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Sample records for pseudo-continuous arterial spin

  1. Comparison of relative cerebral blood flow maps using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling and single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peiying; Uh, Jinsoo; Devous, Michael D; Adinoff, Bryon; Lu, Hanzhang

    2012-05-01

    Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) MRI is a relatively new arterial spin labeling technique and has the potential to extend the cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement to all tissue types, including white matter. However, the arterial transit time (δ(a)) for white matter is not well established and a limited number of reports using multi-delay methods have yielded inconsistent findings. In this study, we used a different approach and measured white matter δ(a) (mean ± standard deviation, 1541 ± 173  ms) by determining the arrival times of exogenous contrast agent in a bolus tracking experiment. The data also confirmed δ(a) of gray matter to be 912 ± 209  ms. In the second part of this study, we used these parameters in PCASL kinetic models and compared relative CBF (rCBF, with respect to the whole brain) maps with those measured using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technique. It was found that the use of tissue-specific δ(a) in the PCASL model was helpful in improving the correspondence between the two modalities. On a regional level, the gray/white matter CBF ratios were 2.47 ± 0.39 and 2.44 ± 0.18 for PCASL and SPECT, respectively. On a single-voxel level, the variance between the modalities was still considerable, with an average rCBF difference of 0.27. PMID:22139764

  2. Reproducibility of multiphase pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling and the effect of post-processing analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Fazlollahi, Amir; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Liang, Xiaoyun; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Connelly, Alan; Salvado, Olivier; Calamante, Fernando

    2015-08-15

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an emerging MRI technique for non-invasive measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Compared to invasive perfusion imaging modalities, ASL suffers from low sensitivity due to poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), susceptibility to motion artifacts and low spatial resolution, all of which limit its reliability. In this work, the effects of various state of the art image processing techniques for addressing these ASL limitations are investigated. A processing pipeline consisting of motion correction, ASL motion correction imprecision removal, temporal and spatial filtering, partial volume effect correction, and CBF quantification was developed and assessed. To further improve the SNR for pseudo-continuous ASL (PCASL) by accounting for errors in tagging efficiency, the data from multiphase (MP) acquisitions were analyzed using a novel weighted-averaging scheme. The performances of each step in terms of SNR and reproducibility were evaluated using test-retest ASL data acquired from 12 young healthy subjects. The proposed processing pipeline was shown to improve the within-subject coefficient of variation and regional reproducibility by 17% and 16%, respectively, compared to CBF maps computed following motion correction but without the other processing steps. The CBF measurements of MP-PCASL compared to PCASL had on average 23% and 10% higher SNR and reproducibility, respectively. PMID:26026814

  3. Feasibility of Using Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion in a Geriatric Population at 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Forsberg, Lars; Aspelund, Thor; van der Geest, Rob J.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Launer, Lenore J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van Osch, Matthias J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) perfusion in a geriatric population at 1.5-Tesla. Materials and Methods In 17 participants (mean age 78.8±1.63 years) we assessed; 1) inter-session repeatability and reliability of resting state perfusion in 27 brain regions; 2) brain activation using finger-tapping as a means to evaluate the ability to detect flow differences; 3) reliability by comparing cerebral blood flow (CBF) with pCASL to CBF with phase contrast (PC-MR). Results The CBF (mean±standard deviation (SD)) for the whole brain grey matter (GM) was 40.6±8.4 and 41.4±8.7 ml/100g/min for the first and second scan respectively. The within-subject standard deviation (SDw), the repeatability index (RI) and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) across the 27 regions ranged from 1.1 to 7.9, 2.2 to 15.5 and 0.35 to 0.98 respectively. For whole brain GM the SDw, RI and ICC were 1.6, 3.2 and 0.96 respectively. The between-subject standard deviation (SDB) was larger than the SDw for all regions. Comparison of CBF at rest and activation on a voxel level showed significantly higher perfusion during finger tapping in the motor- and somatosensory regions. The mean CBF for whole brain GM was 40.6±8.4 ml/100g/min at rest and 42.6±8.6 ml/100g/min during activation. Finally the reliability of pCASL against the reference standard of PC-MR was high (ICC = 0.80). The mean CBF for whole brain measured with PC-MRI was 54.3±10.1 ml/100g/min and 38.3±7.8 ml/100g/min with pCASL. Conclusions The results demonstrate moderate to high levels of repeatability and reliability for most brain regions, comparable to what has been reported for younger populations. The performance of pCASL at 1.5-Tesla shows that region-specific perfusion measurements with this technique are feasible in studies of a geriatric population. PMID:26659363

  4. Reliability of Three-Dimensional Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling MR Imaging for Measuring Visual Cortex Perfusion on Two 3T Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Diandian; Wu, Bing; Shi, Kaining; Ma, Lin; Cai, Youquan; Lou, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the human primary visual cortex is correlated with the loss of visual function in neuro-ophthalmological diseases. Advanced three-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (3D pCASL), as a non-invasive method to access the CBF, can be a novel measurement to detect the visual cortex. The objective of the study was to assess the intra- and inter-scanner reliability of 3D pCASL of the visual cortex in healthy adults and suggest the selection of different post-labeling delay times (PLDs). For this reason, 3D pCASL was conducted in two 3.0T MR three times with twelve healthy volunteers at an interval of 10–15 days. The 1st and 3rd tests were performed on scanner-1, and the 2nd test was performed on scanner-2. The value of the CBF was abstracted from the visual cortex with two PLDs. The intra- and inter-scanner reliability and reproducibility were evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. By estimating the mean value of the CBF in the visual cortex, the intra-scanner results demonstrated the higher reliability (ICC for PLD = 1.5 second presented at 0.743 compared with 0.829 for PLD = 2.5 seconds), and the Bland-Altman plots showed the reproducibility at a longer PLD. We conclude that the calibrated 3D pCASL approach provides a highly reproducible measurement of the CBF of the visual cortex that can serve as a useful quantitative probe for research conducted at multiple centers and for the long-term observation of the clinical effects of neuro-opthalmological diseases. PMID:24278137

  5. Effects of acute levodopa challenge on resting cerebral blood flow in Parkinson’s Disease patients assessed using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling

    PubMed Central

    Pressman, Peter; Simuni, Tanya; Parrish, Todd B.; Gitelman, Darren R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Levodopa is the gold-standard for treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) related motor symptoms. In this study, we used pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) to quantify changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) after acute oral administration of levodopa in PD patients. Materials and Methods. Thirteen patients (3 females, age 66.2 ± 8.7 years) with moderately advanced PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage >2 (median 2.5), disease duration >3 years) were scanned on a 3T Siemens MR scanner before and after oral levodopa administration. Statistical parametric mapping was used to detect drug-induced changes in CBF and its correlation to clinical severity scales. Images were normalized and flipped in order to examine effects on the more affected (left) and less affected (right) cerebral hemispheres across the cohort. Results. Levodopa did not change global CBF but increased regional CBF in dorsal midbrain, precuneus/cuneus, more affected inferior frontal pars opercularis and triangularis, bilateral pre- and postcentral gyri, more affected inferior parietal areas, as well as less affected putamen/globus pallidus by 27–74% (p < 0.05, FWE corrected for multiple comparisons). CBF change was negatively correlated with improvement in bradykinesia UPDRS-III subscore in the more affected precentral gyrus, and total predrug UPDRS-III score in the mid-cingulate region. Drug-induced CBF change in a widespread network of regions including parietal and postcentral areas was also negatively correlated with the predrug rigidity UPDRS-III subscore. Conclusion. These findings are in line with prior reports of abnormal activity in the nigrostriatal pathway of PD patients and demonstrate the feasibility of pCASL as a neuroimaging tool for investigating in vivo physiological effects of acute drug administration in PD. PMID:26734502

  6. Quantitative Functional Arterial Spin Labeling (fASL) MRI – Sensitivity and Reproducibility of Regional CBF Changes Using Pseudo-Continuous ASL Product Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Steketee, Rebecca M. E.; Mutsaerts, Henri J. M. M.; Bron, Esther E.; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; van der Lugt, Aad; Nederveen, Aart J.; Smits, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used to quantify task-related brain activation. This study assessed functional ASL (fASL) using pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) product sequences from two vendors. By scanning healthy participants twice with each sequence while they performed a motor task, this study assessed functional ASL for 1) its sensitivity to detect task-related cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, and 2) its reproducibility of resting CBF and absolute CBF changes (delta CBF) in the motor cortex. Whole-brain voxel-wise analyses showed that sensitivity for motor activation was sufficient with each sequence, and comparable between sequences. Reproducibility was assessed with within-subject coefficients of variation (wsCV) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Reproducibility of resting CBF was reasonably good within (wsCV: 14.1–15.7%; ICC: 0.69–0.77) and between sequences (wsCV: 15.1%; ICC: 0.69). Reproducibility of delta CBF was relatively low, both within (wsCV: 182–297%; ICC: 0.04–0.32) and between sequences (wsCV: 185%; ICC: 0.45), while inter-session variation was low. This may be due to delta CBF’s small mean effect (0.77–1.32 mL/100g gray matter/min). In conclusion, fASL seems sufficiently sensitive to detect task-related changes on a group level, with acceptable inter-sequence differences. Resting CBF may provide a consistent baseline to compare task-related activation to, but absolute regional CBF changes are more variable, and should be interpreted cautiously when acquired with two pCASL product sequences. PMID:26172381

  7. Simultaneous multi-slice Turbo-FLASH imaging with CAIPIRINHA for whole brain distortion-free pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling at 3 and 7 T.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Moeller, Steen; Li, Xiufeng; Vu, An T; Krasileva, Kate; Ugurbil, Kamil; Yacoub, Essa; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-06-01

    Simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) or multiband (MB) imaging has recently been attempted for arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI in conjunction with echo-planar imaging (EPI) readout. It was found that SMS-EPI can reduce the T1 relaxation effect of the label and improve image coverage and resolution with little penalty in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, EPI still suffers from geometric distortion and signal dropout from field inhomogeneity effects especially at high and ultrahigh magnetic fields. Here we present a novel scheme for achieving high fidelity distortion-free quantitative perfusion imaging by combining pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with SMS Turbo-FLASH (TFL) readout at both 3 and 7 T. Bloch equation simulation was performed to characterize and optimize the TFL-based pCASL perfusion signal. Two MB factors (3 and 5) were implemented in SMS-TFL pCASL and compared with standard 2D TFL and EPI pCASL sequences. The temporal SNR of SMS-TFL pCASL relative to that of standard TFL pCASL was 0.76 ± 0.10 and 0.74 ± 0.11 at 7 T and 0.70 ± 0.05 and 0.65 ± 0.05 at 3T for MB factor of 3 and 5, respectively. By implementing background suppression in conjunction with SMS-TFL at 3T, the relative temporal SNR improved to 0.84 ± 0.09 and 0.79 ± 0.10 for MB factor of 3 and 5, respectively. Compared to EPI pCASL, significantly increased temporal SNR (p<0.001) and improved visualization of orbitofrontal cortex were achieved using SMS-TFL pCASL. By combining SMS acceleration with TFL pCASL, we demonstrated the feasibility for whole brain distortion-free quantitative mapping of cerebral blood flow at high and ultrahigh magnetic fields. PMID:25837601

  8. SU-E-I-65: Estimation of Tagging Efficiency in Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling (pCASL) MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, M; Yan, F; Tseng, Y; Chen, C; Lin, C; Liu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: pCASL was recommended as a potent approach for absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification in clinical practice. However, uncertainties of tagging efficiency in pCASL remain an issue. This study aimed to estimate tagging efficiency by using short quantitative pulsed ASL scan (FAIR-QUIPSSII) and compare resultant CBF values with those calibrated by using 2D Phase Contrast (PC) MRI. Methods: Fourteen normal volunteers participated in this study. All images, including whole brain (WB) pCASL, WB FAIR-QUIPSSII and single-slice 2D PC, were collected on a 3T clinical MRI scanner with a 8-channel head coil. DeltaM map was calculated by averaging the subtraction of tag/control pairs in pCASL and FAIR-QUIPSSII images and used for CBF calculation. Tagging efficiency was then calculated by the ratio of mean gray matter CBF obtained from pCASL and FAIR-QUIPSSII. For comparison, tagging efficiency was also estimated with 2D PC, a previously established method, by contrast WB CBF in pCASL and 2D PC. Feasibility of estimation from a short FAIR-QUIPSSII scan was evaluated by number of averages required for obtaining a stable deltaM value. Setting deltaM calculated by maximum number of averaging (50 pairs) as reference, stable results were defined within ±10% variation. Results: Tagging efficiencies obtained by 2D PC MRI (0.732±0.092) were significantly lower than which obtained by FAIRQUIPPSSII (0.846±0.097) (P<0.05). Feasibility results revealed that four pairs of images in FAIR-QUIPPSSII scan were sufficient to obtain a robust calibration of less than 10% differences from using 50 pairs. Conclusion: This study found that reliable estimation of tagging efficiency could be obtained by a few pairs of FAIR-QUIPSSII images, which suggested that calibration scan in a short duration (within 30s) was feasible. Considering recent reports concerning variability of PC MRI-based calibration, this study proposed an effective alternative for CBF quantification with pCASL.

  9. Assessing intracranial vascular compliance using dynamic arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lirong; Liu, Collin Y; Smith, Robert X; Jog, Mayank; Langham, Michael; Krasileva, Kate; Chen, Yufen; Ringman, John M; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular compliance (VC) is an important marker for a number of cardiovascular diseases and dementia, which is typically assessed in the central and peripheral arteries indirectly by quantifying pulse wave velocity (PWV), and/or pulse pressure waveform. To date, very few methods are available for the quantification of intracranial VC. In the present study, a novel MRI technique for in-vivo assessment of intracranial VC was introduced, where dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) scans were synchronized with the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. VC is defined as the ratio of change in arterial cerebral blood volume (ΔCBV) and change in arterial pressure (ΔBP). Intracranial VC was assessed in different vascular components using the proposed dynamic ASL method. Our results show that VC mainly occurs in large arteries, and gradually decreases in small arteries and arterioles. The comparison of intracranial VC between young and elderly subjects shows that aging is accompanied by a reduction of intracranial VC, in good agreement with the literature. Furthermore, a positive association between intracranial VC and cerebral perfusion measured using pseudo-continuous ASL with 3D GRASE MRI was observed independent of aging effects, suggesting loss of VC is associated with a decline in perfusion. Finally, a significant positive correlation between intracranial and central (aortic arch) VC was observed using an ungated phase-contrast 1D projection PWV technique. The proposed dynamic ASL method offers a promising approach for assessing intracranial VC in a range of cardiovascular diseases and dementia. PMID:26364865

  10. Rapid 3D dynamic arterial spin labeling with a sparse model-based image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Fielden, Samuel W; Feng, Xue; Wintermark, Max; Mugler, John P; Meyer, Craig H

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI measures the perfusion bolus at multiple observation times and yields accurate estimates of cerebral blood flow in the presence of variations in arterial transit time. ASL has intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and is sensitive to motion, so that extensive signal averaging is typically required, leading to long scan times for dynamic ASL. The goal of this study was to develop an accelerated dynamic ASL method with improved SNR and robustness to motion using a model-based image reconstruction that exploits the inherent sparsity of dynamic ASL data. The first component of this method is a single-shot 3D turbo spin echo spiral pulse sequence accelerated using a combination of parallel imaging and compressed sensing. This pulse sequence was then incorporated into a dynamic pseudo continuous ASL acquisition acquired at multiple observation times, and the resulting images were jointly reconstructed enforcing a model of potential perfusion time courses. Performance of the technique was verified using a numerical phantom and it was validated on normal volunteers on a 3-Tesla scanner. In simulation, a spatial sparsity constraint improved SNR and reduced estimation errors. Combined with a model-based sparsity constraint, the proposed method further improved SNR, reduced estimation error and suppressed motion artifacts. Experimentally, the proposed method resulted in significant improvements, with scan times as short as 20s per time point. These results suggest that the model-based image reconstruction enables rapid dynamic ASL with improved accuracy and robustness. PMID:26169322

  11. Cerebral Perfusion Measurements in Elderly with Hypertension Using Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Mutsaerts, H. J. M. M.; van Dalen, J. W.; Heijtel, D. F. R.; Groot, P. F. C.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Petersen, E. T.; Richard, E.; Nederveen, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The current study assesses the feasibility and value of crushed cerebral blood flow (CBFcrushed) and arterial transit time (ATT) estimations for large clinical imaging studies in elderly with hypertension. Material and Methods Two pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) scans with (CBFcrushed) and without flow crushers (CBFnon-crushed) were performed in 186 elderly with hypertension, from which CBF and ATT maps were calculated. Standard flow territory maps were subdivided into proximal, intermediate and distal flow territories, based on the measured ATT. The coefficient of variation (CV) and physiological correlations with age and gender were compared between the three perfusion parameters. Results There was no difference in CV between CBFcrushed and CBFnon-crushed (15–24%, p>0.4) but the CV of ATT (4–9%) was much smaller. The total gray matter correlations with age and gender were most significant with ATT (p = .016 and p<.001 respectively), in between for CBFcrushed (p = .206 and p = .019) and least significant for CBFnon-crushed (p = .236 and p = .100). Conclusion These data show the feasibility and added value of combined measurements of both crushed CBF and ATT for group analyses in elderly with hypertension. The obtained flow territories provide knowledge on vascular anatomy of elderly with hypertension and can be used in future studies to investigate regional vascular effects. PMID:26241897

  12. Assessment of vessel permeability by combining dynamic contrast-enhanced and arterial spin labeling MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ho-Ling; Chang, Ting-Ting; Yan, Feng-Xian; Li, Cheng-He; Lin, Yu-Shi; Wong, Alex M

    2015-06-01

    The forward volumetric transfer constant (K(trans)), a physiological parameter extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, is weighted by vessel permeability and tissue blood flow. The permeability × surface area product per unit mass of tissue (PS) in brain tumors was estimated in this study by combining the blood flow obtained through pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) and K(trans) obtained through DCE MRI. An analytical analysis and a numerical simulation were conducted to understand how errors in the flow and K(trans) estimates would propagate to the resulting PS. Fourteen pediatric patients with brain tumors were scanned on a clinical 3-T MRI scanner. PCASL perfusion imaging was performed using a three-dimensional (3D) fast-spin-echo readout module to determine blood flow. DCE imaging was performed using a 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence, and the K(trans) map was obtained with the extended Tofts model. The numerical analysis demonstrated that the uncertainty of PS was predominantly dependent on that of K(trans) and was relatively insensitive to the flow. The average PS values of the whole tumors ranged from 0.006 to 0.217 min(-1), with a mean of 0.050 min(-1) among the patients. The mean K(trans) value was 18% lower than the PS value, with a maximum discrepancy of 25%. When the parametric maps were compared on a voxel-by-voxel basis, the discrepancies between PS and K(trans) appeared to be heterogeneous within the tumors. The PS values could be more than two-fold higher than the K(trans) values for voxels with high K(trans) levels. This study proposes a method that is easy to implement in clinical practice and has the potential to improve the quantification of the microvascular properties of brain tumors. PMID:25880892

  13. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables.

    PubMed

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X; Rios Piedra, Edgar A; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  14. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X.; Rios Piedra, Edgar A.; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  15. [Clinical applications of arterial spin labeling technique in brain diseases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Tiezhu; Guo, Chao; Li, Lin; Lu, Guangming

    2013-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique is a kind of perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging method that is based on endogenous contrast, and it can measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) noninvasively. The ASL technique has advantages of noninvasiveness, simplicity and relatively lower costs so that it is more suitable for longitudinal studies compared with previous perfusion methods, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), CT and the contrast agent based magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. This paper mainly discusses the current clinical applications of ASL in brain diseases as cerebrovascular diseases, brain tumors, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy, etc. PMID:23488163

  16. Arterial Spin Labeling Imaging for the Parotid Glands of Patients with Sjögren’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kami, Yukiko N.; Sumi, Misa; Takagi, Yukinori; Sasaki, Miho; Uetani, Masataka; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is characterized by hypofunction of the salivary and lacrimal glands. The salivary function is largely dependent upon the blood supply in the glands. However, the diseased states of the gland perfusion are not well understood. The arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique allows noninvasive quantitative assessment of tissue perfusion without the need for contrast agent. Here, we prospectively compared the perfusion properties of the parotid glands between patients with SS and those with healthy glands using ASL MR imaging. We analyzed salivary blood flow (SBF) kinetics of 22 healthy parotid glands from 11 volunteers and 28 parotid glands from 14 SS patients using 3T pseudo-continuous ASL imaging. SBF was determined in resting state (base SBF) and at 3 sequential segments after gustatory stimulation. SBF kinetic profiles were characterized by base SBF level, increment ratio at the SBF peak, and the differences in segments where the peak appeared (SBF types). Base SBFs of the SS glands were significantly higher than those of healthy glands (59.2 ± 22.8 vs. 46.3 ± 9.0 mL/min/100 g, p = 0.01). SBF kinetic profiles of the SS glands also exhibited significantly later SBF peaks (p < 0.001) and higher SBF increment ratios (74 ± 49% vs. 47 ± 39%, p = 0.04) than the healthy glands. The best SBF criterion (= 51.2 mL/min/100 mg) differentiated between control subjects and SS patients with 71% sensitivity and 82% specificity. Taken together, these results showed that the SS parotid glands were mostly hyperemic and the SS gland responses to gustatory stimulation were stronger and more prolonged than those of the healthy glands. The ASL may be a promising technique for assessing the diseased salivary gland vascularization of SS patients. PMID:26959680

  17. Clinical Neuroimaging Using Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Ronald L.; Detre, John A.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The two most common methods for measuring perfusion with MRI are based on dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL). Although clinical experience to date is much more extensive with DSC perfusion MRI, ASL methods offer several advantages. The primary advantages are that completely noninvasive absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements are possible with relative insensitivity to permeability, and that multiple repeated measurements can be obtained to evaluate one or more interventions or to perform perfusion-based functional MRI. ASL perfusion and perfusion-based fMRI methods have been applied in many clinical settings, including acute and chronic cerebrovascular disease, CNS neoplasms, epilepsy, aging and development, neurodegenerative disorders, and neuropsychiatric diseases. Recent technical advances have improved the sensitivity of ASL perfusion MRI, and increasing use is expected in the coming years. This review focuses on ASL perfusion MRI and applications in clinical neuroimaging. PMID:17599701

  18. Hepatic arterial spin labelling MRI: an initial evaluation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramasawmy, R; Campbell-Washburn, A E; Wells, J A; Johnson, S P; Pedley, R B; Walker-Samuel, S; Lythgoe, M F

    2015-01-01

    The development of strategies to combat hepatic disease and augment tissue regeneration has created a need for methods to assess regional liver function. Liver perfusion imaging has the potential to fulfil this need, across a range of hepatic diseases, alongside the assessment of therapeutic response. In this study, the feasibility of hepatic arterial spin labelling (HASL) was assessed for the first time in mice at 9.4 T, its variability and repeatability were evaluated, and it was applied to a model of colorectal liver metastasis. Data were acquired using flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery-arterial spin labelling (FAIR-ASL) with a Look–Locker readout, and analysed using retrospective respiratory gating and a T1-based quantification. This study shows that preclinical HASL is feasible and exhibits good repeatability and reproducibility. Mean estimated liver perfusion was 2.2 ± 0.8 mL/g/min (mean ± standard error, n = 10), which agrees well with previous measurements using invasive approaches. Estimates of the variation gave a within-session coefficient of variation (CVWS) of 7%, a between-session coefficient of variation (CVBS) of 9% and a between-animal coefficient of variation (CVA) of 15%. The within-session Bland–Altman repeatability coefficient (RCWS) was 18% and the between-session repeatability coefficient (RCBS) was 29%. Finally, the HASL method was applied to a mouse model of liver metastasis, in which significantly lower mean perfusion (1.1 ± 0.5 mL/g/min, n = 6) was measured within the tumours, as seen by fluorescence histology. These data indicate that precise and accurate liver perfusion estimates can be achieved using ASL techniques, and provide a platform for future studies investigating hepatic perfusion in mouse models of disease. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25522098

  19. Using arterial spin labeling to examine mood states in youth

    PubMed Central

    Mikita, Nina; Mehta, Mitul A; Zelaya, Fernando O; Stringaris, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the neural correlates of mood states and the specific physiological changes associated with their valence and duration, especially in young people. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) imaging is particularly well-suited to study sustained cerebral states in young people, due to its robustness to low-frequency drift, excellent interscan reliability, and noninvasiveness. Yet, it has so far been underutilized for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying mood states in youth. Methods In this exploratory study, 21 healthy adolescents aged 16 to 18 took part in a mood induction experiment. Neutral, sad, and happy mood states were induced using film clips and explicit instructions. An ASL scan was obtained following presentation of each film clip. Results Mood induction led to robust changes in self-reported mood ratings. Compared to neutral, sad mood was associated with increased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the left middle frontal gyrus and anterior prefrontal cortex, and decreased rCBF in the right middle frontal gyrus and the inferior parietal lobule. A decrease in self-reported mood from neutral to sad condition was associated with increased rCBF in the precuneus. Happy mood was associated with increased rCBF in medial frontal and cingulate gyri, the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, and ventral striatum, and decreased rCBF in the inferior parietal lobule. The level of current self-reported depressive symptoms was negatively associated with rCBF change in the cerebellum and lingual gyrus following both sad and happy mood inductions. Conclusions Arterial spin labeling is sensitive to experimentally induced mood changes in healthy young people. The effects of happy mood on rCBF patterns were generally stronger than the effects of sad mood. PMID:26085964

  20. Arterial Spin Labeling for Acute Stroke: Practical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling is a non-contrast method of measuring cerebral perfusion with MRI. It has several advantages over traditional contrast-based perfusion-weighted imaging, including non-invasiveness, more straightforward cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification, and repeatability. However, because of its lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) per unit time and its high sensitivity to arterial transit delays, it has not been used frequently in acute stroke, where arterial delays and time-efficiency are of the essence. This is beginning to change, driven by higher SNR implementations of ASL and the increasing use of 3T scanners. Furthermore, velocity selective ASL sequences that are largely insensitive to arrival times are beginning to be applied to patients with cerebrovascular disease, and promise the ability to quantify CBF even in regions supplied by late-arriving collateral flow. Despite these advances, many practical issues must be addressed to optimize ASL for use in acute stroke studies. These include optimizing the trade-off between time, SNR, imaging resolution, and sensitivity to slow flow. Rapid and robust post-processing of image data must be made routine, such that CBF maps are available in real-time so that they can be considered when making treatment decisions. Lastly, automated software needs to be developed to delineate hypoperfused tissue volumes, with attention to the inherent differences between gray and white matter CBF. Attention to these details is critical to translate this promising research tool into mainstream clinical trials and practice in acute stroke. PMID:24323778

  1. Pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling with optimized tagging efficiency.

    PubMed

    Shin, David D; Liu, Thomas T; Wong, Eric C; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Jung, Youngkyoo

    2012-10-01

    The adiabatic inversion of blood in pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) is highly sensitive to off-resonance effects and gradient imperfections and this sensitivity can lead to tagging efficiency loss and unpredictable variations in cerebral blood flow estimates. This efficiency loss is caused by a phase tracking error between the RF pulses and the flowing spins. This article introduces a new method, referred to as Optimized PCASL (OptPCASL), that minimizes the phase tracking error by applying an additional compensation RF phase term and in-plane gradients to the PCASL pulse train. The optimal RF phase and gradient amplitudes are determined using a prescan procedure, which consists of a series of short scans interleaved with automated postprocessing routines integrated to the scanner console. The prescan procedure is shown to minimize the phase tracking error in a robust and time efficient manner. As an example of its application, the use of OptPCASL for the improved detection of functional activation in the visual cortex is demonstrated and temporal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), image SNR, and baseline cerebral blood flow measures are compared to those acquired from conventional PCASL. PMID:22234782

  2. Diagnostic Potential of Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trebeschi, Stefano; Riederer, Isabelle; Preibisch, Christine; Bohn, Karl P.; Förster, Stefan; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S.; Valentinitsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimers disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Although the underlying pathology is still not completely understood, several diagnostic methods are available. Frequently, the most accurate methods are also the most invasive. The present work investigates the diagnostic potential of Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling (PASL) for AD: a non-invasive, MRI-based technique for the quantification of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In particular, we propose a pilot computer aided diagnostic (CAD) procedure able to discriminate between healthy and diseased subjects, and at the same time, providing visual informative results. This method encompasses the creation of a healthy model, the computation of a voxel-wise likelihood function as comparison between the healthy model and the subject under examination, and the correction of the likelihood function via prior distributions. The discriminant analysis is carried out to maximize the accuracy of the classification. The algorithm has been trained on a dataset of 81 subjects and achieved a sensitivity of 0.750 and a specificity of 0.875. Moreover, in accordance with the current pathological knowledge, the parietal lobe, and limbic system are shown to be the main discriminant factors. PMID:27147946

  3. Nonlinear magnetic field gradients can reduce SAR in flow-driven arterial spin labeling measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marro, Kenneth I.; Lee, Donghoon; Hyyti, Outi M.

    2007-03-01

    This work describes how custom-built gradient coils, designed to generate magnetic fields with amplitudes that vary nonlinearly with position, can be used to reduce the potential for unsafe tissue heating during flow-driven arterial spin labeling processes. A model was developed to allow detailed analysis of the adiabatic excitation process used for flow-driven arterial water stimulation with elimination of tissue signal (FAWSETS) an arterial spin labeling method developed specifically for use in skeletal muscle. The model predicted that, by adjusting the amplitude of the gradient field, the specific absorption rate could be reduced by more than a factor of 6 while still achieving effective labeling. Flow phantom measurements and in vivo measurements from exercising rat hind limb confirmed the accuracy of the model's predictions. The modeling tools were also applied to the more widely used continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) method and predicted that specially shaped gradients could allow similar reductions in SAR.

  4. KIC 4552982: outbursts and pulsations in the longest-ever pseudo-continuous light curve of a ZZ Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, K. J.; Hermes, J. J.; Bischoff-Kim, A.; Moorhead, S.; Castanheira, B. G.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.

    2015-09-01

    KIC 4552982 was the first ZZ Ceti (hydrogen-atmosphere pulsating white dwarf) identified to lie in the Kepler field, resulting in the longest pseudo-continuous light curve ever obtained for this type of variable star. In addition to the pulsations, this light curve exhibits stochastic episodes of brightness enhancement unlike any previously studied white dwarf phenomenon. We briefly highlight the basic outburst and pulsation properties in these proceedings.

  5. Optimization of 4D vessel-selective arterial spin labeling angiography using balanced steady-state free precession and vessel-encoding.

    PubMed

    Okell, Thomas W; Schmitt, Peter; Bi, Xiaoming; Chappell, Michael A; Tijssen, Rob H N; Sheerin, Fintan; Miller, Karla L; Jezzard, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Vessel-selective dynamic angiograms provide a wealth of useful information about the anatomical and functional status of arteries, including information about collateral flow and blood supply to lesions. Conventional x-ray techniques are invasive and carry some risks to the patient, so non-invasive alternatives are desirable. Previously, non-contrast dynamic MRI angiograms based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) have been demonstrated using both spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) and balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) readout modules, but no direct comparison has been made, and bSSFP optimization over a long readout period has not been fully explored. In this study bSSFP and SPGR are theoretically and experimentally compared for dynamic ASL angiography. Unlike SPGR, bSSFP was found to have a very low ASL signal attenuation rate, even when a relatively large flip angle and short repetition time were used, leading to a threefold improvement in the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency compared with SPGR. For vessel-selective applications, SNR efficiency can be further improved over single-artery labeling methods by using a vessel-encoded pseudo-continuous ASL (VEPCASL) approach. The combination of a VEPCASL preparation with a time-resolved bSSFP readout allowed the generation of four-dimensional (4D; time-resolved three-dimensional, 3D) vessel-selective cerebral angiograms in healthy volunteers with 59 ms temporal resolution. Good quality 4D angiograms were obtained in all subjects, providing comparable structural information to 3D time-of-flight images, as well as dynamic information and vessel selectivity, which was shown to be high. A rapid 1.5 min dynamic two-dimensional version of the sequence yielded similar image features and would be suitable for a busy clinical protocol. Preliminary experiments with bSSFP that included the extracranial vessels showed signal loss in regions of poor magnetic field homogeneity. However, for intracranial vessel

  6. Arterial Spin Labeling Measurements of Cerebral Perfusion Territories in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Renata F.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Henning, Erica C.; Nascimento, George C.; Tannús, Alberto; De Araújo, Dráulio B.; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Collateral circulation, defined as the supplementary vascular network that maintains cerebral blood flow (CBF) when the main vessels fail, constitutes one important defense mechanism of the brain against ischemic stroke. In the present study, continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) was used to quantify CBF and obtain perfusion territory maps of the major cerebral arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls. Results show that both WKY and SHR have complementary, yet significantly asymmetric perfusion territories. Right or left dominances were observed in territories of the anterior (ACA), middle and posterior cerebral arteries, and the thalamic artery. Magnetic resonance angiography showed that some of the asymmetries were correlated with variations of the ACA. The leptomeningeal circulation perfusing the outer layers of the cortex was observed as well. Significant and permanent changes in perfusion territories were obtained after temporary occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery in both SHR and WKY, regardless of their particular dominance. However, animals with right dominance presented a larger volume change of the left perfusion territory (23 ± 9%) than animals with left dominance (7 ± 5%, P < 0.002). The data suggest that animals with contralesional dominance primarily safeguard local CBF values with small changes in contralesional perfusion territory, while animals with ipsilesional dominance show a reversal of dominance and a substantial increase in contralesional perfusion territory. These findings show the usefulness of CASL to probe the collateral circulation. PMID:24323754

  7. KIC 4552982: Outbursts and Asteroseismology from the Longest Pseudo-continuous Light Curve of a ZZ Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Keaton J.; Hermes, J. J.; Bischoff-Kim, A.; Moorhead, Sean; Montgomery, M. H.; Østensen, Roy; Castanheira, Barbara G.; Winget, D. E.

    2015-08-01

    We present the Kepler light curve of KIC 4552982, the first ZZ Ceti (hydrogen-atmosphere pulsating white dwarf star) discovered in the Kepler field of view. Our data span more than 1.5 years, with a 86% duty cycle, making it the longest pseudo-continuous light curve ever recorded for a ZZ Ceti. This extensive data set provides the most complete coverage to date of amplitude and frequency variations in a cool ZZ Ceti. We detect 20 independent frequencies of variability in the data that we compare with asteroseismic models to demonstrate that this star has a mass {M}*\\gt 0.6 {M}ȯ . We identify a rotationally split pulsation mode and derive a probable rotation period for this star of 17.47 ± 0.04 hr. In addition to pulsation signatures, the Kepler light curve exhibits sporadic, energetic outbursts that increase the star’s relative flux by 2%–17%, last 4–25 hr, and recur on an average timescale of 2.7 days. These are the first detections of a new dynamic white dwarf phenomenon that may be related to the pulsations of this relatively cool ({T}{eff} \\=\\10,860+/- 120 K) ZZ Ceti star near the red edge of the instability strip.

  8. Validation of diffuse correlation spectroscopy for muscle blood flow with concurrent arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoqiang; Floyd, Thomas F.; Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2007-02-01

    Calf blood flow was measured simultaneously in healthy human subjects (n = 7) during cuff inflation and deflation using near-infrared diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI (ASL-MRI). The DCS and ASL-MRI data exhibited highly correlated absolute and relative dynamic flow responses in each individual (p < 0.001). Peak flow variations during hyperemia were also significantly correlated, though more for relative (p = 0.003) than absolute (p = 0.016) flow. Repeated measurement variation was less than 8% for both modalities. The results provide much needed quantitative blood flow validation of the diffuse optical correlation method in humans.

  9. [Assessment of brain perfusion by arterial spin-labeling MR imaging in qusai-moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisako; Kawatani, Masao; Ohta, Genrei; Kometani, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Yusei

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of 12-year-old girl with Graves' disease who had presented with deterioration in physical and scholastic performances since 10 years of age. She had an episode of atonic seizure and difficulty in speech. Brain MRI revealed formation of moyamoya vessels and a lesion suggestive of ischemic changes in the left frontal lobe. Because of uncontrollable thyrotoxicosis with anti-thyroid drug, she received a subtotal thyroidectomy. Two months later, she received a shunt operation between left superficial temporal artery and middle cerebral artery. The postoperative arterial spin-labeling MR imaging demonstrated an improvement of brain perfusion in left frontal lobe compared with the preoperative one, and provided comparable results of angiography and acetazolamide-challenged 150-gas PET. Thus, arterial spin-labeling MR imaging seems useful for follow-up evaluation of brain perfusion in qusai-moyamoya disease. PMID:25154228

  10. Challenges for non-invasive brain perfusion quantification using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Santos, N; Sanches, J; Figueiredo, P

    2011-03-29

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) sequences for perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have recently become available to be used in the clinical practice, offering a completely non-invasive technique for the quantitative evaluation of brain perfusion. Despite its great potential, ASL perfusion imaging still presents important methodological challenges before its incorporation in routine protocols. Specifically, in some pathological conditions in which the cerebrovascular dynamics is altered, the standard application of ASL may lead to measurement errors. In these cases, it would be possible to estimate perfusion, as well as arterial transit times, by collecting images at multiple time points and then fitting a mathematical model to the data. This approach can be optimized by selecting a set of optimal imaging time points and incorporating knowledge about the physiological distributions of the parameters into the model estimation procedures. In this study, we address the challenges that arise in the measurement of brain perfusion using PASL, due to variations in the arterial transit times, by estimating the errors produced using different types of acquisitions and proposing methods for minimizing such errors. We show by simulation that multiple inversion time ASL acquisitions are expected to reduce measurement errors relative to standard approaches. In data collected from a group of subjects, we further observed reduced inter-subject variability in perfusion measurements when using a multiple versus single inversion time acquisitions. Both measurement errors and variability were further reduced if optimized acquisition and analysis techniques were employed. PMID:24059574

  11. Measurement of vascular water transport in human subjects using time-resolved pulsed arterial spin labelling.

    PubMed

    Bibic, Adnan; Knutsson, Linda; Schmidt, Anders; Henningsson, Erik; Månsson, Sven; Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Åkeson, Jonas; Gunther, Matthias; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Wirestam, Ronnie

    2015-08-01

    Most approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) data analysis aim to provide a quantitative measure of the cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study, however, focuses on the measurement of the transfer time of blood water through the capillaries to the parenchyma (referred to as the capillary transfer time, CTT) as an alternative parameter to characterise the haemodynamics of the system. The method employed is based on a non-compartmental model, and no measurements need to be added to a common time-resolved ASL experiment. Brownian motion of labelled spins in a potential was described by a one-dimensional general Langevin equation as the starting point, and as a Fokker-Planck differential equation for the averaged distribution of labelled spins at the end point, which takes into account the effects of flow and dispersion of labelled water by the pseudorandom nature of the microvasculature and the transcapillary permeability. Multi-inversion time (multi-TI) ASL data were acquired in 14 healthy subjects on two occasions in a test-retest design, using a pulsed ASL sequence and three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (3D-GRASE) readout. Based on an error analysis to predict the size of a region of interest (ROI) required to obtain reasonably precise parameter estimates, data were analysed in two relatively large ROIs, i.e. the occipital lobe (OC) and the insular cortex (IC). The average values of CTT in OC were 260 ± 60 ms in the first experiment and 270 ± 60 ms in the second experiment. The corresponding IC values were 460 ± 130 ms and 420 ± 139 ms, respectively. Information related to the water transfer time may be important for diagnostics and follow-up of cerebral conditions or diseases characterised by a disrupted blood-brain barrier or disturbed capillary blood flow. PMID:26147641

  12. Comparing model-based and model-free analysis methods for QUASAR arterial spin labeling perfusion quantification.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Michael A; Woolrich, Mark W; Petersen, Esben T; Golay, Xavier; Payne, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Amongst the various implementations of arterial spin labeling MRI methods for quantifying cerebral perfusion, the QUASAR method is unique. By using a combination of labeling with and without flow suppression gradients, the QUASAR method offers the separation of macrovascular and tissue signals. This permits local arterial input functions to be defined and "model-free" analysis, using numerical deconvolution, to be used. However, it remains unclear whether arterial spin labeling data are best treated using model-free or model-based analysis. This work provides a critical comparison of these two approaches for QUASAR arterial spin labeling in the healthy brain. An existing two-component (arterial and tissue) model was extended to the mixed flow suppression scheme of QUASAR to provide an optimal model-based analysis. The model-based analysis was extended to incorporate dispersion of the labeled bolus, generally regarded as the major source of discrepancy between the two analysis approaches. Model-free and model-based analyses were compared for perfusion quantification including absolute measurements, uncertainty estimation, and spatial variation in cerebral blood flow estimates. Major sources of discrepancies between model-free and model-based analysis were attributed to the effects of dispersion and the degree to which the two methods can separate macrovascular and tissue signal. PMID:22711674

  13. Hypertension and cerebral vasoreactivity: a continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Ihab; Zhao, Peng; Alsop, David; Novak, Vera

    2010-11-01

    Hypertension is associated with microvascular and macrovascular brain injury but its direct influence on the cerebral circulation is not fully clear. Our objective was to investigate the association of hypertension with global and regional cerebral vasoreactivity to CO(2) using continuous arterial spin labeling MRI, independent of stroke and white matter hyperintensities. Participants (n=62; mean age: 66.7±1.0 years, 55% women, 84% white, 65% hypertension, 47% stroke) underwent arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI during normal breathing, 5% CO(2) rebreathing, and hyperventilation, as well as 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Vasoreactivity was the slope of the regression between cerebral perfusion and end-tidal CO(2). White matter hyperintensity volumes were quantified. Nighttime dipping was calculated as the percentage decline in nighttime/daytime blood pressure. After accounting for stroke and white matter hyperintensity volume, hypertensive participants had lower global vasoreactivity (1.11±0.13 versus 0.43±0.1 mL/100 g per minute per millimeter of mercury; P=0.0012). Regionally, this was significant in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. Higher mean systolic blood pressure was associated with lower vasoreactivity (decreased by 0.11 U/10-mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure; P=0.04), but nighttime dipping was not (P=0.2). The magnitude of decrease in vasoreactivity in hypertension without stroke was comparable to the magnitude of decrease in vasoreactivity in stroke without hypertension. Hypertension has a direct negative effect on the cerebrovascular circulation independent of white matter hyperintensities and stroke that is comparable to that seen with stroke. Because lower vasoreactivity is associated with poor outcomes, studies of the impact of antihypertensive on vasoreactivity are important. PMID:20876450

  14. Vessel-selective, non-contrast enhanced, time-resolved MR angiography with vessel-selective arterial spin labeling technique (CINEMA-SELECT) in intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanobu; Yoneyama, Masami; Tabuchi, Takashi; Takemura, Atsushi; Obara, Makoto; Tatsuno, Satoshi; Sawano, Seishi

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the vessel-selective, non-contrast, time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) technique, "contrast inherent inflow enhanced multi-phase angiography combining vessel-selective arterial spin labeling technique (CINEMA-SELECT)". This sequence consists of two major techniques: pulsed star labeling of arterial regions (PULSAR) and Look-Locker sampling. We hypothesize that this technique allows selective labeling of single intracranial arteries, consisting of high-resolution four-dimensional data with a wide coverage of the brain. In this study, a new vessel-selective, time-resolved angiographic technique is demonstrated that can produce individual angiograms non-invasively by labeling the principal arterial vessels proximal to the circle of Willis. Clear vessel delineation is achieved, and the separation of the three vessels is evident in healthy volunteers. This technique could play an important role in the assessment of the structure and hemodynamics of intracranial arteries without the use of contrast agents. PMID:23475783

  15. Multimodality evaluation of dural arteriovenous fistula with CT angiography, MR with arterial spin labeling, and digital subtraction angiography: case report.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew; McTaggart, Ryan; Santarelli, Justin; Fischbein, Nancy; Marks, Michael; Zaharchuk, Greg; Do, Huy

    2014-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF) are cerebrovascular lesions with pathologic shunting into the venous system from arterial feeders. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has long been considered the gold standard for diagnosis, but advances in noninvasive imaging techniques now play a role in the diagnosis of these complex lesions. Herein, we describe the case of a patient with right-side pulsatile tinnitus and DAVF diagnosed using computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance with arterial spin labeling, and DSA. Implications for imaging analysis of DAVFs and further research are discussed. PMID:23746119

  16. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe₂(MoO₄)₃

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Ji-Li; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Shi, Si-Qi; Shadike, Zulipiya; Huang, Xuan-Qi; Luo, Jun; Yang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao-Qing; et al

    2015-03-06

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na⁺ and Li⁺, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites inmore » partially sodiated Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ and Na/Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries.« less

  17. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe₂(MoO₄)₃

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ji-Li; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Shi, Si-Qi; Shadike, Zulipiya; Huang, Xuan-Qi; Luo, Jun; Yang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Fu, Zheng-Wen

    2015-03-06

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na⁺ and Li⁺, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites in partially sodiated Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ and Na/Fe₂(MoO₄)₃ cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries.

  18. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe2(MoO4)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Ji-Li; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Shi, Si-Qi; Shadike, Zulipiya; Huang, Xuan-Qi; Luo, Jun; Yang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Fu, Zheng-Wen

    2015-03-01

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe2(MoO4)3 electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na+ and Li+, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe2(MoO4)3 and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites in partially sodiated Fe2(MoO4)3 are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe2(MoO4)3 and Na/Fe2(MoO4)3 cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries.

  19. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe2(MoO4)3

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ji-Li; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Shi, Si-Qi; Shadike, Zulipiya; Huang, Xuan-Qi; Luo, Jun; Yang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Fu, Zheng-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe2(MoO4)3 electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na+ and Li+, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe2(MoO4)3 and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites in partially sodiated Fe2(MoO4)3 are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe2(MoO4)3 and Na/Fe2(MoO4)3 cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries. PMID:25744589

  20. Arterial spin tagging fMRI in continuous overt speech production compared to BOLD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemeny, Stefan; Ye, Frank; Braun, Allen

    2003-05-01

    Conventional BOLD fMRI has limited use in overt speech paradigms, due to movement and susceptibility artifacts. Our study used an arterial spin-tagging (AST) sequence to quantify focal brain activation in a continuous speech task. Furthermore, we compared the results to conventional BOLD fMRI. The ASSIST sequence was used to obtain transverse perfusion images of the brain, acquired on a 1.5T GE-Signa scanner. Three conditions were alternated in a block design: generation of complete sentences, nonsense syllables and rest with continuous and overt speech production. For 4 normal volunteers, task-related perfusion maps with quantified rCBF and rCBV values were calculated and activations were mapped to the MNI brain. The same paradigm was scanned with BOLD contrast fMRI in separate, independent scans and data from 6 subjects were analyzed using SPM99. Using the AST sequence, we could reliably identify focal brain activation in an overt continuous speech paradigm, and the activations observed were consistent with previous PET studies. We found differential activation at increasing levels of speech production with a focus in the left insula and opercular IFG related to the production of sentences at a syntactic level as opposed to nonsense syllable production. The BOLD technique failed to identify some of these activation foci, possibly due to decreased SNR and artifacts.

  1. Application of Arterial Spin Labelling in the Assessment of Ocular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pontré, B.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labelling (ASL) is a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modality, capable of measuring blood perfusion without the use of a contrast agent. While ASL implementation for imaging the brain and monitoring cerebral blood flow has been reviewed in depth, the technique is yet to be widely used for ocular tissue imaging. The human retina is a very thin but highly stratified structure and it is also situated close to the surface of the body which is not ideal for MR imaging. Hence, the application of MR imaging and ASL in particular has been very challenging for ocular tissues and retina. That is despite the fact that almost all of retinal pathologies are accompanied by blood perfusion irregularities. In this review article, we have focused on the technical aspects of the ASL and their implications for its optimum adaptation for retinal blood perfusion monitoring. Retinal blood perfusion has been assessed through qualitative or invasive quantitative methods but the prospect of imaging flow using ASL would increase monitoring and assessment of retinal pathologies. The review provides details of ASL application in human ocular blood flow assessment. PMID:27066501

  2. Partial volume correction for arterial spin labeling data using spatial-temporal information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Baojuan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Linchuan; Liang, Zhengrong; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-03-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) provides a noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Due to relatively low spatial resolution, the accuracy of CBF measurement is affected by the partial volume (PV) effect. In general ASL sequence, multiple scans of perfusion image pairs are acquired temporally to improve the signal to noise ratio. Several spatial PV correction methods have been proposed for the simple averaging of pair-difference images, while the perfusion information of gray matter and white matter existed in multiple image pairs was totally ignored. In this study, a statistical model of perfusion mixtures inside each voxel for the 4D ASL sequence is first proposed. To solve the model, a simplified method is proposed, in which the linear regression (LR) method is first used to obtain initial estimates of spatial correction, then an EM (expectation maximization) method is used to obtain accurate estimation using temporal information. The combination of LR and EM method (EM-LR) can effectively utilize the spatial-temporal information of ASL data for PV correction and provide a theoretical solution to estimate the perfusion mixtures. Both simulated and in vivo data were used to evaluate the performance of proposed method, which demonstrated its superiority on PV correction, edge preserving, and noise suppression.

  3. Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Perfusion for Traumatic Brain Injury: Technical Challenges and Potentials.

    PubMed

    Andre, Jalal B

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), including concussion, is a public health concern, as it affects over 1.7 million persons in the United States per year. Yet, the diagnosis of TBI, particularly mild TBI (mTBI), can be controversial, as neuroimaging findings can be sparse on conventional magnetic resonance and computed tomography examinations, and when present, often poorly correlate with clinical signs and symptoms. Furthermore, the discussion of TBI, concussion, and head impact exposure is immediately complicated by the many differing opinions of what constitutes each, their respective severities, and how the underlying biomechanics of the inciting head impact might alter the distribution, severity, and prognosis of the underlying brain injury. Advanced imaging methodologies hold promise in improving the sensitivity and detectability of associated imaging biomarkers that might better correlate with patient outcome and prognostication, allowing for improved triage and therapeutic guidance in the setting of TBI, particularly in mTBI. This work will examine the defining symptom complex associated with mTBI and explore changes in cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labeling, as a potential imaging biomarker for TBI, and briefly correlate these observations with findings identified by single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography imaging. PMID:26502309

  4. ASAP (Automatic Software for ASL Processing): A toolbox for processing Arterial Spin Labeling images.

    PubMed

    Mato Abad, Virginia; García-Polo, Pablo; O'Daly, Owen; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Zelaya, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The method of Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) has experienced a significant rise in its application to functional imaging, since it is the only technique capable of measuring blood perfusion in a truly non-invasive manner. Currently, there are no commercial packages for processing ASL data and there is no recognized standard for normalizing ASL data to a common frame of reference. This work describes a new Automated Software for ASL Processing (ASAP) that can automatically process several ASL datasets. ASAP includes functions for all stages of image pre-processing: quantification, skull-stripping, co-registration, partial volume correction and normalization. To assess the applicability and validity of the toolbox, this work shows its application in the study of hypoperfusion in a sample of healthy subjects at risk of progressing to Alzheimer's disease. ASAP requires limited user intervention, minimizing the possibility of random and systematic errors, and produces cerebral blood flow maps that are ready for statistical group analysis. The software is easy to operate and results in excellent quality of spatial normalization. The results found in this evaluation study are consistent with previous studies that find decreased perfusion in Alzheimer's patients in similar regions and demonstrate the applicability of ASAP. PMID:26612079

  5. 3D GRASE PROPELLER: Improved Image Acquisition Technique for Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huan; Hoge, W. Scott; Hamilton, Craig A.; Günther, Matthias; Kraft, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive technique that can quantitatively measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). While traditionally ASL employs 2D EPI or spiral acquisition trajectories, single-shot 3D GRASE is gaining popularity in ASL due to inherent SNR advantage and spatial coverage. However, a major limitation of 3D GRASE is through-plane blurring caused by T2 decay. A novel technique combining 3D GRASE and a PROPELLER trajectory (3DGP) is presented to minimize through-plane blurring without sacrificing perfusion sensitivity or increasing total scan time. Full brain perfusion images were acquired at a 3×3×5mm3 nominal voxel size with Q2TIPS-FAIR as the ASL preparation sequence. Data from 5 healthy subjects was acquired on a GE 1.5T scanner in less than 4 minutes per subject. While showing good agreement in CBF quantification with 3D GRASE, 3DGP demonstrated reduced through-plane blurring, improved anatomical details, high repeatability and robustness against motion, making it suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:21254211

  6. Acute changes in liver tumour perfusion measured non-invasively with arterial spin labelling

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S Peter; Ramasawmy, Rajiv; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; Wells, Jack A; Robson, Mathew; Rajkumar, Vineeth; Lythgoe, Mark F; Pedley, R Barbara; Walker-Samuel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-invasive measures of tumour vascular perfusion are desirable, in order to assess response to vascular targeting (or modifying) therapies. In this study, hepatic arterial spin labelling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated to measure acute changes in perfusion of colorectal cancer in the liver, in response to vascular disruption therapy with OXi4503. Methods: SW1222 and LS174T tumours were established in the liver of MF1 nu/nu mice via intrasplenic injection. Perfusion and R2* MRI measurements were acquired with an Agilent 9.4T horizontal bore scanner, before and at 90 min after 40 mg kg−1 OXi4503. Results: A significant decrease in SW1222 tumour perfusion was observed (−43±33%, P<0.005). LS174T tumours had a significantly lower baseline level of perfusion. Intrinsic susceptibility MRI showed a significant increase in R2* in LS174T tumours (28±25%, P<0.05). An association was found between the change in tumour perfusion and the proximity to large vessels, with pre-treatment blood flow predictive of subsequent response. Histological evaluation confirmed the onset of necrosis and evidence of heterogeneous response between tumour deposits. Conclusions: Hepatic ASL-MRI can detect acute response to targeted tumour vascular disruption entirely non-invasively. Hepatic ASL of liver tumours has potential for use in a clinical setting. PMID:27031853

  7. Regional Reproducibility of Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Imaging at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wang; Saykin, Andrew J.; Pfeuffer, Josef; Lin, Chen; Mosier, Kristine M.; Shen, Li; Kim, Sungeun; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a promising non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) or perfusion in vivo. To evaluate the feasibility of ASL as a biomarker for clinical trials, it is important to examine test-retest reproducibility. We investigated both inter- and intra-session reproducibility of perfusion MRI using a pulsed ASL (PASL) sequence PICORE Q2TIPS with an echo-planar imaging (EPI) readout. Structural MRI regions of interest (ROIs) were extracted individually by automated parcellation and segmentation methods using FreeSurfer. These cortical and subcortical ROIs were used to assess regional perfusion stability. Our results indicated regional variability in grey matter rCBF. Although rCBF measurements were characterized by intersubject variation, our results also indicated relatively less within-subject variability estimated as within-subject standard deviation (SDW) (intersession SDW: 2.0 to 8.8; intrasession SDW: 2.8 to 9.6) and acceptable reliabilities as measured using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (intersession ICC: 0.68 to 0.94; intrasession ICC: 0.66 to 0.95) for regional MRI perfusion measurements using the PICORE Q2TIPS technique. Overall, our findings suggest that PASL is a technique with good within and between session reproducibility. Further reproducibility studies in target populations relevant for specific clinical trials of neurovascular related agents will be important and the present results provide a framework for such assessments. PMID:20800097

  8. Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Study in the Patients with Subacute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Che-Ming; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Yan, Feng-Xian; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2016-01-01

    Background This study uses a MRI technique, three-dimension pulse continuous arterial spin labeling (3D-PCASL), to measure the patient’s cerebral blood flow (CBF) at the subacute stage of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in order to analyze the relationship between cerebral blood flow and neurocognitive deficits. Objective To provide the relationship between cortical CBF and neuropsychological dysfunction for the subacute MTBI patients. Methods After MTBI, perfusion MR imaging technique (3D-PCASL) measures the CBF of MTBI patients (n = 23) within 1 month and that of normal controls (n = 22) to determine the quantity and location of perfusion defect. The correlation between CBF abnormalities and cognitive deficits was elucidated by combining the results of the neuropsychological tests of the patients. Result We observed a substantial reduction in CBF in the bilateral frontal and left occipital cortex as compared with the normal persons. In addition, there were correlation between post concussive symptoms (including dizziness and simulator sickness) and CBF in the hypoperfused areas. The more severe symptom was correlated with higher CBF in bilateral frontal and left occipital lobes. Conclusion First, this study determined that despite no significant abnormality detected on conventional CT and MRI studies, hypoperfusion was observed in MTBI group using 3D-PCASL technique in subacute stage, which suggested that this approach may increase sensitivity to MTBI. Second, the correlation between CBF and the severity of post concussive symptoms suggested that changes in cerebral hemodynamics may play a role in pathophysiology underlies the symptoms. PMID:26871696

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Quantification of Pulmonary Perfusion using Calibrated Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Tatsuya J.; Prisk, G. Kim; Holverda, Sebastiaan; Sá, Rui Carlos; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Henderson, A. Cortney; Cronin, Matthew V.; Buxton, Richard B.; Hopkins, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    This demonstrates a MR imaging method to measure the spatial distribution of pulmonary blood flow in healthy subjects during normoxia (inspired O2, fraction (FIO2) = 0.21) hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.125), and hyperoxia (FIO2 = 1.00). In addition, the physiological responses of the subject are monitored in the MR scan environment. MR images were obtained on a 1.5 T GE MRI scanner during a breath hold from a sagittal slice in the right lung at functional residual capacity. An arterial spin labeling sequence (ASL-FAIRER) was used to measure the spatial distribution of pulmonary blood flow 1,2 and a multi-echo fast gradient echo (mGRE) sequence 3 was used to quantify the regional proton (i.e. H2O) density, allowing the quantification of density-normalized perfusion for each voxel (milliliters blood per minute per gram lung tissue). With a pneumatic switching valve and facemask equipped with a 2-way non-rebreathing valve, different oxygen concentrations were introduced to the subject in the MR scanner through the inspired gas tubing. A metabolic cart collected expiratory gas via expiratory tubing. Mixed expiratory O2 and CO2 concentrations, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, respiratory exchange ratio, respiratory frequency and tidal volume were measured. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were monitored using pulse-oximetry. Data obtained from a normal subject showed that, as expected, heart rate was higher in hypoxia (60 bpm) than during normoxia (51) or hyperoxia (50) and the arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) was reduced during hypoxia to 86%. Mean ventilation was 8.31 L/min BTPS during hypoxia, 7.04 L/min during normoxia, and 6.64 L/min during hyperoxia. Tidal volume was 0.76 L during hypoxia, 0.69 L during normoxia, and 0.67 L during hyperoxia. Representative quantified ASL data showed that the mean density normalized perfusion was 8.86 ml/min/g during hypoxia, 8.26 ml/min/g during normoxia and 8.46 ml/min/g during hyperoxia, respectively. In this subject, the

  10. Optimization of arterial spin labeling MRI for quantitative tumor perfusion in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Reshmi; Liang, Jieming; Tang, Mei Yee Annie; Henry, Brian; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2015-08-01

    Perfusion is an important biomarker of tissue function and has been associated with tumor pathophysiology such as angiogenesis and hypoxia. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI allows noninvasive and quantitative imaging of perfusion; however, the application in mouse xenograft tumor models has been challenging due to the low sensitivity and high perfusion heterogeneity. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL was optimized for a mouse xenograft tumor. To assess the sensitivity and reliability for measuring low perfusion, the lumbar muscle was used as a reference region. By optimizing the number of averages and inversion times, muscle perfusion as low as 32.4 ± 4.8 (mean ± standard deviation) ml/100 g/min could be measured in 20 min at 7 T with a quantification error of 14.4 ± 9.1%. Applying the optimized protocol, heterogeneous perfusion ranging from 49.5 to 211.2 ml/100 g/min in a renal carcinoma was observed. To understand the relationship with tumor pathology, global and regional tumor perfusion was compared with histological staining of blood vessels (CD34), hypoxia (CAIX) and apoptosis (TUNEL). No correlation was observed when the global tumor perfusion was compared with these pathological parameters. Regional analysis shows that areas of high perfusion had low microvessel density, which was due to larger vessel area compared with areas of low perfusion. Nonetheless, these were not correlated with hypoxia or apoptosis. The results suggest that tumor perfusion may reflect certain aspect of angiogenesis, but its relationship with other pathologies needs further investigation. PMID:26104980

  11. Default Mode Network Connectivity Encodes Clinical Pain: An Arterial Spin Labeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Loggia, Marco L.; Kim, Jieun; Gollub, Randy L.; Vangel, Mark G.; Kirsch, Irving; Kong, Jian; Wasan, Ajay D.; Napadow, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have suggested the presence of alterations in the anatomo-functional properties of the brain of patients with chronic pain. However, investigation of the brain circuitry supporting the perception of clinical pain presents significant challenges, particularly when using traditional neuroimaging approaches. While potential neuroimaging markers for clinical pain have included resting brain connectivity, these cross-sectional studies have not examined sensitivity to within-subject exacerbation of pain. We used the dual regression probabilistic Independent Component Analysis approach to investigate resting-state connectivity on Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) data. Brain connectivity was compared between patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) and healthy controls, before and after the performance of maneuvers aimed at exacerbating clinical pain levels in the patients. Our analyses identified multiple resting state networks, including the Default Mode Network (DMN). At baseline, patients demonstrated stronger DMN connectivity to the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC), left inferior parietal lobule and right insula (rINS). Patients’ baseline clinical pain correlated positively with connectivity strength between the DMN and right insula (DMN-rINS). The performance of calibrated physical maneuvers induced changes in pain, which were paralleled by changes in DMN-rINS connectivity. Maneuvers also disrupted the DMN-pgACC connectivity, which at baseline was anti-correlated with pain. Finally, baseline DMN connectivity predicted maneuver-induced changes in both pain and DMN-rINS connectivity. Our results support the use of ASL to evaluate clinical pain, and the use of resting DMN connectivity as a potential neuroimaging biomarker for chronic pain perception. PMID:23111164

  12. Prognostic value of blood flow measurements using arterial spin labeling in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Furtner, Julia; Bender, Benjamin; Braun, Christian; Schittenhelm, Jens; Skardelly, Marco; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2014-01-01

    The period of event-free survival (EFS) within the same histopathological glioma grades may have high variability, mainly without a known cause. The purpose of this study was to reveal the prognostic value of quantified tumor blood flow (TBF) values obtained by arterial spin labeling (ASL) for EFS in patients with histopathologically proven astrocytomas independent of WHO (World Health Organization) grade. Twenty-four patients with untreated gliomas underwent tumor perfusion quantification by means of pulsed ASL in 3T. The clinical history of the patients was retrospectively extracted from the local database. Six patients had to be excluded due to insufficent follow-up data for further evaluation or histopathologically verified oligodendroglioma tumor components. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to define an optimal cut-off value of maximum TBF (mTBF) values for subgrouping in low-perfused and high-perfused gliomas. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard regression model were used to determine the prognostic value of mTBF for EFS. An optimal mTBF cut-off value of 182 ml/100 g/min (sensitivity  = 83%, specificity  = 100%) was determined. Patients with low-perfused gliomas had significantly longer EFS compared to patients with high-perfused gliomas (p = 0.0012) independent of the WHO glioma grade. Quantified mTBF values obtained by ASL offer a new and totally non-invasive marker to prognosticate the EFS, independently on histopathological tumor grading, in patients with gliomas. PMID:24911025

  13. Prognostic Value of Blood Flow Measurements Using Arterial Spin Labeling in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Furtner, Julia; Bender, Benjamin; Braun, Christian; Schittenhelm, Jens; Skardelly, Marco; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2014-01-01

    The period of event-free survival (EFS) within the same histopathological glioma grades may have high variability, mainly without a known cause. The purpose of this study was to reveal the prognostic value of quantified tumor blood flow (TBF) values obtained by arterial spin labeling (ASL) for EFS in patients with histopathologically proven astrocytomas independent of WHO (World Health Organization) grade. Twenty-four patients with untreated gliomas underwent tumor perfusion quantification by means of pulsed ASL in 3T. The clinical history of the patients was retrospectively extracted from the local database. Six patients had to be excluded due to insufficent follow-up data for further evaluation or histopathologically verified oligodendroglioma tumor components. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to define an optimal cut-off value of maximum TBF (mTBF) values for subgrouping in low-perfused and high-perfused gliomas. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard regression model were used to determine the prognostic value of mTBF for EFS. An optimal mTBF cut-off value of 182 ml/100 g/min (sensitivity  = 83%, specificity  = 100%) was determined. Patients with low-perfused gliomas had significantly longer EFS compared to patients with high-perfused gliomas (p = 0.0012) independent of the WHO glioma grade. Quantified mTBF values obtained by ASL offer a new and totally non-invasive marker to prognosticate the EFS, independently on histopathological tumor grading, in patients with gliomas. PMID:24911025

  14. Quantifying fluctuations of resting state networks using arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weiying; Varma, Gopal; Scheidegger, Rachel; Alsop, David C

    2016-03-01

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to investigate spontaneous low-frequency signal fluctuations across brain resting state networks. However, BOLD only provides relative measures of signal fluctuations. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) MRI holds great potential for quantitative measurements of resting state network fluctuations. This study systematically quantified signal fluctuations of the large-scale resting state networks using ASL data from 20 healthy volunteers by separating them from global signal fluctuations and fluctuations caused by residual noise. Global ASL signal fluctuation was 7.59% ± 1.47% relative to the ASL baseline perfusion. Fluctuations of seven detected resting state networks vary from 2.96% ± 0.93% to 6.71% ± 2.35%. Fluctuations of networks and residual noise were 6.05% ± 1.18% and 6.78% ± 1.16% using 4-mm resolution ASL data applied with Gaussian smoothing kernel of 6mm. However, network fluctuations were reduced by 7.77% ± 1.56% while residual noise fluctuation was markedly reduced by 39.75% ± 2.90% when smoothing kernel of 12 mm was applied to the ASL data. Therefore, global and network fluctuations are the dominant structured noise sources in ASL data. Quantitative measurements of resting state networks may enable improved noise reduction and provide insights into the function of healthy and diseased brain. PMID:26661226

  15. Comparison of cerebral blood flow measurement with [15O]-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fan, Audrey P; Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cerebral blood flow provides critical information to understand normal brain physiology as well as to identify and manage patients with neurological disorders. To date, the reference standard for cerebral blood flow measurements is considered to be positron emission tomography using injection of the [(15)O]-water radiotracer. Although [(15)O]-water has been used to study brain perfusion under normal and pathological conditions, it is not widely used in clinical settings due to the need for an on-site cyclotron, the invasive nature of arterial blood sampling, and experimental complexity. As an alternative, arterial spin labeling is a promising magnetic resonance imaging technique that magnetically labels arterial blood as it flows into the brain to map cerebral blood flow. As arterial spin labeling becomes more widely adopted in research and clinical settings, efforts have sought to standardize the method and validate its cerebral blood flow values against positron emission tomography-based cerebral blood flow measurements. The purpose of this work is to critically review studies that performed both [(15)O]-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling to measure brain perfusion, with the aim of better understanding the accuracy and reproducibility of arterial spin labeling relative to the positron emission tomography reference standard. PMID:26945019

  16. Arterial spin-labeling imaging at 3-T in dural arteriovenous fistulas of cavernous sinus before and after endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Takahito; Shinagawa, Katsuhiro; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2012-12-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with chemosis and ophthalmoplegia due to dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF) of the cavernous sinus (CS). Preoperative arterial spin-labeling (ASL) image showed visible vein in the bilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). Endovascular transvenous embolization of the shunting points of the CS-DAVF was performed, and the postoperative angiogram showed complete obliteration of the CS-DAVF. Postoperative ASL showed no visible vein in the bilateral SOV. ASL in CS-DAVF was proved to have shown retrograde venous drainage from the CS-DAVF by comparing ASL before and after treatment. PMID:23342828

  17. Pseudo continuous wave instrument. [ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic properties and their changes in a sample of liquid, gas, plasma or solid are measured by applying a variable frequency source to the sample by means of a transducer to produce sound waves within the sample. The application of the variable frequency source to the sample is periodically interrupted for a short duration. Means are connected to the transducer for receiving the resulting acoustic signals during the interruptions for producing a control signal indicative of a difference in the frequency of the output of the variable frequency source and the frequency of a mechanical resonant peak in the sample. The control signal is applied to the variable frequency source to maintain its output frequency at the frequency of the mechanical resonant peak. The change in frequency of the variable frequency source indicates the shift in frequency of the mechanical resonant peak and the amplitude of the acoustic signals indicates the attenuation of the acoustic signals in the sample.

  18. Pulsed arterial spin labeling effectively and dynamically observes changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shu-ping; Li, Yi-ning; Liu, Jun; Wang, Zhi-yuan; Zhang, Zi-shu; Zhou, Shun-ke; Tao, Fang-xu; Zhang, Zhi-xue

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow is strongly associated with brain function, and is the main symptom and diagnostic basis for a variety of encephalopathies. However, changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury remain poorly understood. This study sought to observe changes in cerebral blood flow in different regions after mild traumatic brain injury using pulsed arterial spin labeling. Our results demonstrate maximal cerebral blood flow in gray matter and minimal in the white matter of patients with mild traumatic brain injury. At the acute and subacute stages, cerebral blood flow was reduced in the occipital lobe, parietal lobe, central region, subcutaneous region, and frontal lobe. Cerebral blood flow was restored at the chronic stage. At the acute, subacute, and chronic stages, changes in cerebral blood flow were not apparent in the insula. Cerebral blood flow in the temporal lobe and limbic lobe diminished at the acute and subacute stages, but was restored at the chronic stage. These findings suggest that pulsed arterial spin labeling can precisely measure cerebral blood flow in various brain regions, and may play a reference role in evaluating a patient's condition and judging prognosis after traumatic brain injury. PMID:27073378

  19. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M; Jung, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.

  20. Medullary hemangioblastoma in a child with von Hippel-Lindau disease: vascular tumor perfusion depicted by arterial spin labeling and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Ra, Young-Shin

    2015-07-01

    Medullary hemangioblastoma is very rare in children. Based on small nodular enhancement with peritumoral edema and without dilated feeding arteries on conventional MRI, hemangioblastoma, pilocytic astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and ganglioglioma were included in the differential diagnosis of the medullary tumor. In this case report, the authors emphasize the diagnostic value of arterial spin labeling and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in demonstrating vascular tumor perfusion of hemangioblastoma in a 12-year-old boy who was later found to have von Hippel-Lindau disease. PMID:25885801

  1. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87+/-0.95 mm and rotations of 1.56+/-0.66 degrees . Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4+/-7.5 [ml/100 g/min] with a between-subject standard variation SD(b)=5.5 [ml/100 g/min] and a within-subject standard deviation SD(w)=4.7 [ml/100 g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100 g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies. PMID:19660557

  2. 3D GRASE pulsed arterial spin labeling at multiple inflow times in patients with long arterial transit times: comparison with dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Steve Z; Madai, Vince I; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Federico C; Mutke, Matthias A; Bauer, Miriam; Herzig, Cornelius X; Hetzer, Stefan; Günther, Matthias; Sobesky, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) at multiple inflow times (multi-TIs) is advantageous for the measurement of brain perfusion in patients with long arterial transit times (ATTs) as in steno-occlusive disease, because bolus-arrival-time can be measured and blood flow measurements can be corrected accordingly. Owing to its increased signal-to-noise ratio, a combination with a three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (GRASE) readout allows acquiring a sufficient number of multi-TIs within a clinically feasible acquisition time of 5 minutes. We compared this technique with the clinical standard dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging–magnetic resonance imaging in patients with unilateral stenosis >70% of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery (MCA) at 3 Tesla. We performed qualitative (assessment by three expert raters) and quantitative (region of interest (ROI)/volume of interest (VOI) based) comparisons. In 43 patients, multi-TI PASL-GRASE showed perfusion alterations with moderate accuracy in the qualitative analysis. Quantitatively, moderate correlation coefficients were found for the MCA territory (ROI based: r=0.52, VOI based: r=0.48). In the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) territory, a readout related right-sided susceptibility artifact impaired correlation (ROI based: r=0.29, VOI based: r=0.34). Arterial transit delay artifacts were found only in 12% of patients. In conclusion, multi-TI PASL-GRASE can correct for arterial transit delay in patients with long ATTs. These results are promising for the transfer of ASL to the clinical practice. PMID:25407272

  3. The effect of black tea and caffeine on regional cerebral blood flow measured with arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, Rishma; Greyling, Arno; Draijer, Richard; Corfield, Douglas R; Parkes, Laura M

    2013-06-01

    Black tea consumption has been shown to improve peripheral vascular function. Its effect on brain vasculature is unknown, though tea contains small amounts of caffeine, a psychoactive substance known to influence cerebral blood flow (CBF). We investigated the effects on CBF due to the intake of tea components in 20 healthy men in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study. On separate days, subjects received a single dose of 184 mg caffeine (equivalent to one strong espresso coffee), 2,820 mg black tea solids containing 184 mg caffeine (equivalent to 6 cups of tea), 2,820 mg decaffeinated black tea solids, or placebo. The CBF and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to hypercapnia were measured with arterial spin labeled magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and 2 hours after administration. We found a significant global reduction with caffeine (20%) and tea (21%) in gray matter CBF, with no effect of decaffeinated tea, suggesting that only caffeine influences CBF acutely. Voxelwise analysis revealed the effect of caffeine to be regionally specific. None of the interventions had an effect on CVR. Additional research is required to conclude on the physiologic relevance of these findings and the chronic effects of caffeine and tea intake on CBF. PMID:23486295

  4. The effect of black tea and caffeine on regional cerebral blood flow measured with arterial spin labeling

    PubMed Central

    Vidyasagar, Rishma; Greyling, Arno; Draijer, Richard; Corfield, Douglas R; Parkes, Laura M

    2013-01-01

    Black tea consumption has been shown to improve peripheral vascular function. Its effect on brain vasculature is unknown, though tea contains small amounts of caffeine, a psychoactive substance known to influence cerebral blood flow (CBF). We investigated the effects on CBF due to the intake of tea components in 20 healthy men in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study. On separate days, subjects received a single dose of 184 mg caffeine (equivalent to one strong espresso coffee), 2,820 mg black tea solids containing 184 mg caffeine (equivalent to 6 cups of tea), 2,820 mg decaffeinated black tea solids, or placebo. The CBF and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to hypercapnia were measured with arterial spin labeled magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and 2 hours after administration. We found a significant global reduction with caffeine (20%) and tea (21%) in gray matter CBF, with no effect of decaffeinated tea, suggesting that only caffeine influences CBF acutely. Voxelwise analysis revealed the effect of caffeine to be regionally specific. None of the interventions had an effect on CVR. Additional research is required to conclude on the physiologic relevance of these findings and the chronic effects of caffeine and tea intake on CBF. PMID:23486295

  5. Arterial Spin Labeling of Cerebral Perfusion Territories Using a Separate Labeling Coil

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Fernando F.; Tannús, Alberto; Talagala, S. Lalith; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To obtain cerebral perfusion territories of the left, the right and the posterior circulation in humans with high SNR and robust delineation. Materials and Methods CASL was implemented using a dedicated RF coil, positioned over the neck, to label the major cerebral feeding arteries in humans. Selective labeling was achieved by flow-driven adiabatic fast passage and by tilting the longitudinal labeling gradient about the Y-axis by θ=±60°. Results Mean CBF values in gray and white matter were 74±13 ml·100g−1·min−1 and 14±13 ml·100g−1·min−1, respectively (N=14). There were no signal differences between left and right hemispheres when θ=0° (P>0.19), indicating efficient labeling of both hemispheres. When θ=+60°, the signal in GM on the left hemisphere, 0.07±0.06%, was 92% lower than on the right hemisphere, 0.85±0.30% (P<10−9), while for θ=−60°, the signal in the right hemisphere, 0.16±0.13%, was 82% lower than on the contralateral side, 0.89±0.22% (P<10−10). Similar attenuations were obtained in white matter. Conclusions Clear delineation of the left and right cerebral perfusion territories was obtained, allowing discrimination of the anterior and posterior circulation in each hemisphere. PMID:18425844

  6. Hippocampal blood flow in normal aging measured with arterial spin labeling at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Rusinek, Henry; Brys, Miroslaw; Glodzik, Lidia; Switalski, Remigiusz; Tsui, Wai-Hon; Haas, Francois; Mcgorty, Kellyanne; Chen, Qun; de Leon, Mony J.

    2011-01-01

    Due to methodological difficulties related to the small size, variable distribution of hippocampal arteries, and the location of the hippocampus in the proximity of middle cranial fossa, little is known about hippocampal blood flow (HBF). We have tested the utility of a pulsed ASL sequence based on multi-shot TrueFISP to measure HBF in 34 normal volunteers (17 women, 17 men, 26-92 years old). Flow sensitivity to a mild hypercapnic challenge was also examined. Coregistered 3D MPRAGE sequence was used to eliminate from hippocampal and cortical regions of interest all voxel with <75% of gray matter. Large blood vessels were also excluded. HBF in normal volunteers averaged 61.2±9.0 ml/(100g min). There was no statistically significant age or gender effect. Under a mild hypercapnia challenge (end tidal CO2 pressure increase of 6.8±1.9 mg Hg over the baseline), HBF response was 14.1±10.8 ml/(100g min), whereas cortical gray matter flow increased by 18.0±12.2 ml/(100g min). Flow response among women was significantly larger than in the men. The average absolute difference between two successive HBF measures was 3.6 ml/(100g min), or 5.4%. The 3T TrueFISP ASL method offers a HBF measurement strategy that combines good spatial resolution, sensitivity, and minimal image distortions. PMID:20939094

  7. Application of 3.0T magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) technology in mild and moderate intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHONGWEI; LI, NAIKUN; QU, YANYAN; GAI, FENG; ZHANG, GUOWEI; ZHANG, GUANGHUI

    2016-01-01

    The application value of 3.0T magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) technology in mild and moderate intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis was evaluated. A total of 58 cases of transient ischemic attack (TIA) and 60 cases of ischemic cerebral apoplexy cases were selected. The cases were analysed using a GE Healthcare Signa HDx 3.0T superconducting whole-body magnetic resonance scan within 24 h of attack. Eight-channel head phased array coils and conventional sequence were used to create T1-weighted images (T1WI), T2WI, diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and ASL imaging, which were generated into ASL pseudo-color images (blue was hypoperfusion area) through post-processing in order to compare and analyze the correlation and differences between ASL and conventional imaging in terms of lesion location, size, blood perfusion situation and signal range of relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The results showed that, 13 TIA cases of abnormal signal in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also be found through ASL technology. Diameter stenosis beyond 30% in MRA can also be tested in ASL. A positive rate in ASL was significantly higher than that of conventional MRI (χ2=29.078, P<0.001) and hypoperfusion area was greatly increased (t=32.526, P<0.001). The rCBF value was positively correlated with the degree of diameter stenosis shown in MRA (r=0.524, P=0.012). Additionally, the positive rate of ASL was positively correlated with the attack times of TIA (r=0.352, P=0.027). A total of 39 cerebral apoplexy cases of abnormal signal in conventional MRI were also found through ASL technology. A positive rate in ASL was significantly higher than that of conventional MRI (χ2=7.685, P=0.006) and hypoperfusion area was greatly increased (t=9.425, P<0.001). The rCBF value was positively correlated with the degree of diameter stenosis (r=0.635, P=0.009). In conclusion, 3.0T ASL correlated with early diagnosis of TIA and mild and

  8. The Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) database and analysis pipeline for arterial spin labeling MRI data

    PubMed Central

    Shin, David D.; Ozyurt, I. Burak; Liu, Thomas T.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that provides a non-invasive and quantitative measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF). After more than a decade of active research, ASL is now emerging as a robust and reliable CBF measurement technique with increased availability and ease of use. There is a growing number of research and clinical sites using ASL for neuroscience research and clinical care. In this paper, we present an online CBF Database and Analysis Pipeline, collectively called the Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) that allows researchers to upload and share ASL and clinical data. In addition to serving the role as a central data repository, the CBFBIRN provides a streamlined data processing infrastructure for CBF quantification and group analysis, which has the potential to accelerate the discovery of new scientific and clinical knowledge. All capabilities and features built into the CBFBIRN are accessed online using a web browser through a secure login. In this work, we begin with a general description of the CBFBIRN system data model and its architecture, then devote the remainder of the paper to the CBFBIRN capabilities. The latter part of our work is divided into two processing modules: (1) Data Upload and CBF Quantification Module; (2) Group Analysis Module that supports three types of analysis commonly used in neuroscience research. To date, the CBFBIRN hosts CBF maps and associated clinical data from more than 1,300 individual subjects. The data have been contributed by more than 20 different research studies, investigating the effect of various conditions on CBF including Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, traumatic brain injury, HIV, caffeine usage, and methamphetamine abuse. Several example results, generated by the CBFBIRN processing modules, are presented. We conclude with the lessons learned during implementation and deployment of the CBFBIRN and our

  9. The Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) database and analysis pipeline for arterial spin labeling MRI data.

    PubMed

    Shin, David D; Ozyurt, I Burak; Liu, Thomas T

    2013-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that provides a non-invasive and quantitative measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF). After more than a decade of active research, ASL is now emerging as a robust and reliable CBF measurement technique with increased availability and ease of use. There is a growing number of research and clinical sites using ASL for neuroscience research and clinical care. In this paper, we present an online CBF Database and Analysis Pipeline, collectively called the Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) that allows researchers to upload and share ASL and clinical data. In addition to serving the role as a central data repository, the CBFBIRN provides a streamlined data processing infrastructure for CBF quantification and group analysis, which has the potential to accelerate the discovery of new scientific and clinical knowledge. All capabilities and features built into the CBFBIRN are accessed online using a web browser through a secure login. In this work, we begin with a general description of the CBFBIRN system data model and its architecture, then devote the remainder of the paper to the CBFBIRN capabilities. The latter part of our work is divided into two processing modules: (1) Data Upload and CBF Quantification Module; (2) Group Analysis Module that supports three types of analysis commonly used in neuroscience research. To date, the CBFBIRN hosts CBF maps and associated clinical data from more than 1,300 individual subjects. The data have been contributed by more than 20 different research studies, investigating the effect of various conditions on CBF including Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, traumatic brain injury, HIV, caffeine usage, and methamphetamine abuse. Several example results, generated by the CBFBIRN processing modules, are presented. We conclude with the lessons learned during implementation and deployment of the CBFBIRN and our

  10. Partial volume correction of brain perfusion estimates using the inherent signal data of time-resolved arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Petersen, Esben Thade; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative perfusion MRI based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) is hampered by partial volume effects (PVEs), arising due to voxel signal cross-contamination between different compartments. To address this issue, several partial volume correction (PVC) methods have been presented. Most previous methods rely on segmentation of a high-resolution T1 -weighted morphological image volume that is coregistered to the low-resolution ASL data, making the result sensitive to errors in the segmentation and coregistration. In this work, we present a methodology for partial volume estimation and correction, using only low-resolution ASL data acquired with the QUASAR sequence. The methodology consists of a T1 -based segmentation method, with no spatial priors, and a modified PVC method based on linear regression. The presented approach thus avoids prior assumptions about the spatial distribution of brain compartments, while also avoiding coregistration between different image volumes. Simulations based on a digital phantom as well as in vivo measurements in 10 volunteers were used to assess the performance of the proposed segmentation approach. The simulation results indicated that QUASAR data can be used for robust partial volume estimation, and this was confirmed by the in vivo experiments. The proposed PVC method yielded probable perfusion maps, comparable to a reference method based on segmentation of a high-resolution morphological scan. Corrected gray matter (GM) perfusion was 47% higher than uncorrected values, suggesting a significant amount of PVEs in the data. Whereas the reference method failed to completely eliminate the dependence of perfusion estimates on the volume fraction, the novel approach produced GM perfusion values independent of GM volume fraction. The intra-subject coefficient of variation of corrected perfusion values was lowest for the proposed PVC method. As shown in this work, low-resolution partial volume estimation in connection with ASL perfusion

  11. Challenges to attention: A continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) study of the effects of distraction on sustained attention

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Elise; Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Sarter, Martin; Lustig, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining attention and performance over time is an essential part of many activities, and effortful cognitive control is required to avoid vigilance decrements and interference from distraction. Regions at or near right middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann’s area (BA) 9), as well as in other prefrontal and parietal areas, are often activated in studies of sustained attention (e.g., Cabeza & Nyberg, 2000; Kim et al., 2006; Lim et al., 2010). This activation has often been interpreted as representing the engagement of cognitive control processes. However, such studies are typically implemented at one level of task difficulty, without an experimental manipulation of control demands. The present study used the distractor condition sustained attention task (dSAT), which has been used extensively in animals to determine the role of neuromodulator systems in attentional performance, to test the hypotheses that BA 9 is sensitive to changes in the demand for cognitive control and that this sensitivity reflects an increased engagement of attentional effort. Continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to measure neural activity in sixteen healthy, young adults performing a sustained attention task under standard conditions and under a distraction condition that provided an experimental manipulation of demands on cognitive control. The distractor impaired behavioral performance and increased activation in right middle frontal gyrus. Larger increases in right middle frontal gyrus activity were associated with greater behavioral vulnerability to the distractor. These findings indicate that while right middle frontal gyrus regions are sensitive to demands for attentional effort and control, they may not be sufficient to maintain performance under challenge. In addition, they demonstrate the sensitivity of ASL methods to variations in task demands, and suggest that the dSAT may be a useful tool for translational cross-species and clinical research. PMID:20851189

  12. Cerebral blood flow quantification in the rat: a direct comparison of arterial spin labeling MRI with radioactive microsphere PET

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) has been recognised as a valuable method for non-invasive assessment of cerebral blood flow but validation studies regarding quantification accuracy by comparison against an accepted gold standard are scarce, especially in small animals. We have conducted the present study with the aim of comparing ASL flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR)-derived unidirectional water uptake (K1) and 68Ga/64Cu microsphere (MS)-derived blood flow (f) in the rat brain. Methods In 15 animals, K1and f were determined successively in dedicated small animal positron emission tomography and MR scanners. The Renkin-Crone model modified by a scaling factor was used for the quantification of f and K1. Results Below about 1 mL/min/mL, we obtain an approximately linear relationship between f and K1. At higher flow values, the limited permeability of water at the blood brain barrier becomes apparent. Within the accessed dynamic flow range (0.2 to 1.9 mL/min/mL), the data are adequately described by the Renkin-Crone model yielding a permeability surface area product of (1.53±0.46) mL/min/mL. Conclusion The ASL-FAIR technique is suitable for absolute blood flow quantification in the rat brain when using a one-compartment model including a suitable extraction correction for data evaluation. Trial registration 24-9168.21-4/2004-1 (registered in Freistadt Sachsen, Landesdirektion Dresden) PMID:22978819

  13. Voxel-level comparison of arterial spin-labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in adolescents with internet gaming addiction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although recent studies have clearly demonstrated functional and structural abnormalities in adolescents with internet gaming addiction (IGA), less is known about how IGA affects perfusion in the human brain. We used pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling (ASL) perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the effects of IGA on resting brain functions by comparing resting cerebral blood flow in adolescents with IGA and normal subjects. Methods Fifteen adolescents with IGA and 18 matched normal adolescents underwent structural and perfusion fMRI in the resting state. Direct subtraction, voxel-wise general linear modeling was performed to compare resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) between the 2 groups. Correlations were calculated between the mean CBF value in all clusters that survived AlphaSim correction and the Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS) scores, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11) scores, or hours of Internet use per week (hours) in the 15 subjects with IGA. Results Compared with control subjects, adolescents with IGA showed significantly higher global CBF in the left inferior temporal lobe/fusiform gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus/amygdala, right medial frontal lobe/anterior cingulate cortex, left insula, right insula, right middle temporal gyrus, right precentral gyrus, left supplementary motor area, left cingulate gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobe. Lower CBF was found in the left middle temporal gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus, and right cingulate gyrus. There were no significant correlations between mean CBF values in all clusters that survived AlphaSim correction and CIAS or BIS-11 scores or hours of Internet use per week. Conclusions In this study, we used ASL perfusion fMRI and noninvasively quantified resting CBF to demonstrate that IGA alters the CBF distribution in the adolescent brain. The results support the hypothesis that IGA is a behavioral addiction that may share similar neurobiological

  14. Cerebral blood flow changes in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients: an arterial-spin labeling MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao Lu; Wen, Ji Qiu; Zhang, Long Jiang; Zheng, Gang; Li, Xue; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Ya; Zheng, Li Juan; Wu, Long; Chen, Hui Juan; Kong, Xiang; Luo, Song; Lu, Guang Ming; Ji, Xue Man; Zhang, Zong Jun

    2016-08-01

    We used arterial-spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging, a non-invasive technique to evaluate cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD), and nondialysis ESRD patients compared with healthy cohort. Ninety seven ESRD patients including 32 PD patients (20 male, 12 female; mean age 33 ± 8 years), 33 HD patients (22 male, 11 female; mean age 33 ± 8 years) and 32 nondialysis patients (20 male, 12 female; mean age 35 ± 7 years) and 31 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (20 male, 11 female; mean age 32 ± 8 years) were included in this study. All subjects underwent ASL MR imaging, neuropsychologic tests, and ESRD patients underwent laboratory testing. CBF values were compared among PD, HD, nondialysis patients and control groups. Correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis were performed to investigate the association between CBF values and hemoglobin, neuropsychologic test results, serum creatinine, urea levels, disease duration, and dialysis duration. Elevated CBFs of whole brain region, gray matter, and white matter were found in all ESRD patient groups compared with healthy controls (all P < 0.001). However, compared with non-dialysis ESRD patients, both PD and HD patients had widespread regional CBF decline mainly in bilateral frontal and anterior cingulate cortices. There were no differences for CBF between PD and HD patient groups. Negative correlations were observed between mean CBFs of whole brain region, gray matter, and white matter and the hemoglobin level in all ESRD patients. Multiple linear regression showed elevated CBF of multiple brain areas correlated with some neuropsychological tests in ESRD patients (all P < 0.001, AlphaSim corrected), but the association was not present or shrank after adjusting hemoglobin level. This study found that mean CBF was predominantly increased in patients with ESRD, which correlated with their

  15. Time-resolved Non-contrast Enhanced 4-D Dynamic MRA using Multi-bolus TrueFISP based Spin Tagging with Alternating Radiofrequency (True-STAR)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lirong; Salamon, Noriko; Wang, Danny JJ

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the present study was to introduce a new non-contrast enhanced 4D dynamic MR angiography (dMRA) technique termed multi-bolus TrueFISP based spin tagging with alternating radiofrequency (TrueSTAR). Methods Multi-bolus TrueSTAR was developed by taking advantage of the phenomenon that the steady-state signal of TrueFISP is minimally disturbed by periodically inserted magnetization preparations (e.g., spin tagging) that are sandwiched by 2 α/2 RF pulses. Both theoretical analysis and experimental studies were carried out to optimize the proposed method which was compared with both pulsed and pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) based dMRA in healthy volunteers. Optimized multi-bolus dMRA was also applied in a patient with arteriovenous malformation (AVM) to demonstrate its potential clinical utility. Results Multi-bolus dMRA offered a prolonged tagging bolus compared to the standard single-bolus dMRA, and allowed improved visualization of the draining veins in the AVM patient. Compared to pCASL based dMRA, multi-bolus dMRA provided visualization of the full passage of the labeled blood with the flexibility for both static and dynamic MRA. Conclusion By combining the benefits of pulsed and pCASL based dMRA, multi-bolus TrueSTAR can prolong and enhance the tagging bolus without sacrificing imaging speed or temporal resolution. PMID:23440649

  16. In vivo quantification of hyperoxic arterial blood water T1.

    PubMed

    Siero, Jeroen C W; Strother, Megan K; Faraco, Carlos C; Hoogduin, Hans; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Donahue, Manus J

    2015-11-01

    Normocapnic hyperoxic and hypercapnic hyperoxic gas challenges are increasingly being used in cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) and calibrated functional MRI experiments. The longitudinal arterial blood water relaxation time (T1a) change with hyperoxia will influence signal quantification through mechanisms relating to elevated partial pressure of plasma-dissolved O2 (pO2) and increased oxygen bound to hemoglobin in arteries (Ya) and veins (Yv). The dependence of T1a on Ya and Yv has been elegantly characterized ex vivo; however, the combined influence of pO2, Ya and Yv on T1a in vivo under normal ventilation has not been reported. Here, T1a is calculated during hyperoxia in vivo by a heuristic approach that evaluates T1 -dependent arterial spin labeling (ASL) signal changes to varying gas stimuli. Healthy volunteers (n = 14; age, 31.5 ± 7.2 years) were scanned using pseudo-continuous ASL in combination with room air (RA; 21% O2/79% N2), hypercapnic normoxic (HN; 5% CO2/21% O2/74% N2) and hypercapnic hyperoxic (HH; 5% CO2/95% O2) gas administration. HH T1a was calculated by requiring that the HN and HH cerebral blood flow (CBF) change be identical. The HH protocol was then repeated in patients (n = 10; age, 61.4 ± 13.3 years) with intracranial stenosis to assess whether an HH T1a decrease prohibited ASL from being performed in subjects with known delayed blood arrival times. Arterial blood T1a decreased from 1.65 s at baseline to 1.49 ± 0.07 s during HH. In patients, CBF values in the affected flow territory for the HH condition were increased relative to baseline CBF values and were within the physiological range (RA CBF = 36.6 ± 8.2 mL/100 g/min; HH CBF = 45.2 ± 13.9 mL/100 g/min). It can be concluded that hyperoxic (95% O2) 3-T arterial blood T1aHH = 1.49 ± 0.07 s relative to a normoxic T1a of 1.65 s. PMID:26419505

  17. Patterns of postictal cerebral perfusion in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: a multi-delay multi-parametric arterial spin labelling perfusion MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangxiang; Lei, Du; Ren, Jiechuan; Zuo, Panli; Suo, Xueling; Wang, Danny J. J.; Wang, Meiyun; Zhou, Dong; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral haemodynamic status of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is a very complicated process. Little attention has been paid to cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations in IGE detected by arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the selection of an optimal delay time is difficult for single-delay ASL. Multi-delay multi-parametric ASL perfusion MRI overcomes the limitations of single-delay ASL. We applied multi-delay multi-parametric ASL perfusion MRI to investigate the patterns of postictal cerebral perfusion in IGE patients with absence seizures. A total of 21 IGE patients with absence seizures and 24 healthy control subjects were enrolled. IGE patients exhibited prolonged arterial transit time (ATT) in the left superior temporal gyrus. The mean CBF of IGE patients was significantly increased in the left middle temporal gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus and left fusiform gyrus. Prolonged ATT in the left superior temporal gyrus was negatively correlated with the age at onset in IGE patients. This study demonstrated that cortical dysfunction in the temporal lobe and fusiform gyrus may be related to epileptic activity in IGE patients with absence seizures. This information can play an important role in elucidating the pathophysiological mechanism of IGE from a cerebral haemodynamic perspective. PMID:27374369

  18. [Abnormal cerebral blood flow distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus in three pediatric patients measured by arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiko; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2016-05-01

    The ability to visualize brain perfusion is important for identifying epileptic foci. We present three pediatric cases showing asymmetrical cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. During the acute phase, regional CBF measurements in the areas considered including epileptic foci were higher than in the corresponding area of the contralateral hemisphere, though the exact quantitative value varied between cases. We could not identify the correct epileptogenic foci, because those ASL images were taken after the prolonged and extraordinary activation of neurons in the affected area. During the recovery phase, the differences reduced and the average regional CBF measurement was 54.6 ± 6.1 ml/100 g per minute, which was a little less than the number of previous ASL studies. ASL perfusion MRI imaging provides a method for evaluating regional CBF by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. With this technique, we can repeatedly evaluate both the brain structure and the level of perfusion at the same time. ASL is noninvasive and easily accessible, and therefore it could become a routine tool for assessment of perfusion in daily practice of pediatric neurology. PMID:27349086

  19. Quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamic parameters by QUASAR arterial spin labeling in Alzheimer's disease and cognitively normal Elderly adults at 3-tesla.

    PubMed

    Mak, Henry K F; Chan, Queenie; Zhang, Zhipeng; Petersen, Esben T; Qiu, Deqiang; Zhang, Linda; Yau, Kelvin K W; Chu, Leung-Wing; Golay, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    QUASAR arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to investigate the role of vascular impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that the hemodynamic parameters monitoring cerebrovascular integrity, i.e., cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood volume (aBV), and arterial transit time (aTT), would be affected. 13 AD patients and 15 healthy control (HC) subjects underwent 3T MRI scanning. Two separate blood flow acquisitions were obtained with 1 slice overlap for whole brain coverage. CBF, aBV, and aTT maps were calculated using in-house software. Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed on SPM5. Region-of-interest (ROI) studies of ten selected cerebral regions were also conducted. There were significant differences in mini mental status exam (MMSE) (AD: 16.3 ± 4.55, HC: 28.5 ± 2.00) and Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) scores (AD: 25.25 ± 9.64, HC: 5.51 ± 2.62) between the 2 groups (p < 0.001) but none in age (p = 0.068). CBF decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in AD compared to controls in the right middle cingulate, left cuneus, left inferior and middle frontal, right superior frontal, left inferior parietal, and right supramarginal gyri. ROI studies confirmed significant hemodynamic impairments in AD compared to HC (p < 0.05): CBF in middle and posterior cingulate, aBV in left superior temporal, right inferior parietal, and posterior cingulate, and aTT in left inferior frontal and middle cingulate gyri. CBF correlated positively while aTT correlated negatively to MMSE, and vice versa for ADAS-cog. Using QUASAR ASL, we found patterns of regional hemodynamic impairment typical of moderate AD, suggesting underlying vascular abnormality. As potential biomarkers, these hemodynamic parameters could differentiate patients from volunteers, and possibly indicate the conversion from healthy aging to mild cognitive impairment to AD. PMID:22504315

  20. Optimization of 4D vessel‐selective arterial spin labeling angiography using balanced steady‐state free precession and vessel‐encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Peter; Bi, Xiaoming; Chappell, Michael A.; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; Sheerin, Fintan; Miller, Karla L.; Jezzard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Vessel‐selective dynamic angiograms provide a wealth of useful information about the anatomical and functional status of arteries, including information about collateral flow and blood supply to lesions. Conventional x‐ray techniques are invasive and carry some risks to the patient, so non‐invasive alternatives are desirable. Previously, non‐contrast dynamic MRI angiograms based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) have been demonstrated using both spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) and balanced steady‐state free precession (bSSFP) readout modules, but no direct comparison has been made, and bSSFP optimization over a long readout period has not been fully explored. In this study bSSFP and SPGR are theoretically and experimentally compared for dynamic ASL angiography. Unlike SPGR, bSSFP was found to have a very low ASL signal attenuation rate, even when a relatively large flip angle and short repetition time were used, leading to a threefold improvement in the measured signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR) efficiency compared with SPGR. For vessel‐selective applications, SNR efficiency can be further improved over single‐artery labeling methods by using a vessel‐encoded pseudo‐continuous ASL (VEPCASL) approach. The combination of a VEPCASL preparation with a time‐resolved bSSFP readout allowed the generation of four‐dimensional (4D; time‐resolved three‐dimensional, 3D) vessel‐selective cerebral angiograms in healthy volunteers with 59 ms temporal resolution. Good quality 4D angiograms were obtained in all subjects, providing comparable structural information to 3D time‐of‐flight images, as well as dynamic information and vessel selectivity, which was shown to be high. A rapid 1.5 min dynamic two‐dimensional version of the sequence yielded similar image features and would be suitable for a busy clinical protocol. Preliminary experiments with bSSFP that included the extracranial vessels showed signal loss in regions of poor magnetic field

  1. Nicotine and Non-Nicotine Smoking Factors Differentially Modulate Craving, Withdrawal and Cerebral Blood Flow as Measured with Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Addicott, Merideth A; Froeliger, Brett; Kozink, Rachel V; Van Wert, Dana M; Westman, Eric C; Rose, Jed E; McClernon, Francis J

    2014-01-01

    Smoking cessation results in withdrawal symptoms such as craving and negative mood that may contribute to lapse and relapse. Little is known regarding whether these symptoms are associated with the nicotine or non-nicotine components of cigarette smoke. Using arterial spin labeling, we measured resting-state cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 29 adult smokers across four conditions: (1) nicotine patch+denicotinized cigarette smoking, (2) nicotine patch+abstinence from smoking, (3) placebo patch+denicotinized cigarette smoking, and (4) placebo patch+abstinence from smoking. We found that changes in self-reported craving positively correlated with changes in CBF from the denicotinized cigarette smoking conditions to the abstinent conditions. These correlations were found in several regions throughout the brain. Self-reported craving also increased from the nicotine to the placebo conditions, but had a minimal relationship with changes in CBF. The results of this study suggest that the non-nicotine components of cigarette smoke significantly impact withdrawal symptoms and associated brain areas, independently of the effects of nicotine. As such, the effects of non-nicotine factors are important to consider in the design and development of smoking cessation interventions and tobacco regulation. PMID:24820539

  2. Nicotine and non-nicotine smoking factors differentially modulate craving, withdrawal and cerebral blood flow as measured with arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Addicott, Merideth A; Froeliger, Brett; Kozink, Rachel V; Van Wert, Dana M; Westman, Eric C; Rose, Jed E; McClernon, Francis J

    2014-11-01

    Smoking cessation results in withdrawal symptoms such as craving and negative mood that may contribute to lapse and relapse. Little is known regarding whether these symptoms are associated with the nicotine or non-nicotine components of cigarette smoke. Using arterial spin labeling, we measured resting-state cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 29 adult smokers across four conditions: (1) nicotine patch+denicotinized cigarette smoking, (2) nicotine patch+abstinence from smoking, (3) placebo patch+denicotinized cigarette smoking, and (4) placebo patch+abstinence from smoking. We found that changes in self-reported craving positively correlated with changes in CBF from the denicotinized cigarette smoking conditions to the abstinent conditions. These correlations were found in several regions throughout the brain. Self-reported craving also increased from the nicotine to the placebo conditions, but had a minimal relationship with changes in CBF. The results of this study suggest that the non-nicotine components of cigarette smoke significantly impact withdrawal symptoms and associated brain areas, independently of the effects of nicotine. As such, the effects of non-nicotine factors are important to consider in the design and development of smoking cessation interventions and tobacco regulation. PMID:24820539

  3. Noncontrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) intracranial MR angiography using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling and accelerated 3D radial acquisition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huimin; Block, Walter F; Turski, Patrick A; Mistretta, Charles A; Johnson, Kevin M

    2013-03-01

    Pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) can be used to generate noncontrast magnetic resonance angiograms of the cerebrovascular structures. Previously described PCASL-based angiography techniques were limited to two-dimensional projection images or relatively low-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging due to long acquisition time. This work proposes a new PCASL-based 3D magnetic resonance angiography method that uses an accelerated 3D radial acquisition technique (VIPR, spoiled gradient echo) as the readout. Benefiting from the sparsity provided by PCASL and noise-like artifacts of VIPR, this new method is able to obtain submillimeter 3D isotropic resolution and whole head coverage with a 8-min scan. Intracranial angiography feasibility studies in healthy (N = 5) and diseased (N = 5) subjects show reduced saturation artifacts in PCASL-VIPR compared with a standard time-of-flight protocol. These initial results show great promise for PCASL-VIPR for static, dynamic, and vessel selective 3D intracranial angiography. PMID:22532423

  4. Computer-aided classification of patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type based on cerebral blood flow determined with arterial spin labeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasuo; Arimura, Hidetaka; Yoshiura, Takashi; Tokunaga, Chiaki; Magome, Taiki; Monji, Akira; Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Toyofuku, Fukai; Oki, Masafumi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is one of promising non-invasive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF). The aim of this study was to develop a computer-aided classification system for AD patients based on CBFs measured by the ASL technique. The average CBFs in cortical regions were determined as functional image features based on the CBF map image, which was non-linearly transformed to a Talairach brain atlas by using a free-form deformation. An artificial neural network (ANN) was trained with the CBF functional features in 10 cortical regions, and was employed for distinguishing patients with AD from control subjects. For evaluation of the method, we applied the proposed method to 20 cases including ten AD patients and ten control subjects, who were scanned a 3.0-Tesla MR unit. As a result, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve obtained by the proposed method was 0.893 based on a leave-one-out-by-case test in identification of AD cases among 20 cases. The proposed method would be feasible for classification of patients with AD.

  5. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning. PMID:26844450

  6. Quantitative spatial comparison of diffuse optical imaging with blood oxygen level-dependent and arterial spin labeling-based functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Theodore J.; Hoge, Rick D.; Dale, Anders M.; Franceschini, Maria A.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Akin to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is a noninvasive method for measuring localized changes in hemoglobin levels within the brain. When combined with fMRI methods, multimodality approaches could offer an integrated perspective on the biophysics, anatomy, and physiology underlying each of the imaging modalities. Vital to the correct interpretation of such studies, control experiments to test the consistency of both modalities must be performed. Here, we compare DOI with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling fMRI-based methods in order to explore the spatial agreement of the response amplitudes recorded by these two methods. Rather than creating optical images by regularized, tomographic reconstructions, we project the fMRI image into optical measurement space using the optical forward problem. We report statistically better spatial correlation between the fMRI-BOLD response and the optically measured deoxyhemoglobin (R=0.71, p=1 × 10−7) than between the BOLD and oxyhemoglobin or total hemoglobin measures (R=0.38, p=0.04|0.37, p=0.05, respectively). Similarly, we find that the correlation between the ASL measured blood flow and optically measured total and oxyhemoglobin is stronger (R=0.73, p=5 × 10−6 and R=0.71, p=9 × 10−6, respectively) than the flow to deoxyhemoglobin spatial correlation (R=0.26, p=0.10). PMID:17212541

  7. Patient-Specific Detection of Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by Arterial Spin Labeling in Drug-Resistant Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Del Felice, Alessandra; Pizzini, Francesca Benedetta; Arcaro, Chiara; Formaggio, Emanuela; Mai, Roberto; Chappell, Michael; Beltramello, Alberto; Manganotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological and hemodynamic data can be integrated to accurately and precisely identify the generators of abnormal electrical activity in drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for quantitative noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), can provide a direct measure of variations in cerebral perfusion associated with the epileptic focus. In this study, we aimed to confirm the ASL diagnostic value in the identification of the epileptogenic zone, as compared to electrical source imaging (ESI) results, and to apply a template-based approach to depict statistically significant CBF alterations. Standard video-electroencephalography (EEG), high-density EEG, and ASL were performed to identify clinical seizure semiology and noninvasively localize the epileptic focus in 12 drug-resistant focal epilepsy patients. The same ASL protocol was applied to a control group of 17 healthy volunteers from which a normal perfusion template was constructed using a mixed-effect approach. CBF maps of each patient were then statistically compared to the reference template to identify perfusion alterations. Significant hypo- and hyperperfused areas were identified in all cases, showing good agreement between ASL and ESI results. Interictal hypoperfusion was observed at the site of the seizure in 10/12 patients and early postictal hyperperfusion in 2/12. The epileptic focus was correctly identified within the surgical resection margins in the 5 patients who underwent lobectomy, all of which had good postsurgical outcomes. The combined use of ESI and ASL can aid in the noninvasive evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients. PMID:25946055

  8. OP04QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF BLOOD FLOW IN PAEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOURS - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DYNAMIC SUSCEPTIBILITY CONTRAST AND MULTI-TIMEPOINT ARTERIAL SPIN LABEL IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, L.J.; Vidyasagar, R.; Pizer, B.L.; Mallucci, C.L.; Avula, S.; Parkes, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a MR technique that allows for noninvasive quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF). This technique, predominately used in research, has seen significant technical developments in the last few years that have led to more clinical applications. Currently, the main MR method used to provide perfusion measures in brain tumours is dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC). DSC traces the signal changes caused by the transit of a bolus of gadolinium contrast agent. ASL has the advantage of not requiring bolus injection of contrast. We have performed a comparative study of DSC and multi-timepoint ASL in paediatric brain tumours (PBT). METHOD: Data from a total of 19 PBT patients (mean age: 9 ± 5 years; 10 females, 9 males) were included in the analyses for this study. Data used were from first presentation scans performed before any surgical intervention. Comparisons of the quantitative measures of CBF and blood arrival time between the two techniques were carried out to test the feasibility of ASL to provide useful quantification measures of CBF in PBT. RESULTS: DSC measurements of tumour blood flow showed a significant decrease in flow in comparison with normal brain, but this is not seen with ASL. There was a strong correlation between ASL and DSC measures of blood flow in normal brain (r = 0.65, p = 0.009), but not in tumour blood flow (r = 0.33, p = 0.2). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the feasibility and potential utility of ASL as a non-invasive technique for measuring blood flow in PBT. However, there is a discrepancy between ASL and DSC measures, that may be due to leakage of gadolinium contrast, reflecting the abnormal characteristics of tumour blood vessels in PBT.

  9. Interhemispheric Cerebral Blood Flow Balance during Recovery of Motor Hand Function after Ischemic Stroke—A Longitudinal MRI Study Using Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Missimer, John; Schroth, Gerhard; Hess, Christian W.; Sturzenegger, Matthias; Wang, Danny J. J.; Weder, Bruno; Federspiel, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Unilateral ischemic stroke disrupts the well balanced interactions within bilateral cortical networks. Restitution of interhemispheric balance is thought to contribute to post-stroke recovery. Longitudinal measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes might act as surrogate marker for this process. Objective To quantify longitudinal CBF changes using arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL) and interhemispheric balance within the cortical sensorimotor network and to assess their relationship with motor hand function recovery. Methods Longitudinal CBF data were acquired in 23 patients at 3 and 9 months after cortical sensorimotor stroke and in 20 healthy controls using pulsed ASL. Recovery of grip force and manual dexterity was assessed with tasks requiring power and precision grips. Voxel-based analysis was performed to identify areas of significant CBF change. Region-of-interest analyses were used to quantify the interhemispheric balance across nodes of the cortical sensorimotor network. Results Dexterity was more affected, and recovered at a slower pace than grip force. In patients with successful recovery of dexterous hand function, CBF decreased over time in the contralesional supplementary motor area, paralimbic anterior cingulate cortex and superior precuneus, and interhemispheric balance returned to healthy control levels. In contrast, patients with poor recovery presented with sustained hypoperfusion in the sensorimotor cortices encompassing the ischemic tissue, and CBF remained lateralized to the contralesional hemisphere. Conclusions Sustained perfusion imbalance within the cortical sensorimotor network, as measured with task-unrelated ASL, is associated with poor recovery of dexterous hand function after stroke. CBF at rest might be used to monitor recovery and gain prognostic information. PMID:25191858

  10. Reproducibility of Kidney Perfusion Measurements With Arterial Spin Labeling at 1.5 Tesla MRI Combined With Semiautomatic Segmentation for Differential Cortical and Medullary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hammon, Matthias; Janka, Rolf; Siegl, Christian; Seuss, Hannes; Grosso, Roberto; Martirosian, Petros; Schmieder, Roland E.; Uder, Michael; Kistner, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a noninvasive approach to measure organ perfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of ASL kidney perfusion measurements with semiautomatic segmentation, which allows separate quantification of cortical and medullary perfusion. The right kidneys of 14 healthy volunteers were examined 6 times on 2 occasions (3 times at each occasion). There was a 10-minute pause between each examination and a 14-day interval between the 2 occasions. Cortical, medullary, and whole kidney parenchymal perfusion was determined with customized semiautomatic segmentation software. Coefficient of variances (CVs) and intraclass correlations (ICCs) were calculated. Mean whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion was 307.26 ± 25.65, 337.10 ± 34.83, and 279.61 ± 26.73 mL/min/100 g, respectively. On session 1, mean perfusion for the whole kidney, cortex, and medulla was 307.08 ± 26.91, 336.79 ± 36.54, and 279.60 ± 27.81 mL/min/100 g, respectively, and on session 2, 307.45 ± 24.65, 337.41 ± 33.48, and 279.61 ± 25.94 mL/min/100 g, respectively (P > 0.05; R2 = 0.60/0.59/0.54). For whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion, the total ICC/CV were 0.97/3.43 ± 0.86%, 0.97/4.19 ± 1.33%, and 0.96/4.12 ± 1.36%, respectively. Measurements did not differ significantly and showed a very good correlation (P > 0.05; R2 = 0.75/0.76/0.65). ASL kidney measurements combined with operator-independent semiautomatic segmentation revealed high correlation and low variance of cortical, medullary, and whole kidney perfusion. PMID:26986143

  11. Reproducibility of Kidney Perfusion Measurements With Arterial Spin Labeling at 1.5 Tesla MRI Combined With Semiautomatic Segmentation for Differential Cortical and Medullary Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Matthias; Janka, Rolf; Siegl, Christian; Seuss, Hannes; Grosso, Roberto; Martirosian, Petros; Schmieder, Roland E; Uder, Michael; Kistner, Iris

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a noninvasive approach to measure organ perfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of ASL kidney perfusion measurements with semiautomatic segmentation, which allows separate quantification of cortical and medullary perfusion.The right kidneys of 14 healthy volunteers were examined 6 times on 2 occasions (3 times at each occasion). There was a 10-minute pause between each examination and a 14-day interval between the 2 occasions. Cortical, medullary, and whole kidney parenchymal perfusion was determined with customized semiautomatic segmentation software. Coefficient of variances (CVs) and intraclass correlations (ICCs) were calculated.Mean whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion was 307.26 ± 25.65, 337.10 ± 34.83, and 279.61 ± 26.73 mL/min/100 g, respectively. On session 1, mean perfusion for the whole kidney, cortex, and medulla was 307.08 ± 26.91, 336.79 ± 36.54, and 279.60 ± 27.81 mL/min/100 g, respectively, and on session 2, 307.45 ± 24.65, 337.41 ± 33.48, and 279.61 ± 25.94 mL/min/100 g, respectively (P > 0.05; R = 0.60/0.59/0.54). For whole, cortical, and medullary kidney perfusion, the total ICC/CV were 0.97/3.43 ± 0.86%, 0.97/4.19 ± 1.33%, and 0.96/4.12 ± 1.36%, respectively. Measurements did not differ significantly and showed a very good correlation (P > 0.05; R = 0.75/0.76/0.65).ASL kidney measurements combined with operator-independent semiautomatic segmentation revealed high correlation and low variance of cortical, medullary, and whole kidney perfusion. PMID:26986143

  12. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... the artery (arterial bypass) to create a second source of blood supply Clot removal through a balloon catheter placed into the affected artery or through open surgery on the artery (embolectomy) Opening of the ...

  13. The Effects of Acutely Administered 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine on Spontaneous Brain Function in Healthy Volunteers Measured with Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level–Dependent Resting State Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Murphy, Kevin; Leech, Robert; Erritzoe, David; Wall, Matthew B.; Ferguson, Bart; Williams, Luke T.J.; Roseman, Leor; Brugger, Stefan; De Meer, Ineke; Tanner, Mark; Tyacke, Robin; Wolff, Kim; Sethi, Ajun; Bloomfield, Michael A.P.; Williams, Tim M.; Bolstridge, Mark; Stewart, Lorna; Morgan, Celia; Newbould, Rexford D.; Feilding, Amanda; Curran, H. Val; Nutt, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The compound 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a potent monoamine releaser that produces an acute euphoria in most individuals. Methods In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced-order study, MDMA was orally administered to 25 physically and mentally healthy individuals. Arterial spin labeling and seed-based resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) were used to produce spatial maps displaying changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and RSFC after MDMA administration. Participants underwent two arterial spin labeling and two blood oxygen level–dependent scans in a 90-minute scan session; MDMA and placebo study days were separated by 1 week. Results Marked increases in positive mood were produced by MDMA. Decreased CBF only was observed after MDMA, and this was localized to the right medial temporal lobe (MTL), thalamus, inferior visual cortex, and the somatosensory cortex. Decreased CBF in the right amygdala and hippocampus correlated with ratings of the intensity of global subjective effects of MDMA. The RSFC results complemented the CBF results, with decreases in RSFC between midline cortical regions, the medial prefrontal cortex, and MTL regions, and increases between the amygdala and hippocampus. There were trend-level correlations between these effects and ratings of intense and positive subjective effects. Conclusions The MTLs appear to be specifically implicated in the mechanism of action of MDMA, but further work is required to elucidate how the drug’s characteristic subjective effects arise from its modulation of spontaneous brain activity. PMID:24495461

  14. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous blood) mainly in its content of dissolved gases . Testing arterial blood shows the makeup of the ... arteries. Blood samples are mainly taken to measure gases in the arteries. Abnormal results may point to ...

  15. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance hybrid scanner imaging of cerebral blood flow using 15O-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in newborn piglets

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Julie B; Henning, William S; Lindberg, Ulrich; Ladefoged, Claes N; Højgaard, Liselotte; Greisen, Gorm; Law, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Abnormality in cerebral blood flow (CBF) distribution can lead to hypoxic–ischemic cerebral damage in newborn infants. The aim of the study was to investigate minimally invasive approaches to measure CBF by comparing simultaneous 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET) and single TI pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MR) on a hybrid PET/MR in seven newborn piglets. Positron emission tomography was performed with IV injections of 20 MBq and 100 MBq 15O-water to confirm CBF reliability at low activity. Cerebral blood flow was quantified using a one-tissue-compartment-model using two input functions: an arterial input function (AIF) or an image-derived input function (IDIF). The mean global CBF (95% CI) PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL at baseline were 27 (23; 32), 34 (31; 37), and 27 (22; 32) mL/100 g per minute, respectively. At acetazolamide stimulus, PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 64 (55; 74), 76 (70; 83) and 79 (67; 92) mL/100 g per minute, respectively. At baseline, differences between PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 22% (P<0.0001) and −0.7% (P=0.9). At acetazolamide, differences between PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 19% (P=0.001) and 24% (P=0.0003). In conclusion, PET-IDIF overestimated CBF. Injected activity of 20 MBq 15O-water had acceptable concordance with 100 MBq, without compromising image quality. Single TI ASL was questionable for regional CBF measurements. Global ASL CBF and PET CBF were congruent during baseline but not during hyperperfusion. PMID:26058699

  16. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity correlates with cortical perfusion parameters determined by bolus tracking arterial spin labelling (bt-ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the Wistar Kyoto rat.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Shane; Rouine, Jennifer; McIntosh, Allison; Kerskens, Christian; Harkin, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in astrocyte number and function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric disorders. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool in the animal laboratory has enabled an investigation of the relationship between pathological and neuroimaging markers in animal models. However the physiological processes which underlie these markers and their role in mediating behavioural deficits is still poorly understood. Rodent models have provided us with important insights into physiological and cellular mechanisms which may mediate anxiety and depression-related behaviours. The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat is a strain which endogenously expresses highly anxious and depressive-like behaviours and has previously been reported to exhibit alterations in immunoreactivity for the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in brain sub-regions relative to more stress resilient out-bred strains. Here we report that the depressive and anxiety-like behaviours exhibited by the WKY rat strain are associated with alterations in brain morphology including a decrease in hippocampal volume, coupled with reduced resting state frontal cortical perfusion as assessed by MR bolus tracking arterial spin labelling (bt-ASL) relative to the out-bred Wistar strain. Pre-limbic cortical GFAP immunoreactivity and astrocyte cell number were positively correlated with cortical blood perfusion in the WKY strain. These experiments provide a link between pathological and neuroimaging markers of aberrant astrocytic function and add validity to the WKY rat as a model for co-morbid anxiety and depression. PMID:27068181

  17. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  18. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  19. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... limit tissue damage. Alternative Names Blood sample - arterial ... by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, ...

  20. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... rial line can provide valuable information to adjust oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilator (respirator; breathing machine) settings. The blood oxygen pres- sure measures from an arterial line give ...

  1. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  2. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dead bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... The arteries that supply blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta, the main artery from the heart. ...

  3. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  4. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the heart is smaller because it pumps blood only to the lungs. The left coronary artery, ... heart is larger and more muscular because it pumps blood to the rest of the body. Updated August ...

  5. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  6. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  7. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  8. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... Hardening of the arteries often occurs with aging. As you grow older, ... narrows your arteries and makes them stiffer. These changes ...

  9. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ischemia is often seen in people who have hardening of the arteries in other parts of the ... long-term (chronic) mesenteric artery ischemia caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ): Abdominal pain after eating ...

  10. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  11. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  12. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  13. Blood Tracer Kinetics in the Arterial Tree

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Elias; Gall, Peter; Günther, Matthias; Reisert, Marco; Mader, Irina; Fleysher, Roman; Kiselev, Valerij G.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of blood supply of different organs relies on labeling blood with a suitable tracer. The tracer kinetics is linear: Tracer concentration at an observation site is a linear response to an input somewhere upstream the arterial flow. The corresponding impulse response functions are currently treated empirically without incorporating the relation to the vascular morphology of an organ. In this work we address this relation for the first time. We demonstrate that the form of the response function in the entire arterial tree is reduced to that of individual vessel segments under approximation of good blood mixing at vessel bifurcations. The resulting expression simplifies significantly when the geometric scaling of the vascular tree is taken into account. This suggests a new way to access the vascular morphology in vivo using experimentally determined response functions. However, it is an ill-posed inverse problem as demonstrated by an example using measured arterial spin labeling in large brain arteries. We further analyze transport in individual vessel segments and demonstrate that experimentally accessible tracer concentration in vessel segments depends on the measurement principle. Explicit expressions for the response functions are obtained for the major middle part of the arterial tree in which the blood flow in individual vessel segments can be treated as laminar. When applied to the analysis of regional cerebral blood flow measurements for which the necessary arterial input is evaluated in the carotid arteries, present theory predicts about 20% underestimation, which is in agreement with recent experimental data. PMID:25299048

  14. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  15. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  16. Spin ejector

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Flanigan, John J.; Kindley, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus for spin ejecting a body having a flat plate base containing bosses. The apparatus has a base plate and a main ejection shaft extending perpendicularly from the base plate. A compressible cylindrical spring is disposed about the shaft. Bearings are located between the shaft and the spring. A housing containing a helical aperture releasably engages the base plate and surrounds the shaft bearings and the spring. A piston having an aperture follower disposed in the housing aperture is seated on the spring and is guided by the shaft and the aperture. The spring is compressed and when released causes the piston to spin eject the body.

  17. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  18. Spin pumping and spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Eiji

    2012-02-01

    Utilization of a spin current, a flow of electrons' spins in a solid, is the key technology in spintronics that will allow the achievement of efficient magnetic memories and computing devices. In this technology, generation and detection of spin currents are necessary. Here, we review inverse spin-Hall effect and spin-current-generation phenomena recently discovered both in metals and insulators: inverse spin-Hall effect, spin pumping, and spin Seebeck effect. (1)Spin pumping and spin torque in a Mott insulator system We found that spin pumping and spin torque effects appear also at an interface between Pt and an insulator YIG.. This means that we can connect a spin current carried by conduction electrons and a spin-wave spin current flowing in insulators. We demonstrate electric signal transmission by using these effects and interconversion of the spin currents [1]. (2) Spin Seebeck effect We have observed, by using the inverse spin-Hall effect [2], spin voltage generation from a heat current in a NiFe, named the spin-Seebeck effect [3]. Surprisingly, spin-Seebeck effect was found to appear even in insulators [4], a situation completely different from conventional charge Seebeck effect. The result implies an important role of elementary excitation in solids beside charge in the spin Seebeck effect. In the talk, we review the recent progress of the research on this effect. This research is collaboration with K. Ando, K. Uchida, Y. Kajiwara, S. Maekawa, G. E. W. Bauer, S. Takahashi, and J. Ieda. [4pt] [1] Y. Kajiwara and E. Saitoh et al. Nature 464 (2010) 262. [0pt] [2] E. Saitoh et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 (2006) 182509. [0pt] [3] K. Uchida and E. Saitoh et al., Nature 455 (2008)778. [0pt] [4] K. Uchida and E. Saitoh et al.,Nature materials 9 (2010) 894 - 897.

  19. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  20. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  1. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... These blockages are more likely if there is hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) in the eye. Clots ... Blindness and vision loss Blood clots Diabetes Glaucoma Hardening of the arteries High blood cholesterol levels High ...

  2. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to ...

  3. Carotid artery surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000238.htm Carotid artery surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had carotid artery surgery to restore proper blood flow to your ...

  4. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100124.htm Carotid artery surgery - series To use the sharing features on ... 4 Normal anatomy Overview There are four carotid arteries, with a pair located on each side of ...

  5. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007315.htm Coronary artery fistula To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Coronary artery fistula is an abnormal connection between one of ...

  6. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  7. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  8. Combination of Rare Right Arterial Variation with Anomalous Origins of the Vertebral Artery, Aberrant Subclavian Artery and Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, H.; San Millán Ruíz, D.; Abdo, G.; Asakura, F.; Yilmaz, H.; Lovblad, K.O.; Rüfenacht, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary A 32-year-old woman hospitalized for subarachnoid hemorrhage showed rare arterial variation on the right side with anomalous origins of the vertebral artery, aberrant subclavian artery and persistent trigeminal artery. Angiography showed the right vertebral artery to originate from the right common carotid artery, the right subclavian artery to arise separately from the descending aorta, and persistent trigeminal artery on the right side. The possible embryonic mechanism of this previously unreported variant combination is discussed. PMID:22005696

  9. Emergent spin

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Quantum mechanics and relativity in the continuum imply the well known spin–statistics connection. However for particles hopping on a lattice, there is no such constraint. If a lattice model yields a relativistic field theory in a continuum limit, this constraint must “emerge” for physical excitations. We discuss a few models where a spin-less fermion hopping on a lattice gives excitations which satisfy the continuum Dirac equation. This includes such well known systems such as graphene and staggered fermions. -- Highlights: •The spin–statistics theorem is not required for particles on a lattice. •Spin emerges dynamically when spinless fermions have a relativistic continuum limit. •Graphene and staggered fermions are examples of this phenomenon. •The phenomenon is intimately tied to chiral symmetry and fermion doubling. •Anomaly cancellation is a crucial feature of any valid lattice fermion action.

  10. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  11. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  12. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  13. Acute Arterial Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dagnone, L. E.; Brown, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the primary care physician in the initial assessment and management of acute arterial injuries will often be the deciding factor in survival of life, limb or organ system. Most arterial emergencies occur as a result of trauma, disruption of vessel wall and/or occlusion of flow. The common clinical syndromes of acute arterial emergencies are injuries to and beyond the aorta, acute aortic dissection, ruptured aortic aneurysm, and thromboembolic occlusive arterial disease. The role of arteriography and the urgency of definitive surgical repair in acute arterial emergencies is summarized. PMID:21283323

  14. Spin injection into semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestreich, M.; Hübner, J.; Hägele, D.; Klar, P. J.; Heimbrodt, W.; Rühle, W. W.; Ashenford, D. E.; Lunn, B.

    1999-03-01

    The injection of spin-polarized electrons is presently one of the major challenges in semiconductor spin electronics. We propose and demonstrate a most efficient spin injection using diluted magnetic semiconductors as spin aligners. Time-resolved photoluminescence with a Cd0.98Mn0.02Te/CdTe structure proves the feasibility of the spin-alignment mechanism.

  15. Spin noise in mixed Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Erik; Junghyun, Paul; Singh, Swati; Devakul, Trithep; Feguin, Adrian; Hart, Connor; Walsworth, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    The spin noise due to interaction of multiple spin species in mixed spin systems provides a fundamental limit to ultra-sensitive ensemble sensing and quantum information applications. In our work, we investigate the interaction of dense nuclear 13C spins with electronic nitrogen spins using Nitrogen-Vacancy centers in diamond. Our work shows experimentally and theoretically, that under certain conditions, spin noise is greatly suppressed and the coherence time of NV centers improved by order of magnitudes, providing a pathway to engineering high density ensemble samples with long coherence times at room temperature.

  16. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... if they have a history of: Abnormal cholesterol Diabetes Heart disease (coronary artery disease) High blood pressure ( hypertension ) Kidney disease involving hemodialysis Smoking Stroke ( cerebrovascular disease )

  17. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  18. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  19. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  20. Spin-Spin Coupling in Asteroidal Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Gravitationally bound binaries constitute a substantial fraction of the small body population of the solar system, and characterization of their rotational states is instrumental to understanding their formation and dynamical evolution. Unlike planets, numerous small bodies can maintain a perpetual aspheroidal shape, giving rise to a richer array of non-trivial gravitational dynamics. In this work, we explore the rotational evolution of triaxial satellites that orbit permanently deformed central objects, with specific emphasis on quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. Our analysis shows that in addition to conventional spin-orbit resonances, both prograde and retrograde spin-spin resonances naturally arise for closely orbiting, highly deformed bodies. Application of our results to the illustrative examples of (87) Sylvia and (216) Kleopatra multi-asteroid systems implies capture probabilities slightly below ~10% for leading-order spin-spin resonances. Cumulatively, our results suggest that spin-spin coupling may be consequential for highly elongated, tightly orbiting binary objects.

  1. Spin-liquid condensate of spinful bosons.

    PubMed

    Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shoucheng

    2014-08-22

    We introduce the concept of a bosonic spin liquid condensate (SLC), where spinful bosons in a lattice form a zero-temperature spin disordered charge condensate that preserves the spin rotation symmetry, but breaks the U(1) symmetry due to a spinless order parameter with charge one. It has an energy gap to all the spin excitations. We show that such SLC states can be realized in a system of spin S ≥ 2 bosons. In particular, we analyze the SLC phase diagram in the spin 2 case using a mean-field variational wave function method. We show there is a direct analogy between the SLC and the resonating-valence-bond state. PMID:25192078

  2. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  3. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  4. Bilateral popliteal arterial dissection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Liang; Ko, Shih-Yu; Tan, Ken-Hing

    2012-01-01

    A clinical feature of bilateral popliteal arterial dissection without involving the descending aorta, bilateral iliac, as well as femoral arteries has never been reported in the past literature. We report a 56-year-old man with hypertension and coronary artery disease who presented to our emergency department with complaints of bilateral knee pain after long-distance walking. Physical examination was notable for elevated blood pressure, but there was no palpable pulsation over dorsalis pedis arteries on his feet. Laboratory evaluation revealed a d-dimer level of 35.2 mg/L (FEU) on the day of the test and 1.2 mg/L one and a half months ago (normal level, <0.55). These findings were suggestive of a recent-onset peripheral arterial occlusive disorder. Computed tomography of the aorta showed bilateral popliteal arterial dissection with arterial intimal flap. Abdominal aorta, bilateral iliac, and femoral arteries remained intact with only arteriosclerotic change. Minimally invasive endovascular stent grafting was then performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery. PMID:21106320

  5. Weak Radial Artery Pulse

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Poothirikovil; Sivakumar, Puthuval; Ardley, Robert G.; Oates, Crispian

    2012-01-01

    We present an 11year-old boy with a weak right radial pulse, and describe the successful application of vascular ultrasound to identify the ulnar artery dominance and a thin right radial artery with below normal Doppler flow velocity that could explain the discrepancy. The implications of identifying this anomaly are discussed. PMID:22375269

  6. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small balloon on its tip. They inflate the balloon at the blockage site in the carotid artery to flatten or compress the plaque against the artery wall. Carotid angioplasty is often combined with the placement of a small, metal, mesh-like device called a stent. When a stent is placed inside of a ...

  7. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  8. RHIC SPIN FLIPPER

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; ROSER, T.

    2007-06-25

    This paper proposes a new design of spin flipper for RHIC to obtain full spin flip with the spin tune staying at half integer. The traditional technique of using an rf dipole or solenoid as spin flipper to achieve full spin flip in the presence of full Siberian snake requires one to change the snake configuration to move the spin tune away from half integer. This is not practical for an operational high energy polarized proton collider like RHIC where beam lifetime is sensitive to small betatron tune change. The design of the new spin flipper as well as numerical simulations are presented.

  9. Spin projection chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, E. P.; Pastawski, H. M.; Levstein, P. R.

    2004-01-01

    We formulate the many-body spin dynamics at high temperature within the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism. For the simplest XY interaction, analytical expressions in terms of the one particle solutions are obtained for linear and ring configurations. For small rings of even spin number, the group velocities of excitations depend on the parity of the total spin projection. This should enable a dynamical filtering of spin projections with a given parity i.e., a spin projection chromatography.

  10. Magnons, Spin Current and Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2012-02-01

    When metals and semiconductors are placed in a temperature gradient, the electric voltage is generated. This mechanism to convert heat into electricity, the so-called Seebeck effect, has attracted much attention recently as the mechanism for utilizing wasted heat energy. [1]. Ferromagnetic insulators are good conductors of spin current, i.e., the flow of electron spins [2]. When they are placed in a temperature gradient, generated are magnons, spin current and the spin voltage [3], i.e., spin accumulation. Once the spin voltage is converted into the electric voltage by inverse spin Hall effect in attached metal films such as Pt, the electric voltage is obtained from heat energy [4-5]. This is called the spin Seebeck effect. Here, we present the linear-response theory of spin Seebeck effect based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem [6-8] and discuss a variety of the devices. [4pt] [1] S. Maekawa et al, Physics of Transition Metal Oxides (Springer, 2004). [0pt] [2] S. Maekawa: Nature Materials 8, 777 (2009). [0pt] [3] Concept in Spin Electronics, eds. S. Maekawa (Oxford University Press, 2006). [0pt] [4] K. Uchida et al., Nature 455, 778 (2008). [0pt] [5] K. Uchida et al., Nature Materials 9, 894 (2010) [0pt] [6] H. Adachi et al., APL 97, 252506 (2010) and Phys. Rev. B 83, 094410 (2011). [0pt] [7] J. Ohe et al., Phys. Rev. B (2011) [0pt] [8] K. Uchida et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 104419 (2010).

  11. Noncommutativity due to spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, M.; Kupriyanov, V. G.; da Silva, A. J.

    2010-04-01

    Using the Berezin-Marinov pseudoclassical formulation of the spin particle we propose a classical model of spin noncommutativity. In the nonrelativistic case, the Poisson brackets between the coordinates are proportional to the spin angular momentum. The quantization of the model leads to the noncommutativity with mixed spatial and spin degrees of freedom. A modified Pauli equation, describing a spin half particle in an external electromagnetic field is obtained. We show that nonlocality caused by the spin noncommutativity depends on the spin of the particle; for spin zero, nonlocality does not appear, for spin half, ΔxΔy≥θ2/2, etc. In the relativistic case the noncommutative Dirac equation was derived. For that we introduce a new star product. The advantage of our model is that in spite of the presence of noncommutativity and nonlocality, it is Lorentz invariant. Also, in the quasiclassical approximation it gives noncommutativity with a nilpotent parameter.

  12. Spin Rotation of Formalism for Spin Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio,A.

    2008-02-01

    The problem of which coefficients are adequate to correctly represent the spin rotation in vector spin tracking for polarized proton and deuteron beams in synchrotrons is here re-examined in the light of recent discussions. The main aim of this note is to show where some previous erroneous results originated and how to code spin rotation in a tracking code. Some analysis of a recent experiment is presented that confirm the correctness of the assumptions.

  13. Vertebrobasilar Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Jessica C.; Boysen, Megan M.; Warren, Chase R.; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of vertebrobasilar artery occlusion varies with the cause of occlusion and location of ischemia. This often results in delay in diagnosis. Areas of the brain supplied by the posterior circulation are difficult to visualize and usually require angiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Intravenous thrombolysis and local-intra arterial thrombolysis are the most common treatment approaches used. Recanalization of the occluded vessel significantly improves morbidity and mortality. Here we present a review of the literature and a case of a patient with altered mental status caused by vertebrobasilar artery occlusion. PMID:21691534

  14. Celiac Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, D. Michael; McBride, Michael; Livesay, James J.; Dougherty, Kathryn G.; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2006-01-01

    Aneurysm of the celiac artery is an uncommon clinical problem; fewer than 180 cases have been reported in the world medical literature. Most patients are symptomatic at the time of diagnosis. However, occasionally such aneurysms are detected incidentally during diagnostic imaging for other diseases. We present the case of a 72-year-old man who had an asymptomatic celiac artery aneurysm detected by computed tomographic angiography after endoluminal exclusion of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm. The patient underwent successful resection of the aneurysm and revascularization of the aorta–common hepatic and splenic arteries with use of an autologous saphenous vein graft. PMID:16878636

  15. Spin Circuit Representation for Spin Pumping Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kuntal; Datta, Supriyo

    2015-03-01

    There has been enormous progress in the field of spintronics and nanomagnetics in recent years with the discovery of many new materials and phenomena and it remains a formidable challenge to integrate these phenomena into functional devices and evaluate their potential. To facilitate this process a modular approach has been proposed whereby different phenomena are represented by spin circuit components. Unlike ordinary circuit components, these spin circuit components are characterized by 4-component voltages and currents (one for charge and three for spin). In this talk we will (1) present a spin circuit representation for spin pumping phenomena, (2) combine it with a spin circuit representation for the spin Hall effect to show that it reproduces established results obtained earlier by other means, and finally (3) use it to propose a possible method for enhancing the spin pumping efficiency by an order of magnitude through the addition of a spin sink layer. This work was supported by FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  16. Spin Seebeck power generators

    SciTech Connect

    Cahaya, Adam B.; Tretiakov, O. A.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2014-01-27

    We derive expressions for the efficiency and figure of merit of two spin caloritronic devices based on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), i.e., the generation of spin currents by a temperature gradient. The inverse spin Hall effect is conventionally used to detect the SSE and offers advantages for large area applications. We also propose a device that converts spin current into electric one by means of a spin-valve detector, which scales favorably to small sizes and approaches a figure of merit of 0.5 at room temperature.

  17. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability. PMID:25661070

  18. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of PAD is atherosclerosis. This happens when plaque ... substance made up of fat and cholesterol. It causes the arteries to narrow or become blocked. This ...

  19. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ve started to help the medicine work. Other Organizations American Heart Association Questions to Ask Your Doctor Am I at risk for coronary artery disease (CAD)? What lifestyle changes should I make to decrease my risk of ...

  20. Coronary artery spasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocker or a long-acting nitrate long-term. Beta-blockers are another type of medicine that is used with other coronary artery problems. However, beta-blockers may make this problem worse. They should be ...

  1. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  2. Giant Subclavian Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Counts, Sarah; Zeeshan, Ahmad; Elefteriades, John

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old construction executive presenting with chest pain, shortness of breath, and dizziness on exertion secondary to a giant left subclavian artery aneurysm and aortic valvular disease. PMID:27231430

  3. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have had a stroke or TIA, a nervous system (neurological) exam will show other problems. You may also have the following tests: Blood cholesterol and triglycerides test Blood sugar (glucose) test Ultrasound of the carotid arteries ( carotid ...

  4. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... P. Peripheral arterial diseases. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ... noncoronary obstructive vascular disease.In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ...

  5. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  6. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Smoking and Your ... in the body's arteries, the condition is called atherosclerosis . Over time, plaque can harden and narrow the ...

  7. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspirin and heart disease Butter, margarine, and cooking oils Carotid artery surgery - discharge Cholesterol and ... by: Daniel Kantor, MD, Kantor Neurology, Coconut Creek, FL and Immediate Past President of the ...

  8. Cooperative spin decoherence in finite spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Fernando; Fernandez-Rossier, Joaquin

    2014-03-01

    Overcoming the problem of relaxation and decoherence of magnetic nanostructures is one of the mayor goals in magnetic data storage. Although spin chains with as few as 12 magnetic atoms have revealed stability in cryogenic conditions, understanding the mechanism leading to these effects is essential for the engineered of stable structures. Here we consider the problem of spin decoherence and relaxation of finite size quantum spin chains due to elastic and spin conserving interactions with an electron gas. Specifically, we consider how the decoherence (T2) and relaxation (T1) times between the two degenerate ground states of a chain of N coupled spins compares with the one of an isolated spin in the same environment. We find that the spin decoherence time of Ising chains can be either enhanced or suppressed depending on the matching between the Fermi wavelength 2 π /kF and the inter-spin distance a. In particular, we find that depending on the values of kF a , it can show, for certain values that depends on the dimensionality of the electron gas, a cooperative enhancement proportional to N2 of the decoherence, analogous to super radiance decay of atom ensembles, or a suppression.

  9. Spin structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-ping Chen, Alexandre Deur, Sebastian Kuhn, Zein-eddine Meziani

    2011-06-01

    Spin-dependent observables have been a powerful tool to probe the internal structure of the nucleon and to understand the dynamics of the strong interaction. Experiments involving spin degrees of freedom have often brought out surprises and puzzles. The so-called "spin crisis" in the 1980s revealed the limitation of naive quark-parton models and led to intensive worldwide efforts, both experimental and theoretical, to understand the nucleon spin structure. With high intensity and high polarization of both the electron beam and targets, Jefferson Lab has the world's highest polarized luminosity and the best figure-of-merit for precision spin structure measurements. It has made a strong impact in this subfield of research. This chapter will highlight Jefferson Lab's unique contributions in the measurements of valence quark spin distributions, in the moments of spin structure functions at low to intermediate Q2, and in the transverse spin structure.

  10. Evolution of complete arterial grafting. For coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, B F; Fuller, J A; Tatoulis, J

    1998-01-01

    Arterial grafting for the correction of coronary artery disease preceded the use of saphenous vein grafts, but the overwhelming popularity of the saphenous vein from 1970 to 1985 left the development of arterial grafting dormant. Excellent graft patency results from pedicled internal thoracic artery grafting and continued saphenous vein graft failure prompted our unit to explore complete arterial grafting with internal thoracic artery and radial artery grafts. One thousand and fifty-three patients who received a combination of internal thoracic artery and radial artery grafts were compared with 1,156 patients who received internal thoracic artery and saphenous vein grafts. All patients underwent primary coronary artery bypass surgery between 1995 and 1998. The early mortality and morbidity and the probability of survival at 2 years were similar in both groups of patients. Early graft patency studies of 35 radial artery grafts showed 33 (94%) were patent at a mean of 12 months. Complete arterial grafting using internal thoracic and radial arteries is safe and may provide a long-term benefit. Images PMID:9566058

  11. Spinning eggs and ballerinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction between the egg and the surface on which it spins.

  12. Spinning Eggs and Ballerinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Measurements are presented on the rise of a spinning egg. It was found that the spin, the angular momentum and the kinetic energy all decrease as the egg rises, unlike the case of a ballerina who can increase her spin and kinetic energy by reducing her moment of inertia. The observed effects can be explained, in part, in terms of rolling friction…

  13. The Steady Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Richard; Schmidt, Wilhelm

    1931-01-01

    With the object of further clarifying the problem of spinning, the equilibrium of the forces and moments acting on an airplane is discussed in light of the most recent test data. Convinced that in a spin the flight attitude by only small angles of yaw is more or less completely steady, the study is primarily devoted to an investigation of steady spin with no side slip. At small angles, wholly arbitrary and perfectly steady spins may be forced, depending on the type of control displacements. But at large angles only very steep and only "approaching steady" spins are possible, no matter what the control displacements.

  14. Tracheoinnominate artery fistula following tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Keçeligil, H T; Erk, M K; Kolbakir, F; Yildirim, A; Yilman, M; Unal, R

    1995-10-01

    Tracheoinnominate artery fistula is a relatively rare but highly lethal complication occurring in patients with long-standing tracheostomies. Early evaluation of this problem and prompt aggressive therapy are necessary. When massive haemorrhage begins, immediate arterial compression, control of the airway and subsequent treatment of the injured artery may be lifesaving. Immediate surgical exploration through a median sternotomy is necessary to control the proximal and distal innominate artery. After the damaged artery has been excised, vascular reconstruction can be performed to preserve the connection between the proximal and distal ends of the innominate artery. A pedicled pericardial patch was successfully used for the tracheal reconstruction. PMID:8574535

  15. Understanding Arteries | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Understanding Arteries Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Below: ... the arteries and veins are healthy. A Healthy Artery An artery is a muscular tube. It has ...

  16. Inverse spin Hall effect by spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. Y.; Horing, Norman J. M.; Lei, X. L.

    2007-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [S. O. Valenzuela and M. Tinkham, Nature (London) 442, 176 (2006)], the authors present a quantitative microscopic theory to investigate the inverse spin-Hall effect with spin injection into aluminum considering both intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit couplings using the orthogonalized-plane-wave method. Their theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is also clear that the magnitude of the anomalous Hall resistivity is mainly due to contributions from extrinsic skew scattering.

  17. Spin Transport in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2008-03-01

    Silicon has been broadly viewed as the ideal material for spintronics due to its low atomic weight, lattice inversion symmetry, and near lack of nuclear spin, resulting in exceptionally long spin lifetime. Despite this appeal, however, the experimental difficulties of achieving coherent spin transport in silicon were overcome for the first time only recently, by using unique spin-polarized hot-electron injection and detection techniques. [1] Our subsequent observations of very long spin lifetimes and transit lengths [2] have impact on prospects for Silicon spintronics as the basis for a new paradigm of information processing. [1] Ian Appelbaum, Biqin Huang, and Douwe J. Monsma, ``Electronic measurement and control of spin transport in silicon,'' Nature 447, 295 (2007). [2] Biqin Huang, Douwe J. Monsma, and Ian Appelbaum, ``Coherent spin transport through a 350-micron-thick silicon wafer,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 177209 (2007).

  18. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Spontaneous Rupture of the Omental Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Yamagami, Takuji; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Tazoe, Jun; Asai, Shunsuke; Masui, Koji; Ikeda, Jun; Nagata, Akihiro; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We encountered a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. A 25-year-old man without any episode of abdominal trauma or bleeding disorders came to the emergency unit with left upper abdominal pain. Hematoma with extravasation of the greater omentum and a hemoperitoneum was confirmed on abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Bleeding from the omental artery was suspected based on these findings. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed after extravasation of the omental artery, which arises from the left gastroepiploic artery, was confirmed on arteriography. Partial ometectomy was performed 10 days after transcatheter arterial embolization, revealing that the hematoma measured 10 cm in diameter in the greater omentum. Pathological examination showed rupture of the branch of an omental artery without abnormal findings, such as an aneurysm or neoplasm. Thus, we diagnosed him with spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the surgery, with a favorable postoperative course.

  19. All about Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... angioplasty (AN-gee-oh-plas-tee), also called balloon angioplasty , a narrow tube with a balloon attached is inserted and threaded into an artery. Then the balloon is inflated, opening the narrowed artery. Awire tube, ...

  20. Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100160.htm Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - series To use the sharing features ... out of 9 Normal anatomy Overview The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle. The right ...

  1. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  2. About Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  3. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Claudication

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty deposits inside them. This is called atherosclerosis. If you have PAD, your arms, and more ... also more likely in people who already have atherosclerosis in other arteries, such as the arteries in ...

  4. Combination of rare right arterial variation with anomalous origins of the vertebral artery, aberrant subclavian artery and persistent trigeminal artery. A case report.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, H; San Millán Ruíz, D; Abdo, G; Asakura, F; Yilmaz, H; Lovblad, K O; Rüfenacht, D A

    2011-09-01

    A 32-year-old woman hospitalized for subarachnoid hemorrhage showed rare arterial variation on the right side with anomalous origins of the vertebral artery, aberrant subclavian artery and persistent trigeminal artery. Angiography showed the right vertebral artery to originate from the right common carotid artery, the right subclavian artery to arise separately from the descending aorta, and persistent trigeminal artery on the right side. The possible embryonic mechanism of this previously unreported variant combination is discussed. PMID:22005696

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Arterial Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Cecelja, Marina; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Stiffening of large arteries is a hallmark of vascular aging and one of the most important determinants of the age-related increase in blood pressure and cardiovascular disease events. Despite a substantial genetic component, the molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability in arterial stiffness remain unknown. Previous genetic studies have identified several genetic variants that are associated with measures of arterial stiffness. Here, we review the relevant advances in the identification of pathways underlying arterial stiffness from genomic studies. PMID:27493903

  6. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  7. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  8. Uterine artery embolization

    MedlinePlus

    ... the procedure. UAE is less invasive than surgical treatments for uterine fibroids. Many women may return more quickly to activities ... SC, Spies JB, Worthington-Kirsch R, et al. Uterine artery embolization for ... from the FIBROID registry. Obstet Gynecol . 2008; 111:22-33. Munro ...

  9. Spin caloritronics in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Angsula; Frota, H. O.

    2015-06-14

    Spin caloritronics, the combination of spintronics with thermoelectrics, exploiting both the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment in addition to its fundamental electronic charge and temperature, is an emerging technology mainly in the development of low-power-consumption technology. In this work, we study the thermoelectric properties of a Rashba dot attached to two single layer/bilayer graphene sheets as leads. The temperature difference on the two graphene leads induces a spin current, which depends on the temperature and chemical potential. We demonstrate that the Rashba dot behaves as a spin filter for selected values of the chemical potential and is able to filter electrons by their spin orientation. The spin thermopower has also been studied where the effects of the chemical potential, temperature, and also the Rashba term have been observed.

  10. Spin-Orbit Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchon, Aurelien; Ndiaye, Papa Birame; Moon, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2014-03-01

    Utilizing spin-orbit coupling to enable the electrical manipulation of ferromagnets has recently attracted a considerable amount of interest. This spin-orbit torque appears in magnetic systems displaying inversion symmetry breaking. Another adjacent emerging topic, spin caloritronics, aims at exploiting magnonic spin currents driven by temperature gradients, allowing for the transmission of information and the control of magnetic domain walls. In this work, we demonstrate that a magnon flow generates torques on the local magnetization when subjected to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) just as an electron flow generates torques when submitted to Rashba interaction. A direct consequence is the capability to control the magnetization direction of a homogeneous ferromagnet by applying a temperature gradient or local RF excitations. Merging the spin-orbit torques with spin caloritronics is rendered possible by the emergence of DMI in magnetic materials and opens promising avenues in the development of chargeless information technology.

  11. Basilar Artery Aneurysm at a Persistent Trigeminal Artery Junction

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, G.B.; Conti, M.L.M.; Veiga, J.C.E.; Jory, M.; Souza, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The trigeminal artery is an anastomosis between the embryonic precursors of the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems, and may persist into adult life. The association of the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) with cerebral aneurysm is well documented in the literature and, in general, aneurysms are located in the anterior circulation. We describe a patient who presented with a panencephalic Fisher III subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. Digital arteriography showed a saccular aneurysm in the middle third of the basilar artery, adjacent to the junction with a persistent trigeminal artery. She was submitted to endovascular treatment with embolization of the basilar artery aneurysm with coils. Aneurysms at the PTA junction with the basilar artery are rare. This paper describes a case of PTA associated with an aneurysm in the basilar artery at PTA junction and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:22005697

  12. Markers of arterial stiffness in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Marc; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Thalhammer, Christoph; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice R

    2015-09-01

    Increased arterial stiffness results from reduced elasticity of the arterial wall and is an independent predictor for cardiovascular risk. The gold standard for assessment of arterial stiffness is the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Other parameters such as central aortic pulse pressure and aortic augmentation index are indirect, surrogate markers of arterial stiffness, but provide additional information on the characteristics of wave reflection. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterised by its association with systolic hypertension, increased arterial stiffness, disturbed wave reflexion and prognosis depending on ankle-brachial pressure index. This review summarises the physiology of pulse wave propagation and reflection and its changes due to aging and atherosclerosis. We discuss different non-invasive assessment techniques and highlight the importance of the understanding of arterial pulse wave analysis for each vascular specialist and primary care physician alike in the context of PAD. PMID:26317253

  13. Picosecond Spin Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.

    The coupling of spin and heat, i.e., spin caloritronics, gives rise to new physical phenomena in nanoscale spin devices and new ways to manipulate local magnetization. Our work in this field takes advantage of recent advances in the measurement and understanding of heat transport at the nanoscale using ultrafast lasers. We use a picosecond duration pump laser pulses as a source of heat and picosecond duration probe laser pulses to detect changes in temperature, spin accumulation, and spin transfer torque using a combination of time-domain thermoreflectance and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect Our pump-probe optical methods enable us to change the temperature of ferromagnetic layers on a picosecond time-scale and generate enormous heat fluxes on the order of 100 GW m-2 that persist for ~ 30 ps. Thermally-driven ultrafast demagnetization of a perpendicular ferromagnet leads to spin accumulation in a normal metal and spin transfer torque in an in-plane ferromagnet. The data are well described by models of spin generation and transport based on differences and gradients of thermodynamic parameters. The spin-dependent Seebeck effect of a perpendicular ferromagnetic layer converts a heat current into spin current, which in turn can be used to exert a spin transfer torque (STT) on a second ferromagnetic layer with in-plane magnetization. Using a [Co,Ni] multilayer as the source of spin, an energy fluence of ~ 4 J m-2 creates thermal STT sufficient to induce ~ 1 % tilting of the magnetization of a 2 nm-thick CoFeB layer.

  14. Spin coating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Torczynski, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

  15. Rockets for spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The potential effectiveness of rockets as an auxiliary means for an aircraft to effect recovery from spins was investigated. The advances in rocket technology produced by the space effort suggested that currently available systems might obviate many of the problems encountered in earlier rocket systems. A modern fighter configuration known to exhibit a flat spin mode was selected. An analytical study was made of the thrust requirements for a rocket spin recovery system for the subject configuration. These results were then applied to a preliminary systems study of rocket components appropriate to the problem. Subsequent spin tunnel tests were run to evaluate the analytical results.

  16. Polariton spin whirls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilibrizzi, P.; Sigurdsson, H.; Liew, T. C. H.; Ohadi, H.; Wilkinson, S.; Askitopoulos, A.; Shelykh, I. A.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the observation of spin whirls in a radially expanding polariton condensate formed under nonresonant optical excitation. Real space imaging of polarization- and time-resolved photoluminescence reveals a spiralling polarization pattern in the plane of the microcavity. Simulations of the spatiotemporal dynamics of a spinor condensate reveal the crucial role of polariton interactions with a spinor exciton reservoir. Harnessing spin-dependent interactions between the exciton reservoir and polariton condensates allows for the manipulation of spin currents and the realization of dynamic collective spin effects in solid-state systems.

  17. PREFACE: Spin Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieny, B.; Sousa, R.; Prejbeanu, L.

    2007-04-01

    Conventional electronics has in the past ignored the spin on the electron, however things began to change in 1988 with the discovery of giant magnetoresistance in metallic thin film stacks which led to the development of a new research area, so called spin-electronics. In the last 10 years, spin-electronics has achieved a number of breakthroughs from the point of view of both basic science and application. Materials research has led to several major discoveries: very large tunnel magnetoresistance effects in tunnel junctions with crystalline barriers due to a new spin-filtering mechanism associated with the spin-dependent symmetry of the electron wave functions new magnetic tunnelling barriers leading to spin-dependent tunnelling barrier heights and acting as spin-filters magnetic semiconductors with increasingly high ordering temperature. New phenomena have been predicted and observed: the possibility of acting on the magnetization of a magnetic nanostructure with a spin-polarized current. This effect, due to a transfer of angular momentum between the spin polarized conduction electrons and the local magnetization, can be viewed as the reciprocal of giant or tunnel magnetoresistance. It can be used to switch the magnetization of a magnetic nanostructure or to generate steady magnetic excitations in the system. the possibility of generating and manipulating spin current without charge current by creating non-equilibrium local accumulation of spin up or spin down electrons. The range of applications of spin electronics materials and phenomena is expanding: the first devices based on giant magnetoresistance were the magnetoresistive read-heads for computer disk drives. These heads, introduced in 1998 with current-in plane spin-valves, have evolved towards low resistance tunnel magnetoresistice heads in 2005. Besides magnetic recording technology, these very sensitive magnetoresistive sensors are finding applications in other areas, in particular in biology. magnetic

  18. Paramagnetic spin pumping.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Y; Saitoh, E

    2014-12-31

    We have demonstrated spin pumping from a paramagnetic state of an insulator La2NiMnO6 into a Pt film. Single-crystalline films of La2NiMnO6 which exhibit a ferromagnetic order at TC≈270  K were grown by pulsed laser deposition. The inverse spin Hall voltage induced by spin-current injection has been observed in the Pt layer not only in the ferromagnetic phase of La2NiMnO6, but also in a wide temperature range above TC. The efficient spin pumping in the paramagnetic phase is ascribable to ferromagnetic correlation, not to ferromagnetic order. PMID:25615367

  19. Spin-spin and spin-orbit interaction effects of two-electron quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseghi, B.; Rezaei, G.; Taghizadeh, S. F.; Shahedi, Z.

    2014-09-01

    Simultaneous effects of spin-spin and spin-orbit interactions on the energy spectrum of a two-electron spherical quantum dot with parabolic confinement and under the influence of external electric and magnetic fields are investigated. We have calculated energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system for different spin states. Results show that effects of spin-spin interactions are negligible in comparison with those of the spin-orbit interactions. Spin-orbit interaction splits energy levels and removes degeneracy of different spin states. Moreover it is seen that energy eigenvalues and levels splitting strongly depend on the external magnetic field and the dot dimensions.

  20. Right-sided reverse T composite arterial grafting to complete revascularization of the right coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Aazami, Mathias H.; Abbasi-Teshnizi, Mohammad; Amini, Shahram; Lotfinejad, Nasim Sadat

    2014-01-01

    Complete arterial revascularization for the right coronary artery is underused mainly due to technical issues. Herein we report on a new approach for complete arterial revascularization of arterial revascularization for the right coronary artery branches. Complete arterial revascularization for the right coronary artery revascularization was performed in 8 patients using a reverse T composite arterial graft. None of the patients suffered perioperative myocardial infarction. All patients underwent noninvasive coronary imaging, displaying an early patency rate of 100%. Complete arterial arterial revascularization for the right coronary artery revascularization using a reverse T graft offers a new paradigm with enhanced technical flexibility in performing all arterial myocardial complete revascularizations in selected patients. PMID:25714223

  1. Effect of spin rotation coupling on spin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Debashree Basu, B.

    2013-12-15

    We have studied the spin rotation coupling (SRC) as an ingredient to explain different spin-related issues. This special kind of coupling can play the role of a Dresselhaus like coupling in certain conditions. Consequently, one can control the spin splitting, induced by the Dresselhaus like term, which is unusual in a semiconductor heterostructure. Within this framework, we also study the renormalization of the spin-dependent electric field and spin current due to the k{sup →}⋅p{sup →} perturbation, by taking into account the interband mixing in the rotating system. In this paper we predict the enhancement of the spin-dependent electric field resulting from the renormalized spin rotation coupling. The renormalization factor of the spin electric field is different from that of the SRC or Zeeman coupling. The effect of renormalized SRC on spin current and Berry curvature is also studied. Interestingly, in the presence of this SRC-induced SOC it is possible to describe spin splitting as well as spin galvanic effect in semiconductors. -- Highlights: •Studied effect of spin rotation coupling on the spin electric field, spin current and Berry curvature. •In the k{sup →}⋅p{sup →} framework we study the renormalization of spin electric field and spin current. •For an inertial system we have discussed the spin splitting. •Expression for the Berry phase in the inertial system is discussed. •The inertial spin galvanic effect is studied.

  2. Spin Waves in Quasiequilibrium Spin Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, Kevin S.; Dahal, Hari P.

    2006-07-28

    Using the Landau Fermi liquid theory we discovered a new propagating transverse spin wave in a paramagnetic system which is driven slightly out of equilibrium without applying an external magnetic field. We find a gapless mode which describes the uniform precession of the magnetization in the absence of a magnetic field. We also find a gapped mode associated with the precession of the spin current around the internal field. The gapless mode has a quadratic dispersion leading to a T{sup 3/2} contribution to the specific heat. These modes significantly contribute to the dynamic structure function.

  3. Brachial artery pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Katie; Radwan, Rami; Shingler, Guy; Davies, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of an elderly man who presented with an upper arm swelling that had developed following a humeral fracture 8 months previously. The swelling was painless but associated with significantly diminished motor function of his right hand and concurrent paraesthaesia. On examination, a large pulsatile mass was identified and CT angiography confirmed the presence of an 11×7 cm brachial artery pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent surgical repair in which a fragment of the humerus was found to have punctured the brachial artery resulting in a pseudoaneurysm. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative period and was discharged 2 days later having regained some motor function in his right hand. PMID:24859555

  4. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  5. Caliber-Persistent Artery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sabrina Araújo Pinho; Ruiz, Marcelo Martinson; Kaba, Shajadi Pardo; Florezi, Giovanna Piacenza; Lemos Júnior, Celso Augusto; Witzel, Andréa Lusvarghi

    2015-01-01

    Caliber-persistent artery (CPLA) of the lip is a common vascular anomaly in which a main arterial branch extends to the surface of the mucous tissue with no reduction in its diameter. It usually manifests as pulsatile papule, is easily misdiagnosed, and is observed more frequently among older people, suggesting that its development may involve a degenerative process associated with aging; CPLA is also characterized by the loss of tone of the adjacent supporting connective tissue. Although the diagnosis is clinical, high-resolution Doppler ultrasound is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating the lesion. This report describes the case of a 58-year-old male patient who complained of a lesion of the lower lip with bleeding and recurrent ulceration. The patient was successfully treated in our hospital after a diagnosis of CPLA and is currently undergoing a clinical outpatient follow-up with no complaints. PMID:26448884

  6. Coronary artery fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Said, S.A.M.; Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Fieren, M.J.C.H.; Meijboom, E.J.; van der Werf, T.; Bennink, G.B.W.E.

    2002-01-01

    The aetiology of congenital coronary artery fistulas remains a challenging issue. Coronary arteries with an anatomically normal origin may, for obscure reasons, terminate abnormally and communicate with different single or multiple cardiac chambers or great vessels. When this occurs, the angiographic morphological appearance may vary greatly from discrete channels to plexiform network of vessels. Coronary arteriovenous fistulas (CAVFs) have neither specific signs nor pathognomonic symptoms; the spectrum of clinical features varies considerably. The clinical presentation of symptomatic cases can include angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, fatigue, dyspnoea, CHF, SBE, ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias or even sudden cardiac death. CAVFs may, however, be a coincidental finding during diagnostic coronary angiography (CAG). CAG is considered the gold standard for diagnosing and delineating the morphological anatomy and pathway of CAVFs. There are various tailored therapeutic modalities for the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of CAVFs, including conservative pharmacological strategy, percutaneous transluminal embolisation and surgical ligation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696067

  7. Sparkling and Spinning Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Ruth Kearney

    1964-01-01

    Teachers should foster in children's writing the use of words with "sparkle" and "spin"--"sparkle" implying brightness and vitality, "spin" connoting industry, patience, and painstaking work. By providing creative listening experiences with good children's or adult literature, the teacher can encourage students to broaden their imaginations and…

  8. Single-spin CCD.

    PubMed

    Baart, T A; Shafiei, M; Fujita, T; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Vandersypen, L M K

    2016-04-01

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics relies on the ability to store, transport and manipulate electron spin polarization with great precision. In its ultimate limit, information is stored in the spin state of a single electron, at which point quantum information processing also becomes a possibility. Here, we demonstrate the manipulation, transport and readout of individual electron spins in a linear array of three semiconductor quantum dots. First, we demonstrate single-shot readout of three spins with fidelities of 97% on average, using an approach analogous to the operation of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Next, we perform site-selective control of the three spins, thereby writing the content of each pixel of this 'single-spin charge-coupled device'. Finally, we show that shuttling an electron back and forth in the array hundreds of times, covering a cumulative distance of 80 μm, has negligible influence on its spin projection. Extrapolating these results to the case of much larger arrays points at a diverse range of potential applications, from quantum information to imaging and sensing. PMID:26727201

  9. Centralizers of spin subalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arizmendi, Gerardo; Herrera, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    We determine the centralizers of certain isomorphic copies of spin subalgebras spin(r) in so(dr m), where dr is the dimension of a real irreducible representation of Clr0, the even Clifford algebra determined by the positive definite inner product on Rr, where r, m ∈ N.

  10. Coherent spin-networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Eugenio; Magliaro, Elena; Perini, Claudio

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we discuss a proposal of coherent states for loop quantum gravity. These states are labeled by a point in the phase space of general relativity as captured by a spin-network graph. They are defined as the gauge-invariant projection of a product over links of Hall's heat kernels for the cotangent bundle of SU(2). The labels of the state are written in terms of two unit vectors, a spin and an angle for each link of the graph. The heat-kernel time is chosen to be a function of the spin. These labels are the ones used in the spin-foam setting and admit a clear geometric interpretation. Moreover, the set of labels per link can be written as an element of SL(2,C). These states coincide with Thiemann's coherent states with the area operator as complexifier. We study the properties of semiclassicality of these states and show that, for large spins, they reproduce a superposition over spins of spin-networks with nodes labeled by Livine-Speziale coherent intertwiners. Moreover, the weight associated to spins on links turns out to be given by a Gaussian times a phase as originally proposed by Rovelli.

  11. Spin coating of electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-01-01

    Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

  12. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Stephen M; Zhang, Wei; Kc, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E; Jiang, J Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-01

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF_{2}. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF_{2} (110) (30  nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF_{2} (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF_{2} through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9  T) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF_{2} thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected. PMID:26991198

  13. Hadron Spin Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2002-01-09

    Spin effects in exclusive and inclusive reactions provide an essential new dimension for testing QCD and unraveling hadron structure. Remarkable new experiments from SLAC, HERMES (DESY), and Jefferson Lab present many challenges to theory, including measurements at HERMES and SMC of the single spin asymmetries in ep {yields} e{prime}{pi}X where the proton is polarized normal to the scattering plane. This type of single spin asymmetry may be due to the effects of rescattering of the outgoing quark on the spectators of the target proton, an effect usually neglected in conventional QCD analyses. Many aspects of spin, such as single-spin asymmetries and baryon magnetic moments are sensitive to the dynamics of hadrons at the amplitude level, rather than probability distributions. I will illustrate the novel features of spin dynamics for relativistic systems by examining the explicit form of the light-front wavefunctions for the two-particle Fock state of the electron in QED, thus connecting the Schwinger anomalous magnetic moment to the spin and orbital momentum carried by its Fock state constituents and providing a transparent basis for understanding the structure of relativistic composite systems and their matrix elements in hadronic physics. I also present a survey of outstanding spin puzzles in QCD, particularly A{sub NN} in elastic pp scattering, the J/{psi} {yields} {rho}{pi} puzzle, and J/{psi} polarization at the Tevatron.

  14. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  15. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution. PMID:27378060

  16. Single-spin CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, T. A.; Shafiei, M.; Fujita, T.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2016-04-01

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics relies on the ability to store, transport and manipulate electron spin polarization with great precision. In its ultimate limit, information is stored in the spin state of a single electron, at which point quantum information processing also becomes a possibility. Here, we demonstrate the manipulation, transport and readout of individual electron spins in a linear array of three semiconductor quantum dots. First, we demonstrate single-shot readout of three spins with fidelities of 97% on average, using an approach analogous to the operation of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Next, we perform site-selective control of the three spins, thereby writing the content of each pixel of this ‘single-spin charge-coupled device’. Finally, we show that shuttling an electron back and forth in the array hundreds of times, covering a cumulative distance of 80 μm, has negligible influence on its spin projection. Extrapolating these results to the case of much larger arrays points at a diverse range of potential applications, from quantum information to imaging and sensing.

  17. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klooster, N J; Kitslaar, P; Janevski, B K

    1988-06-01

    Two patients with unilateral popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) are reported. The importance of diligence in angiographic diagnosis and recognition of the so-called "functional" PAES group as a separate entity are stressed. It is inferred from our material that a surgical approach for PAES is to be advocated since surgical release of the entrapment can lead to complete resolution of symptoms regardless of aetiology. PMID:2837797

  18. Spin-Wave Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jin; Yu, Weichao; Wu, Ruqian; Xiao, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    A diode, a device allowing unidirectional signal transmission, is a fundamental element of logic structures, and it lies at the heart of modern information systems. The spin wave or magnon, representing a collective quasiparticle excitation of the magnetic order in magnetic materials, is a promising candidate for an information carrier for the next-generation energy-saving technologies. Here, we propose a scalable and reprogrammable pure spin-wave logic hardware architecture using domain walls and surface anisotropy stripes as waveguides on a single magnetic wafer. We demonstrate theoretically the design principle of the simplest logic component, a spin-wave diode, utilizing the chiral bound states in a magnetic domain wall with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and confirm its performance through micromagnetic simulations. Our findings open a new vista for realizing different types of pure spin-wave logic components and finally achieving an energy-efficient and hardware-reprogrammable spin-wave computer.

  19. Apparent arterial compliance.

    PubMed

    Quick, C M; Berger, D S; Noordergraaf, A

    1998-04-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in estimating total arterial compliance. Because it cannot be measured directly, a lumped model is usually applied to derive compliance from aortic pressure and flow. The archetypical model, the classical two-element windkessel, assumes 1) system linearity and 2) infinite pulse wave velocity. To generalize this model, investigators have added more elements and have incorporated nonlinearities. A different approach is taken here. It is assumed that the arterial system 1) is linear and 2) has finite pulse wave velocity. In doing so, the windkessel is generalized by describing compliance as a complex function of frequency that relates input pressure to volume stored. By applying transmission theory, this relationship is shown to be a function of heart rate, peripheral resistance, and pulse wave reflection. Because this pressure-volume relationship is generally not equal to total arterial compliance, it is termed "apparent compliance." This new concept forms the natural counterpart to the established concept of apparent pulse wave velocity. PMID:9575945

  20. LATENT LIFE OF ARTERIES.

    PubMed

    Carrel, A

    1910-07-23

    When a segment of artery, killed by heat, formalin or glycerin is transplanted, it undergoes a rapid degeneration. Its muscle fibers disappear while the tissue of the host reacts by building a new wall of connective tissue. When the transplanted vessel has been preserved in a condition of latent life, no degeneration of the wall occurs, or the wall undergoes only partial degeneration. The muscle fibers can keep their normal appearance, even for a long time after the operation. It is, therefore, demonstrated that arteries can be preserved outside of the body in a condition of unmanifested actual life. The best method of preservation consists of placing the vessels, immersed in vaselin, in an ice box, the temperature of which is slightly above the freezing point. From a surgical standpoint, the transplantation of preserved vessels can be used with some safety. When the arteries were kept in defibrinated blood or vaselin and in cold storage, the proportion of positive results was 75 and 80 per cent., and this can probably be increased. PMID:19867337

  1. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009. (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 59 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents; bypass surgery; cilostazol; exercise; pentoxifylline; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA); prostaglandins; smoking cessation; and statins. PMID:19454099

  2. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010. Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review. We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 70 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents, bypass surgery, cilostazol, exercise, pentoxifylline, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), prostaglandins, smoking cessation, and statins. PMID:21477401

  3. Thermal Spin Transfer Torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerrit

    2009-03-01

    The coupling between spin and charge in electronic transport is studied in the field of spintronics. Heat currents are coupled to both charge and spin currents as well [1]. This extension of spintronics to what may be called ``spin caloritronics'' recently enjoys renewed attention [2]. The spin-transfer torque associated with electric currents can excite magnetizations in nanostructures, switching magnetic configuration in spin valves and move domain walls in magnetic wires when exceeding critical values of the order of 10^7Acm-2 [3]. Also heat currents transfer spin angular momentum [4], either intrinsically or via the thermoelectric generation of particle spin currents. We predict that temperature differences of the order of 100 K over typical metallic nanostructures cause effects equivalent to the critical charge current densities. In this talk I will give a brief review of various aspects of spin caloritronics with emphasis on thermal spin transfer torques. This work has been carried out in collaboration with Moosa Hatami, Qinfang Zhang, Paul Kelly, Hans Joakim Skadsem, Arne Brataas and Sadamichi Maekawa. [4pt] [1] M. Johnson and R.H. Silsbee, Phys. Rev. B 35, 4959 (1987).[0pt] [2] International Workshop on Spin Caloritronics, Lorentz Center of Leiden University, 9-13 February 2009, http://www.lorentzcenter.nl/lc/web/2009/323/info.php3?wsid=323[0pt] [3] D. C. Ralph and M. D. Stiles, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 320, 1190 (2008).[0pt] [4] M. Hatami, G.E.W. Bauer, Q. Zhang, and P.J. Kelly, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 066603 (2007).

  4. Synchronization of spin-transfer torque oscillators by spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects

    SciTech Connect

    Elyasi, Mehrdad; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-02-14

    We have proposed a method to synchronize multiple spin-transfer torque oscillators based on spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects. The proposed oscillator system consists of a series of nano-magnets in junction with a normal metal with high spin-orbit coupling, and an accumulative feedback loop. We conduct simulations to demonstrate the effect of modulated charge currents in the normal metal due to spin pumping from each nano-magnet. We show that the interplay between the spin Hall effect and inverse spin Hall effect results in synchronization of the nano-magnets.

  5. [Staged reconstruction of brachiocephalic arteries and coronary artery bypass grafting].

    PubMed

    Lysenko, A V; Belov, Iu V; Stonogin, A V

    2015-01-01

    It is presented the results of staged treatment of 28 patients with lesion of brachiocephalic arteries and ischemic heart disease. Patients underwent reconstructive surgery on brachiocephalic arteries (n=34) and coronary artery bypass grafting (n=28). Diagnostic and surgical features are described and indications for this technique are defined. The authors studied Russian and international experience, described postoperative complications and suggested ways to improve the results of simultaneous interventions. PMID:26081182

  6. Gluon Spin Contribution to The Nucleon Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz; Shahveh, Abolfazl; Taghavi-Shahri, Fateme

    2010-10-01

    We have calculated δg/ g in the nucleon at all measured kinematics. The smallness of δg/ g in the measured kinematics should not be interpreted as the the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin is small. In fact the first moment of gluon polarization in the nucleon, Δ g( Q2) can be sizable.

  7. True aneurysm of brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovričević, Ivo; Franjić, Dario Bjorn; Brkić, Petar; Tomas, Davor

    2010-10-01

    True upper extremity peripheral artery aneurysms are a rarely encountered arterial disorder. Following computer-tomography angiographic (CT-a) imaging examination, true saccular aneurysm, originating from the left brachial artery was diagnosed in the 77-year-old female without history of trauma. The aneurysm was resected by surgical intervention, and primary repair of the brachial artery was performed by interposition of a part of great saphenous vein harvested from the left groin and creation of two end-to-end anastomoses between interposition graft and previously resected part of brachial artery. No complication was observed during the follow-up. Surgical intervention for upper extremity aneurysms should be initiated without delay. Factors combined with minimal morbidity associated with repair suggest that surgical repair should be performed routinely for true upper extremity arterial aneurysms. PMID:20865459

  8. Spin-orbit coupling and quantum spin Hall effect for neutral atoms without spin flips.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Colin J; Siviloglou, Georgios A; Miyake, Hirokazu; Burton, William Cody; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-11-27

    We propose a scheme which realizes spin-orbit coupling and the quantum spin Hall effect for neutral atoms in optical lattices without relying on near resonant laser light to couple different spin states. The spin-orbit coupling is created by modifying the motion of atoms in a spin-dependent way by laser recoil. The spin selectivity is provided by Zeeman shifts created with a magnetic field gradient. Alternatively, a quantum spin Hall Hamiltonian can be created by all-optical means using a period-tripling, spin-dependent superlattice. PMID:24329453

  9. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  10. Towards a Compositional SPIN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses our initial experience with introducing automated assume-guarantee verification based on learning in the SPIN tool. We believe that compositional verification techniques such as assume-guarantee reasoning could complement the state-reduction techniques that SPIN already supports, thus increasing the size of systems that SPIN can handle. We present a "light-weight" approach to evaluating the benefits of learning-based assume-guarantee reasoning in the context of SPIN: we turn our previous implementation of learning for the LTSA tool into a main program that externally invokes SPIN to provide the model checking-related answers. Despite its performance overheads (which mandate a future implementation within SPIN itself), this approach provides accurate information about the savings in memory. We have experimented with several versions of learning-based assume guarantee reasoning, including a novel heuristic introduced here for generating component assumptions when their environment is unavailable. We illustrate the benefits of learning-based assume-guarantee reasoning in SPIN through the example of a resource arbiter for a spacecraft. Keywords: assume-guarantee reasoning, model checking, learning.

  11. Spin forming development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.

    1982-05-01

    Bendix product applications require the capability of fabricating heavy gage, high strength materials. Five commercial sources have been identified that have the capability of spin forming metal thicknesses greater than 9.5 mm and four equiment manufacturers produce machines with this capability. Twelve assemblies selected as candidates for spin forming applications require spin forming of titanium, 250 maraging steel, 17-4 pH stainless steel, Nitronic 40 steel, 304 L stainless steel, and 6061 aluminum. Twelve parts have been cold spin formed from a 250 maraging steel 8.1 mm wall thickness machine preform, and six have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick flat plate. Thirty-three Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy parts and 26 17-4 pH stainless steel parts have been hot spin formed directly from 31.8-mm-thick plate. Hot spin forming directly from plate has demonstrated the feasibility and favorable economics of this fabrication technique for Bendix applications.

  12. Management of tracheoinnominate artery fistula.

    PubMed

    Wright, C D

    1996-11-01

    TIF is a rare and often fatal complication of tracheostomy. Bleeding from the trachea after tracheostomy demands urgent investigation. Bronchoscopy is the diagnostic procedure of choice. Bedside control of hemorrhage by cuff overinflation or digital arterial compression can be lifesaving. Prompt operation with division of the innominate artery and separation of the trachea from the divided artery by viable tissue is indicated. Neurologic complications are rare. PMID:8934014

  13. Electron spin decoherence in nuclear spin baths and dynamical decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, N.; Yang, W.; Ho, S. W.; Hu, J. L.; Wan, J. T. K.; Liu, R. B.

    2011-12-23

    We introduce the quantum theory of the electron spin decoherence in a nuclear spin bath and the dynamical decoupling approach for protecting the electron spin coherence. These theories are applied to various solid-state systems, such as radical spins in molecular crystals and NV centers in diamond.

  14. Arterial pulse wave pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C.; Gorelick, D.; Chen, W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An arterial pulse wave pressure transducer is introduced. The transducer is comprised of a fluid filled cavity having a flexible membrane disposed over the cavity and adapted to be placed on the skin over an artery. An arterial pulse wave creates pressure pulses in the fluid which are transduced, by a pressure sensitive transistor in direct contact with the fluid, into an electric signal. The electrical signal is representative of the pulse waves and can be recorded so as to monitor changes in the elasticity of the arterial walls.

  15. Proinflammation of Aging Central Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Monticone, Robert E.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial aging is a cornerstone of organismal aging. The central arterial wall structurally and functionally remodels under chronic proinflammatory stress over a lifetime. The low grade proinflammation that accompanies advancing age causes arterial wall thickening and stiffening. These structural and functional alterations are consequences of adverse molecular and cellular events, e.g., an increase in local angiotensin II signaling that induces an inflammatory phenotypic shift of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, interventions to restrict proinflammatory signaling are a rational approach to delay or prevent age-associated adverse arterial remodeling. PMID:25171100

  16. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  17. Contrasting spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, F. L.; Ahilan, K.; Imai, T.; Sefat, A. S.; McGuire, Michael A; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David; Cheng, P.; Shen, B.; Wen, H.-H.

    2010-01-01

    We report the first NMR investigation of spin dynamics in the overdoped nonsuperconducting regime of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} up to x=0.26. We demonstrate that the absence of interband transitions with large momentum transfer Q{sub AF}-({pi}/a,0) between the hole and electron Fermi surfaces results in complete suppression of antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations for x {ge} 0.15. Our experimental results provide direct evidence for a correlation between T{sub c} and the strength of Q{sub AF} antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations.

  18. Spin of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1996-12-01

    The author argues that their response to the spin crisis should not be to abandon the naive quark model baby, but rather to allow it to mature. In particular, he advocates dressing the baby in qq pairs, first showing that this can be done without compromising the naive quark model's success with either spectroscopy or the OZI rule. Finally, he shows that despite their near invisibility elsewhere, pairs do play an important role in the proton's spin structure by creating an antipolarized qq sea. In the context of an explicit calculation he demonstrates that it is plausible that the entire ''spin crisis'' arises from this effect.

  19. Higher spin cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Chethan; Raju, Avinash; Roy, Shubho; Thakur, Somyadip

    2014-02-01

    We construct cosmological solutions of higher spin gravity in 2+1 dimensional de Sitter space. We show that a consistent thermodynamics can be obtained for their horizons by demanding appropriate holonomy conditions. This is equivalent to demanding the integrability of the Euclidean boundary conformal field theory partition function, and it reduces to Gibbons-Hawking thermodynamics in the spin-2 case. By using the prescription of Maldacena, we relate the thermodynamics of these solutions to those of higher spin black holes in AdS3.

  20. Spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effects—Insights for future spin-orbitronics (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Jiang, Wanjun; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Sklenar, Joseph; Ketterson, John B.

    2015-05-07

    Quantification of spin-charge interconversion has become increasingly important in the fast-developing field of spin-orbitronics. Pure spin current generated by spin pumping acts as a sensitive probe for many bulk and interface spin-orbit effects, which has been indispensable for the discovery of many promising new spin-orbit materials. We apply spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effect experiments, as a useful metrology, and study spin-orbit effects in a variety of metals and metal interfaces. We quantify the spin Hall effects in Ir and W using the conventional bilayer structures and discuss the self-induced voltage in a single layer of ferromagnetic permalloy. Finally, we extend our discussions to multilayer structures and quantitatively reveal the spin current flow in two consecutive normal metal layers.

  1. Electron spin decoherence in silicon carbide nuclear spin bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping

    In this paper, we study the electron spin decoherence of single defects in silicon carbide (SiC) nuclear spin bath. We find that, although the natural abundance of 29Si (4.7 counter-intuitive result, is the suppression of heteronuclear-spin flip-flop process in finite magnetic field. Our results show that electron spin of defect centers in SiC are excellent candidates for solid state spin qubit in quantum information processing.

  2. Spin waves in a persistent spin-current Fermi liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, J. D.; Bedell, K. S.

    2010-06-15

    We report two theoretical results for transverse spin waves, which arise in a system with a persistent spin current. Using Fermi liquid theory, we introduce a spin current in the ground state of a polarized or unpolarized Fermi liquid, and we derive the resultant spin waves using the Landau kinetic equation. The resulting spin waves have a q{sup 1} and q{sup 1/2} dispersion to leading order for the polarized and unpolarized systems, respectively.

  3. [The single coronary artery].

    PubMed

    Godart, F; Berzin, B; Rihani, R; Pecheux, M; Dutoit, A

    1992-04-01

    Single coronary artery is a fairly rare entity which may nevertheless be found in 0.4 per cent of coronary arteriograms. The authors report 3 cases seen in 2 departments of cardiology. In each patient, despite the existence of definite cardiovascular risk factors, this distribution was a factor worsening coronary ischemia, leading to complete thrombosis in one case. Although most often a chance discovery, a review of the literature justifies the attribution to this anomaly of the onset of angina, infarction or even sudden death. PMID:1642437

  4. Spin Foam and Regge Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gionti, S. J. Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Recent results in Local Regge Calculus are confronted with Spin Foam Formalism. Introducing Barrett-Crane Quantization in Local Regge Calculus makes it possible to associate a unique Spin jh with an hinge h, fulfilling one of the requirements of Spin Foam definition. It is shown that inter-twiner terms of Spin Foam can follow from the closure constraint in Local Regge Calculus.

  5. MMS Spin Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    The four Magnetospheric Multiscale observatories all undergo what's called a spin test, to learn how well the spacecraft are balanced. It also provides information on how well the mass properties o...

  6. Pluto's Spinning Moons

    NASA Video Gallery

    Most inner moons in the solar system keep one face pointed toward their central planet; this animation shows that certainly isn’t the case with the small moons of Pluto, which behave like spinning ...

  7. ^3He Spin Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Ishimoto, H.; Kojima, H.

    2009-03-01

    The superfluid component of ^3He A1 phase is spin-polarized. The process of forcing the superfluid component through a spin filtering structure, in a manner of mechano-magnetic effect, can be used to increase the spin polarization beyond the equilibrium under a given applied magnetic field. We have constructed a test cell in which a glass capillary array acts as the spin (and entropy) filter and an electrostatically actuated diaphragm forces the superfluid flow through it. Preliminary results show that a maximum relative increase of polarization by 50 % could be achieved. The maximum increase in polarization appears to be limited by the critical superfluid flow through the channels in the glass capillary array. The dependence of the observed effects on temperature, pressure and magnetic field will be presented.

  8. The spin deep within

    SciTech Connect

    Stackhouse, S.

    2008-10-08

    The electronic configuration of iron impurities in lower-mantle minerals influences their physical properties, but it is not well constrained. New studies suggest that ferrous iron in silicate phases exists mainly in an intermediate spin state.

  9. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  10. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  11. The inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery.

    PubMed

    Won, Hyung-Sun; Won, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Chang-Seok; Han, Seung-Ho; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Hoan

    2012-12-01

    We report a rare case of a left inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery in an 84-year-old female cadaver. A common trunk for the inferior epigastric and obturator arteries firstly originated from the left internal iliac artery, at 3.0 mm below the bifurcation of the left common iliac artery. This trunk ran straight between the left external iliac artery and left external iliac vein, and was finally divided into the left inferior epigastric and left obturator arteries just superior to the inguinal ligament. PMID:23301197

  12. The inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery

    PubMed Central

    Won, Hyung-Sun; Won, Hyung-Jin; Han, Seung-Ho; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Hoan

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare case of a left inferior epigastric artery arising from the internal iliac artery via a common trunk with the obturator artery in an 84-year-old female cadaver. A common trunk for the inferior epigastric and obturator arteries firstly originated from the left internal iliac artery, at 3.0 mm below the bifurcation of the left common iliac artery. This trunk ran straight between the left external iliac artery and left external iliac vein, and was finally divided into the left inferior epigastric and left obturator arteries just superior to the inguinal ligament. PMID:23301197

  13. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay carotid artery disease and stroke . Your risk for carotid artery ...

  14. Spin in Hadron Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aidala, Christine A.

    2009-08-04

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has brought the study of spin effects in hadronic collisions to a new energy regime. In conjunction with other experiments at facilities around the world, much can be learned from the high-energy polarized proton collisions RHIC provides, allowing the collider to serve as a powerful tool to continue to understand the rich subtleties and surprises of spin effects in QCD, some of which were originally discovered more than three decades ago.

  15. Litter-Spinning Retarders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Aerodynamic plates stop litter from spinning during hoisting by helicopter. Features of proposed litter-spinning retarders include convenience of deployment and independence from ground restraint. Retarder plate(s) folded flat against bottom of litter during storage or while litter is loaded. Plate(s) held in storage position by latch that releases manually or automatically as litter is hoisted. Upon release, springs move plates into deployed position.

  16. Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rogerio; Jardim, Carlos; Humbert, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), formerly called primary pulmonary hypertension, is a rare disease (incidence and prevalence rates of approximately one and six cases per million inhabitants, respectively) with different clinical phenotypes. A group of diverse conditions manifest pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and share similar pathological and/or clinical findings with IPAH. By definition, IPAH is diagnosed only after alternative diagnoses have been ruled out. Extensive investigation is needed to determine if PAH is associated with thyroid diseases, infectious diseases, autoimmune conditions, exposure to certain drugs (particularly anorexigens), certain genetic mutations, and so on. The presence of genetic abnormalities and risk factors (such as specific drug exposures) reinforces the "multiple hit" concept for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Fortunately, within the past two decades, therapeutic options have become available for IPAH, resulting in improved survival and clinical outcomes. At least seven different compounds have been registered for PAH treatment. However, even with aggressive PAH-specific therapy, mortality rates remain high (∼40% at 5 years). Given the high mortality rates, the use of combinations of agents that work by different pathways has been advocated (either as "add-on" therapy or initial "up front" therapy). Further, new therapeutic agents and treatment strategies are on the near horizon, aiming to further improve survival from the remarkable progress already seen. PMID:24037625

  17. Coronary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Weir, Ian

    2006-05-01

    The near exponential rise in percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI) in the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease and the consequent decline in referral of patients for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has lead to a crisis in cardiac surgery. Is CABG, one of the most successful and widely applied surgical procedures, about to follow surgery for peptic ulcer disease into obsolescence? The question has serious implications for service provision and training as well as for informed patient consent. Keith Dawkins puts the case for PCI and gives a very clear and concise account of its inexorable rise to pre-eminence. David Taggart has taken on the Goliath of interventional cardiology and its associated industry by persuasively marshalling the data from the evidence base which strongly favours surgery in triple vessel and left main coronary disease. He points to the lack of long-term results and also to the weaknesses of many of the comparative studies so far published. His arguments have been positively received on both sides of the Atlantic but it is by no means certain that they will bring about the multidisciplinary approach to providing patients with treatment options which he and others advocate. It also remains to be seen whether the evidence base when it is eventually acquired will vindicate the present increasing dominance of PCI over CABG. PMID:16719994

  18. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation. PMID:26888065

  19. Computer measurement of arterial disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J.; Selzer, R. H.; Barndt, R.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Brooks, S.

    1980-01-01

    Image processing technique quantifies human atherosclerosis by computer analysis of arterial angiograms. X-ray film images are scanned and digitized, arterial shadow is tracked, and several quantitative measures of lumen irregularity are computed. In other tests, excellent agreement was found between computer evaluation of femoral angiograms on living subjects and evaluation by teams of trained angiographers.

  20. Peripheral arterial injuries: a reassessment.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, H F; Parnell, C L; Williams, G D; Campbell, G S

    1976-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with peripheral arterial injuries were subjected to acute repair, negative exploration, or late repair of the complications of the arterial injury (false aneurysm, A-V fistula, and/or limb ischemia). The causes of failure after acute injury include extensive local soft tissue and bony damage, severe concomitant head, chest or abdominal wounding, stubborn reliance on negative arteriograms in patients with probable arterial injury, failure to repair simultaneous venous injuries, or harvesting of a vein graft from a severely damaged extremity. There is a positive correlation between non-operative expectant treatment and the incidence of late vascular complications requiring late arterial repair. Delayed complications of arterial injuries occurred most frequently in wounds below the elbow and knee. PMID:973757

  1. Designing electron spin textures and spin interferometers by shape deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zu-Jian; Gentile, Paola; Ortix, Carmine; Cuoco, Mario

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that the spin orientation of an electron propagating in a one-dimensional nanostructure with Rashba spin-orbit (SO) coupling can be manipulated on demand by changing the geometry of the nanosystem. Shape deformations that result in a nonuniform curvature give rise to complex three-dimensional spin textures in space. We employ the paradigmatic example of an elliptically deformed quantum ring to unveil the way to get an all-geometrical and all-electrical control of the spin orientation. The resulting spin textures exhibit a tunable topological character with windings around the radial and the out-of-plane directions. We show that these topologically nontrivial spin patterns affect the spin interference effect in the deformed ring, thereby resulting in different geometry-driven ballistic electronic transport behaviors. Our results establish a deep connection between electronic spin textures, spin transport, and the nanoscale shape of the system.

  2. Spin-current emission governed by nonlinear spin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Takaharu; Matsuura, Saki; Nomura, Akiyo; Watanabe, Shun; Kang, Keehoon; Sirringhaus, Henning; Ando, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between conduction electrons and localized magnetization is responsible for a variety of phenomena in spintronic devices. This coupling enables to generate spin currents from dynamical magnetization. Due to the nonlinearity of magnetization dynamics, the spin-current emission through the dynamical spin-exchange coupling offers a route for nonlinear generation of spin currents. Here, we demonstrate spin-current emission governed by nonlinear magnetization dynamics in a metal/magnetic insulator bilayer. The spin-current emission from the magnetic insulator is probed by the inverse spin Hall effect, which demonstrates nontrivial temperature and excitation power dependences of the voltage generation. The experimental results reveal that nonlinear magnetization dynamics and enhanced spin-current emission due to magnon scatterings are triggered by decreasing temperature. This result illustrates the crucial role of the nonlinear magnon interactions in the spin-current emission driven by dynamical magnetization, or nonequilibrium magnons, from magnetic insulators. PMID:26472712

  3. Spin-current emission governed by nonlinear spin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Takaharu; Matsuura, Saki; Nomura, Akiyo; Watanabe, Shun; Kang, Keehoon; Sirringhaus, Henning; Ando, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between conduction electrons and localized magnetization is responsible for a variety of phenomena in spintronic devices. This coupling enables to generate spin currents from dynamical magnetization. Due to the nonlinearity of magnetization dynamics, the spin-current emission through the dynamical spin-exchange coupling offers a route for nonlinear generation of spin currents. Here, we demonstrate spin-current emission governed by nonlinear magnetization dynamics in a metal/magnetic insulator bilayer. The spin-current emission from the magnetic insulator is probed by the inverse spin Hall effect, which demonstrates nontrivial temperature and excitation power dependences of the voltage generation. The experimental results reveal that nonlinear magnetization dynamics and enhanced spin-current emission due to magnon scatterings are triggered by decreasing temperature. This result illustrates the crucial role of the nonlinear magnon interactions in the spin-current emission driven by dynamical magnetization, or nonequilibrium magnons, from magnetic insulators. PMID:26472712

  4. Spin-Current and Spin-Splitting in Helicoidal Molecules Due to Spin-Orbit Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of organic materials in spintronic devices has been seriously considered after recent experimental works have shown unexpected spin-dependent electrical properties. The basis for the confection of any spintronic device is ability of selecting the appropriated spin polarization. In this direction, DNA has been pointed out as a potential candidate for spin selection due to the spin-orbit coupling originating from the electric field generated by accumulated electrical charges along the helix. Here, we demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling is the minimum ingredient necessary to promote a spatial spin separation and the generation of spin-current. We show that the up and down spin components have different velocities that give rise to a spin-current. By using a simple situation where spin-orbit coupling is present, we provide qualitative justifications to our results that clearly point to helicoidal molecules as serious candidates to integrate spintronic devices. PMID:27009836

  5. Spin-Current and Spin-Splitting in Helicoidal Molecules Due to Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    The use of organic materials in spintronic devices has been seriously considered after recent experimental works have shown unexpected spin-dependent electrical properties. The basis for the confection of any spintronic device is ability of selecting the appropriated spin polarization. In this direction, DNA has been pointed out as a potential candidate for spin selection due to the spin-orbit coupling originating from the electric field generated by accumulated electrical charges along the helix. Here, we demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling is the minimum ingredient necessary to promote a spatial spin separation and the generation of spin-current. We show that the up and down spin components have different velocities that give rise to a spin-current. By using a simple situation where spin-orbit coupling is present, we provide qualitative justifications to our results that clearly point to helicoidal molecules as serious candidates to integrate spintronic devices.

  6. Spin-Current and Spin-Splitting in Helicoidal Molecules Due to Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Caetano, R A

    2016-01-01

    The use of organic materials in spintronic devices has been seriously considered after recent experimental works have shown unexpected spin-dependent electrical properties. The basis for the confection of any spintronic device is ability of selecting the appropriated spin polarization. In this direction, DNA has been pointed out as a potential candidate for spin selection due to the spin-orbit coupling originating from the electric field generated by accumulated electrical charges along the helix. Here, we demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling is the minimum ingredient necessary to promote a spatial spin separation and the generation of spin-current. We show that the up and down spin components have different velocities that give rise to a spin-current. By using a simple situation where spin-orbit coupling is present, we provide qualitative justifications to our results that clearly point to helicoidal molecules as serious candidates to integrate spintronic devices. PMID:27009836

  7. Patent arterial duct

    PubMed Central

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-01-01

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation

  8. Patent arterial duct.

    PubMed

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-01-01

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation

  9. Measurements of nuclear spin dynamics by spin-noise spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, K. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Cronenberger, S.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2015-06-15

    We exploit the potential of the spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) for studies of nuclear spin dynamics in n-GaAs. The SNS experiments were performed on bulk n-type GaAs layers embedded into a high-finesse microcavity at negative detuning. In our experiments, nuclear spin polarisation initially prepared by optical pumping is monitored in real time via a shift of the peak position in the electron spin noise spectrum. We demonstrate that this shift is a direct measure of the Overhauser field acting on the electron spin. The dynamics of nuclear spin is shown to be strongly dependent on the electron concentration.

  10. Amplification of Spin Waves by Thermal Spin-Transfer Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Hernández, E.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2011-11-01

    We observe amplification of spin-wave packets propagating along a film of single-crystal yttrium iron garnet subject to a transverse temperature gradient. The spin waves are excited and detected with standard techniques used in magnetostatic microwave delay lines in the 1-2 GHz frequency range. The amplification is attributed to the action of a thermal spin-transfer torque acting on the magnetization that opposes the relaxation and which is created by spin currents generated through the spin-Seebeck effect. The experimental data are interpreted with a spin-wave model that gives an amplification gain in very good agreement with the data.

  11. Artery phantoms for intravascular optical coherence tomography: healthy arteries.

    PubMed

    Bisaillon, Charles-Étienne; Dufour, Marc L; Lamouche, Guy

    2011-09-01

    We present a method to make phantoms of coronary arteries for intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). The phantoms provide a calibrated OCT response similar to the layered structure of arteries. The optical properties of each layer are achieved with specific concentrations of alumina and carbon black in a silicone matrix. This composition insures high durability and also approximates the elastic properties of arteries. The phantoms are fabricated in a tubular shape by the successive deposition and curing of liquid silicone mixtures on a lathe setup. PMID:21991552

  12. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge. PMID:27216840

  13. Spin pumping by magnetopolaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yunshan; Yan, Peng; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian; Bauer, Gerrit

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments report the strong coupling of microwaves to the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet with weakly damped magnetization dynamics. We developed a scattering approach to study the coupled magnetization and microwave cavities beyond the paramagnetic/macrospin and rotating wave approximations that are implicit in the Tavis-Cummings model. To this end we solve the coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert and Maxwell's equations for a thin film magnet in a microwave cavity, leading to rich ferromagnetic spin wave resonance spectra of the transmitted or absorbed microwaves. Our method is valid for the full parameter range spanning the weak to strong coupling limits. We demonstrate strong coupling achievement not only for the FMR mode but also for standing spin waves, although the lowest excitation has a decisive leading role for coupling strength. Spin pumping in FI|N bilayers as detected by inverse spin Hall voltages provides additional access to study strong coupling electrically. Funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme [FP7-People-2012-ITN] under Grant Agreement 316657 (SpinIcur).

  14. Overview of spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1992-12-23

    Spin physics activities at medium and high energies became significantly active when polarized targets and polarized beams became accessible for hadron-hadron scattering experiments. My overview of spin physics will be inclined to the study of strong interaction using facilities at Argonne ZGS, Brookhaven AGS (including RHIC), CERN, Fermilab, LAMPF, an SATURNE. In 1960 accelerator physicists had already been convinced that the ZGS could be unique in accelerating a polarized beam; polarized beams were being accelerated through linear accelerators elsewhere at that time. However, there was much concern about going ahead with the construction of a polarized beam because (i) the source intensity was not high enough to accelerate in the accelerator, (ii) the use of the accelerator would be limited to only polarized-beam physics, that is, proton-proton interaction, and (iii) p-p elastic scattering was not the most popular topic in high-energy physics. In fact, within spin physics, [pi]-nucleon physics looked attractive, since the determination of spin and parity of possible [pi]p resonances attracted much attention. To proceed we needed more data beside total cross sections and elastic differential cross sections; measurements of polarization and other parameters were urgently needed. Polarization measurements had traditionally been performed by analyzing the spin of recoil protons. The drawbacks of this technique are: (i) it involves double scattering, resulting in poor accuracy of the data, and (ii) a carbon analyzer can only be used for a limited region of energy.

  15. Spin hydrodynamic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, R.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Chudo, H.; Okayasu, S.; Ieda, J.; Takahashi, S.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generation is the conversion of fluid kinetic energy into electricity. Such conversion, which has been applied to various types of electric power generation, is driven by the Lorentz force acting on charged particles and thus a magnetic field is necessary. On the other hand, recent studies of spintronics have revealed the similarity between the function of a magnetic field and that of spin-orbit interactions in condensed matter. This suggests the existence of an undiscovered route to realize the conversion of fluid dynamics into electricity without using magnetic fields. Here we show electric voltage generation from fluid dynamics free from magnetic fields; we excited liquid-metal flows in a narrow channel and observed longitudinal voltage generation in the liquid. This voltage has nothing to do with electrification or thermoelectric effects, but turned out to follow a universal scaling rule based on a spin-mediated scenario. The result shows that the observed voltage is caused by spin-current generation from a fluid motion: spin hydrodynamic generation. The observed phenomenon allows us to make mechanical spin-current and electric generators, opening a door to fluid spintronics.

  16. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  17. Harnessing spin precession with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A. D.; Datta, S.; Viennot, J. J.; Delbecq, M. R.; Cottet, A.; Kontos, T.

    2016-01-01

    Non-collinear spin transport is at the heart of spin or magnetization control in spintronics devices. The use of nanoscale conductors exhibiting quantum effects in transport could provide new paths for that purpose. Here we study non-collinear spin transport in a quantum dot. We use a device made out of a single-wall carbon nanotube connected to orthogonal ferromagnetic electrodes. In the spin transport signals, we observe signatures of out of equilibrium spin precession that are electrically tunable through dissipation. This could provide a new path to harness spin precession in nanoscale conductors.

  18. Harnessing spin precession with dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Crisan, A. D.; Datta, S.; Viennot, J. J.; Delbecq, M. R.; Cottet, A.; Kontos, T.

    2016-01-01

    Non-collinear spin transport is at the heart of spin or magnetization control in spintronics devices. The use of nanoscale conductors exhibiting quantum effects in transport could provide new paths for that purpose. Here we study non-collinear spin transport in a quantum dot. We use a device made out of a single-wall carbon nanotube connected to orthogonal ferromagnetic electrodes. In the spin transport signals, we observe signatures of out of equilibrium spin precession that are electrically tunable through dissipation. This could provide a new path to harness spin precession in nanoscale conductors. PMID:26816050

  19. Wall thickening pattern in atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianjin; Liu, Lei; He, Xinxin; Zhang, Xuebin; Hu, Libin; Du, Bin; Wang, Wu; Jiang, Weijian; Liu, Zunjing

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate wall thickening (WT) pattern of atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis with three-dimensional volumetric isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (3D VISTA), and the relationship with clinical characteristics. Twenty consecutive patients with atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis were prospectively enrolled. All cross-sectional slices on VISTA images of basilar arteries were assessed, and classified as eccentric or concentric WT. Clinical characteristics and degree of stenosis were compared between the patients with different wall WT pattern. Wall abnormalities were identified in 568 cross-sectional slices in basilar arteries of 20 patients including eccentric WT in 497 (87.5 %) slices, and concentric WT in 71 (12.5 %) slices. In 11 of 20 patients, all the cross-sectional slices (293 slices) showed eccentric WT. In 9 of 20 patients, the cross-sectional slices (275 slices) showed both eccentric WT (204 slices, 74.2 %) and concentric WT (71 slices, 25.8 %). No lesion showed only concentric WT. At the slices of maximum luminal narrowing sites, only one patient showed concentric WT. Symptomatic stenosis was more common in the patients with mixed WT (eccentric and concentric), compared to patients with only eccentric WT (100 vs 54.5 %, p = 0.038). Atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis could show both eccentric and concentric WT based on each slice analysis. Concentric WT was found in near half of the patients, but tended to locate in minimal slices. No lesion was entirely concentric. Lesions with mixed WT (concentric and eccentric) might represent advanced atherosclerosis with high risk of ischemic event. PMID:26520844

  20. Spin-valve phototransistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Altfeder, Igor; Appelbaum, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The spin-valve phototransistor is a semiconductor-ferromagnetic metal multilayer-semiconductor transistor operated by photoexciting hot electrons in the emitter semiconductor into a Schottky collector. This device uses an ultra-high vacuum-bonded float zone Si/multilayer/n-InP structure. To distinguish the emitter interband-excited component of collector current from base/collector internal photoemission, a lock-in spectroscopy sensitive only to the magnetocurrent is used. The experimental results indicate a pathway to improve the magnetocurrent of a related device, the spin-valve photodiode, by increasing the fraction of hot electron current that travels through both layers of the ferromagnetic spin valve and demonstrate that hot electrons photogenerated in one semiconductor can be collected by another through a thin ferromagnetic multilayer.

  1. Doped Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia; Libal, Andras; Reichhardt, Charles

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  2. Mechanical spin bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spin bearing assembly including, a pair of mutually opposing complementary bearing support members having mutually spaced apart bearing support surfaces which may be, for example, bearing races and a set of spin bearings located therebetween. Each spin bearing includes a pair of end faces, a central rotational axis passing through the end faces, a waist region substantially mid-way between the end faces and having a first thickness dimension, and discrete side surface regions located between the waist region and the end faces and having a second thickness dimension different from the first thickness dimension of the waist region and wherein the side surface regions further have respective curvilinear contact surfaces adapted to provide a plurality of bearing contact points on the bearing support members.

  3. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  4. Fermi spin current contribution in spin wave spectrum of spin-1/2 fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel; Kuzmenkov, Leonid

    2016-05-01

    General theory predicts the presence of the thermal part of the spin current in the spin evolution equation for bosons and fermions. For bosons in Bose-Einstein condensate state, it is equal to zero. However, for degenerate fermions it is non zero and it can give a considerable contribution since it describes the Pauli blocking. In this work, we consider spin-1/2 partially polarized fermions. We derive an equation of state for the thermal part of the spin current of degenerate fermions and call it Fermi spin current. We present the spin evolution equation with the Fermi spin current as a part of applied hydrodynamic model. We consider spectrum of collective excitation and describe contribution of the Fermi spin current in the spin wave spectrum. The work of P.A. was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant No. 16-32-00886) and the Dynasty foundation.

  5. Medial Arterial Calcification: An Overlooked Player in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin Yee; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a global health issue that is becoming more prevalent in an aging world population. Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease are also on the increase, and both are associated with accelerated vascular calcification and an unfavorable prognosis in PAD. These data challenge the traditional athero-centric view of PAD, instead pointing toward a disease process complicated by medial arterial calcification. Like atherosclerosis, aging is a potent risk factor for medial arterial calcification, and accelerated vascular aging may underpin the devastating manifestations of PAD, particularly in patients prone to calcification. Consequently, this review will attempt to dissect the relationship between medial arterial calcification and atherosclerosis in PAD and identify common as well as novel risk factors that may contribute to and accelerate progression of PAD. In this context, we focus on the complex interplay between oxidative stress, DNA damage, and vascular aging, as well as the unexplored role of neuropathy. PMID:27312224

  6. Left Subclavian Artery Occlusion: Femoro-Axillary Artery Retrograde Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The treatment tactics for subclavian artery occlusion include the more commonly used endovascular therapy rather than surgical intervention. We present a case of a 61-year-old woman with dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure who experienced left finger necrosis in the left upper extremity. To salvage the limb, we performed femoro-axillary (fem-ax) artery bypass using an autologous saphenous vein graft. However, 10 months later, she experienced coldness in the left forearm. Angiography revealed chronic total occlusion of the venous bypass. Despite emergent thrombectomy, redo fem-ax artery bypass operation was performed using a prosthetic graft. Upper limb salvage can be achieved by fem-ax artery retrograde bypass. PMID:27386454

  7. Spin filter and spin valve in ferromagnetic graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yu Dai, Gang

    2015-06-01

    We propose and demonstrate that a EuO-induced and top-gated graphene ferromagnetic junction can be simultaneously operated as a spin filter and a spin valve. We attribute such a remarkable result to a coexistence of a half-metal band and a common energy gap for opposite spins in ferromagnetic graphene. We show that both the spin filter and the spin valve can be effectively controlled by a back gate voltage, and they survive for practical metal contacts and finite temperature. Specifically, larger single spin currents and on-state currents can be reached with contacts with work functions similar to graphene, and the spin filter can operate at higher temperature than the spin valve.

  8. Spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation in phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpas, Marcin; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    We employ first principles density functional theory calculations to study intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit coupling in monolayer phosphorene. We also extract the spin-mixing amplitudes of the Bloch wave functions to give realistic estimates of the Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation rate. The most remarkable result is the striking anisotropy in both spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation rates, which could be tested experimentally in spin injection experiments. We also identify spin hot spots in the electronic structure of phosphorene at accidental bands anticrossings. We compare the Elliott-Yafet with Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation times, obtained from extrinsic couplings in an applied electric field. We also compare the results in phosphorene with those of black phosphorous. This work is supported by the DFG SPP 1538, SFB 689, and by the EU Seventh Framework Programme under Grant Agreement No. 604391 Graphene Flagship.

  9. [Simultaneous brachiocephalic arteries reconstruction and coronary artery bypass grafting].

    PubMed

    Lysenko, A V; Belov, Iu V; Stonogin, A V

    2015-01-01

    It is presented the results of simultaneous surgical treatment of 55 patients with brachiocephalic arteries lesion and ischemic heart disease. All patients underwent reconstructive operations on brachiocephalic arteries and CABG. The features of diagnosis and surgical stage are described. The indications for this method are defined. The authors studied russian and world experience; complications of simultaneous operations are presented. It is suggested ways for improvement of results of simultaneous reconstructions. PMID:26031945

  10. Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm Formation with Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Tadashi; Kamiya, Chiaki; Suzuki, Jun; Sato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Celiac stenosis or occlusion is attributed partly to increase blood flow at pancreatic arcade from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) system and may play a causal role in true aneurysm of pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDAA) formation. However, despite possible increased blood flow in the pancreatic arcades like celiac stenosis, PDAAs with a stenotic SMA are extremely rare, with only three cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of PDAA with SMA stenosis and review the literature. PMID:25298835

  11. Optical spin excitations in quantum spin ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutis, Gediminas; Gvasaliya, Severian; Xiao, Fan; Landee, Christopher; Zheludev, Andrey

    We present a Raman spectroscopy study of magnetic excitations in quantum spin ladders. We start with a strong-rung ladder Cu(Qnx)(Cl1-xBrx)2. It has recently attracted attention due to proposal that the ratio of leg to rung exchange can be varied continuously by substituting Br for Cl. We have measured the Raman spectra for the hole doping series and report on the scattering from two magnons. We extract the onset and cutoff of the scattering for the whole series and compare it to the estimates from previous bulk measurements as well as numerical calculations. We find that the magnetic spectrum indeed varies continuously as the halogen ions are exchanged. The general behavior is found to be consistent with expectations, however small systematic deviations persist. The difference can potentially be explained by the existence of three-dimensional coupling, however more systematic computational studies are needed to ascertain the origin of the inconsistencies. Having established the analysis using the strong rung case, we then turn our attention to other ladder systems. Unusual magnetic signal is found in a strong leg spin ladder, which is discussed in terms of selection rules and an unexpected energy scale.

  12. Spin Charge Separation in the Quantum Spin Hall State

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum spin Hall state is a topologically non-trivial insulator state protected by the time reversal symmetry. We show that such a state always leads to spin-charge separation in the presence of a {pi} flux. Our result is generally valid for any interacting system. We present a proposal to experimentally observe the phenomenon of spin-charge separation in the recently discovered quantum spin Hall system.

  13. Squeezed spin states: Squeezing the spin uncertainty relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitagawa, Masahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    1993-01-01

    The notion of squeezing in spin systems is clarified, and the principle for spin squeezing is shown. Two twisting schemes are proposed as building blocks for spin squeezing and are shown to reduce the standard quantum noise, s/2, of the coherent S-spin state down to the order of S(sup 1/3) and 1/2. Applications to partition noise suppression are briefly discussed.

  14. Inhomogeneously broadened spin masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romalis, M. V.; Happer, W.

    1999-08-01

    Hyperpolarized 3He gas, where the nuclear spin polarization has been increased to several tens of percent by optical pumping, can couple such a large negative resistance into an external circuit that masing can ensue. The masing threshold can be suppressed by application of a magnetic field gradient. However, edge enhancement, that is, the less effective diffusional damping of the precessing magnetization at the container walls, can lower the masing threshold. The edge enhancement of the masing is greatly modified by magnetic self-interactions of the spins.

  15. Measuring Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    1999-09-01

    WE PROPOSE TO CARRY OUT A SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION SPECTRAL FEATURES THAT ARE OFTEN SEEN IN X-RAY SPECTRA OF BLACK HOLE BINARIES. THE EXCELLENT SENSITIVITY AND ENERGY RESOLUTION OF THE ACIS/HETG COMBINATION WILL NOT ONLY HELP RESOLVE AMBIGUITIES IN INTERPRETING THESE FEATURES, BUT MAY ALLOW MODELLING OF THE EMISSION LINE PROFILES IN DETAIL. THE PROFILES MAY CONTAIN INFORMATION ON SUCH FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES AS THE SPIN OF BLACK HOLES. THEREFORE, THIS STUDY COULD LEAD TO A MEASUREMENT OF BLACK HOLE SPIN FOR SELECTED SOURCES. THE RESULT CAN THEN BE DIRECTLY COMPARED WITH THOSE FROM PREVIOUS STUDIES BASED ON INDEPENDENT METHODS.

  16. Spin Currents in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-03-01

    I will discuss the results of our recent spin injection experiments using long-distance non-degenerate undoped (and n-type doped) Si devices. We have a unique capability to recover the details of electron transport on a sub-ns timescale through a ``Larmor clock'' transformation of spin precession data, despite using only quasistatic current measurements. I suggest that this is potentially a new tool for probing non-equilibrium phenomena in semiconductors, revealing both intrinsic and extrinsic materials properties through sensitivity to subtleties of the bandstructure and impurity spectrum. Supported by ONR and NSF.

  17. Spin labeling EPR.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has emerged as an efficient tool to elucidate the structure and conformational dynamics of biomolecules under native-like conditions. This article summarizes the basics as well as recent progress of site-directed spin labeling. Continuous wave EPR spectra analyses and pulse EPR techniques are reviewed with special emphasis on applications to the sensory rhodopsin-transducer complex mediating the photophobic response of the halophilic archaeum Natronomonas pharaonis and the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. PMID:19728138

  18. Spin, Gravity, and Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.

    2001-01-01

    The gravitational effects in the relativistic quantum mechanics are investigated. The exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation is constructed for the Dirac particle coupled to the static spacetime metric. As a direct application, we analyze the nonrelativistic limit of the theory. The new term describing the specific spin (gravitational moment) interaction effect is recovered in the Hamiltonian. The comparison of the true gravitational coupling with the purely inertial case demonstrates that the spin relativistic effects do not violate the equivalence principle for the Dirac fermions.

  19. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Constructing the forms for the foundation of the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman was given the assignment to design and build a larger spin tunnel that would supplant the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Authorization to build the tunnel using funds from the Federal Public Works Administration (PWA) came in June 1933. Construction started in late winter 1934 and the tunnel was operational in April 1935. The initial construction costs were $64,000. The first step was to pour the foundation for the tunnel and the housing which would encase the wind tunnel.

  20. Higher Spin Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chi-Ming

    This dissertation splits into two distinct halves. The first half is devoted to the study of the holography of higher spin gauge theory in AdS 3. We present a conjecture that the holographic dual of W N minimal model in a 't Hooft-like large N limit is an unusual "semi-local" higher spin gauge theory on AdS3 x 1. At each point on the S1 lives a copy of three-dimensional Vasiliev theory, that contains an infinite tower of higher spin gauge fields coupled to a single massive complex scalar propagating in AdS3. The Vasiliev theories at different points on the S1 are correlated only through the AdS3 boundary conditions on the massive scalars. All but one single tower of higher spin symmetries are broken by the boundary conditions. This conjecture is checked by comparing tree-level two- and three-point functions, and also one-loop partition functions on both side of the duality. The second half focuses on the holography of higher spin gauge theory in AdS 4. We demonstrate that a supersymmetric and parity violating version of Vasiliev's higher spin gauge theory in AdS4 admits boundary conditions that preserve N = 0,1,2,3,4 or 6 supersymmetries. In particular, we argue that the Vasiliev theory with U( M) Chan-Paton and N = 6 boundary condition is holographically dual to the 2+1 dimensional U(N) k x U(M) -k ABJ theory in the limit of large N, k and finite M. In this system all bulk higher spin fields transform in the adjoint of the U(M) gauge group, whose bulk t'Hooft coupling is M/N. Our picture suggests that the supersymmetric Vasiliev theory can be obtained as a limit of type IIA string theory in AdS4 x CP3, and that the non-Abelian Vasiliev theory at strong bulk 't Hooft coupling smoothly turn into a string field theory. The fundamental string is a singlet bound state of Vasiliev's higher spin particles held together by U(M) gauge interactions.

  1. Spin Wave Genie

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce themore » time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.« less

  2. Spin Wave Genie

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce the time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.

  3. Peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Atmer, B; Jogestrand, T; Laska, J; Lund, F

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease in patients with coronary artery disease has been investigated in many different ways and depends on the diagnostic methods and the definition of the atherosclerotic manifestations in the different vascular beds. In this study we used the non-invasive methods digital volume pulse plethysmography and ankle and toe blood pressure measurements to identify arterial abnormalities in the lower limbs in 58 patients (49 males and 9 females; age 37-72 years) examined with coronary angiography. The prevalence of peripheral artery disease was 22%, in agreement with the results of most previous investigations. There was a tendency towards increasing prevalence of peripheral artery disease with more advanced coronary artery disease: 14% of the patients with no or minimal coronary atheromotous lesions, 18% of the patients with moderate coronary atheromotous lesions and 32% of the patients with marked coronary atheromotous disease. For this reason a non-invasive investigation of the peripheral arterial circulation should be included early in the clinical consideration of patients with chest pain or similar symptoms suggesting coronary heart disease. Toe pressure measurement appears to be the most appropriate technique being rather simple in management and also in evaluation of results. PMID:7658111

  4. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Chen; Torng, Pao-Ling; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Ming-Fong; Liau, Chiau-Suong

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited. Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD), compliance (BAC), and resistance (BAR). Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured. Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity. Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than omnivores. Prevention of vitamin B12 deficiency might be beneficial for cardiovascular health in vegetarians. PMID:21915169

  5. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... this depends on which arteries are affected. Coronary Arteries Coronary arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to the ...

  6. Spin Hall and spin Nernst effects: temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrdal, Anna; Barnas, Jozef; Dugaev, Vitalii

    We have considered temperature dependence of spin Hall and spin Nernst effect in two-dimensional electron gas with spin-orbit interaction of Rashba type [arXiv:1510.03080]. In our considerations we have employed the approach based on the Matsubara Green functions. The formalism used in the case of electric field as a driving force was subsequently adopted to the situation of a spin current driven by a temperature gradient. To achieve this, we have used the concept of an auxiliary vector field. Such a description gives the possibility to consider all mechanisms leading to the spin Hall and spin Nernst effect on equal footing and also their behavior at finite temperatures. Both spin Hall and spin Nernst conductivities were calculated in the approximation including the vertex correction. The total spin Hall conductivity, including vertex correction, has been shown to vanish exactly in the whole temperature range. Thus, our results extend the earlier ones to an arbitrary temperatures. In turn, the total spin Nernst conductivity remains finite when the vertex corrections are included. Using the Ioffe-Regel localization criterion, we have also estimated the range of parameters where the calculated results for the spin Hall and spin Nernst conductivities are applicable.

  7. Spin current swapping and spin hall effect in disordered metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidaoui, Hamed; Pauyac, Christian; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    The conversion of charge currents into spin currents via the spin Hall effect has attracted intense experimental and theoretical efforts lately, providing an efficient means to generate electric signals and manipulate the magnetization of single layers. More recently, it was proposed that spin-dependent scattering induced by spin-orbit coupled impurities also produces a so-called spin swapping, i.e. an exchange between the spin angular momentum and linear momentum of itinerant electrons. In this work, we investigate the nature of spin swapping and its interplay with extrinsic spin Hall effect and spin relaxation in finite size normal metals. We use two complementary methods based on non-equilibrium Green's function technique. The first method consists in rigorously deriving the drift-diffusion equation of the spin accumulation in the presence of spin-orbit coupled impurities from quantum kinetics using Wigner expansion. The second method is the real-space tight binding modeling of a finite system in the presence of spin-orbit coupled disorder.

  8. Spin guides and spin splitters: waveguide analogies in one-dimensional spin chains.

    PubMed

    Makin, Melissa I; Cole, Jared H; Hill, Charles D; Greentree, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Here we show a mapping between waveguide theory and spin-chain transport, opening an alternative approach to solid-state quantum information transport. By applying temporally varying control profiles to a spin chain, we design a virtual waveguide or "spin guide" to conduct spin excitations along defined space-time trajectories of the chain. We show that the concepts of confinement, adiabatic bend loss, and beam splitting can be mapped from optical waveguide theory to spin guides, and hence to "spin splitters." Importantly, the spatial scale of applied control pulses is required to be large compared to the interspin spacing, thereby allowing the design of scalable control architectures. PMID:22304287

  9. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  11. Attitude stability of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Some problems of attitude stability of spinning satellites are treated in a rigorous manner. With certain restrictions, linearized stability analysis correctly predicts the attitude stability of spinning satellites, even in the critical cases of the Liapunov-Poincare stability theory.

  12. Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... P. Peripheral arterial diseases. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ... noncoronary obstructive vascular disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ...

  13. Management of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Gey, Daniela C; Lesho, Emil P; Manngold, Johannes

    2004-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is common, but the diagnosis frequently is overlooked because of subtle physical findings and lack of classic symptoms. Screening based on the ankle brachial index using Doppler ultrasonography may be more useful than physical examination alone. Noninvasive modalities to locate lesions include magnetic resonance angiography, duplex scanning, and hemodynamic localization. Major risk factors for peripheral arterial disease are cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, older age (older than 40 years), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and hyperhomocystinemia. Nonsurgical therapy for intermittent claudication involves risk-factor modification, exercise, and pharmacologic therapy. Based on available evidence, a supervised exercise program is the most effective treatment. All patients with peripheral arterial disease should undergo aggressive control of blood pressure, sugar intake, and lipid levels. All available strategies to help patients quit smoking, such as counseling and nicotine replacement, should be used. Effective drug therapies for peripheral arterial disease include aspirin (with or without dipyridamole), clopidogrel, cilostazol, and pentoxifylline. PMID:14971833

  14. Novel, congenital iliac arterial anatomy: Absent common iliac arteries and left internal iliac artery

    PubMed Central

    Green, Christopher S.; Helmy, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the iliac arterial system are rare and can be associated with ischemia. With an increase in vascular imaging and interventions, such anomalies are likely to be encountered with greater frequency. We present the case of a 25-year-old female who was incidentally found to have absence of the common iliac arteries bilaterally and the left internal iliac artery, a constellation not previously reported in the literature. We present relevant imaging findings, review embryonic vascular development, and discuss potential clinical implications.

  15. Cervical arterial dissection: current concepts .

    PubMed

    Menon, Ranjith K; Norris, John W

    2008-10-01

    The increasing use and safety of noninvasive imaging in recent years has revealed the surprising frequency of dissection of the carotid and vertebral arteries (cervical arterial dissection [CAD]) as a cause of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. This review is an overview of current concepts and practice of patients with CAD, but our ideas are constantly evolving with new discoveries from neurovascular imaging and medical and surgical management in this area. PMID:18990128

  16. All Spin Digital Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behin-Aein, Behtash; Datta, Deepanjan; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Datta, Supriyo

    2009-03-01

    Switching of a magnetic free layer using spin polarized current has been demonstrated in Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) devices. Currently MTJ's are being studied for memory and microwave oscillator applications. The purpose of this talk is to explore a modified MTJ where a clock pulse via the fixed layer facilities the switching of the free layer in accordance with a weak bias provided by an input magnet in the form of a spin current. Based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation (LLG) augmented with spin torque functions, we show the switching energy and the switching time of the free layer which indicates the possibility of very low power digital logic applications. Ordinary digital circuits store information in the form of capacitor charges that communicate through electrical interconnects. The purpose of this paper is to show that modified MTJ's can be the basis for all spin digital circuits. Our primary objective is to stimulate proof of concept experiments that could usher in a whole new set of devices suitable for spintronic circuits.

  17. 20-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    Construction of a typical model used in the 20-Foot Spin Tunnel. >From 'Characteristics of Nine Research Wind Tunnels of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory': 'Dynamic models are used for free-spinning tunnel tests. A dynamic model is one for which geometric similarity between model and airplane is extended to obtain geometric similarity of the paths of motion of corresponding points by maintaining constant, in addition to the scale ratio of linear dimensions, three other ratios, that of force, mass, and time. In model testing, however, complete similarity can generally not be duplicated and some compromise is necessary. For free-spinning-model tests in the NACA 20-foot tunnel, the ratio of inertia to frictional or viscous forces (Reynolds number) is not maintained constant, but the ratio of inertia to gravity forces (Froude number) is maintained constant.' 'Models used in the spin tunnel until recently [this report was written in 1957] were made primarily of balsa and reinforced with hardwood. Now, plastic models are being used almost entirely, because they are more durable and when properly constructed are no heavier than balsa models. The models are constructed accurately to scale by pressing plastic material and class cloth into a previously constructed mold. A typical mod is shown in [this picture]. The model is swung as a torsional pendulum and is ballasted to obtain dynamic similarity by placing lead weights in suitable locations within the model wings and fuselage. Corrections are made for the effect of ambient and entrapped air.'

  18. Artificial frustrated spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Y.; Chioar, I. A.; Nguyen, V. D.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Montaigne, F.; Canals, B.; Rougemaille, N.

    2015-09-01

    Complex architectures of nanostructures are routinely elaborated using bottom-up or nanofabrication processes. This technological capability allows scientists to engineer materials with properties that do not exist in nature, but also to manufacture model systems to explore fundamental issues in condensed matter physics. Two-dimensional frustrated arrays of magnetic nanostructures are one class of systems for which theoretical predictions can be tested experimentally. These systems have been the subject of intense research in the last few years and allowed the investigation of a rich physics and fascinating phenomena, such as the exploration of the extensively degenerate ground-state manifolds of spin ice systems, the evidence of new magnetic phases in purely two-dimensional lattices, and the observation of pseudoexcitations involving classical analogues of magnetic monopoles. We show here, experimentally and theoretically, that simple magnetic geometries can lead to unconventional, non-collinear spin textures. For example, kagome arrays of inplane magnetized nano-islands do not show magnetic order. Instead, these systems are characterized by spin textures with intriguing properties, such as chirality, coexistence of magnetic order and disorder, and charge crystallization. Magnetic frustration effects in lithographically patterned kagome arrays of nanomagnets with out-of-plane magnetization also lead to an unusal, and still unknown, magnetic ground state manifold. Besides the influence of the lattice geometry, the micromagnetic nature of the elements constituting the arrays introduce the concept of chiral magnetic monopoles, bringing additional complexity into the physics of artificial frustrated spin systems.

  19. Does the Moon Spin?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Robert; Simpson, Frances

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the question, "Does the Moon spin?", and show how the question is investigated. They emphasise the importance of the process by which people work out what they know, by "learning from the inside out." They stress that those involved in science education have to challenge current conceptions and ideas, making…

  20. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  1. Spin Physics at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Hasch, D.

    2007-06-13

    The HERMES experiment at DESY is a second generation experiment to study the spin structure of the nucleon by measuring not only inclusive but also semi-inclusive and exclusive processes in deep-inelastic lepton scattering. An overview of most recent results is given.

  2. Spin Physics with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2010-05-01

    Inelastic scattering using polarized nucleon targets and polarized charged lepton beams allows the extraction of double and single spin asymmetries that provide information about the helicity structure of the nucleon. A program designed to study such processes at low and intermediate $Q^2$ for the proton and deuteron has been pursued by the CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Lab since 1998. Our inclusive data with high statistical precision and extensive kinematic coverage allow us to better constrain the polarized parton distributions and to accurately determine various moments of spin structure function $g_1$ as a function of $Q^2$. The latest results will be shown, illustrating our contribution to the world data, with comparisons of the data with NLO global fits, phenomenological models, chiral perturbation theory and the GDH and Bjorken sum rules. The semi-inclusive measurements of single and double spin asymmetries for charged and neutral pions are also show, indicating the importance of the orbital motion of quarks in understanding the spin structure of the nucleon.

  3. Transverse Spin at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been exciting development in both experimental and theoretical studies of transverse spin asymmetries in polarized p+p and and DIS collisions. As a unique polarized proton-proton collider, Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the novel physics mechanisms that cause the large single spin asymmetry at the forward rapidity. Both PHENIX and STAR experiments have been studying the transverse spin asymmetries with a variety of final state particles in different kinematic regimes since 2006. Especially, recent theoretical development on scattering a polarized probe on the saturated nuclear may provide a unique way to probe the gluon and quark TMDs. RHIC successfully ran polarized p+Au collisions in 2015. We will expect to have new results from polarized d+Au to compare with existing results from p+p collision to extend our understanding of QCD. Further more, In 2015, PHENIX installed MPC-ex calorimeter at very forward region to measure direct photon AN and STAR installed Roman Pots to study the diffractive events in polarized p+p and p+Au collisions. The recent results on transverse polarized p+p and p+Au collisions from both PHENIX and STAR experiments will be presented in this talk. I will also briefly discuss the possibility for the transverse Spin program at future experiments sPHENIX and forward sPHENIX at RHIC. Supported by US Department of Energy and RIKEN Brookhaven Research Center.

  4. Layered kagome spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamp, James; Dutton, Sian; Mourigal, Martin; Mukherjee, Paromita; Paddison, Joseph; Ong, Harapan; Castelnovo, Claudio

    Spin ice materials provide a rare instance of emergent gauge symmetry and fractionalisation in three dimensions: the effective degrees of freedom of the system are emergent magnetic monopoles, and the extensively many `ice rule' ground states are those devoid of monopole excitations. Two-dimensional (kagome) analogues of spin ice have also been shown to display a similarly rich behaviour. In kagome ice however the ground-state `ice rule' condition implies the presence everywhere of magnetic charges. As temperature is lowered, an Ising transition occurs to a charge-ordered state, which can be mapped to a dimer covering of the dual honeycomb lattice. A second transition, of Kosterlitz-Thouless or three-state Potts type, occurs to a spin-ordered state at yet lower temperatures, due to small residual energy differences between charge-ordered states. Inspired by recent experimental capabilities in growing spin ice samples with selective (layered) substitution of non-magnetic ions, in this work we investigate the fate of the two ordering transitions when individual kagome layers are brought together to form a three-dimensional pyrochlore structure coupled by long range dipolar interactions. We also consider the response to substitutional disorder and applied magnetic fields.

  5. Stabilizing a spinning Skylab.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.; Justice, D. W.; Schweitzer, G.; Patel, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the dynamics of a spinning Skylab space station. The stability of motion of several simplified models with flexible appendages was investigated. A digital simulation model that more accurately portrays the complex Skylab vehicle is described, and simulation results are compared with analytically derived results.

  6. Stabilizing a spinning Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.; Patel, J. S.; Justice, D. W.; Schweitzer, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of a study of the dynamics of a spinning Skylab space station. The stability of motion of several simplified models with flexible appendages was investigated. A digital simulation model that more accurately portrays the complex Skylab vehicle is described, and simulation results are compared with analytically derived results.

  7. Nucleon spin structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Ruan, Jianhong

    2015-10-01

    This paper contains three parts relating to the nucleon spin structure in a simple picture of the nucleon: (i) The polarized gluon distribution in the proton is dynamically predicted starting from a low scale by using a nonlinear quantum chromodynamics (QCD) evolution equation — the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Paris (DGLAP) equation with the parton recombination corrections, where the nucleon is almost consisted only of valence quarks. We find that the contribution of the gluon polarization to the nucleon spin structure is much larger than the predictions of most other theories. This result suggests that a significant orbital angular momentum of the gluons is required to balance the gluon spin momentum. (ii) The spin structure function g1p of the proton is studied, where the perturbative evolution of parton distributions and nonperturbative vector meson dominance (VMD) model are used. We predict g1p asymptotic behavior at small x from lower Q2 to higher Q2. The results are compatible with the data including the early HERA estimations and COMPASS new results. (iii) The generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule is understood based on the polarized parton distributions of the proton with the higher twist contributions. A simple parameterized formula is proposed to clearly present the contributions of different components in the proton to Γ 1p(Q2). The results suggest a possible extended objects with size 0.2-0.3 fm inside the proton.

  8. Spin Transport in Semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Domnita Catalina Marinescu

    2011-02-22

    The focus of the research performed under this grant has been the investigation of spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures. The interest in these systems is motivated both by their intriguing physical properties, as the physical embodiment of a spin-polarized Fermi liquid, as well as by their potential applications as spintronics devices. In our work we have analyzed several different problems that affect the spin dynamics in single and bi-layer spin-polarized two-dimensional (2D) systems. The topics of interests ranged from the fundamental aspects of the electron-electron interactions, to collective spin and charge density excitations and spin transport in the presence of the spin-orbit coupling. The common denominator of these subjects is the impact at the macroscopic scale of the spin-dependent electron-electron interaction, which plays a much more subtle role than in unpolarized electron systems. Our calculations of several measurable parameters, such as the excitation frequencies of magneto-plasma modes, the spin mass, and the spin transresistivity, propose realistic theoretical estimates of the opposite-spin many-body effects, in particular opposite-spin correlations, that can be directly connected with experimental measurements.

  9. An overview of spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Spin physics is playing an increasingly important role in high energy experiments and theory. This review looks at selected topics in high energy spin physics that were discussed at the 9th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics at Bonn in September 1990.

  10. Inferior epigastric artery pseudoaneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Avula, SK

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inferior epigastric artery (IEA) pseudoaneurysms are recognised complications of abdominal wall procedures, and a variety of approaches including surgical excision and ligation, percutaneous procedures and conservative management have been employed in treating this rare complication. Methods We describe a case of an IEA pseudoaneurysm diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) angiography, 14 days following a laparoscopic assisted low anterior resection, which was managed successfully with surgical excision and ligation. A review of the literature identified 32 reports of this complication since 1973 with 69% of cases occurring since 2000. Findings The main aetiology of IEA pseudoaneurysm was abdominal surgery (n=20); 65% of cases were attributable to abdominal wound closure or laparoscopic surgery. Two-thirds (66%) of patients presented between 11 and 63 days, and all except 1 case presented with discomfort, abdominal mass or haemodynamic instability. Colour Doppler ultrasonography was the imaging modality of choice (n=18), either alone or in combination with computed tomography and/or angiography. Surgical ligation and excision and percutaneous coil embolisation formed the mainstay of attempted treatments (69%), particularly following treatment failure using an alternative technique. Conclusions The incidence of iatrogenic IEA pseudoaneurysms appears to be increasing. Awareness of this rare complication is of clinical importance to avoid excessive morbidity for affected individuals. PMID:26263930

  11. Gluonic Spin Contribution to Proton Spin at NLO

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Andrew

    2011-05-24

    In 1988, when the EMC results showed that the quarks had a much smaller contribution to the spin of the proton than previously thought, the 'Proton Spin Crisis' began. Since then, considerable effort has been directed into discovering the main contributors to proton spin and how much each contributes. One such contributor is the gluonic spin component. QCD NLO evolution equations are combined with boundary conditions obtained from heavy quark decoupling expressions to evolve the equations from infinity to the mass of the charm quark in order to determine the gluonic spin contribution.

  12. Spin Circuit Representation of Spin Pumping in Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kuntal

    Earlier we developed spin circuit representation of spin pumping and combined it with the spin circuit representation for the inverse spin Hall effect to show that it reproduces the established results in literature. Here we construct the spin circuit representation of spin pumping in topological insulators. The discovery of spin-polarized surface states in three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs) with strong spin-orbit coupling is promising for the development of spintronics. There is considerable bulk conduction too in 3D TIs (e.g., Bi2Se3) apart from possessing the surface states. We utilize the spin circuit model for spin orbit torques in topological insulator surface states to develop the equivalent circuit model of spin pumping in topological insulators. Such equivalent circuit model developed here can be utilized to analyze available experimental results and evaluate more complex structures. This work was supported by FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  13. Coronary Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Coronary Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... exercise routine produced a strong heart!" Fast Facts Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood ...

  14. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / ... narrows or blocks these arteries—a condition called coronary artery disease (CAD) or coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs. A ...

  15. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Vladislav E.; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O.

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics.

  16. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents.

    PubMed

    Demidov, Vladislav E; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics. PMID:26818232

  17. State diagram of an orthogonal spin transfer spin valve device

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Li; Wolf, Georg; Pinna, Daniele; Chaves-O'Flynn, Gabriel D.; Kent, Andrew D.

    2015-05-21

    We present the switching characteristics of a spin-transfer device that incorporates a perpendicularly magnetized spin-polarizing layer with an in-plane magnetized free and fixed magnetic layer, known as an orthogonal spin transfer spin valve device. This device shows clear switching between parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) resistance states and the reverse transition (AP → P) for both current polarities. Further, hysteretic transitions are shown to occur into a state with a resistance intermediate between that of the P and AP states, again for both current polarities. These unusual spin-transfer switching characteristics can be explained within a simple macrospin model that incorporates thermal fluctuations and considers a spin-polarized current that is tilted with respect to the free layer's plane, due to the presence of the spin-transfer torque from the polarizing layer.

  18. Modeling spin transport with current-sensing spin detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2010-03-01

    The impulse response (or ``Green's function'') of a current-sensing spin detector is derived analytically by incorporating the proper boundary conditions. This result is also compared to a Monte Carlo simulation (which automatically takes the proper boundary conditions into account) and an empirical spin transit time distribution obtained from experimental spin precession measurements. In the strong drift-dominated transport regime, this spin current impulse response can be approximated by multiplying the spin density impulse response by the average drift velocity. However, in weak drift fields, large modeling errors up to a factor of 3 in most-probable spin transit time can be incurred unless the full spin current Green's function is used.

  19. Modeling spin transport with current-sensing spin detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2009-10-01

    By incorporating the proper boundary conditions, we analytically derive the impulse response (or "Green's function") of a current-sensing spin detector. We also compare this result to a Monte Carlo simulation (which automatically takes the proper boundary condition into account) and an empirical spin transit time distribution obtained from experimental spin precession measurements. In the strong drift-dominated transport regime, this spin current impulse response can be approximated by multiplying the spin density impulse response by the average drift velocity. However, in weak drift fields, large modeling errors up to a factor of 3 in most-probable spin transit time can be incurred unless the full spin current Green's function is used.

  20. Spin wave excitation patterns generated by spin torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macià, F.; Hoppensteadt, F. C.; Kent, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Spin torque nano-oscillators (STNO) are nanoscale devices that can convert a direct current into short wavelength spin wave excitations in a ferromagnetic layer. We show that arrays of STNO can be used to create directional spin wave radiation similarly to electromagnetic antennas. Combining STNO excitations with planar spin waves also creates interference patterns. We show that these interference patterns are static and have information on the wavelength and phase of the spin waves emitted from the STNO. We describe a means of actively controlling spin wave radiation patterns with the direct current flowing through STNO, which is useful in on-chip communication and information processing and could be a promising technique for studying short wavelength spin waves in different materials.

  1. Hydrodynamics of spin-polarized transport and spin pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Gurzhi, R. N. Kalinenko, A. N.; Kopeliovich, A. I.; Pyshkin, P. V.; Yanovsky, A. V.

    2007-07-15

    The dynamics of a nonequilibrium spin system dominated by collisions preserving the total quasimomentum of the interacting electrons and quasiparticles is considered. An analysis of the derived hydrodynamic equations shows that weakly attenuated spin-polarization waves associated with an oscillating drift current can exist in a magnetically inhomogeneous conducting ring. Spin-polarized transport in a ballistic regime of wave propagation through a conductor is also considered, and a simple method is proposed for distinguishing these waves from spin and current oscillations that develop in the hydrodynamic regime. It is shown that a potential difference arises between the leads of an open nonuniformly spin-polarized conductor as a manifestation of spin polarization of electron density. This spin-mediated electrical phenomenon occurs in both hydrodynamic and diffusive limits.

  2. Spin quantum Hall effects in featureless nonfractionalized spin-1 magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan-Ming; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2014-05-01

    The Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki state (or Haldane phase) in a spin-1 chain represents a large class of gapped topological paramagnets that host symmetry-protected gapless excitations on the boundary. In this work, we show how to realize this type of featureless spin-1 state on a generic two-dimensional lattice. These states have a gapped spectrum in the bulk, but they support gapless edge states protected by spin rotational symmetry along a certain direction, and they exhibit the spin quantum Hall effect. Using a fermion representation of integer spins, we show a concrete example of such spin-1 topological paramagnets on a kagome lattice, and we suggest a microscopic spin-1 Hamiltonian that may realize it.

  3. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, Vladislav E.; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O.

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics. PMID:26818232

  4. Pseudospin, real spin, and spin polarization of photoemitted electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rui; Weng, Hongming; Fang, Zhong; Dai, Xi

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss the connections between pseudospin, real spin of electrons in a material, and spin polarization of photoemitted electrons out of a material. By investigating these three spin textures for Bi2Se3 and SmB6 compounds, we find that the spin orientation of photoelectrons for SmB6 has a different correspondence to pseudospin and real spin compared to Bi2Se3 , due to the different symmetry properties of the photoemission matrix between the initial and final states. We calculate the spin polarization and circular dichroism spectra of photoemitted electrons for both compounds, which can be detected by spin-resolved and circular dichroism angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments.

  5. Deep circumflex iliac artery as a free arterial graft for myocardial revascularization.

    PubMed

    Yaginuma, G; Sakurai, M; Meguro, T; Ota, K; Abe, K

    2000-02-01

    When complete revascularization cannot be obtained with the internal thoracic artery and the other arterial grafts, the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) may be an excellent alternative conduit. The deep circumflex iliac artery was used as a free graft for direct myocardial revascularization in 4 patients from January to July 1999. We describe our experience with this arterial conduit, review the anatomy of the artery, and present our harvesting technique. PMID:10735725

  6. Electrical spin injection and detection of spin precession in room temperature bulk GaN lateral spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniruddha; Baten, Md Zunaid; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2016-01-01

    We report the measurement of diffusive electronic spin transport characteristics in an epitaxial wurtzite GaN lateral spin valve at room temperature. Hanle spin precession and non-local spin accumulation measurements have been performed with the spin valves fabricated with FeCo/MgO spin contacts. Electron spin relaxation length and spin-flip lifetime of 176 nm and 37 ps, respectively, are derived from analysis of results obtained from four-terminal Hanle spin precession measurements at 300 K. The role of dislocations and defects in bulk GaN has also been examined in the context of electronic spin relaxation dynamics.

  7. Spin Hall controlled magnonic microwaveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. E.; Urazhdin, S.; Rinkevich, A. B.; Reiss, G.; Demokritov, S. O.

    2014-04-14

    We use space-resolved magneto-optical spectroscopy to study the influence of spin Hall effect on the excitation and propagation of spin waves in microscopic magnonic waveguides. We find that the spin Hall effect not only increases the spin-wave propagation length, but also results in an increased excitation efficiency due to the increase of the dynamic susceptibility in the vicinity of the inductive antenna. We show that the efficiency of the propagation length enhancement is strongly dependant on the type of the excited spin-wave mode and its wavelength.

  8. RHIC spin flipper commissioning results

    SciTech Connect

    Bai M.; Roser, T.; Dawson, C.; Kewisch, J.; Makdisi, Y.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.

    2012-05-20

    The five AC dipole RHIC spin flipper design in the RHIC Blue ring was first tested during the RHIC 2012 polarized proton operation. The advantage of this design is to eliminate the vertical coherent betatron oscillations outside the spin flipper. The closure of each ac dipole vertical bump was measured with orbital response as well as spin. The effect of the rotating field on the spin motion by the spin flipper was also confirmed by measuring the suppressed resonance at Q{sub s} = 1 - Q{sub osc}.

  9. Arterial air embolism

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, Rowan

    1967-01-01

    The incidence and the outcome of systemic air embolism in 340 consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass in this unit for congenital defects of the cardiac septa and diseases involving the aortic and mitral valves have been studied. This was thought to have occurred in 40 patients, of whom 10 died. The distribution of air embolism according to the types of operation undertaken was as follows: six of 127 for atrial septal defect; six of 36 for ventricular septal defect; seven of 42 for mitral valve replacement; seven of 47 for aortic valve débridement; and 14 of 55 for aortic valve replacement. The cause was considered to have been systolic ejection of air into the aorta which, following cardiotomy, had been trapped in the pulmonary veins, the left atrium, the ventricular trabeculae, and the aortic root. Since the adoption of a more rigid `debubbling' routine, air embolism has not occurred. The incidence of pulmonary complications occurring in these patients after bypass was studied. Unilateral atelectasis, which occurred in five patients, resulted from retained bronchial secretions in all and was cured by bronchoscopic aspiration in all. The cause of bilateral atelectases, occurring in nine patients and fatal in eight of these, appeared to be related to cardiopulmonary factors and not to air embolism. Acute air injection made into the pulmonary artery of a dog resulted in pulmonary hypertension and a grossly deficient pulmonary circulation, but changes were largely resolved within a week. In view of this, it is considered that pulmonary air embolism may temporarily embarrass the right heart after the repair of a ventricular septal defect in a patient with an elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and diminished pulmonary vascular bed. Images PMID:6035795

  10. Quantitative Cardiac Perfusion: A Noninvasive Spin-labeling Method That Exploits Coronary Vessel Geometry1

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Scott B.; Atalay, Michael K.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Zerhouni, Elias A.; Forder, John R.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantitate myocardial arterial perfusion with a noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique that exploits the geometry of coronary vessel anatomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed with a spinlabeling method in six arrested rabbit hearts at 4.7 T. Selective inversion of magnetization in the short-axis imaging section along with all myocardium apical to that section produces signal enhancement from arterial perfusion. A linescan protocol was used for validation of flow enhancement. Flow was quantitated from two images and validated with spin-echo (SE) imaging. Regional perfusion defects were created by means of coronary artery ligation and delineated with gadolinium-enhanced imaging. RESULTS: Linescan estimates of T1 obtained at physiologic flows agreed with model predictions. Flow-induced signal enhancement measured on SE images also agreed with expected values. Finally, perfusion abnormalities created by means of coronary artery ligation were detected. CONCLUSION: This spin-labeling method provides quantitative estimates of myocardial arterial perfusion in this model and may hold promise for clinical applications. PMID:8657907

  11. Feasibility of Quantifying Arterial Cerebral Blood Volume Using Multiphase Alternate Ascending/Descending Directional Navigation (ALADDIN)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Arterial cerebral blood volume (aCBV) is associated with many physiologic and pathologic conditions. Recently, multiphase balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) readout was introduced to measure labeled blood signals in the arterial compartment, based on the fact that signal difference between labeled and unlabeled blood decreases with the number of RF pulses that is affected by blood velocity. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of a new 2D inter-slice bSSFP-based arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique termed, alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), to quantify aCBV using multiphase acquisition in six healthy subjects. A new kinetic model considering bSSFP RF perturbations was proposed to describe the multiphase data and thus to quantify aCBV. Since the inter-slice time delay (TD) and gap affected the distribution of labeled blood spins in the arterial and tissue compartments, we performed the experiments with two TDs (0 and 500 ms) and two gaps (300% and 450% of slice thickness) to evaluate their roles in quantifying aCBV. Comparison studies using our technique and an existing method termed arterial volume using arterial spin tagging (AVAST) were also separately performed in five subjects. At 300% gap or 500-ms TD, significant tissue perfusion signals were demonstrated, while tissue perfusion signals were minimized and arterial signals were maximized at 450% gap and 0-ms TD. ALADDIN has an advantage of visualizing bi-directional flow effects (ascending/descending) in a single experiment. Labeling efficiency (α) of inter-slice blood flow effects could be measured in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) (20.8±3.7%.) and was used for aCBV quantification. As a result of fitting to the proposed model, aCBV values in gray matter (1.4–2.3 mL/100 mL) were in good agreement with those from literature. Our technique showed high correlation with AVAST, especially when arterial signals were accentuated (i.e., when TD = 0 ms) (r = 0

  12. Feasibility of Quantifying Arterial Cerebral Blood Volume Using Multiphase Alternate Ascending/Descending Directional Navigation (ALADDIN).

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Arterial cerebral blood volume (aCBV) is associated with many physiologic and pathologic conditions. Recently, multiphase balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) readout was introduced to measure labeled blood signals in the arterial compartment, based on the fact that signal difference between labeled and unlabeled blood decreases with the number of RF pulses that is affected by blood velocity. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of a new 2D inter-slice bSSFP-based arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique termed, alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), to quantify aCBV using multiphase acquisition in six healthy subjects. A new kinetic model considering bSSFP RF perturbations was proposed to describe the multiphase data and thus to quantify aCBV. Since the inter-slice time delay (TD) and gap affected the distribution of labeled blood spins in the arterial and tissue compartments, we performed the experiments with two TDs (0 and 500 ms) and two gaps (300% and 450% of slice thickness) to evaluate their roles in quantifying aCBV. Comparison studies using our technique and an existing method termed arterial volume using arterial spin tagging (AVAST) were also separately performed in five subjects. At 300% gap or 500-ms TD, significant tissue perfusion signals were demonstrated, while tissue perfusion signals were minimized and arterial signals were maximized at 450% gap and 0-ms TD. ALADDIN has an advantage of visualizing bi-directional flow effects (ascending/descending) in a single experiment. Labeling efficiency (α) of inter-slice blood flow effects could be measured in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) (20.8±3.7%.) and was used for aCBV quantification. As a result of fitting to the proposed model, aCBV values in gray matter (1.4-2.3 mL/100 mL) were in good agreement with those from literature. Our technique showed high correlation with AVAST, especially when arterial signals were accentuated (i.e., when TD = 0 ms) (r = 0

  13. Spin Funneling for Enhanced Spin Injection into Ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Shehrin; Diep, Vinh Q; Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that high spin-orbit coupling (SOC) materials convert a charge current density into a spin current density which can be used to switch a magnet efficiently and there is increasing interest in identifying materials with large spin Hall angle for lower switching current. Using experimentally benchmarked models, we show that composite structures can be designed using existing spin Hall materials such that the effective spin Hall angle is larger by an order of magnitude. The basic idea is to funnel spins from a large area of spin Hall material into a small area of ferromagnet using a normal metal with large spin diffusion length and low resistivity like Cu or Al. We show that this approach is increasingly effective as magnets get smaller. We avoid unwanted charge current shunting by the low resistive NM layer utilizing the newly discovered phenomenon of pure spin conduction in ferromagnetic insulators via magnon diffusion. We provide a spin circuit model for magnon diffusion in FMI that is benchmarked against recent experiments and theory. PMID:27374496

  14. Spin Funneling for Enhanced Spin Injection into Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Shehrin; Diep, Vinh Q.; Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-07-01

    It is well-established that high spin-orbit coupling (SOC) materials convert a charge current density into a spin current density which can be used to switch a magnet efficiently and there is increasing interest in identifying materials with large spin Hall angle for lower switching current. Using experimentally benchmarked models, we show that composite structures can be designed using existing spin Hall materials such that the effective spin Hall angle is larger by an order of magnitude. The basic idea is to funnel spins from a large area of spin Hall material into a small area of ferromagnet using a normal metal with large spin diffusion length and low resistivity like Cu or Al. We show that this approach is increasingly effective as magnets get smaller. We avoid unwanted charge current shunting by the low resistive NM layer utilizing the newly discovered phenomenon of pure spin conduction in ferromagnetic insulators via magnon diffusion. We provide a spin circuit model for magnon diffusion in FMI that is benchmarked against recent experiments and theory.

  15. Electron-spin dynamics induced by photon spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauke, Heiko; Ahrens, Sven; Keitel, Christoph H.; Grobe, Rainer

    2014-10-01

    Strong rotating magnetic fields may cause a precession of the electron's spin around the rotation axis of the magnetic field. The superposition of two counterpropagating laser beams with circular polarization and opposite helicity features such a rotating magnetic field component but also carries spin. The laser's spin density, which can be expressed in terms of the laser's electromagnetic fields and potentials, couples to the electron's spin via a relativistic correction to the Pauli equation. We show that the quantum mechanical interaction of the electron's spin with the laser's rotating magnetic field and with the laser's spin density counteract each other in such a way that a net spin rotation remains with a precession frequency that is much smaller than the frequency one would expect from the rotating magnetic field alone. In particular, the frequency scales differently with the laser's electric field strength depending on whether relativistic corrections are taken into account or not. Thus, the relativistic coupling of the electron's spin to the laser's spin density changes the dynamics not only quantitatively but also qualitatively as compared to the nonrelativistic theory. The electron's spin dynamics are a genuine quantum mechanical relativistic effect.

  16. All-electric spin transistor using perpendicular spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Bae, Joohyung; Min, Byoung-Chul; Kim, Hyung-jun; Chang, Joonyeon; Koo, Hyun Cheol

    2016-04-01

    All-electric spin transistor is demonstrated using perpendicular spins in an InAs quantum well channel. For the injection and detection of perpendicular spins in the quantum well channel, we use Tb20Fe62Co18/Co40Fe40B20 electrodes, where the Tb20Fe62Co18 layer produces the perpendicular magnetization and the Co40Fe40B20 layer enhances the spin polarization. In this spin transistor device, a gate-controlled spin signal as large as 80 mΩ is observed at 10 K without an external magnetic field. In order to confirm the spin injection and relaxation independently, we measure the three-terminal Hanle effect with an in-plane magnetic field, and obtain a spin signal of 1.7 mΩ at 10 K. These results clearly present that the electric field is an efficient way to modulate spin orientation in a strong spin-orbit interaction system.

  17. Spin Funneling for Enhanced Spin Injection into Ferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Shehrin; Diep, Vinh Q.; Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that high spin-orbit coupling (SOC) materials convert a charge current density into a spin current density which can be used to switch a magnet efficiently and there is increasing interest in identifying materials with large spin Hall angle for lower switching current. Using experimentally benchmarked models, we show that composite structures can be designed using existing spin Hall materials such that the effective spin Hall angle is larger by an order of magnitude. The basic idea is to funnel spins from a large area of spin Hall material into a small area of ferromagnet using a normal metal with large spin diffusion length and low resistivity like Cu or Al. We show that this approach is increasingly effective as magnets get smaller. We avoid unwanted charge current shunting by the low resistive NM layer utilizing the newly discovered phenomenon of pure spin conduction in ferromagnetic insulators via magnon diffusion. We provide a spin circuit model for magnon diffusion in FMI that is benchmarked against recent experiments and theory. PMID:27374496

  18. Muon spin rotation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  19. Spin effects and compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silenko, Alexander J.; Teryaev, Oleg V.

    2014-02-01

    We consider the dynamics of Dirac particles moving in the curved spaces with one coordinate subjected to compactification and thus interpolating smoothly between three- and two-dimensional spaces. We use the model of compactification, which allows us to perform the exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the Dirac equation and then to obtain the exact solutions of the equations of motion for momentum and spin in the classical limit. The spin precesses with the variable angular velocity, and a "flick" may appear in the remnant two-dimensional space once or twice during the period. We note an irreversibility in the particle dynamics because the particle can always penetrate from the lower-dimensional region to the higher-dimensional region, but not inversely.

  20. Art of spin decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiangsong; Sun Weimin; Wang Fan; Goldman, T.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the problem of spin decomposition for an interacting system from a natural perspective of constructing angular-momentum eigenstates. We split, from the total angular-momentum operator, a proper part which can be separately conserved for a stationary state. This part commutes with the total Hamiltonian and thus specifies the quantum angular momentum. We first show how this can be done in a gauge-dependent way, by seeking a specific gauge in which part of the total angular-momentum operator vanishes identically. We then construct a gauge-invariant operator with the desired property. Our analysis clarifies what is the most pertinent choice among the various proposals for decomposing the nucleon spin. A similar analysis is performed for extracting a proper part from the total Hamiltonian to construct energy eigenstates.

  1. Neutron phase spin echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegsa, Florian M.; Hautle, Patrick; Schanzer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A novel neutron spin resonance technique is presented based on the well-known neutron spin echo method. In a first proof-of-principle measurement using a monochromatic neutron beam, it is demonstrated that relative velocity changes of down to a precision of 4 ×10-7 can be resolved, corresponding to an energy resolution of better than 3 neV. Currently, the sensitivity is only limited by counting statistics and not by systematic effects. An improvement by another two orders of magnitude can be achieved with a dedicated setup, allowing energy resolutions in the 10 peV regime. The new technique is ideally suited for investigations in the field of precision fundamental neutron physics, but will also be beneficial in scattering applications.

  2. Ground State Spin Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, James; Faccin, Mauro; Biamonte, Jacob

    2013-03-01

    Designing and optimizing cost functions and energy landscapes is a problem encountered in many fields of science and engineering. These landscapes and cost functions can be embedded and annealed in experimentally controllable spin Hamiltonians. Using an approach based on group theory and symmetries, we examine the embedding of Boolean logic gates into the ground-state subspace of such spin systems. We describe parameterized families of diagonal Hamiltonians and symmetry operations which preserve the ground-state subspace encoding the truth tables of Boolean formulas. The ground-state embeddings of adder circuits are used to illustrate how gates are combined and simplified using symmetry. Our work is relevant for experimental demonstrations of ground-state embeddings found in both classical optimization as well as adiabatic quantum optimization.

  3. Engineering of arteries in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Angela H; Niklason, Laura E

    2014-06-01

    This review will focus on two elements that are essential for functional arterial regeneration in vitro: the mechanical environment and the bioreactors used for tissue growth. The importance of the mechanical environment to embryological development, vascular functionality, and vascular graft regeneration will be discussed. Bioreactors generate mechanical stimuli to simulate biomechanical environment of arterial system. This system has been used to reconstruct arterial grafts with appropriate mechanical strength for implantation by controlling the chemical and mechanical environments in which the grafts are grown. Bioreactors are powerful tools to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on extracellular matrix architecture and mechanical properties of engineered vessels. Hence, biomimetic systems enable us to optimize chemo-biomechanical culture conditions to regenerate engineered vessels with physiological properties similar to those of native arteries. In addition, this article reviews various bioreactors designed especially to apply axial loading to engineered arteries. This review will also introduce and examine different approaches and techniques that have been used to engineer biologically based vascular grafts, including collagen-based grafts, fibrin-gel grafts, cell sheet engineering, biodegradable polymers, and decellularization of native vessels. PMID:24399290

  4. Coronary Artery Imaging with Transthoracic Doppler Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaaki; Nakazono, Akemi

    2016-07-01

    Coronary artery imaging with transthoracic Doppler echocardiography is a simple and useful technique to diagnose significant coronary artery stenosis. The visualization of mosaic flow in the proximal left coronary artery provides a direct indication of the presence of significant stenosis at the corresponding site during routine echocardiography. Coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) has a high diagnostic accuracy and feasibility in detecting the presence of functionally significant coronary stenosis in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and in the right coronary artery. The measurement of CFVR in the LAD also provides prognostic information in patients with intermediate coronary stenosis. This review summarizes the utility of transthoracic coronary artery imaging. PMID:27216843

  5. Dusty spin plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, G.; Marklund, M.; Zamanian, J.

    2008-09-07

    A fluid model is derived, taking into account the effect of spin magnetization of electrons as well as of magnetized dust grains. The model is analyzed, and it is found that both the acoustic velocity and the Alfven velocity is decreased due to the magnetization effects. Furthermore, for low-temperature high density plasmas, it is found that the linear wave modes can be unstable, due to the magnetic attraction of individual fluid elements. The significance of our results are discussed.

  6. Spin Physics at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Contalbrigo, M.

    2007-11-19

    The HERMES experiment at DESY is a second generation experiment to study the spin structure of the nucleon by measuring not only inclusive but also semi-inclusive and exclusive processes in deep-inelastic lepton scattering where both beam and target can be polarised. An overview of finalized measurements and an outlook to upcoming new results is given for data taken with hydrogen and deuterium targets with longitudinal and transverse nucleon polarisation.

  7. Spin and gravitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental variational principle for a perfect fluid in general relativity is extended so that it applies to the metric-torsion Einstein-Cartan theory. Field equations for a perfect fluid in the Einstein-Cartan theory are deduced. In addition, the equations of motion for a fluid with intrinsic spin in general relativity are deduced from a special relativistic variational principle. The theory is a direct extension of the theory of nonspinning fluids in special relativity.

  8. Recovery of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppey, J. M.; Mahaffey, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of a space tug and a spinning satellite in a coupled configuration was simulated and analyzed. A docking concept was developed to investigate the requirements pertaining to the design of a docking interface. Sensing techniques and control requirements for the chase vehicle were studied to assess the feasibility of an automatic docking. The effects of nutation dampers and liquid propellant slosh motion upon the docking transient were investigated.

  9. Spinning out a star.

    PubMed

    Lord, Michael D; Mandel, Stanley W; Wager, Jeffrey D

    2002-06-01

    Spinouts rarely take off; most, in fact, fall into one or more of four traps that doom them from the start. Some companies spin out ventures that are too close to the core of their businesses, in effect selling off their crown jewels. Sometimes, a parent company uses the spinout primarily to pawn off debt or expenses or to quickly raise external capital for itself. Other times, a company may try to spin out an area of its business that lacks one or more of the critical legs of a successful company--a coherent business model, say, or a solid financial base. And in many cases, parent companies can't bring themselves to sever their ownership ties and give up control of their spinouts. R.J. Reynolds, the tobacco giant, managed to avoid these traps when it successfully spun out a most unlikely venture, the pharmaceutical company Targacept. As the story illustrates, the problem with spinouts is similar to the problem of rich children. Their parents have the wherewithal to spoil them or shelter them or cling to them, but what they need is tough love and discipline--much the same discipline that characterizes successful start-ups. R.J. Reynolds recognized that it didn't know that much about the pharmaceutical business and couldn't merely try to spin out a small clone of itself. It had to treat the venture as if it were essentially starting from scratch, with a passionate entrepreneurial leader, a solid business plan, help from outside partners in the industry, and ultimately substantial venture backing. That these lessons are less obvious to executives contemplating spinning out ventures closer to their core businesses may be why so many spinouts fail. PMID:12048993

  10. Spin-driven inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.

    1993-11-01

    Following recent studies of Ford, we suggest - in the framework of general relativity - an inflationary cosmological model with self-interacting spinning matter. A generalization of the standard fluid model is discussed and estimates of the physical parameters of the evolution are given. I would like to thank Professor Friedrich W. Hehl for the careful reading of the manuscript and useful advice. This research was supported by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (Bonn).

  11. Nuclear spin circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaara, Juha; Rizzo, Antonio; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-04-07

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in magneto-optic spectroscopy techniques that use nuclear magnetization as the source of the magnetic field. Here we present a formulation of magnetic circular dichroism (CD) due to magnetically polarized nuclei, nuclear spin-induced CD (NSCD), in molecules. The NSCD ellipticity and nuclear spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) angle correspond to the real and imaginary parts, respectively, of (complex) quadratic response functions involving the dynamic second-order interaction of the electron system with the linearly polarized light beam, as well as the static magnetic hyperfine interaction. Using the complex polarization propagator framework, NSCD and NSOR signals are obtained at frequencies in the vicinity of optical excitations. Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory calculations on relatively small model systems, ethene, benzene, and 1,4-benzoquinone, demonstrate the feasibility of the method for obtaining relatively strong nuclear spin-induced ellipticity and optical rotation signals. Comparison of the proton and carbon-13 signals of ethanol reveals that these resonant phenomena facilitate chemical resolution between non-equivalent nuclei in magneto-optic spectra.

  12. Optimally Squeezed Spin States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, Alberto

    2004-03-01

    We consider optimally spin-squeezed states that maximize the sensitivity of the Ramsey spectroscopy, and for which the signal to noise ratio scales as the number of particles N. Using the variational principle we prove that these states are eigensolutions of the Hamiltonian H(λ)=λ S_z^2-S_x, and that, for large N, the states become equivalent to the quadrature squeezed states of the harmonic oscillator. We present numerical results that illustrate the validity of the equivalence. We also present results of spin squeezing via atom-field interactions within the context of the Tavis-Cummings model. An ensemble of N two-level atoms interacts with a quantized cavity field. For all the atoms initially in their ground states, it is shown that spin squeezing of both the atoms and the field can be achieved provided the initial state of the cavity field has coherence between number states differing by 2. Most of the discussion is restricted to the case of a cavity field initially in a coherent state, but initial squeezed states for the field are also discussed. An analytic solution is found that is valid in the limit that the number of atoms is much greater than unity. References: A. G. Rojo, Phys. Rev A, 68, 013807 (2003); Claudiu Genes, P. R. Berman, and A. G. Rojo Phys. Rev. A 68, 043809 (2003).

  13. Graphene spin diode: Strain-modulated spin rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yunhua; Wang, B. E-mail: wangbiao@mail.sysu.edu.cn; Liu, Yulan E-mail: wangbiao@mail.sysu.edu.cn

    2014-08-04

    Strain effects on spin transport in a ferromagnetic/strained/normal graphene junction are explored theoretically. It is shown that the spin-resolved Fermi energy range can be controlled by the armchair direction strain because the strain-induced pseudomagnetic field suppresses the current. The spin rectification effect for the bias reversal occurs because of a combination of ferromagnetic exchange splitting and the broken spatial symmetry of the junction. In addition, the spin rectification performance can be tuned remarkably by manipulation of the strains. In view of this strain-modulated spin rectification effect, we propose that the graphene-based ferromagnetic/strained/normal junction can be used as a tunable spin diode.

  14. Amplification of spin waves by the spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Hernández, E.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    We observe amplification of spin-wave packets propagating along a film of single-crystal yttrium iron garnet (YIG) subject to a transverse temperature gradient. The spin waves are excited and detected with standard techniques used to study volume or surface magnetostatic waves in the 1-2 GHz frequency range. Amplification gains larger than 20 are observed in a YIG film heated by a current of 20 mA in a Pt layer in a simple YIG/Pt bilayer. The amplification is attributed to the action of a spin-transfer thermal torque acting on the magnetization that opposes the relaxation and which is created by spin currents generated through the spin Seebeck effect. The experimental data are interpreted with a spin-wave model.

  15. Towards Long Range Spin-Spin Interactions via Mechanical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabcenell, Aaron; Gieseler, Jan; Safira, Arthur; Kolkowitz, Shimon; Zibrov, Alexander; Harris, Jack; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen vacancy centers (NVs) are promising candidates for quantum computation, with room temperature optical spin read-out and initialization, microwave manipulability, and weak coupling to the environment resulting in long spin coherence times. The major outstanding challenge involves engineering coherent interactions between the spin states of spatially separated NV centers. To address this challenge, we are working towards the experimental realization of mechanical spin transducers. We have successfully fabricated magnetized high quality factor (Q> 105) , doubly-clamped silicon nitride mechanical resonators integrated close to a diamond surface, and report on experimental progress towards achieving the coherent coupling of the motion of these resonators with the electronic spin states of individual NV centers under cryogenic conditions. Such a system is expected to provide a scalable platform for mediating effective interactions between isolated spin qubits.

  16. FAST AND EXACT SPIN-s SPHERICAL HARMONIC TRANSFORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2010-08-15

    We demonstrate a fast spin-s spherical harmonic transform algorithm, which is flexible and exact for band-limited functions. In contrast to previous work, where spin transforms are computed independently, our algorithm permits the computation of several distinct spin transforms simultaneously. Specifically, only one set of special functions is computed for transforms of quantities with any spin, namely the Wigner d matrices evaluated at {pi}/2, which may be computed with efficient recursions. For any spin, the computation scales as O(L{sup 3}), where L is the band limit of the function. Our publicly available numerical implementation permits very high accuracy at modest computational cost. We discuss applications to the cosmic microwave background and gravitational lensing.

  17. Spin-bus concept of spin quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mehring, Michael; Mende, Jens

    2006-05-15

    We present a spin-bus concept of quantum computing where an electron spin S=1/2 acts as a bus qubit connected to a finite number N of nuclear spins I=1/2 serving as client qubits. Spin-bus clusters are considered as local processing units and may be interconnected with other spin-bus clusters via electron-electron coupling in a scaled up version. Here we lay the ground for the basic functional unit with long qubit registers, provide the theory and experimental verification of correlated qubit states, and demonstrate the Deutsch algorithm. Experiments were performed on a qubyte plus one nuclear spin in a solid state system.

  18. Spin Transfer Torque in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Ching; Chen, Zhihong

    2014-03-01

    Graphene is an idea channel material for spin transport due to its long spin diffusion length. To develop graphene based spin logic, it is important to demonstrate spin transfer torque in graphene. Here, we report the experimental measurement of spin transfer torque in graphene nonlocal spin valve devices. Assisted by a small external in-plane magnetic field, the magnetization reversal of the receiving magnet is induced by pure spin diffusion currents from the injector magnet. The magnetization switching is reversible between parallel and antiparallel configurations by controlling the polarity of the applied charged currents. Current induced heating and Oersted field from the nonlocal charge flow have also been excluded in this study. Next, we further enhance the spin angular momentum absorption at the interface of the receiving magnet and graphene channel by removing the tunneling barrier in the receiving magnet. The device with a tunneling barrier only at the injector magnet shows a comparable nonlocal spin valve signal but lower electrical noise. Moreover, in the same preset condition, the critical charge current density for spin torque in the single tunneling barrier device shows a substantial reduction if compared to the double tunneling barrier device.

  19. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Schonauer, Fabrizio; Marlino, Sergio; Turrà, Francesco; Graziano, Pasquale; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Superficial ulnar artery is a rare finding but shows significant surgical implications. Its thinness and pliability make this flap an excellent solution for soft tissue reconstruction, especially in the head and neck region. We hereby report a successful free superficial ulnar artery perforator forearm flap transfer for tongue reconstruction. A 64-year-old man presenting with a squamous cell carcinoma of the left tongue underwent a wide resection of the tumor, left radical neck dissection, and reconstruction of the tongue and the left tonsillar pillar with the mentioned flap. No complications were observed postoperatively. The flap survived completely; no recurrence at 6 months of follow-up was detected. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap has shown to be a safe alternative to other free tissue flaps in specific forearm anatomic conditions. PMID:25102397

  20. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  1. Persistent trigeminal artery arising from the arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, usually arising from the cavernous or precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and connecting to the distal basilar artery. There are two types of PTA, lateral and medial. We present the first case of a lateral-type PTA arising from the large arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the left ICA with findings from both magnetic resonance angiography and selective catheter angiography. PMID:22215430

  2. Angiographic Enigma: A Single Coronary Artery with the Right Coronary Artery Originating from the Distal Left Circumflex Artery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satyajit; Sahoo, Sanat Kumar; Tripathy, Mahendra Prasad; Jena, Giridhari

    2015-01-01

    An isolated single coronary artery (SCA) is a rare anomaly. A SCA originating from the left sinus of Valsalva is even rarer than one arising from the right. Most patients with a congenital coronary artery anomaly are asymptomatic. Herein, we report an extremely uncommon variant, where the right coronary artery arose from the distal segment of the left circumflex artery with slow coronary flow leading to myocardial ischemia. PMID:27326353

  3. Coherent spin mixing dynamics in a spin-1 atomic condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wenxian; Chang, M.-S.; Chapman, M.S.; Zhou, D.L.; You, L.

    2005-07-15

    We study the coherent off-equilibrium spin mixing inside an atomic condensate. Using mean-field theory and adopting the single-spatial-mode approximation, the condensate spin dynamics is found to be well described by that of a nonrigid pendulum and displays a variety of periodic oscillations in an external magnetic field. Our results illuminate several recent experimental observations and provide critical insights into the observation of coherent interaction-driven oscillations in a spin-1 condensate.

  4. Hardy's argument and successive spin-s measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ahanj, Ali

    2010-07-15

    We consider a hidden-variable theoretic description of successive measurements of noncommuting spin observables on an input spin-s state. In this scenario, the hidden-variable theory leads to a Hardy-type argument that quantum predictions violate it. We show that the maximum probability of success of Hardy's argument in quantum theory is ((1/2)){sup 4s}, which is more than in the spatial case.

  5. Spin transport in antiferromagnetic insulator detected by spin pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Li, Yi; Bailey, William

    Spin transport in antiferromagnetic insulators has drawn attention recently. Prior work has been done on the spin diffusion length of different antiferromagnetic materials via inverse spin hall effect. In this work, we measure the spin pumping of Py/Cu/CoO to characterize the absorption of spin current in the CoO layer. The series of Py/Cu/CoO (t) with changing the thickness of CoO layer indicates that there is a Gilbert damping enhancement of 0.001 in saturation at about 2 nm at room temperature. The spin mixing conductance obtained from this experimental series and from Py (t)/Cu/CoO series is 2.4 nm-2 and 3.2 nm-2 , respectively. We also measured the spin pumping of the Py/Cu/CoO sample at low temperatures. The Gilbert damping exhibits a positive peak at about 280 K, which is close to the Néel temperature of CoO. Our work shows a finite spin mixing conductance in Py/Cu/CoO and the spin diffusion length of CoO is quite small at room temperature. We also find that its Gilbert damping reaches its maximum value at Néel temperature.

  6. Counting spins with a new spin echo double resonance

    PubMed

    Cull; Joers; Gullion; Norberg; Conradi

    1998-08-01

    In traditional spin echo double resonance (SEDOR), the echo amplitude M is decreased when the observed spins S are flipped by pi together with the pi refocusing pulse on the observed spins I; the dependence on tau is then determined. In the new version of SEDOR, the echo amplitude is measured as a function of the S spin flip angle theta at a constant pulse spacing tau. The analysis is simple and powerful for long tau, where the strong collision limit applies. There, the variation of M with theta can be fit, yielding the number n of spins S to which each spin I is coupled. Data from amorphous silicon with 1H and 2D show the described effect. A MAS version of the new method is used on multiply labeled alanine and urea, with results in good agreement with the predictions for n = 2, as expected. By Fourier transforming M with respect to the flip angle theta, a stick spectrum results; the largest numbered non-vanishing stick yields the number n of spins S coupled to each spin I. Simulations are presented for an n = 2 system. The present technique is compared to the multiple-quantum spin-counting method. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9716478

  7. Correlation functions of the integrable spin-s chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, G. A. P.; Klümper, A.

    2016-06-01

    We study the correlation functions of su(2) invariant spin-s chains in the thermodynamic limit. We derive nonlinear integral equations for an auxiliary correlation function ω for any spin s and finite temperature T. For the spin-3/2 chain for arbitrary temperature and zero magnetic field we obtain algebraic expressions for the reduced density matrix of two-sites. In the zero temperature limit, the density matrix elements are evaluated analytically and appear to be given in terms of Riemann’s zeta function values of even and odd arguments. Dedicated to Professor Rodney Baxter on the occasion of his 75th birthday.

  8. ``Spin inverter'' as building block of All Spin Logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Angik; Srinivasan, Srikant; Datta, Supriyo

    2012-02-01

    All-spin logic (ASL) represents a new approach to information processing where the roles of charges and capacitors in charge based transistors are played by spins and magnets, without the need for repeated spin-charge conversion. In our past work, we have presented numerical simulations based on a coupled spin transport and Landau Lifshitz Gilbert model showing that ring oscillators and logic circuits with intrinsic directionality [IEEE Trans. Magn. 47,10, 4026, 2011; Proc. IEDM, 2011)] can be implemented by manipulation of spins in magnetic nanostructures. The aim of this talk is (1) to identify a basic ASL unit that can be interconnected to build up spin circuits analogous to the way transistors are interconnected to build conventional circuits and (2) to present a compact model for this basic unit that can be used to design and analyze large scale spin circuits. We will show that this basic ASL unit is a one-magnet ``spin inverter'' with gain that can be cascaded to accomplish a spin circuit implementation of almost any logic functionality

  9. Visualizing spin states using the spin coherent state representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee Loh, Yen; Kim, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum eigenfunctions are readily understood in terms of spherical harmonics. However, the quantum mechanical phenomenon of spin is often said to be mysterious and hard to visualize, with no classical analog. Many textbooks give a heuristic and somewhat unsatisfying picture of a precessing spin vector. Here, we show that the spin-coherent-state representation is a striking, elegant, and mathematically meaningful tool for visualizing spin states. We also demonstrate that cartographic projections such as the Hammer projection are useful for visualizing functions defined on spherical surfaces.

  10. Branches and arterial supply of the recurrent artery of Heubner.

    PubMed

    Maga, Paweł; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Krzyżewski, Roger M; Golec, Joanna; Depukat, Paweł; Gregorczyk-Maga, Iwona; Skrzat, Janusz

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the branches and arterial supply of the recurrent artery of Heubner (RAH) in order to provide detailed information to neurosurgeons operating in this area of the brain. A total of 70 human brains (39 male and 31 female) obtained from cadavers (aged 31-75 years) during routine autopsies were examined; brains from individuals who died due to neurological disorders were not included in the study. Immediately after dissection the arteries were perfused with acrylic paint emulsion through the circle of Willis or electively through the RAH. Brains were fixed in a 10 % solution of formaldehyde and sectioned; the sections were analyzed under a stereoscopic light microscope (magnification 2-40×). The RAH was present in 138 hemispheres with a mean of 1.99 per hemisphere. Mean RAH length was 25.2 mm and the mean diameter, in its place of origin, was 1 mm. Between two and 30 (mean 9.4) branches originated from the stem of the RAH. Each branch then divided into 2-40 smaller branches (mean 19). Primary branches were divided and named in accordance with their course and arterial supply. Primary RAH branches include the anterior perforating substance, sylvian fissure, olfactory, frontal, hypothalamic, optic tract and connecting branches. Left and right hemispheres were asymmetrically supplied by RAH branches, but none of these discrepancies were of statistical significance. PMID:23860669

  11. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  12. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery: a review.

    PubMed

    Azab, Waleed; Delashaw, Johnny; Mohammed, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    The trigeminal artery is the largest of the fetal carotid-basilar anastomotic arteries, and it persists for the longest embryonic period. The artery usually involutes after the development of the posterior communicating artery. The exact causes of persistence of this primitive vessel into adulthood are not completely clear. Angiographic and anatomical descriptions of the various persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) configurations and their relation to the remainder of the cerebrovascular tree and the other surrounding structures have been reported. Persistent trigeminal artery can be associated with many other vascular anomalies and disorders including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations and carotid-cavernous fistulae. A thorough understanding of the anatomical and angiographic features of this persistent embryonic arterial channel is of utmost importance when making therapeutic decisions and embarking on surgical or endovascular intervention for any pertinent pathological condition. We review the embryology, angiographic features, microsurgical anatomy and associated vascular anomalies and disorders of the persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:22843453

  13. Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of patients and may eliminate the need for coronary artery bypass surgery. The outcome is relief from chest pain ... of the narrowing is not accomplished, heart surgery (coronary artery bypass graft surgery, also called a CABG) may be ...

  14. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is done using a small surgical cut. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut in your groin after using some ...

  15. Facts about Transposition of the Great Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Septal Defect Atrioventricular Septal Defect Coarctation of the Aorta D-Transposition of the Great Arteries Hypoplastic Left ... of the heart—the pulmonary artery and the aorta —are switched in position, or “transposed”. Normally, blood ...

  16. Transposition of the Greater Arteries (TGA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease Diseases of the arteries, valves, and aorta, as well as cardiac rhythm disturbances Aortic Valve ... Transposition of the Great Arteries Coarctation of the Aorta Truncus Arteriosus Single Ventricle Defects Lung, Esophageal, and ...

  17. MedlinePlus: Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Blood Institute Start Here Coronary Artery Bypass (Texas Heart Institute) Also in Spanish Coronary Artery Bypass ... and Blood Institute) Specifics Limited-Access Heart Surgery (Texas Heart Institute) Also in Spanish Types of Coronary ...

  18. Multiferroics with spiral spin orders.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Yoshinori; Seki, Shinichiro

    2010-04-12

    Cross correlation between magnetism and electricity in a solid can host magnetoelectric effects, such as magnetic (electric) induction of polarization (magnetization). A key to attain the gigantic magnetoelectric response is to find the efficient magnetism-electricity coupling mechanisms. Among those, recently the emergence of spontaneous (ferroelectric) polarization in the insulating helimagnet or spiral-spin structure was unraveled, as mediated by the spin-exchange and spin-orbit interactions. The sign of the polarization depends on the helicity (spin rotation sense), while the polarization direction itself depends on further details of the mechanism and the underlying lattice symmetry. Here, we describe some prototypical examples of the spiral-spin multiferroics, which enable some unconventional magnetoelectric control such as the magnetic-field-induced change of the polarization direction and magnitude as well as the electric-field-induced change of the spin helicity and magnetic domain. PMID:20496385

  19. Vaporization of Kitaev Spin Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasu, Joji; Udagawa, Masafumi; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The quantum spin liquid is an exotic quantum state of matter in magnets. This state is a spin analog of liquid helium that does not solidify down to the lowest temperature due to strong quantum fluctuations. In conventional fluids, the liquid and gas possess the same symmetry and adiabatically connect to each other by bypassing the critical end point. We find that the situation is qualitatively different in quantum spin liquids realized in a three-dimensional Kitaev model; both gapless and gapped quantum spin liquid phases at low temperatures are always distinguished from the high-temperature paramagnet (spin gas) by a phase transition. The results challenge the common belief that the absence of thermodynamic singularity down to the lowest temperature is a symptom of a quantum spin liquid.

  20. Inductance due to spin current

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei

    2014-03-21

    The inductance of spintronic devices that transport charge neutral spin currents is discussed. It is known that in a media that contains charge neutral spins, a time-varying electric field induces a spin current. We show that since the spin current itself produces an electric field, this implies existence of inductance and electromotive force when the spin current changes with time. The relations between the electromotive force and the corresponding flux, which is a vector calculated by the cross product of electric field and the trajectory of the device, are clarified. The relativistic origin generally renders an extremely small inductance, which indicates the advantage of spin current in building low inductance devices. The same argument also explains the inductance due to electric dipole current and applies to physical dipoles consist of polarized bound charges.

  1. Dynamic scaling in spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, C.; Mezei, F.; Ehlers, G.; Manuel, P.; Campbell, I. A.

    2003-08-01

    We present neutron spin echo (NSE) results and a revisited analysis of historical data on spin glasses, which reveal a pure power-law time decay of the spin autocorrelation function s(Q,t)=S(Q,t)/S(Q) at the glass temperature Tg. The power law exponent is in excellent agreement with that calculated from dynamic and static critical exponents deduced from macroscopic susceptibility measurements made on a quite different time scale. This scaling relation involving exponents of different physical quantities determined by completely independent experimental methods is stringently verified experimentally in a spin glass. As spin glasses are a subgroup of the vast family of glassy systems also comprising structural glasses and other noncrystalline systems the observed strict critical scaling behavior is important. Above the phase transition the strikingly nonexponential relaxation, best fitted by the Ogielski (power-law times stretched exponential) function, appears as an intrinsic, homogeneous feature of spin glasses.

  2. TRAS principles blight arterial bypass and plasty.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M V; Mehta, L A; Kothari, V M

    1997-01-01

    A new concept--Tissue Requisitions (Principle I)/Relinquishes (Principle II) Arterial Supply--of TRAS principles is introduced to help appreciate the failures/successes of modern medicine's attempts at restoring arterial flow in luminally compromised coronary/carotid fields, an invasive branch rightly called vascular ReRheology, which comprises diagnosing/treating arterial blocks. The technical wizardry of arterial reconstruction (bypass) or lumen--restoration (plasty) has to reckon with the TRAS principles all the time. PMID:10740714

  3. Bilateral Internal Thoracic Artery Configuration for Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Boodhwani, Munir; Hanet, Claude; de Kerchove, Laurent; Navarra, Emiliano; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-01-01

    Background— Bilateral internal thoracic arteries (BITA) have demonstrated superior patency and improved survival in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. However, the optimal configuration for BITA utilization and its effect on long-term outcome remains uncertain. Methods and Results— We randomly assigned 304 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting using BITA to either in situ or Y grafting configurations. The primary end point was 3-year angiographic patency. Secondary end points included major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (ie, death from any cause, stroke, myocardial infarction, or repeat revascularization) at 7 years. More coronary targets were able to be revascularized using internal thoracic arteries in patients randomized to Y grafting versus in situ group (3.2±0.8 versus 2.4±0.5 arteries/patient; P<0.01). The primary end point did not show significant differences in graft patency between groups. Secondary end points occurred more frequently in the in situ group (P=0.03), with 7-year rates of 34±10% in the in situ and 25±12% in the Y grafting groups, driven largely by a higher incidence of repeat revascularization in the in situ group (14±4.5% versus 7.4±3.2% at 7 years; P=0.009). There were no significant differences in hospital mortality or morbidity or in late survival, myocardial infarction, or stroke between groups. Conclusions— Three-year systematic angiographic follow-up revealed no significant difference in graft patency between the 2 BITA configurations. However, compared with in situ configuration, the use of BITA in a Y grafting configuration results in lower rates of major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events at 7 years. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01666366. PMID:27406988

  4. Symplectic integrators for spin systems.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Robert I; Modin, Klas; Verdier, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    We present a symplectic integrator, based on the implicit midpoint method, for classical spin systems where each spin is a unit vector in R{3}. Unlike splitting methods, it is defined for all Hamiltonians and is O(3)-equivariant, i.e., coordinate-independent. It is a rare example of a generating function for symplectic maps of a noncanonical phase space. It yields a new integrable discretization of the spinning top. PMID:25019718

  5. Understanding the proton's spin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Myhrer; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the tremendous progress that has been towards an understanding of how the spin of the proton is distributed on its quark and gluon constituents. This is a problem that began in earnest twenty years ago with the discovery of the proton "spin crisis" by the European Muon Collaboration. The discoveries prompted by that original work have given us unprecedented insight into the amount of spin carried by polarized gluons and the orbital angular momentum of the quarks.

  6. Spontaneous Recanalization of Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Following Angioplasty and Stenting of Inferior Mesenteric Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Erhan Cil, Barbaros E.; Arat, Anil; Baykal, Atac; Karaman, Kerem; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2006-02-15

    An 84-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and coronary artery disease was admitted with a progressively worsening diffuse abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and angiography revealed occlusion of the origin and proximal portion of superior mesenteric artery. Aortography also showed severe origin stenosis of inferior mesenteric artery and that the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery was supplied by a prominent marginal artery of Drummond. Patient was effectively treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of the inferior mesenteric artery. Follow-up imaging studies demonstrated patency of the stent and spontaneous recanalization of superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  7. Hemimelia and absence of the peroneal artery.

    PubMed

    Huda, S; Sangster, G; Pramanik, A; Sankararaman, S; Tice, H; Ibrahim, H

    2014-02-01

    The arterial patterns of the lower extremities of three patients with congenital absence fibulae (hemimelia) were evaluated to determine whether the relationship existed between the absence of peroneal artery and hemimelia. Computerized tomograph angiography revealed the absence of peroneal artery in all the patients with dysplastic limbs and absent fibula. PMID:24476661

  8. Endovascular treatment of isolated arterial pulmonary malinosculation

    PubMed Central

    Mammen, Suraj; Keshava, Shyamkumar N; Moses, Vinu; Chiramel, George Koshy; Irodi, Aparna; Gnanamuthu, Birla Roy

    2015-01-01

    We report the endovascular management of a series of four cases of isolated systemic supply to normal lung or isolated arterial pulmonary malinosculation of the left lung. In these cases, the basal segments of the left lung lacked normal pulmonary arterial supply and instead received systemic arterial blood from the descending thoracic aorta. The relevant anatomy and literature are also reviewed. PMID:26288517

  9. Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.)

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Peripheral Artery Disease (P.A.D.) What is P.A.D.? Arteries Clogged With Plaque Peripheral arterial disease (P. ... button on your keyboard.) Why Is P.A.D. Dangerous? Click for more information Blocked blood flow ...

  10. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  11. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, D.

    2016-04-01

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined.

  12. Spin-orbital driven ferroelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shan; Li, You-Quan

    2014-10-01

    We study the effect of octahedron rotation on the electric polarization with spin-orbit coupling. Employing local coordinates to represent the tilting of the ligands' octahedra, we evaluate the electric polarization in a chain of transition metal ions with non-polar octahedron rotation. We find the orbital ordering produced by the ligands' rotation and the spin order, together, determine the polarization features, manifesting that non-vanishing polarization appears in collinear spin order and the direction of polarization is no more restricted in the plane of spin rotation in cycloidal ordering.

  13. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, D

    2016-04-27

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined. PMID:27001949

  14. The straintronic spin-neuron.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ayan K; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-07-17

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ to mimic neuron firing. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which the soft layer of the MTJ is switched with mechanical strain generated by a voltage (representing weighted sum of input voltages) and term it straintronic spin-neuron. It dissipates orders of magnitude less energy in threshold operations than the traditional current-driven spin neuron at 0 K temperature and may even be faster. We have also studied the room-temperature firing behaviors of both types of spin neurons and find that thermal noise degrades the performance of both types, but the current-driven type is degraded much more than the straintronic type if both are optimized for maximum energy-efficiency. On the other hand, if both are designed to have the same level of thermal degradation, then the current-driven version will dissipate orders of magnitude more energy than the straintronic version. Thus, the straintronic spin-neuron is superior to current-driven spin neurons. PMID:26112081

  15. 14 CFR 23.221 - Spinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spinning. 23.221 Section 23.221 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Spinning § 23.221 Spinning. (a...-turn spin or a three-second spin, whichever takes longer, in not more than one additional turn...

  16. 14 CFR 23.221 - Spinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spinning. 23.221 Section 23.221 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Spinning § 23.221 Spinning. (a...-turn spin or a three-second spin, whichever takes longer, in not more than one additional turn...

  17. 14 CFR 23.221 - Spinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spinning. 23.221 Section 23.221 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Spinning § 23.221 Spinning. (a...-turn spin or a three-second spin, whichever takes longer, in not more than one additional turn...

  18. 14 CFR 23.221 - Spinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spinning. 23.221 Section 23.221 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Spinning § 23.221 Spinning. (a...-turn spin or a three-second spin, whichever takes longer, in not more than one additional turn...

  19. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  20. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscombe, O. J.; Chen, G. F.; Fang, Chen; Perring, T. G.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Christianson, Andrew D; Egami, Takeshi; Wang, Nanlin; Hu, Jiangping; Dai, Pengcheng

    2011-01-01

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  1. Compliant transducer measures artery profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Culler, V. H.; Crawford, D. W.; Spears, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Instrument consisting of compliant fingers with attached semiconductor pickups measures inside contours of narrow vessels. Instrument, originally designed to monitor human arteries, is drawn through vessel to allow finges to follow contours. Lead wires transmit electrical signals to external processing equipment.

  2. Engineering of arteries in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Angela H.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    This review will focus on two elements that are essential for functional arterial regeneration in vitro: the mechanical environment and the bioreactors used for tissue growth. The importance of the mechanical environment to embryological development, vascular functionality, and vascular graft regeneration will be discussed. Bioreactors generate mechanical stimuli to simulate the biomechanical environment of the arterial system. This system has been used to reconstruct arterial grafts with appropriate mechanical strength for implantation by controlling the chemical and mechanical environments in which the grafts are grown. Bioreactors are powerful tools to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture and the mechanical properties of engineered vessels. Hence biomimetic systems enable us to optimize chemo-biomechanical culture conditions to regenerate engineered vessels with physiological properties similar to those of native arterial vessels. In addition, this review will introduce and examine various approaches and techniques that have been used to engineer biologically-based vascular grafts, including collagen-based grafts, fibrin-gel grafts, cell sheet engineering, biodegradable polymers, and decellularization of native vessels. PMID:24399290

  3. [PREDICTORS OF RESISTANT ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION].

    PubMed

    Lazutkina, A Y; Gorbunov, V V

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports results of 6 year prospective observation of 7959 members of locomotive crews engaged at the Transbaikal Railways. The study aimed to estimate the probability and time of development of resistant arterial hypertension under effect of predictors of this disease. The data obtained are of value for diagnostic, prophylactic, and therapeutic practice. PMID:27522725

  4. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the left internal mammary artery graft to the anterior descending coronary artery as a surgical strategy has been shown to improve the survival rate and decrease the risk of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery. These clinical benefits appear to be related to the superior short and long-term patency rates of the internal thoracic artery graft. Although the advantages of using of both internal thoracic arteries (ITA) for bypass grafting have taken longer to prove, recent results from multiple data sets now support these findings. The major advantage of bilateral ITA grafting appears to be improved survival rate, while the disadvantages of complex ITA grafting include the increased complexity of operation, and an increased risk of wound complications. While these short-term disadvantages have been mitigated in contemporary surgical practice, they have not eliminated. Bilateral ITA grafting should be considered the procedure of choice for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery that have a predicted survival rate of longer than ten years. PMID:23977627

  5. Determination of the Pt spin diffusion length by spin-pumping and spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Vlaminck, Vincent; Colegio de Ciencias e Ingenería, Universidad San Fransciso de Quito, Quito ; Divan, Ralu; Bader, Samuel D.; Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439

    2013-12-09

    The spin diffusion length of Pt at room temperature and at 8 K is experimentally determined via spin pumping and spin Hall effect in permalloy/Pt bilayers. Voltages generated during excitation of ferromagnetic resonance from the inverse spin Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance effect were investigated with a broadband approach. Varying the Pt layer thickness gives rise to an evolution of the voltage line shape due to the superposition of the above two effects. By studying the ratio of the two voltage components with the Pt layer thickness, the spin diffusion length of Pt can be directly extracted. We obtain a spin diffusion length of ∼1.2 nm at room temperature and ∼1.6 nm at 8 K.

  6. The Right Gastroepiploic Artery Graft for Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A 30-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Suma, Hisayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Throughout its 30-year history, the right gastroepiploic artery (GEA) has been useful for in situ grafts in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The early graft patency rate is high, and the late patency rate has improved by using the skeletonized GEA graft and proper target selection, which involves having a target coronary artery with a tight >90% stenosis. Total arterial revascularization with the internal thoracic artery and GEA grafts is an option for achieving better outcomes from CABG procedures. PMID:27525230

  7. Missed Total Occlusion Due to the Occipital Artery Arising from the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Ustunsoz, Bahri Gumus, Burcak; Koksal, Ali; Koroglu, Mert; Akhan, Okan

    2007-02-15

    A 56-year-old man was referred for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with an ultrasound diagnosis of right proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis for possible carotid artery stenting. DSA revealed total occlusion of the ICA and an occipital artery arising from the stump and simulating continuation of the ICA. An ascending pharyngeal artery also arose from the same occipital artery. This case is of interest because this is a rare variation besides being a cause of misdiagnosis at carotid ultrasound.

  8. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRA with centric ordering in k space: a preliminary clinical experience in imaging the abdominal aorta and renal and peripheral arterial vasculature.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A N; Bis, K G; Vrachliotis, T G; Kirsch, M; Shirkhoda, A; Ellwood, R

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical utility of a contrast-enhanced, centric reordered, three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography (MRA) pulse sequence in imaging the abdominal aorta and renal and peripheral lower extremity arteries. Twenty-eight MRA studies were performed on 23 patients and four volunteers at 1.5 T using a 3D contrast-enhanced, centric reordered pulse sequence. In 20 patients, the abdominal aorta and renal arteries were imaged, and in seven patients, the lower extremity arteries were imaged. In 19 patients, a total of 51 renal vessels were evaluated (33 renal arteries using .1 mmol/kg of gadopentetate dimeglumine and 18 renal arteries using .2 mmol/kg of gadoteridol). A total of 70 peripheral arterial segments were assessed using .2 mmol/kg of gadoteridol. Correlation with conventional angiography was made for the following 14 cases: renal artery stenosis (four cases), abdominal aortic stenosis (one case), arteriovenous fistula in a transplant kidney (one case), renal arteriovenous malformation (one case), common iliac artery aneurysms (one case), and peripheral lower extremity (six cases). Of the 70 peripheral arterial segments evaluated, in 35, there was correlation with x-ray angiography. The mean percent of aortic signal enhancement was significantly higher in the .2 mmol/kg dose group (370.8 +/- 190.3) than in the .1 mmol/kg dose group (184.5 +/- 128.9) (P = .02). However, there was no apparent difference between the two doses for visualization of the renal and accessory renal arteries. There was concordance between the contrast-enhanced 3D MRA studies and conventional angiography in all cases of renal artery and peripheral arterial stenoses and occlusions, including visualization of reconstituted peripheral arterial segments. There was no evidence of spin dephasing effects at sites of stenoses on the 3D contrast-enhanced MRA studies. Contrast-enhanced, centric reordered, 3D MRA can rapidly image the abdominal aorta and renal

  9. Cerebral arterial bolus arrival time is prolonged in multiple sclerosis and associated with disability

    PubMed Central

    Paling, David; Thade Petersen, Esben; Tozer, Daniel J; Altmann, Daniel R; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia AM; Kapoor, Raju; Miller, David H; Golay, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the overall cerebral hemodynamics have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, their cause and significance is unknown. While potential venous causes have been examined, arterial causes have not. In this study, a multiple delay time arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging sequence at 3T was used to quantify the arterial hemodynamic parameter bolus arrival time (BAT) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and deep gray matter in 33 controls and 35 patients with relapsing–remitting MS. Bolus arrival time was prolonged in MS in NAWM (1.0±0.2 versus 0.9±0.2 seconds, P=0.031) and deep gray matter (0.90±0.18 versus 0.80±0.14 seconds, P=0.001) and CBF was increased in NAWM (14±4 versus 10±2 mL/100 g/min, P=0.001). Prolonged BAT in NAWM (P=0.042) and deep gray matter (P=0.01) were associated with higher expanded disability status score. This study demonstrates alteration in cerebral arterial hemodynamics in MS. One possible cause may be widespread inflammation. Bolus arrival time was longer in patients with greater disability independent of atrophy and T2 lesion load, suggesting alterations in cerebral arterial hemodynamics may be a marker of clinically relevant pathology. PMID:24045400

  10. Chiral spin liquids in arrays of spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Rodrigo

    The chiral spin liquid proposed by Kalmeyer and Laughlin is a spin analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect: it has gapped bulk quasiparticles, charge-neutral chiral edge modes and topological order in the ground state. Recently there has been unambiguous numerical evidence that the chiral spin liquid can be stabilized as the ground state of extended Heisenberg models on the kagome lattice. I will talk about an analytical approach to investigate the emergence and the properties of the chiral spin liquid phase in spatially anisotropic 2D lattices. The approach is inspired by ``coupled-wire constructions'' of quantum Hall states: starting from a quasi-1D system, we build towards the 2D limit by coupling Heisenberg chains with three-spin interactions that drive the chiral spin order. Using a renormalization group analysis, we show that the chiral spin liquid is more easily stabilized in the kagome lattice than in the triangular lattice. Moreover, using the conformal field theory that describes single chains, we explicitly construct the operators that create bulk quasiparticles and those that account for the topological degeneracy on the torus. I will also discuss possible extensions of this approach to construct more exotic quantum spin liquids.

  11. Spin liquid phases of large spin Mott insulating ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Todd C.; Lawler, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding exotic forms of magnetism, primarily those driven by large spin fluctuations such as the quantum spin liquid state, is a major goal of condensed matter physics. But, the relatively small number of viable candidate materials poses a difficulty. We believe this problem can be solved by Mott insulating ultracold atoms with large spin moments that interact via whole-atom exchange. The large spin fluctuations of this exchange could stabilize exotic physics similar to condensed matter systems, all in an extremely tunable environment. We have approached the problem by performing a mean field theory for spin-f bosons in an optical lattice which is exact in the large-f limit. This setting is similar to that of SU(N) magnetism proposed for alkali-earth atoms but without the SU(N) symmetry. We find that states with long-range order, such as the spin nematic phase of f = 1 Na atoms, become highly entangled spin-liquid-like states for f = 3 Cr atoms. This is evidence that the magnetic phase diagram for Mott insulating atoms at larger spins generically contains exotic forms of magnetism.

  12. Spin voltage generation across rare earth spin filter barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Guoxing; Chang, Joonyeon; Moodera, Jagadeesh

    2011-03-01

    When a metal is in close contact with a rare-earth based magnetic compound, strong exchange interaction exists between the localized 4f electrons and the free moving conduction electrons. One important consequence is that the spin degeneracy among the conduction electrons is lifted, showing up as an effective Zeeman splitting higher than tens of Tesla in low dimensional systems such as graphene and other 2DEG. We perform our work using a vertical transport geometry, which consists of double spin filtering barriers based on a ferromagnetic Eu chalcogenide - EuS. A thin Al metallic layer is sandwiched in the middle and its conduction electrons thus experience the strong spin splitting, which is subsequently detected via the spin filtering effect. A spontaneous spin dependent voltage appears across such a device, and its polarity is directly determined by the EuS/Al interface. The voltage level difference between the spin-parallel and -antiparallel configurations is as large as a few mV. Such spin splitting also induces a clear universal behavior in the observed TMR bias dependence. Such spin voltage effect offers a possibility of directly converting magnetic exchange energy into electrical power. This work is supported by NSF DMR 0504158, ONR N00014-06-1-0235, and KIST-MIT project funds.

  13. Reducing the spin-spin interaction of stable carbon radicals.

    PubMed

    Green, Uri; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Ruthstein, Sharon; Cohen, Haim

    2013-05-01

    We report the discovery that a flow of CO2, N2 or He can sufficiently reduce the spin-spin interactions of specific stable carbon centered radicals by displacing the molecular oxygen in the atmosphere enabling their detection via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). This finding unlike other reported effects on carbon radicals occurs under STP conditions and is reversible. PMID:23518921

  14. Spin-SILC: CMB polarisation component separation with spin wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    We present Spin-SILC, a new foreground component separation method that accurately extracts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarisation E and B modes from raw multifrequency Stokes Q and U measurements of the microwave sky. Spin-SILC is an internal linear combination method that uses spin wavelets to analyse the spin-2 polarisation signal P = Q + iU. The wavelets are additionally directional (non-axisymmetric). This allows different morphologies of signals to be separated and therefore the cleaning algorithm is localised using an additional domain of information. The advantage of spin wavelets over standard scalar wavelets is to simultaneously and self-consistently probe scales and directions in the polarisation signal P = Q + iU and in the underlying E and B modes, therefore providing the ability to perform component separation and E-B decomposition concurrently for the first time. We test Spin-SILC on full-mission Planck simulations and data and show the capacity to correctly recover the underlying cosmological E and B modes. We also demonstrate a strong consistency of our CMB maps with those derived from existing component separation methods. Spin-SILC can be combined with the pseudo- and pure E-B spin wavelet estimators presented in a companion paper to reliably extract the cosmological signal in the presence of complicated sky cuts and noise. Therefore, it will provide a computationally-efficient method to accurately extract the CMB E and B modes for future polarisation experiments.

  15. Spin pumping and spin-transfer torques in antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Qian

    2015-03-01

    Spin pumping and spin-transfer torques are key elements of coupled dynamics of magnetization and conduction electron spin, which have been widely studied in various ferromagnetic materials. Recent progress in spintronics suggests that a spin current can significantly affects the behavior of an antiferromagnetic material, and the electron motion become adiabatic when the staggered field varies sufficiently slowly. However, pumping from antiferromagnets and its relation to current-induced torques is yet unclear. In a recent study, we have solved this puzzle analytically by calculating how electrons scatter off a normal metal-antiferromagnetic interface. The pumped spin and staggered spin currents are derived in terms of the staggered field, the magnetization, and their rates of change. We find that for both compensated and uncompensated interfaces, spin pumping is of a similar magnitude as in ferromagnets; the direction of spin pumping is controlled by the polarization of the driving microwave. Via the Onsager reciprocity relations, the current-induced torques are also derived, the salient feature of which is illustrated by a terahertz nano-oscillator. In collaboration with Ran Cheng, Jiang Xiao, and A. Brataas.

  16. Tensor spin observables and spin stucture at low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Slifer, Karl J.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss recent spin structure results from Jefferson Lab, and outline an emerging program to study tensor spin observables using solid deuteron targets. These new experiments open the potential to study hidden color, the tensor nature of short range correlations, and to probe for exotic gluonic states.

  17. Spin Hall effect for detection of spin-currents -- Realization of a Spin transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, Joerg

    2012-02-01

    The realization of a viable semiconductor transistor and information processing devices based on the electron spin has fueled intense basic research of three key elements: injection, detection, and manipulation of spins in the semiconductor microchannel. The inverse spin Hall effect (iSHE) detection of spins manipulated by a gate electrode [1] has recently led to the experimental demonstration of a spin transistor device. [2] Here, the spin injection into a 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) was done optically in the depletion layer of a reverse biased pn-junction. [3] The iSHE detection is also used for electrical spin injection from a Fe electrode into a lateral GaAs channel combined with a simultaneous non-local spin valve measurement [4-10]. The spins in the channel are manipulated via the Hanle spin precession induced by an applied magnetic field and via a drift of electrons induced by an applied electric field. The output spin signal is suppressed or enhanced depending on the applied electrical bias rendering the device to a spin transitor different from the Datta Das concept. [11] [4pt] [1] S. Datta and B. Das, Appl. Phys. Lett. 56, 665 (1990). [0pt] [2] J. Wunderlich, et al., Science 330,1801 (2010). [0pt] [3] J. Wunderlich, et al., Nature Phys., 5, 675 (2009). [0pt] [4] X. Lou, Nature Phys. 3, 197 (2007). [0pt] [5] M. Ciorga, et al., Phys. Rev. B 79, 165321 (2009). [0pt] [6] C. Awo-Affouda, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 102511 (2009). [0pt] [7] M. K. Chan, et al., Phys. Rev. B 80, 161206(R) (2009). [0pt] [8] G. Salis, et al., Phys. Rev. B 80, 115332 (2009). [0pt] [9] G. Salis, et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 205323 (2010). [0pt] [10] E. S. Garlid, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 156602 (2010). [0pt] [11] K. Olejnik, et al., submitted.

  18. Emerging Techniques for Evaluation of the Hemodynamics of Intracranial Vascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Melissa; Chien, Aichi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging modalities have improved the assessment of intracranial hemodynamics using non-invasive techniques. This review examines new imaging modalities and clinical applications of currently available techniques, describes pathophysiology and future directions in hemodynamic analysis of intracranial stenoses, aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations and explores how hemodynamic analysis may have prognostic value in predicting clinical outcomes and assist in risk stratification. The advent of new technologies such as pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling, accelerated magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) techniques, 4D digital subtraction angiography, and improvements in clinically available techniques such as phase-contrast MRA may change the landscape of vascular imaging and modify current clinical practice guidelines. PMID:25924168

  19. Novel itinerant transverse spin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, John Delaney

    In 1956, Lev Davidovich Landau put forth his theory on systems of interacting fermions, or fermi liquids. A year later, Viktor Pavlovich Silin described spin waves that such a system of fermions would support. The treatment of the contribution of the molecular field to the spin wave dispersion was a novel aspect of these spin waves. Silin predicted that there would exist a hierarchy of spin waves in a fermi liquid, one for each component of the spherical harmonic expansion of the fermi surface. In 1968, Anthony J. Leggett and Michael J. Rice derived from fermi liquid theory how the behavior of the spin diffusion coefficient of a fermi liquid could be directly experimentally observable via the spin echo effect [24]. Their prediction, that the diffusion coefficient of a fermi liquid would not decay exponentially with temperature, but rather would have a maximum at some non-zero temperature, was a direct consequence of the fermi liquid molecular field and spin wave phenomena, and this was corroborated by experiment in 1971 by Corruccini, et al. [13]. A parallel advancement in the theory of fermi liquid spin waves came with the extension of the theory to describe weak ferromagnetic metals. In 1959, Alexei Abrikosov and I. E. Dzyaloshiski put forth a theoretical description of a ferromagnetic fermi liquid [1]. In 2001, Kevin Bedell and Krastan Blagoev showed that a non-trivial contribution to the dispersion of the ferromagnetic current spin wave arises from the necessary consideration of higher harmonic moments in the distortion of the fermi surface from its ground state [8]. In the chapters to follow, the author presents new results for transverse spin waves in a fermi liquid, which arise from a novel ground state of a fermi liquid-one in which an l = 1 harmonic distortion exists in the ground state polarization. It is shown that such an instability can lead to spin waves with dispersions that are characterized by a linear dependence on the wave number at long

  20. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jeffrey G.; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed. PMID:27470199

  1. Intrinsic spin torque without spin-orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Whan; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Stiles, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    We derive an intrinsic contribution to the non-adiabatic spin torque for non-uniform magnetic textures. It differs from previously considered contributions in several ways and can be the dominant contribution in some models. It does not depend on the change in occupation of the electron states due to the current flow but rather is due to the perturbation of the electronic states when an electric field is applied. Therefore it should be viewed as electric-field-induced rather than current-induced. Unlike previously reported non-adiabatic spin torques, it does not originate from extrinsic relaxation mechanisms nor spin-orbit coupling. This intrinsic non-adiabatic spin torque is related by a chiral connection to the intrinsic spin-orbit torque that has been calculated from the Berry phase for Rashba systems. PMID:26877628

  2. Unconventional spin texture in a noncentrosymmetric quantum spin Hall insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera Acosta, C.; Babilonia, O.; Abdalla, L.; Fazzio, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose that the simultaneous presence of both Rashba and band inversion can lead to a Rashba-like spin splitting formed by two bands with the same in-plane helical spin texture. Because of this unconventional spin texture, the backscattering is forbidden in edge and bulk conductivity channels. We propose a noncentrosymmetric honeycomb-lattice quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator family formed by the IV, V, and VII elements with this property. The system formed by Bi, Pb, and I atoms is mechanically stable and has both a large Rashba spin splitting of 60 meV and a large nontrivial band gap of 0.14 eV. Since the edge and the bulk states are protected by the time-reversal (TR) symmetry, contrary to what happens in most doped QSH insulators, the bulk states do not contribute to the backscattering in the electronic transport, allowing the construction of a spintronic device with less energy loss.

  3. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Jeffrey G.; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed.

  4. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model.

    PubMed

    Rau, Jeffrey G; Gingras, Michel J P

    2016-01-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed. PMID:27470199

  5. Transverse Spin and Spin-Orbit Coupling in Silicon Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Soria, Alba; Martinez, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Evanescent and tightly confined propagating waves exhibit a remarkable transverse spin density since the longitudinal component of the electric field is not negligible. In this work, we obtain via numerical simulations the electric field components of the fundamental guided modes of two waveguides typically used in silicon photonics: the strip and the slot waveguide. We obtain the relation between transverse and longitudinal field components, the transverse spin densities and other important parameters, such as the longitudinal component of the so-called Belinfante spin momentum density. By asymmetrically placing a circularly-polarized point-like dipole source in regions showing local circular polarization, the guided mode is excited unidirectionally via spin-orbit coupling. In contrast to metal plates supporting surface plasmons, the multimode behavior of silicon waveguides results in different spin-orbit coupling properties for each guided mode. Our results may find application in silicon photonic devices, integrated quantum optics and polarization manipulation at the nanoscale.

  6. Spin injection and spin transport in paramagnetic insulators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Okamoto, Satoshi

    2016-02-22

    We investigate the spin injection and the spin transport in paramagnetic insulators described by simple Heisenberg interactions using auxiliary particle methods. Some of these methods allow access to both paramagnetic states above magnetic transition temperatures and magnetic states at low temperatures. It is predicted that the spin injection at an interface with a normal metal is rather insensitive to temperatures above the magnetic transition temperature. On the other hand below the transition temperature, it decreases monotonically and disappears at zero temperature. We also analyze the bulk spin conductance. We show that the conductance becomes zero at zero temperature as predictedmore » by linear spin wave theory but increases with temperature and is maximized around the magnetic transition temperature. These findings suggest that the compromise between the two effects determines the optimal temperature for spintronics applications utilizing magnetic insulators.« less

  7. Spin-flip noise due to nonequilibrium spin accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liang; Niu, Jiasen; Guo, Huiqiang; Wei, Jian; Li, D. L.; Feng, J. F.; Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2016-05-01

    When current flows through a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), there is spin accumulation at the electrode-barrier interfaces if the magnetic moments of the two ferromagnetic electrodes are not aligned. Here we report that such nonequilibrium spin accumulation generates its own characteristic low frequency noise (LFN). Past work viewed the LFN in MTJs as an equilibrium effect arising from resistance fluctuations (SR) which a passively applied current (I ) converts to measurable voltage fluctuations (SV=I2SR ). We treat the LFN associated with spin accumulation as a nonequilibrium effect, and find that the noise power can be fitted in terms of the spin-polarized current by SIf =a I coth(I/b )-a b , resembling the form of the shot noise for a tunnel junction, but with current now taking the role of the bias voltage, and spin-flip probability taking the role of tunneling probability.

  8. SAMPEX Spin Stabilized Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dean C.; Markley, F. Landis; Watson, Todd P.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), the first of the Small Explorer series of spacecraft, was launched on July 3, 1992 into an 82' inclination orbit with an apogee of 670 km and a perigee of 520 km and a mission lifetime goal of 3 years. After more than 15 years of continuous operation, the reaction wheel began to fail on August 18,2007. With a set of three magnetic torquer bars being the only remaining attitude actuator, the SAMPEX recovery team decided to deviate from its original attitude control system design and put the spacecraft into a spin stabilized mode. The necessary operations had not been used for many years, which posed a challenge. However, on September 25, 2007, the spacecraft was successfully spun up to 1.0 rpm about its pitch axis, which points at the sun. This paper describes the diagnosis of the anomaly, the analysis of flight data, the simulation of the spacecraft dynamics, and the procedures used to recover the spacecraft to spin stabilized mode.

  9. Celiac artery stenting: a new strategy for patients with pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with stenosis of the celiac artery.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yu-Wen; Kao, Hsien-Li; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2004-01-01

    We report a new strategy--celiac artery stenting--to relieve stenosis of the celiac arterial root. This was performed in two patients with pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDA) aneurysm associated with a stenotic celiac arterial root. The first patient was a 66-year-old man complaining of abrupt onset of upper abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a huge retroperitoneal hematoma behind the duodenum, and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) angiography demonstrated an aneurysm arising from inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery and celiac arteriography showed a stenotic celiac arterial root. Transcatheter embolization of the aneurysm was tried, but failed. Because of his unstable hemodynamics, emergent laparotomy with resection of the aneurysm was performed. Fourteen days after the operation, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with celiac arterial stenting was done. The patient was discharged 2 days later, and has had no further bleeding episode for 3 years. The second patient was a 46-year-old woman, who also complained of acute upper abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography disclosed a huge retroperitoneal hematoma, and selective SMA angiography demonstrated an aneurysm arising from the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery, and celiac arteriography showed a stenotic celiac arterial root. Because angiography showed no active bleeding from the aneurysm, percutaneous transluminal angioplastic stenting of the stenotic celiac artery was performed. She was discharged 5 days later and has had no further bleeding episode for 2 years. Celiac arterial stenting, as shown in our two patients, could be easily and safely employed in patients with PDA aneurysm associated with a stenotic celiac arterial root to release the stenosis of the celiac arterial root and to prevent further possible bleeding. PMID:14767741

  10. Enhanced spin polarization in graphene with spin energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling and strain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng-Fang; Wu, Qing-Ping E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Chen, Ai-Xi E-mail: aixichen@ecjtu.jx.cn; Xiao, Xian-Bo; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the possibility of spin polarization in graphene. The result shows that a spin energy gap can be opened in the presence of both spin-orbit coupling and strain. We find that high spin polarization with large spin-polarized current is achieved in the spin energy gap. However, only one of the two modulations is present, no spin polarization can be generated. So the combination of the two modulations provides a way to design tunable spin polarization without need for a magnetic element or an external magnetic field.

  11. Drift transport of helical spin coherence with tailored spin-orbit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunihashi, Y.; Sanada, H.; Gotoh, H.; Onomitsu, K.; Kohda, M.; Nitta, J.; Sogawa, T.

    2016-03-01

    Most future information processing techniques using electron spins in non-magnetic semiconductors will require both the manipulation and transfer of spins without their coherence being lost. The spin-orbit effective magnetic field induced by drifting electrons enables us to rotate the electron spins in the absence of an external magnetic field. However, the fluctuations in the effective magnetic field originating from the random scattering of electrons also cause undesirable spin decoherence, which limits the length scale of the spin transport. Here we demonstrate the drift transport of electron spins adjusted to a robust spin structure, namely a persistent spin helix. We find that the persistent spin helix enhances the spatial coherence of drifting spins, resulting in maximized spin decay length near the persistent spin helix condition. Within the enhanced distance of the spin transport, the transport path of electron spins can be modulated by employing time-varying in-plane voltages.

  12. Spin transport in p-type germanium.

    PubMed

    Rortais, F; Oyarzún, S; Bottegoni, F; Rojas-Sánchez, J-C; Laczkowski, P; Ferrari, A; Vergnaud, C; Ducruet, C; Beigné, C; Reyren, N; Marty, A; Attané, J-P; Vila, L; Gambarelli, S; Widiez, J; Ciccacci, F; Jaffrès, H; George, J-M; Jamet, M

    2016-04-27

    We report on the spin transport properties in p-doped germanium (Ge-p) using low temperature magnetoresistance measurements, electrical spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal and the spin pumping-inverse spin Hall effect method. Electrical spin injection is carried out using three-terminal measurements and the Hanle effect. In the 2-20 K temperature range, weak antilocalization and the Hanle effect provide the same spin lifetime in the germanium valence band (≈1 ps) in agreement with predicted values and previous optical measurements. These results, combined with dynamical spin injection by spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect, demonstrate successful spin accumulation in Ge. We also estimate the spin Hall angle θ(SHE) in Ge-p (6-7 x 10(-4) at room temperature, pointing out the essential role of ionized impurities in spin dependent scattering. PMID:26988255

  13. Spin transport in p-type germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rortais, F.; Oyarzún, S.; Bottegoni, F.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.; Laczkowski, P.; Ferrari, A.; Vergnaud, C.; Ducruet, C.; Beigné, C.; Reyren, N.; Marty, A.; Attané, J.-P.; Vila, L.; Gambarelli, S.; Widiez, J.; Ciccacci, F.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J.-M.; Jamet, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the spin transport properties in p-doped germanium (Ge-p) using low temperature magnetoresistance measurements, electrical spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal and the spin pumping-inverse spin Hall effect method. Electrical spin injection is carried out using three-terminal measurements and the Hanle effect. In the 2-20 K temperature range, weak antilocalization and the Hanle effect provide the same spin lifetime in the germanium valence band (≈1 ps) in agreement with predicted values and previous optical measurements. These results, combined with dynamical spin injection by spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect, demonstrate successful spin accumulation in Ge. We also estimate the spin Hall angle {θ\\text{SHE}} in Ge-p (6-7× {{10}-4} ) at room temperature, pointing out the essential role of ionized impurities in spin dependent scattering.

  14. An unusual course of the radial artery.

    PubMed

    Pelin, C; Zagyapan, R; Mas, N; Karabay, G

    2006-11-01

    Radial artery variations are of importance for clinicians, whether in angiographic examinations or surgical approaches. The high origin radial artery is the most frequent arterial variation observed in the upper limb, showing an incidence of 14.27% in dissection material and 9.75% in angiographic examination. In the present study an unusual course of the radial artery and its relation with the median nerve has been evaluated. During embryological development the radial artery sprouts from two arterial buds arising from the lateral side of the brachial artery and coalescing with each other. The artery lies in the forearm and is overlapped by the brachioradial muscle. In this particular case the radial artery originated from the medial side of the brachial artery and crossed the median nerve twice in an unusual manner 8 cm below the point at which the deep brachial artery arose and 12 cm above the intercondylar line. These results will enhance anatomical knowledge of the region and reduce complication in surgical approaches. PMID:17171625

  15. Proinflammation: The Key to Arterial Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Jiang, Liqun; Monticone, Robert E.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial aging is the major contributing factor to increases in the incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular disease, due mainly to the presence of chronic, low-grade, “sterile” arterial inflammation. Inflammatory signaling driven by the angiotensin II cascade perpetrates adverse age-associated arterial structural and functional remodeling. The aged artery is characterized by endothelial disruption, enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, elastin fracture, and matrix calcification/amyloidosis/glycation. Importantly, the molecular mechanisms of arterial aging are also relevant to the pathogenesis of hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Age-associated arterial proinflammation is, to some extent, mutable, and interventions to suppress or delay it may have the potential to ameliorate or retard age-associated arterial diseases. PMID:24365513

  16. Location of foot arteries using infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villasenor-Mora, Carlos; González-Vega, Arturo; Martín Osmany Falcón, Antonio; Benítez Ferro, Jesús Francisco Guillemo; Córdova Fraga, Teodoro

    2014-11-01

    In this work are presented the results of localization of foot arteries, in a young group of participants by using infrared thermal images, these are the dorsal, posterior tibial and anterior tibial arteries. No inclusion criteria were considered, that causes that no strong statistical data about the influence of the age in the arterial localization. It was achieved to solve the confusion when veins present a heat distribution similar to the artery and in the position of this. it contributes to enhance the rate of location of arteries. In general it is possible to say that the use of infrared thermal images is a good technique to find the foot arteries and can be applied in its characterization in a future. The procedure proposed is a non-invasive technique, and in certain fashion does not requires specialized personnel to achieve locate the arteries. It is portable, safe, and relatively economical.

  17. [Accessory renal arteries in human fetuses].

    PubMed

    Gościcka, D; Szpinda, M; Kochan, J

    1996-12-01

    Using conventional anatomical methods, renal arteries of 140 human fetuses were studied. It was found (21.1%) that the accessory renal arteries occurred in a three-fold manner: 1. as single arteries (19.2%), 2. as double arteries (2.1%) and 3. as triplex arteries (0.7%). More often they originated from the right part of the circumference of the abdominal aorta, mainly in the female fetuses. These arteries penetrated the following segments of the kidney: the inferior (12.9%), the superior (2.3%), the anterior inferior (2.8%), the posterior (2.1%) and the anterior superior (1.5%). They crossed the renal pelvis more often in front (12.2%) than from behind of it (5%). The frequency of the occurrence of the accessory arteries depends not from the age of the fetus. PMID:9082875

  18. Pulmonary Artery Intimal Sarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kriz, Joseph P.; Munfakh, Nabil A.; King, Gregory S.; Carden, Juan O.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas are rare and lethal malignant tumors that typically affect larger vessels: the aorta, inferior vena cava, and pulmonary arteries. Since symptoms and imaging of pulmonary arterial intimal sarcomas mimic pulmonary thromboembolism, the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with chest pain, dyspnea, and filling defect within the pulmonary arteries should include intimal sarcoma. Often right ventricular failure is observed due to pulmonary hypertension caused by the obstructive effect of the tumor and concomitant chronic thromboembolism. We report the case of a 72-year-old African-American male with arterial intimal sarcoma of the left and right pulmonary artery with extension through the right artery into the bronchus and right lung. PMID:27239183

  19. Netrin-1 controls sympathetic arterial innervation

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Isabelle; Gordon, Emma; Han, Jinah; Cristofaro, Brunella; Broqueres-You, Dong; Liu, Chun; Bouvrée, Karine; Zhang, Jiasheng; del Toro, Raquel; Mathivet, Thomas; Larrivée, Bruno; Jagu, Julia; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Pardanaud, Luc; Machado, Maria J.C.; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Zhuang, Zhen; Simons, Michael; Levy, Bernard I.; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger; Eichmann, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic sympathetic nerves innervate peripheral resistance arteries, thereby regulating vascular tone and controlling blood supply to organs. Despite the fundamental importance of blood flow control, how sympathetic arterial innervation develops remains largely unknown. Here, we identified the axon guidance cue netrin-1 as an essential factor required for development of arterial innervation in mice. Netrin-1 was produced by arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) at the onset of innervation, and arterial innervation required the interaction of netrin-1 with its receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), on sympathetic growth cones. Function-blocking approaches, including cell type–specific deletion of the genes encoding Ntn1 in SMCs and Dcc in sympathetic neurons, led to severe and selective reduction of sympathetic innervation and to defective vasoconstriction in resistance arteries. These findings indicate that netrin-1 and DCC are critical for the control of arterial innervation and blood flow regulation in peripheral organs. PMID:24937433

  20. Physiologic assessment of coronary artery fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.C.; Beauvais, J. )

    1991-01-01

    Coronary artery fistula is an uncommon clinical entity. The most common coronary artery fistula is from the right coronary artery to the right side of the heart, and it is less frequent to the pulmonary artery. The effect of a coronary artery fistula may be physiologically significant because of the steal phenomenon resulting in coronary ischemia. Based on published reports, it is recommended that patients with congenital coronary artery fistulas be considered candidates for elective surgical correction to prevent complications including development of congestive heart failure, angina, subacute bacterial endocarditis, myocardial infarction, and coronary aneurysm formation with rupture or embolization. A patient is presented in whom treadmill-exercise thallium imaging was effective in determining the degree of coronary steal from a coronary artery fistula, leading to successful corrective surgery.

  1. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  2. Microfabricated Spin Polarized Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Martinez, Ricardo

    Spin polarized atomic magnetometers involve the preparation of atomic spins and their detection for monitoring magnetic fields. Due to the fact that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our world, spin polarized atomic magnetometers are used in a wide range of applications from the detection of magnetic fields generated by the human heart and brain to the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance. In this thesis we developed microfabricated spin polarized atomic magnetometers. These sensors are based on optical pumping and spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms and noble gases contained in microfabricated millimeter-scale vapor cells. In the first part of the thesis, we improved different features of current microfabricated optical magnetometers. Specifically, we improved the bandwidth of these devices, without degrading their magnetic field sensitivity, by broadening their magnetic resonance through spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms. We also implemented all-optical excitation techniques to avoid problems, such as the magnetic perturbation of the environment, induced by the radio-frequency fields used in some of these sensors. In the second part of the thesis we demonstrated a microfluidic chip for the optical production and detection of hyperpolarized Xe gas through spin-exchange collisions with optically pumped Rb atoms. These devices are critical for the widespread use of spin polarized atomic magnetometers in applications requiring simple, compact, low-cost, and portable instrumentation.

  3. Invariant Spin in the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony W.

    2008-10-13

    We discuss recent theoretical progress in understanding the distribution of spin and orbital angular momentum in the proton. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of QCD evolution and to the distinction between 'chiral' and 'invariant' spin. This is particularly significant with respect to the possible presence of polarized strange quarks.

  4. Electron Spin and Its History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commins, Eugene D.

    2012-11-01

    The history of electron spin is summarized. Topics include the discovery of electron spin, the birth of quantum electrodynamics, the invention of magnetic resonance, the invention of renormalization, the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron in experiment and theory, and searches for the electron electric dipole moment.

  5. Spin Technologies in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Over the past several decades SiC has evolved from being a simple abrasive to a versatile material platform for high-power electronics, optoelectronics, and nanomechanical devices. These technologies have been driven by advanced growth, doping, and processing capabilities, and the ready availability of large-area, single-crystal SiC wafers. Recent advances have also established SiC as a promising host for a novel class of technologies based on the spin of intrinsic color centers. In particular, the divacancies and related defects have ground-state electronic-spin triplets with ms-long coherence times that can be optically addressed near telecom wavelengths and manipulated with magnetic, electric, and strain fields. Recently, divacancy addressability has been extended to the single defect level, laying foundation for single spin technologies in SiC. This rapidly developing field has prompted research into the SiC material host to understand how defect-bound electron spins interact with their surrounding nuclear spin bath. Although nuclear spins are typically a major source of decoherence in color-center spin systems, they are also an important resource since they interact with magnetic fields orders of magnitude more weakly than electronic spins. This fact has motivated their use for quantum memories and ultra-sensitive sensors. In this talk I will review advances in this rapidly developing field and discuss our efforts towards this latter goal. This work was supported by the AFOSR, DARPA, and the NSF.

  6. Invariant Spin in the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony

    2008-11-01

    We discuss recent theoretical progress in understanding the distribution of spin and orbital angular momentum in the proton. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of QCD evolution and to the distinction between "chiral" and "invariant" spin. This is particularly significant with respect to the possible presence of polarized strange quarks.

  7. Spin transport in hydrogenated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, David; Van Tuan, Dinh; M-M Dubois, Simon; Gmitra, Martin; Cummings, Aron W.; Kochan, Denis; Ortmann, Frank; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Fabian, Jaroslav; Roche, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    In this review we discuss the multifaceted problem of spin transport in hydrogenated graphene from a theoretical perspective. The current experimental findings suggest that hydrogenation can either increase or decrease spin lifetimes, which calls for clarification. We first discuss the spin-orbit coupling induced by local σ -π re-hybridization and {s}{{{p}}3} C-H defect formation together with the formation of a local magnetic moment. First-principles calculations of hydrogenated graphene unravel the strong interplay of spin-orbit and exchange couplings. The concept of magnetic scattering resonances, recently introduced by Kochan et al (2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 116602) is revisited by describing the local magnetism through the self-consistent Hubbard model in the mean field approximation in the dilute limit, while spin relaxation lengths and transport times are computed using an efficient real space order N wavepacket propagation method. Typical spin lifetimes on the order of 1 ns are obtained for 1 ppm of hydrogen impurities (corresponding to a transport time of about 50 ps), and the scaling of spin lifetimes with impurity density is described by the Elliott-Yafet mechanism. This reinforces the statement that local defect-induced magnetism can be at the origin of the substantial spin polarization loss in the clean graphene limit.

  8. Recent Development in Proton Spin Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-12-10

    In the naive model of the proton, its 1/2 spin is carried by its quark constituents. However, experiments over the last several decades have shown that the quark spin only contribute a small portion of the proton spin. In this talk, I will present recent developments exploring this proton spin puzzle, and focus on the progress made in the last few years on the longitudinal spin physics, the generalized parton distribution physics, and the transverse spin physics.

  9. Spin noise spectroscopy of ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, H.; Berski, F.; Hübner, J.; Oestreich, M.; Balocchi, A.; Marie, X.; Mansur-Al-Suleiman, M.; Bakin, A.; Waag, A.

    2013-12-04

    We investigate the thermal equilibrium dynamics of electron spins bound to donors in nanoporous ZnO by optical spin noise spectroscopy. The spin noise spectra reveal two noise contributions: A weak spin noise signal from undisturbed localized donor electrons with a dephasing time of 24 ns due to hyperfine interaction and a strong spin noise signal with a spin dephasing time of 5 ns which we attribute to localized donor electrons which interact with lattice defects.

  10. Spinning bodies in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Ambrosi, G.; Satish Kumar, S.; van de Vis, J.; van Holten, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    We study the motion of neutral and charged spinning bodies in curved spacetime in the test-particle limit. We construct equations of motion using a closed covariant Poisson-Dirac bracket formulation that allows for different choices of the Hamiltonian. We derive conditions for the existence of constants of motion and apply the formalism to the case of spherically symmetric spacetimes. We show that the periastron of a spinning body in a stable orbit in a Schwarzschild or Reissner-Nordstrøm background not only precesses but also varies radially. By analyzing the stability conditions for circular motion we find the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) as a function of spin. It turns out that there is an absolute lower limit on the ISCOs for increasing prograde spin. Finally we establish that the equations of motion can also be derived from the Einstein equations using an appropriate energy-momentum tensor for spinning particles.

  11. Hyperdensity of the Basilar Artery on Postmortem CT: A Potential Indicator for Basilar Artery Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Garland, Jack; Tse, Rexson; Beh, Raymond J; Lyons, Timothy J; Cala, Allan D

    2016-06-01

    Basilar artery thrombosis constitutes 1% of all types of stroke, carries a mortality rate of up to 90%, and is one of the rarer causes of sudden death. It leads to brain stem ischemia and commonly presents with impaired consciousness, cranial nerve palsy, hemiplegia or quadriplegia, and sudden collapse. Clinically, the diagnosis of basilar artery thrombosis is made on clinical symptoms, along with a hyperdense basilar artery in antemortem computed tomography (CT) scan. To our knowledge, whether a hyperdense basilar artery indicates basilar artery thrombosis on postmortem CT scan is not documented in the literature. We present a case report of a 55-year-old man who on postmortem CT scan showed a hyperdense basilar artery and was subsequently confirmed to be a fatal basilar artery thrombosis. We suggest that a hyperdense basilar artery on postmortem CT should prompt the pathologist to consider basilar artery thrombosis. PMID:27049662

  12. Anisotropy-Driven Spin Relaxation in Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengke; Li, Jing; Qing, Lan; Dery, Hanan; Appelbaum, Ian

    2013-12-01

    A unique spin depolarization mechanism, induced by the presence of g-factor anisotropy and intervalley scattering, is revealed by spin-transport measurements on long-distance germanium devices in a magnetic field longitudinal to the initial spin orientation. The confluence of electron-phonon scattering (leading to Elliott-Yafet spin flips) and this previously unobserved physics enables the extraction of spin lifetime solely from spin-valve measurements, without spin precession, and in a regime of substantial electric-field-generated carrier heating. We find spin lifetimes in Ge up to several hundreds of nanoseconds at low temperature, far beyond any other available experimental results.

  13. Electro-optical spin measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodale, Robert (Inventor); Hampton, Herbert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An electro-optical spin measurement system for a spin model in a spin tunnel includes a radio controlled receiver/transmitter, targets located on the spin model, optical receivers mounted around the perimeter of the spin tunnel and the base of the spin tunnel for receiving data from the targets, and a control system for accumulating data from the radio controlled receiver and receivers. Six targets are employed. The spin model includes a fuselage, wings, nose, and tail. Two targets are located under the fuselage of the spin model at the nose tip and tail. Two targets are located on the side of the fuselage at the nose tip and tail, and a target is located under each wing tip. The targets under the fuselage at the nose tip and tail measure spin rate of the spin model, targets on the side of the fuselage at the nose tip and tail measure angle of attack of the spin model, and the targets under the wing tips measure roll angle of the spin model. Optical receivers are mounted at 90 degree increments around the periphery of the spin tunnel to determine angle of attack and roll angle measurements of the spin model. Optical receivers are also mounted at the base of the spin tunnel to define quadrant and position of the spin model and to determine the spin rate of the spin model.

  14. Spin filter for arbitrary spins by substrate engineering.

    PubMed

    Pal, Biplab; Römer, Rudolf A; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2016-08-24

    We design spin filters for particles with potentially arbitrary spin [Formula: see text] using a one-dimensional periodic chain of magnetic atoms as a quantum device. Describing the system within a tight-binding formalism we present an analytical method to unravel the analogy between a one-dimensional magnetic chain and a multi-strand ladder network. This analogy is crucial, and is subsequently exploited to engineer gaps in the energy spectrum by an appropriate choice of the magnetic substrate. We obtain an exact correlation between the magnitude of the spin of the incoming beam of particles and the magnetic moment of the substrate atoms in the chain desired for opening up of a spectral gap. Results of spin polarized transport, calculated within a transfer matrix formalism, are presented for particles having half-integer as well as higher spin states. We find that the chain can be made to act as a quantum device which opens a transmission window only for selected spin components over certain ranges of the Fermi energy, blocking them in the remaining part of the spectrum. The results appear to be robust even when the choice of the substrate atoms deviates substantially from the ideal situation, as verified by extending the ideas to the case of a 'spin spiral'. Interestingly, the spin spiral geometry, apart from exhibiting the filtering effect, is also seen to act as a device flipping spins-an effect that can be monitored by an interplay of the system size and the period of the spiral. Our scheme is applicable to ultracold quantum gases, and might inspire future experiments in this direction. PMID:27352129

  15. Spin Orbit Interaction Engineering for beyond Spin Transfer Torque memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang L.

    Spin transfer torque memory uses electron current to transfer the spin torque of electrons to switch a magnetic free layer. This talk will address an alternative approach to energy efficient non-volatile spintronics through engineering of spin orbit interaction (SOC) and the use of spin orbit torque (SOT) by the use of electric field to improve further the energy efficiency of switching. I will first discuss the engineering of interface SOC, which results in the electric field control of magnetic moment or magneto-electric (ME) effect. Magnetic memory bits based on this ME effect, referred to as magnetoelectric RAM (MeRAM), is shown to have orders of magnitude lower energy dissipation compared with spin transfer torque memory (STTRAM). Likewise, interests in spin Hall as a result of SOC have led to many advances. Recent demonstrations of magnetization switching induced by in-plane current in heavy metal/ferromagnetic heterostructures have been shown to arise from the large SOC. The large SOC is also shown to give rise to the large SOT. Due to the presence of an intrinsic extraordinarily strong SOC and spin-momentum lock, topological insulators (TIs) are expected to be promising candidates for exploring spin-orbit torque (SOT)-related physics. In particular, we will show the magnetization switching in a chromium-doped magnetic TI bilayer heterostructure by charge current. A giant SOT of more than three orders of magnitude larger than those reported in heavy metals is also obtained. This large SOT is shown to come from the spin-momentum locked surface states of TI, which may further lead to innovative low power applications. I will also describe other related physics of SOC at the interface of anti-ferromagnetism/ferromagnetic structure and show the control exchange bias by electric field for high speed memory switching. The work was in part supported by ERFC-SHINES, NSF, ARO, TANMS, and FAME.

  16. Mineralization (calcification) of coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R; Wachowiak, J

    1994-01-01

    Mineralogical investigations of calcifications located in coronary vessels were performed on the material obtained from the endarterectomized arteries of 18 patients (15 M, 3 F, aged 36-65) during surgical revascularization procedures consisting in coronary artery bypass grafting. The samples were tested using scanning microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, electron microprobe and neutron activation spectroscopy. The results of analyses were calculated with the use of computer programmes. Two types of mineralization were determined: 1. secret mineralization identified as higher than normal content of elements in biological tissues, not demonstrating any mineral grains, and 2. apparent mineralization, appearing micro- and macroscopically as grains composed mainly of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonate groups, i.e. a mineral identical with apatite present in bones, or as calcification of other tissues (heart valves, lungs etc.). The authors suggest that the phenomenon of mineralization should be taken into consideration in the preventive treatment of coronary atheriosclerosis. PMID:7808039

  17. Management of Carotid Artery Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Gordin, Eli; Stroman, David

    2014-01-01

    With increased awareness and liberal screening of trauma patients with identified risk factors, recent case series demonstrate improved early diagnosis of carotid artery trauma before they become problematio. There remains a need for unified screening criteria for both intracranial and extracranial carotid trauma. In the absence of contraindications, antithrombotic agents should be considered in blunt carotid artery injuries, as there is a significant risk of progression of vessel injury with observation alone. Despite CTA being used as a common screening modality, it appears to lack sufficient sensitivity. DSA remains to be the gold standard in screening. Endovascular techniques are becoming more widely accepted as the primary surgical modality in the treatment of blunt extracranial carotid injuries and penetrating/blunt intracranial carotid lessions. Nonetheless, open surgical approaches are still needed for the treatment of penetrating extracranial carotid injuries and in patients with unfavorable lesions for endovascular intervention. PMID:25136406

  18. Multiferroics of spin origin.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Yoshinori; Seki, Shinichiro; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2014-07-01

    Multiferroics, compounds with both magnetic and ferroelectric orders, are believed to be a key material system to achieve cross-control between magnetism and electricity in a solid with minute energy dissipation. Such a colossal magnetoelectric (ME) effect has been an issue of keen interest for a long time in condensed matter physics as well as a most desired function in the emerging spin-related electronics. Here we begin with the basic mechanisms to realize multiferroicity or spin-driven ferroelectricity in magnetic materials, which have recently been clarified and proved both theoretically and experimentally. According to the proposed mechanisms, many families of multiferroics have been explored, found (re-discovered), and newly developed, realizing a variety of colossal ME controls. We overview versatile multiferroics from the viewpoints of their multiferroicity mechanisms and their fundamental ME characteristics on the basis of the recent advances in exploratory materials. One of the new directions in multiferroic science is the dynamical ME effect, namely the dynamical and/or fast cross-control between electric and magnetic dipoles in a solid. We argue here that the dynamics of multiferroic domain walls significantly contributes to the amplification of ME response, which has been revealed through the dielectric spectroscopy. Another related issue is the electric-dipole-active magnetic resonance, called electromagnons. The electromagnons can provide a new stage of ME optics via resonant coupling with the external electromagnetic wave (light). Finally, we give concluding remarks on multiferroics physics in the light of a broader perspective from the emergent electromagnetism in a solid as well as from the possible application toward future dissipationless electronics. PMID:24994716

  19. Magnetic spin reduction system for free spinning objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A spinning Earth satellite is shown in which it is desired to reduce the rotation or spin to a level that the satellite may be secured or handled remotely from a spacecraft. This is accomplished by the spacecraft having a mast carrying an electrical current coil which encircles the satellite. The magnetic field of the coil is normal to the spin axis of the satellite which causes circular eddy current flow in the housing of the satellite. This generates magnetic force opposing the rotation. In another embodiment the magnetic field is generated by the use of an electromagnet on a remote manipulation arm.

  20. Spin-Thermodynamics of Ultra-Cold Spin-1 Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Yao, D. X.; Bao, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    The spin-thermodynamics of a -body spin-1 condensate containing only the spin-degrees of freedom is studied via a theory in which , the total spin and its Z-component are exactly conserved. The magnetic field is considered as zero at first. Then the effect of a residual is evaluated. A temperature is defined as below that all the spatial degrees of freedom can be considered as being frozen and, accordingly, a pure spin-system will emerge. Effort is made to evaluate . When goes up from zero, the internal energy and the entropy experience sharp changes in two narrow domains of surrounding two turning temperatures and , the latter is higher. When or , and remain unchanged. Whereas when , and . It was found that and originate from the gap (the energy difference between the ground state (g.s.) and the first excited state) and the width (the energy difference between the g.s. and the highest state without spatial excitation) of the spectra, respectively. Thus their appearance is a common feature in spin-thermodynamics. In fact, marks the lowest excitation of the spin-modes, while marks the maximization of the entropy in the spin-space. In particular, the T-dependent population density is defined so that the theory can be checked by experimental data. Two kinds of condensates are notable: (i) the strongly trapped systems with a very small , they can work as pure spin-systems at relatively higher temperature; (ii) the systems with a high magnetization (say, ), the dimensions of their spin-spaces are very low. Furthermore, a larger together with a large N (for Rb) or a large (for Na) will lead to a sufficiently large so that a real g.s. can be experimentally created at a higher temperature. The spin-thermodynamics would remain valid whenever the spatial modes decouple from the spin-modes. This can occur at a higher temperature as demonstrated in Pechkis et al. (Phys Rev Lett 111:025301, 2013).

  1. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25698610

  2. Bilateral posterior cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Davinia; Murphy, Sinead M; Hennessey, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with short-term memory impairment and a homonymous left inferior quadrantanopia secondary to simultaneous bilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territory infarction. As in more than a quarter of cases of PCA infarction, no aetiological cause was identified. Unlike the transient nature of symptoms in some cases following unilateral infarction, his deficits persisted on 2-month follow-up. PMID:22798298

  3. Ultrasonic Imaging Of Deep Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.; Heyser, Richard C.; Lecroissette, Dennis H.

    1990-01-01

    Swept-frequency sound replaces pulsed sound. Ultrasonic medical instrument produces images of peripheral and coronary arteries with resolutions higher and at depths greater than attainable by previous ultrasonic systems. Time-delay-spectrometry imager includes scanning, image-processing, and displaying equipment. It sweeps in frequency from 0 to 10 MHz in 20 ms, pauses for 5 ms, and repeats sweep. Intended for use in noninvasive detection and measurement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  4. Aneurysm of the Splenic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, P. D.; Lodge, Brian

    1960-01-01

    This paper records an incidence of 10·4% of aneurysm of the splenic artery in 250 consecutive routine post-mortem examinations. Medial degeneration seemed to be the commonest cause of such aneurysms and although a number were associated with other intraabdominal pathology, including portal hypertension, the association may be fortuitous and not causal. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:13688586

  5. Digital subtraction angiography of a persistent trigeminal artery variant.

    PubMed

    Temizöz, Osman; Genchellac, Hakan; Unlü, Ercüment; Cağli, Bekir; Ozdemir, Hüseyin; Demir, M Kemal

    2010-09-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery variants are described as cerebellar arteries that directly originate from the precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. This has been observed in 0.18% of cerebral catheter angiograms. On the other hand, a persistent trigeminal artery variant feeding both the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory is very rare. We present this uncommon anomalous artery along with digital subtraction angiography findings and discuss its clinical significance in light of the literature. PMID:19821254

  6. Aberrant ovarian collateral originating from external iliac artery during uterine artery embolization.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Joon Ho; Kim, Man Deuk; Lee, Kwang-Hun; Lee, Myungsu; Lee, Mu Sook; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2013-02-01

    We report a case of a 35-year-old woman who underwent uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic multiple uterine fibroids with collateral aberrant right ovarian artery that originated from the right external iliac artery. We believe that this is the first reported case in the literature of this collateral uterine flow by the right ovarian artery originated from the right external iliac artery. We briefly present the details of the case and review the literature on variations of ovarian artery origin that might be encountered during UAE. PMID:22565531

  7. Superficial Ulnar Artery Associated with Anomalous Origin of the Common Interosseous and Ulnar Recurrent Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Pamidi, Narendra; Nayak, Satheesha B; Jetti, Raghu; Thangarajan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of vascular variations in the upper limb is not uncommon and is well described in the medical literature. However, occurrence of superficial ulnar artery associated with unusual origin of the common interosseous and ulnar recurrent arteries is seldom reported in the literature. In the present case, we report the anomalous origin of common trunk of common interosseous, anterior and posterior ulnar recurrent arteries from the radial artery, in a male cadaver. Further, ulnar artery had presented superficial course. Knowledge of anomalous arterial pattern in the cubital fossa reported here is clinically important during the angiographic procedures and plastic surgeries. PMID:27437201

  8. Superficial Ulnar Artery Associated with Anomalous Origin of the Common Interosseous and Ulnar Recurrent Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Pamidi, Narendra; Nayak, Satheesha B; Jetti, Raghu; Thangarajan, Rajesh

    2016-05-01

    Occurrence of vascular variations in the upper limb is not uncommon and is well described in the medical literature. However, occurrence of superficial ulnar artery associated with unusual origin of the common interosseous and ulnar recurrent arteries is seldom reported in the literature. In the present case, we report the anomalous origin of common trunk of common interosseous, anterior and posterior ulnar recurrent arteries from the radial artery, in a male cadaver. Further, ulnar artery had presented superficial course. Knowledge of anomalous arterial pattern in the cubital fossa reported here is clinically important during the angiographic procedures and plastic surgeries. PMID:27437201

  9. Coronary artery fistula connecting the left main coronary artery with the superior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidou, C; Gourassas, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery fistulas are rare congenital coronary artery abnormalities, with direct communication between a coronary artery and a cardiac chamber, great vessel or other structure. Description of case We report a case of a large coronary artery fistula connecting the left main coronary artery with the superior vena cava in a 70-year-old patient undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography for a non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. The patient rejected closure of the fistula and remains asymptomatic on follow-up. Conclusion Angiographic recognition of coronary artery fistulas is important for the appropriate diagnosis and management of patients. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):186-188.

  10. Aberrant Ovarian Collateral Originating from External Iliac Artery During Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Joon Ho; Kim, Man Deuk Lee, Kwang-hun; Lee, Myungsu; Lee, Mu Sook; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2013-02-15

    We report a case of a 35-year-old woman who underwent uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic multiple uterine fibroids with collateral aberrant right ovarian artery that originated from the right external iliac artery. We believe that this is the first reported case in the literature of this collateral uterine flow by the right ovarian artery originated from the right external iliac artery. We briefly present the details of the case and review the literature on variations of ovarian artery origin that might be encountered during UAE.

  11. Endovascular parent artery occlusion of proximal posterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Hidenori; Tanoue, Shunsuke; Teranishi, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Senshu; Magami, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Arai, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    We report two cases of proximal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms treated with endovascular parent artery occlusion (PAO) with coils. In both cases, selective injection from the 4 F distal access catheter clearly showed the perforating arteries arising from the PCA. Case No 1, a 49-year-old woman, was successfully treated with preservation of a paramedian artery. Case No 2, a 54-year-old woman, was treated in the same manner. The patient underwent extensive thalamic infarction after the procedure because of paramedian artery occlusion. Endovascular PAO with coils is feasible for proximal PCA aneurysms; however, preservation of perforating arteries arising from the PCA is mandatory. PMID:25969452

  12. Separating inverse spin Hall voltage and spin rectification voltage by inverting spin injection direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenxu; Peng, Bin; Han, Fangbin; Wang, Qiuru; Soh, Wee Tee; Ong, Chong Kim; Zhang, Wanli

    2016-03-01

    We develop a method for universally resolving the important issue of separating the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) from the spin rectification effect (SRE) signal. This method is based on the consideration that the two effects depend on the spin injection direction: The ISHE is an odd function of the spin injection direction while the SRE is independent on it. Thus, the inversion of the spin injection direction changes the ISHE voltage signal, while the SRE voltage remains. It applies generally to analyzing the different voltage contributions without fitting them to special line shapes. This fast and simple method can be used in a wide frequency range and has the flexibility of sample preparation.

  13. Growing collateral arteries on demand.

    PubMed

    Oh, Charles C; Klein, Jason D; Migrino, Raymond Q; Thornburg, Kent L

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies have significantly advanced our understanding of arteriogenesis, raising hope that therapies to increase collateral arterial formation may become important new tools in the treatment of ischemic disease. The most important initiating trigger for arteriogenesis is the marked increase in shear stress which is sensed by the endothelium and leads to characteristic changes. Intracellularly, it was shown that platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to increased shear stress, suggesting a role as a possible mechanoreceptor for dynamic and continual monitoring of shear stress. The signal generated by PECAM-1 leads to the activation of the Rho pathway among others. More than 40 genes have been shown to have a shear stress responsive element. The Rho pathway is activated early and appears to be essential to the arteriogenic response as inhibiting it abolished the effect of fluid shear stress. Overexpression of a Rho pathway member, Actin-binding Rho protein (Abra), led to a 60% increase in collateral perfusion over simple femoral artery occlusion. A patent for the Abra gene has been filed recently. It may be a harbinger of a future where collateral arteries grown on demand may become an effective treatment for ischemic vascular disease. PMID:21861827

  14. Management of carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Louridas, George; Junaid, Asad

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To clarify the definition of carotid artery diseases, the appropriateness of screening for disease, investigation and management of patients presenting with transient ischemic attacks, and management of asymptomatic carotid bruits. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using the terms carotid endarterectomy, carotid disease, and carotid stenosis. Most studies offer level II or III evidence. Consensus statements and guidelines from various neurovascular societies were also consulted. MAIN MESSAGE Patients with symptoms of hemispheric transient ischemic attacks associated with >70% stenosis of the internal carotid artery are at highest risk of major stroke or death. Risk is greatest within 48 hours of symptom onset; patients should have urgent evaluation by a vascular surgeon for consideration of carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Patients with 50% to 69% stenosis might benefit from urgent surgical intervention depending on clinical features and associated comorbidity. Patients with <50% stenosis do not benefit from surgery. Asymptomatic patients with >60% stenosis should be considered for elective CEA. CONCLUSION Symptomatic carotid artery syndromes need urgent carotid duplex evaluation to determine the need for urgent surgery. Those with the greatest degree of stenosis derive the greatest benefit from timely CEA. PMID:16060177

  15. Arterial endofibrosis in professional cyclists

    PubMed Central

    VERALDI, G.F.; MACRÌ, M.; CRISCENTI, P.; SCORSONE, L.; ZINGARETTI, C.C.; GNONI, M.; MEZZETTO, L.

    2015-01-01

    External Iliac Artery Endofibrosis (EIAE) is an uncommon disease usually affecting young, otherwise healthy, patients. It usually involves cyclists but cases have been reported in other groups of endurance athletes. The external iliac artery is the most affected anatomical site but other locations are described too. The precise pathophysiology and long-term evolution of the disease still remain unknown. The diagnosis may be challenging and delayed as the patients usually present symptoms only in extreme conditions and physical and instrumental examinations may be normal at rest. We present two cases of young professional cyclists who suffered of exercise-induced leg pain which led them to reduce running. Both patients were firstly treated with balloon angioplasty that rapidly failed to improve their symptoms. The successive open surgery with endofibrosectomy and autologous saphenous vein closure patch completely resolved physical limitations. EIAE is a rare disease that can induce arterial stenosis, thrombosis, dissection and secondary atheroma. After-exercise ankle-brachial index represents a useful diagnostic criterion. Careful observation of angio-CT may strengthen the suspect. Knowledge of the these features allows a better pre-operative assessment and an early effective treatment. Surgical revascularization remains the gold standard approach. PMID:26888703

  16. Morphology of atherosclerotic coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Margaret N.; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Hieber, Simone Elke; Weitkamp, Timm; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia; Lobrinus, Johannes A.; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Mach, François; Zumbuehl, Andreas; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    Atherosclerosis, the narrowing of vessel diameter and build-up of plaques in coronary arteries, leads to an increase in the shear stresses present, which can be used as a physics-based trigger for targeted drug delivery. In order to develop appropriate nanometer-size containers, one has to know the morphology of the critical stenoses with isotropic micrometer resolution. Micro computed tomography in absorption and phase contrast mode provides the necessary spatial resolution and contrast. The present communication describes the pros and cons of the conventional and synchrotron radiation-based approaches in the visualization of diseased human and murine arteries. Using registered datasets, it also demonstrates that multi-modal imaging, including established histology, is even more powerful. The tomography data were evaluated with respect to cross-section, vessel radius and maximal constriction. The average cross-section of the diseased human artery (2.31 mm2) was almost an order of magnitude larger than the murine one (0.27 mm2), whereas the minimal radius differs only by a factor of two (0.51 mm versus 0.24 mm). The maximal constriction, however, was much larger for the human specimen (85% versus 49%). We could also show that a plastic model used for recent experiments in targeted drug delivery represents a very similar morphology, which is, for example, characterized by a maximal constriction of 82%. The tomography data build a sound basis for flow simulations, which allows for conclusions on shear stress distributions in stenosed blood vessels.

  17. Anomalous Origin of Left Circumflex Artery

    PubMed Central

    Çitaku, Hajdin; Kamberi, Lulzim; Gorani, Daut; Koçinaj, Dardan; Krasniqi, Xhevdet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The coronary anatomic variation of the left circumflex artery (LCx) is considered as the most common anatomic variation with a separate ostium from the right sinus, and very unusual variation as a proximal branch of right coronary artery (RCA). Case report: We report two cases, the first case is a 64-year-old man with chest pain and with history of hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia and current smoker, and the second case is a 67-year-old who presented to the emergency department with chest pain and with a past medical history of arterial hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the coronarography of the first case is detected an ectopic left circumflex coronary artery from the right coronary sinus with stenotic changes in RCA and LCx. The second case in the coronary angiography revealed an ectopic left circumflex coronary artery from the proximal part of the right coronary artery with stenotic changes in LAD, RCA and LCx. Based on guidelines for revascularization our patients successfully underwent treatment procedures. We present two cases that because of the atherosclerotic coronary artery disease leads to the need of coronarography find out the presence of coronary artery anomalies. Conclusion: During the coronarography we should think about coronary artery anomaly or missing artery knowing that type of these anomalies, considering that may be a contributing factor in the development of the atherosclerosis determines the method of the treatment. PMID:26843740

  18. True Aneurysm of the Proximal Brachial Artery

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Pinjala; Mahapatra, Sandeep; Rajesh, Ratna

    2013-01-01

    A 35-year-old farmer presented with complaints of pain in the right upper limb for 1 month and bluish discoloration of the right-hand finger tips with tingling and numbness. He sustained injury to the right upper limb while lifting a heavy object 1 mo previously. There was an ovoid swelling of 4 × 2 cm on the medial aspect of the right arm, 12 cm above the medial epicondyle at the level of the armpit with visible pulsations. There was distal neurovascular deficit. Duplex scan of the right upper limb arterial system revealed a pseudoaneurysm of the proximal right brachial artery, with dampened monophasic flow in the ulnar artery and no flow in the radial artery. Spiral computed tomography angiogram showed the presence of an echogenic periarterial lesion in the proximal brachial artery suggestive of pseudoaneurysm or an extrinsic compression by hematoma. Distal brachial artery was found to have filled with thrombus, with non-opacification of the radial and the distal ulnar artery. The patient was posted for excision of the aneurysmal arterial segment. A 5-cm-long reversed segment of vein graft was interposed in between the cut ends of the brachial artery. Histopathology: Specimen shows a part of the vessel wall composed of intimal, medial, and adventitial layers with intraluminal thrombus showing evidence of recanalization suggestive of true aneurysm of the brachial artery. PMID:26798692

  19. Assessment of conduit artery vasomotion using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanders, Karlis; Grabovskis, Andris; Marcinkevics, Zbignevs; Aivars, Juris Imants

    2013-11-01

    Vasomotion is a spontaneous oscillation of vascular tone. The phenomenon has been observed in small arterioles and capillaries as well as in the large conduit arteries. The layer of smooth muscle cells that surrounds a blood vessel can spontaneously and periodically change its tension and thereby the arterial wall stiffness also changes. As the understanding of the phenomenon is still rather obscure, researchers would benefit from a low-cost and reliable investigation technique such as photoplethysmography (PPG). PPG is an optical blood pulsation measurement technique that can offer substantial information about the arterial stiffness. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the usefulness of the PPG technique in the research of vasomotion and to investigate vasomotion in the relatively large conduit arteries. Continuous 15 minute long measurements of posterior tibial artery wall stiffness were taken. Artery diameter, electrocardiogram, blood pressure and respiration were also simultaneously registered. Fast Fourier Transform power spectra were calculated to identify unique stiffness oscillations that did not correspond to fluctuations in the systemic parameters and thus would indicate vasomotion. We concluded that photoplethysmography is a convenient method for the research of the vasomotion in large arteries. Local stiffness parameter b/a is more accurate to use and easier to measure than the pulse wave velocity which describes stiffness of a segment of an artery. Conduit arteries might exhibit a low amplitude high frequency vasomotion ( 9 to 27 cycles per minute). Low frequency vasomotion is problematic to distinguish from the passive oscillations imposed by the arterial pressure.

  20. The clinical anatomy of the conal artery.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Marios; Patel, Swetal; Cesmebasi, Alper; Muresian, Horia; Tubbs, R Shane; Spicer, Diane; Dabrowski, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Coronary arteries have been extensively described and recognized by gross anatomic studies. However, in the clinical setting, the recognition of the conal artery is essential during coronary angiography, as well as certain congenital heart conditions such as tetralogy of Fallot. In order to provide a complete anatomic and physiologic correlation of the actual incidence and distribution of the conal artery we examined 300 formalin fixed hearts with gross dissections and 300 coronary angiograms. The conal artery was identified in all hearts examined and five main patterns were recognized. In Type A (193, 32.1%), the conal artery arose as a branch of the right coronary artery (RCA); in Type B (96, 16%), the conal artery arose from the common coronary ostium with the RCA; in Type C (242, 40.3%), the conal artery took origin from the right aortic sinus as an independent artery; in Type D (48, 8%), multiple conal arteries were present and arose from the RCA as separate branches (32, 66.6%), from a common ostium with the RCA (8, 16.6%) or from the aortic sinus (8, 16.6%); in Type E (22, 3.6%), the conal artery arose as a branch of the right ventricular branch (17, 2.8%) or acute marginal artery (5, 0.8%). The relative prevalence of the five patterns as well as the morphology and the topography of the conal artery varied significantly with the degree of coronary luminal stenosis (as observed during angiography) and also with the degree of hypertrophied ventricular wall (as observed during gross dissections). Clin. Anat. 29:371-379, 2016. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25255889