on the taxonomy of the Phylum Tardigrada.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Filipe; Bertolani, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of the taxonomy of the Tardigrada is offered, based on the latest checklist version. A total of 1167 species from 113 genera were counted, but marine species are misrepresented on account of being understudied. Moreover, many poor descriptions and synonyms remain in this constantly growing list. We advocate more accurate future taxonomic work, aiming for an official list of species that better represents true values of biodiversity. PMID:26176134

  14. he microsporidia, or phy-lum Microspora, were

    E-print Network

    Keeling, Patrick

    bomby- cis was found to cause the de- structive pébrine disease in the commercially important silk- worm for the diseases they cause in fish and in insects such as silkworms, bees and locusts. In 1985, howev- er, allowing the microsporidian cell to pass directly into the host cytoplasm (Fig. 1, stages b and c). Once

  15. Status and applications of echinoid (phylum echinodermata) toxicity test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bay, S.; Burgess, R.; Nacci, D.

    1993-01-01

    The use of echinoderms for toxicity testing has focused primarily on sea urchins and sand dollars (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Arbacia punctulata, Lytechinus pictus, and Dendraster excentricus, for example). The status and relative sensitivity of various test methods are described. The most frequently used test methods consist of short-term exposures of sea urchin sperm or embryos; these tests can be easily conducted at all times of the year by using species with complementary spawning cycles or laboratory conditioned populations of a single species. Data from reference toxicant and effluent toxicity tests are summarized. Information on the precision and sensitivity of echinoid test methods are limited and preclude rigorous comparisons with other test methods. The available data indicate that the sensitivity and precision of these methods are comparable to short-term chronic methods for other marine invertebrates and fish. Recent application of the sperm test in toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs) and studies of effluent toxicity decay and sediment toxicity illustrate the versatility of this rapid (10 to 60 min exposure) test method. Embryo tests typically use a 48 to 96 h exposure period and measure the occurrence of embryo malformations. Most recent applications of the embryo test have been for the assessment of sediment elutriate toxicity. Adult echinoderms are not frequently used to assess effluent or receiving water toxicity. Recent studies have had success in using the adult life stage of urchins and sand dollars to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on growth, behavior, and bioaccumulation.

  16. STATUS AND APPLICATIONS OF ECHINOID (PHYLUM ECHINODERMATA) TOXICITY TEST METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of echinoderms for toxicity testing has focused primarily on sea urchins and sand dollars (Strongylocentrolus purpuratus, Arbacia punctulata, Lytechinus pictus, and Dendraster excentricus, for example). he status and relative sensitivity of various test methods are descri...

  17. [Phylum Orthonectida: morphology, biology, and relationships to other multicellular animals].

    PubMed

    Sliusarev, G S

    2008-01-01

    New data on morphology of the ciliary cells, sex pore, cuticle formation, sperm cell, and plasmodium in the Orthonectida were obtained. Interdigitating ciliary cells constitute a single-row epithelial layer underlied by the intercellular matrix but the basal plate formed by the matrix is not solid. Orthonectids are shown to possess the genuine muscle system consisting of the outer circular and inner longitudinal muscles. Metameric arrangement of the circular muscles in Intoshia linei, Rhopalura litoralis, and Rhopalura philinae corresponds to the integument netamery, the circular muscles underlying the circles of non-ciliary cells. In different species the longitudinal muscles form 4 to 6 bilateral cords. The longitudinal muscles provide body bending during pivots of the ciliary locomotion; they are also involved in the copulation as well as in the extrusion of genital pore cells, sperm cells, and larvae. Formation of the muscle cords in the embryogenesis is preceded by the stage of a solid layer of presumptive myoblasts at the boundary between outer and inner cell layers. Multicellular receptor in adult orthonectids is described. Finding both the muscle system and the multicellular receptor evidences for the existence of the nervous system in the orthonectids. A group of cells forming a putative ganglion is revealed in the anterior part of the ciliary individuals. Orthonectid cuticle is of microvillar type resembling that of Annelida. Comparison of reproductive individuals in Orthonectida and Dicyemida indicates that these taxa are distinct phyla belonging to quite separate branches of the Metazoan phylogenetic tree. New data on morphology and biology of the orthonectid plasmodium are obtained. The mechanism of the orthonectid leaving their hosts is described: the reproductive individuals move within the plasmodium processes that grow through the host tissues and contact with the environment. The plasmodium is shown to be covered with two membranes and is proved to contain multiple nuclei. The data obtained evidence for the parasitic nature of the orthonectid plasmodium. The orthonectid life cycle includes alternation of the sexual, asexual, and parthenogenetic reproduction phases and can be characterized as a combination of the metagenesis and heterogony. The term "metaheterogony" is suggested to denotate the orthonectid life cycle. By the entire set of the morphological characters, the orthonectids are to be allocated to the Spiralia. PMID:19140332

  18. Life cycle of Hammondia hammondi (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) in cats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hammondia hammondi and Toxoplasma gondii are feline coccidian that are morphologically, antigenically, and phylogenitically related. Both parasites multiply asexually and sexually in feline intestinal enterocytes but H. hammondi remains confined to enterocytes whereas T. gondii also parasitizes extr...

  19. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM HOMINIS N. SP. (APICOMPLEXA: CRYPTOSPORIDIDAE) FROM HUMANS, HOMO SAPIENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure and infectivity of the oocysts of a new species of Cryptosporidium from the feces of humans are described. Oocysts are structurally indistinguishable from those of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocysts of the new species are passed fully sporulated, lack sporocysts, and measure 4.6 - 5.4 m ...

  20. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM HOMINIS N. SP. (APICOMPLEXA: CRYPTOSPORIDIIDAE) FROM HUMANS, HOMO SAPIENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on biological and molecular data, the species of Cryptosporidium infecting the intestine of humans is considered a new species for which the name Cryptosporidium hominis is proposed. The structure and infectivity of the oocysts of C. hominis from the feces of humans are described. Oocysts are ...

  1. BESNOITIA ORYCTOFELISI N. SP. (PROTOZOA: APICOMPLEXA) FROM DOMESTIC RABBITS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A species of Besnoitia from naturally infected rabbits from Argentina was propagated experimentally in mice, gerbils, rabbits, cats, and cell cultures. Cats fed tissue cysts from rabbits shed oocysts with a prepatent period of nine to 13 days. Sporulated oocysts were infective to gerbils, rabbits,...

  2. Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Kvá?, Martin; Hofmannová, Lada; Hlásková, Lenka; Kv?to?ová, Dana; Vítovec, Ji?í; McEvoy, John; Sak, Bohumil

    2014-03-17

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. is proposed to reflect its specificity for hedgehogs under natural and experimental conditions. Oocysts of C. erinacei are morphologically indistinguishable from Cryptosporidium parvum, measuring 4.5-5.8 ?m (mean=4.9 ?m) × 4.0-4.8 ?m (mean=4.4 ?m) with a length to width ratio of 1.13 (1.02-1.35) (n=100). Oocysts of C. erinacei obtained from a naturally infected European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) were infectious for naïve 8-week-old four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris); the prepatent period was 4-5 days post infection (DPI) and the patent period was longer than 20 days. C. erinacei was not infectious for 8-week-old SCID and BALB/c mice (Mus musculus), Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), or golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, 60 kDa glycoprotein, actin, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, thrombospondin-related adhesive protein of Cryptosporidium-1, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. erinacei is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species. PMID:24529828

  3. Two new eimerians (Apicomplexa) from insectivorous mammals in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Couch, Lee; Laakkonen, Juha; Goodman, Steven; Duszynski, Donald W

    2011-04-01

    Fecal samples from 126 insectivorous mammals in Madagascar were collected between spring 1999 and fall 2001. In the Afrosoricida, 21 species in 5 genera were sampled, including 17 species of Microgale (31/96, 32% infected), Hemicentetes semispinosus (1/2, 50%), Oryzorictes hova (1/5, 20%), Setifer setosus (8/13, 61.5%), and Tenrec ecaudatus (5/8, 62.5%); in the Soricomorpha, only Suncus murinus was examined and 1/2 (50%) were infected. Two morphotypes of eimeriid oocysts, representing 2 presumptive new species, were found in 47 (37%) infected animals; only 2 afrosoricid hosts (2% of all hosts, 4% of infected hosts) had both oocyst morphotypes. Sporulated oocysts of the first morphotype, Eimeria tenrececaudata n. sp., are subspheroidal, 18.8 × 17.4 (17-22 × 15-20), with a length?width ratio (L/W) of 1.1 (1.0-1.2); they lack a micropyle but may contain 0-2 polar granules and a single, small round oocyst residuum, 3 × 2.3. Sporocysts are lemon-shaped, 9.9 × 6.6 (9-11 × 5-8), with a L/W of 1.5 (1.2-2.0); they have a prominent, slightly flattened Stieda body and a substieda body but lack a parastieda body. The sporocyst residuum consists of only a few granules between the sporozoites, which are sausage-shaped and have a large posterior refractile body. Oocysts of the second morphotype, Eimeria setifersetosa n. sp. are spheroidal to subspheroidal, 30.1 × 28.6 (27-34 × 25-34), with a L/W of 1.1 (1.0-1.2); they lack both micropyle and oocyst residuum, but 1-2 polar granules are usually present. Sporocysts are subspheroidal to broadly ellipsoidal, 9.6 × 7.3 (9-11 × 6-8), with a L/W of 1.3 (1.1-1.7); they have a broad Stieda body, lack sub- and parastieda bodies, and have a residuum of a few granules scattered throughout the sporocyst. Sporozoites were not clearly defined, but what seemed to be a single large refractile body is seen, presumably in each sporozoite. PMID:21506791

  4. Characterization of microneme antigens of Cryptosporidium parvum (Protozoa, Apicomplexa).

    PubMed Central

    Bonnin, A; Dubremetz, J F; Camerlynck, P

    1991-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against purified excysted oocysts and sporozoites of cryptosporidium parvum reacted in an immunofluorescence assay with antigens located at the anterior pole of the zoites. On Western blots of purified oocysts, these MAbs reacted with a series of bands between 210 and 40 kDa; several of these bands were recognized by both MAbs; others were specific. One MAb (TOU) did not react after periodic acid treatment and was therefore considered to recognize a carbohydrate epitope; as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, this MAb reacted on micronemes of sporozoites and merozoites and also with the peripheral cytoplasm and the parasitophorous vacuole of trophozoites and macrogametes. The other MAb (HAD) reacted with an epitope that was insensitive to periodate treatment but did not react in the immunoelectron microscopy assay. However, the similar labeling pattern obtained with the immunofluorescence assay with both MAbs and the fact that the two antibodies share common bands on Western immunoblots suggest that both MAbs react with molecules located in Cryptosporidium micronemes, one reacting with a glycannic epitope and the other reacting with a peptidic epitope. Images PMID:1708357

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Eimeria magna (Apicomplexa: Coccidia).

    PubMed

    Tian, Si-Qin; Cui, Ping; Fang, Su-Fang; Liu, Guo-Hua; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Eimeria magna from rabbits for the first time, and compared its gene contents and genome organizations with that of seven Eimeria spp. from domestic chickens. The size of the complete mt genome sequence of E. magna is 6249?bp, which consists of 3 protein-coding genes (cytb, cox1 and cox3), 12 gene fragments for the large subunit (LSU) rRNA, and 7 gene fragments for the small subunit (SSU) rRNA, without transfer RNA genes, in accordance with that of Eimeria spp. from chickens. The putative direction of translation for three genes (cytb, cox1 and cox3) was the same as those of Eimeria species from domestic chickens. The content of A?+?T is 65.16% for E. magna mt genome (29.73% A, 35.43% T, 17.09 G and 17.75% C). The E. magna mt genome sequence provides novel mtDNA markers for studying the molecular epidemiology and population genetics of Eimeria spp. and has implications for the molecular diagnosis and control of rabbit coccidiosis. PMID:24328820

  6. COCCIDIAN PARASITES (APICOMPLEXA: EUCOCCIDORIDA) IN HARDY HEAD FISH, ATHERINOMORUS CAPRICORNENSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Authors describe coccidian merozoites (asexual stages) in theexocrine pancreas and oocysts in the gut epithelium of hardy heads,(Woodland) (family Atherinidae) collected at Heron Island, Queensland, Australia, during the pre-ICOPA (International Congress of Parasitology) workshop...

  7. their support for these competing hypoth-eses.Treesbuiltusingsinglegenesfrommany

    E-print Network

    of species represented in a phylogenetic study can have two effects on tree reconstruction. First, without of evolution compared with the rest. Unfortunatelyforwhole-genomestudies,the usualoutgroup,yeast choanoflagellates, thought to be the protozoan phylum most closely related toanimals). Whenonlyadistantoutgroup(yeast

  8. Elongator Protein 3 (Elp3) Lysine Acetyltransferase Is a Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Protein in Toxoplasma gondii *

    PubMed Central

    Stilger, Krista L.; Sullivan, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important, widespread post-translational modification occurring on proteins that reside in multiple cellular compartments, including the mitochondria. However, no lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) has been definitively localized to this organelle to date. Here we describe the identification of an unusual homologue of Elp3 in early-branching protozoa in the phylum Apicomplexa. Elp3 is the catalytic subunit of the well-conserved transcription Elongator complex; however, Apicomplexa lack all other Elongator subunits, suggesting that the Elp3 in these organisms plays a role independent of transcription. Surprisingly, Elp3 in the parasites of this phylum, including Toxoplasma gondii (TgElp3), possesses a unique C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) that localizes the protein to the mitochondrion. As TgElp3 is devoid of known mitochondrial targeting signals, we used selective permeabilization studies to reveal that this KAT is oriented with its catalytic components facing the cytosol and its C-terminal TMD inserted into the outer mitochondrial membrane, consistent with a tail-anchored membrane protein. Elp3 trafficking to mitochondria is not exclusive to Toxoplasma as we also present evidence that a form of Elp3 localizes to these organelles in mammalian cells, supporting the idea that Elp3 performs novel functions across eukaryotes that are independent of transcriptional elongation. Importantly, we also present genetic studies that suggest TgElp3 is essential in Toxoplasma and must be positioned at the mitochondrial surface for parasite viability. PMID:23878194

  9. Sirtuins of parasitic protozoa: In search of function(s)

    PubMed Central

    Religa, Agnieszka A.; Waters, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    The SIR2 family of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases, collectively called sirtuins, has been of central interest due to their proposed roles in life-span regulation and ageing. Sirtuins are one group of environment sensors of a cell interpreting external information and orchestrating internal responses at the sub-cellular level, through participation in gene regulation mechanisms. Remarkably conserved across all kingdoms of life SIR2 proteins in several protozoan parasites appear to have both conserved and intriguing unique functions. This review summarises our current knowledge of the members of the sirtuin families in Apicomplexa, including Plasmodium, and other protozoan parasites such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania. The wide diversity of processes regulated by SIR2 proteins makes them targets worthy of exploitation in anti-parasitic therapies. PMID:22906508

  10. Antibiotic resistance in prevalent bacterial and protozoan sexually transmitted infections

    PubMed Central

    Krupp, Karl; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is causing a treatment crisis across the globe. While cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea is one of the most pressing issues, extensively antibiotic resistant Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma hominis are also becoming commonplace. Experts have suggested that the failure of current treatment regimens are “largely inevitable” and have called for entirely new classes of antimicrobial agents. With the exception of several new classes of drugs primarily targeting nosocomial infections, progress has been slow. While pharmaceutical companies continue to introduce new drugs, they are based on decade-old discoveries. While there is disagreement about what constitutes new classes of antibiotics, many experts suggest that the last truly new family of antimicrobials was discovered in 1987. This review summarizes the existing literature on antibiotic resistance in common bacterial and protozoal STIs. It also briefly discusses several of the most promising alternatives to current therapies, and further examines how advances in drug delivery, formulation, concentration, and timing are improving the efficacy of existing treatments. Finally, the paper discusses the current state of pharmaceutical development for multidrug-resistant STI. PMID:26392647

  11. PROTOZOAN SOURCES OF SPONTANEOUS COLIFORM OCCURRENCE IN CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spontaneous occurrence of coliforms in chlorinated drinking waters has resulted in concern over their potential source and mechanism(s) of introduction into water delivery systems. Previous observations related to protozoal resistance to chlorine coupled with the ingestion of...

  12. Search for blood protozoans in the American woodcock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krohn, W.B.; Hynson, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Smears were prepared from heart blood of 55 woodcock collected in central Maine between spring and fall, 1972 and 1973. Peripheral blood taken from the wings of 41 of these birds also was examined. Examination of stained films revealed no infected blood cells. Samples of heart blood from 35 of the 41 woodcock were injected into young ducks, quail, and a gull. Plasmodia were not seen in inoculated birds.

  13. [Common tropical infections with protozoans, worms and ectoparasites].

    PubMed

    Schliemann, S

    2014-10-01

    Infectious diseases of the skin have become rarer in industrialized nations, but they still affect a considerable part of the population in tropical regions. Skin diseases induced by protozoa, worms and ectoparasites are among the 17 "neglected tropical diseases" defined by the WHO (leishmaniasis, dracunculiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis). Skin symptoms in travellers returning from the tropics may challenge dermatologists in Germany regarding differential diagnostic assessment and therapy. Among the 12 most frequent skin diseases in travellers are cutaneous larva migrans, leishmaniasis and myiasis. In this review, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of some the most relevant tropical dermatoses due to protozoa, worms and ectoparasites are discussed. PMID:25217086

  14. Adaptation to environmental warming by experimental populations of protozoans

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, P.

    1995-09-01

    Sexual populations and replicates of two clones of Tetrahymena thermophila were subjected to a continuously increasing temperature, to simulated the effects of global warming. The model of Lynch and Lande (1993) predicts that the ability of a population to adapt to a directional change in the environment will be determined by the rate of environmental change and the amount of genetic variation within the population. The amount of variation depends in turn upon the genetic structure of the population: sexual populations continuously generate new variation through segregation and recombination; variation with clones is limited by the rate of accumulation of new mutations. The model predicts that there will be a lag time between the environmental change and adaptation by the population. Adaptation will be measured by changes in the temperature optima for population growth. I predict that sexual populations will have higher temperature optima, when subjected to constantly increasing temperatures, than either clones or control populations grown under a constant temperature.

  15. Evolutionary ecology of transmission strategies in protozoan parasites 

    E-print Network

    Pollitt, Laura C.

    2011-11-24

    In recent years there has been growing interest in applying frameworks from evolutionary ecology to understand infectious disease. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the interactions between parasites within the ...

  16. Importance of Nonenteric Protozoan Infections in Immunocompromised People

    PubMed Central

    Barratt, J. L. N.; Harkness, J.; Marriott, D.; Ellis, J. T.; Stark, D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: There are many neglected nonenteric protozoa able to cause serious morbidity and mortality in humans, particularly in the developing world. Diseases caused by certain protozoa are often more severe in the presence of HIV. While information regarding neglected tropical diseases caused by trypanosomatids and Plasmodium is abundant, these protozoa are often not a first consideration in Western countries where they are not endemic. As such, diagnostics may not be available in these regions. Due to global travel and immigration, this has become an increasing problem. Inversely, in certain parts of the world (particularly sub-Saharan Africa), the HIV problem is so severe that diseases like microsporidiosis and toxoplasmosis are common. In Western countries, due to the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), these diseases are infrequently encountered. While free-living amoebae are rarely encountered in a clinical setting, when infections do occur, they are often fatal. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to the survival of patients infected with these organisms. This paper reviews information on the diagnosis and treatment of nonenteric protozoal diseases in immunocompromised people, with a focus on patients infected with HIV. The nonenteric microsporidia, some trypanosomatids, Toxoplasma spp., Neospora spp., some free-living amoebae, Plasmodium spp., and Babesia spp. are discussed. PMID:20930074

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Towards an unbiased metabolic profiling of protozoan

    E-print Network

    Breitling, Rainer

    following transmission by sand flies (Psychodidae: Phlebotominae). The life cycle of this parasite consists is then extracted in cold chloroform/methanol/water 20/60/20 (v/v/v) for 1 h at 4 °C, resulting in both cell of two distinct morphological forms: (a) promasti- gotes, adapted to life in the sand fly intestinal

  18. Antibiotic resistance in prevalent bacterial and protozoan sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Karl; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is causing a treatment crisis across the globe. While cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea is one of the most pressing issues, extensively antibiotic resistant Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma hominis are also becoming commonplace. Experts have suggested that the failure of current treatment regimens are "largely inevitable" and have called for entirely new classes of antimicrobial agents. With the exception of several new classes of drugs primarily targeting nosocomial infections, progress has been slow. While pharmaceutical companies continue to introduce new drugs, they are based on decade-old discoveries. While there is disagreement about what constitutes new classes of antibiotics, many experts suggest that the last truly new family of antimicrobials was discovered in 1987. This review summarizes the existing literature on antibiotic resistance in common bacterial and protozoal STIs. It also briefly discusses several of the most promising alternatives to current therapies, and further examines how advances in drug delivery, formulation, concentration, and timing are improving the efficacy of existing treatments. Finally, the paper discusses the current state of pharmaceutical development for multidrug-resistant STI. PMID:26392647

  19. NERL MICROBIAL PROGRAM WITH EMPHASIS ON PROTOZOAN METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Exposure Research Laboratory's facility in Cincinnati is engated in a variety of microbiological research projects that include studies on bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa. One of these was a protzoology project to determine the best way to evaluate methods rep...

  20. The Toxoplasma protein ARO mediates the apical positioning of rhoptry organelles, a prerequisite for host cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Christina; Klages, Natacha; Jacot, Damien; Santos, Joana M; Cabrera, Ana; Gilberger, Tim W; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2013-03-13

    Members of the phylum Apicomplexa actively enter host cells by a process involving the discharge of the apically localized microneme and rhoptry organelles. To unravel the processes involved in rhoptry organelle biogenesis, we focused on the Toxoplasma gondii armadillo repeats only protein (TgARO), a conserved acylated protein homogenously anchored to the rhoptry membrane. Conditional disruption of TgARO results in the random cytosolic dispersion of rhoptries and a severe defect in T. gondii invasion, with no effects on intracellular growth or host cell egress. Importantly, rhoptry displacement upon ARO depletion can be functionally complemented with wild-type TgARO but not an acylation mutant. TgARO interacts with myosin F, and inhibition of actin polymerization or myosin function also results in rhoptry dispersal, indicating that the apical positioning of rhoptries is an actomyosin-based process. Thus, TgARO mediates the apical localization of rhoptries, which is specifically required for host cell invasion. PMID:23498954

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis Strain UCD-SED8 (Phylum Gammaproteobacteria).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ruth D; Jospin, Guillaume; Lang, Jenna M; Eisen, Jonathan A; Coil, David A

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis UCD-SED8, a marine bacterium normally associated with the production of tetrodotoxin in pufferfish. This strain was isolated from sediment samples surrounding Zostera marina roots collected from Bodega Marine, California. The assembly consists of 4,017,727 bp contained in 35 contigs. PMID:26543114

  2. Body size evolution in the Phylum Brachiopoda throughout the Phanerozoic Eon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, N.; Zhang, Z.; Augustin, M.; Payne, J.; Paleobiology

    2011-12-01

    Body size is a useful trait for studying the evolution of life on Earth. It is functionally important and therefore reflects how species respond to fluctuating environmental conditions such as changing oxygen and resource availabilities. In this study, we measured 4,993 species of brachiopods, spanning the whole Phanerozoic Eon, from the Treatise of Invertebrate Paleontology. Brachiopods were chosen for the study because they have an extensive and well-studied fossil record, are extremely abundant in rocks of many ages, and are well preserved due to their mineralized shells. Brachiopod mean body size increased significantly during the Devonian period and continued growing throughout the Carboniferous period, but declined sharply after the Permian-Triassic extinction. Soon after, their body size remained stable throughout the Jurassic and again declined during the Cretaceous, never to regain their high body size again. Brachiopod body size displayed different trends throughout the Phanerozoic Eon, which led to a diversification of species.

  3. De Novo Assembly and Characterization of Four Anthozoan (Phylum Cnidaria) Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Sheila A.; Crowder, Camerron M.; Poole, Angela Z.; Weis, Virginia M.; Meyer, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Many nonmodel species exemplify important biological questions but lack the sequence resources required to study the genes and genomic regions underlying traits of interest. Reef-building corals are famously sensitive to rising seawater temperatures, motivating ongoing research into their stress responses and long-term prospects in a changing climate. A comprehensive understanding of these processes will require extending beyond the sequenced coral genome (Acropora digitifera) to encompass diverse coral species and related anthozoans. Toward that end, we have assembled and annotated reference transcriptomes to develop catalogs of gene sequences for three scleractinian corals (Fungia scutaria, Montastraea cavernosa, Seriatopora hystrix) and a temperate anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima). High-throughput sequencing of cDNA libraries produced ?20–30 million reads per sample, and de novo assembly of these reads produced ?75,000–110,000 transcripts from each sample with size distributions (mean ?1.4 kb, N50 ?2 kb), comparable to the distribution of gene models from the coral genome (mean ?1.7 kb, N50 ?2.2 kb). Each assembly includes matches for more than half the gene models from A. digitifera (54–67%) and many reasonably complete transcripts (?5300–6700) spanning nearly the entire gene (ortholog hit ratios ?0.75). The catalogs of gene sequences developed in this study made it possible to identify hundreds to thousands of orthologs across diverse scleractinian species and related taxa. We used these sequences for phylogenetic inference, recovering known relationships and demonstrating superior performance over phylogenetic trees constructed using single mitochondrial loci. The resources developed in this study provide gene sequences and genetic markers for several anthozoan species. To enhance the utility of these resources for the research community, we developed searchable databases enabling researchers to rapidly recover sequences for genes of interest. Our analysis of de novo assembly quality highlights metrics that we expect will be useful for evaluating the relative quality of other de novo transcriptome assemblies. The identification of orthologous sequences and phylogenetic reconstruction demonstrates the feasibility of these methods for clarifying the substantial uncertainties in the existing scleractinian phylogeny. PMID:26384772

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter sp. Strain UCD-UG_FMILLET (Phylum Proteobacteria)

    E-print Network

    Raizada, Manish N.

    is an endophyte isolated from the roots of finger millet, an Afro-Indian cereal crop. The genome contains 4 during August, 2012. Finger millet seeds were planted under semi-hydroponic con- ditions in 22.5 liter- terobacter sp. strain UCD-UG_FMILLET was isolated from the roots of the Afro-Indian cereal crop, finger

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter sp. Strain UCD-UG_FMILLET (Phylum Proteobacteria).

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Cassandra L; Mousa, Walaa M; Raizada, Manish N; Eisen, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Enterobacter sp. strain UCD-UG_FMILLET. This strain is an endophyte isolated from the roots of finger millet, an Afro-Indian cereal crop. The genome contains 4,801,411 bp in 53 scaffolds. PMID:25614569

  6. Chryseobacterium takakiae sp. nov., a member of the phylum Bacteroidetes isolated from Takakia lepidozioides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ran; Chen, Xin Yao; Li, Xue Dong; Chen, Zhi Ling; Li, Yan Hong

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and non-endospore-forming bacterium, designated strain AG1-2(T), was isolated from Takakia lepidozioides collected from the Gawalong glacier in Tibet, China and characterized using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The predominant fatty acids of strain AG1-2(T) were iso-C15?:?0 (36.0?%), iso-C17:0 3-OH (20.2?%), summed feature 9 (iso-C17:1?9c and/or C16:0 10-methyl, 16.4%) and summed feature 3 (C16:1?7c and/or C16:1?6c, 11.1%). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, three unidentified aminolipids and two unidentified lipids. Strain AG1-2(T) contained MK-6 as the dominant menaquinone, and the genomic DNA G+C content was 37.3 mol%. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain AG1-2(T) was affiliated to species of the genus Chryseobacterium, and its closest related species were Chryseobacterium taiwanense Soil-3-27(T), Chryseobacterium hispalense AG13(T), Chryseobacterium camelliae THG C4-1(T) and Chryseobacterium taeanense PHA3-4(T) with a sequence similarity of 98.0, 97.8, 97.3 and 97.1%, respectively. However, the DNA-DNA relatedness values between these strains and strain AG1-2(T) were 29, 21, 21 and 45%, respectively. Based on phylogenetic inference and phenotypic data, strain AG1-2(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Chryseobacterium, for which the name Chryseobacterium takakiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AG1-2(T) (?=?CGMCC 1.12488(T)?=?DSM 26898(T)). PMID:25273512

  7. De Novo Assembly and Characterization of Four Anthozoan (Phylum Cnidaria) Transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Sheila A; Crowder, Camerron M; Poole, Angela Z; Weis, Virginia M; Meyer, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Many nonmodel species exemplify important biological questions but lack the sequence resources required to study the genes and genomic regions underlying traits of interest. Reef-building corals are famously sensitive to rising seawater temperatures, motivating ongoing research into their stress responses and long-term prospects in a changing climate. A comprehensive understanding of these processes will require extending beyond the sequenced coral genome (Acropora digitifera) to encompass diverse coral species and related anthozoans. Toward that end, we have assembled and annotated reference transcriptomes to develop catalogs of gene sequences for three scleractinian corals (Fungia scutaria, Montastraea cavernosa, Seriatopora hystrix) and a temperate anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima). High-throughput sequencing of cDNA libraries produced ?20-30 million reads per sample, and de novo assembly of these reads produced ?75,000-110,000 transcripts from each sample with size distributions (mean ?1.4 kb, N50 ?2 kb), comparable to the distribution of gene models from the coral genome (mean ?1.7 kb, N50 ?2.2 kb). Each assembly includes matches for more than half the gene models from A. digitifera (54-67%) and many reasonably complete transcripts (?5300-6700) spanning nearly the entire gene (ortholog hit ratios ?0.75). The catalogs of gene sequences developed in this study made it possible to identify hundreds to thousands of orthologs across diverse scleractinian species and related taxa. We used these sequences for phylogenetic inference, recovering known relationships and demonstrating superior performance over phylogenetic trees constructed using single mitochondrial loci. The resources developed in this study provide gene sequences and genetic markers for several anthozoan species. To enhance the utility of these resources for the research community, we developed searchable databases enabling researchers to rapidly recover sequences for genes of interest. Our analysis of de novo assembly quality highlights metrics that we expect will be useful for evaluating the relative quality of other de novo transcriptome assemblies. The identification of orthologous sequences and phylogenetic reconstruction demonstrates the feasibility of these methods for clarifying the substantial uncertainties in the existing scleractinian phylogeny. PMID:26384772

  8. Differential gene expression between functionally specialized polyps of the colonial hydrozoan Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus (Phylum Cnidaria)

    E-print Network

    Sanders, Steven M.; Shcheglovitova, Mariya; Cartwright, Paulyn

    2014-01-01

    of stinging cells (nematocysts) and the gonozooid bears gonophores on its body column. Morphological differences between polyp types can be attributed to simple changes in their axial patterning during development, and it has long been hypothesized...

  9. Evaluating the use of DNA Sequences for Species Identification in Medusozoans (Phylum Cnidaria)

    E-print Network

    Richardson, Rhea

    2012-04-01

    . Journal of Biogeography, 32, 5 1 5 - 5 5 3 . D r u m m o n d A J , A s h t o n B, B u x t o n S, C h e u n g M, C o o p e r A, D u r a n C, Field M, Heled J, Kearse M, M a r k o w i t z S, Moir R, S t o n e s - H a v a s S, Sturrock S, T h i e r e r T... t i n g . R F o u n d a t i o n for Statistical C o m p u t i n g , V i e n n a , Austr ia . ISBN 3 - 9 0 0 0 5 1 - 0 7 - 0 , U R L h t t p : / / w w w . R - p r o j e c t . o r g / . Shearer , T.L. and M.A. Coffroth (2008) B a r c o d i n g...

  10. A new isolate of Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum, and Amoeboaphelidium occidentale, a new species in phylum Aphelida (Opisthosporidia).

    PubMed

    Letcher, Peter M; Powell, Martha J; Lopez, Salvador; Lee, Philip A; McBride, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae used in the production of biofuels represents an alternative to fossil fuels. One problem in the production of algae for biofuels is attacks by algal parasitoids that can cause population crashes when algae are cultivated in outdoor ponds (Greenwell et al. 2010). Integrated solutions are being sought to mitigate this problem, and an initial step is pest identification. We isolated an algal parasitoid from an open pond of Scenedesmus dimorphus used for biofuel production in New Mexico and examined its morphology, ultrastructure and molecular phylogeny. A phylogenetic analysis placed this organism in Aphelida as conspecific with Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum sensu Karpov et al. 2013. As a result we re-evaluated the taxonomy of Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum sensu Letcher et al. 2013 and here designate it as a new species, Amoeboaphelidium occidentale. PMID:25661716

  11. DNA taxonomy of a neglected animal phylum: an unexpected diversity of tardigrades.

    PubMed Central

    Blaxter, Mark; Elsworth, Ben; Daub, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    A molecular survey technique was used to investigate the diversity of terrestrial tardigrades from three sites within Scotland. Ribosomal small subunit sequence was used to classify specimens into molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTU). Most MOTU were identified to the generic level using digital voucher photography. Thirty-two MOTU were defined, a surprising abundance given that the documented British fauna is 68 species. Some tardigrade MOTU were shared between the two rural collection sites, but no MOTU were found in both urban and rural sites, which conflicts with models of ubiquity of meiofaunal taxa. The patterns of relatedness of MOTU were particularly intriguing, with some forming clades with low levels of divergence, suggestive of taxon flocks. Some morphological taxa contained well-separated MOTU, perhaps indicating the existence of cryptic taxa. DNA sequence-based MOTU proved to be a revealing method for meiofaunal diversity studies. PMID:15252980

  12. Correction: Phylogenetic placement of the enigmatic parasite, Polypodium hydriforme, within the Phylum Cnidaria

    E-print Network

    Evans, Nathaniel Michael; Lindner, Alberto; Raikova, Ekaterina V.; Collins, Allen G.; Cartwright, Paulyn

    2009-07-15

    , Russia and 4National Systematics Laboratory of NOAA Fisheries Service, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20013-7012, USA Email: Nathaniel M Evans - evansnat@ku.edu; Alberto Lindner - alindner@usp.br; Ekaterina V...

  13. Extensive and evolutionarily persistent mitochondrial tRNA editing in Velvet Worms (phylum Onychophora).

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Pett, Walker; Trewick, Steve; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of onychophorans (velvet worms) present an interesting problem: Some previous studies reported them lacking several transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, whereas others found that all their tRNA genes were present but severely reduced. To resolve this discrepancy, we determined complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of the onychophorans Oroperipatus sp. and Peripatoides sympatrica as well as cDNA sequences from 14 and 10 of their tRNAs, respectively. We show that tRNA genes in these genomes are indeed highly reduced and encode truncated molecules, which are restored to more conventional structures by extensive tRNA editing. During this editing process, up to 34 nucleotides are added to the tRNA sequences encoded in Oroperipatus sp. mtDNA, rebuilding the aminoacyl acceptor stem, the T?C arm, and in some extreme cases, the variable arm and even a part of the anticodon stem. The editing is less extreme in P. sympatrica in which at least a part of the T?C arm is always encoded in mtDNA. When the entire T?C arm is added de novo in Oroperipatus sp., the sequence of this arm is either identical or similar among different tRNA species, yet the sequences show substantial variation for each tRNA. These observations suggest that the arm is rebuilt, at least in part, by a template-independent mechanism and argue against the alternative possibility that tRNA genes or their parts are imported from the nucleus. By contrast, the 3' end of the aminoacyl acceptor stem is likely restored by a template-dependent mechanism. The extreme tRNA editing reported here has been preserved for >140 My as it was found in both extant families of onychophorans. Furthermore, a similar type of tRNA editing may be present in several other groups of arthropods, which show a high degree of tRNA gene reduction in their mtDNA. PMID:21546355

  14. Genomics of Actinobacteria: Tracing the Evolutionary History of an Ancient Phylum

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Marco; Canchaya, Carlos; Tauch, Andreas; Chandra, Govind; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Chater, Keith F.; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Actinobacteria constitute one of the largest phyla among Bacteria and represent gram-positive bacteria with a high G+C content in their DNA. This bacterial group includes microorganisms exhibiting a wide spectrum of morphologies, from coccoid to fragmenting hyphal forms, as well as possessing highly variable physiological and metabolic properties. Furthermore, Actinobacteria members have adopted different lifestyles, and can be pathogens (e.g., Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Tropheryma, and Propionibacterium), soil inhabitants (Streptomyces), plant commensals (Leifsonia), or gastrointestinal commensals (Bifidobacterium). The divergence of Actinobacteria from other bacteria is ancient, making it impossible to identify the phylogenetically closest bacterial group to Actinobacteria. Genome sequence analysis has revolutionized every aspect of bacterial biology by enhancing the understanding of the genetics, physiology, and evolutionary development of bacteria. Various actinobacterial genomes have been sequenced, revealing a wide genomic heterogeneity probably as a reflection of their biodiversity. This review provides an account of the recent explosion of actinobacterial genomics data and an attempt to place this in a biological and evolutionary context. PMID:17804669

  15. Phylogeny of Arenig to Caradoc crinoids (Phylum Echinodermata) and suprageneric classification of the Crinoidea

    E-print Network

    Ausich, W. I.

    1998-06-01

    entirely in North America, with the exception of Tunguskocrinus from the Siberian Platform, Russia. Therefore, despite the similarity of the aboral cup architecture of Tunguskocrinus to homocrinids, it is pos- sible that Tunguskocrinus represents...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis Strain UCD-SED8 (Phylum Gammaproteobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ruth D.; Jospin, Guillaume; Lang, Jenna M.; Coil, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis UCD-SED8, a marine bacterium normally associated with the production of tetrodotoxin in pufferfish. This strain was isolated from sediment samples surrounding Zostera marina roots collected from Bodega Marine, California. The assembly consists of 4,017,727 bp contained in 35 contigs. PMID:26543114

  17. [Proposition of a new classification of the phylum of the protozoa Ciliophora Doflein, 1901].

    PubMed

    de Puytorac, P; Batisse, A; Deroux, G; Fleury, A; Grain, J; Laval-Peuto, M; Tuffrau, M

    1993-08-01

    It is proposed to use all the presently available molecular, ultrastructural, biological and ecological data on ciliates for the new classification of this group of protists. On the basis of the cortical organization and the mode of cilia anchoring as well as the degree of conservation of the cortical pattern during the process of morphogenesis, eleven classes (Karyorelictea, Heterotrichea, Hypotrichea, Oligotrichea, Plagiopylea, Colpodea, Litostomatea, Vestibuliferea, Phyllopharyngea, Nassophorea and Oligohymenophorea) have been distinguished. These classes, in turn, were, according to the "shell theory" of Fleury and coworkers (1992), grouped into three subphyla: Tubulicorticata (presence of the cortical microtubular lattices), Filicorticata (characteristic ecto-endoplasmic microfibrillar boundary) and Epiplasmata (presence of a sub-membraneous epiplasmic layer). PMID:8044695

  18. Sarcocystis oreamni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus).

    PubMed

    Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Van Wilpe, Erna; White, Kevin; Verma, Shiv K; Cerqueira-Cézar, Camila K; Dubey, Jitender P

    2015-11-01

    Numerous species of Sarcocystis have been reported from wild ruminants, but none has been named from the Rocky Mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus). Mature sarcocysts were found in frozen muscle samples of three of seven mountain goats from Alaska, USA. Two morphological types of sarcocysts were found; one had Sarcocystis cornagliai-like sarcocysts, previously named from the Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) from Europe. Two other goats were infected with a new species, Sarcocystis oreamni. Sarcocystis oreamni sarcocysts were microscopic with 2 ?m-thick sarcocyst wall. By transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall had 1.7 ?m-thick with unusual molar tooth-like villar protrusions (vp), type 29. The vp had an electron dense core and two disc-shaped plaques at the tip with fine microtubules. Bradyzoites were 8.6-9.1 ?m long. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identified in 18S rRNA, and 28S rRNA loci of rDNA regions that suggested S. oreamni molecularly apart from related species. The phylogenetic analysis based on 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA sequences suggested S. oreamni is related with Sarcocystis species that employ members of the Canidae family as their definitive host. PMID:26255900

  19. Sarcocystis cafferi, n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four species of Sarcocystis are currently recognized in the Asian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): Sarcocystis fusiformis with macrocysts and cats as definitive hosts, S. buffalonis also with macrocysts and cats as definitive hosts, S. levinei with microcysts and dogs as definitive hosts, and S. dub...

  20. Cryptosporidium ryanae n.sp. (Apicomplexa:Cryptosporidiidae)in cattle (Bos Taurus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new species, Cryptosporidium ryanae, is described from cattle. Oocysts of C. ryanae, previously identified as the Cryptosporidium deer-like genotype and recorded as such in GenBank (AY587166, EU203216, DQ182597, AY741309, and DQ871345), are morphologically similar to those of C. parvum and C. bovi...

  1. SARCOCYSTIS URSUSI, N. SP (APICOMPLEXA; SARCOCYSTIDAE) FROM THE BLACK BEAR (URSUS AMERICANUS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection with Sarcocystis species is common in hervibores but is rare in bears. Histological sections of 374 black bears (Ursus americanus) from Pennsylvania were examined for sarcocysts. A total of 3 sarcocysts were found in 3 bears, 1 sarcocyst per section. Sarcocysts from 2 bears were considered...

  2. Eimeria biarmicus sp.n. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) infecting falcons from the genus Falco in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alfaleh, F A; Alyousif, M S; Al-Quraishy, S; Al-Shawa, Y R

    2012-05-01

    The oocysts of Eimeria biarmicus sp. n. were described from the feces of the lanner falcon, Falco biarmicus, collected from the falcon market in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia. The prevalence of infection was 5% (2/40). The majority of the oocysts examined had completed sporulation within 84 h at 24 ± 2°C. Sporulated oocysts are ovoid in shape, measuring 22.4 × 17.9 (20.5-24.7 × 15.8-18.5) ?m; shape index (L/W) is 1.25 (1.14-1.36) ?m. The oocyst wall is smooth and bi-layered. Micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent. A polar granule is present, consisting of 2-4 globules. Sporocysts are ovoid, 10.1 × 6.1 (9.4-11.2 × 5.4-6.8) ?m; with a smooth single-layered wall and a minute Stieda body, but there is no substieda body. The sporocyst residuum consists of numerous small granules. Sporozoites are comma shaped, each contains two refractile bodies. E. biarmicus sp. n. is the second eimerian species described from F. biarmicus. PMID:21997853

  3. Caryospora biarmicusis sp.n. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) infecting falcons from the genus Falco in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alyousif, M S; Alfaleh, F A; Al-Shawa, Y R

    2011-04-01

    The oocysts of Caryospora biarmicusis sp.n. is described from the feces of the lanner falcon, Falco biarmicus, from the falcon market in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia. Sporulated oocysts are ovoid in shape, measuring 40.2 x 34.7 (37.5-42.4 x 32.9-35.7) microm; shape index (L/W) is 1.16 (1.08-1.31) microm. The oocyst wall is smooth and bi-layered. Micropyle and polar granule are absent, but an oocyst residuum is present. Sporocysts are spheroid, 20.1 (18.6-21.3) microm; with a smooth single-layered wall, lacking Stieda body. Sporocyst residuum is present as numerous small granules. Sporozoites are stout with a large single refractile body. PMID:21634236

  4. Sarcocystis heydorni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Protozoa) with cattle (Bos taurus) and human (Homo sapiens) cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle (Bos taurus) are intermediate hosts for four species of Sarcocystis, S. cruzi, S. hirsuta, S. hominis, and S. rommeli. Of these four species, mature sarcocysts of S. cruzi are thin-walled (< 1µm) whereas S. hirsuta, S. hominis, and S. rommeli have thick walls (4 µm or more). Here we describe ...

  5. Caryospora bigenetica (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in South America: new hosts and distribution records.

    PubMed

    Viana, Lúcio André; Mecchi, Kamilla Costa; do Nascimento, Leonardo França; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Santa-Rita, Paula Helena; Miglionico, Marcos Tobias de Santana; Esteves, Rhaiza Gama; Gimenez, Anibal Rafael Melgarejo; Paiva, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The coccidian Caryospora bigenetica was first described in the snake Crotalus horridus (Viperidae) from United States of America. This study represents the first record of the occurrence of C. bigenetica in snakes in South America. Feces were sampled between November 2013 and May 2014 from 256 wild snakes maintained in scientific breeding facilities in the states of Mato Grosso do Sul (MS; n = 214) and Rio de Janeiro (RJ; n = 42), Brazil. Caryospora bigenetica was found in 14 (5.6%) snakes, all belonging to the family Viperidae. Ten Bothrops moojeni and two Crotalus durissus from MS were infected. The coccidian was also found in one C. durissus and in one Bothrops jararacussu from the state of RJ. The oocysts were spherical with a double wall, the exterior lightly mammillated, striations apparent in transverse view, 13.0 µm (12 - 14); polar granule fixed in the internal wall. Sporocysts oval or pyriform, 10.0 × 8.0 µm (9 - 11 × 8 - 9); Stieda body discoid; sub-Stieda body present; sporocyst residuum present, formed by a group of spheroid bodies between sporozoites. This study increases the number of viperid hosts of C. bigenetica and expands the geographical distribution to South America. PMID:25909262

  6. Leucocytozoon (Apicomplexa: Leucocytozoidae) from West African birds, with descriptions of two species.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh I; Sehgal, Ravinder N M; Smith, Thomas B

    2005-04-01

    Five species of Leucocytozoon were recovered from 35/828 birds of 95 species examined from 6 sites in West Africa between May 1995 and June 2001. Leucocytozoon pogoniuli n. sp. is described from the tinker barbets Pogoniulus subsulphureus and Pogoniulus atroflavus. Leucocytozoon trachyphoni n. sp. is described from the barbet Trachyphonus purpureus. No leucocytozoids have been reported previously in species of Pogoniulus. Leucocytozoon nectariniae was identified from the sunbird Nectarinia olivacea, and Leucocytozoon brimonti was recovered from 4 species of Pycnonotidae (bulbuls), all of which are new host records. We also report the first Leucocytozoon to be recovered from the phylogenetically isolated bird, Picathartes sp. (Picathartidae). This parasite is similar in appearance to Leucocytozoon sakharoffi, and probably represents a previously undescribed species. In view of the intraspecific variability and, frequently, relatively minor interspecific differences within Leucocytozoidae, we suggest that the development and application of molecular techniques would greatly advance understanding of speciation and relationships within this family. PMID:15986615

  7. Cryptosporidium rubeyi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in multiple Spermophilus ground squirrel species.

    PubMed

    Li, Xunde; Pereira, Maria das Graças Cabral; Larsen, Royce; Xiao, Chengling; Phillips, Ralph; Striby, Karl; McCowan, Brenda; Atwill, Edward R

    2015-12-01

    Previously we reported the unique Cryptosporidium sp. "c" genotype (e.g., Sbey03c, Sbey05c, Sbld05c, Sltl05c) from three species of Spermophilus ground squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi, Spermophilus beldingi, Spermophilus lateralis) located throughout California, USA. This follow-up work characterizes the morphology and animal infectivity of this novel genotype as the final step in proposing it as a new species of Cryptosporidium. Analysis of sequences of 18S rRNA, actin, and HSP70 genes of additional Cryptosporidium isolates from recently sampled California ground squirrels (S. beecheyi) confirms the presence of the unique Sbey-c genotype in S. beecheyi. Phylogenetic and BLAST analysis indicates that the c-genotype in Spermophilus ground squirrels is distinct from Cryptosporidium species/genotypes from other host species currently available in GenBank. We propose to name this c-genotype found in Spermophilus ground squirrels as Cryptosporidium rubeyi n. sp. The mean size of C. rubeyi n. sp. oocysts is 4.67 (4.4-5.0) ?m × 4.34 (4.0-5.0) ?m, with a length/width index of 1.08 (n = 220). Oocysts of C. rubeyi n. sp. are not infectious to neonatal BALB/c mice and Holstein calves. GenBank accession numbers for C. rubeyi n. sp. are DQ295012, AY462233, and KM010224 for the 18S rRNA gene, KM010227 for the actin gene, and KM010229 for the HSP70 gene. PMID:26543805

  8. Identification of sporozoite surface proteins and antigens of Eimeria nieschulzi (Apicomplexa)

    SciTech Connect

    Tilley, M.; Upton, S.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, lectin binding, and {sup 125}I surface labeling of sporozoites were used to probe sporozoites of the rat coccidian, Eimeria nieschulzi. Analysis of silver stained gels revealed greater than 50 bands. Surface iodination revealed about 14 well labeled, and about 10 weakly labeled but potential, surface proteins. The most heavily labeled surface proteins had molecular masses of 60, 53-54, 45, 28, 23-24, 17, 15, 14, 13, and 12 kD. Following electrophoresis and Western blotting, 2 of the 12 125I labeled lectin probes bound to two bands on the blots, which collectively indicated that two bands were glycosylated. Concanavalin A (ConA) specifically recognized a band at 53 kD, which may represent a surface glycoprotein, and a lectin derived from Osage orange (MPA) bound to a single band at 82-88 kD, that may also be a surface molecule. Immunoblotting using sera collected from rats inoculated orally with oocysts, as well as sera from mice hyperimmunized with sporozoites, revealed that many surface molecules appear to be immunogenic.

  9. GOUSSIA GIRELLAE N. SP. (APICOMPLEXA: EIMERIORINA) IN THE OPALEYE, 'GIRELLA NIGRICANS' (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goussia girellae n. sp. is described from the opaleye fish, Girella nigricans. Merogonic stages were observed in the apices of intestinal epithelial cells, in the lamina propria, and in extraintestinal sites including liver, gills, and spleen. Gamonts were observed in the intesti...

  10. Didelphis aurita (Marsupialia: Didelphidae): a new host for Sarcocystis lindsayi (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva Stabenow, Cristiane; Ederli, Nicole Brand; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes; de Oliveira, Francisco Carlos Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Nine opossums, Didelphis aurita , were captured in the city of Seropédica, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and examined for species of Sarcocystis. Sporocysts were observed in the mucosal scrapings of the small intestine from 3 opossums. Five budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus , were infected with sporocysts from each of these infected opossums and 5 budgerigars were used as controls. Of the 15 sporocyst-treated budgerigars, 5 birds that received sporocysts from 1 of the infected opossums developed tissue parasites. Meronts in the vascular endothelium of the lung venous capillaries and cysts in the skeletal and cardiac muscle cells were observed in histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The microscopic cysts, which were predominantly in the tongue and leg muscles, ranged from 65.3 to 118.1 ?m in length and 14.0 to 29.4 ?m in width and from 0.9 to 1.9 ?m in thickness of the cystic wall. Sections examined by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the cyst wall contained numerous slender and jagged-shaped protrusions, each with a finger-like formation at the end. The morphology, especially of the cyst wall, and the morphometry of the tissue cysts indicate that the parasite is Sarcocystis lindsayi and, therefore, the opossum, D. aurita , is now considered a definitive host for this species in Brazil. PMID:22571294

  11. Effects of decoquinate and clopidol on electron transport in mitochondria of Eimeria tenella (Apicomplexa: Coccidia).

    PubMed

    Fry, M; Williams, R B

    1984-01-15

    Resistance of the chicken coccidium Eimeria tenella to the anticoccidial agents decoquinate and clopidol, and the synergistic activity of mixtures of these compounds have been confirmed in vivo. Inhibition of electron transport by decoquinate and clopidol has been studied in mitochondria isolated from unsporulated oocysts of the same lines of E. tenella as those used in the in vivo studies. Electron transport in mitochondria of a drug sensitive line was susceptible to inhibition by both decoquinate and clopidol, and mitochondria isolated from lines made resistant to one or the other of these compounds showed a corresponding resistance at the level of electron transport. Combinations of low concentrations of decoquinate and clopidol caused a greater inhibition of electron transport than expected from summation of their individual actions. Isobolograms showed that decoquinate and clopidol in fact potentiated each other's effect on electron transport. Induced resistance to either decoquinate or clopidol resulted in an increased sensitivity of electron transport to inhibition by the other drug. Cytochrome spectra of E. tenella mitochondria and a biphasic response of NADH-oxidase and terminal oxidase activity to inhibition by cyanide or azide suggest the presence of two functional terminal oxidases. There is a correlation between the resistance of electron transport to inhibition by decoquinate or clopidol and the susceptibility to inhibition by cyanide or azide. Mitochondrial electron transport that is more resistant to inhibition by decoquinate exhibits greater sensitivity to cyanide and azide; electron transport that is more resistant to inhibition by clopidol exhibits a decreased sensitivity to cyanide and azide. Resistance to decoquinate and clopidol is discussed in view of a possibly branched electron transport chain in mitochondria of E. tenella. PMID:6704148

  12. CALYPTOSPORA FUNDULI (APICOMPLEXA, CALYPTOSPORIDAE IN THE LIVER OF THE GULF TOADFISH, OPSANUS BETA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Authors report the occurrence of what appears to be C. funduli nfecting the liver of a single specimen of gulf toadfish, opsanus eta, from a total of 54 toadfish livers examined histologically. oadfish were captured by trawling from aters of the Mississippi ound near ocean Spring...

  13. Sarcocystis mehlhorni n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection with Sarcocystis is common in many species of wild cervids but none is reported from the black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus). Here, we report Sarcocystis infection in two black-tailed deer from northwest USA for the first time. Sarcocysts were microscopic, up to 556 µm long...

  14. Sarcocystis mehlhorni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus).

    PubMed

    Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Verma, Shiv K; Cerqueira-Cézar, Camila K; Schafer, Laurence M; Van Wilpe, Erna; Dubey, Jitender P

    2015-12-01

    Infection with Sarcocystis is common in many species of wild cervids but none is reported from the black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus). Here, we report Sarcocystis infection in two black-tailed deer from northwest USA for the first time. Sarcocysts were microscopic, up to 556 ?m long and mature. The sarcocyst wall was up to 1.39 ?m thick and had rectangular 1.17-?m-long villar protrusions, type 17, with thin (230 nm) electron dense ground substance layer. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis indicated that Sarcocystis in the black-tailed deer is related to structurally distinct Sarcocystis species in cervids. A new name, Sarcocystis mehlhorni, is proposed for the Sarcocystis species in black-tailed deer. PMID:26346449

  15. Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) of the lowland European bison Bison bonasus bonasus (L.).

    PubMed

    Pyziel, Anna M; Jó?wikowski, Micha?; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W

    2014-05-28

    Coprological studies conducted between 2007 and 2011 in free-roaming and captive European bison Bison bonasus (Linnaeus, 1758) from Poland revealed 11 species of Eimeria infecting the host, i.e., Eimeria alabamensis, Eimeria auburnensis, Eimeria bovis, Eimeria brasiliensis, Eimeria bukidnonensis, Eimeria canadensis, Eimeria cylindrica, Eimeria ellipsoidalis, Eimeria pellita, Eimeria subspherica, and Eimeria zuernii. The typical host for all isolated species is cattle. The most prevalent species was E. bovis (29.7%), while E. brasiliensis was the rarest (0.5%). Five of the species (E. bovis, E. bukidnonensis, E. canadensis, E. ellipsoidalis, E. zuernii) have been observed previously in bison by other authors, 3 species were noticed by us in bison previously (E. alabamensis, E. cylindrica, E. pellita), while for 3 species (E. auburnensis, E. brasiliensis, and E. subspherica) these are new host and locality records. Oocysts of two species (E. brasiliensis, E. bukidnonensis) were noted only in the feces of bison kept in captivity. Moreover, the prevalence of positive samples was higher in the group of captive animals (55.4%) in comparison with the free-roaming herds (29.5%); although, oocysts per gram (OPG), counted with the conventional McMaster technique, was comparable in both groups, reaching maximally 6550 and 6400 in free-roaming and captive individuals, respectively. Overall, 142 fecal samples from 424 samples examined were positive for Eimeria (prevalence=33.5%). Age-related analysis revealed a higher percentage of Eimeria spp. positive samples and higher OPG values in bison under 1 year old as compared to older individuals (93.3% and 50-4050; 37.3% and 50-550, respectively). Additionally, greater eimerian species diversity was present among calves in comparison with older bison. In most cases single-species infections were observed (59.8%) with a predominance of E. bovis (85.9%). Multiple-species infections consisted of 2-7 species, usually including E. bovis. The observation was made that E. bovis infection appears conducive to the host acquiring more eimerian species. No symptoms of clinical coccidiosis occurred during the study. PMID:24702772

  16. Sarcocystis lindsayi-like (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystinae) of the opossum (Didelphis aurita) from Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Stabenow, Cristiane S; De Oliveira, Francisco C R; Albuquerque, George R; Lopes, Carlos Wilson G

    2008-09-01

    Sporocysts of Sarcocystis were obtained from intestinal scrapings of three out of five opossums (Didelphis aurita) trapped in the southeastern region, of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Fifteen caged budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) received, orally, twenty-six sporocysts in 500 mL PBS, but only five belonging to one of the groups developed clinical signs, that consisted of anorexia, lethargy, ruffled feathers and dyspnoea, and parasitism in tissues. Two of the five budgerigars died on the 25th and 29th days after infection (DAI). The other three budgerigars were posted on the 30th DAI. In all the five infected birds were observed meronts in the capillaries of the lungs and cysts in muscles, mainly in the tongue and legs. PMID:20059875

  17. Sarcocystis heydorni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) with cattle (Bos taurus) and human (Homo sapiens) cycle.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Jitender P; van Wilpe, Erna; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Fayer, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Cattle (Bos taurus) are intermediate hosts for four species of Sarcocystis, namely Sarcocystis cruzi, Sarcocystis hirsuta, Sarcocystis hominis, and Sarcocystis rommeli. Of these four species, mature sarcocysts of S. cruzi are thin-walled (<1 ?m), whereas S. hirsuta, S. hominis, and S. rommeli have thick walls (4 ?m or more). Here, we describe a new species of Sarcocystis with thin-walled sarcocysts in cattle. Two newborn calves were fed with sporocysts from the feces of a human volunteer who had ingested raw beef. The calves were killed 111 and 222 days later. In addition to thick-walled sarcocysts of S. hominis, both calves were coinfected with a Sarcocystis species that had a thin-walled sarcocysts, distinct from S. cruzi. The sarcocysts were mature, microscopic, up to 80 ?m wide, and up to 1060 ?m long. By light microscopy, the sarcocyst wall was thin (<1 ?m thick) and had minute protrusions. By transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall had short, conical villar protrusions (vp) that were up to 0.5 ?m long and up to 0.5 ?m wide, similar to type 29. The vp on the sarcocyst wall lacked microtubules but had six or more disc-shaped plaques. The ground substance layer was smooth, approximately 0.5 ?m thick, and without microtubules. The bradyzoites were 8-11 ?m long. The structure of the sarcocyst wall was distinct from any species of Sarcocystis reported from livestock. This unique species is named in honor of Dr. Alfred Otto Heydorn who provided the sporocysts. PMID:26243573

  18. Occurrence of Leucocytozoon and Haemoproteus (Apicomplexa, Haemosporina) in Falconiformes and Strigiformes of Italy.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, L; Prigioni, C

    1984-01-01

    Blood smears from Falconiformes (91 birds of 10 species) and Strigiformes (23 birds of 5 species) captured in Italy, were examined for haematozoa. Leucocytozoon were found in Falco tinnuculus, Buteo buteo, Circus cyaneus, Circus pygargus, Accipiter nisus from Falconiformes and in Strix aluco, from Strigiformes. Haemoproteus were found in Falco tinnuculus and Strix aluco; this latter species harbored mixed infections Leucocytozoon-Haemoproteus. Prevalences were 20.80% in Falconiformes and 21.74% in Strigiformes. PMID:6431891

  19. Enteric coccidia (Apicomplexa) in the small intestine of the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina).

    PubMed

    Hoberg, E P; Cawthorn, R J; Hedstrom, O R

    1993-07-01

    Sporulated oocysts (mean dimensions = 13.0 x 10.8 microns) and sporocysts (11.3 x 5.5 microns) of a coccidian resembling Frenkelia sp. or Sarcocystis sp. were present in the lamina propria of the small intestine of a naturally-infected northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) collected near Medford, Oregon (USA). Dimensions of these oocytes and sporocysts appear to be considerably smaller than those from other sarcocystid species with avian definitive hosts. Additionally, numerous developmental stages and unsporulated oocysts (mean dimensions 22.8 x 17.8 microns) of a possible species of Isospora also were observed in the intestinal epithelium. This constitutes the first report of enteric coccidia from spotted owls. Neither parasite appeared to cause the death of the bird. PMID:8355357

  20. Ultrastructural development of the sarcocyst of Sarcocystis rauschorum (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) in the varying lemming Dicrostonyx richardsoni.

    PubMed

    Friesen, D L; Cawthorn, R J; Speer, C A; Brooks, R J

    1989-06-01

    The development of the sarcocyst of Sarcocystis rauschorum in its intermediate host was studied. Lemmings were orally administered sporocysts of S. rauschorum obtained from snowy owls (Nyctea scandiaca). Beginning at 9 days postinoculation (DPI) and at various intervals to 84 DPI, skeletal muscle tissue taken from the infected lemmings was examined by electron microscopy. At 9 DPI the sarcocysts contained few metrocytes and the cyst wall was flat. The metrocytes underwent endodyogeny, and within a few days the cyst wall of the rapidly growing sarcocyst developed numerous tubulovesicular invaginations into the electron-dense layer, and the wall had a few irregular infoldings. By 21 DPI, banana-shaped bradyzoites appeared, and by 84 DPI the mature cysts were filled with bradyzoites in groups subdivided by septa and by deep infoldings of the cyst wall. The fine structure of the wall remained simple throughout maturation, with no conspicuous invagination or protrusion. The sarcocyst produced in response to S. rauschorum is unlike those from many species of Sarcocystis, which have complex walls that change markedly as the sarcocysts mature; however, its simple appearance is similar to other species that have rodents as intermediate hosts and raptorial birds as definitive hosts. PMID:2498495

  1. Three new species of Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Skinks, Lipinia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Oceania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Austin, Christopher C.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between September 1991 and March 1993, 25 moth skinks (Lipinia noctua) were collected from various localities on the Cook Islands, Fiji, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and Vanuatu and examined for coccidians. In addition, a single Roux's lipinia skink (Lipinia rouxi) was collected from PNG and examined for coccidia. Sixteen (64%) L. noctua were found to harbor 2 new eimerians, and L. rouxi harbored another new Eimeria sp. Oocysts of Eimeria lipinia n. sp. from 9 (36%) L. noctua from the Cook Islands, Fiji, and PNG were subspherical with a bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 18.6 × 16.9 ?m, with a L/W ratio of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria melanesia n. sp. from 6 (24%) L. noctua from Fiji and Vanuatu and a single L. rouxi from PNG were subspherical to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured 19.8 × 17.5 ?m, and L/W was 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single or fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria lessoni n. sp. from 1 (4%) L. noctua from PNG were cylindroidal with a bilayered wall and measured 28.1 × 15.7 ?m, and L/W was 1.8. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single polar granule was present. These represent the third report of Eimeria spp. reported from any host on PNG and the only coccidians, to our knowledge, ever described from L. noctua and L. rouxi and from the Cook Islands and Vanuatu.

  2. Eimeria tiliquae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the shingleback skink (Tiliqua rugosa rugosa).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Ryan, Una; Bennett, Mark D

    2013-02-01

    A new species, Eimeria tiliquae n. sp. is described from a shingleback skink (Tiliqua rugosa rugosa). Sporulated oocysts (n=50) are spherical to subspherical, with colourless trilaminate oocyst wall, 0.7±0.1 (0.5-0.75) thick. Oocyst with 4 spheroidal to subspheroidal sporocysts. Oocyst length, 13.7±0.9 (12.0-16.3); oocyst width, 12.8±0.9 (11.5-15.0); oocyst length/width (L/W) ratio, 1.07±0.05 (1.0-1.2). Micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule absent. Sporocysts with globular sporocyst residuum and 2 sporozoites. Sporocyst length, 6.0±0.6 (5.0-7.5); sporocyst width, 5.4±0.6 (4.0-7.0); sporocyst L/W ratio, 1.11±0.11 (1.0-1.5). Stieda, parastieda and substieda bodies absent. Phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA sequences indicated that E. tiliquae n. sp. shared 96.4-96.5% genetic similarity to E. tropidura, its closest relative. Reptile-derived sequences were not available for the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (COI) and phylogenetic analysis at this locus placed E. tiliquae n. sp. in a clade by itself but grouping closest (92% similarity) with a novel isolate from a King's skink (Egernia kingii) from Western Australia. Based on morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of coccidian parasite that to date has only been found in shingleback skinks. PMID:23201215

  3. Eimeria collieie n. sp. (Apicomplexa:Eimeriidae) from the western long-necked turtle (Chelodina colliei).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Elloit, Aileen; Lee, Elvina; Ryan, Una

    2015-07-01

    A new species, Eimeria collieie n. sp., is described from the western long-necked turtle (Chelodina colliei). Sporulated oocysts (n?=?35) are spherical to subspherical, with colourless single layer oocyst wall, 0.6?±?0.2 (0.4-0.7)?µm thick. Oocyst with elongated ellipsoid sporocysts. Oocyst length, 29.8?±?0.4 (28.2-31.0)?µm; oocyst width, 29.4?±?0.3 (28.0-30.8) µm; oocyst length/width (L/W) ratio, 1.0?±?0.03 (1.0-1.05). Micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts with sporocyst residuum and 2 sporozoites. Sporocyst length, 21.6?±?0.4 (21.2-22.0)?µm; sporocyst width, 6.0?±?0.3 (5.7-6.3)?µm; sporocyst L/W ratio, 3.6?±?0.2 (3.4-3.8). Stieda, parastieda and substieda bodies were absent. Sporozoite length, 14.0?±?0.2 (13.8-14.2)?µm; sporozoite width, 2.6?±?0.2 (2.4-2.8)?µm; sporozoite L/W ratio, 5.46?±?0.10 (5.4-5.6). Molecular analysis was conducted at three loci: the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (COI). At the 18S rRNA locus, E.?collieie n. sp. shared 96.4% and 98.3% genetic similarity to E.?ranae (GenBank accession number: EU717219) and E.?arnyi (AY613853) respectively. At the 28S rRNA locus, E.?collieie n. sp. shared 91.6% genetic similarity to E.?papillata (GenBank accession number: GU593706) and phylogenetic analysis at this locus placed E.?collieie n. sp. in aseparateclade. At the COI locus, E.?collieie n. sp. shared 92.7% genetic similarity to Eimeria setonicis (GenBankaccession number: KF225638) from a quokka (Setonix brachyurus) in Western Australia. Reptile-derived sequences were not available for the 28S rRNA and the COI loci. Based on morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of coccidian parasite that, to date, has only been found in western long-necked turtles. PMID:25917644

  4. First report of Hepatozoon (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) in caecilians, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Harris, D James; Damas-Moreira, Isabel; Maia, João P M C; Perera, Ana

    2014-02-01

    Hepatozoon spp. are identified for the first time in the amphibian order Gymnophiona, or caecilians, from the Seychelles island of Silhouette. Estimate of relationships derived from partial 18S rRNA gene sequences indicate these are not related to Hepatozoon spp. from frogs or to other Hepatozoon spp. from reptiles in the Seychelles. Assessment of mature gamonts from blood smears indicate that these can be recognized as a new species, Hepatozoon seychellensis n. sp. PMID:23971488

  5. Cryptosporidium rubeyi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in multiple Spermophilus ground squirrel species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xunde; Pereira, Maria das Graças Cabral; Larsen, Royce; Xiao, Chengling; Phillips, Ralph; Striby, Karl; McCowan, Brenda; Atwill, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Previously we reported the unique Cryptosporidium sp. “c” genotype (e.g., Sbey03c, Sbey05c, Sbld05c, Sltl05c) from three species of Spermophilus ground squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi, Spermophilus beldingi, Spermophilus lateralis) located throughout California, USA. This follow-up work characterizes the morphology and animal infectivity of this novel genotype as the final step in proposing it as a new species of Cryptosporidium. Analysis of sequences of 18S rRNA, actin, and HSP70 genes of additional Cryptosporidium isolates from recently sampled California ground squirrels (S. beecheyi) confirms the presence of the unique Sbey-c genotype in S. beecheyi. Phylogenetic and BLAST analysis indicates that the c-genotype in Spermophilus ground squirrels is distinct from Cryptosporidium species/genotypes from other host species currently available in GenBank. We propose to name this c-genotype found in Spermophilus ground squirrels as Cryptosporidium rubeyi n. sp. The mean size of C. rubeyi n. sp. oocysts is 4.67 (4.4–5.0) ?m × 4.34 (4.0–5.0) ?m, with a length/width index of 1.08 (n = 220). Oocysts of C. rubeyi n. sp. are not infectious to neonatal BALB/c mice and Holstein calves. GenBank accession numbers for C. rubeyi n. sp. are DQ295012, AY462233, and KM010224 for the 18S rRNA gene, KM010227 for the actin gene, and KM010229 for the HSP70 gene. PMID:26543805

  6. Life cycle of Cystoisospora felis (Coccidia: Apicomplexa) in cats and mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cystoisospora felis is a ubiquitous apicomplexan protozoon of cats. The endogenous development of C. felis was studied in cats after feeding them infected mice. For this, 5 newborn cats were killed at 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h after having been fed mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens of mice that wer...

  7. Discovery of the principal specific transcription factors of Apicomplexa and their implication for the

    E-print Network

    Babu, M. Madan

    identified two other novel families of AP2 DNA binding domains in bacteria andtransposons that the ApiAP2 proteins are likely to function as previously unknown specific TFs in the apicomplexans.Usingstructuresimilaritysearches, we also identified divergent versions of the AP2- integrase DNA binding domain fold in the DNA

  8. Sarcocystis cafferi n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Lane, Emily P; van Wilpe, Erna; Suleman, Essa; Reininghaus, Bjorn; Verma, S K; Rosenthal, B M; Mtshali, Moses S

    2014-12-01

    Sarcocystis infections have been reported from the African buffalo ( Syncerus caffer ), but the species have not been named. Here we propose a new name Sarcocystis cafferi from the African buffalo. Histological examination of heart (92), skeletal muscle (36), and tongue (2) sections from 94 buffalos from the Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa, and a review of the literature revealed only 1 species of Sarcocystis in the African buffalo. Macrocysts were up to 12 mm long and 6 mm wide and were located in the neck muscles and overlying connective tissue. They were pale yellow; shaped like a lychee fruit stone or cashew nut; turgid or flaccid and oval to round (not fusiform). By light microscopy (LM) the sarcocyst wall was relatively thin. By scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the sarcocyst wall had a mesh-like structure with irregularly shaped villar protrusions (vp) that were of different sizes and folded over the sarcocyst wall. The entire surfaces of vp were covered with papillomatous structures. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the sarcocyst wall was up to 3.6 ?m thick and had highly branched villar protrusions that were up to 3 ?m long. The villar projections contained filamentous tubular structures, most of which were parallel to the long axis of the projections, but some tubules criss-crossed, especially at the base. Granules were absent from these tubules. Longitudinally cut bradyzoites were 12.1 × 2.7 ?m in size, had a long convoluted mitochondrion, and only 2 rhoptries. Phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA and cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences indicated that this Sarcocystis species is very closely related to, but distinct from, Sarcocystis fusiformis and Sarcocystis hirsuta. Thus, morphological findings by LM, SEM, and TEM together with molecular phylogenetic data (from 18S rRNA and cox1) confirm that the Sarcocystis species in the African buffalo is distinct from S. fusiformis and has therefore been named Sarcocystis cafferi. PMID:25026178

  9. Cryptosporidium huwi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Una; Paparini, Andrea; Tong, Kaising; Yang, Rongchang; Gibson-Kueh, Susan; O'Hara, Amanda; Lymbery, Alan; Xiao, Lihua

    2015-03-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium piscine genotype 1 from the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium huwi n. sp. is proposed to reflect its genetic and biological differences from gastric and intestinal Cryptosporidium species. Oocysts of C.huwi n. sp. over-lap in size with Cryptosporidium molnari, measuring approximately 4.4-4.9?µm (mean 4.6) by 4.0-4.8?µm (mean 4.4?µm) with a length to width ratio of 1.04 (0.92-1.35) (n?=?50). Similar to C.molnari, C.huwi n. sp. was identified in the stomach only and clusters of oogonial and sporogonial stages were identified deep within the epithelium. However, phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA sequences indicated that C. huwi n. sp. exhibited 8.5-9.2% and 3.5% genetic distance from C.molnari isolates and piscine genotype 7 respectively. At the actin locus, the genetic distance between C.huwi n. sp. and C.molnari was 16.6%. The genetic distance between C.huwi n. sp. and other Cryptosporidium species at the 18S locus was 13.2%-17% and at the actin locus was 18.9%-26.3%. Therefore C. huwi n. sp. is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species. PMID:25637783

  10. Experimental Infection with Sporulated Oocysts of Eimeria maxima (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in Broiler

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Luciana da S.; Pereira, Elder N.; da Silva, Augusta A.; Bentivóglio Costa Silva, Vinícius; Freitas, Fagner L. da C.

    2014-01-01

    Through this study we assessed the metabolic and pathological changes in broilers experimentally infected with oocysts of Eimeria maxima. To perform the experiment, we used 150 broiler strain cooB males, with ten days of age, were randomized according to weight and randomly assigned to two experimental groups: the control group was inoculated with 0.5?mL of distilled water; the infected group inoculated with 0.5?mL of solution containing 5 × 104 sporulated oocysts of Eimeria maxima. The live performance was evaluated on day 0 (day of inoculation), 5°, 10°, 15°, 25°, and 35°?dpi, being slaughtered by cervical dislocation, fifteen birds/group. Although the sum in meat production was higher in the control group, the weight of the heart and gizzard of the experimental animals showed no significant difference, while the liver had difference on day 5°, 15°, and 35°?dpi. The pathologic evaluation showed congested mucosa and presence of large amounts of mucus at 6 dpi. Therefore, it is concluded that the dose of 5 × 104?E. maxima inoculated in the experimental group was enough to cause harm to the animal organism. PMID:26464925

  11. Effects of Psychodiella sergenti (Apicomplexa, Eugregarinorida) on its natural host Phlebotomus sergenti (Diptera, Psychodidae).

    PubMed

    Lantova, Lucie; Svobodova, Milena; Volf, Petr

    2011-09-01

    Phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera, Psychodidae) are important vectors of human pathogens. Moreover, they possess monoxenous parasites, including gregarines of the genus Psychodiella Votypka, Lantova, and Volf, which can negatively affect laboratory-reared colonies, and have been considered as potential candidates in biological control. In this study, effects of the gregarine Psychodiella sergenti Lantova, Volf, and Votypka on its natural host Phlebotomus sergenti Parrot were evaluated. The gregarines increased the mortality of immature sand fly stages, and this effect was even more apparent when the infected larvae were reared in more dense conditions. Similarly, the gregarines negatively affected the survival of adult males and females. However, no impact was observed on the mortality of blood-fed females, the proportion of females that laid eggs, and the number of eggs oviposited. The 10-times higher infection dose (50 versus five gregarine oocysts per one sand fly egg) led to -10 times more gamonts in fourth-instar larvae and two or three times more gamonts in females and males, respectively. Our study clearly shows that Ps. sergenti is harmful to its natural host under laboratory conditions. However, its potential for use in biological control is questionable as a result of several factors, including this parasite's strict host specificity. PMID:21936316

  12. Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in domestic pigs (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Kvá?, Martin; Kest?ánová, Michaela; Pinková, Martina; Kv?to?ová, Dana; Kalinová, Jana; Wagnerová, Pavla; Kotková, Michaela; Vítovec, Ji?í; Ditrich, Oleg; McEvoy, John; Stenger, Brianna; Sak, Bohumil

    2012-01-01

    We describe the morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium pig genotype II and propose the species name Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. to reflect its prevalence in adult pigs worldwide. Oocysts of C. scrofarum are morphologically indistinguishable from C. parvum, measuring 4.81–5.96 µm (mean = 5.16) × 4.23–5.29 µm (mean = 4.83) with a length to width ratio of 1.07 ± 0.06 (n = 400). Oocysts of C. scrofarum obtained from a naturally infected pig were infectious for 8-week-old pigs but not 4-week-old pigs. The prepatent period in 8-week-old Cryptosporidium-naive pigs was 4–6 days and the patent period was longer than 30 days. The infection intensity of C. scrofarum in pigs was generally low, in the range 250-4000 oocysts per gram of faeces. Infected pigs showed no clinical signs of cryptosporidiosis and no pathology was detected. Cryptosporidium scrofarum was not infectious for adult SCID mice, adult BALB c mice, Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha), yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis), or guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Phylogenetic analyses based on Small subunit rRNA, actin, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. scrofarum is genetically distinct from all known Cryptosporidium species. PMID:23021264

  13. Phylogeny, Diversity, Distribution, and Host Specificity of Haemoproteus spp. (Apicomplexa: Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae) of Palaearctic Tortoises.

    PubMed

    Javanbakht, Hossein; Kvi?erová, Jana; Dvo?áková, Nela; Mikulí?ek, Peter; Sharifi, Mozafar; Kautman, Matej; Maršíková, Aneta; Široký, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    A complex wide-range study on the haemoproteid parasites of chelonians was carried out for the first time. Altogether, 811 samples from four tortoise species from an extensive area between western Morocco and eastern Afghanistan and between Romania and southern Syria were studied by a combination of microscopic and molecular-genetic methods. Altogether 160 Haemoproteus-positive samples were gathered in the area between central Anatolia and eastern Afghanistan. According to variability in the cytochrome b gene, two monophyletic evolutionary lineages were distinguished; by means of microscopic analysis it was revealed that they corresponded to two previously described species-Haemoproteus anatolicum and Haemoproteus caucasica. Their distribution areas overlap only in a narrow strip along the Zagros Mts. range in Iran. This fact suggests the involvement of two different vector species with separated distribution. Nevertheless, no vectors were confirmed. According to phylogenetic analyses, H. caucasica represented a sister group to H. anatolicum, and both of them were most closely related to H. pacayae and H. peltocephali, described from South American river turtles. Four unique haplotypes were revealed in the population of H. caucasica, compared with seven haplotypes in H. anatolicum. Furthermore, H. caucasica was detected in two tortoise species, Testudo graeca and Testudo horsfieldii, providing evidence that Haemoproteus is not strictly host-specific to the tortoise host species. PMID:25939459

  14. A Survey of Innovation through Duplication in the Reduced Genomes of Twelve Parasites

    PubMed Central

    DeBarry, Jeremy D.; Kissinger, Jessica C.

    2014-01-01

    We characterize the prevalence, distribution, divergence, and putative functions of detectable two-copy paralogs and segmental duplications in the Apicomplexa, a phylum of parasitic protists. Apicomplexans are mostly obligate intracellular parasites responsible for human and animal diseases (e.g. malaria and toxoplasmosis). Gene loss is a major force in the phylum. Genomes are small and protein-encoding gene repertoires are reduced. Despite this genomic streamlining, duplications and gene family amplifications are present. The potential for innovation introduced by duplications is of particular interest. We compared genomes of twelve apicomplexans across four lineages and used orthology and genome cartography to map distributions of duplications against genome architectures. Segmental duplications appear limited to five species. Where present, they correspond to regions enriched for multi-copy and species-specific genes, pointing toward roles in adaptation and innovation. We found a phylum-wide association of duplications with dynamic chromosome regions and syntenic breakpoints. Trends in the distribution of duplicated genes indicate that recent, species-specific duplicates are often tandem while most others have been dispersed by genome rearrangements. These trends show a relationship between genome architecture and gene duplication. Functional analysis reveals: proteases, which are vital to a parasitic lifecycle, to be prominent in putative recent duplications; a pair of paralogous genes in Toxoplasma gondii previously shown to produce the rate-limiting step in dopamine synthesis in mammalian cells, a possible link to the modification of host behavior; and phylum-wide differences in expression and subcellular localization, indicative of modes of divergence. We have uncovered trends in multiple modes of duplicate divergence including sequence, intron content, expression, subcellular localization, and functions of putative recent duplicates that highlight the role of duplications in the continuum of forces that have shaped these genomes. PMID:24919110

  15. Molecular characterization of Babesia vogeli in dogs from Belém, northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moraes, P H G; Rufino, C P; Baraúna, A R F; Reis, T; Agnol, L T D; Meneses, A M C; Aguiar, D C F; Nunes, M R T; Gonçalves, E C

    2015-01-01

    Babesiosis is an infectious hemolytic disease that occurs worldwide, and is caused by a protozoan of the Babesia genus (Apicomplexa). Little is known about this genus; therefore, this study conducted a molecular characterization of Babesia spp in naturally infected dogs in northern Brazil. Blood samples were collected from 172 dogs from metropolitan Belém, and screened for Babesia spp using semi-nested polymerase chain reactions. Subsequently, 18S rDNA gene fragments were amplified and sequenced. Alignments of the 27 nucleotide sequences returned fragments measuring 1023 bp in size, which did not include any polymorphic sites (100% identity). This genotype was very similar to the 18S rDNA gene in B. vogeli. This study provides an important molecular characterization of the parasite responsible for canine babesiosis in naturally infected dogs in metropolitan Belém. In addition, the 18S rDNA gene in B. vogeli may represent the most common genotype occurring in South America. PMID:26662431

  16. The major surface-metalloprotease of the parasitic protozoan, Leishmania, protects against antimicrobial

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    antimicrobial activity and are components of the innate immune systems of a wide variety of unicellular antimicrobial peptide-induced apoptotic killing Manjusha M. Kulkarni,1 W. Robert McMaster,2 Elzbieta Kamysz,3 the cytolytic effects of various antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which are important components of the innate

  17. Albendazole induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in the parasitic protozoan Giardia duodenalis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Argüello-García, Raúl; Saavedra, Emma; Ortega-Pierres, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The control of Giardia duodenalis infections is carried out mainly by drugs, among these albendazole (ABZ) is commonly used. Although the cytotoxic effect of ABZ usually involves binding to ?-tubulin, it has been suggested that oxidative stress may also play a role in its parasiticidal mechanism. In this work the effect of ABZ in Giardia clones that are susceptible or resistant to different concentrations (1.35, 8, and 250 ?M) of this drug was analyzed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were induced by ABZ in susceptible clones and this was associated with a decrease in growth that was alleviated by cysteine supplementation. Remarkably, ABZ-resistant clones exhibited partial cross-resistance to H2O2, whereas a Giardia H2O2-resistant strain can grow in the presence of ABZ. Lipid oxidation and protein carbonylation in ABZ-treated parasites did not show significant differences as compared to untreated parasites; however, ABZ induced the formation of 8OHdG adducts and DNA degradation, indicating nucleic acid oxidative damage. This was supported by observations of histone H2AX phosphorylation in ABZ-susceptible trophozoites treated with 250 ?M ABZ. Flow cytometry analysis showed that ABZ partially arrested cell cycle in drug-susceptible clones at G2/M phase at the expense of cells in G1 phase. Also, ABZ treatment resulted in phosphatidylserine exposure on the parasite surface, an event related to apoptosis. All together these data suggest that ROS induced by ABZ affect Giardia genetic material through oxidative stress mechanisms and subsequent induction of apoptotic-like events. PMID:26300866

  18. Destabilization domain approach adapted for regulated protein expression in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuk-Chien; Singh, Upinder

    2014-09-01

    A plethora of information has been gained by sequencing the genome of the human parasite Entamoeba histolytica, however a lack of robust genetic tools hampers experimental elucidation of gene functions. We adapted the destabilization domain approach for modulation of protein levels in E. histolytica using the destabilization domains of FK506 binding protein (ddFKBP) and dihydrofolate reductase (ddDHFR), respectively. In our studies, the ddFKBP appears to be more tightly regulated than ddDHFR, with minimal detectable protein in trophozoites in the absence of the stabilizing compound. The on- and off-rate kinetics for ddFKBP were rapid, with stabilization and degradation within 3h of addition or removal of stabilizing compound, respectively. The kinetics for ddDHFR was different, with rapid stabilization (within 3h of stabilizing compound being added) but much slower degradation (protein not destabilized until 24h after compound removal). Furthermore, we demonstrated that for the ddFKBP, the standard stabilizing compound Shield-1 could be effectively replaced by two cheaper alternatives (rapamycin and FK506), indicating that the more cost-effective alternatives are viable options for use with E. histolytica. Thus, the destabilization domain approach represents a powerful method to study protein functions in E. histolytica and adds to the catalog of genetic tools that could be used to study this important human pathogen. PMID:24929134

  19. Protozoan Parasite Growth Inhibitors Discovered by Cross-Screening Yield Potent Scaffolds for Lead Discovery.

    PubMed

    Devine, William; Woodring, Jennifer L; Swaminathan, Uma; Amata, Emanuele; Patel, Gautam; Erath, Jessey; Roncal, Norma E; Lee, Patricia J; Leed, Susan E; Rodriguez, Ana; Mensa-Wilmot, Kojo; Sciotti, Richard J; Pollastri, Michael P

    2015-07-23

    Tropical protozoal infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide; four in particular (human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), Chagas disease, cutaneous leishmaniasis, and malaria) have an estimated combined burden of over 87 million disability-adjusted life years. New drugs are needed for each of these diseases. Building on the previous identification of NEU-617 (1) as a potent and nontoxic inhibitor of proliferation for the HAT pathogen (Trypanosoma brucei), we have now tested this class of analogs against other protozoal species: T. cruzi (Chagas disease), Leishmania major (cutaneous leishmaniasis), and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria). Based on hits identified in this screening campaign, we describe the preparation of several replacements for the quinazoline scaffold and report these inhibitors' biological activities against these parasites. In doing this, we have identified several potent proliferation inhibitors for each pathogen, such as 4-((3-chloro-4-((3-fluorobenzyl)oxy)phenyl)amino)-6-(4-((4-methyl-1,4-diazepan-1-yl)sulfonyl)phenyl)quinoline-3-carbonitrile (NEU-924, 83) for T. cruzi and N-(3-chloro-4-((3-fluorobenzyl)oxy)phenyl)-7-(4-((4-methyl-1,4-diazepan-1-yl)sulfonyl)phenyl)cinnolin-4-amine (NEU-1017, 68) for L. major and P. falciparum. PMID:26087257

  20. Protozoan Parasite Growth Inhibitors Discovered by Cross-Screening Yield Potent Scaffolds for Lead Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tropical protozoal infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide; four in particular (human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), Chagas disease, cutaneous leishmaniasis, and malaria) have an estimated combined burden of over 87 million disability-adjusted life years. New drugs are needed for each of these diseases. Building on the previous identification of NEU-617 (1) as a potent and nontoxic inhibitor of proliferation for the HAT pathogen (Trypanosoma brucei), we have now tested this class of analogs against other protozoal species: T. cruzi (Chagas disease), Leishmania major (cutaneous leishmaniasis), and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria). Based on hits identified in this screening campaign, we describe the preparation of several replacements for the quinazoline scaffold and report these inhibitors’ biological activities against these parasites. In doing this, we have identified several potent proliferation inhibitors for each pathogen, such as 4-((3-chloro-4-((3-fluorobenzyl)oxy)phenyl)amino)-6-(4-((4-methyl-1,4-diazepan-1-yl)sulfonyl)phenyl)quinoline-3-carbonitrile (NEU-924, 83) for T. cruzi and N-(3-chloro-4-((3-fluorobenzyl)oxy)phenyl)-7-(4-((4-methyl-1,4-diazepan-1-yl)sulfonyl)phenyl)cinnolin-4-amine (NEU-1017, 68) for L. major and P. falciparum. PMID:26087257

  1. Repurposing human Aurora kinase inhibitors as leads for anti-protozoan drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Gautam; Roncal, Norma E; Lee, Patricia J; Leed, Susan E; Erath, Jessey; Rodriguez, Ana; Sciotti, Richard J; Pollastri, Michael P

    2014-05-01

    Hesperadin, an established human Aurora B inhibitor, was tested against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania major, and Plasmodium falciparum, and was identified to be a potent proliferation inhibitor. A series of analogs was designed and tested to establish the initial structure-activity relationships for each parasite. In this study, we identified multiple non-toxic compounds with high potency against T. brucei and P. falciparum with good selectivity. These compounds may represent an opportunity for continued optimization. PMID:24910766

  2. Targeting essential pathways in trypanosomatids gives insights into protozoan mechanisms of cell death

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis is a normal component of the development and health of multicellular organisms. However, apoptosis is now considered a prerogative of unicellular organisms, including the trypanosomatids of the genera Trypanosoma spp. and Leishmania spp., causative agents of some of the most important neglected human diseases. Trypanosomatids show typical hallmarks of apoptosis, although they lack some of the key molecules contributing to this process in metazoans, like caspase genes, Bcl-2 family genes and the TNF-related family of receptors. Despite the lack of these molecules, trypanosomatids appear to have the basic machinery to commit suicide. The components of the apoptotic execution machinery of these parasites are slowly coming into light, by targeting essential processes and pathways with different apoptogenic agents and inhibitors. This review will be confined to the events known to drive trypanosomatid parasites to apoptosis. PMID:21083891

  3. Reproductive clonality in protozoan pathogens-truth or artifact? A comment on Ramírez and Llewellyn.

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-12-01

    The predominant clonal evolution (PCE) model of micropathogens proposed by us has been challenged by a recent paper in Molecular Ecology. We review the main tenets of our model and show that the criticisms raised by the paper's authors are based on papers that are either misunderstood or misquoted. We argue that the PCE model and its recent developments (in particular the 'Russian doll model' dealing with micro-clonal evolution) are supported in most cases when adequate data are available. PMID:26607214

  4. MENINGOENCEPHALITIS ASSOCIATED WITH AN UNIDENTIFIED APICOMPLEXAN PROTOZOAN IN A PACIFIC HARBOR SEAL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Pacific harbor seal (Phoca vitulina richardsii) was found on the central California coast with neurologic signs and labored breathing, which were unresponsive to treatment. Necropsy revealed a non-suppurative necrotizing meningoencephalitis, a multilocular thymic cyst, and non-suppurative cystitis...

  5. Parasitism by protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis enhanced invasion of Aeromonas hydrophila in tissues of channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet (Ich) and Aeromonas hydrophila are two common pathogens of cultured fish. Currently there is no information available for the effect of coinfection by Ich and A. hydrophila on bacterial load and survival in channel catfish. Two trials were conducted in this stud...

  6. The effect of protozoan grazers on the cycling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in marine systems

    E-print Network

    Kujawinski, Elizabeth B

    2000-01-01

    Processes affecting organic carbon distribution and composition can control the speciation of organic contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and ultimately determine their residence time in a particular ...

  7. The short non-coding transcriptome of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Oscar; Arner, Erik; Ferella, Marcela; Nilsson, Daniel; Respuela, Patricia; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Aslund, Lena; Andersson, Björn; Daub, Carsten O

    2011-08-01

    The pathway for RNA interference is widespread in metazoans and participates in numerous cellular tasks, from gene silencing to chromatin remodeling and protection against retrotransposition. The unicellular eukaryote Trypanosoma cruzi is missing the canonical RNAi pathway and is unable to induce RNAi-related processes. To further understand alternative RNA pathways operating in this organism, we have performed deep sequencing and genome-wide analyses of a size-fractioned cDNA library (16-61 nt) from the epimastigote life stage. Deep sequencing generated 582,243 short sequences of which 91% could be aligned with the genome sequence. About 95-98% of the aligned data (depending on the haplotype) corresponded to small RNAs derived from tRNAs, rRNAs, snRNAs and snoRNAs. The largest class consisted of tRNA-derived small RNAs which primarily originated from the 3' end of tRNAs, followed by small RNAs derived from rRNA. The remaining sequences revealed the presence of 92 novel transcribed loci, of which 79 did not show homology to known RNA classes. PMID:21912713

  8. Exosome secretion by the parasitic protozoan Leishmania within the sand fly midgut

    PubMed Central

    Atayde, Vanessa Diniz; Suau, Hamide Aslan; Townsend, Shannon; Hassani, Kasra; Kamhawi, Shaden; Olivier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite several studies describing the secretion of exosomes by Leishmania in vitro, observation of their formation and release in vivo has remained a major challenge. Herein, we show that Leishmania constitutively secretes exosomes within the lumen of the sand fly midgut through a mechanism homologous to the mammalian pathway. Through egestion experiments, we demonstrate that Leishmania exosomes are part of the sand fly inoculum and are co-egested with the parasite during the insect’s bite possibly influencing the host infectious process. Indeed, co-inoculation of mice footpads with L. major plus midgut-isolated or in vitro-isolated L. major exosomes resulted in a significant increase in footpad swelling. Notably, co-injections produced exacerbated lesions through overinduction of inflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-17a. Our data indicate that Leishmania exosomes are an integral part of the parasite’s infectious life cycle and propose to add these vesicles to the repertoire of virulence factors associated to vector-transmitted infections. PMID:26565909

  9. Identification of a novel lipin homologue from the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arginine methylation is a post-translational modification that expands the functional diversity of proteins. Kinetoplastid parasites contain a relatively large group of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) compared to other single celled eukaryotes. Several T. brucei proteins have been shown to serve as TbPRMT substrates in vitro, and a great number of proteins likely to undergo methylation are predicted by the T. brucei genome. This indicates that a large number of proteins whose functions are modulated by arginine methylation await discovery in trypanosomes. Here, we employed a yeast two-hybrid screen using as bait the major T. brucei type I PRMT, TbPRMT1, to identify potential substrates of this enzyme. Results We identified a protein containing N-LIP and C-LIP domains that we term TbLpn. These domains are usually present in a family of proteins known as lipins, and involved in phospholipid biosynthesis and gene regulation. Far western and co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the TbPRMT1-TbLpn interaction. We also demonstrated that TbLpn is localized mainly to the cytosol, and is methylated in vivo. In addition, we showed that, similar to mammalian and yeast proteins with N-LIP and C-LIP domains, recombinant TbLpn exhibits phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity, and that two conserved aspartic acid residues present in the C-LIP domain are critical for its enzymatic activity. Conclusions This study reports the characterization of a novel trypanosome protein and provides insight into its enzymatic activity and function in phospholipid biosynthesis. It also indicates that TbLpn functions may be modulated by arginine methylation. PMID:23656927

  10. An expanded adenylate kinase gene family in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Leon A; Miranda, Mariana R; Canepa, Gaspar E; Alves, Maria Júlia M; Pereira, Claudio A

    2006-06-01

    Adenylate kinases supply energy routes in cellular energetic homeostasis. In this work, we identified and characterized the adenylate kinase activity in extracts from the flagellated parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. Adenylate kinase activity was detected in different subcellular fractions and the cytosolic isoform was biochemically characterized. Cytosolic adenylate kinase specific activity increases continuously during the epimastigote growth and is down-regulated when other soluble phosphotransferase, arginine kinase, is overexpressed. Six different genes of adenylate kinase isoforms were identified and the mRNA expression was confirmed by RT-PCR and Northern Blot. Three open reading frames coding for different enzyme isoforms named TzADK1, TzADK2 and TzADK5 were cloned and functionally expressed in E. coli. This work reports an unusually large number of genes of adenylate kinases and suggests a coordinated regulation of phosphotransferase-mediated ATP regenerating pathways in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. PMID:16567051

  11. EFFECT OF PROTOZOAN PREDATION ON RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OF FAST- AND SLOW-GROWING BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survival of six bacterial species with different growth rates was tested in raw sewage and sewage rendered free of protozoa. hen the six species were inoculated at the same densities into sewage containing protozoa, the three slow-growing species were rapidly eliminated, and two ...

  12. Marked Antigiardial Activity of Yucca baccata Extracts: A Potential Natural Alternative for Treating Protozoan Infections

    PubMed Central

    Quihui-Cota, Luis; León-Trujillo, Rocio; Astiazarán-García, Humberto; Esparza-Romero, Julián; Robles, María del Refugio; Robles-Zepeda, Ramón E.; Canett, Rafael; Sánchez-Escalante, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Human Giardiosis is a public health problem in Mexico, where the national prevalence was estimated to be up to 68%. Misuse of antiprotozoal drugs may result in low effectiveness and undesirable side effects. Research on natural products is a good strategy for discovering more effective antiparasitic compounds. This study evaluated the antigiardial activity of extracts of Yucca baccata, which is native to northwestern Mexico. Forty-two gerbils (females) were weighed and orally inoculated with 5 × 106 Giardia trophozoites. Two gerbils were selected at random to confirm infection. Forty living gerbils were randomly allocated into 5 treatment groups (8 per group). Gerbils were randomly assigned to be treated with 24.4?mg/mL, 12.2?mg/mL, and 6.1?mg/mL of extracts, metronidazole (2?mg/mL) or PBS, which were intragastrically administered once per day for 3 days. Nine gerbils died during the study course. On day 10 postinfection, gerbils were euthanized and trophozoites were quantified. Yucca extracts reduced, albeit not significantly, the trophozoite counts in the duodenum segment. Only the high-extract concentration significantly reduced the trophozoite counts in the proximal segment and it was similar to that of metronidazole. Extracts of Y. baccata may represent an effective and natural therapeutic alternative for human giardiosis. PMID:25250335

  13. Artemisinin Induces Calcium-Dependent Protein Secretion in the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii? †

    PubMed Central

    Nagamune, Kisaburo; Beatty, Wandy L.; Sibley, L. David

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular calcium controls several crucial cellular events in apicomplexan parasites, including protein secretion, motility, and invasion into and egress from host cells. The plant compound thapsigargin inhibits the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), resulting in elevated calcium and induction of protein secretion in Toxoplasma gondii. Artemisinins are natural products that show potent and selective activity against parasites, making them useful for the treatment of malaria. While the mechanism of action is uncertain, previous studies have suggested that artemisinin may inhibit SERCA, thus disrupting calcium homeostasis. We cloned the single-copy gene encoding SERCA in T. gondii (TgSERCA) and demonstrate that the protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum in the parasite. In extracellular parasites, TgSERCA partially relocalized to the apical pole, a highly active site for regulated secretion of micronemes. TgSERCA complemented a calcium ATPase-defective yeast mutant, and this activity was inhibited by either thapsigargin or artemisinin. Treatment of T. gondii with artemisinin triggered calcium-dependent secretion of microneme proteins, similar to the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin. Artemisinin treatment also altered intracellular calcium in parasites by increasing the periodicity of calcium oscillations and inducing recurrent, strong calcium spikes, as imaged using Fluo-4 labeling. Collectively, these results demonstrate that artemisinin perturbs calcium homeostasis in T. gondii, supporting the idea that Ca2+-ATPases are potential drug targets in parasites. PMID:17766463

  14. Marked antigiardial activity of Yucca baccata extracts: a potential natural alternative for treating protozoan infections.

    PubMed

    Quihui-Cota, Luis; León-Trujillo, Rocio; Astiazarán-García, Humberto; Esparza-Romero, Julián; del Refugio Robles, María; Robles-Zepeda, Ramón E; Canett, Rafael; Sánchez-Escalante, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Human giardiosis is a public health problem in Mexico, where the national prevalence was estimated to be up to 68%. Misuse of antiprotozoal drugs may result in low effectiveness and undesirable side effects. Research on natural products is a good strategy for discovering more effective antiparasitic compounds. This study evaluated the antigiardial activity of extracts of Yucca baccata, which is native to northwestern Mexico. Forty-two gerbils (females) were weighed and orally inoculated with 5 × 10(6) Giardia trophozoites. Two gerbils were selected at random to confirm infection. Forty living gerbils were randomly allocated into 5 treatment groups (8 per group). Gerbils were randomly assigned to be treated with 24.4 mg/mL, 12.2 mg/mL, and 6.1 mg/mL of extracts, metronidazole (2 mg/mL) or PBS, which were intragastrically administered once per day for 3 days. Nine gerbils died during the study course. On day 10 postinfection, gerbils were euthanized and trophozoites were quantified. Yucca extracts reduced, albeit not significantly, the trophozoite counts in the duodenum segment. Only the high-extract concentration significantly reduced the trophozoite counts in the proximal segment and it was similar to that of metronidazole. Extracts of Y. baccata may represent an effective and natural therapeutic alternative for human giardiosis. PMID:25250335

  15. Metabolic Reprogramming during Purine Stress in the Protozoan Pathogen Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Soysa, Radika; Alfaro, Joshua F.; Yang, Feng; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; David, Larry L.; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Myler, Peter J.; Carter, Nicola S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of Leishmania to survive in their insect or mammalian host is dependent upon an ability to sense and adapt to changes in the microenvironment. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the parasite response to environmental changes, such as nutrient availability. To elucidate nutrient stress response pathways in Leishmania donovani, we have used purine starvation as the paradigm. The salvage of purines from the host milieu is obligatory for parasite replication; nevertheless, purine-starved parasites can persist in culture without supplementary purine for over three months, indicating that the response to purine starvation is robust and engenders parasite survival under conditions of extreme scarcity. To understand metabolic reprogramming during purine starvation we have employed global approaches. Whole proteome comparisons between purine-starved and purine-replete parasites over a 6–48 h span have revealed a temporal and coordinated response to purine starvation. Purine transporters and enzymes involved in acquisition at the cell surface are upregulated within a few hours of purine removal from the media, while other key purine salvage components are upregulated later in the time-course and more modestly. After 48 h, the proteome of purine-starved parasites is extensively remodeled and adaptations to purine stress appear tailored to deal with both purine deprivation and general stress. To probe the molecular mechanisms affecting proteome remodeling in response to purine starvation, comparative RNA-seq analyses, qRT-PCR, and luciferase reporter assays were performed on purine-starved versus purine-replete parasites. While the regulation of a minority of proteins tracked with changes at the mRNA level, for many regulated proteins it appears that proteome remodeling during purine stress occurs primarily via translational and/or post-translational mechanisms. PMID:24586154

  16. Protozoan Cysts Act as a Survival Niche and Protective Shelter for Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Ellen; Baré, Julie; Chavatte, Natascha; Bert, Wim; Sabbe, Koen; Houf, Kurt

    2015-08-15

    The production of cysts, an integral part of the life cycle of many free-living protozoa, allows these organisms to survive adverse environmental conditions. Given the prevalence of free-living protozoa in food-related environments, it is hypothesized that these organisms play an important yet currently underinvestigated role in the epidemiology of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. Intracystic bacterial survival is highly relevant, as this would allow bacteria to survive the stringent cleaning and disinfection measures applied in food-related environments. The present study shows that strains of widespread and important foodborne bacteria (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Listeria monocytogenes) survive inside cysts of the ubiquitous amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, even when exposed to either antibiotic treatment (100 ?g/ml gentamicin) or highly acidic conditions (pH 0.2) and resume active growth in broth media following excystment. Strain- and species-specific differences in survival periods were observed, with Salmonella enterica surviving up to 3 weeks inside amoebal cysts. Up to 53% of the cysts were infected with pathogenic bacteria, which were located in the cyst cytosol. Our study suggests that the role of free-living protozoa and especially their cysts in the persistence and epidemiology of foodborne bacterial pathogens in food-related environments may be much more important than hitherto assumed. PMID:26070667

  17. CONCERNS RELATED TO PROTOZOAN AND HELMINTH PARASITES IN BIOSOLIDS AND ANIMAL WASTES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This in-depth review of parasites found in municipal wastewater effluents, biosolids, or animal wastes and considered to be a concern to public health includes the protozoa Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Toxoplasma, Microsporidia, Balantidium, Giardia, and Entamoeba as well as the helminths Trichuris,...

  18. Removal of virus to protozoan sized particles in point-of-use ceramic water filters.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt, Angela R; Kowalski, Kate; Schilling, Cherylynn; Schreier, Simon; Kohler, Amanda; Scott Summers, R

    2010-03-01

    The particle removal performance of point-of-use ceramic water filters (CWFs) was characterized in the size range of 0.02-100 microm using carboxylate-coated polystyrene fluorescent microspheres, natural particles and clay. Particles were spiked into dechlorinated tap water, and three successive water batches treated in each of six different CWFs. Particle removal generally increased with increasing size. The removal of virus-sized 0.02 and 0.1 microm spheres were highly variable between the six filters, ranging from 63 to 99.6%. For the 0.5 microm spheres removal was less variable and in the range of 95.1-99.6%, while for the 1, 2, 4.5, and 10 microm spheres removal was >99.6%. Recoating four of the CWFs with colloidal silver solution improved removal of the 0.02 microm spheres, but had no significant effects on the other particle sizes. Log removals of 1.8-3.2 were found for natural turbidity and spiked kaolin clay particles; however, particles as large as 95 microm were detected in filtered water. PMID:19926110

  19. Exosome Secretion by the Parasitic Protozoan Leishmania within the Sand Fly Midgut.

    PubMed

    Atayde, Vanessa Diniz; Aslan, Hamide; Townsend, Shannon; Hassani, Kasra; Kamhawi, Shaden; Olivier, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Despite several studies describing the secretion of exosomes by Leishmania in vitro, observation of their formation and release in vivo has remained a major challenge. Herein, we show that Leishmania constitutively secretes exosomes within the lumen of the sand fly midgut through a mechanism homologous to the mammalian pathway. Through egestion experiments, we demonstrate that Leishmania exosomes are part of the sand fly inoculum and are co-egested with the parasite during the insect's bite, possibly influencing the host infectious process. Indeed, co-inoculation of mice footpads with L. major plus midgut-isolated or in-vitro-isolated L. major exosomes resulted in a significant increase in footpad swelling. Notably, co-injections produced exacerbated lesions through overinduction of inflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-17a. Our data indicate that Leishmania exosomes are an integral part of the parasite's infectious life cycle, and we propose to add these vesicles to the repertoire of virulence factors associated with vector-transmitted infections. PMID:26565909

  20. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM AND OTHER OPPORTUNISTIC PROTOZOANS POTENTIALLY TRANSMITTED FROM ANIMALS TO HUMANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pandemic of the Human Immunodeficiecy Virus and the resultant acquired immunodeficiency disease HIV/AIDS has assumed a major, almost overwhelming, public health importance in many parts of the world. HIV steadily weakens the body's immune system, increasing susceptibility to a variety of opportu...

  1. Mapping the germ-line and somatic genomes of a ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Orias, E

    1998-02-01

    Ciliates are among the very few eukaryotes in which the powers of molecular biology, conventional genetics, and microbial methodology can be synergistically combined. Because ciliates also are distant relatives of vertebrates, fungi, and plants, the sequencing of a ciliate genome will be of import to our understanding of eukaryotic biology. Tetrahymena thermophila is the only ciliate in which a systematic genetic mapping of DNA polymorphisms has begun. Tetrahymena has many biological features that make it a specially or uniquely useful experimental system for fundamental research in cell and molecular biology and for biotechnological applications. A key factor in the usefulness of Tetrahymena is the speed, facility, and versatility with which it can be cultivated under a wide range of nutrient conditions, temperature, and scale. This article describes the progress made in genetically and physically mapping the genomes of T. thermophila: the micronuclear (germ-line) genome, which is not transcriptionally expressed, and the macronuclear (somatic) fragmented genome, which is actively expressed and determines the cell's phenotype. PMID:9477337

  2. An immobilization antigen gene of the fish-parasitic protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis strain ARS-6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is a severe fish parasite that causes ‘white spot’ disease in many freshwater fish and leads to high mortality. The antigens on the parasite surface are involved in the antibody-mediated immobilization and hence designated as immobilization antigens (i-antigens). ...

  3. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Settimo, Luca; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (DA; Berenil®), cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (melarsoprol/pentamidine cross resistance, MPXR) is the result of loss of a separate high affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1). A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the “selectivity region” of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a possible structural rationale for this remarkable ability. PMID:25814953

  4. Transport Behavior of Groundwater Protozoa and Protozoan-Sized Microspheres in Sandy Aquifer Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R. W.; Kinner, N. E.; Bunn, A.; MacDonald, D.; Metge, D.

    1995-01-01

    Transport behaviors of unidentified flagellated protozoa (flagellates) and flagellate-sized carboxylated microspheres in sandy, organically contaminated aquifer sediments were investigated in a small-scale (1 to 4-m travel distance) natural-gradient tracer test on Cape Cod and in flow-through columns packed with sieved (0.5-to 1.0-mm grain size) aquifer sediments. The minute (average in situ cell size, 2 to 3 (mu)m) flagellates, which are relatively abundant in the Cape Cod aquifer, were isolated from core samples, grown in a grass extract medium, labeled with hydroethidine (a vital eukaryotic stain), and coinjected into aquifer sediments along with bromide, a conservative tracer. The 2-(mu)m flagellates appeared to be near the optimal size for transport, judging from flowthrough column experiments involving a polydispersed (0.7 to 6.2 (mu)m in diameter) suspension of carboxylated microspheres. However, immobilization within the aquifer sediments accounted for a log unit reduction over the first meter of travel compared with a log unit reduction over the first 10 m of travel for indigenous, free-living groundwater bacteria in earlier tests. High rates of flagellate immobilization in the presence of aquifer sediments also was observed in the laboratory. However, immobilization rates for the laboratory-grown flagellates (initially 4 to 5 (mu)m) injected into the aquifer were not constant and decreased noticeably with increasing time and distance of travel. The decrease in propensity for grain surfaces was accompanied by a decrease in cell size, as the flagellates presumably readapted to aquifer conditions. Retardation and apparent dispersion were generally at least twofold greater than those observed earlier for indigenous groundwater bacteria but were much closer to those observed for highly surface active carboxylated latex microspheres. Field and laboratory results suggest that 2-(mu)m carboxylated microspheres may be useful as analogs in investigating several abiotic aspects of flagellate transport behavior in groundwater. PMID:16534904

  5. UPTAKE, DISTRIBUTION, AND BIOCONVERSION OF FLUORESCENT LIPID ANALOGS IN THE OYSTER PROTOZOAN PARASITE, PERKINSUS MARINUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been established that host lipids play a unique role for long term survival and life cycle completion in endogenous parasites. Parasites exploit fatty acids and lipids from the host, not only for membrane synthesis, but also for modification of their surface integrity to a...

  6. Comparative cytotoxicity and accumulation of Roxarsone and its photodegradates in freshwater Protozoan Tetrahymenathermophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenzhong; Xu, Fang; Han, Jingjing; Sun, Qun; Yang, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Roxarsone (ROX) remains to be as an organoarsenical feed additive used widely in developing countries. However, most of the ROX is excreted unchanged in manure, which could be readily photodegraded into inorganic arsenic derivatives. In this study, the comparative cytotoxicity and arsenic accumulation were evaluated after the exposure of Tetrahymenathermophila (T. thermophila) cell model to ROX and its photodegradates. The cytotoxic effects were estimated according to the relevant cell growth curves, morphologies and MTT assays. The 36 h median effective concentrations for ROX and its photodegradates at various photolysis times (10, 20, and 30 min) are 39.0, 2.08, 1.88, and 1.82 mg (total arsenic) L(-1), respectively. In parallel, the cellular arsenic uptakes were determined by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Phospholipid layer as basic membrane structure was mimicked to assess the correlation between membrane permeability and cytotoxicity. The biocompatibility of ROX was dependent on its tendency to interact with cell membrane while the cytotoxicity was induced by the trans-membrane of the inorganic arsenic species present in the photodegradates of ROX. Furthermore, the photodegradates of ROX-associated alterations of intracellular protein profiles were analyzed using a proteomic approach. Overall, the significance was clarified that the control of arsenic emission caused by the application of ROX needs to be imposed. PMID:25577319

  7. Metabolic Reprogramming During Purine Stress in the Protozoan Pathogen Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jessica L.; Yates, Phillip A.; Soysa, Radika; Alfaro, Joshua F.; Yang, Feng; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; David, Larry L.; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Myler, Peter J.; Carter, Nicola S.

    2014-02-27

    The ability of Leishmania to survive in their insect or mammalian host is dependent upon an ability to sense and adapt to changes in the microenvironment. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the parasite response to environmental changes, such as nutrient availability. To elucidate nutrient stress response pathways in Leishmania donovani, we have used purine starvation as the paradigm. The salvage of purines from the host milieu is obligatory for parasite replication; nevertheless, purine-starved parasites can persist in culture without supplementary purine for over 3 months, indicating that the response to purine starvation is robust and engenders parasite survival under conditions of extreme scarcity. To understand metabolic reprogramming during purine starvation we have employed global approaches. Whole proteome comparisons between purine-starved and purine-replete parasites over a 6-48 h span have revealed a temporal and coordinated response to purine starvation. Purine transporters and enzymes involved in acquisition at the cell surface are upregulated within a few hours of purine removal from the media, while other key purine salvage components are upregulated later in the time-course and more modestly. After 48 h, the proteome of purine-starved parasites is extensively remodeled and adaptations to purine stress appear tailored to deal with both purine deprivation and general stress. To probe the molecular mechanisms affecting proteome remodeling in response to purine starvation, comparative RNA-seq analyses, qRT-PCR, and luciferase reporter assays were performed on purine-starved versus purine-replete parasites. While the regulation of a minority of proteins tracked with changes at the mRNA level, for many regulated proteins it appears that proteome remodeling during purine stress occurs primarily via translational and/or post-translational mechanisms.

  8. Tolerance of ciliated protozoan Paramecium bursaria (Protozoa, Ciliophora) to ammonia and nitrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Henglong; Song, Weibo; Lu, Lu; Alan, Warren

    2005-09-01

    The tolerance to ammonia and nitrites in freshwater ciliate Paramecium bursaria was measured in a conventional open system. The ciliate was exposed to different concentrations of ammonia and nitrites for 2h and 12h in order to determine the lethal concentrations. Linear regression analysis revealed that the 2h-LC50 value for ammonia was 95.94 mg/L and for nitrite 27.35 mg/L using probit scale method (with 95% confidence intervals). There was a linear correlation between the mortality probit scale and logarithmic concentration of ammonia which fit by a regression equation y=7.32 x 9.51 ( R 2=0.98; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of ammonia), by which 2 h-LC50 value for ammonia was found to be 95.50 mg/L. A linear correlation between mortality probit scales and logarithmic concentration of nitrite is also followed the regression equation y=2.86 x+0.89 ( R 2=0.95; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of nitrite). The regression analysis of toxicity curves showed that the linear correlation between exposed time of ammonia-N LC50 value and ammonia-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=2 862.85 e -0.08 x ( R 2=0.95; y, duration of exposure to LC50 value; x, LC50 value), and that between exposed time of nitrite-N LC50 value and nitrite-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=127.15 e -0.13 x ( R 2=0.91; y, exposed time of LC50 value; x, LC50 value). The results demonstrate that the tolerance to ammonia in P. bursaria is considerably higher than that of the larvae or juveniles of some metozoa, e.g. cultured prawns and oysters. In addition, ciliates, as bacterial predators, are likely to play a positive role in maintaining and improving water quality in aquatic environments with high-level ammonium, such as sewage treatment systems.

  9. Transport behavior of groundwater protozoa and protozoan-sized microspheres in sandy aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Kinner, N.E.; Bunn, A.; MacDonald, D.; Metge, D.

    1995-01-01

    Transport behaviors of unidentified flagellated protozoa (flagellates) and flagellate-sized carboxylated microspheres in sandy, organically contaminated aquifer sediments were investigated in a small-scale (1 to 4-m travel distance) natural-gradient tracer test on Cape Cod and in flow-through columns packed with sieved (0.5-to 1.0-mm grain size) aquifer sediments. The minute (average in situ cell size, 2 to 3 ??m) flagellates, which are relatively abundant in the Cape Cod aquifer, were isolated from core samples, grown in a grass extract medium, labeled with hydroethidine (a vital eukaryotic stain), and coinjected into aquifer sediments along with bromide, a conservative tracer. The 2-??m flagellates appeared to be near the optimal size for transport, judging from flowthrough column experiments involving a polydispersed (0.7 to 6.2 ??m in diameter) suspension of carboxylated microspheres. However, immobilization within the aquifer sediments accounted for a log unit reduction over the first meter of travel compared with a log unit reduction over the first 10 m of travel for indigenous, free-living groundwater bacteria in earlier tests. High rates of flagellate immobilization in the presence of aquifer sediments also was observed in the laboratory. However, immobilization rates for the laboratory-grown flagellates (initially 4 to 5 ??m) injected into the aquifer were not constant and decreased noticeably with increasing time and distance of travel. The decrease in propensity for grain surfaces was accompanied by a decrease in cell size, as the flagellates presumably readapted to aquifer conditions. Retardation and apparent dispersion were generally at least twofold greater than those observed earlier for indigenous groundwater bacteria but were much closer to those observed for highly surface active carboxylated latex microspheres. Field and laboratory results suggest that 2- ??m carboxylated microspheres may be useful as analogs in investigating several abiotic aspects of flagellate transport behavior in groundwater.

  10. VIRUS-LIKE, DOUBLE-STRANDED RNAS IN THE PARASITIC PROTOZOAN CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM. (R828043)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Detoxication of zinc and cadmium by the freshwater protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis: the effect of water hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, G.; Dunlop, S.

    1981-10-01

    Estimated 8-hr LC/sub 50/ values of zinc and cadmium were less than 1 ppm in the absence of soluble calcium and magnesium, but were raised, for example, to 24 ppm of zinc and 19 ppm of cadmium by the addition of calcium plus magnesium at a concentration (500 ppm) equivalent to that of very hard water. Experiments with /sup 65/Zn showed that uptake of this element from sublethal concentrations over 8 hr was reduced from approximately 50 X 10/sup -2/ ..mu..g liter/sup -1/ to 10 X 10/sup -2/ ..mu..g liter/sup -1/ per 10/sup 6/ cells by the addition of 500 ppm of calcium and magnesium. Diminished uptake may partly explain the antagonism observed in the toxicity tests.

  12. Ultraviolet light photobiology of the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis and chemical reactivation of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The tunable dye laser was developed in order to perform UV-B and UV-C (254-320 nm) action spectra studies on several different organisms. Using the laser, action spectra studies have been performed for Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces, Chlamydomonas, Caenorhabditis elegans, Paramecium, and Tetrahymena pyriformis. Studies generally indicate increasing LD{sub 50} values with increasing wavelength. Two notable findings were made: (1) The action spectra does not follow the DNA absorption spectra at 280, 290 and 295 nm; (2) The repair competent/repair defective sensitization factor does not remain constant throughout the wavelength region. In addition it was found that the repair defective strain of E. coli, Bs-1, showed an increase in survival with increasing UV irradiation, at certain dose levels. Further experiments were designed to better characterize the reactivation. Tetrahymena were exposed to UV-C and reactivated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and 4-nitro quinoline oxide (4-NQO). In both cases survival was seen to increase after chemical exposure. Likewise, UV-C was found to reactivate chemical damage (MMS).

  13. Effect of island size, distance, and epicenter maturity on colonization in freshwater protozoan communities

    SciTech Connect

    Henebry, M.S.; Cairns, J. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (a) obtain baseline data on the colonization of artificial islands in a closed laboratory system; (b) investigate effects of island area and distance from an epicenter (source of protozoa) on the colonization process, and (c) test the effect of the maturity of an epicenter on the colonization of surrounding islands. Islands which were smallest in area or closest to the epicenter had significantly greater species richness during the 7 days of the experiments. Islands exposed to epicenters of intermediate, maturity had significantly greater species richness than islands tested with mature (fully colonized) epicenters. Evidence gathered thus far strongly suggests that kinds of species during different periods of colonization are responsible for differences in species richness on islands exposed to epicenters of different maturities.

  14. Genome and transcriptome studies of the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Giardia intestinalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farran, Alexandra J. E.

    Vocal fold (VF) diseases and disorders are difficult to treat surgically or therapeutically. Tissue engineering offers an alternative strategy for the restoration of functional VF. In this work, we have developed tissue engineering methodologies for the functional reconstruction of VF. As a first step, the structure, composition and mechanical properties of native VF tissues have been investigated. In pigs ranging from fetal to 2+ years old, the VF structure and viscoelastic properties were found to be age-dependent. Adult tissues were more organized, displaying a denser lamina propria, and mature elastin fibers compared to fetal tissues, resulting in higher storage moduli. Secondly, biomimetic scaffolds which recaptured the mechanical properties of the native VF were developed. Chemically-defined collagen-hyaluronic acid (HA) composite hydrogels, and elastin-mimetic hybrid polymers (EMHPs) were successfully used as conducive 3D matrices, and 2D elastic scaffolds respectively, to in vitro static culture of fibroblasts. While the collagen-HA hydrogels allowed for in situ cell encapsulation and supported cell attachment and proliferation in 3D, the integrin-binding domain RGDSP was needed for cell proliferation on EMHPs. To emulate in vitro the mechanical environment of the native VF tissue, a dynamic culture system capable of generating vibratory stimulations at human phonation frequencies was successfully created and characterized. Gene expression analysis of fibroblasts subjected to 1 hour vibrations in 2D revealed that the expression of ECM-related genes was altered in response to changes in vibratory frequency and amplitude. Finally, expanding on our previous studies, the dynamic culture system was modified to accommodate for the long-term dynamic culture of cell-laden hydrogels. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in a collagen/HA-based hydrogel, cultured in presence of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and subjected to high frequency vibrations were shown to respond to all three type of external factors. In summary, microenvironments such as biomimetic scaffolds, soluble factors, and mechanical stimuli are important modulator of cellular function. The strategic combination of those microenvironments into a biomimicking VF tissue engineering 3D system did not only provide an in vitro platform for the investigation of VF diseases, but also have the potential to offer alternative treatments for VF disorders.

  15. Microfluidic Trap Arrays: Passive Sensors for Studying Aquatic Protozoan Ecology and Biogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, J. F.; Bouchillon, G.; Shor, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    Microscopic organisms such as bacteria and protozoa are the engine that drives global biogeochemical processes: microbes fix carbon, produce oxygen, mediate nutrient cycling, and break down anthropogenic contaminants. In many habitats, the bacterial community structure and its net production is controlled in a top-down fashion by predation by protozoa. Despite their importance, many researchers have noted a significant gap in our understanding of their diversity, biogeography, and ecosystem function. We developed a microfluidic field sampling and analysis tool to study the biogeography and function of microbial eukaryotes. Microfluidic samplers were created to systematically target the morphology, function, and habitat of different microbial eukaryotes. Features such as channel dimensions, branching angles and radii of curvature were varied to allow organisms to be selected and captured based on cell size, shape, plasticity, and swimming or crawling modalities. We also developed genetic analysis protocols to extract and amplify DNA from a single trapped cell, allowing for molecular identification of trapped species. Results from freshwater sediment and water column deployments confirmed design efficiencies in trapping and concentrating protozoa based on biomass density, allowed for analysis of body plasticity and cell size, and also confirmed the viability of this technology for future real time monitoring of protozoa in aquatic ecosystems. This research offers a radical departure from existing approaches to study microbial eukaryotic communities in the field. Our novel methodology involving trapping, observation and recording of physical characteristics and genetic analysis of single cells allows comparison with bulk samples to place trapped microbes within a function- and habitat-specific context.

  16. The protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii targets the paracellular pathway to invade the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Weight, Caroline M; Carding, Simon R

    2012-07-01

    Abstract? Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous parasite found within all mammals and birds worldwide that can cause fatal infections in immunocompromised persons and fetuses. The parasite causes chronic infections by residing in long-living tissues of the muscle and brain. T. gondii infects the host through contaminated meat and water consumption with the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) being the first point of contact with the host. The mechanisms by which the parasite invades the host through the GI tract are unknown, although it has been suggested that the paracellular pathway is important for parasite dissemination. Studies indicate that epithelial tight junction-associated proteins are affected by T. gondii, although which junctional proteins are affected and the nature of host protein-parasite interactions have not been established. We have uncovered evidence that T. gondii influences the cellular distribution of occludin to transmigrate the intestinal epithelium and suggest how candidate binding partners can be identified. PMID:22731726

  17. Exploring in vitro and in vivo Hsp90 inhibitors activity against human protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Giuseppe; Battistuzzi, Gianfranco

    2015-02-01

    A set of compounds, previously selected as potent Hsp90? inhibitors, has been studied on a panel of human parasites. 5-Aryl-3,4-isoxazolediamide derivatives (1) were active against two protozoa, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Plasmodium falciparum, with a good tolerability toward cytotoxicity on non-malignant L6 rat myoblast cell line, unlike the 1,5-diaryl,4-carboxamides-1,2,3-triazole derivatives (2) which, while showing a single-digit nM range activity against the same protozoa, were also highly cytotoxic on L6 cells. In a subsequent in vivo study, two isoxazolediamide derivatives, 1a and 1b, were very efficacious on the sleeping sickness-causing agent with a clear parasitaemia during treatment. These data, however, showed that not all protozoa are sensitive to Hsp90 inhibitors, as well as not all Hsp90 inhibitors are equally active on parasites. PMID:25547934

  18. Protozoan-induced regulation of cycliclipopeptide biosythesis is an effective predation defense mechanism for Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The grazing activity of protozoa significantly impacts the dynamics, diversification and evolution of bacterial communities in soil ecosystems. The feeding preference of protozoa is related to their inability to ingest or digest specific bacteria. Pseudomonas fluorescens strains SBW25 and SS101 used...

  19. Can the protozoan parasite Bonamia ostreae infect larvae of flat oysters Ostrea edulis?

    PubMed

    Arzul, Isabelle; Langlade, Aimé; Chollet, Bruno; Robert, Maeva; Ferrand, Sylvie; Omnes, Emmanuelle; Lerond, Sophie; Couraleau, Yann; Joly, Jean-Pierre; François, Cyrille; Garcia, Céline

    2011-06-30

    Bonamia ostreae is an intracellular protistan parasite affecting flat oysters Ostrea edulis. It can be detected in juveniles but mortalities mainly affect oysters which are more than 2 years old. The parasite is usually observed inside haemocytes and sometimes free, notably in gill epithelia suggesting a parasite release through this organ. However, the infective form and ways of entry and release remain undetermined. Flat oysters incubate their larvae in their pallial cavity for 8-10 days before releasing them into the water column. Flat oysters in Bay of Quiberon in South Brittany (France) are known to be infected with B. ostreae since 1979 and is the most important area in France for O. edulis spat collection. Flat oysters incubating larvae were sampled in this area during summertime between 2007 and 2009. Both adults and larvae were preserved and assayed by PCR and in situ hybridisation (ISH). PCR tests revealed the presence of parasite DNA in some adults and larvae. Specific labelling could be detected by ISH in gills, digestive system, gonad and mantle in adults and in the epithelium surrounding the visceral cavity of some larvae. Our results demonstrate that larvae can be infected with B. ostreae. Larvae might thus contribute to the spread of the parasite during their planktonic life. In addition, their transfer for aquaculture purpose should be controlled especially when they are exported from infected zones. PMID:21334809

  20. Repurposing human Aurora kinase inhibitors as leads for anti-protozoan drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Gautam; Roncal, Norma E.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Erath, Jessey; Rodriguez, Ana; Sciotti, Richard J.; Pollastri, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Hesperadin, an established human Aurora B inhibitor, was tested against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania major, and Plasmodium falciparum, and was identified to be a potent proliferation inhibitor. A series of analogs was designed and tested to establish the initial structure-activity relationships for each parasite. In this study, we identified multiple non-toxic compounds with high potency against T. brucei and P. falciparum with good selectivity. These compounds may represent an opportunity for continued optimization. PMID:24910766

  1. Calcium-dependent phosphorylation alters class XIVa myosin function in the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing; Andenmatten, Nicole; Hortua Triana, Miryam A.; Deng, Bin; Meissner, Markus; Moreno, Silvia N. J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Ward, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    Class XIVa myosins comprise a unique group of myosin motor proteins found in apicomplexan parasites, including those that cause malaria and toxoplasmosis. The founding member of the class XIVa family, Toxoplasma gondii myosin A (TgMyoA), is a monomeric unconventional myosin that functions at the parasite periphery to control gliding motility, host cell invasion, and host cell egress. How the motor activity of TgMyoA is regulated during these critical steps in the parasite's lytic cycle is unknown. We show here that a small-molecule enhancer of T. gondii motility and invasion (compound 130038) causes an increase in parasite intracellular calcium levels, leading to a calcium-dependent increase in TgMyoA phosphorylation. Mutation of the major sites of phosphorylation altered parasite motile behavior upon compound 130038 treatment, and parasites expressing a nonphosphorylatable mutant myosin egressed from host cells more slowly in response to treatment with calcium ionophore. These data demonstrate that TgMyoA undergoes calcium-dependent phosphorylation, which modulates myosin-driven processes in this important human pathogen. PMID:24989796

  2. Response to Tibayrenc and Ayala: reproductive clonality in protozoan pathogens - truth or artefact?

    PubMed

    Ramírez, J D; Llewellyn, M S

    2015-12-01

    Tibayrenc and Ayala raised several interesting objections to an opinion piece we recently published in Molecular Ecology (Ramirez & Llewellyn 2014). Our piece examined the value of an alternative perspective to their theory of predominant clonal evolution (PCE) on the prevalence and importance of genetic exchange in parasitic protozoa. In particular, our aim was to establish whether population genetic signatures of clonality in parasites were representative of true biological/evolutionary processes or artefacts of inadequate tools and inappropriate or inadequate sampling. We address Tibayrenc and Ayala's criticisms and make a detailed response. In doing so, we deny the consensus that Tibayrenc and Ayala claim around their views and dismiss much of the language which Tibayrenc and Ayala have introduced to this debate as either arbitrary or inaccurate. We strongly reject accusations that we misunderstood and misquoted the work of others. We do not think the PCE provides a useful framework for understanding existing parasite population structures. Furthermore, on the eve of the population genomic era, we strongly urge Tibayrenc and Ayala to wait for the forthcoming wealth of high-resolution data before considering whether it is appropriate to refine or re-iterate their PCE hypothesis. PMID:26607215

  3. Destabilization domain approach adapted for regulated protein expression in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuk-Chien; Singh, Upinder

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of information has been gained by sequencing the genome of the human parasite Entamoeba histolytica, however a lack of robust genetic tools hampers experimental elucidation of gene functions. We adapted the destabilization domain (DD) approach for modulation of protein levels in E. histolytica using the destabilization domains of FK506 binding protein (ddFKBP) and dihydrofolate reductase (ddDHFR), respectively. In our studies, the ddFKBP appears to be more tightly regulated than ddDHFR, with minimal detectable protein in trophozoites in the absence of the stabilizing compound. The on- and off-rate kinetics for ddFKBP were rapid, with stabilization and degradation within 3 h of addition or removal of stabilizing compound, respectively. The kinetics for ddDHFR was different, with rapid stabilization (within 3 h of stabilizing compound being added) but much slower degradation (protein not destabilized until 24 h after compound removal). Furthermore, we demonstrated that for the ddFKBP, the standard stabilizing compound Shield-1 could be effectively replaced by two cheaper alternatives (rapamycin and FK506), indicating that the more cost-effective alternatives are viable options for use with E. histolytica. Thus, the DD approach represents a powerful method to study protein functions in E. histolytica and adds to the catalog of genetic tools that could be used to study this important human pathogen. PMID:24929134

  4. EFFECT OF GROWTH RATE AND HYDROPHOBICITY ON BACTERIA SURVIVING PROTOZOAN GRAZING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements were made of the predation by Tetrahymena thermophila on several bacterial species in media containing heat-killed Escherichia cells to serve as an alternative prey. f grazing pressure was initially not intense on a mixture of bacterial species, the species that surv...

  5. Estimates of protozoan-and viral-mediated mortality of bacterioplankton in Lake Bourget (France)

    E-print Network

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    , and this impact varied seasonally. 4. From parallel transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, we found flow cytometry (FCM) while protozoa were counted using epifluorescence microscopy (EFM). 2. A dilution an increased impact of viruses during summer. Keywords: bacteria, lake, mortality, protists, viruses

  6. Reconstructing SALMFamide Neuropeptide Precursor Evolution in the Phylum Echinodermata: Ophiuroid and Crinoid Sequence Data Provide New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Elphick, Maurice R.; Semmens, Dean C.; Blowes, Liisa M.; Levine, Judith; Lowe, Christopher J.; Arnone, Maria I.; Clark, Melody S.

    2015-01-01

    The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinoidea), the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea), and the starfish Patiria miniata (Asteroidea) reveals that in each species there are two types of SALMFamide precursor: an L-type precursor comprising peptides with a C-terminal LxFamide-type motif and an F-type precursor solely or largely comprising peptides with a C-terminal FxFamide-type motif. Here, we have identified transcripts encoding SALMFamide precursors in the brittle star Ophionotus victoriae (Ophiuroidea) and the feather star Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea). We have also identified SALMFamide precursors in other species belonging to each of the five echinoderm classes. As in S. purpuratus, A. japonicus, and P. miniata, in O. victoriae there is one L-type precursor and one F-type precursor. However, in A. mediterranea only a single SALMFamide precursor was found, comprising two peptides with a LxFamide-type motif, one with a FxFamide-type motif, five with a FxLamide-type motif, and four with a LxLamide-type motif. As crinoids are basal to the Echinozoa (Holothuroidea?+?Echinoidea) and Asterozoa (Asteroidea?+?Ophiuroidea) in echinoderm phylogeny, one model of SALMFamide precursor evolution would be that ancestrally there was a single SALMFamide gene encoding a variety of SALMFamides (as in crinoids), which duplicated in a common ancestor of the Echinozoa and Asterozoa and then specialized to encode L-type SALMFamides or F-type SALMFamides. Alternatively, a second SALMFamide precursor may remain to be discovered or may have been lost in crinoids. Further insights will be obtained if SALMFamide receptors are identified, which would provide a molecular basis for experimental analysis of the functional significance of the “cocktails” of SALMFamides that exist in echinoderms. PMID:25699014

  7. 'CANDIDATUS PAENICARDINIUM ENDOI', AN ENDOSYMBIONT OF THE PLANT-PARASITIC NEMATODE HETERODERA GLYCINES (NEMATA: TYLENCHIDA), AFFILIATED TO THE PHYLUM BACTERIODETES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During TEM studies of females of the plant-parasitic nematodes Globodera rostochiensis and Heterodera goettingiana and juveniles of H. glycines conducted in the 1970s, bacteria-like endosymbionts were observed. These organisms were characterized as being rod-shaped ranging in size from 0.3 – 0.5 um...

  8. Highly conserved functions of the Brachyury gene on morphogenetic movements: insight from the early-diverging phylum Ctenophora.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Atsuko; Martindale, Mark Q; Fukui, Akimasa; Tochinai, Shin

    2010-03-01

    Brachyury, a member of the T-box transcription family identified in a diverse array of metazoans, was initially recognized for its function in mesoderm formation and notochord differentiation in vertebrates; however, its ancestral role has been suggested to be in control of morphogenetic movements. Here, we show that morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of Brachyury (MlBra) in embryos of a ctenophore, one of the most ancient groups of animals, prevents the invagination of MlBra expressing stomodeal cells and is rescued with corresponding RNA injections. Injection of RNA encoding a dominant-interfering construct of MlBra causes identical phenotypes to that of RNA encoding a dominant-interfering form of Xenopus Brachyury (Xbra) in Xenopus embryos. Both injected embryos down-regulate Xbra downstream genes, Xbra itself and Xwnt11 but not axial mesodermal markers, resulting in failure to complete gastrulation due to loss of convergent extension movements. Moreover, animal cap assay reveals that MlBra induces Xwnt11 like Xbra. Overall results using Xenopus embryos show that these two genes are functionally interchangeable. These functional experiments demonstrate for the first time in a basal metazoan that the primitive role of Brachyury is to regulate morphogenetic movements, rather than to specify endomesodermal fates, and the role is conserved between non-bilaterian metazoans and vertebrates. PMID:20036227

  9. Reproductive biology of the deep-water coral Acanella arbuscula (Phylum Cnidaria: Class Anthozoa: Order Alcyonacea), northwest Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beazley, Lindsay I.; Kenchington, Ellen L.

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the reproductive life-history of deep-water corals is important for assessing their vulnerability to anthropogenic impacts. Yet, the reproductive biology of many deep-water corals, especially members of the subclass Octocorallia, has not been examined. We used histological techniques to describe the reproductive biology of the deep-water gorgonian coral Acanella arbuscula from the northwest Atlantic. All colonies examined were gonochoric, and no embryos or planula larvae were observed in the polyps. Mean polyp-level fecundity (females: 21.0±17.5 oocytes polyp-1, and males: 13.9±13.5 sperm sacs polyp-1) is high compared to other deep-water gorgonians, and polyps closer to the branch tips had the highest fecundities in both females and males. The presence of large oocytes (maximum diameter 717.8 ?m) suggests that A. arbuscula produces lecithotrophic larvae. Despite the potentially high fecundity and small size at first reproduction, the paucity of information on dispersal and recruitment, combined with its longevity, vulnerability to bottom fishing gear, and ecological role as a structure-forming species, still warrants the classification of A. arbuscula as a vulnerable marine ecosystem indicator.

  10. The amathiiform Ctenostomata (phylum Bryozoa) of New Zealand--including four new species, two of them of probable alien origin.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Dennis P; Spencer-Jones, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The status of the vesiculariid ctenostome genus Amathia in New Zealand has been evaluated on the basis of all known material, including historic specimens in museums and those newly collected during formal surveillance of ports, harbours and vessels for possible alien species. Eight species are recognised, four of them new to science. Amathia gracei n. sp. and Amathia zealandica n. sp. are the only apparently endemic species. Amathia chimonidesi n. sp. appears to be a previously unrecognised alien species and is known only from shipping harbours and/or yacht marinas and some nearby beaches. Amathia similis n. sp. has been known in the Auckland area since the 1960s but was confused with A. distans Busk. Amathia bicornis (Tenison-Woods), A. biseriata Krauss, A. lamourouxi Chimonides and A. wilsoni Kirkpatrick are Australasian species that occur naturally on both sides of the Tasman Sea. Of this latter group, A. bicornis was discovered only at a single locality on the southwest coast of North Island in 1983 on a fucoid seaweed and it may be relatively re-cently self-introduced. A specimen of A. lendigera (Linnaeus) in the Museum of New Zealand, purportedly from Napier, is considered to be based on a misunderstanding or a labelling error and does not represent a failed alien introduction. The Amathia-like vesiculariid Bowerbankia citrina (Hincks) sensu lato is newly recorded for New Zealand. Keys are provided to the amathiiform (i.e. Amathia and Amathia-like) Ctenostomata of New Zealand and to the worldwide species of Amathia and Bowerbankia with zooid clusters spiralled on stoloniform axes. PMID:26295099

  11. Thermogutta terrifontis gen. nov., sp. nov. and Thermogutta hypogea sp. nov., thermophilic anaerobic representatives of the phylum Planctomycetes.

    PubMed

    Slobodkina, Galina B; Kovaleva, Olga L; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Slobodkin, Alexander I; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Novikov, Andrei A; van Heerden, Esta; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2015-03-01

    Two novel strains of thermophilic planctomycetes were recovered from terrestrial and subterranean habitats. Strain R1(T) was isolated from a hot spring (Kunashir Island, Russia) and strain SBP2(T) was isolated from a deep gold mine (South Africa). Both isolates grew in the temperature range 30-60 °C and pH range 5.0-8.0. Strain R1(T) grew optimally at 60 °C and pH 6.0-6.5; for SBP2(T) optimal conditions were at 52 °C and pH 7.5-8.0. Both strains were capable of anaerobic respiration with nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptors as well as of microaerobic growth. They also could grow by fermentation of mono-, di- and polysaccharides. Based on their phylogenetic position and phenotypic features we suggest that the new isolates represent two novel species belonging to a new genus in the order Planctomycetales, for which the names Thermogutta terrifontis gen. nov., sp. nov. and Thermogutta hypogea sp. nov. are proposed. The type strain of Thermogutta terrifontis, the type species of the genus, is R1(T) (?=?DSM 26237(T)?=?VKM B-2805(T)), and the type strain of Thermogutta hypogea is SBP2(T) (?=?JCM 19991(T)?=?VKM B-2782(T)). PMID:25479950

  12. Candidatus Syngnamydia Venezia, a Novel Member of the Phylum Chlamydiae from the Broad Nosed Pipefish, Syngnathus typhle

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike; Nufer, Lisbeth; Wilson, Anthony; Svercel, Miroslav; Richter, Denis; Segner, Helmut; Pospischil, Andreas; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia are obligate intracellular bacteria and important pathogens of humans and animals. Chlamydia-related bacteria are also major fish pathogens, infecting epithelial cells of the gills and skin to cause the disease epitheliocystis. Given the wide distribution, ancient origins and spectacular diversity of bony fishes, this group offers a rich resource for the identification and isolation of novel Chlamydia. The broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle) is a widely distributed and genetically diverse temperate fish species, susceptible to epitheliocystis across much of its range. We describe here a new bacterial species, Candidatus Syngnamydia venezia; epitheliocystis agent of S. typhle and close relative to other chlamydial pathogens which are known to infect diverse hosts ranging from invertebrates to humans. PMID:23951025

  13. Four new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Owen Stanley Skinks, Papuascincus stanleyanus (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September and November 1991, 12 Owen Stanley skinks, Papuascincus stanleyanus (Booulenger) were collected from various localities on Papua New Guinea and examined for coccidians. Six (50%) were found to harbour four eimerians that we describe here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria burseyi sp. n. were elongate to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured (length x width, L x W) 36.0 x 24.0 microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.5. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria goldbergi sp. n. were ellipsoidal, with a bilayered wall, and measured 21.4 x 16.1 microm; L/W ratio was 1.3. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single or fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria boulengeri sp. n. were spheroidal to slightly subspheroidal, with a thin, single-layered wall that readily collapses, and measured 16.0 microm, L/W ratio was 1.0. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but usually one (sometimes two) polar granule(s) were present. Oocysts of Eimeria niuginiensis sp. n. were oblong to tapered with a bilayered wall, and measured 20.0 x 13.1 microm; L/W ratio was 1.5. A micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule were absent. To our knowledge, these represent the only coccidians ever described from P. stanleyanus.

  14. A New Species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Green Frog, Lithobates clamitans (Anura: Ranidae) from Arkansas, U.S.A

    PubMed Central

    Seville, R. Scott; Bursey, Charles R.; Trauth, Stanley E.; Connior, Matthew B.; Robison, Henry W.

    2014-01-01

    Between April and October 2012, 20 juvenile and adult green frogs (Lithobates clamitans) were collected by hand or dipnet from 3 counties of Arkansas and examined for coccidial parasites. A single frog (5%) was found to be passing oocysts of a new eimerian species. Oocysts of Eimeria menaensis n. sp. were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal with a bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 25.4 × 15.6 (23–27 × 13–17) µm, with a L/W ratio of 1.6. A micropyle was absent but an oocyst residuum and polar granule were present. Sporocysts were spheroidal to subspheroidal and measured 5.0 × 5.0 (4–6) µm with L/W of 1.1. An indistinct Stieda body was present, but sub–and para–Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of condensed granules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate and attenuated at both ends with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. This represents the second report of coccidia from L. clamitans and the first time a coccidian has been reported from a green frog from Arkansas. PMID:25580093

  15. Synoptic revision of Blabericola (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Blabericolidae) parasitizing blaberid cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blaberidae), with comments on delineating gregarine species boundaries.

    PubMed

    Clopton, Richard E

    2012-06-01

    Complete synoptic redescriptions, including complete morphometric data for all life cycle stages, species recognition characters, and differential comparisons are presented for the 4 gregarine species comprising Blabericola . Blabericola cubensis ( Peregrine, 1970 ), Blabericola haasi (Geus, 1969), Blabericola migrator ( Clopton, 1995 ), and Blabericola princisi ( Peregrine, 1970 ) are redescribed from their type hosts, i.e., the discoid cockroach Blaberus discoidalis , the lobster cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea , the Madagascar hissing cockroach Gromphadorhina portentosa , and the Bolivian cockroach Blaberus boliviensis , respectively. These gregarine species descriptions are stabilized through deposition of extensive new voucher collections. Species of Blabericola are distinguished by differences in relative metric ratios, morphology of oocysts, and by relative metric ratios of mature gamonts in association. This work is discussed as a model for morphological species descriptions in the Eugregarinorida including the 6 principles for morphological gregarine species descriptions, i.e., a centroid and population variation approach, adequate sample size, partitioning developmental variation and sexual dimorphism, recognition and minimization of fixation and physiological artifacts to eliminate false morphotypes, and comparative data sets across multiple life cycle stages. PMID:22150235

  16. Microscopic and molecular characterization of Hepatozoon domerguei (Apicomplexa) and Foleyella furcata (Nematoda) in wild endemic reptiles from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Maia, João P.; Crottini, Angelica; Harris, David James

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is one of the world’s top twelve “megadiversity” hot spots hosting unique and threatened flora and fauna. Parasites are a major component of biodiversity but remain largely uncharacterized in wildlife. In this study we combine microscopic and molecular assessment of hemoparasites in endemic reptile species from Madagascar. We detected three distinct parasites: the apicomplexans Hepatozoon and Sarcocystis, and filarial nematodes. The prevalence and intensity of these apicomplexans were low overall, while microfilarial infections in chameleons were relatively high. We detected mixed infections of two Hepatozoon haplotypes in Madagascarophis colubrinus, and of Hepatozoon and microfilariae in a Furcifer sp. Phylogenetic analyses of Hepatozoon showed evidence of prey-predator transmission, with identical sequences found in the snakes M. colubrinus and Ithycyphus oursi, and their prey Furcifer sp. Based on previous studies regarding the life cycle of Hepatozoon domerguei Landau, Chabaud, Michel, and Brygoo, 1970 in these hosts and due to their morphological similarity, we propose that this Hepatozoon haplotype is Hepatozoon domerguei. Future studies, including the examination of invertebrate hosts, are needed to verify this preliminary taxonomic identification. A distinct hemogregarine haplotype was found in Oplurus sp., which displayed morphologically different gametocytes, some of which were apparently inside leukocytes. The Sarcocystis identified from Tracheloptychus petersi was identical to that reported in a North African snake, indicating that the same lineage is found in geographically distinct regions. By combining morphological and genetic information, Foleyella furcata (Linstow, 1899) filarial nematodes were identified in several Furcifer chameleons. This study provides insights into the distribution, diversity and host-parasite interactions of hemoparasites in wild reptile populations from Madagascar. PMID:25224723

  17. A new species of Choleoeimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) parasitic in the rough-tailed gecko Cyrtopodion scabrum (Sauria: Gekkonidae) in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Haleem, Heba M

    2015-03-01

    Coprological examination of 15 samples of the rough-tailed gecko Cyrtopodion scabrum collected from Abu Rawash, Giza, Egypt, revealed that 20 % (3/15) were passing oocysts of a new Choleoeimeria species. Oocysts of Choleoeimeria scabrumi n. sp. are ellipsoidal with a smooth, yellow to orange, bilayered smooth wall, measure 26 × 13 ?m, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.8. Polar granule, micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal and 8 × 5 ?m and the sporocyst wall has two plates joined by a longitudinal suture. Stieda, substieda and parastieda bodies are absent. The endogenous development is confined to the gallbladder epithelium. Mature meronts are subspheroidal and 11-13 × 8-10 ?m. Macrogamonts are mostly spheroidal and 12-14 ?m wide, with a prominent nucleus in the centre. Microgamonts are irregular in shape, 9-11 × 5-7 ?m. Based on the morphological features of the oocysts and the endogenous development in the gallbladder epithelium, we identified this biliary coccidium to be a new species in the genus Choleoeimeria. PMID:25592755

  18. Novel anti-infective molecule from innate immune cells as an antibiotic-alternative to control infections caused by Apicomplexa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing needs for the global animal industry to address the regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production, there is much interest to find alternatives to AGPs. To develop alternatives to antibiotics against the major poultry parasitic disease, ...

  19. Eimeria lancasterensis (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the eastern fox squirrel, Sciurus niger (Rodentia: Sciuridae), in north-central Texas.

    PubMed

    McAllister, C T; Upton, S J

    1989-08-01

    Eimeria lancasterensis Joseph, 1969, is reported for the first time from the feces of 10 of 11 (91%) eastern fox squirrels, Sciurus niger ludovicianus, in Dallas and Johnson counties, Texas. Oocyst measurements were similar to those reported previously from the eastern gray squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis carolinensis, in Massachusetts. Except for our observation of a substieda body, oocyst morphology was identical to the original description of E. lancasterensis. PMID:2760777

  20. Redescription of Hepatozoon felis (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) based on phylogenetic analysis, tissue and blood form morphology, and possible transplacental transmission

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A Hepatozoon parasite was initially reported from a cat in India in 1908 and named Leucocytozoon felis domestici. Although domestic feline hepatozoonosis has since been recorded from Europe, Africa, Asia and America, its description, classification and pathogenesis have remained vague and the distinction between different species of Hepatozoon infecting domestic and wild carnivores has been unclear. The aim of this study was to carry out a survey on domestic feline hepatozoonosis and characterize it morphologically and genetically. Methods Hepatozoon sp. DNA was amplified by PCR from the blood of 55 of 152 (36%) surveyed cats in Israel and from all blood samples of an additional 19 cats detected as parasitemic by microscopy during routine hematologic examinations. Hepatozoon sp. forms were also characterized from tissues of naturally infected cats. Results DNA sequencing determined that all cats were infected with Hepatozoon felis except for two infected by Hepatozoon canis. A significant association (p = 0.00001) was found between outdoor access and H. felis infection. H. felis meronts containing merozoites were characterized morphologically from skeletal muscles, myocardium and lungs of H. felis PCR-positive cat tissues and development from early to mature meront was described. Distinctly-shaped gamonts were observed and measured from the blood of these H. felis infected cats. Two fetuses from H. felis PCR-positive queens were positive by PCR from fetal tissue including the lung and amniotic fluid, suggesting possible transplacental transmission. Genetic analysis indicated that H. felis DNA sequences from Israeli cats clustered together with the H. felis Spain 1 and Spain 2 sequences. These cat H. felis sequences clustered separately from the feline H. canis sequences, which grouped with Israeli and foreign dog H. canis sequences. H. felis clustered distinctly from Hepatozoon spp. of other mammals. Feline hepatozoonosis caused by H. felis is mostly sub-clinical as a high proportion of the population is infected with no apparent overt clinical manifestations. Conclusions This study aimed to integrate new histopathologic, hematologic, clinical, epidemiological and genetic findings on feline hepatozoonosis and promote the understanding of this infection. The results indicate that feline infection is primarily caused by a morphologically and genetically distinct species, H. felis, which has predilection to infecting muscular tissues, and is highly prevalent in the cat population studied. The lack of previous comprehensively integrated data merits the redescription of this parasite elucidating its parasitological characteristics. PMID:23587213

  1. Morphologic and molecular characteristics of Sarcocystis atraii n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) infecting the common coot (Fulica atra) from Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Morsey, Ahmed; El-Seify, Mahmoud; Desouky, Abdel-Razik Y; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed M; El-Dakhly, Khaled Mohamed; Kasem, Samy; Abdo, Walied; Haridy, Mohie; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2015-12-01

    A single morphologic type of Sarcocystis cysts found in two out of 43 examined common coots, Fulica atra, is considered to represent a new species for which the name Sarcocystis atraii n. sp. is proposed and its description is provided. Coots were hunted from the vicinity of Brolos Lake located at KafrElsheikh province, Egypt. The structural morphology of the revealed sarcocysts was described using light and transmission electron microscopy. Sarcocysts were found in the leg and thigh muscles. The cysts were microscopic and measured 165-850 ?m in length × 50-85 ?m in width. Histologically; the sarcocyst wall was wavy and had minute undulations. Ultrastructurally, it measured 1-3 ?m in thickness and possessed many mushroom-like villar protrusions sometimes originating from other mushroom-like villar protrusions that measured approximately 0.5-2 ?m in length and up to 2 ?m in width, with the presence of electron dense ground substance of 300 nm to 1 ?m thick. The bradyzoites were elongated, banana-shaped and measured 7.5-14 × 1.5-2.5 ?m, with centrally or terminally located nuclei. The ultrastructural features of the cyst wall belonged to type 24. On the basis of sequencing and phylogenic analyses for 18S rRNA , 28S rRNA genes and ITS-1 region; S. atraii n. sp. is considered a genetically distinct species, being most closely related to avian Sarcocystis spp. whose definitive hosts are predatory mammals. PMID:26408592

  2. Sarcocystis eothenomysi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the large oriental vole Eothenomys miletus (Thomas) (Cricetidae: Microtinae) from Anning, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun-Jie; Liu, Qiong; Yang, Yan-Fen; Esch, Gerald W; Guo, Yan-Mei; Zou, Feng-Cai

    2014-09-01

    Fifty-six oriental voles, Eothenomys miletus (Thomas), were collected in Anning prefecture of Yunnan Province (China) between March 2012 and December 2013 and examined for the presence of sarcocysts. Sarcosysts of a new species, Sarcocystis eothenomysi n. sp., were found in 14 out of 56 E. miletus (25%); they possessed a striated cyst wall, c.1-2 ?m thick. Under transmission electron microscopy the cysts of S. eothenomysi exhibited numerous small, irregular protrusions, which may appear T-shaped in some sections. A phylogenetic analysis based on 18S rRNA gene sequences indicated that S. eothenomysi shares closest affinity with those species of Sarcocystis Lankester, 1982, which use cobra or viperid snakes as definitive hosts. We therefore, hypothesise that a venomous snake may serve as the definitive host for S. eothenomysi. This is the first species of Sarcocystis reported from Eothenomys spp. PMID:25079817

  3. Haemoproteus ilanpapernai n. sp. (Apicomplexa, Haemoproteidae) in Strix seloputo from Singapore: morphological description and reassignment of molecular data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Haemoproteus ilanpapernai Karadjian and Landau n. sp. from the Spotted Wood Owl, Strix seloputo, in Singapore is described from material from Ilan Paperna’s collection of slides. The species was previously identified as Haemoproteus syrnii (Mayer, 1910). However, comparisons between the material from Strix seloputo and our own material from Strix aluco, the type host of H. syrnii, revealed morphological and molecular differences. H. ilanpapernai n. sp. differs morphologically from H. syrnii by the much smaller size of the gametocytes, the different position of the mature gametocytes in the erythrocyte (apical, subapical, or lateral in H. ilanpapernai vs. always lateral in H. syrnii), the effect on the erythrocyte nucleus (frequently tilted in H. ilanpapernai but not displaced laterally vs. straight and displaced laterally in H. syrnii) and characters of the pigment (aggregated in the gametocytes of H. ilanpapernai vs. dispersed in H. syrnii). A molecular analysis showed that the two species differ by 2.9% at the cyt b and 3.1% at the COI genes. PMID:24759652

  4. Haemoproteus ilanpapernai n. sp. (Apicomplexa, Haemoproteidae) in Strix seloputo from Singapore: morphological description and reassignment of molecular data.

    PubMed

    Karadjian, Grégory; Martinsen, Ellen; Duval, Linda; Chavatte, Jean-Marc; Landau, Irène

    2014-01-01

    Haemoproteus ilanpapernai Karadjian and Landau n. sp. from the Spotted Wood Owl, Strix seloputo, in Singapore is described from material from Ilan Paperna's collection of slides. The species was previously identified as Haemoproteus syrnii (Mayer, 1910). However, comparisons between the material from Strix seloputo and our own material from Strix aluco, the type host of H. syrnii, revealed morphological and molecular differences. H. ilanpapernai n. sp. differs morphologically from H. syrnii by the much smaller size of the gametocytes, the different position of the mature gametocytes in the erythrocyte (apical, subapical, or lateral in H. ilanpapernai vs. always lateral in H. syrnii), the effect on the erythrocyte nucleus (frequently tilted in H. ilanpapernai but not displaced laterally vs. straight and displaced laterally in H. syrnii) and characters of the pigment (aggregated in the gametocytes of H. ilanpapernai vs. dispersed in H. syrnii). A molecular analysis showed that the two species differ by 2.9% at the cyt b and 3.1% at the COI genes. PMID:24759652

  5. Exogenous stages of Eimeria bemricki n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the great gray owl, Strix nebulosa (Foster).

    PubMed

    Averbeck, G A; Cooney, J D; Guarnera, T R; Redig, P; Stromberg, B E

    1998-10-01

    Exogenous stages of a new species of Eimeria are described from feces of a captive great gray owl, Strix nebulosa, held at the Gabbert Raptor Center, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota. Oocysts (n = 100) of Eimeria bemricki are spherical to subspherical, 19.2 x 19.0 (21.5-16.0 x 21.0-16.0) microm, with ovoidal sporocysts (n = 100), 10.0 x 6.5 (12.0-7.0 x 7.0-5.5) microm and sporozoites (n = 20), 8.2 x 3.2 (6.8-10.1 x 2.5-3.9) microm. Stieda bodies, substieda bodies, polar bodies, and sporocyst residua are present, but micropyle, oocyst residuum, and parastieda bodies are absent. Three refractile bodies are contained in each sporozoite. PMID:9794640

  6. Two new species of Isospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from skinks Emoia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Fiji and Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between September and October 1991 and again during September 1992, skinks (Emoia spp.) were collected from various localities on Fiji and Papua New Guinea (PNG) and examined for coccidians. One of 4 (25%) De Vis' emo skinks (Emoia pallidiceps) from PNG harbored an undescribed species of Isospora in its feces. Oocysts of Isospora grinbikpelapalai n. sp. were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal, 18.1 × 14.9 (17–20 × 14–16) ?m, with a bilayered wall and a length/width index (L/W) of 1.2. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a prominent polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.7 × 7.6 (10–11 × 7–8) ?m, with a L/W index of 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present, but para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of large scattered globules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Isospora grinbikpelapalai was also found in 1 of 2 (50%) Pope's emo skinks (Emoia popei) from PNG. One of 13 (8%) white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), from Fiji, was passing another undescribed species of Isospora in its feces. Oocysts of Isospora casei n. sp. were elongate, 31.8 × 21.3 (28–35 × 18–24) ?m, with a bilayered wall and a L/W index of 1.5. Micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were all absent. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 15.3 × 10.6 (14–16 × 10–12) ?m, with a L/W index of 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present, but para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of scattered globules among sporozoites or as a cluster surrounding sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Isospora casei was also found in 1 of 2 (50%) Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor) from Fiji. This represents the first report of coccidia from Emoia spp. and, to our knowledge, the initial documentation of reptilian coccidia from herpetofauna from Papua New Guinea.

  7. Two new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa, Eimeriidae) from tree skinks, Prasinohaema spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September 1991 and June 1992, feces from 4 species of tree skinks, Prasinohaema spp. from Papua New Guinea, were collected and examined for coccidia. Two species, P. flavipes and P. prehensicauda were found to harbor eimerians which are described as new. Oocysts of Eimeria krausi sp. nov. from P. flavipes were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal with a smooth bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 19.2 × 16.9 ?m, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1. Micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent but a fragmented polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.7 × 6.7 ?m, L/W of 1.5. Stieda, subStieda and paraStieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum was composed of many small granules in a compact mass between sporozoites. The sporozoites were sausage-shaped, 11.7 × 2.7 ?m, in situ, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. Oocysts of Eimeria greeri sp. nov. from P. prehensicauda were ellipsoidal with a smooth bilayered wall, (L × W) 23.0 × 18.3 ?m, with a L/W of 1.3. Micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent but a fragmented polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.7 × 8.4 ?m, with a L/W of 1.2. Stieda, subStieda and paraStieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum was composed of many large granules in a compact mass between sporozoites. The sporozoites were sausage-shaped, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. We document here the first report of coccidia from skinks of the genus Prasinohaema.

  8. Morphological and molecular characterization of Eimeria haematodi, coccidian parasite (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in a rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Ryan, Una

    2015-06-01

    Eimeria haematodi was first described in 1977 from the rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) in Papua New Guinea. In the present study, we re-describe this coccidian species morphologically and molecularly from a rainbow lorikeet bird in Western Australia (WA). The oocysts were ovoid to slightly piriform and measured 28.5-37.8 by 25.8-33.0?µm (33.3 by 28.1?µm). Oocyst wall was approximately 1.5?µm thick and bilayered. Micropyle (5-7?µm) and oocyst residuum (8.0-10.0?µm) present; polar granule was absent. Sporocysts ellipsoidal, 11.8-13.6 by 8.0-9.6?µm (12.2 by 8.3?µm), with thin convex Stieda body and granular sporocyst residuum (4.0-5.0?µm). Molecular characterization of E. haematodi was conducted at 18S ribosomal RNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (COI) loci. At the 18S ribosomal RNA locus, E. haematodi shared 98.1% genetic similarity to E. alabamensis from cattle in New South Wales, Australia. At COI locus, E. haematodi was closest (92.3% similarity) to E. praecox from domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) from Canada and China. PMID:25795281

  9. Isospora anthochaerae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from a Red wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata) (Passeriformes: Meliphagidae) in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Ryan, Una

    2014-05-01

    A new species, Isospora anthochaerae n. sp. is described from a Red wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata). Sporulated oocysts (n=37) are subspherical, with smooth colourless to pale brown bilayered oocyst wall, 0.8 ?m thick (outer layer 0·6 ?m, inner 0.2 ?m thick). Oocyst with 2 spheroidal to subspheroidal sporocysts. Oocyst length, 23.4 ?m (20.0-26.0); oocyst width, 20.7 ?m (19.0-22.0); oocyst length/width (L/W) ratio, 1.1. Micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts with compact sporocyst residuum and 4 sporozoites. Sporocyst length, 14.5 ?m; sporocyst width, 10.1 ?m sporocyst L/W ratio, 1.4. Molecular analysis was conducted at four loci; the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (COI). At the COI locus, I. anthochaerae n. sp. exhibited 98.5% similarity to Isospora lesouefi from a Regent honeyeater (Xanthomyza phrygia) and 98% similarity with an Isospora sp. (iSAT5) from a blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla). Based on morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of coccidian parasite that to date has only been found in Red wattlebirds. PMID:24602873

  10. A new species of Caryospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Accipitriformes: Accipitridae), from Kansas.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; McKown, Richard D

    2013-04-01

    Between March 1989 and February 1994, 4 bald eagles ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) from various localities in Kansas were examined for coccidia. One (25%) of the bald eagles was found to be passing an undescribed species of Caryospora in its feces. Oocysts of Caryospora hanebrinki n. sp. are ellipsoidal to ovoidal with a bilayered wall and measure 48.1 × 42.1 ?m with a shape index of 1.2. A micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts are spheroidal, 24.8 ?m wide. Stieda, substieda, and parastieda bodies were absent; a spheroidal sporocyst residuum is present; it measures 17.5 ?m and is composed of many intact homogenous globules with a few dispersed in a loose spiral around the sporocysts. This is the first caryosporan documented from the bald eagle and is the largest known Caryospora from raptors. PMID:22992168

  11. A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Carlia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 from rainbow skinks, Carlia ailanpalai Zug and Carlia eothen Zug is described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Oöcysts of Eimeria zugi n. sp. from one of one (100%) C. eothen are ellipsoidal to cylindroidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 25.1 × 15.5 ?m and have a length/width ratio of 1.6. The micropyle and the oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. The sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal and 10.3 × 7.1 ?m in size and do not contain Stieda, sub-Stieda or para-Stieda bodies; and the sporocyst residuum is composed of a compact mass of large globules. The sporozoites are elongate, 12.8 × 2.9 ?m in size, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. This is the ninth species of coccidium described from skinks from PNG, and the new species described herein is apparently endemic to the skink genus Carlia (Gray).

  12. Microscopic and molecular characterization of Hepatozoon domerguei (Apicomplexa) and Foleyella furcata (Nematoda) in wild endemic reptiles from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Maia, João P; Crottini, Angelica; Harris, David James

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is one of the world's top twelve "megadiversity" hot spots hosting unique and threatened flora and fauna. Parasites are a major component of biodiversity but remain largely uncharacterized in wildlife. In this study we combine microscopic and molecular assessment of hemoparasites in endemic reptile species from Madagascar. We detected three distinct parasites: the apicomplexans Hepatozoon and Sarcocystis, and filarial nematodes. The prevalence and intensity of these apicomplexans were low overall, while microfilarial infections in chameleons were relatively high. We detected mixed infections of two Hepatozoon haplotypes in Madagascarophis colubrinus, and of Hepatozoon and microfilariae in a Furcifer sp. Phylogenetic analyses of Hepatozoon showed evidence of prey-predator transmission, with identical sequences found in the snakes M. colubrinus and Ithycyphus oursi, and their prey Furcifer sp. Based on previous studies regarding the life cycle of Hepatozoon domerguei Landau, Chabaud, Michel, and Brygoo, 1970 in these hosts and due to their morphological similarity, we propose that this Hepatozoon haplotype is Hepatozoon domerguei. Future studies, including the examination of invertebrate hosts, are needed to verify this preliminary taxonomic identification. A distinct hemogregarine haplotype was found in Oplurus sp., which displayed morphologically different gametocytes, some of which were apparently inside leukocytes. The Sarcocystis identified from Tracheloptychus petersi was identical to that reported in a North African snake, indicating that the same lineage is found in geographically distinct regions. By combining morphological and genetic information, Foleyella furcata (Linstow, 1899) filarial nematodes were identified in several Furcifer chameleons. This study provides insights into the distribution, diversity and host-parasite interactions of hemoparasites in wild reptile populations from Madagascar. PMID:25224723

  13. Identification of a Divergent Environmental DNA Sequence Clade Using the Phylogeny of Gregarine Parasites (Apicomplexa) from Crustacean Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Rueckert, Sonja; Simdyanov, Timur G.; Aleoshin, Vladimir V.; Leander, Brian S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Environmental SSU rDNA surveys have significantly improved our understanding of microeukaryotic diversity. Many of the sequences acquired using this approach are closely related to lineages previously characterized at both morphological and molecular levels, making interpretation of these data relatively straightforward. Some sequences, by contrast, appear to be phylogenetic orphans and are sometimes inferred to represent “novel lineages” of unknown cellular identity. Consequently, interpretation of environmental DNA surveys of cellular diversity rely on an adequately comprehensive database of DNA sequences derived from identified species. Several major taxa of microeukaryotes, however, are still very poorly represented in these databases, and this is especially true for diverse groups of single-celled parasites, such as gregarine apicomplexans. Methodology/Principal Findings This study attempts to address this paucity of DNA sequence data by characterizing four different gregarine species, isolated from the intestines of crustaceans, at both morphological and molecular levels: Thiriotia pugettiae sp. n. from the graceful kelp crab (Pugettia gracilis), Cephaloidophora cf. communis from two different species of barnacles (Balanus glandula and B. balanus), Heliospora cf. longissima from two different species of freshwater amphipods (Eulimnogammarus verrucosus and E. vittatus), and Heliospora caprellae comb. n. from a skeleton shrimp (Caprella alaskana). SSU rDNA sequences were acquired from isolates of these gregarine species and added to a global apicomplexan alignment containing all major groups of gregarines characterized so far. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of these data demonstrated that all of the gregarines collected from crustacean hosts formed a very strongly supported clade with 48 previously unidentified environmental DNA sequences. Conclusions/Significance This expanded molecular phylogenetic context enabled us to establish a major clade of intestinal gregarine parasites and infer the cellular identities of several previously unidentified environmental SSU rDNA sequences, including several sequences that have formerly been discussed broadly in the literature as a suspected “novel” lineage of eukaryotes. PMID:21483868

  14. Endogenous Life Cycle of Eimeria marmosopos (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Opossum, Didelphis marsupialis (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae) in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Misael; Valerio, Idalia; Duszynski, Donald

    2015-08-01

    The endogenous life cycle of Eimeria marmosopos was studied in experimentally infected young opossums, Didelphis marsupialis . All the endogenous stages were located in the epithelial cells of villi in the small intestine. Giemsa-stained mucosal scrapings and histological sections were studied for the diagnosis of all the life cycle stages. Eimeria marmosopos has 3 generations of meronts (M) that differ by size, shape, and number of merozoites (m), which also differ in their size, shape, and location of their nuclei within the cytoplasm of the meronts. The 3 meront types, M(1)-M(3), respectively, had 8-15 (m(1)), 4-9 (m(2)), and 22-30 (m(3)) merozoites. Macrogametocytes and microgametocytes, as well as macrogametes and microgametes, completed the sexual cycle, finishing with the formation of unsporulated oocysts. This parasite's endogenous development produced severe intestinal lesions in experimentally infected opossums. There are 56 Eimeria species known from all marsupials worldwide, but this is the first complete life cycle in which both the asexual and sexual stages have been documented. PMID:25807059

  15. Phylogeny of gregarines (Apicomplexa) as inferred from small-subunit rDNA and beta-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Leander, Brian S; Clopton, Richard E; Keeling, Patrick J

    2003-01-01

    Gregarines are thought to be deep-branching apicomplexans. Accordingly, a robust inference of gregarine phylogeny is crucial to any interpretation of apicomplexan evolution, but molecular sequences from gregarines are restricted to a small number of small-subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences from derived taxa. This work examines the usefulness of SSU rDNA and beta-tubulin sequences for inferring gregarine phylogeny. SSU rRNA genes from Lecudina (Mingazzini) sp., Monocystis agilis Stein, Leidyana migrator Clopton and Gregarina polymorpha Dufour, as well as the beta-tubulin gene from Leidyana migrator, were sequenced. The results of phylogenetic analyses of alveolate taxa using both genes were consistent with an early origin of gregarines and the putative 'sister' relationship between gregarines and Cryptosporidium, but neither phylogeny was strongly supported. In addition, two SSU rDNA sequences from unidentified marine eukaryotes were found to branch among the gregarines: one was a sequence derived from the haemolymph parasite of the giant clam, Tridacna crocea, and the other was a sequence misattributed to the foraminiferan Ammonium beccarii. In all of our analyses, the SSU rDNA sequence from Colpodella sp. clustered weakly with the apicomplexans, which is consistent with ultrastructural data. Altogether, the exact position of gregarines with respect to Cryptosporidium and other apicomplexans remains to be confirmed, but the congruence of SSU rDNA and beta-tubulin trees with one another and with morphological data does suggest that further sampling of molecular data will eventually put gregarine diversity into a phylogenetic context. PMID:12656194

  16. Two new species of Sarcocystis, Sarcocystis caninum and Sarcocystis svanai (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the domestic dog (Canis familiaris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sarcocystis species have a 2-host life cycle with carnivores as definitive hosts and herbivores as intermediate hosts. Occasionally dogs are definitive as well as intermediate hosts for Sarcocystis species. There are several reports of Sarcocystis sarcocysts in muscles of dogs but these species have...

  17. Eimeria cryptotis n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the least shrew, Cryptotis parva (Insectivora: Soricidae), in north-central Texas.

    PubMed

    McAllister, C T; Upton, S J

    1989-04-01

    From March through November 1987, 14 least shrews, Cryptotis parva (Say), were collected in portions of north-central Texas and examined for coccidian parasites; only 1 (7.1%) was found to be passing oocysts. Eimeria cryptotis n. sp. is described herein as new and represents the only coccidian reported thus far from C. parva. Sporulated oocysts are subspherical, 16.4 x 15.3 (14-18 x 13-17) microns; shape index 1.1 (1.0-1.2) microns. A micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. The sporocysts are ovoid, 10.6 x 7.0 (9-11 x 6-8) microns; shape index 1.5 (1.4-1.8) microns. Stieda and substieda bodies and a sporocyst residuum are present. The sporozoites are elongate and only 2 could be observed well enough to measure (11.2 x 2.4 and 8.8 x 2.4 microns) because they are normally obscured by the sporocyst residuum. Sporozoites lack refractile bodies and contain a centrally located nucleus. The new species can be distinguished from the majority of insectivore coccidia on the basis of oocyst size. PMID:2926589

  18. Ecology 2004 18, 685691

    E-print Network

    Poulin, Robert

    7602, South Africa Summary 1. Hairworms (phylum Nematomorpha) and mermithid nematodes (phylum Nematoda. Mermithids (phylum Nematoda) have independently evolved an almost identical life cycle, and are also known

  19. A portable identification guide to invertebrates living in freshwater streams, lakes, creeks and ponds

    E-print Network

    Thorp, James H.

    , Class Turbellaria Chapter 08 Hairworms: Phylum Nematomorpha Chapter 09 Snails: Phylum Mollusca, Class Gastropoda Chapter 10 Mussels and Clams: Phylum Mollusca, Class Bivalvia Chapter 11 Aquatic Segmented Worms

  20. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    PubMed Central

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective. PMID:25945702