Science.gov

Sample records for pseudo-first-order reaction rate

  1. Increasing PCB radiolysis rates in transformer oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Brey, Richard R.; Rodriguez, René G.; Pristupa, Scott; Ruhter, Aaron

    2002-11-01

    The kinetics of Aroclor 1242 radiolysis in transformer oil, using high-energy electrons, was found to be analogous to that previously measured for individual polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners irradiated with γ-rays. The plot of the pseudo-first-order rate constant for PCB decomposition versus initial PCB concentration is a power function, with high rate constants for low concentrations. The addition of alkaline isopropanol to transformer oil was found to increase the pseudo-first-order rate constant for PCB decomposition. The rate constant under these conditions is independent of concentration. This may be explained by the establishment of chain reaction dechlorination in the oil.

  2. Increasing PCB Radiolysis Rates in Transformer Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, Bruce Jay

    2002-11-01

    The kinetics of Aroclor 1242 radiolysis in transformer oil, using high-energy electrons, was found to be analogous to that previously measured for individual polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners irradiated with ó-rays. The plot of the pseudo-first-order rate constant for PCB decomposition versus initial PCB concentration is a power function, with high rate constants for low concentrations. The addition of alkaline isopropanol to transformer oil was found to increase the pseudo-first-order rate constant for PCB decomposition. The rate constant under these conditions is independent of concentration. This may be explained by the establishment of chain reaction dechlorination in the oil.

  3. Absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine /2P/ atoms and hydrogen peroxide from 298 to 424 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine (2P) atoms and hydrogen peroxide was determined from 298 to 424 K, using the discharge flow resonance fluorescence technique. Pseudo-first-order conditions were used with hydrogen peroxide in large excess. A fast flow-sampling procedure limited hydrogen peroxide decomposition to less than 5% over the temperature range studied. At 298 K, the rate constant is (4.1 plus or minus 0.2) x 10 to the minus 13th cu cm/molecule-sec.

  4. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with hydrazine H + N2H4 yields H2 + N2H3 have been determined in a direct manner using flash photolysis of dilute mixtures of hydrazine in helium and time dependent observation of H via resonance fluorescence. By measuring the H-atom decay under pseudo-first-order conditions, the bimolecular rate constant K sub 1 was obtained over the temperature range 228-400 K. The data were fitted with good linearity to the Arrhenius expression K sub 1 = (9.87 plus or minus 1.17) x 10 to the -12th exp(-2380 plus or minus 100/RT) cu cm/molecule/s. The data were shown to be free of any contributions from secondary reactions involving H as a reactant or product.

  5. Rate constant for formation of chlorine nitrate by the reaction ClO + NO2 + M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, M. T.; Lin, C. L.; Demore, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    The pseudo-first-order decay of ClO in a large excess of NO2 was monitored in a discharge flow/mass-spectrometer apparatus in order to measure the rate constant of the reaction ClO + NO2 + M yields ClONO2 + M for M = He, Ar, and N2 over the temperature range from 248 to 417 K. Numerical results are given for He at 248, 299, 360, and 417 K (1 to 9 torr); for Ar at 298 K (1 to 4 torr); and for N2 at 299, 360, and 417 K (1 to 6 torr). Systematic errors are estimated, and identification of the reaction product is discussed. The results obtained are shown to be in excellent agreement with other recent measurements of the same rate constant.

  6. Temperature dependence of the rate constants for reactions of O/1D/ atoms with a number of halocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. A.; Schiff, H. I.; Brown, T. J.; Howard, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for an experimental study of the reactions of O(1D) with CCl4, CFCl3, CF2Cl2, CHFCl2, CHF2Cl, and CF2ClCFCl2 over the temperature range from 173 to 343 K, based on the time-resolved emission of O(1D) at 630 nm. The experiments involved photolysis of O3 by Nd-YAG laser pulses and measurements of 630-nm emission intensity in mixtures with He and the various halocarbons. Pseudo-first-order rate constants are derived from plots of the logarithms of the 630-nm emission intensities as a function of time for particular He/O3/halocarbon mixtures, and second-order rate constants are then obtained from plots of these pseudo-first-order rate constants as a function of halocarbon concentration at constant He and O3 concentrations. No temperature dependence of the second-order rate constants is observed over the range studied, within the precision of the measurements. It is found that the rate constants decrease as H is substituted for Cl in a halocarbon molecule and as F is substituted for H or Cl.

  7. Reaction kinetics of resveratrol with tert-butoxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džeba, Iva; Pedzinski, Tomasz; Mihaljević, Branka

    2012-09-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of t-butoxyl radicals with resveratrol was studied under pseudo-first order conditions. The rate constant was determined by measuring the phenoxyl radical formation rate at 390 nm as function of resveratrol concentration in acetonitrile. The rate constant was determined to be 6.5×108 M-1s-1. This high value indicates the high reactivity consistent with the strong antioxidant activity of resveratrol.

  8. The sonochemical degradation of azobenzene and related azo dyes: Rate enhancements via Fenton's reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, J.M.; Destaillats, H.; Hung, H.M.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    2000-01-20

    The sonochemical degradation of aqueous solutions of azobenzene and related azo dyes (methyl orange, o-methyl red, and p-methyl red) was performed at 500 kHz and 50 W, under air, O{sub 2}, or Ar saturation at 288 K. Reaction products and intermediates were identified by HPLC-ES-MS. Total organic carbon (TOC) was also determined as a function of reaction time. The authors propose a reaction mechanism based on the observed species and the extent and rate of TOC depletion. The effects of the dye structures and of the background gas on the sonochemical bleaching rates were also investigated. The reaction rates for o-methyl red were approximately 30--40% faster than those for the other compounds. Saturating with Ar instead of air or O{sub 2} increased the pseudo first-order rate constants for the degradation by 10%. The acceleration of the sonochemical bleaching and the mineralization process upon addition of Fe(II) was also investigated in Ar-saturated methyl orange solutions. A 3-fold increase in the reaction rate was observed at optimal Fe(II) concentrations. This kinetic effect is quantitatively accounted for by a simple kinetic model based on the reaction of Fe(II) with sonochemically produced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (Fenton's reaction). This latter effect illustrates a simple way of achieving a substantial improvement in the efficiency of sonochemical degradation reactions.

  9. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  10. Rate determination of azide click reactions onto alkyne polymer brush scaffolds: a comparison of conventional and catalyst-free cycloadditions for tunable surface modification.

    PubMed

    Orski, Sara V; Sheppard, Gareth R; Arumugam, Selvanathan; Arnold, Rachelle M; Popik, Vladimir V; Locklin, Jason

    2012-10-16

    The postpolymerization functionalization of poly(N-hydroxysuccinimide 4-vinylbenzoate) brushes with reactive alkynes that differ in relative rates of activity of alkyne-azide cycloaddition reactions is described. The alkyne-derived polymer brushes undergo "click"-type cycloadditions with azido-containing compounds by two mechanisms: a strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) with dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO) and azadibenzocyclooctyne (ADIBO) or a copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) to a propargyl group (PPG). Using a pseudo-first-order limited rate equation, rate constants for DIBO, ADIBO, and PPG-derivatized polymer brushes functionalized with an azide-functionalized dye were calculated as 7.7 × 10(-4), 4.4 × 10(-3), and 2.0 × 10(-2) s(-1), respectively. The SPAAC click reactions of the surface bound layers were determined to be slower than the equivalent reactions in solution, but the relative ratio of the reaction rates for the DIBO and ADIBO SPAAC reactions was consistent between solution and the polymer layer. The rate of functionalization was not influenced by the diffusion of azide into the polymer scaffold as long as the concentration of azide in solution was sufficiently high. The PPG functionalization by CuAAC had an extremely fast rate, which was comparable to other surface click reaction rates. Preliminary studies of dilute solution azide functionalization indicate that the diffusion-limited regime of brush functionalization impacts a 50 nm polymer brush layer and decreases the pseudo-first-order rate by a constant diffusion-limited factor of 0.233. PMID:23009188

  11. Rate Constant for the OH + CO Reaction at Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingdi; Sander, Stanley P

    2015-10-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of OH + CO → products (1) have been measured using laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) over the temperature range 193–296 K and at pressures of 50–700 Torr of Ar and N2. The reaction was studied under pseudo-first-order conditions, monitoring the decay of OH in the presence of a large excess of CO. The rate constants can be expressed as a combination of bimolecular and termolecular components. The bimolecular component was found to be temperature-independent with an expression given by kbi(T) = (1.54 ± 0.14) × 10(–13)[e(–(13±17)/T)] cm(3) molecule(–1) s(–1), with an error of one standard deviation. The termolecular component was fitted to the expression, kter = k0(T)[M]/[1 + (k0(T)[M]/k∞(T)] × 0.6({1+[log10(k0(T)[M]/k∞(T))]2}−1) where k0(T) = k0(300)(T/300)(−n) and k∞(T) = k∞(300)(T/300)(−m). The parameters for k0(T) were determined to be k0(300) = (6.0±0.5) × 10(−33) cm(6) molecule(–2) s(–1) in N2 and k0(300) = (3.4 ± 0.3) × 10(–33) cm(6) molecule(–2) s(–1) in Ar, with n = 1.9±0.5 and 2.0±0.4 in N2 and Ar, respectively. These parameters were determined using k0(T) and m from the NASA kinetics data evaluation (JPL Publication No. 10-6) since the experimental pressure range was far from the high-pressure limit. Addition of low concentrations of O2 had no discernible effect on the mechanism of the OH + CO reaction but resulted in secondary reactions which regenerated OH. PMID:26305192

  12. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  13. Measurement of sulfur dioxide reaction rates in wintertime orographic clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Releases of SO2 into the wintertime orographic clouds at Elk Mountain in southeastern Wyoming were utilized to accelerate the rate of SO2 oxidation to cloud-water dissolved sulfate (SO4(-2)). Background SO2 mixing ratios were 0.6 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv) and were consistent with the remote location of the experimental site and with supplemental cloud water, snow, and aerosol composition measurements. Background mixing ratios of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the organohydroperoxides, expressed as methyl hydroperoxide (MHP), were 0.15 and 0.17 ppbv, respectively. The concentration of H2O2 in cloud water, obtained as rime, was also monitored. Analysis of these findings suggests that both reactive loss of H2O2 and volatilization during riming are mechanisms for H2O2 loss. The pseudo first-order SO2 depletion rates varied between 2 and 72 percent /hr (x=32 plus or minus 22 percent/hr, n=10). Observed depletions of H2O2 (x=0.030 ppbv) were consistent with observed yields of SO4(-2) (x=0.027 ppbv) and with model predictions. Observed depletions of MHP were not significantly different from 0.0 ppbv. This observation is both consistent with the much smaller solubility of MHP, compared with H2O2, and with the results of 16 model simulations. Reactions between dissolved SO2 and O3, between SO2 and O2, and between SO2 and HCHO were calculated to contribute less than 40 percent to the total amount of SO4(-2). These reactions were inferred to be inhibited by the low pH (less than 5) of the Elk Mountain cloud water. It is concluded that H2O2 is the dominant SO2 oxidant in these clouds, and that the laboratory measurements form an adequate basis for predicting the rate of in-cloud oxidation of SO2 by H2O2.

  14. Rate Coefficients for the OH + (CHO)2 (Glyoxal) Reaction Between 240 and 400 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feierabend, K. J.; Talukdar, R. K.; Zhu, L.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2006-12-01

    Glyoxal (CHO)2, the simplest dialdehyde, is an end product formed in the atmospheric oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons, for example, isoprene. As such, glyoxal plays a role in regional air quality and ozone production in certain locations. Glyoxal is lost in the atmosphere via UV photolysis and reaction with OH. However, the currently available rate coefficient data for the OH + glyoxal reaction is limited to a single room- temperature measurement made using the relative rate method. A determination of the rate coefficient temperature dependence is therefore needed for a more complete interpretation of the atmospheric processing of glyoxal. This study reports the rate coefficient for the OH + (CHO)2 reaction measured under pseudo- first-order conditions in OH ([(CHO)2] > 1000 [OH]0). OH radicals were produced using 248 nm pulsed laser photolysis of H2O2 or HNO3 and detected by pulsed laser induced fluorescence. The concentration of glyoxal in the reactor was determined using three independent techniques; gas flow rates as well as in situ UV and IR absorption. The total pressure in the reactor was varied from 40 to 300 Torr (He), and the rate coefficient was found to be independent of pressure over the temperature range studied. The rate coefficient exhibits a negative temperature dependence between 240 and 400 K consistent with the dependence previously observed for many other aldehydes. Our room-temperature rate coefficient is smaller than the relative rate value that is currently recommended for use in atmospheric model calculations. Our measured rate coefficients are discussed with respect to those for other aldehydes. The atmospheric implications of our work will also be discussed.

  15. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: measurements and site-specific rate rules.

    PubMed

    Badra, Jihad; Elwardany, Ahmed E; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-06-28

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (C=O) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (C=O), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group): PMID:24817270

  16. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  17. Nucleophilic substitution at centers other than carbon. 2. Reaction at the chlorine of N-chloroacetanilide with substituted phenoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dietze, P.E.; Underwood, G.R.

    1984-06-29

    All reactions were carried out in buffered 10% aqueous acetonitrile brought to an ionic strength of 1.350 M with NaClO/sub 4/ at 39.36/sup 0/C. A series of meta- and para-substituted phenols (H, p-CH/sub 3/, m-Cl, m-NO/sub 2/, and p-NO/sub 2/) were allowed to react with N-chloroacetanilide under pseudo-first-order conditions with the phenol in an 11- to 16-fold excess. The pseudo-first-order rate constants, k/sub obsd/, were obtained by monitoring the disappearance of the N-chloroacetanilide as a function of time.

  18. Renormalized reaction and relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2016-06-01

    Impact of the non-equilibrium on the reaction and relaxation rates (called as generalized relaxation rates - GRR), for the spatially inhomogeneous gas mixture is considered. Discarding the assumption that the 'chemical' part of the collisional integral is a small correction to non-reactive part, the expression for the zero-order GRR is derived. They are represented as a renormalization of the traditional reaction and relaxation rates, which means mixing of all corresponding processes. Thus all reactions and relaxation processes are entangled.

  19. Fast liquid-liquid reactions: Role of emulsifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Smita, S.L.; Bhave, R.R.; Sharma, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of emulsifiers such as sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate, sorbitan monooleate, etc., on the rate of alkaline hydrolysis of higher formate esters was studied. The extraction of these formate esters is accompanied by a fast pseudo-first-order reaction in the diffusion film. Values of effective interfacial area were measured in a mechanically agitated contactor; the specific rate of extraction was measured in a stirred cell of known interfacial area. The effects of speed of agitation and the emulsifier concentration on the effective interfacial area were studied. Emulsifiers can increase the effective interfacial area markedly; the highest increase was by a factor of 14.

  20. The Rate Constant for the Reaction H + C2H5 at T = 295 - 150K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pimentel, Andre S.; Payne, Walter A.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Cody, Regina J.; Stief, Louis J.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction between the hydrogen atom and the ethyl (C2H3) radical is predicted by photochemical modeling to be the most important loss process for C2H5 radicals in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. This reaction is also one of the major sources for the methyl radicals in these atmospheres. These two simplest hydrocarbon radicals are the initial species for the synthesis of larger hydrocarbons. Previous measurements of the rate constant for the H + C2H5 reaction varied by a factor of five at room temperature, and some studies showed a dependence upon temperature while others showed no such dependence. In addition, the previous studies were at higher temperatures and generally higher pressures than that needed for use in planetary atmospheric models. The rate constant for the reaction H + C2H5 has been measured directly at T = 150, 202 and 295 K and at P = 1.0 Torr He for all temperatures and additionally at P = 0.5 and 2.0 Torr He at T = 202 K. The measurements were performed in a discharge - fast flow system. The decay of the C2H5 radical in the presence of excess hydrogen was monitored by low-energy electron impact mass spectrometry under pseudo-first order conditions. H atoms and C2H5 radicals were generated rapidly and simultaneously by the reaction of fluorine atoms with H2 and C2H6, respectively. The total rate constant was found to be temperature and pressure independent. The measured total rate constant at each temperature are: k(sub 1)(295K) = (1.02+/-0.24)x10(exp -10), k(sub 1)(202K) = (1.02+/-0.22)x10(exp -10) and k(sub 1)(150K) = (0.93+/-0.21)x10(exp -10), all in units of cu cm/molecule/s. The total rate constant derived from all the combined measurements is k(sub 1) = (l.03+/-0.17)x10(exp -10) cu cm/molecule/s. At room temperature our results are about a factor of two higher than the recommended rate constant and a factor of three lower than the most recently published study.

  1. Nova reaction rates and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, S.; Herlitzius, C.; Fiehl, J.

    2011-04-01

    Oxygen-neon novae form a subset of classical novae events known to freshly synthesize nuclei up to mass number A≲40. Because several gamma-ray emitters lie in this mass range, these novae are also interesting candidates for gamma-ray astronomy. The properties of excited states within those nuclei in this mass region play a critical role in determining the resonant (p,γ) reaction rates, themselves, largely unknown for the unstable nuclei. We describe herein a new Doppler shift lifetime facility at the Maier-Leibnitz tandem laboratory, Technische Universität München, with which we will map out important resonant (p,γ) nova reaction rates.

  2. QSARS FOR PREDICTING REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION RATE CONSTANTS OF HALOGENATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ANOXIC SEDIMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are developed relating initial and final pseudo-first-order disappearance rate constants of 45 halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons in anoxic sediments to four readily available molecular descriptors: the carbon-halogen bond stre...

  3. Kinetic evidence for the existence of a rate-limiting step in the reaction of ferric hemoproteins with anionic ligands.

    PubMed

    Coletta, M; Angeletti, M; De Sanctis, G; Cerroni, L; Giardina, B; Amiconi, G; Ascenzi, P

    1996-01-15

    The kinetics of azide and fluroide binding to various monomeric and tetrameric ferric hemoproteins (sperm whale Mb, isolated alpha and beta chains of human Hb reacted with p-chloromercuribenzoate, dromeday, ox and human Hb) has been investigated (at pH 6.5 and 20 degrees C over a large range (20 microM to 2 M) of ligand concentration. It has been observed that the pseuo-first-order rate constant for azide binding to the hemoproteins investigated does not increase linearly with ligand concentration, but tends to level off toward an asymptomatic concentration-independent value typical for each hemoprotein. This behavior, which has been detected only by an investigation covering an unusually large range of ligand concentrations appears to be independent of the ionic strength, and it underlies the existence of a rate-limiting step in the dynamic pathway of azide binding to ferric hemoproteins, which is detectable whenever the observed pseudo- first-order rate constant becomes faster than a given value characteristic of the specific hemoprotein. Such a behavior is not observed in the case of fluroide binding probably because the pesudo- first-order rate constant for this ligand is much slower and never attains a value faster than that of the rate-limiting step. In general terms, this feature should involve a conformational equilibrium between at least two forms (possibly related to the interaction of H2O with distal histidine and its exchange with the bulk solvent) which modulates the access of the anionic ligand into the heme pocket and its reaction with the ferric iron. PMID:8631366

  4. QSARS FOR PREDICTING BIOTIC AND ABIOTIC REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION RATE CONSTANTS OF HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS IN ANOXIC SEDIMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are developed relating biotic and abiotic pseudo-first-order disappearance rate constants of halogenated hydrocarbons in anoxic sediments to a number of readily available molecular descriptors. ased upon knowledge of the under...

  5. The Rate Laws for Reversible Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Edward L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the rate laws for reversible reactions. Indicates that although prediction of the form of the rate law for a reverse reaction given the rate law for the forward reaction is not certain, the number of possibilities is limited because of relationships described. (JN)

  6. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOEpatents

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Furth, Harold P.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Goldhaber, Maurice

    1988-03-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  7. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOEpatents

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Furth, Harold P.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Goldhaber, Maurice

    1988-01-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  8. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  9. The photoenhanced aging process of soot by the heterogeneous ozonization reaction.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong

    2016-09-21

    The atmospheric aging of soot can significantly modify its composition and microstructure, likely leading to changes in its effects on climate and health. The photochemical aging process of soot by O3 under simulated sunlight was investigated using in situ attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy. Simulated sunlight could markedly enhance the aging of soot by O3, which produced various oxygen containing species such as lactones, anhydrides, ketones and aldehydes. Elemental carbon (EC) showed minor reactivity toward O3. The organic carbon (OC), which was mainly composed of various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and some unidentified components, played a key role in the photochemical aging of soot by O3. The kinetics of aromatic species on soot can be well described by a pseudo-first order reaction. The fitting results of the pseudo first-order rate constant (k1,obs) as a function of O3 concentration demonstrated that the photochemical reaction of soot with O3 followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. PMID:27534511

  10. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  11. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  12. Reactions of lignin peroxidase compounds I and II with veratryl alcohol. Transient-state kinetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Wariishi, H; Huang, J; Dunford, H B; Gold, M H

    1991-11-01

    Stopped-flow techniques were utilized to investigate the kinetics of the reaction of lignin peroxidase compounds I and II (LiPI and LiPII) with veratryl alcohol (VA). All rate data were collected from single turnover experiments under pseudo first-order conditions. The reaction of LiPI with VA strictly obeys second-order kinetics over the pH range 2.72-5.25 as demonstrated by linear plots of the pseudo first-order rate constants versus concentrations of VA. The second-order rate constants are strongly dependent on pH and range from 2.62 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 (pH 2.72) to 1.45 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 (pH 5.25). The reaction of LiPII and VA exhibits saturation behavior when the observed pseudo first-order rate constants are plotted against VA concentrations. The saturation phenomenon is quantitatively explained by the formation of a 1:1 LiPII-substrate complex. Results of kinetic and rapid scan spectral analyses exclude the formation of a LiPII-VA cation radical complex. The first-order dissociation rate constant and the equilibrium dissociation constant for the LiPII reaction are also pH dependent. Binding of VA to LiPII is controlled by a heme-linked ionizable group of pKa approximately 4.2. The pH profiles of the second-order rate constants for the LiPI reaction and of the first-order dissociation constants for the LiPII reaction both demonstrate two pKa values at approximately 3.0 and approximately 4.2. Protonated oxidized enzyme intermediates are most active, suggesting that only electron transfer, not proton uptake from the reducing substrate, occurs at the enzyme active site. These results are consistent with the one-electron oxidation of VA to an aryl cation radical by LiPI and LiPII. PMID:1939119

  13. Thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulose to enhance methane fermentation. I. Monosaccharide and furfurals hydrothermal decomposition and product formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, K.D.; McCarty, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    Over a pH range 1-4 and temperatures from 170 to 230/sup 0/C, the decomposition rates of xylose, galactose, mannose, glucose, 2-furfural, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) were pseudo first order. The effect of temperature and pH on the pseudo first-order decomposition rate constants was modeled using the Arrhenius equation and acid-base catalysis, respectively. Decomposition rates of the monosaccharides were minimum at a pH 2-2.5. Above pH 2.5, the monosaccharide decomposition was base catalyzed, with acid catalysis occurring at a pH of less than 2 for glucose. The furfurals were subject to acid catalysis at below ca. pH 3.5. The hydrothermal conversion of glucose to its decomposition products during thermochemical pretreatment can be modeled as a combination of series and parallel reactions. The formation rates of identified soluble products from glucose decomposition, 5-HMF and levulinic acid, were also functions of temperature and pH. The rate of 5-HMF formation relative to glucose decomposition decreased as the pH increased from 2.0 to 4.0, with levulinic acid formation only detected when the pH was 2.5 or less. For glucose decomposition, humic solids accounted for ca. 20% of the decomposition products.

  14. Kinetic and products study of the gas-phase reaction of Lewisite with ozone under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haitao; Zhang, Yuanpeng; Guo, Xiaodi; Shao, Yusheng; Gao, Runli; Liang, Dejian; Sun, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The rate constant for the gas-phase reaction of O3 and Lewisite was studied in air using the smog chamber technique. The experiments were carried out under pseudo-first-order reaction conditions with [O3]≪[Lewisite]. The observed rate constant of O3 with Lewisite was (7.83 ± 0.38) × 10(-19)cm(3)/(molecule·sec) at 298 ± 2K. Lewisite was discussed in terms of reactivity with O3 and its relationship with the ionization potential. Our results show that the rate constant for the gas-phase reaction of O3 with Lewisite is in line with the trend of the rate constants of O3 with haloalkenes. PMID:26969539

  15. Astrophysical Reaction Rates Obtained By Indirect Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, R. E.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Alharbi, A.; Banu, A.; Chen, X.; Clark, H. L.; Fu, C.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; Lui, Y.-W.; McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Roeder, B.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tokimoto, Y.; Trache, L.

    2010-08-12

    Indirect techniques have been used to obtain information about reaction rates for several proton capture reactions that occur on short-lived nuclei. The techniques used to carry out the measurements are reviewed and the results obtained are presented. Also future prospects for further measurements with a new facility, T-REX are discussed.

  16. The Kinetic Rate Law for Autocatalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata-Perez, Fernando; Perez-Benito, Joaquin F.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a method of obtaining accurate rate constants for autocatalytic reactions. The autocatalytic oxidation of dimethylamine by permanganate ion in aqueous solution is used as an example. (RH)

  17. Critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenborg, R.C.; Harradine, D.M.; Loge, G.W.; Lyman, J.L.; Schott, G.L.; Winn, K.R.

    1989-01-01

    High Mach number flight requires that the scramjet propulsion system operate at a relatively low static inlet pressure and a high inlet temperature. These two constraints can lead to extremely high temperatures in the combustor, yielding high densities of radical species and correspondingly poor chemical combustion efficiency. As the temperature drops in the nozzle expansion, recombination of these excess radicals can produce more product species, higher heat yield, and potentially more thrust. The extent to which the chemical efficiency can be enhanced in the nozzle expansion depends directly on the rate of the radical recombination reactions. A comprehensive assessment of the important chemical processes and an experimental validation of the critical rate parameters is therefore required if accurate predictions of scramjet performance are to be obtained. This report covers the identification of critical reactions, and the critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Universal reaction rates for ultracold molecular collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, Paul; Idziaszek, Zbigniew

    2010-03-01

    We offer a simple yet general model of reactive collisions using a quantum defect framework based on the separation of the collision dynamics into long-range and a short-range parts [1]. Two dimensionless quantum defect parameters s and y are used to characterize the S-matrix for a given entrance channel; s represents a phase parameter and y the probability of short-range reaction. The simple analytic expressions we obtain give universal values for s-wave and p-wave collision rates for a van der Waals potential when y approaches unity. In this limit, reaction rates are governed entirely by the threshold laws governing the quantum transmission of the long range potential and depend only on the van der Waals coefficient. The universal rate constants explain the magnitude of the observed rate constants for reactive collisions of fermionic KRb + KRb or K + KRb [2]. In contrast, reaction rates will be non-universal and depend strongly on the phase parameter s if the short range reaction probability is low, y << 1. [1] Z. Idziaszek and P. S. Julienne, arXiv:0912.0370. [2] S. Ospelkaus, K.-K. Ni, D. Wang, M. H. G. de Miranda, B. Neyenhuis, G. Qu'em'ener, P. S. Julienne, J. L. Bohn, D. S. Jin, and J. Ye, arXiv:0912.3854.

  19. Enhanced aqueous photochemical reaction rates after freezing.

    PubMed

    Grannas, Amanda M; Bausch, Alexandra R; Mahanna, Kendell M

    2007-11-01

    Sunlit snow/ice is known to play an important role in the processing of atmospheric species, including photochemical production of NO(x), HONO, molecular halogens, alkyl halides, and carbonyl compounds, among others. It has been shown that a liquid-like (quasi-liquid or disordered) layer exists on the surface of pure ice and that this quasi-liquid layer is also found on the surface of ambient snow crystals and ice at temperatures similar to polar conditions. However, it is unclear what role the liquid-like fractions present in and on frozen water play in potential photochemical reactions, particularly with regard to organic substrates. Here, we report a detailed study of enhanced rates of photochemical nucleophilic substitution of p-nitroanisole (PNA) with pyridine, a well-characterized and commonly used actinometer system. Reaction rates were enhanced by a factor of up to approximately 40 when frozen at temperatures between 236 and 272 K. Reaction rates were dependent on temperature and solute concentration, both variables that control the nature of the liquid-like fraction in frozen water. The results obtained indicate that a major portion of the organic solutes is excluded to the liquid-like layer, significantly impacting the rate of the photochemical nucleophilic substitution reaction studied here. Also, the direct comparison of liquid-phase kinetics to reactions occurring in frozen water systems is drawn into question, indicating that a simple extrapolation of liquid-phase mechanisms to snow/ice may not be valid for certain reactions. PMID:17918916

  20. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    PubMed Central

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model, and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is on the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules. PMID:26871190

  1. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  2. [Preparation of Coated CMC-Fe0 Using Rheological Phase Reaction Method and Research on Degradation of TCE in Water].

    PubMed

    Fan, Wen-jing; Cheng, Yue; Yu, Shu-zhen; Fan, Xiao-feng

    2015-06-01

    The coated nanoscale zero-valent iron (coated CMC-Fe0) was synthesized with cheap and environment friendly CMC as the coating agent using rheological phase reaction. The sample was characterized by means of XRD, SEM, TEM and N2 adsorption-stripping and used to study reductive dechlorination of TCE. The experimental results indicated that the removal rate of TCE was about 100% when the CMC-Fe0 dosage was 6 g x L(-1), the initial TCE concentration was 5 mg x L(-1) and the reaction time was 40 h. The TCE degradation reaction of coated CMC-Fe0 followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Finally, the product could be simply recovered. PMID:26387321

  3. Oxidative degradation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) by potassium permanganate: reaction pathways, kinetics, and mechanisms assisted by density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqi; Qu, Ruijuan; Feng, Mingbao; Wang, Xinghao; Wang, Liansheng; Yang, Shaogui; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-04-01

    This study found that decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) could be oxidized effectively by potassium permanganate (KMnO4) in sulfuric acid medium. A total of 15 intermediate oxidative products were detected. The reaction pathways were proposed, which primarily included cleavage of the ether bond to form pentabromophenol. Direct oxidation on the benzene ring also played an important role because hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were produced during the oxidation process. The degradation occurred dramatically in the first few minutes and fitted pseudo-first-order kinetics. Increasing the water content decelerated the reaction rate, whereas increasing the temperature facilitated the reaction. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) was employed to determine the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) and frontier electron density (FED) of BDE 209 and the oxidative products. The theoretical calculation results confirmed the proposed reaction pathways. PMID:25751737

  4. Kinetics of the reaction O + HO2 yields OH + O2 from 229 to 372 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1982-01-01

    The discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique has been used to obtain absolute rate data for the O + HO2 reaction from 229 to 372 K at a total pressure of 1 torr. Pseudo-first-order conditions were used with HO2 concentrations in large excess over initial atomic oxygen in order to minimize interference from secondary reactions. The results are independent of the method used to generate HO2 and atomic oxygen. At 299 K, the result is (6.1 + or - 0.4) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/molecule s. The temperature dependence expressed in Arrhenius form is (3.1 + or - 0.3) x 10 to the -11th exp/(+200 + or - 28)/T/. The error limits given are twice the standard deviation; overall experimental error is estimated to be + or - 25%.

  5. Kinetics study of the Cl/2P/ + Cl2O yields Cl2 + ClO reaction at 298 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, G. W.; Keyser, L. F.; Watson, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics of the Cl + Cl2O reaction, a possible source of ClO(2 Pi) radicals for atmospheric photochemical studies, are investigated at 298 K. The discharge flow/mass spectrometry and discharge flow/resonance fluorescence techniques were used to monitor the decay of C12O in the presence of excess concentrations of atomic chlorine and chlorine monoxide, respectively. The pseudo-first order rate constants obtained from both experiments are found to be in excellent agreement, averaging 9.8 + or - 0.8 x 10 to the -11th cu cm/molecule per sec. Results are consistent with the lower limit obtained by Edgecombe et al. (1957) but differ by a factor of 150 from those of Basco and Dogra (1971). The present value is also noted to be consistent with a lower value for the rate constant of the reaction of oxygen atoms with Cl2O.

  6. Thermodynamic limitations on microbially catalyzed reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, Douglas E.; Dale, Andrew W.; Amend, Jan P.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Quantification of global biogeochemical cycles requires knowledge of the rates at which microorganisms catalyze chemical reactions. In order for models that describe these processes to capture global patterns of change, the underlying formulations in them must account for biogeochemical transformations over seasonal and millennial time scales in environments characterized by different energy levels. Building on existing models, a new thermodynamic limiting function is introduced. With only one adjustable parameter, this function that can be used to model microbial metabolism throughout the range of conditions in which organisms are known to be active. The formulation is based on a comparison of the amount of energy available from any redox reaction to the energy required to maintain a membrane potential, a proxy for the minimum amount of energy required by an active microorganism. This function does not require species- or metabolism-specific parameters, and can be used to model metabolisms that capture any amount of energy. The utility of this new thermodynamic rate limiting term is illustrated by applying it to three low-energy processes: fermentation, methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. The model predicts that the rate of fermentation will be reduced by half once the Gibbs energy of the catalyzed reaction reaches -12 kJ (mol e-)-1, and then slowing exponentially until the energy yield approaches zero. Similarly, the new model predicts that the low energy yield of methanogenesis, -4 to -0.5 kJ (mol e-)-1, for a partial pressure of H2 between 11 and 0.6 Pa decreases the reaction rate by 95-99%. Finally, the new function's utility is illustrated through its ability to accurately model sulfate concentration data in an anoxic marine sediment.

  7. Pycnonuclear reaction rates for binary ionic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichimaru, S.; Ogata, S.; Van Horn, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Through a combination of compositional scaling arguments and examinations of Monte Carlo simulation results for the interparticle separations in binary-ionic mixture (BIM) solids, we have derived parameterized expressions for the BIM pycnonuclear rates as generalizations of those in one-component solids obtained previously by Salpeter and Van Horn and by Ogata et al. We have thereby discovered a catalyzing effect of the heavier elements, which enhances the rates of reactions among the lighter elements when the charge ratio exceeds a critical value of approximately 2.3.

  8. Kinetics and Mechanistic Studies on the Reaction between Cytochrome c and Tea Catechins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Santos, Elizabeth; Schenk, Desiree; Rabago-Smith, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is characterized by the presence of an abundance of polyphenolic compounds, also known as catechins, including epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epicatechin gallate (EGC) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). In addition to being a popular beverage, tea consumption has been suggested as a mean of chemoprevention. However, its mode of action is unclear. It was discovered that tea catechins can react with cytochrome c. When oxidized cytochrome c was mixed with catechins commonly found in green tea under non-steady-state conditions, a reduction of cytochrome c was observed. The reaction rate of the catechins was dependent on the pH and the nature of the catechin. The pseudo-first order rate constant obtained increased in the order of EC < ECG < EGC < EGCG, which is consistent with previously reported superoxide reduction activities and Cu2+ reduction activities of tea catechins. PMID:26785071

  9. An approximate classical unimolecular reaction rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meishan; Rice, Stuart A.

    1992-05-01

    We describe a classical theory of unimolecular reaction rate which is derived from the analysis of Davis and Gray by use of simplifying approximations. These approximations concern the calculation of the locations of, and the fluxes of phase points across, the bottlenecks to fragmentation and to intramolecular energy transfer. The bottleneck to fragment separation is represented as a vibration-rotation state dependent separatrix, which approximation is similar to but extends and improves the approximations for the separatrix introduced by Gray, Rice, and Davis and by Zhao and Rice. The novel feature in our analysis is the representation of the bottlenecks to intramolecular energy transfer as dividing surfaces in phase space; the locations of these dividing surfaces are determined by the same conditions as locate the remnants of robust tori with frequency ratios related to the golden mean (in a two degree of freedom system these are the cantori). The flux of phase points across each dividing surface is calculated with an analytic representation instead of a stroboscopic mapping. The rate of unimolecular reaction is identified with the net rate at which phase points escape from the region of quasiperiodic bounded motion to the region of free fragment motion by consecutively crossing the dividing surfaces for intramolecular energy exchange and the separatrix. This new theory generates predictions of the rates of predissociation of the van der Waals molecules HeI2, NeI2 and ArI2 which are in very good agreement with available experimental data.

  10. Fusion Reaction Rate in an Inhomogeneous Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S. Son; N.J. Fisch

    2004-09-03

    The local fusion rate, obtained from the assumption that the distribution is a local Maxwellian, is inaccurate if mean-free-paths of fusing particles are not sufficiently small compared with the inhomogeneity length of the plasma. We calculate the first order correction of P0 in terms of the small spatial gradient and obtain a non-local modification of P(sub)0 in a shock region when the gradient is not small. Use is made of the fact that the fusion reaction cross section has a relatively sharp peak as a function of energy.

  11. Rate Constants for the Reactions of OH with CO, NO and NO2, and of HO2 with NO2 in the Presence of Water Vapour at Lower-Tropospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolletter, Michael; Fuchs, Hendrik; Novelli, Anna; Ehlers, Christian; Hofzumahaus, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the chemistry of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) in the lower troposphere is not fully understood. Aside from heterogenous reactions, the daytime HONO formation in the gas-phase is not well understood (Li et al., Science, 2014). For a better understanding of HONO in the gas-phase, we have reinvestigated the reaction rate constants of important tropospheric reactions of the HOx radical family (OH and HO2) with nitrogen oxides at realistic conditions of the lower troposphere (at ambient temperature/pressure and in humid air). In this study we apply a direct pump and probe technique with high accuracy, using small radical concentrations to avoid secondary chemistry. Pulsed laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) was used to investigate the reaction rate constants of OH with CO, NO, NO2, and HO2 with NO2 in synthetic air at different water vapor concentrations (up to 5 x 1017 molecules cm‑3). Photolysis of ozone in the presence of gaseous water was the source of OH. The reactions took place in a flow-tube at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The chemical decay of the radicals was monitored by laser-induced fluorescence detection in a low-pressure cell, which sampled air continuously from the end of the flow-tube. Knowing the reactant concentrations subsequently allowed to calculate the bimolecular reaction rate constants at 1 atm from the pseudo-first-order decays. In order to observe HO2 reactions, OH was converted into HO2 with an excess of CO in the flow-tube. The newly measured rate constants for OH with CO, NO and NO2 agree very well with current recommendations by NASA/JPL and IUPAC and have an improved accuracy (uncertainty < 5%). These rate coefficients are independent of the presence of water vapour. The measured rate constant of HO2 with NO2 was found to depend significantly on the water-vapour concentration (probably due to formation of HO2*H2O complexes) and to exceed current recommendations by NASA/JPL and

  12. The kinetics of electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride in different solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Rehana; Nadeem, Syed Muhammad Saqib

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride was investigated in different solvents by spectrophotometry at different temperatures. The the reaction rate was determined by monitoring the absorbance as a function of time at λmax 655 nm. The reaction is pseudo-first order, dependent only on the concentration of titanium trichloride at a fixed concentration of methylene green. The effect of an aqueous alcoholic solvent was studied in the acidic range of pH from 4 to 7. It was observed that the reaction rate increased with an increase in polarity of the reaction medium. The the reaction rate was high in acidic conditions and decreased with a further increase in acidity. The increase in temperature increased the rate of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride. The activation energy ( E a) was calculated by the Arrhenius relation. The absence of any reaction intermediate was confirmed by spectroscopic and kinetic investigations. A plausible mechanism for the reaction in line with outer-sphere reaction pathway has been proposed. Thermodynamic parameters such as the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H), free energy change (Δ G), and entropy change (Δ S) were also evaluated

  13. Photochemical reactions of anthropogenic chemicals in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Toole, A.P.; Crosby, D.G. )

    1988-09-01

    Sunlight-driven, photochemical reactions can be a major degradative force for anthropogenic organic compounds in the aquatic environment. Chlorinated phenols, various classes of pesticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are among some examples of the compounds shown to be degraded by sunlight. Most environmental photochemistry has been studied in fresh water, despite the fact that the oceans cover more than 70% of the earths surface and receive large inputs of anthropogenic chemicals via atmospheric transport, runoff, and coastal outfalls. This fact, along with increasing pressure for ocean waste disposal as land options dwindle, present a need for information on the photochemical reactions of anthropogenic organic chemicals in seawater. Several probable seawater pollutants were selected as probes for studying photochemical reactions including, 2-nitrotoluene, 4-nitrotoluene, styrene, 4,5-dichloroguaiacol, 4,5,6-trichloroguaiacol and tetrachloroguaiacol. Dilute solutions of each probe were prepared in buffered (pH 8), distilled water (DW), synthetic seawater (SSW) and natural seawater (NSW), then irradiated in a temperature-controlled photoreactor fitted with a General Electric F40BL fluorescent lamp to simulate sunlight. Samples were taken at regular intervals, concentrated using solid phase extraction techniques and analyzed by gas chromatography. Photolysis rates were determined assuming first, or pseudo-first, order kinetics. Photoproducts were identified by gas chromatography;mass spectrometry and confirmed by comparison to standards when available. By determining rates in DW containing selected components of SSW, at SSW concentrations, the inorganic compounds mediating the photochemical reactions in seawater could be determined.

  14. Indirect techniques for astrophysical reaction rates determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammache, F.; Oulebsir, N.; Benamara, S.; De Séréville, N.; Coc, A.; Laird, A.; Stefan, I.; Roussel, P.

    2016-05-01

    Direct measurements of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest can be challenging. Alternative experimental techniques such as transfer reactions and inelastic scattering reactions offer the possibility to study these reactions by using stable beams. In this context, I will present recent results that were obtained in Orsay using indirect techniques. The examples will concern various astrophysical sites, from the Big-Bang nucleo synthesis to the production of radioisotopes in massive stars.

  15. Representing Rate Equations for Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2011-01-01

    Rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are derived and presented in a way that makes it easier for the nonspecialist to see how the rate of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction depends upon kinetic constants and concentrations. This is done with distribution equations that show how the rate of the reaction depends upon the relative quantities of…

  16. Direct measurement and theoretical calculation of the rate coefficient for Cl+CH3 in the range from T=202-298 K.

    PubMed

    Parker, James K; Payne, Walter A; Cody, Regina J; Nesbitt, Fred L; Stief, Louis J; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Harding, Lawrence B

    2007-02-15

    The rate coefficient has been measured under pseudo-first-order conditions for the Cl+CH3 association reaction at T=202, 250, and 298 K and P=0.3-2.0 Torr helium using the technique of discharge-flow mass spectrometry with low-energy (12-eV) electron-impact ionization and collision-free sampling. Cl and CH3 were generated rapidly and simultaneously by reaction of F with HCl and CH4, respectively. Fluorine atoms were produced by microwave discharge in an approximately 1% mixture of F2 in He. The decay of CH3 was monitored under pseudo-first-order conditions with the Cl-atom concentration in large excess over the CH3 concentration ([Cl]0/[CH3]0=9-67). Small corrections were made for both axial and radial diffusion and minor secondary chemistry. The rate coefficient was found to be in the falloff regime over the range of pressures studied. For example, at T=202 K, the rate coefficient increases from 8.4x10(-12) at P=0.30 Torr He to 1.8x10(-11) at P=2.00 Torr He, both in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1. A combination of ab initio quantum chemistry, variational transition-state theory, and master-equation simulations was employed in developing a theoretical model for the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate coefficient. Reasonable empirical representations of energy transfer and of the effect of spin-orbit interactions yield a temperature- and pressure-dependent rate coefficient that is in excellent agreement with the present experimental results. The high-pressure limiting rate coefficient from the RRKM calculations is k2=6.0x10(-11) cm3 molecule-1 s-1, independent of temperature in the range from 200 to 300 K. PMID:17253663

  17. Gas-phase rate coefficients for the OH + n-, i-, s-, and t-butanol reactions measured between 220 and 380 K: non-Arrhenius behavior and site-specific reactivity.

    PubMed

    McGillen, Max R; Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Burkholder, James B

    2013-06-01

    Butanol (C4H9OH) is a potential biofuel alternative in fossil fuel gasoline and diesel formulations. The usage of butanol would necessarily lead to direct emissions into the atmosphere; thus, an understanding of its atmospheric processing and environmental impact is desired. Reaction with the OH radical is expected to be the predominant atmospheric removal process for the four aliphatic isomers of butanol. In this work, rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reaction of the n-, i-, s-, and t-butanol isomers with the OH radical were measured under pseudo-first-order conditions in OH using pulsed laser photolysis to produce OH radicals and laser induced fluorescence to monitor its temporal profile. Rate coefficients were measured over the temperature range 221-381 K at total pressures between 50 and 200 Torr (He). The reactions exhibited non-Arrhenius behavior over this temperature range and no dependence on total pressure with k(296 K) values of (9.68 ± 0.75), (9.72 ± 0.72), (8.88 ± 0.69), and (1.04 ± 0.08) (in units of 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) for n-, i-, s-, and t-butanol, respectively. The quoted uncertainties are at the 2σ level and include estimated systematic errors. The observed non-Arrhenius behavior is interpreted here to result from a competition between the available H-atom abstraction reactive sites, which have different activation energies and pre-exponential factors. The present results are compared with results from previous kinetic studies, structure-activity relationships (SARs), and theoretical calculations and the discrepancies are discussed. Results from this work were combined with available high temperature (1200-1800 K) rate coefficient data and room temperature reaction end-product yields, where available, to derive a self-consistent site-specific set of reaction rate coefficients of the form AT(n) exp(-E/RT) for use in atmospheric and combustion chemistry modeling. PMID:23627621

  18. Impact of THM reaction rates for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.

    2015-10-01

    Burning reaction S(E)-factor determinations are among the key ingredients for stellar models when one has to deal with energy generation evaluation and the genesis of the elements at stellar conditions. To by pass the still present uncertainties in extrapolating low-energies values, S(E)-factor measurements for charged-particle induced reactions involving light elements have been made available by devote Trojan Horse Method (THM) experiments. The recent results are here discussed together with their impact in astrophysics.

  19. INITIAL TEST OF THE BENCHMARK CHEMICAL APPROACH FOR PREDICTING MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATION RATES IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid methyl ester (2,4-DME) as a benchmark chemical, we determined relative pseudo-first-order rate coefficients for butoxyethyl ester of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-DBE), methyl parathion, and methyl-3-chlorobenzoate in a diversity of micr...

  20. Ring-closing metathesis reactions: interpretation of conversion-time data.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vasco; Wannowius, Klaus-Jürgen; Wolff, Christiane; Thiele, Christina M; Plenio, Herbert

    2013-11-25

    Conversion-time data were recorded for various ring-closing metathesis (RCM) reactions that lead to five- or six-membered cyclic olefins by using different precatalysts of the Hoveyda type. Slowly activated precatalysts were found to produce more RCM product than rapidly activated complexes, but this comes at the price of slower product formation. A kinetic model for the analysis of the conversion-time data was derived, which is based on the conversion of the precatalyst (Pcat) into the active species (Acat), with the rate constant k(act), followed by two parallel reactions: 1) the catalytic reaction, which utilizes Acat to convert reactants into products, with the rate k(cat), and 2) the conversion of Acat into the inactive species (Dcat), with the rate k(dec). The calculations employ two experimental parameters: the concentration of the substrate (c(S)) at a given time and the rate of substrate conversion (-dc(S)/dt). This provides a direct measure of the concentration of Acat and enables the calculation of the pseudo-first-order rate constants k(act), k(cat), and k(dec) and of k(S) (for the RCM conversion of the respective substrate by Acat). Most of the RCM reactions studied with different precatalysts are characterized by fast k(cat) rates and by the k(dec) value being greater than the k(act) value, which leads to quasistationarity for Acat. The active species formed during the activation step was shown to be the same, regardless of the nature of different Pcats. The decomposition of Acat occurs along two parallel pathways, a unimolecular (or pseudo-first-order) reaction and a bimolecular reaction involving two ruthenium complexes. Electron-deficient precatalysts display higher rates of catalyst deactivation than their electron-rich relatives. Slowly initiating Pcats act as a reservoir, by generating small stationary concentrations of Acat. Based on this, it can be understood why the use of different precatalysts results in different substrate conversions in

  1. Photosensitized degradation kinetics of trace halogenated contaminants in natural waters using membrane introduction mass spectrometry as an in situ reaction monitor.

    PubMed

    Letourneau, Dane R; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2015-11-01

    The photochemically mediated dechlorination of polyhalogenated compounds represents a potential decontamination strategy and a relevant environmental process in chemically reducing media. We report the UV irradiation of natural and artificial waters containing natural dissolved organic matter to effect the photo-sensitized degradation of chlorinated organic compounds, including tetrachloromethane, 1,1,1-tricloroethane, perchloroethene, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and chlorobenzene at trace (ppb) levels in aqueous solution. The degradation kinetics are followed in situ using membrane introduction mass spectrometry. By re-circulating the reaction mixture in a closed loop configuration over a semi-permeable hollow fiber polydimethylsiloxane membrane in a flow cell interface, volatile and semi-volatile compounds are continuously monitored using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The time resolved quantitative information provides useful mechanistic insights, including kinetic data. Pseudo first-order rate constants for the degradation of contaminant mixtures in natural waters are reported. PMID:26439106

  2. Typewriting rate as a function of reaction time.

    PubMed

    Hayes, V; Wilson, G D; Schafer, R L

    1977-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the relationship between reaction time and typewriting rate. Subjects were 24 typists ranging in age from 19 to 39 yr. Reaction times (.001 sec) to a light were recorded for each finger and to each alphabetic character and three punctuation marks. Analysis of variance yielded significant differences in reaction time among subjects and fingers. Correlation between typewriting rate and average reaction time to the alphabetic characters and three punctuation marks was --.75. Correlation between typewriting rate and the difference between the reaction time of the hands was --.42. Factors influencing typewriting rate may include reaction time of the fingers, difference between the reaction time of the hands, and reaction time to individual keys on the typewriter. Implications exist for instructional methodology and further research. PMID:604897

  3. Multidimensional reaction rate theory with anisotropic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Szabo, Attila; Greives, Nicholas; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2014-11-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the rate constant that describes diffusive transitions between two deep wells of a multidimensional potential. The expression, in contrast to the Kramers-Langer formula for the rate constant, is valid even when the diffusion is highly anisotropic. Our approach is based on a variational principle for the reactive flux and uses a trial function for the splitting probability or commitor. The theoretical result is validated by Brownian dynamics simulations.

  4. DSMC predictions of non-equilibrium reaction rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-04-01

    A set of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) chemical-reaction models recently proposed by Bird and based solely on the collision energy and the vibrational energy levels of the species involved is applied to calculate nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates for atmospheric reactions in hypersonic flows. The DSMC non-equilibrium model predictions are in good agreement with theoretical models and experimental measurements. The observed agreement provides strong evidence that modeling chemical reactions using only the collision energy and the vibrational energy levels provides an accurate method for predicting non-equilibrium chemical-reaction rates.

  5. On the rate of relativistic surface chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Veitsman, E V

    2004-07-15

    On the basis of special relativity and the classical theory of chemical reaction rates it is shown how the surface chemical reaction rates vary as v --> c, where v is the velocity of the object under study and c is the velocity of light. PMID:15178286

  6. Empirical rate equation for association reactions and ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shin

    2016-05-01

    Temperature dependence of the rate constants of many association reactions is now available. In order to express the rate constants at temperatures from very low to high, we tried to use the sum of new empirical rate equations for association reactions and Arrhenius equations. Temperature dependence of a number of radical-molecule and some ion-molecule reactions could be successfully demonstrated. A new procedure to analyze ion-molecule reactions was proposed. This might suggest a new viewpoint to understanding chemical reactions.

  7. Graphene Facilitated Removal of Labetalol in Laccase-ABTS System: Reaction Efficiency, Pathways and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shipeng; Xiao, Huifang; Huang, Qingguo; Zhang, Jian; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of the beta-blocker labetalol causes environmental health concern. Enzymatic reactions are highly efficient and specific offering biochemical transformation of trace contaminants with short reaction time and little to none energy consumption. Our experiments indicate that labetalol can be effectively transformed by laccase-catalyzed reaction using 2, 2-Azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) as a mediator, while no significant removal of labetalol can be achieved in the absence of ABTS. A total of three products were identified. It is interesting that the presence of graphene greatly increased the reaction rate while not changed the products. In the presence of 100 μg/L graphene, the pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant was increased ~50 times. We found that the enhancement of graphene is probably attributed to the formation and releasing of ABTS2+ which has a much greater reactivity towards labetalol when graphene is present. This study provides fundamental information for laccase-ABTS mediated labetalol reactions and the effect of graphene, which could eventually lead to development of novel methods to control beta-blocker contamination. PMID:26891761

  8. Graphene Facilitated Removal of Labetalol in Laccase-ABTS System: Reaction Efficiency, Pathways and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shipeng; Xiao, Huifang; Huang, Qingguo; Zhang, Jian; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-02-01

    The widespread occurrence of the beta-blocker labetalol causes environmental health concern. Enzymatic reactions are highly efficient and specific offering biochemical transformation of trace contaminants with short reaction time and little to none energy consumption. Our experiments indicate that labetalol can be effectively transformed by laccase-catalyzed reaction using 2, 2-Azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) as a mediator, while no significant removal of labetalol can be achieved in the absence of ABTS. A total of three products were identified. It is interesting that the presence of graphene greatly increased the reaction rate while not changed the products. In the presence of 100 μg/L graphene, the pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant was increased ~50 times. We found that the enhancement of graphene is probably attributed to the formation and releasing of ABTS2+ which has a much greater reactivity towards labetalol when graphene is present. This study provides fundamental information for laccase-ABTS mediated labetalol reactions and the effect of graphene, which could eventually lead to development of novel methods to control beta-blocker contamination.

  9. Estimating the Backup Reaction Wheel Orientation Using Reaction Wheel Spin Rates Flight Telemetry from a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    A report describes a model that estimates the orientation of the backup reaction wheel using the reaction wheel spin rates telemetry from a spacecraft. Attitude control via the reaction wheel assembly (RWA) onboard a spacecraft uses three reaction wheels (one wheel per axis) and a backup to accommodate any wheel degradation throughout the course of the mission. The spacecraft dynamics prediction depends upon the correct knowledge of the reaction wheel orientations. Thus, it is vital to determine the actual orientation of the reaction wheels such that the correct spacecraft dynamics can be predicted. The conservation of angular momentum is used to estimate the orientation of the backup reaction wheel from the prime and backup reaction wheel spin rates data. The method is applied in estimating the orientation of the backup wheel onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The flight telemetry from the March 2011 prime and backup RWA swap activity on Cassini is used to obtain the best estimate for the backup reaction wheel orientation.

  10. Theory of Crowding Effects on Bimolecular Reaction Rates.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Szabo, Attila

    2016-07-01

    An analytical expression for the rate constant of a diffusion-influenced bimolecular reaction in a crowded environment is derived in the framework of a microscopic model that accounts for: (1) the slowdown of diffusion due to crowding and the dependence of the diffusivity on the distance between the reactants, (2) a crowding-induced attractive short-range potential of mean force, and (3) nonspecific reversible binding to the crowders. This expression spans the range from reaction to diffusion control. Crowding can increase the reaction-controlled rate by inducing an effective attraction between reactants but decrease the diffusion-controlled rate by reducing their relative diffusivity. PMID:27096470

  11. An Improved Reaction Rate Equation for Simulating the Ignition and Growth of Reaction in High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M J

    2010-03-08

    We describe an improved reaction rate equation for simulating ignition and growth of reaction in high explosives. It has been implemented into CALE and ALE3D as an alternate to the baseline the Lee-Tarver reactive flow model. The reactive flow model treats the explosive in two phases (unreacted/reactants and reacted/products) with a reaction rate equation to determine the fraction reacted, F. The improved rate equation has fewer parameters, is continuous with continuous derivative, results in a unique set of reaction rate parameters for each explosive while providing the same functionality as the baseline rate equation. The improved rate equation uses a cosine function in the ignition term and a sine function in the growth and completion terms. The improved rate equation is simpler with fewer parameters.

  12. Gas-solid reaction-rate enhancement by pressure cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, H. Y.; Aboukheshem, M. B.

    1992-06-01

    An experimental study and mathematical modeling of the effects of external pressure cycling on gas-solid reactions have been conducted using the reduction of nickel oxide pellets by hy-drogen. Experiments were carried out in two phases: In the first phase, the intrinsic kinetic parameters were measured, and in the second phase, the gas-solid reaction was carried out under a constant or cycling external pressure. The effects of the frequency and amplitude of pressure cycling were studied at various reaction conditions. Pressure cycling substantially increases the overall rate of the reaction. A mathematical model was developed from the first principles to establish the extent of the overall reaction-rate enhancement and subsequently to analyze the experimental observations. The calculated values from the mathematical model are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effects are most pronounced when the overall rate under a constant pressure is controlled by diffusion. Depending on the reaction condition, a very large degree of rate enhancement could be achieved. Furthermore, low-amplitude pressure waves, like acoustic waves, could significantly increase the rates of gas-solid reactions.

  13. Removal Rates of Aqueous Cr(VI) by Zero-Valent Iron Measured Under Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2002-05-10

    Studies were undertaken to measure the rate of Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase by zero-valent iron, Fe(0), under flow conditions. The intent of this work was to generate removal rate coefficients that would be applicable to the Reactive Well Technology, a groundwater remediation technology that replaces the sand in a filter pack of a conventional well with a reactive material, such as Fe(0). The pseudo-first-order rate coefficients measured under flow conditions were comparable to those previously measured under batch conditions that had significantly greater ratios of solution volume to Fe(0) surface area. Between the range of 20 and 100 weight percent Fe(0), there was little measurable change in the reaction kinetics. Thus, it may be possible to include sand into the reactive filter packs in the event it is necessary to increase filter pack porosity or to decrease the accumulation of secondary reaction products that may lead to filter pack plugging. Background water chemistry had only marginal effects on reaction rate coefficients. The reaction rates measured in this study indicated that an Fe(0) filter pack could be used to lower Cr(VI) concentrations by several orders of magnitude in a once-through mode of operation of the Reactive Well Technology.

  14. Non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, T.; Tamii, A.; Aoi, N.; Fujita, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ogata, K.; Carter, J.; Donaldson, L.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Furuno, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kamimura, M.; Nemulodi, F.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Swarts, C.

    2014-05-02

    Our experimental goal is to study the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperture (T < 10{sup 8} K). The {sup 13}C(p,d) reaction at 66 MeV has been used to probe the alpha-unbound continuum state in {sup 12}C just below the 2{sup nd} 0{sup +} state at 7.65 MeV. The transition strength to the continuum state is predicted to be sensitive to the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate. The experiment has been performed at iThemba LABS. We report the present status of the experiment.

  15. Rate of reaction between molecular hydrogen and molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokaw, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The shock tube data of Jachimowski and Houghton were rigorously analyzed to obtain rate constants for the candidate initiation reactions H2 + O2 yields H + HO2, H2 + O2 yields H2O + O, and H2 + O2 yields OH + OH. Reaction (01) is probably not the initiation process because the activation energy obtained is less than the endothermicity and because the derived rates greatly exceed values inferred in the literature from the reverse of reaction (01). Reactions (02) and (03) remain as possibilities, with reaction (02) slightly favored on the basis of steric and statistical considerations. The solution of the differential equations is presented in detail to show how the kinetics of other ignition systems may be solved.

  16. Kinetic study of the reaction of sulfamethoxazole and glucose under acidic conditions: I. Effect of pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Lucida, H; Parkin, J E; Sunderland, V B

    2000-07-20

    The kinetics of the reaction of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) in 5% w/v glucose to form the corresponding alpha- and beta-glucosylamines over the pH range of 0.80-6.88 at 37 degrees C has been investigated. The identity of the glucosylamines was determined by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of an authentic sample of the alpha-glucosylamine (USP) and the reaction products, and by interconversion of this compound to the corresponding beta-anomer. The reaction followed pseudo first-order reversible kinetics and involved specific acid and general acid-base catalysis. The pH-rate profile demonstrated that over the pH range of 0.80-2.90 and 5.50-6. 88 the reactions were dependent on H(+) concentration but pH independent between pH 3.00-5.45, which reflects the influence of ionization of SMX and the glucosylamines on the reversible reaction. Interpretation of the data with respect to kinetic models and rate equations for the formation and hydrolysis of the glucosylamines was investigated. Temperature dependence studies followed the Arrhenius equation with an Ea of 49.28 kJ mol(-1) for the forward and 63.46 kJ mol(-1) for the reverse reaction at pH 2.89 respectively. PMID:10915926

  17. Analysis of reaction schemes using maximum rates of constituent steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain Motagamwala, Ali; Dumesic, James A.

    2016-05-01

    We show that the steady-state kinetics of a chemical reaction can be analyzed analytically in terms of proposed reaction schemes composed of series of steps with stoichiometric numbers equal to unity by calculating the maximum rates of the constituent steps, rmax,i, assuming that all of the remaining steps are quasi-equilibrated. Analytical expressions can be derived in terms of rmax,i to calculate degrees of rate control for each step to determine the extent to which each step controls the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction. The values of rmax,i can be used to predict the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction, making it possible to estimate the observed reaction kinetics. This approach can be used for catalytic reactions to identify transition states and adsorbed species that are important in controlling catalyst performance, such that detailed calculations using electronic structure calculations (e.g., density functional theory) can be carried out for these species, whereas more approximate methods (e.g., scaling relations) are used for the remaining species. This approach to assess the feasibility of proposed reaction schemes is exact for reaction schemes where the stoichiometric coefficients of the constituent steps are equal to unity and the most abundant adsorbed species are in quasi-equilibrium with the gas phase and can be used in an approximate manner to probe the performance of more general reaction schemes, followed by more detailed analyses using full microkinetic models to determine the surface coverages by adsorbed species and the degrees of rate control of the elementary steps.

  18. Analysis of reaction schemes using maximum rates of constituent steps.

    PubMed

    Motagamwala, Ali Hussain; Dumesic, James A

    2016-05-24

    We show that the steady-state kinetics of a chemical reaction can be analyzed analytically in terms of proposed reaction schemes composed of series of steps with stoichiometric numbers equal to unity by calculating the maximum rates of the constituent steps, rmax,i, assuming that all of the remaining steps are quasi-equilibrated. Analytical expressions can be derived in terms of rmax,i to calculate degrees of rate control for each step to determine the extent to which each step controls the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction. The values of rmax,i can be used to predict the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction, making it possible to estimate the observed reaction kinetics. This approach can be used for catalytic reactions to identify transition states and adsorbed species that are important in controlling catalyst performance, such that detailed calculations using electronic structure calculations (e.g., density functional theory) can be carried out for these species, whereas more approximate methods (e.g., scaling relations) are used for the remaining species. This approach to assess the feasibility of proposed reaction schemes is exact for reaction schemes where the stoichiometric coefficients of the constituent steps are equal to unity and the most abundant adsorbed species are in quasi-equilibrium with the gas phase and can be used in an approximate manner to probe the performance of more general reaction schemes, followed by more detailed analyses using full microkinetic models to determine the surface coverages by adsorbed species and the degrees of rate control of the elementary steps. PMID:27162366

  19. Nonlinear dynamical effects on reaction rates in thermally fluctuating environments.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2010-07-21

    A framework to calculate the rate constants of condensed phase chemical reactions of manybody systems is presented without relying on the concept of transition state. The theory is based on a framework we developed recently adopting a multidimensional underdamped Langevin equation in the region of a rank-one saddle. The theory provides a reaction coordinate expressed as an analytical nonlinear functional of the position coordinates and velocities of the system (solute), the friction constants, and the random force of the environment (solvent). Up to moderately high temperature, the sign of the reaction coordinate can determine the final destination of the reaction in a thermally fluctuating media, irrespective of what values the other (nonreactive) coordinates may take. In this paper, it is shown that the reaction probability is analytically derived as the probability of the reaction coordinate being positive, and that the integration with the Boltzmann distribution of the initial conditions leads to the exact reaction rate constant when the local equilibrium holds and the quantum effect is negligible. Because of analytical nature of the theory taking into account all nonlinear effects and their combination with fluctuation and dissipation, the theory naturally provides us with the firm mathematical foundation of the origin of the reactivity of the reaction in a fluctuating media. PMID:20544104

  20. Urea degradation by electrochemically generated reactive chlorine species: products and reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kangwoo; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the transformation of urea by electrochemically generated reactive chlorine species (RCS). Solutions of urea with chloride ions were electrolyzed using a bismuth doped TiO2 (BiOx/TiO2) anode coupled with a stainless steel cathode at applied anodic potentials (Ea) of either +2.2 V or +3.0 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode. In NaCl solution, the current efficiency of RCS generation was near 30% at both potentials. In divided cell experiments, the pseudo-first-order rate of total nitrogen decay was an order of magnitude higher at Ea of +3.0 V than at +2.2 V, presumably because dichlorine radical (Cl2(-)·) ions facilitate the urea transformation primary driven by free chlorine. Quadrupole mass spectrometer analysis of the reactor headspace revealed that N2 and CO2 are the primary gaseous products of the oxidation of urea, whose urea-N was completely transformed into N2 (91%) and NO3(-) (9%). The higher reaction selectivity with respect to N2 production can be ascribed to a low operational ratio of free available chlorine to N. The mass-balance analysis recovered urea-C as CO2 at 77%, while CO generation most likely accounts for the residual carbon. In light of these results, we propose a reaction mechanism involving chloramines and chloramides as reaction intermediates, where the initial chlorination is the rate-determining step in the overall sequence of reactions. PMID:25219459

  1. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  2. A Transition in the Cumulative Reaction Rate of Two Species Diffusion with Bimolecular Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, Harihar; Arshadi, Masoud

    2015-04-01

    Diffusion and bimolecular reaction between two initially separated reacting species is a prototypical small-scale description of reaction induced by transverse mixing. It is also relevant to diffusion controlled transport regimes as encountered in low-permeability matrix blocks in fractured media. In previous work, the reaction-diffusion problem has been analyzed as a Stefan problem involving a distinct moving boundary (reaction front), which predicts that front motion scales as √t, and the cumulative reaction rate scales as 1/√t-. We present a general non-dimensionalization of the problem and a perturbation analysis to show that there is an early time regime where the cumulative reaction rate scales as √t- rather than 1/√t. The duration of this early time regime (where the cumulative rate is kinetically rather than diffusion controlled) depends on the rate parameter, in a manner that is consistently predicted by our non-dimensionalization. We also present results on the scaling of the reaction front width. We present numerical simulations in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media to demonstrate the limited influence of heterogeneity on the behavior of the reaction-diffusion system. We illustrate applications to the practical problem of in-situ chemical oxidation of TCE and PCE by permanganate, which is employed to remediate contaminated sites where the DNAPLs are largely dissolved in the rock matrix.

  3. Benchmark calculations of thermal reaction rates. I - Quantal scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal rate coefficient for the prototype reaction H + H2 yields H2 + H with zero total angular momentum is calculated by summing, averaging, and numerically integrating state-to-state reaction probabilities calculated by time-independent quantum-mechanical scattering theory. The results are very carefully converged with respect to all numerical parameters in order to provide high-precision benchmark results for confirming the accuracy of new methods and testing their efficiency.

  4. Shock tube kinetic study of the CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2} {r_equilibrium} H + CH{sub 4} reaction and the methane dissociation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W.; Tao, Wen

    1992-02-01

    In this kinetic study of (1) the reaction of CH{sub 3} radicals with H{sub 2} and (2) the thermal dissociation of methane, primary product H atoms were monitored directly using the sensitive atomic resonance absorption detection technique. The detection limit for the [H] was about 3{times}10{sup 10} atoms cm{sup {minus}3}. Rate constants for both reactions were obtained under pseudo-first-order conditions. In addition, computer simulations verified that kinetic complications were avoided. For the reaction of CH{sub 3}+H{sub 2}, experiments were performed using either acetone or ethane to generate CH{sub 3} radicals rapidly by thermal dissociation in argon. Twenty-four experiments were performed over the temperature range 1346K to 1793K and a rate constant expression derived using linear least-squares analysis: k{sub {minus}2}(T) = (6.0{plus_minus}0.7){times}10{sup {minus}12} exp ({minus}5920{plus_minus}190K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. 46 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Shock tube kinetic study of the CH sub 3 + H sub 2 r equilibrium H + CH sub 4 reaction and the methane dissociation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W.; Tao, Wen.

    1992-01-01

    In this kinetic study of (1) the reaction of CH{sub 3} radicals with H{sub 2} and (2) the thermal dissociation of methane, primary product H atoms were monitored directly using the sensitive atomic resonance absorption detection technique. The detection limit for the (H) was about 3{times}10{sup 10} atoms cm{sup {minus}3}. Rate constants for both reactions were obtained under pseudo-first-order conditions. In addition, computer simulations verified that kinetic complications were avoided. For the reaction of CH{sub 3}+H{sub 2}, experiments were performed using either acetone or ethane to generate CH{sub 3} radicals rapidly by thermal dissociation in argon. Twenty-four experiments were performed over the temperature range 1346K to 1793K and a rate constant expression derived using linear least-squares analysis: k{sub {minus}2}(T) = (6.0{plus minus}0.7){times}10{sup {minus}12} exp ({minus}5920{plus minus}190K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. 46 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Diagrammatic algorithm for evaluating finite-temperature reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashida, Naoki; Nakkagawa, Hisao; Niégawa, Akira; Yokota, Hiroshi

    1992-05-01

    In this paper, by following the procedure of statistical mechanics we present the systematic calculational rules for evaluating the reaction rate of a generic dynamical process taking place in a heat bath. These rules are formulated within the framework of real-time thermal field theory (RTFT), in terms of the Feynman-like diagrams, the so-called circled diagrams. With the machinery developed in this paper we can establish the finite temperature generalization of the Cutkosky, or the cutting rules in quantum field theory at zero temperature. We have also studied the relation between the imaginary part of forward RTFT amplitude and the reaction rates; the imaginary part consists of various reaction rates. This is a finite temperature generalization of the optical theorem.

  7. Revisiting catalytic model reaction p-nitrophenol/NaBH4 using metallic nanoparticles coated on polymeric spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maolin; Chen, Guofang

    2013-11-01

    The early reported pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics of the polymer-supported metallic nanocatalysts for the model reaction of p-nitrophenol (p-NP)/NaBH4 were probably oversimplified. Here a detailed study of p-NP reduction by NaBH4 in the presence of the raspberry-like poly(allylamine hydrochloride)-modified polymer poly(glycidyl methacrylate) composite sub-microspheres with tunable gold nanoparticles (PGMA@PAH@AuNPs) was presented. Effects of polyelectrolyte concentration, the ratio of polymer spheres to gold nanoparticles, and the solution pH value for composite synthesis on the induction period, reaction time, average reaction rate and average turnover frequency were systematically investigated. Experimental results in all cases of our study revealed an nth order (n > 1) of the p-NP/NaBH4 catalytic reaction by the prepared polymer composite particles. The apparent order of reaction, n, is dependent on the total surface area of the coated gold nanoparticles on the polymer spheres, which can be closely correlated with the tunable gold nanoparticle surface coverage. The mechanism of the observed catalytic activity enhancement was proposed based on active epoxy groups of the polymer spheres and a large adsorption of p-nitrophenolate anions onto the positively-charged spheres.

  8. A transition in the spatially integrated reaction rate of bimolecular reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshadi, Masoud; Rajaram, Harihar

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations of diffusion with bimolecular reaction demonstrate a transition in the spatially integrated reaction rate—increasing with time initially, and transitioning to a decrease with time. In previous work, this reaction-diffusion problem has been analyzed as a Stefan problem involving a distinct moving boundary (reaction front), leading to predictions that front motion scales as √t, and correspondingly the spatially integrated reaction rate decreases as the square root of time 1/√t. We present a general nondimensionalization of the problem and a perturbation analysis to show that there is an early time regime where the spatially integrated reaction rate scales as √t rather than 1/√t. The duration of this early time regime (where the spatially integrated reaction rate is kinetically rather than diffusion controlled) is shown to depend on the kinetic rate parameters, diffusion coefficients, and initial concentrations of the two species. Numerical simulation results confirm the theoretical estimates of the transition time. We present illustrative calculations in the context of in situ chemical oxidation for remediation of fractured rock systems where contaminants are largely dissolved in the rock matrix. We consider different contaminants of concern (COCs), including TCE, PCE, MTBE, and RDX. While the early time regime is very short lived for TCE, it can persist over months to years for MTBE and RDX, due to slow oxidation kinetics.

  9. Reaction rate uncertainties and the ν p-process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, C.; Rauscher, T.

    2012-11-01

    Current hydrodynamical simulations of core collapse supernovae find proton-rich early ejecta. At the same time, the models fail to eject neutron-rich matter, thus leaving the origin of the main r-process elements unsolved. However, the proton-rich neutrino-driven winds from supernovae have been identified as a possible production site for light n-capture elements beyond iron (such as Ge, Sr, Y, Zr) through the νp-process. The detailed nucleosynthesis patterns of the νp-process depend on the hydrodynamic conditions and the nuclear reaction rates of key reactions. We investigate the impact of reaction rate uncertainties on the νp-process nucleosynthesis.

  10. Semiclassical Calculation of Reaction Rate Constants for Homolytical Dissociations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2002-01-01

    There is growing interest in extending organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) to III-V materials that exhibit large thermal decomposition at their optimum growth temperature, such as indium nitride. The group III nitrides are candidate materials for light-emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. To overcome decomposition of the deposited compound, the reaction must be conducted at high pressures, which causes problems of uniformity. Microgravity may provide the venue for maintaining conditions of laminar flow under high pressure. Since the selection of optimized parameters becomes crucial when performing experiments in microgravity, efforts are presently geared to the development of computational OMCVD models that will couple the reactor fluid dynamics with its chemical kinetics. In the present study, we developed a method to calculate reaction rate constants for the homolytic dissociation of III-V compounds for modeling OMCVD. The method is validated by comparing calculations with experimental reaction rate constants.

  11. Reaction rate uncertainties and the {nu}p-process

    SciTech Connect

    Froehlich, C.; Rauscher, T.

    2012-11-12

    Current hydrodynamical simulations of core collapse supernovae find proton-rich early ejecta. At the same time, the models fail to eject neutron-rich matter, thus leaving the origin of the main r-process elements unsolved. However, the proton-rich neutrino-driven winds from supernovae have been identified as a possible production site for light n-capture elements beyond iron (such as Ge, Sr, Y, Zr) through the {nu}p-process. The detailed nucleosynthesis patterns of the {nu}p-process depend on the hydrodynamic conditions and the nuclear reaction rates of key reactions. We investigate the impact of reaction rate uncertainties on the {nu}p-process nucleosynthesis.

  12. A transport equation for reaction rate in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabelnikov, V. A.; Lipatnikov, A. N.; Chakraborty, N.; Nishiki, S.; Hasegawa, T.

    2016-08-01

    New transport equations for chemical reaction rate and its mean value in turbulent flows have been derived and analyzed. Local perturbations of the reaction zone by turbulent eddies are shown to play a pivotal role even for weakly turbulent flows. The mean-reaction-rate transport equation is shown to involve two unclosed dominant terms and a joint closure relation for the sum of these two terms is developed. Obtained analytical results and, in particular, the closure relation are supported by processing two widely recognized sets of data obtained from earlier direct numerical simulations of statistically planar 1D premixed flames associated with both weak large-scale and intense small-scale turbulence.

  13. Quantum and semiclassical theories of chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H. |

    1995-09-01

    A rigorous quantum mechanical theory (and a semiclassical approximation thereto) is described for calculating chemical reaction rates ``directly``, i.e., without having to solve the complete state-to-state reactive scattering problem. The approach has many vestiges of transition state theory, for which it may be thought of as the rigorous generalization.

  14. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources. PMID:27329206

  15. Assessment of reaction-rate predictions of a collision-energy approach for chemical reactions in atmospheric flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-06-01

    A recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates is assessed for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary non-equilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological nonequilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, significant differences can be found. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  16. Code System to Calculate Integral Parameters with Reaction Rates from WIMS Output.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-10-25

    Version 00 REACTION calculates different integral parameters related to neutron reactions on reactor lattices, from reaction rates calculated with WIMSD4 code, and comparisons with experimental values.

  17. Rate of reaction of OH with HNO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Kreutter, N. M.; Shah, R. C.; Nicovich, J. M.; Thompson, R. L.; Wuebbles, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the kinetics of the reaction of OH with HNO3, and mechanisms of HNO3 removal from the stratosphere, are reported. Bimolecular rate constants were determined at temperatures between 224 and 366 K by monitoring the concentrations of OH radicals produced by HNO3 photolysis and HNO3 according to their resonance fluorescence and 184.9-nm absorption, respectively. The rate constant measured at 298 K is found to be somewhat faster than previously accepted values, with a negative temperature dependence. Calculations of a one-dimensional transport-kinetic atmospheric model on the basis of the new rate constant indicate reductions in O3 depletion due to chlorofluoromethane release and NOx injection, of magnitudes dependent on the nature of the reaction products.

  18. Reaction rate and products for the reaction O/3P/ + H2CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. S.; Barker, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    A study of reaction kinetics of O + H2CO in a discharge-flow system using mass spectrometric detection of reactants and products is presented. It was performed under both oxygen-atom-rich and formaldehyde-rich conditions over the 296 to 437 K range, showing that the global bimolecular rate constant is in agreement with other studies. This study differs from others in that the reaction products can be observed, and a substantial yield of a primary reaction product was measured with a mass spectral peak at m/e=44. This suggests that the global reaction rate probably consists of combination, as well as of simple abstraction. For the combination, one hypothesis is that triplet dioxymethylene is formed which polymerizes to triplet formic acid; the vibrationally excited triplet formic acid may decompose to form several sets of products, including HCO + OH and HCO2 + H.

  19. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A G; Ghanbarian, B; Skinner, T E; Ewing, R P

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture. PMID:26232976

  20. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. G.; Ghanbarian, B.; Skinner, T. E.; Ewing, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  1. Stellar Evolution Constraints on the Triple-α Reaction Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Takuma; Hirschi, Raphael; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the quantitative constraint on the triple-α reaction rate based on stellar evolution theory, motivated by the recent significant revision of the rate proposed by nuclear physics calculations. Targeted stellar models were computed in order to investigate the impact of that rate in the mass range of 0.8 <= M/M sun <= 25 and in the metallicity range between Z = 0 and Z = 0.02. The revised rate has a significant impact on the evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars, while its influence on the evolution of massive stars (M >~ 10 M sun) is minimal. We find that employing the revised rate suppresses helium shell flashes on asymptotic giant branch phase for stars in the initial mass range 0.8 <= M/M sun <= 6, which is contradictory to what is observed. The absence of helium shell flashes is due to the weak temperature dependence of the revised triple-α reaction cross section at the temperature involved. In our models, it is suggested that the temperature dependence of the cross section should have at least ν > 10 at T = (1-1.2) × 108 K where the cross section is proportional to T ν. We also derive the helium ignition curve to estimate the maximum cross section to retain the low-mass first red giants. The semi-analytically derived ignition curves suggest that the reaction rate should be less than ~10-29 cm6 s-1 mole-2 at ≈107.8 K, which corresponds to about three orders of magnitude larger than that of the NACRE compilation. In an effort to compromise with the revised rates, we calculate and analyze models with enhanced CNO cycle reaction rates to increase the maximum luminosity of the first giant branch. However, it is impossible to reach the typical red giant branch tip luminosity even if all the reaction rates related to CNO cycles are enhanced by more than 10 orders of magnitude.

  2. STELLAR EVOLUTION CONSTRAINTS ON THE TRIPLE-{alpha} REACTION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.; Hirschi, Raphael

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the quantitative constraint on the triple-{alpha} reaction rate based on stellar evolution theory, motivated by the recent significant revision of the rate proposed by nuclear physics calculations. Targeted stellar models were computed in order to investigate the impact of that rate in the mass range of 0.8 {<=} M/M{sub sun} {<=} 25 and in the metallicity range between Z = 0 and Z = 0.02. The revised rate has a significant impact on the evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars, while its influence on the evolution of massive stars (M {approx}> 10 M{sub sun}) is minimal. We find that employing the revised rate suppresses helium shell flashes on asymptotic giant branch phase for stars in the initial mass range 0.8 {<=} M/M{sub sun} {<=} 6, which is contradictory to what is observed. The absence of helium shell flashes is due to the weak temperature dependence of the revised triple-{alpha} reaction cross section at the temperature involved. In our models, it is suggested that the temperature dependence of the cross section should have at least {nu} > 10 at T = (1-1.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} K where the cross section is proportional to T {sup {nu}}. We also derive the helium ignition curve to estimate the maximum cross section to retain the low-mass first red giants. The semi-analytically derived ignition curves suggest that the reaction rate should be less than {approx}10{sup -29} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} mole{sup -2} at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 7.8} K, which corresponds to about three orders of magnitude larger than that of the NACRE compilation. In an effort to compromise with the revised rates, we calculate and analyze models with enhanced CNO cycle reaction rates to increase the maximum luminosity of the first giant branch. However, it is impossible to reach the typical red giant branch tip luminosity even if all the reaction rates related to CNO cycles are enhanced by more than 10 orders of magnitude.

  3. Mechanistic elucidation of linker and ancillary ligand substitution reactions in Pt(II) dinuclear complexes.

    PubMed

    Ongoma, Peter O; Jaganyi, Deogratius

    2013-02-28

    The rate of substitution of aqua ligands by three nucleophiles, thiourea (TU), N,N-dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and N,N,N,N-tetramethylthiourea (TMTU), for the complexes [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-μ-pyrazine](ClO4)2 (pzn), [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-μ-2,3-dimethylpyrazine](ClO4)2 (2,3pzn), [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-μ-2,5-pyrazine](ClO4)2 (2,5pzn) and [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-μ-2,6-dimethylpyrazine](ClO4)2 (2,6pzn) was investigated under pseudo first-order conditions as a function of concentration and temperature by stopped-flow and UV-Visible spectrophotometry. The reaction proceeded in three consecutive steps; each step follows first order kinetics with respect to each complex and nucleophile. The pseudo first-order rate constants, k(obs(1/2/3)), for sequential substitution of the aqua ligands and subsequent displacement of the linker obeyed the rate law: k(obs(1/2/3)) = k((1/2/3))[nucleophile]. The steric hindrance properties of the pyrazine-bridging ligand control the overall reaction pattern. The order of reactivity of the complexes is 2,3pzn ≈ 2,5pzn < 2,6pzn < pzn. The difference in reactivity attributed to the steric crowding at the Pt(II) centre imposed by the methyl groups reduces the lability of the aqua complexes. The order of reactivity of the nucleophiles decreases with the increase in steric demand TU > DMTU > TMTU. 1H and 195Pt NMR spectroscopic results confirmed the observed dissociation of the bridging ligand from the metal centre of the cis-dinuclear complexes and its derivatives in the third step. The dissociation process is accelerated by the introduction of the steric effect on the linker in conjunction with the increased ligand field strength imparted by additional thiourea ligands at each metal centre. The large negative entropy of activation ΔS(≠) values in all cases support an associative substitution mechanism. PMID:23223554

  4. The astrophysical reaction rate for the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Paul, M.; Roberts, A.D.

    1996-03-01

    Proton and alpha widths for a 3/2{sup +} ({ell}{sub p} = 0) state in {sup 19}Ne at E{sub x} = 7.1 MeV have been extracted using the results of recent measurements of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction. This {ell}{sub p} = 0 resonance dominates the astrophysical reaction rates at temperatures T{sub 9} > 0.5.

  5. Sonication effect on the reaction of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene with sodium sulfide in liquid-liquid multi-site phase-transfer catalysis condition - kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Abimannan, Pachaiyappan; Selvaraj, Varathan; Rajendran, Venugopal

    2015-03-01

    The synthesis of di-p-tolylsulfane from the reaction of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene (BMB) with sodium sulfide was carried out using a multi-site phase-transfer catalyst (MPTC) viz., 1,4-dihexyl-1,4-diazoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octanium dibromide and ultrasonic irradiation in a liquid-liquid reaction condition. The overall reaction rate is greatly enhanced when catalyzed by multi-site phase-transfer catalyst (MPTC) combined with sonication (40 kHz, 300 W) in a batch reactor than catalyzed by MPTC without sonication. Effects on the reaction due to various operating conditions, such as agitation speed, different ultrasound frequencies, different phase-transfer catalysts, different organic solvents, the amount of MPTC, temperature, amount of sodium sulfide, effect of sodium hydroxide, volume of n-hexane and the concentration of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene. The reaction obeys a pseudo first-order rate law and a suitable mechanism was proposed based on the experimental observation. PMID:25199442

  6. Pore size and the lab-field reaction rate riddle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanuel, S.; Ague, J. J.; Walderhaug, O.

    2009-12-01

    Pore size is usually thought to influence the rate of crystal growth during diagenesis and metamorphism by controlling the ratio of surface area to fluid volume. However, theory suggests that in micron-scale to nanometer-scale pores, interfacial energy effects can also become important. We used mercury porosimetry to investigate the pore-size distributions in naturally cemented sandstone adjacent to stylolites and found that quartz precipitation was inhibited in pores smaller than 10 microns in diameter. We demonstrate that standard kinetic models cannot reproduce the observed pore-size patterns in mineralized samples; by contrast, excellent fits with the data are obtained when interfacial energy effects are taken into account. Moreover, as such micron-scale pores comprise the overwhelming majority of surface area in the sandstone, average reaction rates for the rock are significantly reduced. Reaction rates in geological media determined in field studies can be orders of magnitude lower than those measured in laboratory experiments, and we propose that reduced reaction rates in rocks with micron-scale porosity could account for the apparent paradox.

  7. Factors influencing the mechanism of surfactant catalyzed reaction of vitamin C-ferric chloride hexahydrate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrukh, Muhammad Akhyar; Kauser, Robina; Adnan, Rohana

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of vitamin C by ferric chloride hexahydrate has been investigated in the aqueous ethanol solution of basic surfactant viz. octadecylamine (ODA) under pseudo-first order conditions. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant was determined by surface tension measurement. The effect of pH (2.5-4.5) and temperature (15-35°C) in the presence and absence of surfactant were investigated. Activation parameters, Δ E a, Δ H #, Δ S #, Δ G ≠, for the reaction were calculated by using Arrhenius and Eyring plot. Surface excess concentration (Γmax), minimum area per surfactant molecule ( A min), average area occupied by each molecule of surfactant ( a), surface pressure at the CMC (Πmax), Gibb's energy of micellization (Δ G M°), Gibb's energy of adsorption (Δ G ad°), were calculated. It was found that the reaction in the presence of surfactant showed faster oxidation rate than the aqueous ethanol solution. Reaction mechanism has been deduced in the presence and absence of surfactant.

  8. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  9. Suppression of excited-state contributions to stellar reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, T.

    2013-09-01

    It has been shown in previous work [Kiss , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.101.191101 101, 191101 (2008); Rauscher , Phys. Rev. C10.1103/PhysRevC.80.035801 80, 035801 (2009)] that a suppression of the stellar enhancement factor (SEF) occurs in some endothermic reactions at and far from stability. This effect is re-evaluated using the ground-state contributions to the stellar reaction rates, which were shown to be better suited to judging the importance of excited-state contributions than the previously applied SEFs. An update of the tables shown in the latter work is given. The new evaluation finds 2350 cases (out of a full set of 57 513 reactions) for which the ground-state contribution is larger in the reaction direction with a negative reaction Q value than in the exothermic direction, thus providing exceptions to the commonly applied Q value rule. The results confirm the Coulomb suppression effect but lead to a larger number of exceptions than previously found. This is due to the fact that often a large variation in the g.s. contribution does not lead to a sizable change in the SEF. On the other hand, several previously identified cases do not appear anymore because it is found that their g.s. contribution is smaller than inferred from the SEF.

  10. Triple-α reaction rate constrained by stellar evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Takuma; Hirschi, Raphael; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the quantitative constraint on the triple-α reaction rate based on stellar evolution theory, motivated by the recent significant revision of the rate proposed by nuclear physics calculations. Targeted stellar models were computed in order to investigate the impact of that rate in the mass range of 0.8<=M/Msolar<=25 and in the metallicity range between Z = 0 and Z = 0.02. The revised rate has a significant impact on the evolution of low-and intermediate-mass stars, while its influence on the evolution of massive stars (M > 10Msolar) is minimal. We find that employing the revised rate suppresses helium shell flashes on AGB phase for stars in the initial mass range 0.8<=M/Msolar<=6, which is contradictory to what is observed. The absence of helium shell flashes is due to the weak temperature dependence of the revised triple-α reaction cross section at the temperature involved. In our models, it is suggested that the temperature dependence of the cross section should have at least ν > 10 at T = 1-1.2×108K where the cross section is proportional to Tν. We also derive the helium ignition curve to estimate the maximum cross section to retain the low-mass first red giants. The semi-analytically derived ignition curves suggest that the reaction rate should be less than ~ 10-29 cm6 s-1 mole-2 at ~ 107.8 K, which corresponds to about three orders of magnitude larger than that of the NACRE compilation.

  11. Triple-{alpha} reaction rate constrained by stellar evolution models

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, Takuma; Hirschi, Raphael; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2012-11-12

    We investigate the quantitative constraint on the triple-{alpha} reaction rate based on stellar evolution theory, motivated by the recent significant revision of the rate proposed by nuclear physics calculations. Targeted stellar models were computed in order to investigate the impact of that rate in the mass range of 0.8{<=}M/M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }{<=}25 and in the metallicity range between Z= 0 and Z= 0.02. The revised rate has a significant impact on the evolution of low-and intermediate-mass stars, while its influence on the evolution of massive stars (M > 10M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }) is minimal. We find that employing the revised rate suppresses helium shell flashes on AGB phase for stars in the initial mass range 0.8{<=}M/M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }{<=}6, which is contradictory to what is observed. The absence of helium shell flashes is due to the weak temperature dependence of the revised triple-{alpha} reaction cross section at the temperature involved. In our models, it is suggested that the temperature dependence of the cross section should have at least {nu} > 10 at T = 1-1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}K where the cross section is proportional to T{sup {nu}}. We also derive the helium ignition curve to estimate the maximum cross section to retain the low-mass first red giants. The semi-analytically derived ignition curves suggest that the reaction rate should be less than {approx} 10{sup -29} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} mole{sup -2} at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 7.8} K, which corresponds to about three orders of magnitude larger than that of the NACRE compilation.

  12. Application of semiclassical methods to reaction rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, R.

    1993-11-01

    This work is concerned with the development of approximate methods to describe relatively large chemical systems. This effort has been divided into two primary directions: First, we have extended and applied a semiclassical transition state theory (SCTST) originally proposed by Miller to obtain microcanonical and canonical (thermal) rates for chemical reactions described by a nonseparable Hamiltonian, i.e. most reactions. Second, we have developed a method to describe the fluctuations of decay rates of individual energy states from the average RRKM rate in systems where the direct calculation of individual rates would be impossible. Combined with the semiclassical theory this latter effort has provided a direct comparison to the experimental results of Moore and coworkers. In SCTST, the Hamiltonian is expanded about the barrier and the ``good`` action-angle variables are obtained perturbatively; a WKB analysis of the effectively one-dimensional reactive direction then provides the transmission probabilities. The advantages of this local approximate treatment are that it includes tunneling effects and anharmonicity, and it systematically provides a multi-dimensional dividing surface in phase space. The SCTST thermal rate expression has been reformulated providing increased numerical efficiency (as compared to a naive Boltzmann average), an appealing link to conventional transition state theory (involving a ``prereactive`` partition function depending on the action of the reactive mode), and the ability to go beyond the perturbative approximation.

  13. Calculated Third Order Rate Constants for Interpreting the Mechanisms of Hydrolyses of Chloroformates, Carboxylic Acid Halides, Sulfonyl Chlorides and Phosphorochloridates

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, T. William

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolyses of acid derivatives (e.g., carboxylic acid chlorides and fluorides, fluoro- and chloroformates, sulfonyl chlorides, phosphorochloridates, anhydrides) exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics. Reaction mechanisms vary from those involving a cationic intermediate (SN1) to concerted SN2 processes, and further to third order reactions, in which one solvent molecule acts as the attacking nucleophile and a second molecule acts as a general base catalyst. A unified framework is discussed, in which there are two reaction channels—an SN1-SN2 spectrum and an SN2-SN3 spectrum. Third order rate constants (k3) are calculated for solvolytic reactions in a wide range of compositions of acetone-water mixtures, and are shown to be either approximately constant or correlated with the Grunwald-Winstein Y parameter. These data and kinetic solvent isotope effects, provide the experimental evidence for the SN2-SN3 spectrum (e.g., for chloro- and fluoroformates, chloroacetyl chloride, p-nitrobenzoyl p-toluenesulfonate, sulfonyl chlorides). Deviations from linearity lead to U- or V-shaped plots, which assist in the identification of the point at which the reaction channel changes from SN2-SN3 to SN1-SN2 (e.g., for benzoyl chloride). PMID:26006228

  14. Omphacite breakdown reactions and relation to eclogite exhumation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eric D.; Moecher, David P.

    2007-09-01

    Clinopyroxene + plagioclase (±Hbl ± Qtz) symplectites after omphacite are widely cited as evidence for prior eclogite-facies or high-pressure (HP) metamorphism. Precursor omphacite compositions of retrograde eclogites, used for reconstructing retrograde P- T paths, are commonly estimated by reintegrating symplectite phases with the assumption that the symplectite-forming reactions were isochemical. Comparisons of broadbeam symplectite compositions to adjacent unreacted pyroxene from various symplectites after clinopyroxene from the Appalachian Blue Ridge (ABR) and Western Gneiss Region (WGR) suggest that the symplectite forming reactions are largely isochemical. Endmember calculations based on reintegrated symplectite compositions from the ABR and WGR suggest that a minor Ca-Eskola (CaEs) component (XCaEs = 0.04-0.15) was present in precursor HP clinopyroxene. WGR symplectites consist of fine-grained (˜1 μm-scale), vermicular intergrowths of Pl + Cpx II ± Hbl that occur at grain boundaries or internally. ABR symplectites contain coarser (˜10 μm-scale) planar lamellae and rods of Pl + Cpx II + Qtz + Hbl within clinopyroxene cores. The contrasting textures correlate with decompression and cooling rate, and degree of overstepping of the retrograde reaction (lamellar: slow, erosionally controlled exhumation with slow/low overstepping; fine-grained, grainboundary symplectite: rapid, tectonic exhumation with rapid/high overstepping). Variations in XCaEs, Xjd, and XCaTs of precursor HP omphacite are related to the symplectic mineral assemblages that result from decompression. Quartz-normative symplectities indicate quartz-producing retrograde reactions (e.g., breakdown of precursor CaEs); quartz-free symplectities (e.g., diopside + plagioclase after omphacite) indicate quartz-consuming reactions (jd, CaTs breakdown) outpaced quartz-producing reactions.

  15. Direct measurement and theoretical calculation of the rate coefficient for Cl + CH3 from T = 202 - 298 K.

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Walter A.; Harding, Lawrence B.; Stief, Louis J.; Parker, James F. , 1925-; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Cody, Regina J.

    2004-10-01

    The rate coefficient has been measured under pseudo-first-order conditions for the Cl + CH{sub 3} association reaction at T = 202, 250, and 298 K and P = 0.3-2.0 Torr helium using the technique of discharge-flow mass spectrometry with low-energy (12-eV) electron-impact ionization and collision-free sampling. Cl and CH{sub 3} were generated rapidly and simultaneously by reaction of F with HCl and CH{sub 4}, respectively. Fluorine atoms were produced by microwave discharge in an approximately 1% mixture of F{sub 2} in He. The decay of CH{sub 3} was monitored under pseudo-first-order conditions with the Cl-atom concentration in large excess over the CH{sub 3} concentration ([Cl]{sub 0}/[CH{sub 3}]{sub 0} = 9-67). Small corrections were made for both axial and radial diffusion and minor secondary chemistry. The rate coefficient was found to be in the falloff regime over the range of pressures studied. For example, at T = 202 K, the rate coefficient increases from 8.4 x 10{sup -12} at P = 0.30 Torr He to 1.8 x 10{sup -11} at P = 2.00 Torr He, both in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. A combination of ab initio quantum chemistry, variational transition-state theory, and master-equation simulations was employed in developing a theoretical model for the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate coefficient. Reasonable empirical representations of energy transfer and of the effect of spin-orbit interactions yield a temperature- and pressure-dependent rate coefficient that is in excellent agreement with the present experimental results. The high-pressure limiting rate coefficient from the RRKM calculations is k{sub 2} = 6.0 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, independent of temperature in the range from 200 to 300 K.

  16. r-PROCESS Reaction Rates for the Actinides and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, I. V.; Korneev, I. Yu.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the importance of different fission rates for the formation of heavy and superheavy nuclei in the astrophysical r-process. Neutron-induced reaction rates, including fission and neutron capture, are calculated in the temperature range 108 ≤ T(K) ≤ 1010 within the framework of the statistical model for targets with the atomic number 84 ≤ Z ≤ 118 (from Po to Uuo) from the neutron to the proton drip-line for different mass and fission barrier predictions based on Thomas-Fermi (TF), Extended Thomas-Fermi plus Strutinsky Integral (ETFSI), Finite-Range Droplet Model (FRDM) and Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) approaches. The contribution of spontaneous fission as well as beta-delayed fission to the recycling r-process is discussed. We also discuss the possibility of rate tests, based on mini r-processed yields in nuclear explosions.

  17. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Leu, M. T.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant and temperature dependence of the Cl + CH4 reaction have been investigated by the techniques of competitive chlorination of CH4/C2H6 mixtures and by discharge-flow/mass spectroscopy. The objectives were to determine an accurate value for the rate constant for use in stratospheric modeling, and to clarify discrepancies in results previously obtained by different techniques. The results deduced from the competitive chlorination study are in good agreement with the absolute values measured by the mass spectrometric method, and at temperatures above 300 K are in good agreement with measurements by other techniques based on resonance fluorescence detection of atomic chlorine. However, in the 220-300 K region, the competitive experiments indicate lower rate constants than those obtained by resonance fluorescence methods, and do not reproduce the curved Arrhenius plots seen in some of those studies.

  18. Primordial lithium: New reaction rates, new abundances, new constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, L.; Schramm, D.; Steigman, G.

    1986-12-01

    Newly measured nuclear reaction rates for /sup 3/H(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 7/Li (higher than previous values) and /sup 7/Li(p,..cap alpha..)/sup 4/He (lower than previous values) are shown to increase the /sup 7/Li yield from big bang nucleosynthesis for lower baryon to photon ratio (eta less than or equal to 4 x 10/sup -10/); the yield for higher eta is not affected. New, independent determinations of Li abundances in extreme Pop II stars are in excellent agreement with the earlier work of the Spites and give continued confidence in the use of /sup 7/Li in big bang baryon density determinations. The new /sup 7/Li constraints imply a lower limit on eta of 2 x 10/sup -10/ and an upper limit of 5 x 10/sup -10/. This lower limit to eta is concordant with that obtained from considerations of D + /sup 3/He. The upper limit is consistent with, but even more restrictive than, the D bound. With the new rates, any observed primordial Li/H ratio below 10/sup -10/ would be inexplicable by the standard big bang nucleosynthesis. A review is made of the strengths and possible weaknesses of utilizing conclusions drawn from big bang lithium considerations. An appendix discusses the null effect of a factor of 32 increase in the experimental rate for the D(d,..gamma..)/sup 4/He reaction. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Suitable combination of promoter and micellar catalyst for kilo fold rate acceleration on benzaldehyde to benzoic acid conversion in aqueous media at room temperature: a kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aniruddha; Saha, Rumpa; Ghosh, Sumanta K; Mukherjee, Kakali; Saha, Bidyut

    2013-05-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde by chromic acid in aqueous and aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, alkyl phenyl polyethylene glycol, Triton X-100 and N-cetylpyridinium chloride, CPC) media have been investigated in the presence of promoter at 303 K. The pseudo-first-order rate constants (kobs) were determined from a logarithmic plot of absorbance as a function time. The rate constants were found to increase with introduction of heteroaromatic nitrogen base promoters such as Picolinic acid (PA), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). The product benzoic acid has been characterized by conventional melting point experiment, NMR, HRMS and FTIR spectral analysis. The mechanism of both unpromoted and promoted reaction path has been proposed for the reaction. In presence of the anionic surfactant SDS, cationic surfactant CPC and neutral surfactant TX-100 the reaction can undergo simultaneously in both aqueous and micellar phase with an enhanced rate of oxidation in the micellar phase. Both SDS and TX-100 produce normal micellar effect whereas CPC produce reverse micellar effect in the presence of benzaldehyde. The observed net enhancement of rate effects has been explained by considering the hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the surfactants and reactants. SDS and bipy combination is the suitable one for benzaldehyde oxidation. PMID:23501718

  20. Suitable combination of promoter and micellar catalyst for kilo fold rate acceleration on benzaldehyde to benzoic acid conversion in aqueous media at room temperature: A kinetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aniruddha; Saha, Rumpa; Ghosh, Sumanta K.; Mukherjee, Kakali; Saha, Bidyut

    2013-05-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde by chromic acid in aqueous and aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, alkyl phenyl polyethylene glycol, Triton X-100 and N-cetylpyridinium chloride, CPC) media have been investigated in the presence of promoter at 303 K. The pseudo-first-order rate constants (kobs) were determined from a logarithmic plot of absorbance as a function time. The rate constants were found to increase with introduction of heteroaromatic nitrogen base promoters such as Picolinic acid (PA), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). The product benzoic acid has been characterized by conventional melting point experiment, NMR, HRMS and FTIR spectral analysis. The mechanism of both unpromoted and promoted reaction path has been proposed for the reaction. In presence of the anionic surfactant SDS, cationic surfactant CPC and neutral surfactant TX-100 the reaction can undergo simultaneously in both aqueous and micellar phase with an enhanced rate of oxidation in the micellar phase. Both SDS and TX-100 produce normal micellar effect whereas CPC produce reverse micellar effect in the presence of benzaldehyde. The observed net enhancement of rate effects has been explained by considering the hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the surfactants and reactants. SDS and bipy combination is the suitable one for benzaldehyde oxidation.

  1. RPMDRATE: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, Yu. V.; Allen, J. W.; Green, W. H.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDRATE, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. Catalogue identifier: AENW_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: MIT license No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 94512 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1395674 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90/95, Python (version 2.6.x or later, including any version of Python 3, is recommended). Computer: Not computer specific. Operating system: Any for which Python, Fortran 90/95 compiler and the required external routines are available. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: The program can efficiently utilize 4096+ processors, depending on problem and available computer. At low temperatures, 110 processors are reasonable for a typical umbrella integration run with an analytic potential energy function and gradients on the latest x86-64 machines.

  2. Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium Theory of Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keck, James C.

    2008-08-01

    The Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE) method for simplifying the treatment of reactions in complex systems is summarized and the selection of constraints for both close-to and far-from equilibrium systems is discussed. Illustrative examples of RCCE calculations of carbon monoxide concentrations in the exhaust products of an internal combustion engine and ignition delays for methane-oxygen mixtures in a constant volume adiabatic chamber are given and compared with "detailed" calculations. The advantages of RCCE calculations over "detailed" calculations are discussed.

  3. Kinetics of Imidazole Catalyzed Ester Hydrolysis: Use of Buffer Dilutions to Determine Spontaneous Rate, Catalyzed Rate, and Reaction Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Anthony

    1982-01-01

    Described is an advanced undergraduate kinetics experiment using buffer dilutions to determine spontaneous rate, catalyzed rate, and reaction order. The reaction utilized is hydrolysis of p-nitro-phenyl acetate in presence of imidazole, which has been shown to enhance rate of the reaction. (Author/JN)

  4. Decomposition of phenylarsonic acid by AOP processes: degradation rate constants and by-products.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, K; Czaplicka, M; Bratek, Ł

    2014-10-01

    The paper presents results of the studies photodegradation, photooxidation, and oxidation of phenylarsonic acid (PAA) in aquatic solution. The water solutions, which consist of 2.7 g dm(-3) phenylarsonic acid, were subjected to advance oxidation process (AOP) in UV, UV/H2O2, UV/O3, H2O2, and O3 systems under two pH conditions. Kinetic rate constants and half-life of phenylarsonic acid decomposition reaction are presented. The results from the study indicate that at pH 2 and 7, PAA degradation processes takes place in accordance with the pseudo first order kinetic reaction. The highest rate constants (10.45 × 10(-3) and 20.12 × 10(-3)) and degradation efficiencies at pH 2 and 7 were obtained at UV/O3 processes. In solution, after processes, benzene, phenol, acetophenone, o-hydroxybiphenyl, p-hydroxybiphenyl, benzoic acid, benzaldehyde, and biphenyl were identified. PMID:24824504

  5. Primordial lithium - New reaction rates, new abundances, new constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawano, Lawrence; Schramm, David; Steigman, Gary

    1988-01-01

    Newly measured nuclear reaction rates for H-3(alpha, gamma)Li-7 (higher than previous values) and Li-7(p, alpha)He-4 (lower than previous values) are shown to increase the Li-7 yield from big band nucleosynthesis for lower baryon-to-photon ratio (less than about 4 x 10 to the 10th). Recent revisions in the He-3(alpha, gamma)Be-7 and the D(p, gamma)He-3 rates enhance the high (greater than 4 x 10 to the 10th) Li-7(Be) production. New, independent determinations of Li abundances in extreme population II stars are in excellent agreement with the work of Spites and give continued confidence in the use of Li-7 in big bang baryon density determinations.

  6. Constraining kinetic rates of mineral reactions using reactive transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, E. W.; Wang, Z.; Ague, J.; Bercovici, D.; Cai, Z.; Karato, S.; Oristaglio, M. L.; Qiu, L.

    2012-12-01

    We use a reactive transport model to better understand results of experiments to obtain kinetic rates of mineral reactions in closed systems. Closed system experiments pose special challenges in that secondary minerals may form that modify the fluid composition evolution and may grow on the dissolving minerals thus armoring the surface. Even so, such closed system experiments provide critical data for what minerals would actually form in field applications and how coupled dissolution and precipitation mineral reactions are strongly linked. Comparing to experimental observations can test the reactive transport model, and the experimental observations can be better understood by comparing the results to the modeling. We apply a 0D end member of the model to understand the dissolution of single crystals of forsterite in a variety of settings (low pH, high pH, or NaHCO3 initial fluids, at 100 C and 1 bar, or 200 C and 150 bar). Depending on the initial conditions, we observe the precipitation of talc, brucite, amorphous silica, chrysotile, or magnesite, in various combinations. We compare simulation results to fluid compositions and the presence of secondary minerals experimentally sampled at various times. Insight from the simulations helped create an inverse model to extract the rates of forsterite dissolution and to create a simple forward model useful for exploring the influence of system size, secondary mineral surface areas, etc. Our reactive transport model allows secondary minerals to armor the forsterite surface, which can strongly decrease the dissolution rate as the system evolves. Tuning our model with experimentally derived rates and assuring relevant processes are included so as to reproduce experimental observations is necessary before upscaling to heterogeneous field conditions. The reactive transport model will be used for field-scale sequestration simulations and coupled with a geomechanical model that includes the influence of deformation.

  7. Nucleation and reaction rates controlled by local reaction volume and reaction-induced stress - spinel layer growth as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, Lutz C.; Milke, Ralf; Dohmen, Ralf; Wirth, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We observed the growth of spinel sensu stricto (MgAl2O4) between periclase (MgO) and corundum (Al2O3) in thin films deposited by the pulsed laser deposition method on crystallographically oriented single crystal substrates. The starting samples consisted of cut and ultra polished single crystals of either corundum (parallel (0001)) or periclase (parallel (111)) and an amorphous source layer of the respective reactant that in the very first stages of the experiments became polycrystalline. The cutting direction in the substrate minerals ensures that the substrate phases start to react along their close-packed hexagonal oxygen layers which allows topotactical growth of the newly formed spinel. The entire layer setup on the substrate crystals was only a few 100 nm thick. The growth of these spinel product layers was monitored in-situ using a heating attachment and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. From the reacted samples we took electron transparent foils by the focused ion beam method and analysed them ex-situ by TEM. At 1000°C we found a difference in spinel growth rate between one and two orders of magnitude between the two substrates, all other parameters held constant. At 900 and 1000 °C spinel had formed after one hour by 0.004 nm/s (900°C) and 0.034 nm/s (1000°C) on corundum substrate, while on periclase substrate the reaction had gone completely through the Al2O3 source layer transforming it to spinel by at least 15-30 times higher reaction rates (boundary values) and probably even faster. At 800°C no reaction occurred between periclase layers and corundum single crystals, whereas spinel crystallized at a (linearized) rate of 46 nm/h on periclase single crystals. We explain our findings by the local reaction volume at the periclase-corundum interface. Many studies (including this one) have established that spinel grows by cation exchange in a rather immobile oxygen sublattice. This mechanism implies a negative volume change at the Sp-Per interface (by -13

  8. Kinetics of the reaction OH + HO2 yields H2O + O2 from 254 to 382 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, Leon F.

    1988-01-01

    The discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique has been used to determine the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + HO2 yields H2O + O2 from 254 to 382 K at a total pressure of 1 Torr. Pseudo-=first-order conditions were used with HO2 in large excess over OH. The rate constant was obtained directly from observed decays of OH and measured concentrations of HO2. Since the observed rate constant was found to be very sensitive to small background concentrations of O and H atoms, NO2 was used to remove both atom species from the system. With added NO2 the result at 299 K is (1.1 + or - 0.3) x 10 to the -10th cu cm/molecule where the error limits are one standard deviation and include an estimate of overall experimental uncertainty. The temperature dependence expressed in Arrhenius form is (4.8 + or - 0.8) x 10 to the -11th exp (250 + or - 50)/T. The results are independent of the type of reactor surface and the precursor used to produce OH and HO2. The present results agree well with earlier measurements near 1-atm total pressure and suggest that this rate constant exhibits little or no pressure dependence between 1 and 1000 Torr.

  9. In Search of Reaction Rate Scaling Law for Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladeinde, Foluso; Lou, Zhipeng; Li, Wenhai

    2015-11-01

    As a way of employing the flamelet approach, which was developed essentially for incompressible flows, to model supersonic combustion, the role ascribed to pressure has not been very convincing. That is, the reaction rate is often scaled on the square of the pressure in the finite Mach number flow field relative to the usually atmospheric static pressure field used in the generation of the flamelet library. This scaling assumption is quite simple and will therefore be very attractive if it has a sound theoretical basis and it works for a large selection of high-speed combustion flows. We try to find some justifications for different scaling laws, with the hope of coming up with a more universally-acceptable flamelet procedure for supersonic combustion.

  10. The effects of vacuum polarization on thermonuclear reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Added to the pure Coulomb potential, the contribution from vacuum polarization increases the barrier, reducing the wave function (u) for reacting nuclei within the range of nuclear forces. The cross section and reaction rate are then reduced accordingly by a factor proportional to u squared. The effect is treated by evaluating the vacuum polarization potential as a small correction to the Coulomb term, then computing u in a WKB formulation. The calculation is done analytically employing the small r power-series expansion for the Uehling potential to express the final result in terms of convenient parameters. At a temperature of 1.4 x 10 to the 7th K the (negative) correction is 1.3 percent for the fundamental fusion process p + p yields d + e(+) + nu.

  11. ZERO-VALENT IRON REMOVAL RATES OF AQUEOUS Cr(VI) MEASURED UNDER FLOW CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2004-06-01

    The rates of Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase by zero-valent iron, Fe(0), was measured under flow conditions. The intent of this work was to generate removal rate coefficients that would be applicable to the Reactive Well Technology, a groundwater remediation technology that replaces the sand in a filter pack of a conventional well with a reactive material, such as Fe(0). Dissolved Cr(VI) concentration, dissolved O2 concentration, and Eh data indicated that Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase was mass-transfer limited. All pseudo-first-order regression fits to the data were significant (P≤0.05), however, they did not capture many of the salient aspects of the data, including that the removal rate often decreased as contact time increased. As such, application of these rate coefficients to predict long-term Cr(VI) removal were compromised. The rate coefficients measured under flow conditions were comparable to those measured previously under batch conditions with significantly greater solution:solid ratios. Between the range of 20 and 100 wt-% Fe(0) in the column, there was little measurable change in the reaction kinetics. Thus, it may be possible to include sand into the reactive filter packs in the event it is necessary to increase filter pack porosity or to decrease the accumulation of secondary reaction products that may lead to filter pack plugging. Background water chemistry (0.2 M NaHCO3, distilled water, and a carbonate-dominated groundwater) had only marginal, if any, effects on reaction rate coefficients. The reaction rates measured in this study indicated that an Fe(0) filter pack could be used to lower Cr(VI) concentrations by several orders of magnitude in a once-through mode of operation of the Reactive Well Technology.

  12. An Experiment To Demonstrate How a Catalyst Affects the Rate of a Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copper, Christine L.; Koubeck, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Describes a chemistry experiment that allows students to calculate rates of reaction, orders of reaction, and activation energies. The activity demonstrates that to increase a reaction's rate, a catalyst need only provide any additional pathway for the reaction, not necessarily a pathway having lower activation energy. (WRM)

  13. New insights into atrazine degradation by cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation: kinetics, reaction products and transformation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuefei; Dong, Changxun; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe

    2015-03-21

    The widespread occurrence of atrazine in waters poses potential risk to ecosystem and human health. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms and transformation pathways of atrazine degradation by cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (Co(II)/PMS). Co(II)/PMS was found to be more efficient for ATZ elimination in aqueous solution than Fe(II)/PMS process. ATZ oxidation by Co(II)/PMS followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the reaction rate constant (k(obs)) increased appreciably with increasing Co(II) concentration. Increasing initial PMS concentration favored the decomposition of ATZ, however, no linear relationship between k(obs) and PMS concentration was observed. Higher efficiency of ATZ oxidation was observed around neutral pH, implying the possibility of applying Co(II)/PMS process under environmental realistic conditions. Natural organic matter (NOM), chloride (Cl(-)) and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) showed detrimental effects on ATZ degradation, particularly at higher concentrations. Eleven products were identified by applying solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC/MS) techniques. Major transformation pathways of ATZ included dealkylation, dechlorination-hydroxylation, and alkyl chain oxidation. Detailed mechanisms responsible for these transformation pathways were discussed. Our results reveal that Co(II)/PMS process might be an efficient technique for remediation of groundwater contaminated by ATZ and structurally related s-triazine herbicides. PMID:25544494

  14. Calculating the Bimolecular Rate of Protein-Protein Association with Interacting Crowders.

    PubMed

    Yap, Eng-Hui; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2013-05-14

    We have recently introduced a method termed Poisson-Boltzmann semianalytical method (PB-SAM) for solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for large numbers of arbitrarily shaped dielectric cavities with controlled precision. In this work we extend the applicability of the PB-SAM approach by deriving force and torque expressions that fully account for mutual polarization in both the zero- and first-order derivatives of the surface charges, that can now be embedded into a Brownian dynamics scheme to look at electrostatic-driven mesoscale assembly and kinetics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the PB-SAM approach by simulating the protein concentration effects on the bimolecular rate of association of barnase and barstar, under periodic boundary conditions and evaluated through mean first passage times. We apply PB-SAM to the pseudo-first-order reaction rate conditions in which either barnase or barstar are in great excess relative to the other protein (124:1). This can be considered a specific case in which the PB-SAM approach can be applied to crowding conditions in which crowders are not inert but can form interactions with other molecules. PMID:26583736

  15. Pressure Dependence of Gas-Phase Reaction Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Persis, Stephanie; Dollet, Alain; Teyssandier, Francis

    2004-01-01

    It is presented that only simple concepts, mainly taken from activated-complex or transition-state theory, are required to explain and analytically describe the influence of pressure on gas-phase reaction kinetics. The simplest kind of elementary gas-phase reaction is a unimolecular decomposition reaction.

  16. Microenvironment effects on the kinetics of electron-transfer reactions involving dithionite ions and viologens. 1. A comparison between two types of polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hag Seong; Claude, B.; Tondre, C. )

    1990-09-20

    The retardation of the rate of electron-transfer reactions constitutes a major goal in the development of energy-producing photochemical processes. The stopped-flow technique was used in this work to investigate the retarding effects of two polyelectrolytes on the rate of reduction of a series of dialkylviologens (N,N{prime}-dialkyl-4,4{prime}-bipyridinium, with alkyl chains varying from methyl to hexadecyl) by sodium dithionite. The apparent rate constants for reduction have been measured in the absence and in the presence of polyelectrolytes having widely different shapes: poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PSSH), which is essentially linear, and maleic acid-cetyl vinyl ether (MA-CVE), which is a polysoap. The latter one was shown to be much more efficient than the former. The larger retardation effect (about 50-fold) was obtained with MA-CVE in combination with di-C{sub 16}-viologen. The effect of polyelectrolyte concentration on the observed pseudo-first-order rate constant could be theoretically predicted for both polyelectrolytes.

  17. Photonuclear and radiative capture reaction rates for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Mary; Frauendorf, S.; Kaempfer, B.; Scwengner, R.; Wiescher, M.

    2011-10-01

    The vast majority of nuclei heavier than iron are synthesisized via the capture of neutrons. There are however 35 naturally occurring nuclei, including isotopes of Mo and La, located on the neutron-deficient size of the valley of stability. It has been proposed that these nuclei, referred to as p-nuclei, are produced via sequential photo-dissociation reactions in the oxygen-neon shell burning regions of a pre-supernova star. As such, cross sections for p-nuclei production are particularly sensitive to the gamma-ray strength function, which, though dominated by the giant dipole resonance, may contain extra strength contributions near to the neutron threshold. Recently new (γ, γ') cross section measurements have been performed at the ELBE facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf for the nuclei ^92-100Mo, ^88Sr, ^90Zr and ^139La probing the photo-absorption cross section over an energy range 4.5 - 6 MeV, up to the neutron separation threshold. The use of these measurements as a test of existing gamma-ray strength function models, and the consequent impact on p-nuclei production rates, will be discussed.

  18. Enhanced reaction rates in NDP analysis with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R. Gregory

    2014-04-15

    Neutron depth profiling (NDP) makes accessible quantitative information on a few isotopic concentration profiles ranging from the surface into the sample a few micrometers. Because the candidate analytes for NDP are few, there is little interference encountered. Furthermore, neutrons have no charge so mixed chemical states in the sample are of no direct concern. There are a few nuclides that exhibit large probabilities for neutron scattering. The effect of neutron scattering on NDP measurements has not previously been evaluated as a basis for either enhancing the reaction rates or as a source of measurement error. Hydrogen is a common element exhibiting large neutron scattering probability found in or around sample volumes being analyzed by NDP. A systematic study was conducted to determine the degree of signal change when neutron scattering occurs during analysis. The relative signal perturbation was evaluated for materials of varied neutron scattering probability, concentration, total mass, and geometry. Signal enhancements up to 50% are observed when the hydrogen density is high and in close proximity to the region of analysis with neutron beams of sub thermal energies. Greater signal enhancements for the same neutron number density are reported for thermal neutron beams. Even adhesive tape used to position the sample produces a measureable signal enhancement. Because of the shallow volume, negligible distortion of the NDP measured profile shape is encountered from neutron scattering.

  19. A Shock-Tube Study of the CO + OH Reaction Near the Low-Pressure Limit.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Ehson F; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-06-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction between carbon monoxide and hydroxyl radical were measured behind reflected shock waves over 700-1230 K and 1.2-9.8 bar. The temperature/pressure conditions correspond to the predicted low-pressure limit of this reaction, where the channel leading to carbon dioxide formation is dominant. The reaction rate coefficients were inferred by measuring the formation of carbon dioxide using quantum cascade laser absorption near 4.2 μm. Experiments were performed under pseudo-first-order conditions with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as the OH precursor. Using ultraviolet laser absorption by OH radicals, the TBHP decomposition rate was measured to quantify potential facility effects under extremely dilute conditions used here. The measured CO + OH rate coefficients are provided in Arrhenius form for three different pressure ranges: kCO+OH(1.2-1.6 bar) = (9.14 ± 2.17) × 10(-13) exp(-(1265 ± 190)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); kCO+OH(4.3-5.1 bar) = (8.70 ± 0.84) × 10(-13) exp(-(1156 ± 83)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); and kCO+OH(9.6-9.8 bar) = (7.48 ± 1.92) × 10(-13) exp(-(929 ± 192)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The measured rate coefficients are found to be lower than the master equation modeling results by Weston et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 821] at 819 K and in closer agreement with the expression provided by Joshi and Wang [Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 2006, 38, 57]. PMID:27182716

  20. Reaction mechanism and rate constants of the CH+CH4 reaction: a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Joao Marcelo; Mebel, Alexander M.

    2015-07-01

    Ab initio and density functional calculations have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of CH radical insertion into methane. The results show that the reaction can be viewed to occur via two stages. On the first stage, the CH radical approaches methane without large structural changes to acquire proper positioning for the subsequent stage, where H-migration occurs from CH4 to CH, along with a C-C bond formation. Where the first stage ends and the second begins, a tight transition state was located using the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) and MP4(SDQ)/6-311++G(d,p) methods. Using a rigid rotor - harmonic oscillator approach within transition state theory, we show that at the MP5/6-311++G(d,p)//MP4(SDQ)/6-311++G(d,p) level the calculated rate constants are in a reasonably good agreement with experiment in a broad temperature range of 145-581 K. Even at low temperatures, the insertion reaction bottleneck is found about the location of the tight transition state, rather than at long separations between the CH and CH4 reactants. In addition, high level CCSD(T)-F12/CBS calculations of the remainder of the C2H5 potential energy surface predict the CH+CH4 reaction to proceed via the initial insertion step to the ethyl radical which then can emit a hydrogen atom to form highly exothermic C2H4+H products.

  1. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  2. Laser flash photolysis studies of radical-radical reaction kinetics: The HO{sub 2} + IO reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkhite, J.M.; Stickel, R.E.; Nicovich, J.M.; Wine, P.H.

    1999-04-29

    Reactive iodine as a potential tropospheric O{sub 3} sink has received considerable attention recently. Laser flash photolysis of Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 3}OH/O{sub 2}/I{sub 2}/NO{sub 2}/SF{sub 6}N{sub 2} mixtures at 308 nm has been coupled with simultaneous time-resolved detection of HO{sub 2} (by infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) and IO (by visible absorption spectroscopy) to investigate the kinetics of the atmospherically important reaction HO{sub 2} + IO {r_arrow} products over the temperature range 274--373 K in N{sub 2} buffer gas at pressures of 12 and 25 Torr. All experiments were performed under near pseudo-first-order conditions with HO{sub 2} in excess over IO. At 298 K, the rate coefficient was determined to be (9.7 {+-} 2.9) {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1}s{sup {minus}1}, with the primary source of uncertainty being knowledge of the infrared line strength(s) required to convert measured HO{sub 2} absorbances to absolute concentrations. The temperature dependence of the HO{sub 2} + IO rate coefficient was found to be adequately described by the Arrhenius expression k = 9.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} exp(680/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The results reported in this study are compared with other recent studies of HO{sub 2} + IO kinetics, and the potential roles of this reaction in atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  3. On the ambiguity of the reaction rate constants in multivariate curve resolution for reversible first-order reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Henning; Sawall, Mathias; Kubis, Christoph; Selent, Detlef; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin; Neymeyr, Klaus

    2016-07-13

    If for a chemical reaction with a known reaction mechanism the concentration profiles are accessible only for certain species, e.g. only for the main product, then often the reaction rate constants cannot uniquely be determined from the concentration data. This is a well-known fact which includes the so-called slow-fast ambiguity. This work combines the question of unique or non-unique reaction rate constants with factor analytic methods of chemometrics. The idea is to reduce the rotational ambiguity of pure component factorizations by considering only those concentration factors which are possible solutions of the kinetic equations for a properly adapted set of reaction rate constants. The resulting set of reaction rate constants corresponds to those solutions of the rate equations which appear as feasible factors in a pure component factorization. The new analysis of the ambiguity of reaction rate constants extends recent research activities on the Area of Feasible Solutions (AFS). The consistency with a given chemical reaction scheme is shown to be a valuable tool in order to reduce the AFS. The new methods are applied to model and experimental data. PMID:27237834

  4. Experimental and density functional theoretical study of the effects of Fenton's reaction on the degradation of Bisphenol A in a high voltage plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fei; Fan, Xiangru; Stratton, Gunnar R; Bellona, Christopher L; Holsen, Thomas M; Crimmins, Bernard S; Xia, Xiaoyan; Mededovic Thagard, Selma

    2016-05-01

    A novel electrical discharge plasma reactor configuration with and without iron ions was evaluated for the degradation of 0.02 mM Bisphenol A (BPA). The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant calculated for the plasma treatment of BPA with a stainless steel electrode in the presence of dissolved ferrous ion (Fe(2+)) salts (termed plasma/Fenton treatment) was higher than in the plasma treatment in the absence of iron salts. At the optimal ferrous ion concentration, longer plasma treatment times resulted in higher BPA degradation rates, likely due to increased hydroxyl (OH) radical concentration formed through the decomposition of H2O2. Replacing the stainless steel with a carbon steel grounded electrode resulted in the release of iron ions from the carbon steel thereby increasing the rate of BPA removal and eliminating the need for iron salts. After the plasma/Fenton treatment, >97% of the residual iron salts were removed by coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation. Byproduct identification coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that OH radical attack on BPA's hydroxyl group is the primary pathway for byproduct formation. PMID:26874105

  5. Photooxidative removal of the herbicide Acid Blue 9 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide: modeling of the reaction for evaluation of electrical energy per order (E EO).

    PubMed

    Khataee, Ali R; Khataee, Hamid R

    2008-09-01

    The present work deals with photooxidative removal of the herbicide, Acid Blue 9 (AB9), in water in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under UV light illumination (30 W). The influence of the basic operational parameters such as amount of H2O2, irradiation time and initial concentration of AB9 on the photodegradation efficiency of the herbicide was investigated. The degradation rate of AB9 was not appreciably high when the photolysis was carried out in the absence of H2O2 and it was negligible in the absence of UV light. The photooxidative removal of the herbicide was found to follow pseudo-first-order kinetic, and hence the figure-of-merit electrical energy per order (E Eo) was considered appropriate for estimating the electrical energy efficiency. A mathematical relation between the apparent reaction rate constant and H2O2 used was applied for prediction of the electricity consumption in the photooxidative removal of AB9. The results indicated that this kinetic model, based on the initial rates of degradation, provided good prediction of the E Eo values for a variety of conditions. The results also indicated that the UV/H2O2 process was appropriate as the effective treatment method for removal of AB9 from the contaminated wastewater. PMID:18803110

  6. Optimal reconstruction of reaction rates from particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Random walk particle tracking methodologies to simulate solute transport of conservative species constitute an attractive alternative for their computational efficiency and absence of numerical dispersion. Yet, problems stemming from the reconstruction of concentrations from particle distributions have typically prevented its use in reactive transport problems. The numerical problem mainly arises from the need to first reconstruct the concentrations of species/components from a discrete number of particles, which is an error prone process, and then computing a spatial functional of the concentrations and/or its derivatives (either spatial or temporal). Errors are then propagated, so that common strategies to reconstruct this functional require an unfeasible amount of particles when dealing with nonlinear reactive transport problems. In this context, this article presents a methodology to directly reconstruct this functional based on kernel density estimators. The methodology mitigates the error propagation in the evaluation of the functional by avoiding the prior estimation of the actual concentrations of species. The multivariate kernel associated with the corresponding functional depends on the size of the support volume, which defines the area over which a given particle can influence the functional. The shape of the kernel functions and the size of the support volume determines the degree of smoothing, which is optimized to obtain the best unbiased predictor of the functional using an iterative plug-in support volume selector. We applied the methodology to directly reconstruct the reaction rates of a precipitation/dissolution problem involving the mixing of two different waters carrying two aqueous species in chemical equilibrium and moving through a randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

  7. Kinetics of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) reactions with H₂SO₄, HNO₃ and HCl: implication for hydrometallurgy of electronic wastes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yin; Li, Dan; Mao, Zhe; Huang, Weilin; Peng, Ping'an; Chen, Pei; Mei, Jun

    2014-04-15

    Hydrometallurgy is an acid leaching based process widely used for recovering precious metals from electronic wastes (e-wastes). The effects of acid leaching on the fate of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in typical hydrometallurgical processes remain largely unknown. This study was aimed at evaluating the fate of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a commonly used BFR, in three acid leaching reagents (i.e. H2SO4, HNO3, and HCl) commonly used in hydrometallurgy. It was found that the reactions of TBBPA with concentrated H2SO4 followed a pseudo-zero-order rate and the reaction rates declined rapidly as the concentrations of H2SO4 decreased. In contrast, TBBPA could be easily transformed in less concentrated HNO3 solutions (<21.7 wt%) and the reactions followed a pseudo-first-order rate. The reaction products identified by GC-MS indicated different transformation pathways of TBBPA in H2SO4 and HNO3. HCl or HCl/H2SO4 mixtures (3:1, v/v) did not appear to react with TBBPA, while aqua regia (3:1 HCl/HNO3, v/v) reacted violently with TBBPA and led to almost complete disappearance of TBBPA within a minute. It suggested that HNO3 significantly affected the fate of TBBPA and the use of HNO3 as leaching reagents in hydrometallurgy of e-wastes should be carefully evaluated. Collectively, our findings of distinct fate of TBBPA in different acid leaching reagents provided fundamental information for design of hydrometallurgical treatment of e-wastes to minimize acid reactions with BFRs within plastics matrix and to maximize acid leaching efficiency for metals recycling processes. PMID:24594840

  8. On the theoretical limits of detecting cyclic changes in cardiac high-energy phosphates and creatine kinase reaction kinetics using in vivo ³¹P MRS.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Kilian; Bottomley, Paul A; Weiss, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is absolutely required to fuel normal cyclic contractions of the heart. The creatine kinase (CK) reaction is a major energy reserve reaction that rapidly converts creatine phosphate (PCr) to ATP during the cardiac cycle and at times of stress and ischemia, but is significantly impaired in conditions such as hypertrophy and heart failure. Because the magnitudes of possible in vivo cyclic changes in cardiac high-energy phosphates (HEPs) during the cardiac cycle are not well known from previous work, this study uses mathematical modeling to assess whether, and to what extent, cyclic variations in HEPs and in the rate of ATP synthesis through CK (CK flux) could exist in the human heart, and whether they could be measured with current in vivo (31)P MRS methods. Multi-site exchange models incorporating enzymatic rate equations were used to study the cyclic dynamics of the CK reaction, and Bloch equations were used to simulate (31)P MRS saturation transfer measurements of the CK reaction. The simulations show that short-term buffering of ATP by CK requires temporal variations over the cardiac cycle in the CK reaction velocities modeled by enzymatic rate equations. The maximum variation in HEPs in the normal human heart beating at 60 min(-1) was approximately 0.4 mM and proportional to the velocity of ATP hydrolysis. Such HEP variations are at or below the current limits of detection by in vivo (31)P MRS methods. Bloch equation simulations show that (31)P MRS saturation transfer estimates the time-averaged, pseudo-first-order forward rate constant, k(f,ap)', of the CK reaction, and that periodic short-term fluctuations in kf ' and CK flux are not likely to be detectable in human studies employing current in vivo (31)P MRS methods. PMID:25914379

  9. Cross sections and reaction rates of relevance to aeronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical data relevant to models and measurements of the chemical and thermal structures and luminosity of the thermospheres of the earth and planets published during the last four years are surveyed. Among chemical processes, attention is given to ion-molecule reactions, dissociative recombination of molecular ions, and reactions between neutral species. Both reactions between ground state species and species in excited states are considered, including energy transfer and quenching. Measured and calculated cross sections for interactions of solar radiation with atmospheric species, such as photoabsorption, photoionization, and photodissociation and related processes are surveyed.

  10. Hydroxamate siderophore-promoted reactions between iron(II) and nitroaromatic groundwater contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwook; Duckworth, Owen W.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies show that ferrous iron (Fe II), which is often abundant in anaerobic soil and groundwater, is capable of abiotically reducing many subsurface contaminants. However, studies also demonstrate that Fe II redox reactivity in geochemical systems is heavily dependent upon metal speciation. This contribution examines the influence of hydroxamate ligands, including the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB), on Fe II reactions with nitroaromatic groundwater contaminants (NACs). Experimental results demonstrate that ring-substituted NACs are reduced to the corresponding aniline products in aqueous solutions containing Fe II complexes with DFOB and two monohydroxamate ligands (acetohydroxamic acid and salicylhydroxamic acid). Reaction rates are heavily dependent upon solution conditions and the identities of both the Fe II-complexing hydroxamate ligand and the target NAC. Trends in the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants for reduction of 4-chloronitrobenzene ( kobs, s -1) are quantitatively linked to the formation of Fe II species with standard one-electron reduction potentials, EH0 (Fe III/Fe II), below -0.3 V. Linear free energy relationships correlate reaction rates with the EH0 (Fe III/Fe II) values of different electron-donating Fe II complexes and with the apparent one-electron reduction potentials of different electron-accepting NACs, EH1'(ArNO 2). Experiments describing a redox auto-decomposition mechanism for Fe II-DFOB complexes that occurs at neutral pH and has implications for the stability of hydroxamate siderophores in anaerobic environments are also presented. Results from this study indicate that hydroxamates and other Fe III-stabilizing organic ligands can form highly redox-active Fe II complexes that may contribute to the natural attenuation and remediation of subsurface contaminants.

  11. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  12. Interactive Program System for Integration of Reaction Rate Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a Pascal-language based kinetics rate package for the microcomputer. Considers possible ecological uses for the program and illustrates results for several rate laws. Discusses hardware and software needs for adequate operation. (ML)

  13. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  14. Women's Self-Disclosure of HIV Infection: Rates, Reasons, Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoni, Jane M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 65 ethnically diverse women revealed relatively low rates of disclosure of HIV-positive serostatus to extended family members, somewhat higher rates for immediate family members, and highest rates for lovers or friends. Spanish-speaking Latinas were less likely to disclose their serostatus than English-speaking Latinas, African…

  15. Quick and Easy Rate Equations for Multistep Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Phillip E.

    2008-01-01

    Students rarely see closed-form analytical rate equations derived from underlying chemical mechanisms that contain more than a few steps unless restrictive simplifying assumptions (e.g., existence of a rate-determining step) are made. Yet, work published decades ago allows closed-form analytical rate equations to be written quickly and easily for…

  16. Development of the new approach to the diffusion-limited reaction rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Veshchunov, M. S.

    2012-04-15

    The new approach to the diffusion-limited reaction rate theory, recently proposed by the author, is further developed on the base of a similar approach to Brownian coagulation. The traditional diffusion approach to calculation of the reaction rate is critically analyzed. In particular, it is shown that the traditional approach is applicable only in the special case of reactions with a large reaction radius and the mean inter-particle distances, and become inappropriate in calculating the reaction rate in the case of a relatively small reaction radius. In the latter case, most important for chemical reactions, particle collisions occur not in the diffusion regime but mainly in the kinetic regime characterized by homogeneous (random) spatial distribution of particles on the length scale of the mean inter-particle distance. The calculated reaction rate for a small reaction radius in three dimensions formally (and fortuitously) coincides with the expression derived in the traditional approach for reactions with a large reaction radius, but notably deviates at large times from the traditional result in the planar two-dimensional geometry. In application to reactions on discrete lattice sites, new relations for the reaction rate constants are derived for both three-dimensional and two-dimensional lattices.

  17. Kinetics study of heterogeneous reactions of ozone with erucic acid using an ATR-IR flow reactor.

    PubMed

    Leng, Chunbo; Hiltner, Joseph; Pham, Hai; Kelley, Judas; Mach, Mindy; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2014-03-01

    The ozone initiated heterogeneous oxidation of erucic acid (EA) thin film was investigated using a flow system combined with attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) over wide ranges of ozone concentrations (0.25-60 ppm), thin film thickness (0.1-1.0 μm), temperatures (263-298 K), and relative humidities (0-80% RH) for the first time. Pseudo-first-order rate constants, kapp, and overall reactive uptake coefficients, γ, were obtained through changes in the absorbance of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching bands at 1695 cm(-1), which is assigned to the carbonyl group in carboxylic acid. Results showed that the reaction followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism and kapp was largely dominated by surface reaction over bulk phase reaction. In addition, both the kapp and the γ values showed very strong temperature dependences (∼two orders of magnitude) over the temperature range; in contrast, they only slightly increased with increasing RH values from 0-80%. According to the kapp values as a function of temperature, the activation energy for the heterogeneous reaction was estimated to be 80.6 kJ mol(-1). Our results have suggested that heterogeneous reactions between ozone and unsaturated solid surfaces likely have a substantially greater temperature dependence than liquid ones. Moreover, the hygroscopic properties of EA thin films before and after exposure to ozone were also studied by measurement of water uptake. Based on the hygroscopicity data, the insignificant RH effect on reaction kinetics was probably due to the relatively weak water uptake by the unreacted and reacted EA thin films. PMID:24457621

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of electron transfer reaction of single and double chain surfactant cobalt(III) complex by Fe2+ ions in liposome (dipalmitoylphosphotidylcholine) vesicles: effects of phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we report the kinetics of reduction reactions of single and double chain surfactant cobalt(III) complexes of octahedral geometry, cis-[Co(en)2(4AMP)(DA)](ClO4)3 and cis-[Co(dmp)2(C12H25NH2)2](ClO4)3 (en = ethylenediamine, dmp = 1,3-diaminopropane, 4AMP = 4-aminopropane, C12H25NH2 = dodecylamine) by Fe2+ ion in dipalmitoylphosphotidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles at different temperatures under pseudo first-order conditions. The kinetics of these reactions is followed by spectrophotometry method. The reactions are found to be second order and the electron transfer is postulated as outer sphere. The remarkable findings in the present investigation are that, below the phase transition temperature of DPPC, the rate decreases with an increase in the concentration of DPPC, while above the phase transition temperature the rate increases with an increase in the concentration of DPPC. The main driving force for this phenomenon is considered to be the intervesicular hydrophobic interaction between vesicles surface and hydrophobic part of the surfactant complexes. Besides, comparing the values of rate constants of these outer-sphere electron transfer reactions in the absence and in the presence of DPPC, the rate constant values in the presence of DPPC are always found to be greater than in the absence of DPPC. This is ascribed to the double hydrophobic fatty acid chain in the DPPC that gives the molecule an overall tubular shape due to the intervesicular hydrophobic interaction between vesicles surface and hydrophobic part of the surfactant complexes more suitable for vesicle aggregation which facilitates lower activation energy, and consequently higher rate is observed in the presence of DPPC. The activation parameters (ΔS# and ΔH#) of the reactions at different temperatures have been calculated which corroborate the kinetics of the reaction.

  19. The surface reaction kinetics of salicylate on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ainsworth, C.C.; Friedrich, D.M.; Joly, A.G.; Gassman, P.L.

    1997-12-31

    The kinetics of reaction of salicylate with colloidal alumina in aqueous suspension and with Al(III) in homogeneous aqueous solution were studied by stopped-flow laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The emission spectra confirmed the formation of both monodentate complexes and more stable bidentate chelates. Temporal evolution of the spectra indicated that the reaction was fast (within first few minutes) for both the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions but slowed down afterwards for the latter. Reactions completed within 10 minutes in homogeneous phase at pH 3.3 but took more than 12 hours in alumina suspension. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity within first four minutes showed that in homogeneous phase the reaction followed a single pseudo-first-order kinetics. In alumina suspension log plots were nonlinear and characteristic of multiple heterogeneous reaction paths. The kinetics are interpreted in terms of the simultaneous formation of multiple species as well as subsequent conversion between species.

  20. Influence of chemical kinetics on postcolumn reaction in a capillary Taylor reactor with catechol analytes and photoluminescence following electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Moon Chul; Weber, Stephen G

    2005-02-15

    -hydroquinone. Kinetically controlled reactions of catechols, however, could be also completed in a reasonable time at increased reagent concentration. A satisfactory reactor, operating at 1.7 cm/s (2 microL/min) velocity with solutes having diffusion coefficients in the 5 x 10(-6) cm2/s range, can be constructed from 8.0 cm of 25-microm-radius capillary. Slower reactions require longer reaction times, but theoretical calculations expect that a CTR does not broaden a chromatographic peak (N = 14 000) from a 100-microm-capillary chromatography column by 10% if the pseudo-first-order rate constant is larger than 0.1 s(-1). PMID:15858975

  1. Reactions of the oxidized organic cofactor in copper-depleted bovine serum amine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Agostinelli, E; De Matteis, G; Sinibaldi, A; Mondovì, B; Morpurgo, L

    1997-01-01

    A novel copper-depleted bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO), in which about half the molecules contained the organic cofactor in the oxidized form, was prepared by adding a reductant in anaerobic conditions to the cyanide-reacted protein. The CuI-semiquinone formed in these conditions reoxidizes after the removal of copper. The inactive derivative was reduced by benzylamine at approx. 1/1000 the rate of BSAO. The pseudo-first-order reaction was preceded by the formation of a protein-benzylamine complex with dissociation constant, Kd, of 4.9+/-0.5 mM, similar to the Km of BSAO (2.2 mM). Also the reactions with phenylhydrazine and benzohydrazide were considerably slower than in holo-BSAO, whereas the reactions with p-pyridine-2-ylphenylacetohydrazide, containing a longer aromatic tail, and semicarbazide, lacking an aromatic moiety, were less severely affected. Removal of copper had no effect on the optical spectra of BSAO and of most adducts, containing the cofactor in quinol form, showing that copper is bound to neither the oxidized nor the reduced cofactor. Benzylhydrazine did not produce optical effects but was tightly bound, as inferred from its inhibitory effect on reaction with other molecules. Substrate and inhibitors might bind a hydrophobic pocket at some distance from the quinone, probably near the protein surface, with their affinity depending on the hydrophobic character and pKa. The binding, which is not greatly influenced by copper removal, probably induces a copper-dependent change of conformation, 'opening' a pathway to the active site buried in the protein interior. PMID:9182709

  2. Fluctuation enhanced electrochemical reaction rates at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Vladimir; Krischer, Katharina

    2010-03-01

    The electrode potential constitutes a dynamical variable whenever an electrode is resistively coupled to the electric circuit. We show that at the nanoscale, the discreteness and stochasticity of an electron transfer event causes fluctuations of the electrode potential that render all elementary electrochemical reactions to be faster on a nanoelectrode than predicted by the macroscopic (Butler-Volmer) electrochemical kinetics. This phenomenon is substantiated by means of a generalized (electro)chemical master equation. PMID:20176966

  3. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  4. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  5. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Errormore » rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu , Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition.« less

  6. Rate Constants for the Reactions of Hydroxyl Radical with Several Alkanes, Cycloalkanes, and Dimethyl Ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMore, W.; Bayes, K.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiements were used to measure rate constants and temperature denpendencies of the reactions of OH with propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, and dimethyl ether.

  7. Effect of temperature oscillation on chemical reaction rates in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberstein, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of temperature fluctuations on atmospheric ozone chemistry is examined by considering the Chapman photochemical theory of ozone transport to calculate globally averaged ozone production rates from mean reaction rates, activation energies, and recombination processes.

  8. Upper atmosphere research: Reaction rate and optical measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to provide photochemical, kinetic, and spectroscopic information necessary for photochemical models of the Earth's upper atmosphere and to examine reactions or reactants not presently in the models to either confirm the correctness of their exclusion or provide evidence to justify future inclusion in the models. New initiatives are being taken in technique development (many of them laser based) and in the application of established techniques to address gaps in the photochemical/kinetic data base, as well as to provide increasingly reliable information.

  9. Interlaboratory reaction rate program. 12th progress report, November 1976-October 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.; Preston, C.C.

    1980-09-01

    The Interlaboratory Reaction Rate UILRR) program is establishing the capability to accurately measure neutron-induced reactions and reaction rates for reactor fuels and materials development programs. The goal for the principal fission reactions, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U and /sup 239/Pu, is an accuracy to within +- 5% at the 95% confidence level. Accurate measurement of other fission and nonfission reactions is also required, but to a lesser accuracy, between +- 5% and 10% at the 95% confidence level. A secondary program objective is improvement in knowledge of the nuclear parameters involved in the standarization of fuels and materials dosimetry measurements of neutron flux, spectra, fluence and burnup.

  10. Controlling the emotional heart: heart rate biofeedback improves cardiac control during emotional reactions.

    PubMed

    Peira, Nathalie; Fredrikson, Mats; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    When regulating negative emotional reactions, one goal is to reduce physiological reactions. However, not all regulation strategies succeed in doing that. We tested whether heart rate biofeedback helped participants reduce physiological reactions in response to negative and neutral pictures. When viewing neutral pictures, participants could regulate their heart rate whether the heart rate feedback was real or not. In contrast, when viewing negative pictures, participants could regulate heart rate only when feedback was real. Ratings of task success paralleled heart rate. Participants' general level of anxiety, emotion awareness, or cognitive emotion regulation strategies did not influence the results. Our findings show that accurate online heart rate biofeedback provides an efficient way to down-regulate autonomic physiological reactions when encountering negative stimuli. PMID:24373886

  11. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : the Effect of Pressure on the Rate of Propagation of the Reaction Zone and upon the Rate of Molecular Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1932-01-01

    This study of gaseous explosive reaction has brought out a number of important fundamental characteristics of the explosive reaction indicating that the basal processes of the transformation are much simpler and corresponds more closely to the general laws and principles of ordinary transformations than is usually supposed. The report calls attention to the point that the rate of molecular transformation within the zone was found in all cases to be proportional to pressure, that the transformation within the zone is the result of binary impacts. This result is of unusual interest in the case of the reaction of heavy hydrocarbon fuels and the reaction mechanism proposed by the recent kinetic theory of chain reactions.

  12. Rate and pathways for the reaction of OH with the biogenic p-cymene, an alkylated aromatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekowski, R.; Rayez, M.-T.; Rayez, J.-C.; Zetzsch, C.

    2009-04-01

    Aromatics are known to contribute strongly to tropospheric formation of ozone, and p-cymene (4-isopropyltoluene) is one of only a few biogenic, volatile aromatic hydrocarbons. In spite of its symmetry, this molecule (CH3 - °-CH(CH3)2) has a multitude of potential pathways of its reaction with OH radicals. Addition of OH is well-known to be the predominating primary step in the tropospheric transformation of aromatic hydrocarbons. The addition is expected to occur preferably at a non-occupied position, where four positions are available: two equivalent ones ortho to the methyl group and two equivalent ones ortho to the isopropyl group. Furthermore, various C-H bonds (4 aromatic and 10 aliphatic) are available for abstraction, leading to benzyl-type radicals in two cases. The present study combines theoretical calculations with kinetic experiments in the gas phase. The theoretical calculations are based on electronic quantum chemistry DFT method for the investigation of the possible pathways in the potential energy surface of the reaction. The experiments are carried out by the flash photolysis/resonance fluorescence technique. OH radicals are produced by pulsed vacuum-UV photolysis of H2O (> 115 nm) in the presence of p-cymene in a slow flow of He as carrier gas. Their pseudo-first-order decays are monitored by resonance fluorescence, storing the photon counts by multichannel scaling in a PC and accumulating 50 decays each; see Koch et al. (2007) for details of the technique and evaluation of data. The temperature was varied between room temperature (295 K) and 345K, the He pressure was 250 mbar, and the level of p-cymene was increased stepwise, up to 3 x 1013 molecules/cm3. The decays of OH were observed to be exponential at room temperature, becoming clearly biexponential at higher temperatures, thus indicating reversible addition of OH according to the equilibration OH + p-cymene ⇔ p-cymene-OH (1, -1) These reactions might be accompanied by various

  13. Simulation of Transport and Reaction Using Random Walks: Reactions Without Concentrations and the Automatic Simulation of Drastically Different Thermodynamic--- Versus Diffusion---Limited Reaction Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, D. A.; Meerschaert, M. M.

    2008-12-01

    We extend the advantages of Lagrangian random walk particle tracking (RWPT) methods that have long been used to simulate advection and dispersion in highly heterogeneous media. By formulating dissolution as a random, independent decay process, the classical continuum rate law is recovered. A novel formulation of the random precipitation process requires a consideration of the probability that two nearby particles will occupy the same differential volume in a given time period. This depends on local mixing (as by diffusion) and the total domain particle number density, which are fixed and therefore easy to calculate. The result is that the effective reaction rate follows two regimes. First, for high thermodynamic reaction probability and/or fast mixing, the classical continuum rate laws are reproduced. These are coded in the Gillespie method. This implies an exponentially fast approach to equilibrium. Second, for diffusion (mixing) limited reaction rates, equilibrium is approached much more slowly, following a power law that differs for 1-, 2-, or 3-d. At long enough times, the classical law of mass action for equilibrium reactions is reproduced, in an ensemble sense, for either rate regime. The same number of parameters for A+B ⇌ C are needed in a probabilistic versus continuum reaction simulation---one each for forward and backward probabilities that correspond to continuum thermodynamic rates. The random nature of the simulations allows for significant disequilibrium in any given region at any time that is independent of the numerical details such as time stepping or particle density. This is exemplified by nearby or intermingled groups of reactants and little or no product---a result that is often noted in the field that is difficult to reconcile with continuum methods or coarse-grained Eulerian models. Our results support both the recent experiments that show mixing-limited reactions and the results of perturbed advection-dispersion-reaction continuum models

  14. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Thanh, Vo Hong; Priami, Corrado

    2015-08-07

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness.

  15. Imidazole C-2 Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Reaction at Histidine for Probing Protein Structure and Function with MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Naoka; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nakajima, Chihiro; Kawahara, Kazuki; Miyagi, Masaru; Nishimura, Osamu; Matsuo, Hisayuki; Nakazawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We present a mass spectrometric method for analyzing protein structure and function, based on the imidazole C-2 or histidine Cε1 hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reaction, which is intrinsically second order with respect to the concentrations of the imidazolium cation and OD− in D2O. The second-order rate constant (k2) of this reaction was calculated from the pH-dependency of the pseudo-first-order rate constant (kφ) obtained from the change of average mass ΔMr (0 ≤ ΔMr < 1) of a peptide fragment containing a defined histidine residue at incubation time (t) such that kφ = − [ln(1−ΔMr)]/t. We preferred using k2 rather than kφ because k2max (maximal value of k2) was empirically related to pKa as illustrated with a Brønsted plot: logk2max=-0.7pKa+α (α is an arbitrary constant), so that we could analyze the effect of structure on the H/D-exchange rate in terms of log(k2max/k2) representing the deviation of k2 from k2max. In the catalytic site of bovine ribonuclease A, His12 showed much larger change in log(k2max/k2) compared with His119 upon binding with cytidine 3′-monophosphate, as anticipated from the X-ray structures and the possible change in solvent accessibility. However, there is a need of considering the hydrogen bonds of the imidazole group with non-dissociable groups to interpret an extremely slow H/D exchange rate of His48 in partially solvent-exposed situation. PMID:24606199

  16. The effect of temperature fluctuations of reaction rate constants in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Antaki, P. J.; Kassar, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current models of turbulent reacting flows frequently use Arrhenius reaction rate constants obtained from static or laminar flow theory and/or experiments, or from best fits of static, laminar, and turbulent data. By treating the reaction rate constant as a continuous random variable which is temperature-dependent, the present study assesses the effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the reaction rate constant. This model requires that a probability density function (PDF) describing the nature of the fluctuations be specified. Three PDFs are examined: the clipped Gaussian, the beta PDF, and the ramp model. All the models indicate that the reaction rate constant is greater in a turbulent flow field than in an equivalent laminar flow. In addition, an amplification ratio, which is the ratio of the turbulent rate constant to the laminar rate constant, is defined and its behavior as a function of the mean temperature fluctuations is described

  17. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of CaCO3 Particles with Gaseous HNO3 Over a Wide Range of Humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Gibson, Elizabeth R.; Cain, Jeremy P.; Wang, Hai; Grassian, Vicki H.; Laskin, Alexander

    2008-02-21

    Heterogeneous reaction kinetics of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3) with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles was investigated using the Particle-on-Substrate Stagnation Flow Reactor (PS-SFR). The technique utilizes the exposure of substrate deposited, isolated, and narrowly dispersed particles to a gas mixture of HNO3/H2O/N2 followed by microanalysis of individual reacted particles using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX). The first series of experiment was conducted at atmospheric pressure, room temperature and constant relative humidity (40%) with a median dry particle diameter pD = 0.85 μm, particle loading densities 2×104 ≤ Ns ≤ 6×106 cm–2 and free stream HNO3 concentrations of 7, 14 and 25 ppb. The apparent, pseudo first-order rate constant for the reaction was determined from oxygen enrichment in individual particles as a function of particle loading. Quantitative treatment of the data using a diffusion-kinetic model yields lower limit to the net reaction probability γnet ≥ 0.06 (×3/÷2). In the second series of experiments, HNO3 uptake on CaCO3 of the same particle size was examined over a wide range of relative humidity, from 10 to 80%. The lower limit for the net reaction probability was found to increase with an increase in the relative humidity, from γnet ≥ 0.003 at RH = 10% to 0.21 at 80%.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Brussels nuclear reaction rate library (Aikawa+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, M.; Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.; Takahashi, K.

    2005-07-01

    The present data is part of the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library (BRUSLIB) for astrophysics applications and concerns nuclear reaction rate predictions calculated within the statistical Hauser-Feshbach approximation and making use of global and coherent microscopic nuclear models for the quantities (nuclear masses, nuclear structure properties, nuclear level densities, gamma-ray strength functions, optical potentials) entering the rate calculations. (4 data files).

  19. Chiral polymerization in open systems from chiral-selective reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Nelson, Bradley J; Walker, Sara Imari

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the possibility that prebiotic homochirality can be achieved exclusively through chiral-selective reaction rate parameters without any other explicit mechanism for chiral bias. Specifically, we examine an open network of polymerization reactions, where the reaction rates can have chiral-selective values. The reactions are neither autocatalytic nor do they contain explicit enantiomeric cross-inhibition terms. We are thus investigating how rare a set of chiral-selective reaction rates needs to be in order to generate a reasonable amount of chiral bias. We quantify our results adopting a statistical approach: varying both the mean value and the rms dispersion of the relevant reaction rates, we show that moderate to high levels of chiral excess can be achieved with fairly small chiral bias, below 10%. Considering the various unknowns related to prebiotic chemical networks in early Earth and the dependence of reaction rates to environmental properties such as temperature and pressure variations, we argue that homochirality could have been achieved from moderate amounts of chiral selectivity in the reaction rates. PMID:22610131

  20. A simple expression for the apparent reaction rate of large wood char gasification with steam.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Kentaro; Roh, Seon-Ah; Min, Tai-Jin; Namioka, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    2010-06-01

    A simple expression for the apparent reaction rate of large wood char gasification with steam is proposed. Large char samples were gasified under steam atmosphere using a thermo-balance reactor. The apparent reaction rate was expressed as the product of the intrinsic rate and the effective factor. The effective factor was modified to include the effect of change in char diameter and intrinsic reaction rate during the reaction. Assuming uniform conversion ratio throughout a particle, the simplified reaction scheme was divided into three stages. In the initial stage, the local conversion ratio increases without particle shrinkage. In the middle stage, the particle shrinks following the shrinking core model without change in the local conversion ratio. In the final stage, the local conversion ratio increases without particle shrinkage. The validity of the modified effective value was confirmed by comparison with experimental results. PMID:20144863

  1. Determination of the Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constants for HO2/Acetonylperoxy Reaction and Acetonylperoxy Self-Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, E. C.; Grieman, F. J.; Hui, A. O.; Okumura, M.; Sander, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Reactions of hydroperoxy radical, HO2, with carbonyl containing RO2 can play an important role in the oxidation chemistry of the troposphere. Discovered radical product channels in addition to radical termination channels have resulted in increased study of these important reactions. In our continued study of HO2 reactions with acetonylperoxy and acetylperoxy radicals, we report here our first results on the kinetics of the acetonylperoxy system. Previous studies have resulted in conflicting results and no temperature dependence of the rate constants. Using the Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy (IRKS) method in which a temperature-controlled slow-flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis of Cl2 are used to produce HO2 and CH3C(O)CH2O2 from methanol and acetone, respectively, we studied the chemical kinetics involved over the temperature range of 295 to 240 K. Rates of chemical reaction were determined by monitoring the HO2 concentration as a function of time by sensitive near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy while simultaneously measuring the disappearance of [CH3C(O)CH2O2] in the ultraviolet at 300 nm. The simultaneous fits resulted in the determination of the temperature dependence of the rate constants for the HO2/acetonylperoxy reaction and the acetonylperoxy self-reaction. At the lower temperatures, the reactions of HO2 and CH3C(O)CH2O2 with the adducts HO2•CH3OH and HO2•CH3C(O)CH3 formed in significant concentrations needed to be included in the fitting models.

  2. Manganese peroxidase from the lignin-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Transient state kinetics and reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Gold, M.H. ); Dunford, H.B.; MacDonald, I.D. )

    1989-02-25

    Stopped-flow techniques were used to investigate the kinetics of the formation of manganese peroxidase compound I (MnPI) and of the reactions of MnPI and manganese peroxidase compound II (MnPII) with p-cresol and Mn{sup II}. All of the rate data were obtained from single turnover experiments under pseudo-first order conditions. In the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} the formation of MnPI is independent of pH over the range 3.12-8.29 with a second-order rate constant of (2.0{+-}0.1) {times} 10{sup 6} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The activation energy for MnPI formation is 20 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. MnPI formation also occurs with organic peroxides such as peracetic acid, m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid, and p-nitroperoxybenzoic acid with second-order rate constants of 9.7 x 10{sup 5}, 9.5 {times} 10{sup 4}, and 5.9 {times} 10{sup 4} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reactions of MnPI and MnPII with p-cresol strictly obeyed second-order kinetics. The second-order rate constant for the reaction of MnPII with p-cresol is extremely low, (9.5{+-}0.5) m{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Kinetic analysis of the reaction of Mn{sup II} with MnPI and MnPII showed a binding interaction with the oxidized enzymes which led to saturation kinetics. The first-order dissociation rate constants for the reaction of Mn{sup II} with MnPI and MnPII are (0.7{+-}0.1) and (0.14{+-}0.01) s{sup {minus}1}, respectively, when the reaction is conducted in lactate buffer. Rate constants are considerably lower when the reactions are conducted in succinate buffer. Single turnover experiments confirmed that Mn{sup II} serves as an obligatory substrate for MnPII and that both oxidized forms of the enzyme form productive complexes with Mn{sup II}. Finally, these results suggest the {alpha}-hydroxy acids such as lactate facilitate the dissociation of Mn{sup II} from the enzyme.

  3. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-01

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2‧-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe2+ ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323 K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH‡ and entropy of activation ΔS‡) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction.

  4. Viscosity Dependence of Some Protein and Enzyme Reaction Rates: Seventy-Five Years after Kramers.

    PubMed

    Sashi, Pulikallu; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2015-07-28

    Kramers rate theory is a milestone in chemical reaction research, but concerns regarding the basic understanding of condensed phase reaction rates of large molecules in viscous milieu persist. Experimental studies of Kramers theory rely on scaling reaction rates with inverse solvent viscosity, which is often equated with the bulk friction coefficient based on simple hydrodynamic relations. Apart from the difficulty of abstraction of the prefactor details from experimental data, it is not clear why the linearity of rate versus inverse viscosity, k ∝ η(-1), deviates widely for many reactions studied. In most cases, the deviation simulates a power law k ∝ η(-n), where the exponent n assumes fractional values. In rate-viscosity studies presented here, results for two reactions, unfolding of cytochrome c and cysteine protease activity of human ribosomal protein S4, show an exceedingly overdamped rate over a wide viscosity range, registering n values up to 2.4. Although the origin of this extraordinary reaction friction is not known at present, the results indicate that the viscosity exponent need not be bound by the 0-1 limit as generally suggested. For the third reaction studied here, thermal dissociation of CO from nativelike cytochrome c, the rate-viscosity behavior can be explained using Grote-Hynes theory of time-dependent friction in conjunction with correlated motions intrinsic to the protein. Analysis of the glycerol viscosity-dependent rate for the CO dissociation reaction in the presence of urea as the second variable shows that the protein stabilizing effect of subdenaturing amounts of urea is not affected by the bulk viscosity. It appears that a myriad of factors as diverse as parameter uncertainty due to the difficulty of knowing the exact reaction friction and both mode and consequences of protein-solvent interaction work in a complex manner to convey as though Kramers rate equation is not absolute. PMID:26135219

  5. Estimation of the prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Benjamin P.L.; Lohrke, Britta; Wilkinson, Robert; Pitman, John P.; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Bock, Naomi; Lowrance, David W.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Mataranyika, Mary; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute transfusion reactions are probably common in sub-Saharan Africa, but transfusion reaction surveillance systems have not been widely established. In 2008, the Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia implemented a national acute transfusion reaction surveillance system, but substantial under-reporting was suspected. We estimated the actual prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia. Methods The percentage of transfusion events resulting in a reported acute transfusion reaction was calculated. Actual percentage and rates of acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units were estimated by reviewing patients’ records from six hospitals, which transfuse >99% of all blood in Windhoek. Patients’ records for 1,162 transfusion events occurring between 1st January – 31st December 2011 were randomly selected. Clinical and demographic information were abstracted and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network criteria were applied to categorize acute transfusion reactions1. Results From January 1 – December 31, 2011, there were 3,697 transfusion events (involving 10,338 blood units) in the selected hospitals. Eight (0.2%) acute transfusion reactions were reported to the surveillance system. Of the 1,162 transfusion events selected, medical records for 785 transfusion events were analysed, and 28 acute transfusion reactions were detected, of which only one had also been reported to the surveillance system. An estimated 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.3–4.4) of transfusion events in Windhoek resulted in an acute transfusion reaction, with an estimated rate of 11.5 (95% CI: 7.6–14.5) acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units. Conclusion The estimated actual rate of acute transfusion reactions is higher than the rate reported to the national haemovigilance system. Improved surveillance and interventions to reduce transfusion-related morbidity and mortality

  6. Temperature trends for reaction rates, hydrogen generation, and partitioning of iron during experimental serpentinization of olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Klein, Frieder; Robbins, Mark; Moskowitz, Bruce; Berquó, Thelma S.; Jöns, Niels; Bach, Wolfgang; Templeton, Alexis

    2016-05-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were conducted to examine how partitioning of Fe among solid reaction products and rates of H2 generation vary as a function of temperature during serpentinization of olivine. Individual experiments were conducted at temperatures ranging from 200 to 320 °C, with reaction times spanning a few days to over a year. The extent of reaction ranged from <1% to ∼23%. Inferred rates for serpentinization of olivine during the experiments were 50-80 times slower than older studies had reported but are consistent with more recent results, indicating that serpentinization may proceed more slowly than previously thought. Reaction products were dominated by chrysotile, brucite, and magnetite, with minor amounts of magnesite, dolomite, and iowaite. The chrysotile contained only small amounts of Fe (XFe = 0.03-0.05, with ∼25% present as ferric Fe in octahedral sites), and displayed little variation in composition with reaction temperature. Conversely, the Fe contents of brucite (XFe = 0.01-0.09) increased steadily with decreasing reaction temperature. Analysis of the reaction products indicated that the stoichiometry of the serpentinization reactions varied with temperature, but remained constant with increasing reaction progress at a given temperature. The observed distribution of Fe among the reaction products does not appear to be entirely consistent with existing equilibrium models of Fe partitioning during serpentinization, suggesting improved models that include kinetic factors or multiple reaction steps need to be developed. Rates of H2 generation increased steeply from 200 to 300 °C, but dropped off at higher temperatures. This trend in H2 generation rates is attributable to a combination of the overall rate of serpentinization reactions and increased partitioning of Fe into brucite rather than magnetite at lower temperatures. The results suggest that millimolal concentration of H2 could be attained in moderately hot hydrothermal

  7. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-01

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data. PMID:27258213

  8. Thermonuclear reaction rate of 18Ne(α ,p ) 21Na from Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, P.; Longland, R.; Iliadis, C.

    2014-12-01

    The 18Ne(α ,p ) 21Na reaction impacts the break-out from the hot CNO cycles to the r p process in type-I x-ray bursts. We present a revised thermonuclear reaction rate, which is based on the latest experimental data. The new rate is derived from Monte Carlo calculations, taking into account the uncertainties of all nuclear physics input quantities. In addition, we present the reaction rate uncertainty and probability density versus temperature. Our results are also consistent with estimates obtained using different indirect approaches.

  9. Evidence of reaction rate influencing cubic and hexagonal phase formation process in CdS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Kuldeep; Kalita, M. P. C.

    2016-05-01

    CdS nanocrystals are synthesized by co-precipitation method using 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as capping agent. Cubic, hexagonal and their mixture are obtained by varying the ME concentration. Lower (higher) ME concentration results in cubic (hexagonal) phase. The crystallite sizes are in the range 3-7 nm. Increase in ME concentration lead to lower reaction rate between Cd2+ and S2- of the precursors, and slower reaction rate is found to favor hexagonal phase formation over the cubic one in CdS nanocrystals. Role of reaction rate in the phase formation process provides a way to synthesize CdS nanocrystals in desired crystal phase.

  10. Rate of recombination of oxygen atoms and CO at temperatures below ambient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inn, E. C. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The measurements reported were conducted with 30.0 torr CO, 40.0 torr argon, and varying amounts of carbon dioxide from about 20 to 230 torr. Measurements were made at 277, 272, 263, and 257 K. The pseudo-first-order decay rate as a function of carbon dioxide pressure is shown in a graph. An Arrhenius plot for the rate constants obtained from the measurements is also presented. A value for the activation energy was determined on the basis of a linear least-squares fit to the data.

  11. Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in type Ia supernovae: Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Eduardo; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2012-05-01

    Background: Type Ia supernovae contribute significantly to the nucleosynthesis of many Fe-group and intermediate-mass elements. However, the robustness of nucleosynthesis obtained via models of this class of explosions has not been studied in depth until now.Purpose: We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis resulting from thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We put particular emphasis on indentifying the individual reactions rates that most strongly affect the isotopic products of these supernovae.Method: We have adopted a standard one-dimensional delayed detonation model of the explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf and have postprocessed the thermodynamic trajectories of every mass shell with a nucleosynthetic code to obtain the chemical composition of the ejected matter. We have considered increases (decreases) by a factor of 10 on the rates of 1196 nuclear reactions (simultaneously with their inverse reactions), repeating the nucleosynthesis calculations after modification of each reaction rate pair. We have computed as well hydrodynamic models for different rates of the fusion reactions of 12C and of 16O. From the calculations we have selected the reactions that have the largest impact on the supernova yields, and we have computed again the nucleosynthesis using two or three alternative prescriptions for their rates, taken from the JINA REACLIB database. For the three reactions with the largest sensitivity we have analyzed as well the temperature ranges where a modification of their rates has the strongest effect on nucleosynthesis.Results: The nucleosynthesis resulting from the type Ia supernova models is quite robust with respect to variations of nuclear reaction rates, with the exception of the reaction of fusion of two 12C nuclei. The energy of the explosion changes by less than ˜4% when the rates of the reactions 12C+12C or 16O+16O are multiplied by a factor of ×10 or

  12. ACTIVE: a program to calculate and plot reaction rates from ANISN calculated fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    The ACTIVE code calculates spatial heating rates, tritium production rates, neutron reaction rates, and energy spectra from particle fluxes calculated by ANISN. ACTIVE has a variety of input options including the capability to plot all calculated spatial distributions. The code was primarily designed for use with fusion first wall/blanket systems, but could be applied to any one-dimensional problem.

  13. Rate constants measured for hydrated electron reactions with peptides and proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braams, R.

    1968-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation on the amino acids of proteins and the reactivity of the protonated amino group depends upon the pK subscript a of the group. Estimates of the rate constants for reactions involving the amino acid side chains are presented. These rate constants gave an approximate rate constant for three different protein molecules.

  14. Astrophysical S-Factors and Reaction Rates of Threshold (p, n)-Reactions on {sup 99-102}Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Skakun, Ye.; Rauscher, T.

    2010-08-12

    Astrophysical S-factors of (p, n) reactions on {sup 99}Ru, {sup 100}Ru, {sup 101}Ru, and {sup 102}Ru were derived from the sum of experimental isomeric and ground states cross sections measured in the incident proton energy range of 5-9 MeV. They were compared with Hauser-Feshbach statistical model predictions of the NON-SMOKER code. Good agreement was found in the majority of cases. Reaction rates were derived up to 8.7 GK stellar temperature by combining experiment and theory.

  15. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reaction flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnotti, F.; Diskin, G.; Matulaitis, J.; Chinitz, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of silane (SiH4) as an effective ignitor and flame stabilizing pilot fuel is well documented. A reliable chemical kinetic mechanism for prediction of its behavior at the conditions encountered in the combustor of a SCRAMJET engine was calculated. The effects of hydrogen addition on hydrocarbon ignition and flame stabilization as a means for reduction of lengthy ignition delays and reaction times were studied. The ranges of applicability of chemical kinetic models of hydrogen-air combustors were also investigated. The CHARNAL computer code was applied to the turbulent reaction rate modeling.

  16. Comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reaction flows

    SciTech Connect

    Magnotti, F.; Diskin, G.; Matulaitis, J.; Chinitz, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of silane (SiH4) as an effective ignitor and flame stabilizing pilot fuel is well documented. A reliable chemical kinetic mechanism for prediction of its behavior at the conditions encountered in the combustor of a SCRAMJET engine was calculated. The effects of hydrogen addition on hydrocarbon ignition and flame stabilization as a means for reduction of lengthy ignition delays and reaction times were studied. The ranges of applicability of chemical kinetic models of hydrogen-air combustors were also investigated. The CHARNAL computer code was applied to the turbulent reaction rate modeling.

  17. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, J.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    2016-04-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of B (E 1 ) distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to 11Li (9Li+n +n ) and 6He (4He+n +n ) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  18. Anticipatory Heart Rate Deceleration and Reaction Time in Children with and without Referral for Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroufe, L. Alan; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The finding of major significance in this study concerns the effect of stimulant drug medication on the relationship between heart rate deceleration and reaction time with the clinic children. (Authors)

  19. Nonequilibrium Contribution to the Rate of Reaction. III. Isothermal Multicomponent Systems

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Shizgal, B.; Karplus, M.

    1970-10-01

    The nonequilibrium contribution to the reaction rate of an isothermal multicomponent system is obtained by solution of the appropriate Chapman-Enskog equation; the system is composed of reactive species in contact with a heat bath of inert atoms M.

  20. Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2003-04-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus (vessel) for providing a heat transfer rate from a reaction chamber through a wall to a heat transfer chamber substantially matching a local heat transfer rate of a catalytic thermal chemical reaction. The key to the invention is a thermal distance defined on a cross sectional plane through the vessel inclusive of a heat transfer chamber, reaction chamber and a wall between the chambers. The cross sectional plane is perpendicular to a bulk flow direction of the reactant stream, and the thermal distance is a distance between a coolest position and a hottest position on the cross sectional plane. The thermal distance is of a length wherein the heat transfer rate from the reaction chamber to the heat transfer chamber substantially matches the local heat transfer rate.

  1. Reaction mechanisms and rate constants of waste degradation in landfill bioreactor systems with enzymatic-enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, P A; Hettiaratchi, J P A; Mehrotra, A K; Kumar, S

    2014-06-01

    Augmenting leachate before recirculation with peroxidase enzymes is a novel method to increase the available carbon, and therefore the food supply to microorganisms at the declining phase of the anaerobic landfill bioreactor operation. In order to optimize the enzyme-catalyzed leachate recirculation process, it is necessary to identify the reaction mechanisms and determine rate constants. This paper presents a kinetic model developed to ascertain the reaction mechanisms and determine the rate constants for enzyme catalyzed anaerobic waste degradation. The maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) for MnP enzyme-catalyzed reactors was 0.076 g(TOC)/g(DS).day. The catalytic turnover number (k(cat)) of the MnP enzyme-catalyzed was 506.7 per day while the rate constant (k) of the un-catalyzed reaction was 0.012 per day. PMID:24759644

  2. Controlling the rates of biochemical reactions and signaling networks by shape and volume changes.

    PubMed

    Lizana, L; Bauer, B; Orwar, O

    2008-03-18

    In biological systems, chemical activity takes place in micrometer- and nanometer-sized compartments that constantly change in shape and volume. These ever-changing cellular compartments embed chemical reactions, and we demonstrate that the rates of such incorporated reactions are directly affected by the ongoing shape reconfigurations. First, we show that the rate of product formation in an enzymatic reaction can be regulated by simple volume contraction-dilation transitions. The results suggest that mitochondria may regulate the dynamics of interior reaction pathways (e.g., the Krebs cycle) by volume changes. We then show the effect of shape changes on reactions occurring in more complex and structured systems by using biomimetic networks composed of micrometer-sized compartments joined together by nanotubes. Chemical activity was measured by implementing an enzymatic reaction-diffusion system. During ongoing reactions, the network connectivity is changed suddenly (similar to the dynamic tube formations found inside Golgi stacks, for example), and the effect on the reaction is registered. We show that spatiotemporal properties of the reaction-diffusion system are extremely sensitive to sudden changes in network topology and that chemical reactions can be initiated, or boosted, in certain nodes as a function of connectivity. PMID:18337513

  3. Shell and explosive hydrogen burning. Nuclear reaction rates for hydrogen burning in RGB, AGB and Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeltzig, A.; Bruno, C. G.; Cavanna, F.; Cristallo, S.; Davinson, T.; Depalo, R.; deBoer, R. J.; Di Leva, A.; Ferraro, F.; Imbriani, G.; Marigo, P.; Terrasi, F.; Wiescher, M.

    2016-04-01

    The nucleosynthesis of light elements, from helium up to silicon, mainly occurs in Red Giant and Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Novae. The relative abundances of the synthesized nuclides critically depend on the rates of the nuclear processes involved, often through non-trivial reaction chains, combined with complex mixing mechanisms. In this paper, we summarize the contributions made by LUNA experiments in furthering our understanding of nuclear reaction rates necessary for modeling nucleosynthesis in AGB stars and Novae explosions.

  4. A Unified Equation for the Reaction Rate in Dense Matter Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gasques, L. R.; Wiescher, M.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2007-10-26

    We analyze thermonuclear and pycnonuclear reaction rates in multi-component dense stellar plasma. First we describe calculations of the astrophysical S-factor at low energies using the Sao Paulo potential on the basis of the barrier penetration model. Then we present a simple phenomenological expression for a reaction rate. The expression contains several fit parameters which we adjust to reproduce the best microscopic calculations available in the literature.

  5. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindquist, W Brent

    2009-03-03

    The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

  6. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  7. Thick target measurement of the 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, S A; Burke, J T; Scielzo, N D; Phair, L; Bleuel, D; Norman, E B; Grant, P G; Hurst, A M; Tumey, S; Brown, T A; Stoyer, M

    2009-02-06

    The thick-target yield for the {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction has been measured for E{sub beam} = 4.13, 4.54, and 5.36 MeV using both an activation measurement and online {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The results of the two measurements agree. From the measured yield a reaction rate is deduced that is smaller than statistical model calculations. This implies a smaller {sup 44}Ti production in supernova compared to recently measured {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction rates.

  8. Rate coefficients from quantum and quasi-classical cumulative reaction probabilities for the S(1D) + H2 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambrina, P. G.; Lara, Manuel; Menéndez, M.; Launay, J.-M.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2012-10-01

    Cumulative reaction probabilities (CRPs) at various total angular momenta have been calculated for the barrierless reaction S(1D) + H2 → SH + H at total energies up to 1.2 eV using three different theoretical approaches: time-independent quantum mechanics (QM), quasiclassical trajectories (QCT), and statistical quasiclassical trajectories (SQCT). The calculations have been carried out on the widely used potential energy surface (PES) by Ho et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 4124 (2002), 10.1063/1.1431280] as well as on the recent PES developed by Song et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 9213 (2009), 10.1021/jp903790h]. The results show that the differences between these two PES are relatively minor and mostly related to the different topologies of the well. In addition, the agreement between the three theoretical methodologies is good, even for the highest total angular momenta and energies. In particular, the good accordance between the CRPs obtained with dynamical methods (QM and QCT) and the statistical model (SQCT) indicates that the reaction can be considered statistical in the whole range of energies in contrast with the findings for other prototypical barrierless reactions. In addition, total CRPs and rate coefficients in the range of 20-1000 K have been calculated using the QCT and SQCT methods and have been found somewhat smaller than the experimental total removal rates of S(1D).

  9. High-precision (p,t) reaction to determine {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Matic, A.; Berg, A. M. van den; Harakeh, M. N.; Woertche, H. J.; Berg, G. P. A.; Couder, M.; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Since the identification of ongoing {sup 26}Al production in the universe, the reaction sequence {sup 24}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 25}Al({beta}{sup +{nu}}){sup 25}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Al has been studied intensively. At temperatures where the radiative capture on {sup 25}Al (t{sub 1/2}=7.2 s) becomes faster than the {beta}{sup +} decay, the production of {sup 26}Al can be reduced due to the depletion of {sup 25}Al. To determine the resonances relevant for the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si bypass reaction, we measured the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction with high-energy precision using the Grand Raiden spectrometer at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Several new energy levels were found above the p threshold and for known states excitation energies were determined with smaller uncertainties. The calculated stellar rates of the bypass reaction agree well with previous results, suggesting that these rates are well established.

  10. Rate constants of reactions of bromine with phenols in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Gallard, Hervé; Pellizzari, Fabien; Croué, Jean Philippe; Legube, B

    2003-07-01

    The kinetics of bromination of six ortho- and para-substituted phenols was investigated between pH 5 and pH 12 in aqueous solution. Kinetics was followed with a continuous-flow reactor previously validated by studying the fast reaction between chlorine and ammonia. The overall reaction rate between bromine and phenols is controlled by the reaction of HOBr with the phenoxide ion between pH 6 and pH 10. The reaction of HOBr with the undissociated phenols and the reaction of BrO(-) with the phenoxide ions become only significant for pH<6 and pH>10, respectively. The second-order rate constants for the reaction of HOBr with phenoxide ions vary between 1.4(+/-0.1)x10(3) and 2.1(+/-0.5)x10(8)M(-1)s(-1) for 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and 4-methylphenol, respectively. Hammett-type correlation was obtained for the reaction of HOBr with the phenoxide ions (log(k)=8.0-3.33 x Sigmasigma) and was compared with Hammett-type correlations of HOCl and HOI. The reaction rate of bromine with phenol-like organic compounds was estimated to be about 10(3)-fold higher than with chlorine and 10(3)-fold lower than with ozone in drinking water treatment conditions. PMID:12767291

  11. Recent Augmentations of the Functionality of the Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Calculator (TReRaC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Kyle; Smith, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The chemical variety of our universe can be explained by stellar nucleosynthesis. Many thermonuclear reactions are studied by reproducing them in accelerator experiments and determining their rates. Using the codes available through the Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics (CINA), researchers can process the results of these experiments. One such program is the Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Calculator (TReRaC), which uses various experimental inputs including resonant energies, strengths, channel widths, and information on non-resonant contributions to calculate reaction rates. Presently, TReRaC is capable of quickly generating accurate rates which closely match those given in a number of publications. This adds to CINA capabilities by enabling a wider variety of nuclear information to generate rates. The next step in TReRaC's evolution is integration into the existing CINA complex so that it can be used by researchers worldwide.

  12. Pore-Scale Process Coupling and Effective Surface Reaction Rates in Heterogeneous Subsurface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript provides a review of pore-scale researches in literature including experimental and numerical approaches, and scale-dependent behavior of geochemical and biogeochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media. A mathematical equation that can be used to predict the scale-dependent behavior of geochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media has been derived. The derived effective rate expression explicitly links the effective reaction rate constant to the intrinsic rate constant, and to the pore-scale variations in reactant concentrations in porous media. Molecular simulations to calculate the intrinsic rate constants were provided. A few examples of pore-scale simulations were used to demonstrate the application of the equation to calculate effective rate constants in heterogeneous materials. The results indicate that the deviation of effective rate constant from the intrinsic rate in heterogeneous porous media is caused by the pore-scale distributions of reactants and their correlation, which are affected by the pore-scale coupling of reactions and transport.

  13. Reaction Rates of Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds with the Hydroxyl Radical.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Philip Neal

    1995-01-01

    The atmosphere is the primary route of global dispersion of many semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs), including polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins, and dibenzofurans. While the long-distance atmospheric transport of these compounds has been well established, the importance of chemical reactions that may occur while SOCs are in the atmosphere is largely unknown. For most semi-volatile organic compounds in the vapor phase, the most significant atmospheric reaction is likely to be attack by the hydroxyl radical (OH). The importance of this removal pathway, relative to other loss mechanisms from the atmosphere, is dependent on the reaction rate of a given semi-volatile organic compound with OH. A system was constructed and validated to measure the reaction rate of OH with semi-volatile organic compounds in the laboratory. The system featured a small, heated, quartz chamber with on-line detection of reactants by mass spectrometry. OH radicals were generated by the 254 nm photolysis of O _3 in the presence of H_2 O. The temperature dependent reaction rates of OH with 15 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), containing 0-5 chlorines, were measured. Calculated atmospheric lifetimes of PCBs due to OH-initiated reactions ranged from 2 days for biphenyl to 34 days for a pentachlorobiphenyl. Using an average of reaction rates extrapolated to atmospheric temperatures, the lifetime in the atmosphere for total PCBs due to OH reaction was calculated. A model for the vertical concentration gradient of PCBs in the troposphere was developed and used to calculate the flux (16 mug m^{-2} yr^{-1}) and total global flow (8,300 tonnes yr^{-1}) of PCBs removed from the atmosphere by OH-PCB reaction. This pathway is very large in comparison to any other known permanent PCB loss processes from the environment, such as deep ocean sediment burial (240 tonnes yr^ {-1}). The reaction of PCBs with OH may be the dominant removal mechanism of PCBs from the natural environment.

  14. STARLIB: A Next-generation Reaction-rate Library for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaska, A. L.; Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E.; Goriely, S.; Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X.

    2013-07-01

    STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, γ), (p, α), (α, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

  15. Reaction rate and composition dependence of the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Cyburt, R. H.; Heger, A.

    2014-06-01

    The stability of thermonuclear burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate. The burning behavior is observed to change from Type I X-ray bursts to stable burning, with oscillatory burning occurring at the transition. Simulations predict the transition at a 10 times higher mass accretion rate than observed. Using numerical models we investigate how the transition depends on the hydrogen, helium, and CNO mass fractions of the accreted material, as well as on the nuclear reaction rates of 3α and the hot-CNO breakout reactions {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne and {sup 18}Ne(α, p){sup 21}Na. For a lower hydrogen content the transition is at higher accretion rates. Furthermore, most experimentally allowed reaction rate variations change the transition accretion rate by at most 10%. A factor 10 decrease of the {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne rate, however, produces an increase of the transition accretion rate of 35%. None of our models reproduce the transition at the observed rate, and depending on the true {sup 15}O(α, γ){sup 19}Ne reaction rate, the actual discrepancy may be substantially larger. We find that the width of the interval of accretion rates with marginally stable burning depends strongly on both composition and reaction rates. Furthermore, close to the stability transition, our models predict that X-ray bursts have extended tails where freshly accreted fuel prolongs nuclear burning.

  16. Temperature-dependent reaction-rate expression for oxygen recombination at Shuttle entry conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Simmonds, A. L.; Gupta, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    A temperature-dependent oxygen surface reaction-rate coefficient has been determined from experimental STS-2 heating and wall temperature data at altitudes of 77.91 km, 74.98 km, and 71.29 km. The coefficient is presented in an Arrhenius form and is shown to be less temperature dependent than previous results. Finite-rate viscous-shock-layer heating rates based on this present expression have been compared with predicted heating rates using the previous rate coefficients and with experimental heating data obtained over an extensive range of STS-2 and STS-3 entry conditions. A substantial improvement is obtained in comparison of experimental data and predicted heating rates using the present oxygen reaction-rate expression.

  17. Estimation of the reaction rate constant of HOCl by SMILES observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuribayashi, Kouta; Kasai, Yasuko; Sato, Tomohiro; Sagawa, Hideo

    2012-07-01

    Hypochlorous acid, HOCl plays an important role to link the odd ClOx and the odd HOx in the atmospheric chemistry with the reaction: {ClO} + {HO_{2}} \\longrightarrow {HOCl} + {O_{2}} Quantitative understanding of the rate constant of the reaction (1.1) is essential for understanding the ozone loss in the mid-latitude region because of a view point of its rate controlling role in the ozone depletion chemistry. Reassessment of the reaction rate constant was pointed out from MIPAS/Envisat observations (von Clarmann et al., 2011) and balloon-borne observations (Kovalenko et al., 2007). Several laboratory studies had been reported, although the reaction rate constants have large uncertainties, as k{_{HOCl}} = (1.75 ± 0.52) × 10^{-12} exp[(368 ± 78)/T] (Hickson et al., 2007), and large discrepancies (Hickson et al., 2007;Stimpfle et al., 1979). Moreover, theoretical ab initio studies pointed out the pressure dependence of the reaction (1.1) (Xu et al., 2003). A new high-sensitive remote sensing technology named Superconducting SubMillimeter-wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on the International Space Station (ISS) had observed diurnal variations of HOCl in the upper stratosphere/lower mesosphere (US/LM) region for the first time. ClO and HO_{2} were slso observed simultaneously with HOCl. SMILES performed the observations between 12^{{th}} October 2009 and 21^{{th}} April 2010. The latitude coverage of SMILES observation is normally 38°S-65°N. The altitude region of HOCl observation is about 28-70 km. We estimated the time period in which the reaction (1.1) becomes dominant in the ClO_{y} diurnal chemistry in US/LM. The reaction rate constant was directly estimated by decay of [ClO] and [HO_{2}] amounts in that period. The derived reaction rate constant represented well the increase of [HOCl] amount.

  18. [Incidence rate of adverse reaction/event by Qingkailing injection: a Meta-analysis of single rate].

    PubMed

    Ai, Chun-ling; Xie, Yan-ming; Li, Ming-quan; Wang, Lian-xin; Liao, Xing

    2015-12-01

    To systematically review the incidence rate of adverse drug reaction/event by Qingkailing injection. Such databases as the PubMed, EMbase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, VIP WanFang data and CBM were searched by computer from foundation to July 30, 2015. Two reviewers independently screened literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted data and cross check data. Then, Meta-analysis was performed by using the R 3.2.0 software, subgroup sensitivity analysis was performed based on age, mode of medicine, observation time and research quality. Sixty-three studies involving 9,793 patients with Qingkailing injection were included, 367 cases of adverse reactions/events were reported in total. The incidence rate of adverse reaction in skin and mucosa group was 2% [95% CI (0.02; 0.03)]; the digestive system adverse reaction was 6% [95% CI(0.05; 0.07); the injection site adverse reaction was 4% [95% CI (0.02; 0.07)]. In the digestive system as the main types of adverse reactions/events, incidence of children and adults were 4.6% [0.021 1; 0.097 7] and 6.9% [0.053 5; 0.089 8], respectively. Adverse reactions to skin and mucous membrane damage as the main performance/event type, the observation time > 7 days and ≤ 7 days incidence of 3% [0.012 9; 0.068 3] and 1.9% [0.007 8; 0.046 1], respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that different types of adverse reactions, combination in the incidence of adverse reactions/events were higher than that of single drug, the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). This study suggested the influence factors of adverse reactions occur, and clinical rational drug use, such as combination, age and other fators, and the influence factors vary in different populations. Therefore, clinical doctors for children and the elderly use special care was required for a clear and open spirit injection, the implementation of individualized medication. PMID:27245021

  19. REACLIB: A Reaction Rate Library for the Era of Collaborative Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Zachary

    2008-10-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates and weak decay rates are of great importance to modern nuclear astrophysics. They are critical in the study of many topics such as Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, X-ray bursts, Supernovae, and S-process element formation, among others. The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) has been created to increase connectivity amongst nuclear astrophysicists in our modern age of highly collaborative science. Within JINA there has been an effort to create a frequently updated and readily accessible database of thermonuclear reactions and weak decay rates. This database is the REACLIB library, which can be accessed at the web address: http://www.nscl.msu.edu/˜nero/db/. Here I will discuss the JINA REACLIB Project, including a new procedure to fit reaction rates as a function of temperature that takes full advantage of physicality. With these updated reaction rates, astrophysical modelers will no longer have to worry about the adverse effects of using obsolete reaction rate libraries lacking physical behavior.

  20. Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Wang, Yong; Wegeng, Robert S.; Gao, Yufei

    2003-09-09

    Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

  1. EFFECTS OF RING STRAIN ON GAS-PHASE RATE CONSTANTS. 2. OH RADICAL REACTIONS WITH CYCLOALKENES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relative rate constants for the gas phase reactions of OH radicals with a series of cycloalkenes have been determined at 298 + or - 2 K, using methyl nitrite photolysis in air as a source of OH radicals. The data show that the rate constants for the nonconjugated cycloalkenes stu...

  2. Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Wang, Yong; Wegeng, Robert S.; Gao, Yufei

    2006-05-16

    Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

  3. Field measurement of slow metamorphic reaction rates at temperatures of 500 degrees to 600 degrees C

    PubMed

    Baxter; DePaolo

    2000-05-26

    High-temperature metamorphic reaction rates were measured using strontium isotopic ratios of garnet and whole rock from a field site near Simplon Pass, Switzerland. For metamorphic conditions of cooling from 612 degrees +/- 17 degrees C to 505 degrees +/- 15 degrees C at pressures up to 9.1 kilobars, the inferred bulk fluid-rock exchange rate is 1.3(-0.4)(+1.1) x 10(-7) grams of solid reacted per gram of solid per year, several orders of magnitude lower than laboratory-based estimates. The inferred reaction rate suggests that mineral chemistry may lag the evolving conditions in Earth's crust during mountain building. PMID:10827949

  4. Venus volcanism: Rate estimates from laboratory studies of sulfur gas-solid reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.; Prinn, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    Thermochemical reactions between sulfur-bearing gases in the atmosphere of Venus and calcium-, iron-, magnesium-, and sulfur-bearing minerals on the surface of Venus are an integral part of a hypothesized cycle of thermochemical and photochemical reactions responsible for the maintenance of the global sulfuric acid cloud cover on Venus. SO2 is continually removed from the Venus atmosphere by reaction with calcium bearing minerals on the planet's surface. The rate of volcanism required to balance SO2 depletion by reactions with calcium bearing minerals on the Venus surface can therefore be deduced from a knowledge of the relevant gas-solid reaction rates combined with reasonable assumptions about the sulfur content of the erupted material (gas + magma). A laboratory program was carried out to measure the rates of reaction between SO2 and possible crustal minerals on Venus. The reaction of CaCO3(calcite) + SO2 yields CaSO4 (anhydrite) + CO was studied. Brief results are given.

  5. Rate Coefficient Measurements of the Reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. M.; Ryu, Si-Ok; DeWitt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O were measured behind reflected shock waves in a series of lean CH4-O2-Ar mixtures using hydroxyl and methyl radical diagnostics. The rate coefficients are well represented by an Arrhenius expression given as k = (1.60(sup +0.67, sub -0.47 ) x 10(exp 13) e(-15813 +/- 587 K/T)/cubic cm.mol.s. This expression, which is valid in the temperature range 1575-1822 K, supports the downward trend in the rate coefficients that has been reported in recent determinations. All measurements to date, including the present study, have been to some extent affected by secondary reactions. The complications due to secondary reactions, choice of thermochemical data, and shock-boundary layer interactions that affect the determination of the rate coefficients are examined.

  6. Rate Coefficient Measurements of the Reaction CH3+O2+CH3O+O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. M.; Ryu, Si-Ok; DeWitt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O were measured behind reflected shock waves in a series of lean CH4-O2-Ar mixtures using hydroxyl and methyl radical diagnostics. The rate coefficients are well represented by an Arrhenius expression given as k = (1.60(sup +0.67, -0.47)) X 10(exp 13) exp(- 15813 +/- 587 K/T)cc/mol s. This expression, which is valid in the temperature range 1575-1822 K, supports the downward trend in the rate coefficients that has been reported in recent determinations. All measurements to date, including the present study, have been to some extent affected by secondary reactions. The complications due to secondary reactions, choice of thermochemical data, and shock-boundary layer interactions that affect the determination of the rate coefficients are examined.

  7. Rate Constant Change of Photo Reaction of Bacteriorhodopsin Observed in Trimeric Molecular System.

    PubMed

    Tsujiuchi, Yutaka; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Goto, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the time evolution of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin in glycerol mixed purple membrane at around 196 K under irradiation by red light, a kinetic model was constructed. The change of absorption with irradiation at times of 560 nm and 412 nm was analyzed for the purpose of determining reaction rates of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin and its product M intermediate. In this study it is shown that reaction rates of conversion from bacteriorhodopsin to the M intermediate can be explained by a set of linear differential equations. This model analysis concludes that bacteriorhodopsin in which constitutes a trimer unit with other two bacteriorhodopsin molecules changes into M intermediates in the 1.73 of reaction rate, in the initial step, and according to the number of M intermediate in a trimer unit, from three to one, the reaction rate of bacteriorhodopsin into M intermediates smaller as 1.73, 0.80, 0.19 which caused by influence of inter-molecular interaction between bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:27451646

  8. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  9. Ultrasound promoted reaction of Rhodamine B with sodium hypochlorite using sonochemical and dental ultrasonic instruments.

    PubMed

    Tiong, T Joyce; Price, Gareth J

    2012-03-01

    The sonochemical acceleration of bleaching of Rhodamine B by sodium hypochlorite has been studied using ultrasound intensities in the range 0-7 W cm(-2). Using a 20 kHz ultrasonic horn, it was shown that ultrasound could significantly shorten the treatment time and/or the concentration of hypochlorite required for the reaction. A number of intermediate species formed during the reaction have been identified. It was demonstrated that the same sonochemical reactions occur during the use of dental ultrasound instruments of the type used in endodontics where hypochlorite solutions act as disinfectants. Results showed pseudo-first order degradation kinetics for the degradation of Rhodamine B for both types of source. Both the distribution of cavitation and the resulting bleaching reactions were dependent on the design of the tips. The bleaching reaction can therefore be used to characterise the behaviour of dental instruments and aid in the optimisation of their performance. PMID:21868274

  10. Unbound states of (32)Cl andthe (31)S(p,gamma)(32)Cl reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, M.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Linhardt, Laura; Bardayan, Daniel W; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Clark, Jason; Diebel, C.; O'Malley, Patrick; Parker, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The {sup 31}S(p,{gamma}){sup 32}Cl reaction is expected to provide the dominant break-out path from the SiP cycle in novae and is important for understanding enrichments of sulfur observed in some nova ejecta. We studied the {sup 32}S(3He,t){sup 32}Cl charge-exchange reaction to determine properties of proton-unbound levels in {sup 32}Cl that have previously contributed significant uncertainties to the {sup 31}S(p,{gamma}){sup 32}Cl reaction rate. Measured triton magnetic rigidities were used to determine excitation energies in {sup 32}Cl. Proton-branching ratios were obtained by detecting decay protons from unbound {sup 32}Cl states in coincidence with tritons. An improved {sup 31}S(p,{gamma}){sup 32}Cl reaction rate was calculated including robust statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  11. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule–Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide‐and‐conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction‐type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre‐exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude). PMID:27008460

  12. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule-Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-04-18

    The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide-and-conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction-type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre-exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude). PMID:27008460

  13. Reaction kinetics and oxidation product formation in the degradation of acetaminophen by ferrate (VI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Yibing; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the degradation of acetaminophen (AAP) in aqueous solutions by ferrate (VI), aiming to propose the kinetics, pathways and the oxidation products' formation in the AAP degradation. A series of jar tests were undertaken over ferrate (VI) dosages (molar ratios of ferrate (VI):AAP, 5:1 to 25:1) and pH values (4-11). The effects of co-existing ions (0.2-5 mM) and humic acid (10-50 mg l(-1)) on the AAP removal were investigated. Ferrate (VI) can remove 99.6% AAP (from 1000 μg l(-1)) in 60 min under study conditions when majority of the AAP reduction occurred in the first 5 min. The treatment performance depended on the ferrate(VI) dosage, pH and the type and strength of co-existing ions and humic acid. Raising ferrate (VI) dosage with optimal pH 7 improved the AAP degradation. In the presence of humic acid, the AAP degradation by ferrate (VI) was promoted in a short period (<30 min) but then inhibited with increasing in humic acid contents. The presence of Al(3+), CO3(2-) and PO4(3-) ions declined but the existence of K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions can improve the AAP removal. The catalytic function of Al(3+) on the decomposition of ferrate (VI) in aqueous solution was found. The kinetics of the reaction between ferrate (VI) and AAP was pseudo first-order for ferrete (VI) and pseudo second-order for AAP. The pseudo rate constant of ferrate (VI) with AAP was 1.4 × 10(-5) L(2) mg(-2) min(-1). Three oxidation products (OPs) were identified and the AAP degradation pathways were proposed. PMID:27155474

  14. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  15. Exploiting time-resolved magnetic field effects for determining radical ion reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessmertnykh, A. O.; Borovkov, V. I.; Bagryansky, V. A.; Molin, Yu N.

    2016-07-01

    The capabilities of the method of time-resolved magnetic field effect in determining the rates of charge transfer reactions between radical ions and molecules on a nanosecond time scale have been investigated. The approach relies on the electron spin coherence in radical pair's partners generated by ionizing radiation. The spin evolution of the pair is sensitive to the reaction since the latter results in changing magnetic interactions of the unpaired electron. This process can be monitored by magnetic-field-sensitive fluorescence from an irradiated sample that is illustrated using reactions involving alkane radical cations. The accuracy and limitations of the approach are discussed.

  16. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of ground state atomic oxygen with dimethyl sulfide and episulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Timmons, R. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    It is pointed out that the investigated reaction of oxygen with dimethyl sulfide may play an important role in photochemical smog formation and in the chemical evolution of dense interstellar clouds. Kinetic data were obtained with the aid of the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence method. The photodecomposition of molecular oxygen provided the oxygen atoms for the experiments. The decay of atomic oxygen was studied on the basis of resonance fluorescence observations. Both reactions investigated were found to be fast processes. A negative temperature dependence of the rate constants for reactions with dimethyl sulfide was observed.

  17. Rate constants for chemical reactions in high-temperature nonequilibrium air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the nonequilibrium atmospheric chemistry regime that will be encountered by the proposed Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle in the upper atmosphere, where air density is too low for thermal and chemical equilibrium to be maintained, the detailed high temperature air chemistry plays a critical role in defining radiative and convective heating loads. Although vibrational and electronic temperatures remain low (less than 15,000 K), rotational and translational temperatures may reach 50,000 K. Attention is presently given to the effects of multiple temperatures on the magnitudes of various chemical reaction rate constants, for the cases of both bimolecular exchange reactions and collisional excitation and dissociation reactions.

  18. Considerations Based on Reaction Rate on Char Gasification Behavior in Two-stage Gasifier for Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Miki; Nishiyama, Akio; Sasauchi, Kenichi; Ito, Yusuke; Akamatsu, Fumiteru

    In order to develop a small-scale gasifier in which biomass can be converted to energy with high efficiency, we planned a gasification process that consists of two parts: pyrolysis part (rotary kiln) and gasification part (downdraft gasifier). We performed fundamental experiments on gasification part and discussed the appropriate conditions such as air supply location, air ratio, air temperature and hearth load. We considered the results by calculating reaction rates of representative reactions on char gasification part and found that water gas reaction is dominant in the reduction area and its behavior gives important information to decide the adequate length of the char layer.

  19. Reaction Rates for the Formation of Deuterium Tritide from Deuterium and Tritium

    SciTech Connect

    McConville, G. T.; Menke, D. A.; Ellefson, R. E.

    1985-04-01

    The rates of formation of DT in a mixture of D2 and T2 have been measured as a function of initial T2 concentration, pressure, temperature,and methane concentration in a stainless steel reaction container which had been treated to inhibit protium ingrowth. An attempt has been made to explain the experimental resuts on the basis of ion-molecule chain reactions. Some of the observations are consistent with a gas-phase ion, ground-state molecule reaction, but some of the more interesting observations require more complicated models. The addition of excited state molecules or heterogeneous catalytic effects are possibilities that will need further experiments for confirmation.

  20. Matching of experimental and statistical-model thermonuclear reaction rates at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Joseph; Longland, Richard; Iliadis, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Reliable reaction rates at high stellar temperatures are necessary for the study of advanced stellar burning stages, supernovae and x-ray bursts. We suggest a new procedure for extrapolating experimental thermonuclear reaction rates to these higher temperatures (T > 1 GK) using statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) results. Current, generally accepted, procedures involve the use of the Gamow peak, which has been shown to be unreliable for narrow resonances at high stellar temperatures [1]. Our new approach defines the effective thermonuclear energy range (ETER) by using the 8^th, 50^th and 92^nd percentiles of the cumulative distribution of fractional resonant reaction contributions. The ETER is then used to define a reliable temperature for matching experimental rates to Hauser-Feshbach rates. The resulting matching temperature is often well above the previous result using the Gamow peak concept. Our new method should provide more accurate extrapolated rates since Hauser-Feshbach rates are more reliable at higher temperatures. These ideas are applied to 21 (p,γ), (p,α) and (α,γ) reactions on a range of A = 20-40 target nuclei and results will be presented. [0pt] [1] J. R. Newton, C. Iliadis, A. E. Champagne, A. Coc, Y. Parpottas and R. Ugalde, Phys. Rev. C 75, 045801 (2007).

  1. Determination of the rate constant of hydroperoxyl radical reaction with phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozmér, Zsuzsanna; Arany, Eszter; Alapi, Tünde; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László; Dombi, András

    2014-09-01

    The rate constant of HO2rad reaction with phenol (kHO2rad +phenol) was investigated. The primary radical set produced in water γ radiolysis (rad OH, eaq- and Hrad ) was transformed to HO2rad /O2rad - by using dissolved oxygen and formate anion (in the form of either formic acid or sodium formate). The concentration ratio of HO2rad /O2rad - was affected by the pH value of the solution: under acidic conditions (using HCOOH) almost all radicals were converted to HO2rad , while under alkaline conditions (using HCOONa) to O2rad -. The degradation rate of phenol was significantly higher using HCOOH. From the ratio of reaction rates under the two reaction conditions kHO2rad +phenol was estimated to be (2.7±1.2)×103 L mol-1 s-1.

  2. The 25Al(p,g)26Si Reaction Rate in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, Dan; Blackmon, J. C.; Hix, W. R.; Liang, J. F.; Smith, M. S.; Howard, J. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Brune, C. R.; Chae, K. Y.; Lingerfelt, E. J.; Scott, J. P.; Johnson, M. S.; Jones, K. L.; Pain, S. D.; Thomas, J. S.; Livesay, R. J.; Wisser, D. W.

    The production of 26Al in novae is uncertain, in part, because of the uncertain rate of the 25 Al(p,γ)26Si reaction at novae temperatures. This reaction is thought to be dominated by a long- sought 3+ level in 26Si, and the calculated reaction rate varies by orders of magnitude depending on the energy of this resonance. We present evidence concerning the spin of a level at 5.914 MeV in 26Si from the 28Si(p,t)26Si reaction studied at the Holifield Radioactive Beam Facility at ORNL. We find that the angular distribution for this level implies either a 2+ or 3+ assignment, with only a 3+ being consistent with the mirror nucleus, 26Mg. Additionally, we have used the updated 25Al(p,γ)26Si reaction rate in a nova nucleosynthesis calculation and have addressed the effects of the remaining uncertainties in the rate on 26Al production.

  3. Triple-alpha reaction rate studied with the Faddeev three-body formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Souichi

    2012-11-12

    The triple-alpha (3{alpha}) reaction, {sup 4}He+{sup 4}He+{sup 4}He{yields}{sup 12}C+{gamma}, which plays a significant role in the stellar evolution scenarios, is studied in terms of a three-alpha (3-{alpha}) model. The reaction rate of the process is calculated via an inverse process, 3-{alpha} photodisintegration of a {sup 12}C nucleus. Both of 3-{alpha} bound and-continuum states are calculated by a Faddeev method with accommodating the long range Coulomb interaction. With being adjusted to the empirical E2-strength for {sup 12}C(0{sub 2}{sup +}){yields}{sup 12}C(2{sub 1}{sup +}) transition, results of the 3{alpha} reaction rate <{alpha}{alpha}{alpha}> at higher temperature (T > 10{sup 8} K), where the reaction proceeds mainly through the {sup 8}Be and {sup 12}C(0{sub 2}{sup +}) resonant states, almost agree with those of the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of Reaction Rates (NACRE). On the other hand, calculated values of <{alpha}{alpha}{alpha}> are about 10{sup 3} times larger than the NACRE rate at a low temperature (T= 10{sup 7} K), which means our results are remarkably smaller than recent CDCC results.

  4. Determination of Global Reaction Rate During Laser-Induced Decomposition at Static High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas. P.; Pangilinan, Gerardo I.

    1998-03-01

    The laser induced decomposition of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5 triazine (C_3H_6N_6O_6, RDX), trinitro azetidine (C_3H_4N_3O_6, TNAZ) and ammonium perchlorate (NH_4ClO_4, AP) at static high pressure in the range of 0.6 - 2.0 GPa is presented. The samples are loaded in a gem anvil cell and the reaction is induced with a single laser pulse (514 nm, 6 μs duration, 3-22 J/cm^2). The dynamic chemical processes are probed using time resolved uv-Vis absorption spectroscopy, during and up to 20 μs after the laser pulse. In all three materials, decomposition is characterized by a time-dependent increase in absorbance from 300-500 nm. This absorption change is directly proportional to the mole fraction of reaction and provides a measurement of the global reaction rate. The reaction rate is determined to be dependent on the sample, the initial pressure, and the laser fluence. The chemical decomposition is modeled using a three term reaction rate equation encompassing initiation, growth, and coalescence. A description of the differences in the decomposition kinetics for each material will be provided. Finally, the implications of these measurements to models of macroscopic energy release rates will be addressed.

  5. Impact of strange quark matter nuggets on pycnonuclear reaction rates in the crusts of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Golf, B.; Hellmers, J.; Weber, F.

    2009-07-15

    This article presents an investigation into the pycnonuclear reaction rates in dense crustal matter of neutron stars contaminated with strange quark matter nuggets. The presence of such nuggets in the crustal matter of neutron stars would be a natural consequence if Witten's strange quark matter hypothesis is correct. The methodology presented in this article is a recreation of a recent representation of nuclear force interactions embedded within pycnonuclear reaction processes. The study then extends the methodology to incorporate distinctive theoretical characteristics of strange quark matter nuggets, like their low charge-per-baryon ratio, and then assesses their effects on the pycnonuclear reaction rates. Particular emphasis is put on the impact of color superconductivity on the reaction rates. Depending on whether quark nuggets are in this novel state of matter, their electric charge properties vary drastically, which turns out to have a dramatic effect on the pycnonuclear reaction rates. Future nuclear fusion network calculations may thus have the potential to shed light on the existence of strange quark matter nuggets and on whether they are in a color superconducting state, as suggested by QCD.

  6. Rates of various reactions catalyzed by ATP synthase as related to the mechanism of ATP synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Berkich, D.A.; Williams, G.D.; Masiakos, P.T.; Smith, M.B.; Boyer, P.D.; LaNoue, K.F. )

    1991-01-05

    The forward and reverse rates of the overall reaction catalyzed by the ATP synthase in intact rat heart mitochondria, as measured with 32P, were compared with the rates of two partial steps, as measured with 18O. Such rates have been measured previously, but their relationship to one another has not been determined, nor have the partial reactions been measured in intact mitochondria. The partial steps measured were the rate of medium Pi formation from bound ATP (in state 4 this also equals the rate of medium Pi into bound ATP) and the rate of formation of bound ATP from bound Pi within the catalytic site. The rates of both partial reactions can be measured by 31P NMR analysis of the 18O distribution in Pi and ATP released from the enzyme during incubation of intact mitochondria with highly labeled (18O)Pi. Data were obtained in state 3 and 4 conditions with variation in substrate concentrations, temperature, and mitochondrial membrane electrical potential gradient (delta psi m). Although neither binding nor release of ATP is necessary for phosphate/H2O exchange, in state 4 the rate of incorporation of at least one water oxygen atom into phosphate is approximately twice the rate of the overall reaction rate under a variety of conditions. This can be explained if the release of Pi or ATP at one catalytic site does not occur, unless ATP or Pi is bound at another catalytic site. Such coupling provides strong support for the previously proposed alternating site mechanism. In state 3 slow reversal of ATP synthesis occurs within the mitochondrial matrix and can be detected as incorporation of water oxygen atoms into medium Pi even though medium (32P)ATP does not give rise to 32Pi in state 3. These data can be explained by lack of translocation of ATP from the medium to the mitochondrial matrix.

  7. A flash photolysis-shock tube kinetic study of the H atom reaction with O sub 2 : H + O sub 2 rightleftharpoons OH + O (962 K le T le 1705 K) and H + O sub 2 + Ar yields HO sub 2 + Ar (746 K le T le 987 K)

    SciTech Connect

    Pirraglia, A.N.; Michael, J.V.; Sutherland, J.W.; Klemm, R.B. )

    1989-01-12

    Rate constants for the reactions H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O (1) and H + O{sub 2} + M {yields} HO{sub 2} + M (2) were measured under pseudo-first-order conditions by the flash photolysis-shock tube technique that employs the atomic resonance absorption detection method to monitor (H){sub t}. Rate data for reaction 1 were obtained over the temperature range from 962 to 1705 K, and the results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression k{sub 1}(T) = (2.79 {plus minus} 0.32) {times} 10{sup {minus}10} exp(-16132 {plus minus} 276 cal mol{sup {minus}1}/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The mean deviation of the experimentally measured rate constants from those calculated by using this expression is {plus minus}16% over the stated temperature range. The recent shock tube data of Frank and Just (1693-2577 K) were combined with the present results for k{sub 1}(T) to obtain the following Arrhenius expression for the overall temperature span (962-2577 K); k{sub 1}(T) = (3.18 {plus minus} 0.24) {times} 10{sup {minus}10} exp(-16439 {plus minus} 186 cal mol{sup {minus}1}/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The mean deviation of the experimentally measured rate constants from this expression is {plus minus}15% over the entire temperature range. Values for the rate constant for the reverse of reaction 1 were calculated from each of the experimentally measured K{sub 1}(T) values with expressions for the equilibrium constant derived by using the latest JANAF thermochemical data. These k{sub {minus}1}(T) values were also combined with similarly derived values from the Frank and Just data.

  8. Astrophysical reaction rate for Be9 formation within a three-body approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, J.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Thompson, I. J.

    2014-10-01

    The structure of the Borromean nucleus Be9 (α+α+n) is addressed within a three-body approach using the analytical transformed harmonic oscillator method. The three-body formalism provides an accurate description of the radiative capture reaction rate for the entire temperature range relevant in astrophysics. At high temperatures, results match the calculations based on two-step sequential processes. At low temperatures, where the particles have no access to intermediate two-body resonances, the three-body direct capture leads to reaction rates larger than the sequential processes. These results support the reliability of the method for systems with several charged particles.

  9. Photochemistry of solutes in/on ice: reaction rate dependence on sample orientation and photon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hullar, T.; Anastasio, C.

    2015-12-01

    Particularly in polar regions, photochemical reactions in snowpacks can be an important mechanism for transforming organic and inorganic compounds. Chemicals within snow and ice are found in three different compartments: distributed in the bulk ice, concentrated in liquid-like regions (LLRs) within the ice matrix (such as at grain boundaries), or present in quasi-liquid layers (QLLs) at the air-ice interface. While some previous work suggested reaction rates may vary in these different compartments, our preliminary experiments found similar reaction rates in all three compartments, as well as in aqueous solution. Previous work also suggested reaction rate constants may be independent of photon flux under certain illumination conditions. Here, we extend our investigations to measure reaction rate constants in ice samples with different orientations to the illumination source, which our work thus far suggests may impact the measured rate constants. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common pollutants in snow and ice. We first prepared aqueous solutions of a single PAH. We then froze these samples using various methods previously shown to segregate the solute into known locations in the ice matrix. With simulated polar sunlight, we illuminated these samples and measured photon flux (using 2-nitrobenzaldehyde as a chemical actinometer) and photodecay of the PAH. Using this information, we normalized the rate of PAH loss to the photon flux and calculated the rate constants for PAH photodegradation under various freezing conditions, photon fluxes, and sample orientations. We will report on the impact of these variables on PAH photodegradation as well as the effect of varying the photon flux.

  10. Assessing hydrodynamic effects on jarosite dissolution rates, reaction products, and preservation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Emily M.; Elwood Madden, Andrew S.; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Elwood Madden, Megan E.

    2015-04-01

    Jarosite flow-through dissolution experiments were conducted in ultrapure water (UPW), pH 2 sulfuric acid, and saturated NaCl and CaCl2 brines at 295-298 K to investigate how hydrologic variables may affect jarosite preservation and reaction products on Mars. K+-based dissolution rates in flowing UPW did not vary significantly with flow rate, indicating that mineral surface reactions control dissolution rates over the range of flow rates investigated. In all of the solutions tested, hydrologic variables do not significantly affect extent of jarosite alteration; therefore, jarosite is equally likely to be preserved in flowing or stagnant waters on Mars. However, increasing flow rate did affect the mineralogy and accumulation of secondary reaction products. Iron release rates in dilute solutions increased as the flow rate increased, likely due to nanoscale iron (hydr)oxide transport in flowing water. Anhydrite formed in CaCl2 brine flow-through experiments despite low temperatures, while metastable gypsum and bassanite were observed in batch experiments. Therefore, observations of the hydration state of calcium sulfate minerals on Mars may provide clues to unravel past salinity and hydrologic conditions as well as temperatures and vapor pressures.