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Sample records for pseudomonas putida zwl73

  1. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C.; Silver, S. )

    1990-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a K{sub m} of 40 {mu}M CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  2. Methylmercury degradation by Pseudomonas putida V1.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Lucélia; Yu, Ri-Qing; Crane, Sharron; Giovanella, Patricia; Barkay, Tamar; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2016-08-01

    Environmental contamination of mercury (Hg) has caused public health concerns with focuses on the neurotoxic substance methylmercury, due to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food chains. The goals of the present study were to examine: (i) the transformation of methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercuric acetate and mercuric chloride by cultures of Pseudomonas putida V1, (ii) the presence of the genes merA and merB in P. putida V1, and (iii) the degradation pathways of methylmercury by P. putida V1. Strain V1 cultures readily degraded methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercury acetate, and reduced mercuric chloride into gaseous Hg(0). However, the Hg transformation in LB broth by P. putida V1 was influenced by the type of Hg compounds. The merA gene was detected in P. putida V1, on the other hand, the merB gene was not detected. The sequencing of this gene, showed high similarity (100%) to the mercuric reductase gene of other Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, tests using radioactive (14)C-methylmercury indicated an uncommon release of (14)CO2 concomitant with the production of Hg(0). The results of the present work suggest that P. putida V1 has the potential to remove methylmercury from contaminated sites. More studies are warranted to determine the mechanism of removal of methylmercury by P. putida V1. PMID:27062344

  3. Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida toward chlorinated benzoates

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Parales, R.E.; Dispensa, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The chlorinated aromatic acids 3-chlorobenzoate and 4-chlorobenzoate are chemoattractants for Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. These compounds are detected by a chromosomally encoded chemotactic response to benzoate which is inducible by {beta}-ketoadipate, and intermediate of benzoate catabolism. Plasmid pAC27, encoding enzymes for 3-chlorobenzoate degradation, does not appear to carry genes for chemotaxis toward chlorinated compounds.

  4. Pseudomonas putida Stimulates Primordia on Agaricus bitorquis.

    PubMed

    Colauto, Nelson B; Fermor, Terry R; Eira, Augusto F; Linde, Giani A

    2016-04-01

    Casing layer is one step of Agaricus bisporus cultivation where there is a competitive environment with a high number of microorganisms and diversity interacting with mycelia. It is suggested that a minimal community of these microorganisms would be necessary to stimulate fructification. However, A. bisporus is not able to produce primordia in sterile casing layers or Petri dishes. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize bacterial microbiota of casing layers from A. bisporus cultivation, isolate, identify and characterize the bacteria responsible for the stimulation of primordium and their action mechanism using Agaricus bitorquis as a primordium stimulation model. Bacterial and Pseudomonas spp. communities of different casing layers of A. bisporus cultivation were collected and quantified. It was concluded that Pseudomonas spp. corresponds to 75-85% of bacterial population of the casing layers in A. bisporus cultivation and among those 12% are Pseudomonas putida. Four biochemical assays were used to identify P. putida. In vitro primordium stimulation of living P. putida and non-living bacterial suspensions, after chemical or physical treatments, was tested using A. bitorquis as a primordium stimulation model. Primordium stimulation assay was registered by photographs, and micrographs of vertical cut of primordium were registered by scanning electron microscope. Interaction of living P. putida with A. bitorquis mycelia is capable of stimulating primordial instead of non-living bacterial suspensions. Stimulation of A. bitorquis primordia does not imply or is related to mycelial growth inhibition, but a hierarchical relation of primordium succession and development is suggested. PMID:26742772

  5. Engineering the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas putida for Arsenic Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Qin, Jie; Zhu, Yong-Guan; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of arsenic has potential health risks through consumption of food. Here, we inserted the arsenite [As(III)] S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase (ArsM) gene into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Recombinant bacteria methylate inorganic arsenic into less toxic organoarsenicals. This has the potential for bioremediation of environmental arsenic and reducing arsenic contamination in food. PMID:23645194

  6. Biological production of monoethanolamine by engineered Pseudomonas putida S12.

    PubMed

    Foti, Mirjam; Médici, Rosario; Ruijssenaars, Harald J

    2013-09-10

    Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered for the production of monoethanolamine (MEA) from glucose via the decarboxylation of the central metabolite L-serine, which is catalyzed by the enzyme L-serine decarboxylase (SDC). The host was first evaluated for its tolerance towards MEA as well as its endogenous ability to degrade this alkanolamine. Growth inhibition was observed at MEA concentrations above 100 mM, but growth was never completely arrested even at 750 mM of MEA. P. putida S12 was able to catabolize MEA in the absence of ammonia, but deletion of the eutBC genes that encode ethanolamine ammonia-lyase (EAL) enzyme sufficed to eliminate this capacity. For the biological production of MEA, the sdc genes from Arabidopsis thaliana (full-length and a truncated version) and Volvox carteri were expressed in P. putida S12. From 20 mM of glucose, negligible amounts of MEA were produced by P. putida S12 ΔeutBC expressing the sdc genes from A. thaliana and V. carteri. However, 0.07 mmol of MEA was obtained per g of cell dry weight of P. putida S12 ΔeutBC expressing the truncated variant of the A. thaliana SDC. When the medium was supplemented with L-serine (30 mM), MEA production increased to 1.25 mmol MEA g⁻¹ CDW, demonstrating that L-serine availability was limiting MEA production. PMID:23876477

  7. Bioremediation of p-Nitrophenol by Pseudomonas putida 1274 strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background p-Nitrophenol (PNP) occurs as contaminants of industrial effluents and it is the most important environmental pollutant and causes significant health and environmental risks, because it is toxic to many living organisms. Nevertheless, the information regarding PNP degradation pathways and their enzymes remain limited. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of the Pseudomonas Putida 1274 for removal of PNP. Methods P. putida MTCC 1274 was obtained from MTCC Chandigarh, India and cultured in the minimal medium in the presence of PNP. PNP degradation efficiency was compared under different pH and temperature ranges. The degraded product was isolated and analyzed with different chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. Results P. putida 1274 shows good growth and PNP degradation at 37°C in neutral pH. Acidic and alkali pH retarded the growth of P. putida as well as the PNP degradation. On the basis of specialized techniques, hydroquinone was identified as major degraded product. The pathway was identified for the biodegradation of PNP. It involved initial removal of the nitrate group and formation of hydroquinone as one of the intermediates. Conclusion Our results suggested that P. putida 1274 strain would be a suitable aspirant for bioremediation of nitro-aromatic compounds contaminated sites in the environment. PMID:24581307

  8. Pseudomonas putida which can grow in the presence of toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Yamamoto, Mami; Horikoshi, Koki )

    1991-05-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain able to grow in the presence of more than 50% toluene was isolated from soil. The strain was tolerant of other toxic solvents, including aliphatic hydrocarbons, alicyclic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, and ethers. The stability of the solvent tolerance of strain IH-2,000 was stimulated by addition of Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} to the medium containing toluene.

  9. Biological manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida in trickling filters.

    PubMed

    McKee, Kyle P; Vance, Cherish C; Karthikeyan, Raghupathy

    2016-06-01

    Biological oxidation has been researched as a viable alternative for treating waters with high manganese (Mn) concentrations, typically found in mine drainage or in some geological formations. In this study, laboratory-scale trickling filters were constructed to compare the Mn removal efficiency between filters inoculated with the Mn oxidizing bacteria, Pseudomonas putida, and filters without inoculation. Manganese oxidation and removal was found to be significantly greater in trickling filters with Pseudomonas putida after startup times of only 48 h. Mn oxidation in Pseudomonas putida inoculated trickling filters was up to 75% greater than non-inoculated filters. One-dimensional advective-dispersive models were formulated to describe the transport of Mn in trickling filter porous media. Based on the experimental transport parameters obtained, the model predicted that a filter depth of only 16 cm is needed to reduce influent concentration of 10 mg L(-1) to 0.05 mg L(-1). PMID:26943637

  10. Sorption of Pseudomonas putida onto differently structured kaolinite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliadou, I. A.; Papoulis, D.; Chrysikopoulos, C.; Panagiotaras, D.; Karakosta, E.; Fardis, M.; Papavassiliou, G.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of bio-colloids (e.g. bacteria and viruses) in the subsurface could be attributed to the release of particles from septic tanks, broken sewer lines or from artificial recharge with treated municipal wastewater. Bio-colloid transport in the subsurface is significantly affected by sorption onto the solid matrix. Bio-colloid attachment onto mobile or suspended in the aqueous phase soil particles (e.g. clay or other minerals) also may influence their fate and transport in the subsurface. The present study focuses on the investigation of Pseudomonas (Ps.) putida sorption onto well (KGa-1) and poorly (KGa-2) crystallized kaolinite minerals. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the sorption isotherms of Ps. putida onto both types of kaolinite particles. The sorption process of Ps. putida onto KGa-1 and KGa-2 is adequately described by a Langmuir isotherm. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy as well as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance were employed to study the sorption mechanisms of Ps. putida. Experimental results indicated that KGa-2 presented higher affinity and sorption capacity than KGa-1. It was shown that electrostatic interactions and structural disorders can influence the sorption capacity of clay particles.

  11. Efficient recombinant production of prodigiosin in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Domröse, Andreas; Klein, Andreas S.; Hage-Hülsmann, Jennifer; Thies, Stephan; Svensson, Vera; Classen, Thomas; Pietruszka, Jörg; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Drepper, Thomas; Loeschcke, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Serratia marcescens and several other bacteria produce the red-colored pigment prodigiosin which possesses bioactivities as an antimicrobial, anticancer, and immunosuppressive agent. Therefore, there is a great interest to produce this natural compound. Efforts aiming at its biotechnological production have so far largely focused on the original producer and opportunistic human pathogen S. marcescens. Here, we demonstrate efficient prodigiosin production in the heterologous host Pseudomonas putida. Random chromosomal integration of the 21 kb prodigiosin biosynthesis gene cluster of S. marcescens in P. putida KT2440 was employed to construct constitutive prodigiosin production strains. Standard cultivation parameters were optimized such that titers of 94 mg/L culture were obtained upon growth of P. putida at 20°C using rich medium under high aeration conditions. Subsequently, a novel, fast and effective protocol for prodigiosin extraction and purification was established enabling the straightforward isolation of prodigiosin from P. putida growth medium. In summary, we describe here a highly efficient method for the heterologous biosynthetic production of prodigiosin which may serve as a basis to produce large amounts of this bioactive natural compound and may provide a platform for further in-depth studies of prodiginine biosynthesis. PMID:26441905

  12. Specific Gene Loci of Clinical Pseudomonas putida Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Bernal, Patricia; Roca, Amalia; de la Torre, Jesús; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida are ubiquitous inhabitants of soils and clinical isolates of this species have been seldom described. Clinical isolates show significant variability in their ability to cause damage to hosts because some of them are able to modulate the host’s immune response. In the current study, comparisons between the genomes of different clinical and environmental strains of P. putida were done to identify genetic clusters shared by clinical isolates that are not present in environmental isolates. We show that in clinical strains specific genes are mostly present on transposons, and that this set of genes exhibit high identity with genes found in pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. The set of genes prevalent in P. putida clinical isolates, and absent in environmental isolates, are related with survival under oxidative stress conditions, resistance against biocides, amino acid metabolism and toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems. This set of functions have influence in colonization and survival within human tissues, since they avoid host immune response or enhance stress resistance. An in depth bioinformatic analysis was also carried out to identify genetic clusters that are exclusive to each of the clinical isolates and that correlate with phenotypical differences between them, a secretion system type III-like was found in one of these clinical strains, a determinant of pathogenicity in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26820467

  13. Water stress effects on toluene biodegradation by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Holden, P A; Halverson, L J; Firestone, M K

    1997-01-01

    We quantified the effects of matric and solute water potential on toluene biodegradation by Pseudomonas putida mt-2, a bacterial strain originally isolated from soil. Across the matric potential range of 0 to -1.5 MPa, growth rates were maximal for P. putida at -0.25 MPa and further reductions in the matric potential resulted in concomitant reductions in growth rates. Growth rates were constant over the solute potential range 0 to -1.0 MPa and lower at -1.5 MPa. First order toluene depletion rate coefficients were highest at 0.0 MPa as compared to other matric water potentials down to -1.5 MPa. Solute potentials down to -1.5 MPa did not affect first order toluene depletion rate coefficients. Total yield (protein) and carbon utilization efficiency were not affected by water potential, indicating that water potentials common to temperate soils were not sufficiently stressful to change cellular energy requirements. We conclude that for P. putida: (1) slightly negative matric potentials facilitate faster growth rates on toluene but more negative water potentials result in slower growth, (2) toluene utilization rate per cell mass is highest without matric water stress and is unaffected by solute potential, (3) growth efficiency did not differ across the range of matric water potentials 0.0 to -1.5 MPa. PMID:9396169

  14. Genome features of Pseudomonas putida LS46, a novel polyhydroxyalkanoate producer and its comparison with other P. putida strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A novel strain of Pseudomonas putida LS46 was isolated from wastewater on the basis of its ability to synthesize medium chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs). P.putida LS46 was differentiated from other P.putida strains on the basis of cpn60 (UT). The complete genome of P.putida LS46 was sequenced and annotated. Its chromosome is 5,86,2556 bp in size with GC ratio of 61.69. It is encoding 5316 genes, including 7 rRNA genes and 76 tRNA genes. Nucleotide sequence data of the complete P. putida LS46 genome was compared with nine other P. putida strains (KT2440, F1, BIRD-1, S16, ND6, DOT-T1E, UW4, W619 and GB-1) identified either as biocontrol agents or as bioremediation agents and isolated from different geographical region and different environment. BLASTn analysis of whole genome sequences of the ten P. putida strains revealed nucleotide sequence identities of 86.54 to 97.52%. P.putida genome arrangement was LS46 highly similar to P.putida BIRD1 and P.putida ND6 but was markedly different than P.putida DOT-T1E, P.putida UW4 and P.putida W619. Fatty acid biosynthesis (fab), fatty acid degradation (fad) and PHA synthesis genes were highly conserved among biocontrol and bioremediation P.putida strains. Six genes in pha operon of P. putida LS46 showed >98% homology at gene and proteins level. It appears that polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis is an intrinsic property of P. putida and was not affected by its geographic origin. However, all strains, including P. putida LS46, were different from one another on the basis of house keeping genes, and presence of plasmid, prophages, insertion sequence elements and genomic islands. While P. putida LS46 was not selected for plant growth promotion or bioremediation capacity, its genome also encoded genes for root colonization, pyoverdine synthesis, oxidative stress (present in other soil isolates), degradation of aromatic compounds, heavy metal resistance and nicotinic acid degradation, manganese (Mn II) oxidation

  15. Amino Acid Racemization in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Radkov, Atanas D.

    2013-01-01

    d-Amino acids have been shown to play an increasingly diverse role in bacterial physiology, yet much remains to be learned about their synthesis and catabolism. Here we used the model soil- and rhizosphere-dwelling organism Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to elaborate on the genomics and enzymology of d-amino acid metabolism. P. putida KT2440 catabolized the d-stereoisomers of lysine, phenylalanine, arginine, alanine, and hydroxyproline as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. With the exception of phenylalanine, each of these amino acids was racemized by P. putida KT2440 enzymes. Three amino acid racemases were identified from a genomic screen, and the enzymes were further characterized in vitro. The putative biosynthetic alanine racemase Alr showed broad substrate specificity, exhibiting measurable racemase activity with 9 of the 19 chiral amino acids. Among these amino acids, activity was the highest with lysine, and the kcat/Km values with l- and d-lysine were 3 orders of magnitude greater than the kcat/Km values with l- and d-alanine. Conversely, the putative catabolic alanine racemase DadX showed narrow substrate specificity, clearly preferring only the alanine stereoisomers as the substrates. However, DadX did show 6- and 9-fold higher kcat/Km values than Alr with l- and d-alanine, respectively. The annotated proline racemase ProR of P. putida KT2440 showed negligible activity with either stereoisomer of the 19 chiral amino acids but exhibited strong epimerization activity with hydroxyproline as the substrate. Comparative genomic analysis revealed differences among pseudomonads with respect to alanine racemase genes that may point to different roles for these genes among closely related species. PMID:23995642

  16. Identification and transcriptional profiling of Pseudomonas putida genes involved in furoic acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural (2-furaldehyde) is a furan formed by dehydration of pentose sugars. Pseudomonas putida Fu1 metabolizes furfural through a pathway involving conversion to 2-oxoglutarate, via 2-furoic acid and Coenzyme A intermediates. To identify genes involved in furan metabolism, two P. putida transposo...

  17. Investigation of plasmid-induced growth defect in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jia; Sydow, Anne; Schempp, Florence; Becher, Daniela; Schewe, Hendrik; Schrader, Jens; Buchhaupt, Markus

    2016-08-10

    Genetic engineering in bacteria mainly relies on the use of plasmids. But despite their pervasive use for physiological studies as well as for the design and optimization of industrially used production strains, only limited information about plasmid induced growth defects is available for different replicons and organisms. Here, we present the identification and characterization of such a phenomenon for Pseudomonas putida transformants carrying the pBBR1-derived plasmid pMiS1. We identified the kanamycin resistance gene and the transcription factor encoding rhaR gene to be causal for the growth defect in P. putida. In contrast, this effect was not observed in Escherichia coli. The plasmid-induced growth defect was eliminated after introduction of a mutation in the plasmid-encoded rep gene, thus enabling construction of the non-toxic variant pMiS4. GFP reporters construct analyses and qPCR experiments revealed a distinctly lowered plasmid copy number for pMiS4, which is probably the reason for alleviation of the growth defect by this mutation. Our work expands the knowledge about plasmid-induced growth defects and provides a useful low-copy pBBR1 replicon variant. PMID:27287537

  18. Toluene diffusion and reaction in unsaturated Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, P.A.; Hunt, J.R.; Firestone, M.K.

    1997-12-20

    Biofilms are frequently studied in the context of submerged or aquatic systems. However, much less is known about biofilms in unsaturated systems, despite their importance to such processes as food spoilage, terrestrial nutrient cycling, and biodegradation of environmental pollutants in soils. Using modeling and experimentation, the authors have described the biodegradation of toluene in unsaturated media by bacterial biofilms as a function of matric water potential, a dominant variable in unsaturated systems. They experimentally determined diffusion and kinetic parameters for Pseudomonas putida biofilms, then predicted biodegradation rates over a range of matric water potentials. For validation, the authors measured the rate of toluene depletion by intact biofilms and found the results to reasonably follow the model predictions. The diffusion coefficient for toluene through unsaturated P. putida biofilm averaged 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}/s, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than toluene diffusivity in water. Their studies show that, at the scale of the microbial biofilm, the diffusion of toluene to biodegrading bacteria can limit the overall rate of biological toluene depletion in unsaturated systems.

  19. Conversion of levoglucosan and cellobiosan by Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Franden, Mary Ann; Fulk, Emily M.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-02-02

    Pyrolysis offers a straightforward approach for the deconstruction of plant cell wall polymers into bio-oil. Recently, there has been substantial interest in bio-oil fractionation and subsequent use of biological approaches to selectively upgrade some of the resulting fractions. A fraction of particular interest for biological upgrading consists of polysaccharide-derived substrates including sugars and sugar dehydration products such as levoglucosan and cellobiosan, which are two of the most abundant pyrolysis products of cellulose. Levoglucosan can be converted to glucose-6-phosphate through the use of a levoglucosan kinase (LGK), but to date, the mechanism for cellobiosan utilization has not been demonstrated. Here, wemore » engineer the microbe Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to use levoglucosan as a sole carbon and energy source through LGK integration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cellobiosan can be enzymatically converted to levoglucosan and glucose with β-glucosidase enzymes from both Glycoside Hydrolase Family 1 and Family 3. β-glucosidases are commonly used in both natural and industrial cellulase cocktails to convert cellobiose to glucose to relieve cellulase product inhibition and to facilitate microbial uptake of glucose. Using an exogenous β-glucosidase, we demonstrate that the engineered strain of P. putida can grow on levoglucosan up to 60 g/L and can also utilize cellobiosan. Overall, this study elucidates the biological pathway to co-utilize levoglucosan and cellobiosan, which will be a key transformation for the biological upgrading of pyrolysis-derived substrates.« less

  20. Toluene Diffusion and Reaction in Unsaturated Pseudomonas putida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Patricia A.; Hunt, James R.; Firestone, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Biofilms are frequently studied in the context of submerged or aquatic systems. However, much less is known about biofilms in unsaturated systems, despite their importance to such processes as food spoilage, terrestrial nutrient cycling, and biodegradation of environmental pollutants in soils. Using modeling and experimentation, we have described the biodegradation of toluene in unsaturated media by bacterial biofilms as a function of matric water potential, a dominant variable in unsaturated systems. We experimentally determined diffusion and kinetic parameters for Pseudomonas putida biofilms, then predicted biodegradation rates over a range of matric water potentials. For validation, we measured the rate of toluene depletion by intact biofilms and found the results to reasonably follow the model predictions. The diffusion coefficient for toluene through unsaturated P. putida biofilm averaged 1.3 × 10−7 cm2/s, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than toluene diffusivity in water. Our studies show that, at the scale of the microbial biofilm, the diffusion of toluene to biodegrading bacteria can limit the overall rate of biological toluene depletion in unsaturated systems. PMID:18642338

  1. Biofilm formation-defective mutants in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Aroa; Leal-Morales, Antonio; Jiménez-Díaz, Lorena; Platero, Ana I; Bardallo-Pérez, Juan; Díaz-Romero, Alberto; Acemel, Rafael D; Illán, Juan M; Jiménez-López, Julia; Govantes, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Out of 8000 candidates from a genetic screening for Pseudomonas putida KT2442 mutants showing defects in biofilm formation, 40 independent mutants with diminished levels of biofilm were analyzed. Most of these mutants carried insertions in genes of the lap cluster, whose products are responsible for synthesis, export and degradation of the adhesin LapA. All mutants in this class were strongly defective in biofilm formation. Mutants in the flagellar regulatory genes fleQ and flhF showed similar defects to that of the lap mutants. On the contrary, transposon insertions in the flagellar structural genes fliP and flgG, that also impair flagellar motility, had a modest defect in biofilm formation. A mutation in gacS, encoding the sensor element of the GacS/GacA two-component system, also had a moderate effect on biofilm formation. Additional insertions targeted genes involved in cell envelope function: PP3222, encoding the permease element of an ABC-type transporter and tolB, encoding the periplasmic component of the Tol-OprL system required for outer membrane stability. Our results underscore the central role of LapA, suggest cross-regulation between motility and adhesion functions and provide insights on the role of cell envelope trafficking and maintenance for biofilm development in P. putida. PMID:27190143

  2. Analysis of the pathogenic potential of nosocomial Pseudomonas putida strains

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Matilde; Porcel, Mario; de la Torre, Jesús; Molina-Henares, M. A.; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Llamas, María A.; Roca, Amalia; Carriel, Victor; Garzón, Ingrid; Ramos, Juan L.; Alaminos, Miguel; Duque, Estrella

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have also been reported as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing nosocomial infections. In this study we describe the multilocus sequence typing of four P. putida strains (HB13667, HB8234, HB4184, and HB3267) isolated from in-patients at the Besançon Hospital (France). The four isolates (in particular HB3267) were resistant to a number of antibiotics. The pathogenicity and virulence potential of the strains was tested ex vivo and in vivo using different biological models: human tissue culture, mammalian tissues, and insect larvae. Our results showed a significant variability in the ability of the four strains to damage the host; HB13667 did not exhibit any pathogenic traits, HB4184 caused damage only ex vivo in human tissue cultures, and HB8234 had a deleterious effect in tissue culture and in vivo on rat skin, but not in insect larvae. Interestingly, strain HB3267 caused damage in all the model systems studied. The putative evolution of these strains in medical environments is discussed. PMID:26379646

  3. Toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Combarros, R G; Collado, S; Díaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in industrial and household applications will very likely lead to the release of such materials into the environment. As wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are usually the last barrier before the water is discharged into the environment, it is important to understand the effects of these materials in the biotreatment processes, since the results in the literature are usually contradictory. We proposed the use of flow cytometry (FC) technology to obtain conclusive results. Aqueous solutions of TiO2 nanoparticles (0-2 mg mL(-1)) were used to check its toxicity effect using Pseudomonas putida as simplified model of real sludge over room light. Physiological changes in P. putida from viable to viable but non-culturable cells were observed by flow cytometry in presence of TiO2. The damaged and dead cell concentrations were below 5% in all cases under study. Both FSC and SSC parameter increased with TiO2 dose dependent manner, indicating nanoparticles uptake by the bacteria. The biological removal of salicylic acid (SA) was also significantly impacted by the presence of TiO2 in the medium reducing the efficiency. The use of FC allows also to develop and fit segregated kinetic models, giving the impact of TiO2 nanoparticles in the physiological subpopulations growth and implications for SA removal. PMID:26771160

  4. Scanning electron microscope study of Pseudomonas putida colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, J A

    1985-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida colonies were examined by scanning electron microscope. A variety of cell morphologies, multicellular arrangements, and extracellular materials were observed in the fixed material. Different regions of a single colony showed characteristic organizations of these architectural elements. In some cases, the detailed microstructure of the fixed colony surfaces observed by scanning electron microscopy could be correlated with macroscopic patterns visualized by histochemical staining and surface relief photography of live colonies. Extracellular materials were seen to extend onto the agar surface beyond the boundaries of the cell mass, and the final structures of these materials, after fixation and desiccation, were colony specific. The significance of these features of colony microstructure for formulating hypotheses about the control of colony morphogenesis is discussed. Images PMID:4066611

  5. Herellea (Acinetobacter) and Pseudomonas ovalis (P. putida) from Frozen Foods

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Charles

    1969-01-01

    Seventeen strains of Herellea vaginicola (Acinetobacter antitratus) and 8 of Pseudomonas ovalis (P. putida), isolated from 23 (6.3%) of 364 samples of frozen, foil-pack foods, were identified and characterized morphologically and biochemically. Herellea was isolated from 17 foods (4.7%), P. ovalis from 6 (1.6%). No Mima were found. The food samples included precooked frozen meats, precooked and uncooked frozen vegetables, and uncooked frozen desserts. The bacteria were detected in the food with a procedure used generally for the detection of salmonellae. The pseudomonad simulated the characteristics of Herellea on Sellers differential agar, except for the fact that it fluoresced. From consideration of the habitat and pathogenicity of Herellea and Mima, it is concluded that, although the presence of these bacteria may not be desirable, their significance in food remains unanswered. PMID:4886860

  6. Biodegradation of nitrobenzene through a hybrid pathway in Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, K.H.; Lee, J.Y.; Kim, H.S.

    1995-12-20

    The biodegradation of nitrobenzene was attempted by using Pseudomonas putida TB 103 which possesses the hybrid pathway combining the tod and the tol pathways. Analysis of the metabolic flux of nitrobenzene through the hybrid pathway indicated that nitrobenzene was initially oxidized to cis-1,2-dihydroxy-3-nitrocyclohexa-3,5-diene by toluene dioxygenase in the tod pathway and then channeled into the tol pathway, leading to the complete biodegradation of nitrobenzene. A crucial metabolic step redirecting the metabolic flux of nitrobenzene from the tod to the tol pathway was determined from the genetic and biochemical studies on the enzymes involved in the tol pathway. From these results, it was found that toluate-cis-glycol dehydrogenase could convert cis-1,2-dihydroxy-3-nitrocyclohexa-3,5-diene to catechol in the presence of NAD{sup +} with liberation of nitrite and the reduced form of NAD{sup +} (NADH) into the medium.

  7. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens Species Group Recovery from Human Homes Varies Seasonally and by Environment

    PubMed Central

    Remold, Susanna K.; Purdy-Gibson, Megan E.; France, Michael T.; Hundley, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    By shedding light on variation in time as well as in space, long-term biogeographic studies can help us define organisms’ distribution patterns and understand their underlying drivers. Here we examine distributions of Pseudomonas in and around 15 human homes, focusing on the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups. We describe recovery from 10,941 samples collected during up to 8 visits per home, occurring on average 2.6 times per year. We collected a mean of 141 samples per visit, from sites in most rooms of the house, from the surrounding yards, and from human and pet occupants. We recovered Pseudomonas in 9.7% of samples, with the majority of isolates being from the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups (approximately 62% and 23% of Pseudomonas samples recovered respectively). Although representatives of both groups were recovered from every season, every house, and every type of environment sampled, recovery was highly variable across houses and samplings. Whereas recovery of P. putida group was higher in summer and fall than in winter and spring, P. fluorescens group isolates were most often recovered in spring. P. putida group recovery from soils was substantially higher than its recovery from all other environment types, while higher P. fluorescens group recovery from soils than from other sites was much less pronounced. Both species groups were recovered from skin and upper respiratory tract samples from healthy humans and pets, although this occurred infrequently. This study indicates that even species that are able to survive under a broad range of conditions can be rare and variable in their distributions in space and in time. For such groups, determining patterns and causes of stochastic and seasonal variability may be more important for understanding the processes driving their biogeography than the identity of the types of environments in which they can be found. PMID:26023929

  8. Characterization of Pseudomonas putida Genes Responsive to Nutrient Limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, Chris K.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Kingsley, Mark T.; Swarup, Sanjay

    2004-06-01

    The low bioavailability of nutrients and oxygen in the soil environment has hampered successful expression of biodegradation/biocontrol genes that are driven by promoters highly active during routine laboratory conditions of high nutrient- and oxygen-availability. Hence, in the present study, expression of the gus-tagged genes in 12 Tn5-gus mutants of the soil microbe Pseudomonas putida PNL-MK25 was examined under various conditions chosen to mimic the soil environment: low carbon, phosphate, nitrate, or oxygen, and in the rhizosphere. Based on their expression profiles, three nutrient-responsive mutant (NRM) strains, NRM5, NRM7, and NRM17, were selected for identification of the tagged genes. In the mutant strain NRM5, expression of the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdhA) gene was increased between 4.9- to 26.4-fold under various low nutrient conditions. In NRM7, expression of the novel NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase-like (nql) gene was consistently amongst the highest and was synergistically upregulated by low nutrient and anoxic conditions. The cyoD gene in NRM17, which encodes the fourth subunit of the cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase complex, had decreased expression in low nutrient conditions but its absolute expression levels was still amongst the highest. Additionally, it was independent of oxygen availability, in contrast to that in E. coli.

  9. A holistic view of polyhydroxyalkanoate metabolism in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Auxiliadora; Escapa, Isabel F; Martínez, Virginia; Dinjaski, Nina; Herencias, Cristina; de la Peña, Fernando; Tarazona, Natalia; Revelles, Olga

    2016-02-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) metabolism has been traditionally considered as a futile cycle involved in carbon and energy storage. The use of cutting-edge technologies linked to systems biology has improved our understanding of the interaction between bacterial physiology, PHA metabolism and other cell functions in model bacteria such as Pseudomonas putida KT2440. PHA granules or carbonosomes are supramolecular complexes of biopolyester and proteins that are essential for granule segregation during cell division, and for the functioning of the PHA metabolic route as a continuous cycle. The simultaneous activities of PHA synthase and depolymerase ensure the carbon flow to the transient demand for metabolic intermediates to balance the storage and use of carbon and energy. PHA cycle also determines the number and size of bacterial cells. The importance of PHAs as nutrients for members of the microbial community different to those that produce them is illustrated here via examples of bacterial predators such as Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus that prey on PHA producers and produces specific extra-cellular depolymerases. PHA hydrolysis confers Bdellovibrio ecological advantages in terms of motility and predation efficiency, demonstrating the importance of PHA producers predation in population dynamics. Metabolic modulation strategies for broadening the portfolio of PHAs are summarized and their properties are compiled. PMID:25556983

  10. Physical Morphology and Surface Properties of Unsaturated Pseudomonas putida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Ilene D.; Sorensen, Cody; Hansma, Helen G.; Holden, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Unsaturated biofilms of Pseudomonas putida, i.e., biofilms grown in humid air, were analyzed by atomic force microscopy to determine surface morphology, roughness, and adhesion forces in the outer and basal cell layers of fresh and desiccated biofilms. Desiccated biofilms were equilibrated with a 75.5% relative humidity atmosphere, which is far below the relative humidity of 98 to 99% at which these biofilms were cultured. In sharp contrast to the effects of drying on biofilms grown in fluid, we observed that drying caused little change in morphology, roughness, or adhesion forces in these unsaturated biofilms. Surface roughness for moist and dry biofilms increased approximately linearly with increasing scan sizes. This indicated that the divides between bacteria contributed more to overall roughness than did extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on individual bacteria. The EPS formed higher-order structures we termed mesostructures. These mesostructures are much larger than the discrete polymers of glycolipids and proteins that have been previously characterized on the outer surface of these gram-negative bacteria. PMID:10850998

  11. Metabolism of Phenol and Cresols by Mutants of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Bayly, R. C.; Wigmore, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mutant strains of Pseudomonas putida strain U have been obtained which are deficient in enzymes of the degradative pathways of phenol and cresols. Mutant strains deficient in catechol 2, 3-oxygenase accumulated the appropriate catechol derivative from cresols. A mutant strain which would not grow on either phenol or a cresol was shown to be deficient in both 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde hydrolase and a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form, (NAD+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase. When this strain was grown in the presence of phenol or a cresol, the appropriate product of meta fission of these compounds accumulated in the growth medium. A partial revertant of this mutant strain, which was able to grow on ortho- and meta-cresol but not para-cresol, was shown to have regained only the hydrolase activity. This strain was used to show that the products of meta ring fission of the cresols and phenol are metabolized as follows: (i) ortho- and meta-cresol exclusively by a hydrolase; (ii) para-cresol exclusively by a NAD+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase; (iii) phenol by both a NAD+-dependent dehydrogenase and a hydrolase in the approximate ratio of 5 to 1. This conclusion is supported by the substrate specificity and enzymatic activity of the hydrolase and NAD+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes of the wild-type strain. The results are discussed in terms of the physiological significance of the pathway. Properties of some of the mutant strains isolated are discussed. PMID:4347965

  12. Co-transport of Pseudomonas putida and kaolinite colloid particles through water saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliadou, I. A.; Chrysikopoulos, C. V.

    2009-04-01

    Groundwater contamination is often associated with the presence of dissolved contaminants and/or suspended particles, which are either harmful biocolloids or toxic substances sorbed onto colloid particles. The present study focuses on the transport of bacteria in porous media in the presence of suspended kaolinite colloid particles. The bacteria used are the species Pseudomonas putida. Batch sorption experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption of Pseudomonas putida onto the surfaces of kaolinite particles. The results from the batch experiments indicate that Pseudomonas putida significantly adsorbed onto kaolinite colloid particles. The adsorption process is adequately described by a Langmuir type isotherm. Transport experiments were conducted under various flow conditions in water saturated columns packed with glass beads. Initial flowthrough experiments were performed with bacteria and kaolinite alone in order to better understand their individual transport characteristics. Finally, Pseudomonas putida and kaolinite colloid particles were injected simultaneously into the packed column in order to investigate their co-transport behavior. The flowthrough experimental data suggest that the presence of the clay particles significantly inhibit the transport of bacteria in water saturated porous media. The observed reduction of Pseudomonas putida recovery at the packed column exit is mainly attributed to the attachment of bacteria onto kaolinite particles, which are adsorbed onto the solid matrix of the column.

  13. Proteomics reveals a core molecular response of Pseudomonas putida F1 to acute chromate challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Dorothea K.; Chourey, Karuna; Wickham, Gene S; Thieman, Stephanie; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Zhang, Bing; McCarthy, Andrea T; Rudisill, Matt; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a model organism for bioremediation because of its remarkable metabolic versatility, extensive biodegradative functions, and ubiquity in contaminated soil environments. To further the understanding of molecular pathways responding to the heavy metal chromium(VI) [Cr(VI)], the proteome of aerobically grown, Cr(VI)-stressed P. putida strain F1 was characterized within the context of two disparate nutritional environments: rich (LB) media and minimal (M9L) media containing lactate as the sole carbon source.

  14. Oxidation of substituted phenols by Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6

    SciTech Connect

    Spain, J.C.; Gibson, D.T.

    1988-06-01

    The biodegradation of benzene, toluene, and chlorobenzenes by Pseudomonas putida involves the initial conversion of the parent molecules to cis-dihydrodiols by dioxygenase enzyme systems. The cis-dihydrodiols are then converted to the corresponding catechols by dihydrodiol dehydrogenase enzymes. Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6 uses a similar system for growth on toluene or dichlorobenzenes. We tested the wild-type organisms and a series of mutants for their ability to transform substituted phenols after induction with toluene. When grown on toluene, both wild-type organisms converted methyl-, chloro-, and nitro-substituted phenols to the corresponding catechols. Mutant strains deficient in dihydrodiol dehydrogenase or catechol oxygenase activities also transformed the phenols. Oxidation of phenols was closely correlated with the induction and activity of the toluene dioxygenase enzyme system.

  15. Comparative genomics and functional analysis of niche-specific adaptation in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Monchy, Sébastien; Taghavi, Safiyh; Zhu, Wei; Ramos, Juan; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a gram-negative rod-shaped gammaproteobacterium that is found throughout various environments. Members of the species P. putida show a diverse spectrum of metabolic activities, which is indicative of their adaptation to various niches, which includes the ability to live in soils and sediments contaminated with high concentrations of heavy metals and organic contaminants. Pseudomonas putida strains are also found as plant growth-promoting rhizospheric and endophytic bacteria. The genome sequences of several P. putida species have become available and provide a unique tool to study the specific niche adaptation of the various P. putida strains. In this review, we compare the genomes of four P. putida strains: the rhizospheric strain KT2440, the endophytic strain W619, the aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading strain F1 and the manganese-oxidizing strain GB-1. Comparative genomics provided a powerful tool to gain new insights into the adaptation of P. putida to specific lifestyles and environmental niches, and clearly demonstrated that horizontal gene transfer played a key role in this adaptation process, as many of the niche-specific functions were found to be encoded on clearly defined genomic islands. PMID:20796030

  16. Comparative genomics and functional analysis of niche-specific adaptation in Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Wu X.; van der Lelie D.; Monchy, S.; Taghavi, S.; Zhu, W.; Ramos, J.

    2011-03-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a gram-negative rod-shaped gammaproteobacterium that is found throughout various environments. Members of the species P. putida show a diverse spectrum of metabolic activities, which is indicative of their adaptation to various niches, which includes the ability to live in soils and sediments contaminated with high concentrations of heavy metals and organic contaminants. Pseudomonas putida strains are also found as plant growth-promoting rhizospheric and endophytic bacteria. The genome sequences of several P. putida species have become available and provide a unique tool to study the specific niche adaptation of the various P. putida strains. In this review, we compare the genomes of four P. putida strains: the rhizospheric strain KT2440, the endophytic strain W619, the aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading strain F1 and the manganese-oxidizing strain GB-1. Comparative genomics provided a powerful tool to gain new insights into the adaptation of P. putida to specific lifestyles and environmental niches, and clearly demonstrated that horizontal gene transfer played a key role in this adaptation process, as many of the niche-specific functions were found to be encoded on clearly defined genomic islands.

  17. Survival of rifampin-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida in soil systems.

    PubMed Central

    Compeau, G; Al-Achi, B J; Platsouka, E; Levy, S B

    1988-01-01

    The fate of spontaneous chromosomal rifampin-resistant (Rifr) mutants of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens in sterile and live organic soil from which they were isolated was studied. In sterile native-soil assays, a Rifr mutant of P. putida showed no decrease in competitive fitness when compared with the wild-type parent. However, mutants of P. fluorescens were of two general categories. Group 1 showed no difference from the wild type in terms of growth rate, competitive fitness, and membrane protein composition. Group 2 showed a slower growth rate in both minimal and enriched media and an altered membrane protein profile. These mutants also demonstrated decreased competitive fitness compared with the wild-type strain. In live soil, the Rifr P. putida strain persisted throughout the 38-day test period with a decay rate of 0.7 log10 CFU/g of soil per 10 days. A group 1 Rifr P. fluorescens mutant maintained its inoculated titer for 7 to 10 days and then decayed at a rate of 0.2 to 0.4 log10 CFU/g of soil per 10 days. A group 2 Rifr P. fluorescens mutant remained at its titer for 1 to 5 days before decaying at a two- to threefold-faster rate. These findings indicate that rifampin resistance may not be an innocuous mutation in some pseudomonads and that marked strains should be compared with wild-type parents before being used as monitors of parental strain survival. Colonization of sterile soil with either the wild-type or mutant strain precluded normal colonization of the second added strain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3144244

  18. Siderotyping of fluorescent pseudomonads: characterization of pyoverdines of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida strains from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J M; Stintzi, A; Coulanges, V; Shivaji, S; Voss, J A; Taraz, K; Budzikiewicz, H

    1998-11-01

    Five independent fluorescent pseudomonad isolates originating from Antarctica were analysed for their pyoverdine systems. A pyoverdine-related siderotyping, which involved pyoverdine-induced growth stimulation, pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake, pyoverdine analysis by electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing, revealed three different pyoverdine-related siderotypes among the five isolates. One siderotype, including Pseudomonas fluorescens 1W and P. fluorescens 10CW, was identical to that of P. fluorescens ATCC 13525. Two other strains, P. fluorescens 9AW and Pseudomonas putida 9BW, showed identical pyoverdine-related behaviour to each other, whereas the fifth strain, P. fluorescens 51W, had unique features compared to the other strains or to a set of 12 fluorescent Pseudomonas strains used as comparison material. Elucidation of the structure of the pyoverdines produced by the Antarctic strains supported the accuracy of the siderotyping methodology by confirming that pyoverdines from strains 1W and 10CW had the same structures as the P. fluorescens ATCC 13525 pyoverdine, whereas the 9AW and 9BW pyoverdines are probably identical with the pyoverdine of P. fluorescens strain 244. Pyoverdine from strain 51W appeared to be a novel pyoverdine since its structure was different from all previously established pyoverdine structures. Together with the conclusion that the Antarctic Pseudomonas strains have no special features at the level of their pyoverdines and pyoverdine-mediated iron metabolism compared to worldwide strains, the present work demonstrates that siderotyping provides a rapid means of screening for novel pyoverdines. PMID:9846748

  19. Transcriptome dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 under water stress.

    PubMed

    Gülez, Gamze; Dechesne, Arnaud; Workman, Christopher T; Smets, Barth F

    2012-02-01

    Water deprivation can be a major stressor to microbial life in surface and subsurface soil. In unsaturated soils, the matric potential (Ψ(m)) is often the main component of the water potential, which measures the thermodynamic availability of water. A low matric potential usually translates into water forming thin liquid films in the soil pores. Little is known of how bacteria respond to such conditions, where, in addition to facing water deprivation that might impair their metabolism, they have to adapt their dispersal strategy as swimming motility may be compromised. Using the pressurized porous surface model (PPSM), which allows creation of thin liquid films by controlling Ψ(m), we examined the transcriptome dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. We identified the differentially expressed genes in cells exposed to a mild matric stress (-0.4 MPa) for 4, 24, or 72 h. The major response was detected at 4 h before gradually disappearing. Upregulation of alginate genes was notable in this early response. Flagellar genes were not downregulated, and the microarray data even suggested increasing expression as the stress prolonged. Moreover, we tested the effect of polyethylene glycol 8000 (PEG 8000), a nonpermeating solute often used to simulate Ψ(m), on the gene expression profile and detected a different profile than that observed by directly imposing Ψ(m). This study is the first transcriptome profiling of KT2440 under directly controlled Ψ(m) and also the first to show the difference in gene expression profiles between a PEG 8000-simulated and a directly controlled Ψ(m). PMID:22138988

  20. Cometabolic degradation kinetics of TCE and phenol by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Min; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Huang, Chih; Lin, Jui-Che

    2008-08-01

    Modeling of cometabolic kinetics is important for better understanding of degradation reaction and in situ application of bio-remediation. In this study, a model incorporated cell growth and decay, loss of transformation activity, competitive inhibition between growth substrate and non-growth substrate and self-inhibition of non-growth substrate was proposed to simulate the degradation kinetics of phenol and trichloroethylene (TCE) by Pseudomonas putida. All the intrinsic parameters employed in this study were measured independently, and were then used for predicting the batch experimental data. The model predictions conformed well to the observed data at different phenol and TCE concentrations. At low TCE concentrations (<2 mg l(-1)), the models with or without self-inhibition of non-growth substrate both simulated the experimental data well. However, at higher TCE concentrations (>6 mg l(-1)), only the model considering self-inhibition can describe the experimental data, suggesting that a self-inhibition of TCE was present in the system. The proposed model was also employed in predicting the experimental data conducted in a repeated batch reactor, and good agreements were observed between model predictions and experimental data. The results also indicated that the biomass loss in the degradation of TCE below 2 mg l(-1) can be totally recovered in the absence of TCE for the next cycle, and it could be used for the next batch experiment for the degradation of phenol and TCE. However, for higher concentration of TCE (>6 mg l(-1)), the recovery of biomass may not be as good as that at lower TCE concentrations. PMID:18586301

  1. Effect of ZnO Nanostructured Thin Films on Pseudomonas Putida Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, I.; Lukanov, A.; Angelov, O.; Popova, R.; Nichev, H.; Mikli, V.; Dimova-Malinovska, Doriana; Dushkin, C.

    In this report we study the interaction between the bacteria Pseudomonas putida and nanostructured ZnO and ZnO:H thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering of a ZnO target. The nanostructured ZnO and ZnO:H thin films possess some biological-active properties when in contact with bacteria. Our experimental data show that these films have no destructive effect on the cell division of Pseudomonas putida in poor liquid medium and can be applied in biosensor devices.

  2. Proteomic characterization of the outer membrane vesicle of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chi-Won; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Lee, Yeol Gyun; Hong, Yeonhee; Park, Kyeong Ryang; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Kim, Seung Il

    2014-10-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced by various pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In this study, we isolated OMVs from a representative soil bacterium, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which has a biodegradative activity toward various aromatic compounds. Proteomic analysis identified the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) OprC, OprD, OprE, OprF, OprH, OprG, and OprW as major components of the OMV of P. putida KT2440. The production of OMVs was dependent on the nutrient availability in the culture media, and the up- or down-regulation of specific OMPs was observed according to the culture conditions. In particular, porins (e.g., benzoate-specific porin, BenF-like porin) and enzymes (e.g., catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, benzoate dioxygenase) for benzoate degradation were uniquely found in OMVs prepared from P. putida KT2440 that were cultured in media containing benzoate as the energy source. OMVs of P. putida KT2440 showed low pathological activity toward cultured cells that originated from human lung cells, which suggests their potential as adjuvants or OMV vaccine carriers. Our results suggest that the protein composition of the OMVs of P. putida KT2440 reflects the characteristics of the total proteome of P. putida KT2440. PMID:25198519

  3. Comparative genomics of an endophytic Pseudomonas putida isolated from mango orchard.

    PubMed

    Asif, Huma; Studholme, David J; Khan, Asifullah; Aurongzeb, M; Khan, Ishtiaq A; Azim, M Kamran

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the genome sequence of an endophytic bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida TJI51 isolated from mango bark tissues. Next generation DNA sequencing and short read de novo assembly generated the 5,805,096 bp draft genome of P. putida TJI51. Out of 6,036 protein coding genes in P. putida TJI51 sequences, 4,367 (72%) were annotated with functional specifications, while the remaining encoded hypothetical proteins. Comparative genome sequence analysis revealed that the P. putida TJI51genome contains several regions, not identified in so far sequenced P. putida genomes. Some of these regions were predicted to encode enzymes, including acetylornithine deacetylase, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, benzoylformate decarboxylase, hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase, and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase. The genome of P. putida TJI51 contained three nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters. Genome sequence analysis of P. putidaTJI51 identified this bacterium as an endophytic resident. The endophytic fitness might be linked with alginate, which facilitates bacterial colonization in plant tissues. Genome sequence analysis shed light on the presence of a diverse spectrum of metabolic activities and adaptation of this isolate to various niches. PMID:27392236

  4. Comparative genomics of an endophytic Pseudomonas putida isolated from mango orchard

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Huma; Studholme, David J.; Khan, Asifullah; Aurongzeb, M.; Khan, Ishtiaq A.; Azim, M. Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We analyzed the genome sequence of an endophytic bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida TJI51 isolated from mango bark tissues. Next generation DNA sequencing and short read de novo assembly generated the 5,805,096 bp draft genome of P. putida TJI51. Out of 6,036 protein coding genes in P. putida TJI51 sequences, 4,367 (72%) were annotated with functional specifications, while the remaining encoded hypothetical proteins. Comparative genome sequence analysis revealed that the P. putida TJI51genome contains several regions, not identified in so far sequenced P. putida genomes. Some of these regions were predicted to encode enzymes, including acetylornithine deacetylase, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, benzoylformate decarboxylase, hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase, and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase. The genome of P. putida TJI51 contained three nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters. Genome sequence analysis of P. putidaTJI51 identified this bacterium as an endophytic resident. The endophytic fitness might be linked with alginate, which facilitates bacterial colonization in plant tissues. Genome sequence analysis shed light on the presence of a diverse spectrum of metabolic activities and adaptation of this isolate to various niches. PMID:27560648

  5. Acute toxic effects of three pesticides on Pseudomonas putida monitored by microcalorimeter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Lun; Yao, Jun; Wang, Fei; Bramanti, Emilia; Maskow, Thomas; Zaray, Gyula

    2009-02-01

    A series of calorimetric experiments were performed to investigate the toxic effects of beta-cypermethrin (BCP), bensulfuron-methyl (BSM) and prometryne (PM) on Pseudomonas putida (P. putida). The metabolic action of P. putida on the three pesticides was studied by obtaining power-time curves. The growth of P. putida was inhibited completely in each case when the concentrations of pesticides were up to 80 micro g mL(- 1). The relationships between the inhibitory ratio (k) and doses of contaminants were approximately linear for the three pesticides. The total heat dissipated per milliliter (Q(total)) for the pesticides decreased during the course of the experiment. The OD(600) of P. putida growth in the absence and presence of pesticides was also obtained. The power-time curves of P. putida growth coincided with its turbidity curves. This elucidates that microcalorimetric method agrees well with the routine microbiological method. Among these three pesticides, BSM was found to be the most toxic with an IC(50) of 19.24 micro g mL(- 1) against P. putida. PM exhibited moderate virulence with an IC(50) of 27.86 micro g mL(- 1) and BCP had the lowest toxicity with an IC(50) of 39.64 micro g mL(- 1). PMID:19130374

  6. Comparative genomics of an endophytic Pseudomonas putida isolated from mango orchard.

    PubMed

    Asif, Huma; Studholme, David J; Khan, Asifullah; Aurongzeb, M; Khan, Ishtiaq A; Azim, M Kamran

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the genome sequence of an endophytic bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida TJI51 isolated from mango bark tissues. Next generation DNA sequencing and short read de novo assembly generated the 5,805,096 bp draft genome of P. putida TJI51. Out of 6,036 protein coding genes in P. putida TJI51 sequences, 4,367 (72%) were annotated with functional specifications, while the remaining encoded hypothetical proteins. Comparative genome sequence analysis revealed that the P. putida TJI51genome contains several regions, not identified in so far sequenced P. putida genomes. Some of these regions were predicted to encode enzymes, including acetylornithine deacetylase, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, benzoylformate decarboxylase, hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase, and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase. The genome of P. putida TJI51 contained three nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters. Genome sequence analysis of P. putidaTJI51 identified this bacterium as an endophytic resident. The endophytic fitness might be linked with alginate, which facilitates bacterial colonization in plant tissues. Genome sequence analysis shed light on the presence of a diverse spectrum of metabolic activities and adaptation of this isolate to various niches. PMID:27560648

  7. Survival and impact of genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida harboring mercury resistance gene in soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, K; Uchiyama, H; Yagi, O

    1994-01-01

    The survival of genetically engineered and wild-type Pseudomonas putida PpY101, that contained a recombinant plasmid pSR134 conferring mercury resistance, were monitored in andosol and sand microcosms. The survival of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida was not significantly different in andosol. The population change of the two strains was dissimilar in andosol and sand. The survival of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida strains was affected by the water content of andosol, and increased with the increment of the water content. The impact of the addition of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida strains on indigenous bacteria and fungi was examined. Inoculation of both strains had no apparent effect on the density of indigenous microorganisms. PMID:7764510

  8. Engineering mediator-based electroactivity in the obligate aerobic bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Simone; Nies, Salome; Wierckx, Nick; Blank, Lars M.; Rosenbaum, Miriam A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are being developed as microbial production hosts for production of a range of amphiphilic and hydrophobic biochemicals. P. putida's obligate aerobic growth thereby can be an economical and technical challenge because it requires constant rigorous aeration and often causes reactor foaming. Here, we engineered a strain of P. putida KT2440 that can produce phenazine redox-mediators from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to allow partial redox balancing with an electrode under oxygen-limited conditions. P. aeruginosa is known to employ its phenazine-type redox mediators for electron exchange with an anode in bioelectrochemical systems (BES). We transferred the seven core phenazine biosynthesis genes phzA-G and the two specific genes phzM and phzS required for pyocyanin synthesis from P. aeruginosa on two inducible plasmids into P. putida KT2440. The best clone, P. putida pPhz, produced 45 mg/L pyocyanin over 25 h of growth, which was visible as blue color formation and is comparable to the pyocyanin production of P. aeruginosa. This new strain was then characterized under different oxygen-limited conditions with electrochemical redox control and changes in central energy metabolism were evaluated in comparison to the unmodified P. putida KT2440. In the new strain, phenazine synthesis with supernatant concentrations up to 33 μg/mL correlated linearly with the ability to discharge electrons to an anode, whereby phenazine-1-carboxylic acid served as the dominating redox mediator. P. putida pPhz sustained strongly oxygen-limited metabolism for up to 2 weeks at up to 12 μA/cm2 anodic current density. Together, this work lays a foundation for future oxygen-limited biocatalysis with P. putida strains. PMID:25914687

  9. Comparative genomic and functional analyses: unearthing the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in Pseudomonas putida strain 1A00316.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Jing, Xueping; Peng, Wen-Lei; Nie, Qiyu; Zhai, Yile; Shao, Zongze; Zheng, Longyu; Cai, Minmin; Li, Guangyu; Zuo, Huaiyu; Zhang, Zhitao; Wang, Rui-Ru; Huang, Dian; Cheng, Wanli; Yu, Ziniu; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    We isolated Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) strain 1A00316 from Antarctica. This bacterium has a high efficiency against Meloidogyne incognita (M. incognita) in vitro and under greenhouse conditions. The complete genome of P. putida 1A00316 was sequenced using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. A comparative genomic analysis of 16 Pseudomonas strains revealed that although P. putida 1A00316 belonged to P. putida, it was phenotypically more similar to nematicidal Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) strains. We characterized the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida 1A00316 with comparative genomics and functional analysis, and found that P. putida 1A00316 has diverse nematicidal factors including protein alkaline metalloproteinase AprA and two secondary metabolites, hydrogen cyanide and cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline). We show for the first time that cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline) exhibit nematicidal activity in P. putida. Interestingly, our study had not detected common nematicidal factors such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and pyrrolnitrin in P. putida 1A00316. The results of the present study reveal the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida strain 1A00316. PMID:27384076

  10. Comparative genomic and functional analyses: unearthing the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in Pseudomonas putida strain 1A00316

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Jing, Xueping; Peng, Wen-Lei; Nie, Qiyu; Zhai, Yile; Shao, Zongze; Zheng, Longyu; Cai, Minmin; Li, Guangyu; Zuo, Huaiyu; Zhang, Zhitao; Wang, Rui-Ru; Huang, Dian; Cheng, Wanli; Yu, Ziniu; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    We isolated Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) strain 1A00316 from Antarctica. This bacterium has a high efficiency against Meloidogyne incognita (M. incognita) in vitro and under greenhouse conditions. The complete genome of P. putida 1A00316 was sequenced using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. A comparative genomic analysis of 16 Pseudomonas strains revealed that although P. putida 1A00316 belonged to P. putida, it was phenotypically more similar to nematicidal Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) strains. We characterized the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida 1A00316 with comparative genomics and functional analysis, and found that P. putida 1A00316 has diverse nematicidal factors including protein alkaline metalloproteinase AprA and two secondary metabolites, hydrogen cyanide and cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline). We show for the first time that cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline) exhibit nematicidal activity in P. putida. Interestingly, our study had not detected common nematicidal factors such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and pyrrolnitrin in P. putida 1A00316. The results of the present study reveal the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida strain 1A00316. PMID:27384076

  11. ACTIVE EFFLUX OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS BY PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA S12 IS INDUCED BY SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of the membrane-associated organic solvent efflux system SrpABC of Pseudomonas putida S12 was examined by cloning a 312-bp DNA fragment, containing the srp promoter, in the broad-host-range reporter vector pKRZ-1. Compounds that are capable of inducing expression of the...

  12. Expression, localization and functional analysis of polychlorinated biphenyl degradation genes cbpABCD of Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.A.; Walia, S.K. )

    1991-05-01

    This report describes the subcloning, identification, localization, and expression of dbp genes of Pseudomonas putida OU83. Furthermore, evidence is provided that the PCB degradation genes are organized in an operon. Evidence is also provided for the precise localization of cbpC gene encoding narrow-sub-strate-specific 3-PDase.

  13. Interaction of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and Bacteriophage gh-1 in Berea Sandstone Rock.

    PubMed

    Chang, P L; Yen, T F

    1985-12-01

    Measurements of the passage of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and a phage-resistant mutant through Berea sandstone rock were made. When bacteriophage gh-1 was adsorbed within the rock matrix, a reduction in the passage of the susceptible but not the resistant cells through the rock was observed. PMID:16346956

  14. Interaction of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and Bacteriophage gh-1 in Berea Sandstone Rock

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Philip Lee; Yen, Teh Fu

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the passage of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and a phage-resistant mutant through Berea sandstone rock were made. When bacteriophage gh-1 was adsorbed within the rock matrix, a reduction in the passage of the susceptible but not the resistant cells through the rock was observed. PMID:16346956

  15. Complete Genome of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1

    SciTech Connect

    Matilla, M.A.; van der Lelie, D.; Pizarro-Tobias, P.; Roca, A.; Fernandez, M.; Duque, E.; Molina, L.; Wu, X.; Gomez, M. J.; Segura, A.; Ramos, J.-L.

    2011-03-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 5.7-Mbp genome of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1, a metabolically versatile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that is highly tolerant to desiccation and capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and iron and of synthesizing phytohormones that stimulate seed germination and plant growth.

  16. Using "Pseudomonas Putida xylE" Gene to Teach Molecular Cloning Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Xu; Xin, Yi; Ye, Li; Ma, Yufang

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a serial experiment in molecular cloning laboratory course for undergraduate students majored in biotechnology. "Pseudomonas putida xylE" gene, encoding catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase, was manipulated to learn molecular biology techniques. The integration of cloning, expression, and enzyme assay gave students a chance…

  17. Differential proteomics and physiology of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 under filament-inducing conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas putida exerts a filamentous phenotype in response to environmental stress conditions that are encountered during its natural life cycle. This study assessed whether P. putida filamentation could confer survival advantages. Filamentation of P. putida was induced through culturing at low shaking speed and was compared to culturing in high shaking speed conditions, after which whole proteomic analysis and stress exposure assays were performed. Results P. putida grown in filament-inducing conditions showed increased resistance to heat and saline stressors compared to non-filamented cultures. Proteomic analysis showed a significant metabolic change and a pronounced induction of the heat shock protein IbpA and recombinase RecA in filament-inducing conditions. Our data further indicated that the associated heat shock resistance, but not filamentation, was dependent of RecA. Conclusions This study provides insights into the altered metabolism of P. putida in filament-inducing conditions, and indicates that the formation of filaments could potentially be utilized by P. putida as a survival strategy in its hostile, recurrently changing habitat. PMID:23186381

  18. Manganese (Mn) Oxidation Increases Intracellular Mn in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    PubMed Central

    Banh, Andy; Chavez, Valarie; Doi, Julia; Nguyen, Allison; Hernandez, Sophia; Ha, Vu; Jimenez, Peter; Espinoza, Fernanda; Johnson, Hope A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial manganese (Mn) oxidation plays an important role in the global biogeochemical cycling of Mn and other compounds, and the diversity and prevalence of Mn oxidizers have been well established. Despite many hypotheses of why these bacteria may oxidize Mn, the physiological reasons remain elusive. Intracellular Mn levels were determined for Pseudomonas putida GB-1 grown in the presence or absence of Mn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Mn oxidizing wild type P. putida GB-1 had higher intracellular Mn than non Mn oxidizing mutants grown under the same conditions. P. putida GB-1 had a 5 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to the non Mn oxidizing mutant P. putida GB-1-007 and a 59 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to P. putida GB-1 ∆2665 ∆2447. The intracellular Mn is primarily associated with the less than 3 kDa fraction, suggesting it is not bound to protein. Protein oxidation levels in Mn oxidizing and non oxidizing cultures were relatively similar, yet Mn oxidation did increase survival of P. putida GB-1 when oxidatively stressed. This study is the first to link Mn oxidation to Mn homeostasis and oxidative stress protection. PMID:24147089

  19. Characterization of type IV pilus genes in plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida WCS358.

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, A; Heijnen, I; de Cock, H; Filloux, A; Tommassen, J

    1994-01-01

    In a search for factors that could contribute to the ability of the plant growth-stimulating Pseudomonas putida WCS358 to colonize plant roots, the organism was analyzed for the presence of genes required for pilus biosynthesis. The pilD gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which has also been designated xcpA, is involved in protein secretion and in the biogenesis of type IV pili. It encodes a peptidase that processes the precursors of the pilin subunits and of several components of the secretion apparatus. Prepilin processing activity could be demonstrated in P. putida WCS358, suggesting that this nonpathogenic strain may contain type IV pili as well. A DNA fragment containing the pilD (xcpA) gene of P. putida was cloned and found to complement a pilD (xcpA) mutation in P. aeruginosa. Nucleotide sequencing revealed, next to the pilD (xcpA) gene, the presence of two additional genes, pilA and pilC, that are highly homologous to genes involved in the biogenesis of type IV pili. The pilA gene encodes the pilin subunit, and pilC is an accessory gene, required for the assembly of the subunits into pili. In comparison with the pil gene cluster in P. aeruginosa, a gene homologous to pilB is lacking in the P. putida gene cluster. Pili were not detected on the cell surface of P. putida itself, not even when pilA was expressed from the tac promoter on a plasmid, indicating that not all the genes required for pilus biogenesis were expressed under the conditions tested. Expression of pilA of P. putida in P. aeruginosa resulted in the production of pili containing P. putida PilA subunits. Images PMID:7905475

  20. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE AGGA LOCUS INVOLVED IN AGGLUTINATION ND ADHERENCE OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA, A BENEFICIAL FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONAD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An isolate of Pseudomonas putida, which rapidly adheres to plant roots is agglutinated by a glycoprotein from root surfaces. gglutination is presented and adherence to the root surface is diminished by Tn5 insertion in mutant 5123. wo cosmid clones from wild type P putida and 2.7...

  1. Dechlorination of Chloral Hydrate Is Influenced by the Biofilm Adhesin Protein LapA in Pseudomonas putida LF54

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wanjun; Huhe; Pan, Yuanbai; Toyofuku, Masanori; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    LapA is the largest surface adhesion protein of Pseudomonas putida that initiates biofilm formation. Here, by using transposon insertion mutagenesis and a conditional lapA mutant, we demonstrate for the first time that LapA influences chloral hydrate (CH) dechlorination in P. putida LF54. PMID:23603683

  2. Cotransport of TiO2 nanoparticles and Pseudomonas putida in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharis, Ioannis; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2015-04-01

    The scope of this study was to investigate the cotransport of Pseudomonas putida and TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) in porous media. Flowthrough experiments were conducted in glass columns with diameter of 2.5 cm and length of 30 cm, packed with 2-mm diameter spherical glass beads. Anatase TiO2 NPs solutions were prepared in distilled water of at two different concentrations: 5 and 50 mg/L. The concentration of P. putida solutions varied from 105 to 109 cfu/mL. Initially, transport experiments were conducted separately for P. putida and TiO2 NPs. Subsequently, TiO2 and P. putida cotransport experiments were conducted. The concentration of TiO2 NPs was measured by a fluorescence spectrophotometer and P. putida concentration was determined by plate counts on agar plates and optical density measurements. All experiments were conducted with two different flow rates: 1 and 2 mL/min. The transport experiments with P. putida exhibited similar transport behavior with the tracer (NaBr) indicating that there was not considerable retention. The mass recovery of P. putida was close to 100% in all of the transport experiments conducted. However, the transport experiments with TiO2 NPs suggested that a significant portion of the NPs was retained in the column. Based on the cotransport experimental data, it is evident that the transport of P. putida was not significantly affected by the presence of TiO2. It should be noted that the mass recovery of NPs in the transport and costransport experiments was between 40 and 60%.

  3. Survival and impact of genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida harboring mercury resistance gene in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, K; Uchiyama, H; Yagi, O

    1993-08-01

    The survival of wild-type and genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida PpY101 that contained a recombinant plasmid pSR134 conferring mercury resistance were monitored in aquatic microcosms. We used lake, river, and spring water samples. The density of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida decreased rapidly within 5 days (population change rate k -0.87 approximately -1.00 day-1), then moderately after 5 to 28 days (-0.10 approximately -0.14 day-1). The population change rates of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida were not significantly different. We studied the important factors affecting the survival of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida introduced in aquatic microcosms. Visible light exerted an adverse effect on the survival of the two strains. The densities of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida were almost constant until 7 days after inoculation in natural water filtered with a 0.45-micron membrane filter, or treated with cycloheximide to inhibit the growth of protozoa. These results suggested that protozoan predation was one of the most important factors for the survival of two strains. We examined the impact of the addition of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida on indigenous bacteria and protozoa. Inoculation of genetically engineered or wild-type P. putida had no apparent effect on the density of indigenous bacteria. The density of protozoa increased in microcosms inoculated with genetically engineered or wild-type P. putida at 3 days after inoculation, but after 5 to 21 days, the density of protozoa decreased to the same level as the control microcosms. PMID:7764012

  4. Experimental and theoretical study of Pseudomonas putida transport in a three-dimensional model aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliadou, I. A.; Katzourakis, V. E.; Syngouna, V. I.; Chrysikopoulos, C. V.

    2012-04-01

    This study is focused on the transport of Pseudomonas (P.) putida bacterial cells in a three-dimensional model aquifer. The pilot-scale aquifer consisted of a rectangular glass tank with internal dimensions: 120 cm length, 48 cm width, and 50 cm height, carefully packed with well-characterized quartz sand. The P. putida attachment onto the aquifer sand was determined with batch experiments, and was adequately described by a linear isotherm. Transport experiments with a conservative tracer and P. putida were conducted to characterize the aquifer and to investigate the bacterial behavior during transport in water saturated porous media. A three-dimensional, finite-difference numerical model for bacterial transport in saturated, homogeneous porous media was developed and was used to successfully fit the experimental data. Furthermore, theoretical interaction energy calculations suggested that the extended DLVO theory seems to predict bacteria attachment onto the aquifer sand better than the classical DLVO theory.

  5. Trichloroethylene degradation by Escherichia coli containing the cloned Pseudomonas putida F1 toluene dioxygenase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, G.J.; Gibson, D.T. ); Wackett, L.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 has been implicated as an enzyme capable of degrading trichloroethylene. This has now been confirmed with Escherichia coli JM109(pDTG601) that contains the structural genes (todC1C2BA) of toluene dioxygenase under the control of the tac promoter. The extent of trichloroethylene degradation by the recombinant organism depended on the cell concentration and the concentration of trichloroethylene. A linear rate of trichloroethylene degradation was observed with the E. coli recombinant strain. In contrast, P. putida F39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1 that does not contain cis-toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, showed a much faster initial rate of trichloroethylene degradation which decreased over time.

  6. Evaluation of various carbon substrates for the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates bearing functional groups by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Kim, D Y; Kim, Y B; Rhee, Y H

    2000-10-10

    The ability of Pseudomonas putida to synthesize polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) from 36 different carboxylic acids containing various functional groups was examined. This bacterium did not utilize short carboxylic acids (C(4)-C(6)) containing bromine, methoxy, ethoxy, cyclohexyl, phenoxy, and olefin groups as the sole carbon substrate. No polymer was isolated from the cells grown with carboxylic acids bearing hydroxyl, amino, para-methoxyphenoxy, and para-ethoxyphenoxy groups regardless of the carbon substrate chain lengths used even when they were cofed with nonanoic acid. Of all the carbon substrates evaluated, only 6-para-methylphenoxyhexanoic acid, 8-para-methylphenoxyoctanoic acid, 8-meta-methylphenoxyoctanoic acid, 10-undecenoic acid, and 10-undecynoic acid supported both growth and the production of PHA containing the corresponding functional groups by P. putida. The present results indicate that the carbon availability of P. putida for growth and PHA production is significantly different from that of P. oleovorans. PMID:11033174

  7. Expression analysis of the fpr (ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase) gene in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yunho; Pena-Llopis, Samuel; Kang, Yoon-Suk; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Demple, Bruce; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun . E-mail: wpark@korea.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    The ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (fpr) participates in cellular defense against oxidative damage. The fpr expression in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is induced by oxidative and osmotic stresses. FinR, a LysR-type transcriptional factor near the fpr gene in the P. putida KT2440 genome, is required for induction of the fpr under both conditions. We have shown that the fpr and finR gene products can counteract the effects of oxidative and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, FinR-independent expression occurs either during a long period of incubation with paraquat or with high concentrations of oxidative stress agent. This result indicates that there may be additional regulators present in the P. putida KT2440 genome. In contrast to in vivo expression kinetics of fpr from the plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, the fpr gene from P. putida KT2440 exhibited unusually prolonged expression after oxidative stress. Transcriptional fusion and Northern blot analysis studies indicated that the FinR is negatively autoregulated. Expression of the fpr promoter was higher in minimal media than in rich media during exponential phase growth. Consistent with this result, the fpr and finR mutants had a long lag phase in minimal media in contrast to wild-type growth characteristics. Antioxidants such as ascorbate could increase the growth rate of all tested strains in minimal media. This result confirmed that P. putida KT2440 experienced more oxidative stress during exponential growth in minimal media than in rich media. Endogenous promoter activity of the fpr gene is much higher during exponential growth than during stationary growth. These findings demonstrate new relationships between fpr, finR, and the physiology of oxidative stress in P. putida KT2440.

  8. Solvent resistance pumps of Pseudomonas putida S12: Applications in 1-naphthol production and biocatalyst engineering.

    PubMed

    Janardhan Garikipati, S V B; Peeples, Tonya L

    2015-09-20

    The solvent resistance capacity of Pseudomonas putida S12 was applied by using the organism as a host for biocatalysis and through cloning and expressing solvent resistant pump genes into Escherichia coli. P. putida S12 expressing toluene ortho mononooxygenase (TOM-Green) was used for 1-naphthol production in a water-organic solvent biphasic system. Application of P. putida S12 improved 1-naphthol production per gram cell dry weight by approximately 42% compared to E. coli. Moreover, P. putida S12 enabled the use of a less expensive solvent, decanol, for 1-naphthol production. The solvent resistant pump (srpABC) genes of P. putida S12 were cloned into a solvent sensitive E. coli strain to transfer solvent tolerance. Recombinant strains bearing srpABC genes in either a low-copy number or a high-copy number plasmid grew in the presence of saturated concentration of toluene. Both of the recombinant strains were more tolerant to 1% v/v of toxic solvents, decanol and hexane, reaching similar cell density as the no-solvent control. Reverse-transcriptase analysis revealed that the srpABC genes were transcribed in engineered strains. The results demonstrate successful transfer of the proton-dependent solvent resistance mechanism and suggest that the engineered strain could serve as more robust biocatalysts in media with organic solvents. PMID:26143210

  9. Toxicity of graphene oxide on growth and metabolism of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Combarros, R G; Collado, S; Díaz, M

    2016-06-01

    The increasing consumption of graphene derivatives leads to greater presence of these materials in wastewater treatment plants and ecological systems. The toxicity effect of graphene oxide (GO) on the microbial functions involved in the biological wastewater treatment process is studied, using Pseudomonas putida and salicylic acid (SA) as bacterial and pollutant models. A multiparametric flow cytometry (FC) method has been developed to measure the metabolic activity and viability of P. putida in contact with GO. A continuous reduction in the percentages of viable cells and a slight increase, lower than 5%, in the percentages of damaged and dead cells, suggest that P. putida in contact with GO loses the membrane integrity but preserves metabolic activity. The growth of P. putida was strongly inhibited by GO, since 0.05mgmL(-1) of GO reduced the maximum growth by a third, and the inhibition was considerably greater for GO concentrations higher than 0.1mgmL(-1). The specific SA removal rate decreased with GO concentration up to 0.1mgmL(-1) indicating that while GO always reduces the growth of P. putida, for concentrations higher than 0.1mgmL(-1), it also reduces its activity. Similar behaviour is observed using simulated urban and industrial wastewaters, the observed effects being more acute in the industrial wastewaters. PMID:26937871

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Caprolactam-Degrading Pseudomonas putida Strain SJ3.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Jun; Park, Gun-Seok; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Jung, Byung Kown; Park, Yeong-Jun; Yoo, Na-Kyung; Lee, Changhee; Park, Choi Kyu; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain SJ3, which possesses caprolactam-degrading ability, was isolated from dyeing industry wastewater in Daegu, Republic of Korea. Here, we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of the strain. The 5,596,765-bp-long genome contains 4,293 protein-coding genes and 68 RNA genes with 61.70% G+C content. PMID:26205864

  11. Cotransport of Pseudomonas putida and kaolinite particles through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliadou, Ioanna A.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2011-02-01

    This study is focused on Pseudomonas putida bacteria transport in porous media in the presence of suspended kaolinite clay particles. Experiments were performed with bacteria and kaolinite particles separately to determine their individual transport characteristics in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads. The results indicated that the mass recovery of bacteria and clay particles decreased as the pore water velocity decreased. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the attachment of Pseudomonas putida onto kaolinite particles. The attachment process was adequately described by a Langmuir isotherm. Finally, bacteria and kaolinite particles were injected simultaneously into a packed column in order to investigate their cotransport behavior. The experimental data suggested that the presence of clay particles significantly inhibited the transport of bacteria in water-saturated porous media. The observed reduction of Pseudomonas putida recovery in the column outflow was attributed to bacteria attachment onto kaolinite particles, which were retained onto the solid matrix of the column. A mathematical model was developed to describe the transport of bacteria in the presence of suspended clay particles in one-dimensional water-saturated porous media. Model simulations were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Factors influencing the ability of Pseudomonas putida strains epI and II to degrade the organophosphate ethoprophos.

    PubMed

    Karpouzas, D G; Walker, A

    2000-07-01

    Two strains of Pseudomonas putida (epI and epII), isolated previously from ethoprophos-treated soil, were able to degrade ethoprophos (10 mg 1(-1)) in a mineral salts medium plus nitrogen (MSMN) in less than 50 h with a concurrent population growth. Addition of glucose or succinate to MSMN did not influence the degrading ability of Ps. putida epI, but increased the lag phase before rapid degradation commenced with Ps. putida epII. The degrading ability of the two isolates was lost when the pesticide provided the sole source of phosphorus. Degradation of ethoprophos was most rapid when bacterial cultures were incubated at 25 and 37 degrees C. Pseudomonas putida epI was capable of completely degrading ethoprophos at a slow rate at 5 degrees C, compared with Ps. putida epII which could not completely degrade ethoprophos at the same time. Pseudomonas putida epI was capable of degrading ethoprophos when only 60 cells ml(-1) were used as initial inoculum. In contrast, Ps. putida epII was able to totally degrade ethoprophos when inoculum densities of 600 cells ml(-1) or higher were used. In general, longer lag phases accompanied the lower inoculum levels. Both isolates rapidly degraded ethoprophos in MSMN at pHs ranging from 5.5 to 7.6, but not at pH 5 or below. PMID:10945777

  13. Efficient hydroxylation of 1,8-cineole with monoterpenoid-resistant recombinant Pseudomonas putida GS1.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jia; Schewe, Hendrik; Buchhaupt, Markus; Holtmann, Dirk; Schrader, Jens

    2016-07-01

    In this work, monoterpenoid hydroxylation with Pseudomonas putida GS1 and KT2440 were investigated as host strains, and the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP176A1 (P450cin) and its native redox partner cindoxin (CinC) from Citrobacter braakii were introduced in P. putida to catalyze the stereoselective hydroxylation of 1,8-cineole to (1R)-6β-hydroxy-1,8-cineole. Growth experiments in the presence of 1,8-cineole confirmed pseudomonads' superior resilience compared to E. coli. Whole-cell P. putida harboring P450cin with and without CinC were capable of hydroxylating 1,8-cineole, whereas coexpression of CinC has been shown to accelerate this bioconversion. Under the same conditions, P. putida GS1 produced more than twice the amount of heterologous P450cin and bioconversion product than P. putida KT2440. A concentration of 1.1 ± 0.1 g/L (1R)-6β-hydroxy-1,8-cineole was obtained within 55 h in shake flasks and 13.3 ± 1.9 g/L in 89 h in a bioreactor, the latter of which corresponds to a yield YP/S of 79 %. To the authors' knowledge, this is the highest product titer for a P450 based whole-cell monoterpene oxyfunctionalization reported so far. These results show that solvent-tolerant P. putida GS1 can be used as a highly efficient recombinant whole-cell biocatalyst for a P450 monooxygenase-based valorization of monoterpenoids. PMID:27263007

  14. Plasmid control of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida phenotypes and of linalool and p-cymene oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    de Smet, M J; Friedman, M B; Gunsalus, I C

    1989-01-01

    Two Pseudomonas strains (PpG777 and PaG158) were derived from the parent isolate Pseudomonas incognita (putida). Strain PpG777 resembles the parental culture in growth on linalool as a source of carbon and slight growth on p-cymene, whereas PaG158 grows well on p-cymene, but not on linalool or other terpenes tested, and has a P. aeruginosa phenotype. Curing studies indicate that linalool metabolism is controlled by an extrachromosomal element whose loss forms a stable strain PaG158 with the p-cymene growth and P. aeruginosa phenotype characters. The plasmid can be transferred by PpG777 to both P. putida and P. aeruginosa strains. Surprisingly, the latter assume the P. putida phenotype. We conclude that the genetic potential to oxidize p-cymene is inherent in PpG777 but expression is repressed. Similarly, this observation implies that support of linalool oxidation effectively conceals the P. aeruginosa character. PMID:2504698

  15. Effect of Pseudomonas putida on Growth and Anthocyanin Pigment in Two Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Zulueta-Rodriguez, Ramon; Cordoba-Matson, Miguel Victor; Hernandez-Montiel, Luis Guillermo; Murillo-Amador, Bernardo; Rueda-Puente, Edgar; Lara, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) that have the capacity to improve growth in plants. The purpose of this study was to determine growth and anthocyanin pigmentation of the bracts in two poinsettia Euphorbia pulcherrima cultivars (Prestige and Sonora Marble) using three strains of P. putida, as well as a mixture of the three (MIX). Comparison with the control group indicated for the most part that Prestige grew better than the Sonora Marble cultivars with the PGPR strains. Prestige with the MIX strain grew better compared to control for the number of cyathia (83 versus 70.4), volume of roots (45 versus 35 cm3), number of leaves (78 versus 58), and area of leaf (1,788 versus 1,331 cm2), except for the number of flowers (8.8 versus 11.6). To the naked eye, coloration of plants appeared identical in color compared to the control group. For all plants with P. putida strains, there was less anthocyanin pigment, but biomass was always greater with PGPR strains. Nevertheless, to the naked eye, the coloration of the plants appeared identical in color compared to the control group. This is the first study reporting the positive effects of P. putida rhizobacteria treatments on growth of poinsettia cultivars. PMID:25097888

  16. Effect of Pseudomonas putida on growth and anthocyanin pigment in two poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Zulueta-Rodriguez, Ramon; Cordoba-Matson, Miguel Victor; Hernandez-Montiel, Luis Guillermo; Murillo-Amador, Bernardo; Rueda-Puente, Edgar; Lara, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) that have the capacity to improve growth in plants. The purpose of this study was to determine growth and anthocyanin pigmentation of the bracts in two poinsettia Euphorbia pulcherrima cultivars (Prestige and Sonora Marble) using three strains of P. putida, as well as a mixture of the three (MIX). Comparison with the control group indicated for the most part that Prestige grew better than the Sonora Marble cultivars with the PGPR strains. Prestige with the MIX strain grew better compared to control for the number of cyathia (83 versus 70.4), volume of roots (45 versus 3  cm(3)), number of leaves (78 versus 58), and area of leaf (1,788 versus 1,331 cm(2)), except for the number of flowers (8.8 versus 11.6). To the naked eye, coloration of plants appeared identical in color compared to the control group. For all plants with P. putida strains, there was less anthocyanin pigment, but biomass was always greater with PGPR strains. Nevertheless, to the naked eye, the coloration of the plants appeared identical in color compared to the control group. This is the first study reporting the positive effects of P. putida rhizobacteria treatments on growth of poinsettia cultivars. PMID:25097888

  17. Degradation of trichloroethylene by toluene dioxygenase in whole-cell studies with Pseudomonas putida F1.

    PubMed Central

    Wackett, L P; Gibson, D T

    1988-01-01

    Toluene-induced cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 removed trichloroethylene from growth media at a significantly greater initial rate than the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. With toluene-induced P. putida F1, the initial degradation rate varied linearly with trichloroethylene concentration over the range of 8 to 80 microM (1.05 to 10.5 ppm). At 80 microM (10.5 ppm) trichloroethylene and 30 degrees C, the initial rate was 1.8 nmol/min per mg of total cell protein, but the rate decreased rapidly with time. A series of mutant strains derived from P. putida F1 that are defective in the todC gene, which encodes the oxygenase component of toluene dioxygenase, failed to degrade trichloroethylene and to oxidize indole to indigo. A spontaneous revertant selected from a todC culture regained simultaneously the abilities to oxidize toluene, to form indigo, and to degrade trichloroethylene. The three isomeric dichloroethylenes were degraded by P. putida F1, but tetrachloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethylene were not removed from incubation mixtures. PMID:3415234

  18. Metal Inhibition of Growth and Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, J.; Sposito, G.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (MnO2) are ubiquitous nanoparticulate minerals that contribute to the adsorption of nutrient and toxicant metals, the oxidative degradation of various organic compounds, and the respiration of metal-reducing bacteria in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The formation of these minerals is catalyzed by a diverse and widely-distributed group of bacteria and fungi, often through the enzymatic oxidation of aqueous Mn(II) to Mn(IV). In metal-impacted ecosystems, toxicant metals may alter the viability and metabolic activity of Mn-oxidizing organisms, thereby limiting the conditions under which biogenic MnO2 can form and diminishing their potential as adsorbent materials. Pseudomonas putida GB-1 (P. putida GB-1) is a model Mn-oxidizing laboratory culture representative of freshwater and soil biofilm-forming bacteria. Manganese oxidation in P. putida GB-1 occurs via two single-electron-transfer reactions, involving a multicopper oxidase enzyme found on the bacterial outer membrane surface. Near the onset of the stationary phase of growth, dark brown MnO2 particles are deposited in a matrix of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances, thus forming heterogeneous biomineral assemblages. In this study, we assessed the influence of various transition metals on microbial growth and manganese oxidation capacity in a P. putida GB-1 culture propagated in a nutrient-rich growth medium. The concentration-response behavior of actively growing P. putida GB-1 cells was investigated for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn at pH ≈ 6 in the presence and absence of 1 mM Mn. Toxicity parameters such as EC0, EC50 and Hillslope, and EC100 were obtained from the sigmoidal concentration-response curves. The extent of MnO2 formation in the presence of the various metal cations was documented 24, 50, 74 and 104 h after the metal-amended medium was inoculated. Toxicity values were compared to twelve physicochemical properties of the metals tested. Significant

  19. Effects of Mutations in the Pseudomonas putida miaA Gene: Regulation of the trpE and trpGDC Operons in P. putida by Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Olekhnovich, Igor; Gussin, Gary N.

    2001-01-01

    Tn5 insertion mutants defective in regulation of the Pseudomonas putida trpE and trpGDC operons by tryptophan were found to contain insertions in the P. putida miaA gene, whose product (in Escherichia coli) modifies tRNATrp and is required for attenuation. Nucleotide sequences upstream of trpE and trpG encode putative leader peptides similar in sequence to leader peptides found in other bacterial species, and the phenotypes of the mutants strongly suggest that transcription of these operons is regulated solely by attenuation. PMID:11325956

  20. Response of plant-colonizing pseudomonads to hydrogen peroxide. [Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuwon, J.; Anderson, A.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Colonization of plant root surfaces by Pseudomonas putida may require mechanisms that protect this bacterium against superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide produced by the root. Catalase and superoxide dismutase may be important in this bacterial defense system. Stationary-phase cells of P. putida were not killed by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at concentrations up to 10 mM, and extracts from these cells possessed three isozymic bands (A, B, and C) of catalase activity in native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Logarithmic-phase cells exposed directly to hydrogen peroxide concentrations above 1 mM were killed. Extracts of logarithmic-phase cells displayed only band A catalase activity. Protection against 5 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was apparent after previous exposure of the logarithmic-phase cells to nonlethal concentrations (30 to 300 {mu}M) of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Extracts of these protected cells possessed enhanced catalase activity of band A and small amounts of bands B and C. A single form of superoxide dismutase and isoforms of catalase were apparent in extracts from a foliar intercellular pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola. The mobilities of these P. syringae enzymes were distinct from those of enzymes in P. putida extracts.

  1. Phenol removal from waste gases with a biological filter by Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Zilli, M.; Coverti, A.; Lodi, A.; Del Borghi, M.; Ferraiolo, G. )

    1993-03-25

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of biologically removing phenol from waste gases by means of a biofilter using a Pseudomonas putida strain. Two series of both batch and continuous test have been performed in order to ascertain the microbial degradation of phenol. For the preliminary batch tests, carried out in order to test the effective feasibility of the process and to investigate their kinetic behavior, two different microbial cultures belonging to the Pseudomonas genus have been employed, a heterogeneous culture and a pure strain of P. putida. The results of these comparative investigations showed that the pure culture is more efficient than the mixed one, even when the latter has undergone three successive acclimatization test. The continuous experiments have been conducted during a period of about 1 year in a laboratory-scale column, packed with a mixture of peat and glass beads, and utilizing the pure culture of P. putida as microflora and varying the inlet phenol concentration from 50 up to 2,000 mg m[sup [minus]3]. The results obtained show that high degrees of conversion can be obtained (0.93/0.996) operating at a residence time of 54 s.

  2. EXPRESSION OF DEGRADATIVE GENES OF 'PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA' IN 'CAULOBACTER CRESCENTUS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recombinant plasmid RP4-TOL was transferred into Caulobacter crescentus at a high frequency, and the plasmid was maintained for at least 50 generations. C. crescentus cells which contained RP4-TOL grew on all the aromatic compounds that the plasmid normally allowed Pseudomona...

  3. Regulation of Hydroxylation and Nitroreduction Pathways during Metabolism of the Neonicotinoid Insecticide Imidacloprid by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tian-Qi; Mao, Shi-Yun; Sun, Shi-Lei; Yang, Wen-Long; Ge, Feng; Dai, Yi-Jun

    2016-06-22

    Imidacloprid (IMI) is mainly metabolized via nitroreduction and hydroxylation pathways, which produce different metabolites that are toxic to mammals and insects. However, regulation of IMI metabolic flux between nitroreduction and hydroxylation pathways is still unclear. In this study, Pseudomonas putida was found to metabolize IMI to 5-hydroxy and nitroso IMI and was therefore used for investigating the regulation of IMI metabolic flux. The cell growth time, cosubstrate, dissolved oxygen concentration, and pH showed significant effect on IMI degradation and nitroso and 5-hydroxy IMI formation. Gene cloning and overexpression in Escherichia coli proved that P. putida KT2440 aldehyde oxidase mediated IMI nitroreduction to nitroso IMI, while cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP) failed to improve IMI hydroxylation. Moreover, E. coli cells without CYP could hydroxylate IMI, demonstrating the role of a non-CYP enzyme in IMI hydroxylation. Thus, the present study helps to further understand the environmental fate of IMI and its underlying mechanism. PMID:27230024

  4. Induction of the tod operon by trichloroethylene in Pseudomonas putida TVA8

    SciTech Connect

    Shingleton, J.T.; Applegate, B.M.; Nagel, A.C.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Sayler, G.S.

    1998-12-01

    Bioluminescence, mRNA levels, and toluene degradation rates in Pseudomonas putida TVA8 were measured as a function of various concentrations of toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE). TVA8 showed an increasing bioluminescence response to increasing TCE and toluene concentrations. Compared to uninduced TVA8 cultures, todC1 mRNA levels increased 11-fold for TCE-treated cultures and 13-fold for toluene-treated cultures. Compared to uninduced P. putida F1 cultures, todC1 mRNA levels increased 4,4-fold for TCE-induced cultures and 4.9-fold for toluene-induced cultures. Initial toluene degradation rates were linearly correlated with specific bioluminescence in TVA8 cultures.

  5. Biotransformation of 6,6-Dimethylfulvene by Pseudomonas putida RE213

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, R. W.; Selifonov, S. A.

    1996-01-01

    The biotransformation of 6,6-dimethylfulvene [5-(1-methylethylidene)-1,3-cyclopentadiene], a nonaromatic C(inf5) carbocyclic analog of isopropylbenzene, was examined by using Pseudomonas putida RE213, a Tn5-generated dihydrodiol-accumulating mutant of the isopropylbenzene-degrading strain P. putida RE204. 6,6-Dimethylfulvene was converted to a single chiral product identified as (+)-(1R,2S)-cis-1,2-dihydroxy-5-(1-methylethylidene)-3-cyclopentene. This isopropylbenzene 2,3-dioxygenase-catalyzed transformation demonstrates the potential of bacterial arene dioxygenases for the direct conversion of cyclopentadienylidene compounds to homochiral C(inf5) carbocyclic cis-diols for use in enantiocontrolled organic syntheses. PMID:16535266

  6. Stereospecific hydroxylation of indan by Escherichia coli containing the cloned toluene dioxygenase genes from Pseudomonas putida F1

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.M.; Cruden, D.L.; Zylstra, G.J.; Gibson, D.T. )

    1992-10-01

    Escheria coli JM109(pDTG601), containing the todC1C2BA genes encoding toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1, oxides indan to (-)-(1R)-indanol (83{percent} R) and trans-1,3-indandiol. Under similar conditions, P.putida F39/D oxidizes indan to (-)-(1R)-indanol (96{percent}R), 1-indanone, and trans-1,3-indandiol. The differences in the enantiomeric composition of the 1-indanols formed by the two organisms are due to the presence of a 1-indanol dehydrogenase in P.putida F39/D that preferentially oxidizes (+)-(1S)-indanol.

  7. Metabolism of chlorofluorocarbons and polybrominated compounds by pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) via an engineered metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, H.G.; Sadowsky, M.J.; Wackett, L.P.

    1994-11-01

    Polyhalogenated EPA Priority Pollutants are among the most toxic and persistent of the xenobiotic compounds found in the environment. In those instances when biodegradation does occure, it is typically via reductive dechlorination reactions in anaerobic sediments. These reactions are very slow and difficult to study. In this study, cytochrome P-450{sub cam} from Pseudomonas putida G786 and toluene dioxygenase from P. putida F1 were used to catalyze consecutive cometabolic dehalogenation reactions. New halogenated substrates for both were identified. The results demonstrate the metabolism of polybrominated compounds and chlorofluoroalkanes via the engineered metabolic pathway in P. putida G786(pHG-2). 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Cytosine chemoreceptor McpC in Pseudomonas putida F1 also detects nicotinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Hughes, Jonathan G.; Luu, Rita A.; Ditty, Jayna L.

    2014-01-01

    Soil bacteria are generally capable of growth on a wide range of organic chemicals, and pseudomonads are particularly adept at utilizing aromatic compounds. Pseudomonads are motile bacteria that are capable of sensing a wide range of chemicals, using both energy taxis and chemotaxis. Whilst the identification of specific chemicals detected by the ≥26 chemoreceptors encoded in Pseudomonas genomes is ongoing, the functions of only a limited number of Pseudomonas chemoreceptors have been revealed to date. We report here that McpC, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein in Pseudomonas putida F1 that was previously shown to function as a receptor for cytosine, was also responsible for the chemotactic response to the carboxylated pyridine nicotinic acid. PMID:25294107

  9. Trichloroethylene removal and oxidation toxicity mediated by toluene dioxygenase of Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.; Jenkins, R.O.

    1994-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a major ground water contaminant and potential health hazard in drinking water. This paper reports on the cometabolism of TCE by a wild-type strain of Pseudomonas putida containing an inducible toluene dioxygenase enzyme. The results show rapid TCE removal by the strain but severe oxidation toxicity and rapid cell death. This is also the first report of enhanced capacity of bacterial cells to remove TCE in the presence of dithiothreitol. Presented also is evidence for induction of toluene degradation by TCE. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Nucleotide sequencing and characterization of the genes encoding benzene oxidation enzymes of Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, S.; Doi, S.; Yorifuji, T.; Takagi, M.; Yano, K.

    1987-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genes from Pseudomonas putida encoding oxidation of benzene to catechol was determined. Five open reading frames were found in the sequence. Four corresponding protein molecules were detected by a DNA-directed in vitro translation system. Escherichia coli cells containing the fragment with the four open reading frames transformed benzene to cis-benzene glycol, which is an intermediate of the oxidation of benzene to catechol. The relation between the product of each cistron and the components of the benzene oxidation enzyme system is discussed.

  11. Antibiotic resistance determinants in a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a hospital.

    PubMed

    Molina, Lázaro; Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Roca, Amalia; Porcel, Mario; de la Torre, Jesús; Segura, Ana; Plesiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267) kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts. PMID:24465371

  12. Antibiotic Resistance Determinants in a Pseudomonas putida Strain Isolated from a Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Roca, Amalia; Porcel, Mario; de la Torre, Jesús; Segura, Ana; Plesiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267) kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts. PMID:24465371

  13. Investigating Pseudomonas putida-Candida humicola interactions as affected by chelate Fe(III) in soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yao, Jun; Yu, Chan; Chen, Huilun; Yi, Zhengji

    2014-03-01

    Microcalorimetric technique was applied to assess the toxic effect of EDTA-chelated trivalent iron on Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) (bacterium), Candida humicola (C. humicola) (fungus) and their mixture in sterilized soil. Microbial growth rate constant k, total heat evolution Q T, metabolic enthalpy ∆H met, mass specific heat rate J Q/S, microbial biomass C and inhibitory ratio I were calculated. Results showed that microcalorimetric indexes decreased with the increasing Fe(III)-EDTA complex concentration. Comparing the single and mixed strains, the effect of Fe(III) on bacterium-fungus interaction was dominant at lower dose, whereas, the metal toxicity at high dose of Fe was the main factor affecting P. putida and C. humicola activity. Thus, the mixture had moderate tolerance to the iron overload, and exhibit synergistic interaction in exponential growth phase (0-0.3 mg g(-1)). The results of glucose degradation showed that glucose was consumed totally at the end of exponential phase of microbial growth. PMID:24270965

  14. Metabolomics reveals the physiological response of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (UWC1) after pharmaceutical exposure.

    PubMed

    Currie, Felicity; Broadhurst, David I; Dunn, Warwick B; Sellick, Christopher A; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-04-01

    Human pharmaceuticals have been detected in wastewater treatment plants, rivers, and estuaries throughout Europe and the United States. It is widely acknowledged that there is insufficient information available to determine whether prolonged exposure to low levels of these substances is having an impact on the microbial ecology in such environments. In this study we attempt to measure the effects of exposing cultures of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (UWC1) to six pharmaceuticals by looking at differences in metabolite levels. Initially, we used Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis to discriminate between cell cultures exposed to different pharmaceuticals. This suggested that on exposure to propranolol there were significant changes in the lipid complement of P. putida. Metabolic profiling with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), coupled with univariate statistical analyses, was used to identify endogenous metabolites contributing to discrimination between cells exposed to the six drugs. This approach suggested that the energy reserves of exposed cells were being expended and was particularly evident on exposure to propranolol. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were raised in P. putida exposed to propranolol. Increased energy requirements may be due to energy dependent efflux pumps being used to remove propranolol from the cell. PMID:26932201

  15. Novel broad host range shuttle vectors for expression in Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Troeschel, Sonja Christina; Thies, Stephan; Link, Olga; Real, Catherine Isabell; Knops, Katja; Wilhelm, Susanne; Rosenau, Frank; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2012-10-15

    Novel shuttle vectors named pEBP were constructed to allow the gene expression in different bacterial hosts including Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. These vectors share the inducible promoters P(T7) and P(Xyl) and a cos site to enable packaging of plasmid DNA into phage, and carry different multiple cloning sites and antibiotic resistance genes. Vector pEBP41 generally replicates episomally while pEBP18 replicates episomally in Gram-negative bacteria only, but integrates into the chromosome of B. subtilis. Plasmid copy numbers determined for E. coli and P. putida were in the range of 5-50 per cell. The functionality of pEBP18 and pEBP41 was confirmed by expression of two lipolytic enzymes, namely lipase A from B. subtilis and cutinase from the eukaryotic fungus Fusarium solani pisi in three different host strains. Additionally, we report here the construction of a T7 RNA polymerase-based expression strain of P. putida. PMID:22440389

  16. Metabolic Engineering of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to Produce Anthranilate from Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Kuepper, Jannis; Dickler, Jasmin; Biggel, Michael; Behnken, Swantje; Jäger, Gernot; Wierckx, Nick; Blank, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas putida KT2440 strain was engineered in order to produce anthranilate (oAB, ortho-aminobenzoate), a precursor of the aromatic amino acid tryptophan, from glucose as sole carbon source. To enable the production of the metabolic intermediate oAB, the trpDC operon encoding an anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase (TrpD) and an indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase (TrpC), were deleted. In addition, the chorismate mutase (pheA) responsible for the conversion of chorismate over prephenate to phenylpyruvate was deleted in the background of the deletion of trpDC to circumvent a potential drain of precursor. To further increase the oAB production, a feedback insensitive version of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase encoded by the aroGD146N gene and an anthranilate synthase (trpES40FG) were overexpressed separately and simultaneously in the deletion mutants. With optimized production conditions in a tryptophan-limited fed-batch process a maximum of 1.54 ± 0.3 g L-1 (11.23 mM) oAB was obtained with the best performing engineered P. putida KT2440 strain (P. putida ΔtrpDC pSEVA234_aroGD146N_trpES40FG). PMID:26635771

  17. Degradation of chloronitrobenzenes by a coculture of Pseudomonas putida and a Rhodococcus sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.S.; Lim, S.J.; Chang, Y.K.; Kim, H.S.; Livingston, A.G.

    1999-03-01

    A single microorganism able to mineralize chloronitrobenzenes (CNBs) has not been reported, and degradation of CNBs of coculture of two microbial strains was attempted. Pseudomonas putida HS12 was first isolated by analogue enrichment culture using nitrobenzene (NB) as the substrate, and this strain was observed to possess a partial reductive pathway for the degradation of NB. From high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, NB-grown cells of P. putida HS12 were found to convert 3- and 4-CNBs to the corresponding 5- and 4-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, respectively, by partial reduction and subsequent acetylation. For the degradation of CNBs, Rhodococcus sp. strain HS51, which degrades 4- and 5-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, was isolated and combined with P. putida HS12 to give a coculture. This coculture was confirmed to mineralize 3- and 4-CNBs in the presence of an additional carbon source. A degradation pathway for 3- and 4-CNBs by the two isolated strains was also proposed.

  18. Metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas putida for production of docosahexaenoic acid based on a myxobacterial PUFA synthase.

    PubMed

    Gemperlein, Katja; Zipf, Gregor; Bernauer, Hubert S; Müller, Rolf; Wenzel, Silke C

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) can be produced de novo via polyketide synthase-like enzymes known as PUFA synthases, which are encoded by pfa biosynthetic gene clusters originally discovered from marine microorganisms. Recently similar gene clusters were detected and characterized in terrestrial myxobacteria revealing several striking differences. As the identified myxobacterial producers are difficult to handle genetically and grow very slowly we aimed to establish heterologous expression platforms for myxobacterial PUFA synthases. Here we report the heterologous expression of the pfa gene cluster from Aetherobacter fasciculatus (SBSr002) in the phylogenetically distant model host bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida. The latter host turned out to be the more promising PUFA producer revealing higher production rates of n-6 docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). After several rounds of genetic engineering of expression plasmids combined with metabolic engineering of P. putida, DHA production yields were eventually increased more than threefold. Additionally, we applied synthetic biology approaches to redesign and construct artificial versions of the A. fasciculatus pfa gene cluster, which to the best of our knowledge represents the first example of a polyketide-like biosynthetic gene cluster modulated and synthesized for P. putida. Combination with the engineering efforts described above led to a further increase in LC-PUFA production yields. The established production platform based on synthetic DNA now sets the stage for flexible engineering of the complex PUFA synthase. PMID:26617065

  19. Survival in soils of an herbicide-resistant Pseudomonas putida strain bearing a recombinant TOL plasmid

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, J.L.; Duque, E.; Ramos-Gonzalez, M.-I. )

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida EEZ15(pWW0-EB62) is a phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant strain with a recombinant TOL plasmid which allows the strain to grown on p-ethylbenzoate. The survival of this strain in sterile agricultural soils depends on the physicochemical properties of the soil. The recombinant pWW0-EB62 plasmid and its catabolic functions were stable for periods of up to 1 month in bacteria introduced in unamended soils and only conferred selective advantage to the host bacteria without the plasmid or with the natural pWW0 plasmid when the soils were amended with low amounts of p-ethylbenzoate. The addition to soils of aromatics that are cometabolized by P. putida EEZ15(pWW0-EB62) had a detrimental effect on the survival of the bacteria, whereas low amounts of aromatics that are not metabolized by this bacterium had no effect on their survival. Survival of P. putida EEZ15(pWW0-EB62) was better at 4 and 25{degree}C than at 37{degree}C. The host bacterium carrying the recombinant pWW0-EB62 plasmid was established in unsterile soils.

  20. Metabolic Engineering of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to Produce Anthranilate from Glucose.

    PubMed

    Kuepper, Jannis; Dickler, Jasmin; Biggel, Michael; Behnken, Swantje; Jäger, Gernot; Wierckx, Nick; Blank, Lars M

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas putida KT2440 strain was engineered in order to produce anthranilate (oAB, ortho-aminobenzoate), a precursor of the aromatic amino acid tryptophan, from glucose as sole carbon source. To enable the production of the metabolic intermediate oAB, the trpDC operon encoding an anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase (TrpD) and an indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase (TrpC), were deleted. In addition, the chorismate mutase (pheA) responsible for the conversion of chorismate over prephenate to phenylpyruvate was deleted in the background of the deletion of trpDC to circumvent a potential drain of precursor. To further increase the oAB production, a feedback insensitive version of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase encoded by the aroG (D146N) gene and an anthranilate synthase (trpE (S40F) G) were overexpressed separately and simultaneously in the deletion mutants. With optimized production conditions in a tryptophan-limited fed-batch process a maximum of 1.54 ± 0.3 g L(-1) (11.23 mM) oAB was obtained with the best performing engineered P. putida KT2440 strain (P. putida ΔtrpDC pSEVA234_aroG (D146N) _trpE (S40F) G). PMID:26635771

  1. Genetic programming of catalytic Pseudomonas putida biofilms for boosting biodegradation of haloalkanes.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Ilaria; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Nikel, Pablo I

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms outperform planktonic counterparts in whole-cell biocatalysis. The transition between planktonic and biofilm lifestyles of the platform strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is ruled by a regulatory network controlling the levels of the trigger signal cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). This circumstance was exploited for designing a genetic device that over-runs the synthesis or degradation of c-di-GMP--thus making P. putida to form biofilms at user's will. For this purpose, the transcription of either yedQ (diguanylate cyclase) or yhjH (c-di-GMP phoshodiesterase) from Escherichia coli was artificially placed under the tight control of a cyclohexanone-responsive expression system. The resulting strain was subsequently endowed with a synthetic operon and tested for 1-chlorobutane biodegradation. Upon addition of cyclohexanone to the culture medium, the thereby designed P. putida cells formed biofilms displaying high dehalogenase activity. These results show that the morphologies and physical forms of whole-cell biocatalysts can be genetically programmed while purposely designing their biochemical activity. PMID:26620533

  2. Effect of gravity on Pseudomonas putida and kaolinite cotransport in water saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliadou, Ioanna A.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2013-04-01

    Bacterial transport in porous media can be affected by several factors, such as cell concentration, water velocity, and attachment onto the solid matrix or suspended in the aqueous phase soil particles (e.g. clays). Gravity, also may significantly influence bacterial transport behavior in the subsurface. The present study aims to determine the gravity effect on transport and cotransport of bacteria species Pseudomonas (P.) putida and kaolinite colloid particles in porous media. Transport experiments were conducted under horizontal-, up- and down-flow conditions in water saturated columns packed with glass beads. These different flow modes represent different gravity effects, namely: no-, negative- and positive-gravity effect. Initial experiments were performed with bacteria and kaolinite alone in order to evaluate the effect of gravity on their individual transport characteristics. No significant gravity effect was observed on the transport of individual bacterial cells. In contrary, each different flow mode was found to differently affect kaolinite transport. Compared to the horizontal-flow mode, the kaolinite mass recovery was decreased during the up-flow mode, and increased during the down-flow mode. Finally, P. putida and kaolinite particles were injected simultaneously into the packed column in order to investigate their cotransport behavior under different flow modes. The experimental data indicated that the kaolinite-P. putida cotransport behavior was similar to that observed for the transport of individual kaolinite particles. It was observed that the P. putida mass recovery decreased during down-flow conditions. This phenomenon may be caused by the attachment of bacteria onto kaolinite particles, which were adsorbed onto the solid matrix.

  3. Physicochemical surface properties of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Saba; Rehman, Abdul

    2014-04-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 were used as cadmium (Cd) resistant and sensitive bacteria, respectively to study the effect of Cd on physicochemical surface properties which include the study of surface charge and hydrophobicity which are subjected to vary under stress conditions. In this research work, effective concentration 50 (EC50 ) was calculated to exclude the doubt that dead cells were also responding and used as reference point to study the changes in cell surface properties in the presence of Cd. EC50 of C. metallidurans CH34 was found to be 2.5 and 0.25 mM for P. putida mt2. The zeta potential analysis showed that CH34 cells were slightly less unstable than mt2 cells as CH34 cells exhibited -8.5 mV more negative potential than mt2 cells in the presence of Cd in growth medium. Cd made P. putida mt2 surface to behave as intermediate hydrophilic (θw  = 25.32°) while C. metallidurans CH34 as hydrophobic (θw  = 57.26°) at their respective EC50 . Although belonging to the same gram-negative group, both bacteria behaved differently in terms of changes in membrane fluidity. Expression of trans fatty acids was observed in mt2 strain (0.45%) but not in CH34 strain (0%). Similarly, cyclopropane fatty acids were observed more in mt2 strain (0.06-0.14%) but less in CH34 strain (0.01-0.02%). Degree of saturation of fatty acids decreased in P. putida mt2 (36.8-33.75%) while increased in C. metallidurans CH34 (35.6-39.3%). Homeoviscous adaptation is a survival strategy in harsh environments which includes expression of trans fatty acids and cyclo fatty acids in addition to altered degree of saturation. Different bacteria show different approaches to homeoviscous adaptation. PMID:23564035

  4. Entner–Doudoroff pathway for sulfoquinovose degradation in Pseudomonas putida SQ1

    PubMed Central

    Felux, Ann-Katrin; Spiteller, Dieter; Klebensberger, Janosch; Schleheck, David

    2015-01-01

    Sulfoquinovose (SQ; 6-deoxy-6-sulfoglucose) is the polar head group of the plant sulfolipid SQ-diacylglycerol, and SQ comprises a major proportion of the organosulfur in nature, where it is degraded by bacteria. A first degradation pathway for SQ has been demonstrated recently, a “sulfoglycolytic” pathway, in addition to the classical glycolytic (Embden–Meyerhof) pathway in Escherichia coli K-12; half of the carbon of SQ is abstracted as dihydroxyacetonephosphate (DHAP) and used for growth, whereas a C3-organosulfonate, 2,3-dihydroxypropane sulfonate (DHPS), is excreted. The environmental isolate Pseudomonas putida SQ1 is also able to use SQ for growth, and excretes a different C3-organosulfonate, 3-sulfolactate (SL). In this study, we revealed the catabolic pathway for SQ in P. putida SQ1 through differential proteomics and transcriptional analyses, by in vitro reconstitution of the complete pathway by five heterologously produced enzymes, and by identification of all four organosulfonate intermediates. The pathway follows a reaction sequence analogous to the Entner–Doudoroff pathway for glucose-6-phosphate: It involves an NAD+-dependent SQ dehydrogenase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconolactone (SGL) lactonase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconate (SG) dehydratase, and 2-keto-3,6-dideoxy-6-sulfogluconate (KDSG) aldolase. The aldolase reaction yields pyruvate, which supports growth of P. putida, and 3-sulfolactaldehyde (SLA), which is oxidized to SL by an NAD(P)+-dependent SLA dehydrogenase. All five enzymes are encoded in a single gene cluster that includes, for example, genes for transport and regulation. Homologous gene clusters were found in genomes of other P. putida strains, in other gamma-Proteobacteria, and in beta- and alpha-Proteobacteria, for example, in genomes of Enterobacteria, Vibrio, and Halomonas species, and in typical soil bacteria, such as Burkholderia, Herbaspirillum, and Rhizobium. PMID:26195800

  5. Fluorene and phenanthrene uptake by Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17514: kinetics and physiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana C; Wuertz, Stefan; Brito, António G; Melo, Luís F

    2005-05-01

    Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17514 was used as a model strain to investigate the characteristics of bacterial growth in the presence of solid fluorene and phenanthrene. Despite the lower water-solubility of phenanthrene, P. putida degraded this polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) at a maximum observed rate of 1.4 +/- 0.1 mg L(-1) h(-1), higher than the apparent degradation rate of fluorene, 0.8 +/- 0.07 mg L(-1) h(-1). The role of physiological processes on the biodegradation of these PAHs was analyzed and two different uptake strategies were identified. Zeta potential measurements revealed that phenanthrene-grown cells were slightly more negatively charged (-57.5 +/- 4.7 mV) than fluorene-grown cells (-51.6 +/- 4.9 mV), but much more negatively charged than glucose-grown cells (-26.8 +/- 3.3 mV), suggesting that the PAH substrate induced modifications on the physical properties of bacterial surfaces. Furthermore, protein-to-exopolysaccharide ratios detected during bacterial growth on phenanthrene were typical of biofilms developed under physicochemical stress conditions, caused by the presence of sparingly water-soluble chemicals as the sole carbon and energy source for growth, the maximum value for TP/EPS during growth on phenanthrene (1.9) being lower than the one obtained with fluorene (5.5). Finally, confocal laser microscopy observations using a gfp-labeled derivative strain revealed that, in the presence of phenanthrene, P. putida::gfp cells formed a biofilm on accessible crystal surfaces, whereas in the presence of fluorene the strain grew randomly between the crystal clusters. The results showed that P. putida was able to overcome the lower aqueous solubility of phenanthrene by adhering to the solid PAH throughout the production of extracellular polymeric substances, thus promoting the availability and uptake of such a hydrophobic compound. PMID:15800860

  6. Entner-Doudoroff pathway for sulfoquinovose degradation in Pseudomonas putida SQ1.

    PubMed

    Felux, Ann-Katrin; Spiteller, Dieter; Klebensberger, Janosch; Schleheck, David

    2015-08-01

    Sulfoquinovose (SQ; 6-deoxy-6-sulfoglucose) is the polar head group of the plant sulfolipid SQ-diacylglycerol, and SQ comprises a major proportion of the organosulfur in nature, where it is degraded by bacteria. A first degradation pathway for SQ has been demonstrated recently, a "sulfoglycolytic" pathway, in addition to the classical glycolytic (Embden-Meyerhof) pathway in Escherichia coli K-12; half of the carbon of SQ is abstracted as dihydroxyacetonephosphate (DHAP) and used for growth, whereas a C3-organosulfonate, 2,3-dihydroxypropane sulfonate (DHPS), is excreted. The environmental isolate Pseudomonas putida SQ1 is also able to use SQ for growth, and excretes a different C3-organosulfonate, 3-sulfolactate (SL). In this study, we revealed the catabolic pathway for SQ in P. putida SQ1 through differential proteomics and transcriptional analyses, by in vitro reconstitution of the complete pathway by five heterologously produced enzymes, and by identification of all four organosulfonate intermediates. The pathway follows a reaction sequence analogous to the Entner-Doudoroff pathway for glucose-6-phosphate: It involves an NAD(+)-dependent SQ dehydrogenase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconolactone (SGL) lactonase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconate (SG) dehydratase, and 2-keto-3,6-dideoxy-6-sulfogluconate (KDSG) aldolase. The aldolase reaction yields pyruvate, which supports growth of P. putida, and 3-sulfolactaldehyde (SLA), which is oxidized to SL by an NAD(P)(+)-dependent SLA dehydrogenase. All five enzymes are encoded in a single gene cluster that includes, for example, genes for transport and regulation. Homologous gene clusters were found in genomes of other P. putida strains, in other gamma-Proteobacteria, and in beta- and alpha-Proteobacteria, for example, in genomes of Enterobacteria, Vibrio, and Halomonas species, and in typical soil bacteria, such as Burkholderia, Herbaspirillum, and Rhizobium. PMID:26195800

  7. Breeding of a cyclic imide-assimilating bacterium, Pseudomonas putida s52, for high efficiency production of pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Makoto; Horinouchi, Nobuyuki; Tu, Weihao; Soong, Chee-Leong; Ito, Masashi; Segawa, Toshinori; Mu, Xiaoqing; Hagishita, Tairo; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Shimizu, Sakayu; Ogawa, Jun

    2013-01-01

    A succinimide-assimilating bacterium, Pseudomonas putida s52, was found to be a potent producer of pyruvate from fumarate. Using washed cells from P. putida s52 as catalyst, 400 mM pyruvate was produced from 500 mM fumarate in a 36-h reaction. Bromopyruvate, a malic enzyme inhibitor, was used for the selection of mutants with higher pyruvate productivity. A bromopyruvate-resistant mutant, P. putida 15160, was found to be an effective catalyst for pyruvate production. Moreover, under batch bioreactor conditions, 767 mM of pyruvate was successfully produced from 1,000 mM fumarate in a 72-h reaction with washed cells from P. putida 15160 as catalyst. PMID:23924711

  8. Variability in subpopulation formation propagates into biocatalytic variability of engineered Pseudomonas putida strains

    PubMed Central

    Lindmeyer, Martin; Jahn, Michael; Vorpahl, Carsten; Müller, Susann; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Pivotal challenges in industrial biotechnology are the identification and overcoming of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in microbial processes. While the development of subpopulations of isogenic cells in bioprocesses is well described (intra-population variability), a possible variability between genetically identical cultures growing under macroscopically identical conditions (clonal variability) is not. A high such clonal variability has been found for the recombinant expression of the styrene monooxygenase genes styAB from Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120 in solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E using the alk-regulatory system from P. putida GPo1. In this study, the oxygenase subunit StyA fused to eGFP was used as readout tool to characterize the population structure in P. putida DOT-T1E regarding recombinant protein content. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that in individual cultures, at least two subpopulations with highly differing recombinant StyA-eGFP protein contents appeared (intra-population variability). Interestingly, subpopulation sizes varied from culture-to-culture correlating with the specific styrene epoxidation activity of cells derived from respective cultures (clonal variability). In addition, flow cytometric cell sorting coupled to plasmid copy number (PCN) determination revealed that detected clonal variations cannot be correlated to the PCN, but depend on the combination of the regulatory system and the host strain employed. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first work reporting that intra-population variability (with differing protein contents in the presented case study) causes clonal variability of genetically identical cultures. Respective impacts on bioprocess reliability and performance and strategies to overcome respective reliability issues are discussed. PMID:26483771

  9. Enhancing Indigo Production by Over-Expression of the Styrene Monooxygenase in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Yin, Sheng; Chen, Min; Sun, Baoguo; Hao, Shuai; Wang, Chengtao

    2016-08-01

    As an important traditional blue dye, indigo has been used in food and textile industry for centuries, which can be produced via the styrene oxygenation pathway in Pseudomonas putida. Hence, the styrene monooxygenase gene styAB and oxide isomerase gene styC are over-expressed in P. putida to investigate their roles in indigo biosynthesis. RT-qPCR analysis indicated that transcriptions of styA and styB were increased by 2500- and 750-folds in the styAB over-expressed strain B4-01, compared with the wild-type strain B4, consequently significantly enhancing the indole monooxygenase activity. Transcription of styC was also increased by 100-folds in the styC over-expressed strain B4-02. Besides, styAB over-expression slightly up-regulated the transcription of styC in B4-01, while styC over-expression hardly exerted an effect on the transcriptional levels of styA and styB and indole monooxygenase activity in B4-02. Furthermore, shaking flask experiments showed that indigo production in B4-01 reached 52.13 mg L(-1) after 24 h, which was sevenfold higher than that in B4. But no obvious increase in indigo yield was observed in B4-02. Over-expression of styAB significantly enhanced the indigo production, revealing that the monooxygenase STYAB rather than oxide isomerase STYC probably acted as the key rate-limiting enzyme in the indigo biosynthesis pathway in P. putida. This work provided a new strategy for enhancing indigo production in Pseudomonas. PMID:27154464

  10. [Removal of toluene waste gas by Pseudomonas putida with a bio-trickling filter].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Jing; Li, Jian; Li, Yi-Li; Jin, Yu-Quan; Sun, Li

    2007-08-01

    In transient conditions close to the industrialized application situation, the removal of toluene was investigated with a lab-scale bio-trickling filter inoculated with pure bacterial culture (Pseudomonas putida). The start-up process and the ability of resisting different toluene loading in the steady state on the performance of the bio-trickling filter were studied. The microstructure of biofilm in the filter was also observed. With inlet concentration range from 544 to 1044 mg x m(-3) at the temperature ranging from 17 to 26 degrees C, the removal efficiency of toluene was almost 100% at the residence time of 54 s and 43.2 s. The maximum volumetric removal loading of 105.35 g x (m3 x h)(-1) was achieved. The results indicate that it was feasible to remove toluene by Pseudomonas putida which had not be acclimated by toluene. In the steady state, the bio-trickling filter had a high flexibility for the load change and the removal efficiency of the reactor was not influenced by the variance of residence time and inlet concentration. The rapid increase of biofilm can be controlled by adjusting the interval of nutrition liquid accession. There were some changes in bacterial community, and lots of micro-pore existed in the biofilm. It was proved that the absorption of the biofilm was an important precondition for the biodegradation of toluene. PMID:17926425

  11. In silico analysis for prediction of degradative capacity of Pseudomonas putida SF1.

    PubMed

    Tikariha, Hitesh; Pal, Rajesh Ramavadh; Qureshi, Asifa; Kapley, Atya; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-10-15

    The study employs draft genome sequence data to explore p-nitrophenol (PNP) degradation activity of Pseudomonas putida strain SF-1 at a genomic scale. Annotation analysis proposes that the strain SF1 not only possesses the gene cluster for PNP utilization but also for the utilization of benzoate, catechol, hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate, and homogentisate. Further, the analysis was carried out to understand more details of PNP 4-monooxygenase and its regulator. A comparative analysis of PNP 4-monooxygenase from SF1 was carried out for prediction of its tertiary structure; and also its binding affinity with PNP, FAD, NADH and NADPH using FlexX docking. The tertiary structure of regulator was also predicted along with its conserved DNA binding residues. Regulator binding site (RBS) and promoter region were mapped for the PNP degradation gene cluster. Based on genome sequence analysis, the study unveiled the genomic attributes for a versatile catabolic potential of Pseudomonas putida strain SF-1 for different aromatic compounds. PMID:27317892

  12. Mechanisms of solvent resistance mediated by interplay of cellular factors in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Juan-Luis; Sol Cuenca, Maria; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Segura, Ana; Duque, Estrella; Gómez-García, María R; Udaondo, Zulema; Roca, Amalia

    2015-07-01

    A number of microorganisms have the ability to thrive in the presence of a range of toxic solvents. Tolerance to these chemicals is a multifactorial process, meaning that bacterial cells use a set of physiological and gene expression changes to overcome the damage imparted by these chemicals. This review focuses mainly on issues related to tolerance to aromatic hydrocarbons and butanol in Pseudomonas, although other microorganisms are also discussed. Pseudomonas putida strains contain a circular chromosome of approximately 6 Mbp which encodes about 5300 genes. A combination of physiological and biochemical assays, a genome-wide collection of mutants and several omics approaches have provided useful information to help identify functions involved in solvent tolerance in P. putida. The solvent response involves fine-tuning of lipid fluidity to adjust membrane functions including impermeabilization, activation of a general stress-response system, increased energy generation and induction of specific efflux pumps that extrude solvents to the medium. These responses are modulated at the transcriptional level by local and global regulators as well as by a number of sRNAs whose levels fluctuate with the presence of solvents in the environment. Taken as a whole these regulatory inputs orchestrate the complex network of metabolic responses observed after solvent addition. PMID:25934123

  13. Detection and characterization of a bacteriocin, putadicin T01, produced by Pseudomonas putida isolated from hot spring water.

    PubMed

    Ghrairi, Taoufik; Braiek, Olfa Ben; Hani, Khaled

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas strains isolated from hot spring water were tested for bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) production using a target panel of closely related microorganisms and other Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Molecular identification was carried out through specific PCR and 16S RNA sequence analysis. Isolates were identified as Brevundimonas diminuta and Pseudomonas putida, the latter exhibited antimicrobial activity. Pseudomonas putida strains produce an inhibitory substance against other Pseudomonas strains and other species including food-borne pathogens. The BLS was sensitive to the proteolytic action of proteinase K, pronase E and trypsin but resistant to α-amylase, RNase and lipase C, reflecting its proteinaceous nature. The BLS was stable at 100 °C and also after thermal treatment at 121 °C for 15 min. Additionally, it was stable within a wide range of pH (2-10). The substance from P. putida T01 strain was bactericidal to Escherichia coli. SDS-PAGE analysis of the partial purified supernatant of strain T01 revealed a BLS with an approximate molecular mass of 8 kDa. Therefore, the results of this study show that P. putida strain T01 produces a BLS with a higher activity spectrum, which may find application in human medicine and in minimally processed food preservation. PMID:25556393

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida BW11M1, a Banana Rhizosphere Isolate with a Diversified Antimicrobial Armamentarium

    PubMed Central

    Swings, Toon; Michiels, Jan; Gross, Harald; De Mot, René

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the draft genome of Pseudomonas putida BW11M1, a banana rhizosphere isolate producing various antimicrobial compounds, including a lectin-like bacteriocin, an R-type tailocin, the cyclic lipopeptide xantholysin, and the fatty acid–derived pseudopyronine. PMID:27081131

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida BW11M1, a Banana Rhizosphere Isolate with a Diversified Antimicrobial Armamentarium.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Swings, Toon; Michiels, Jan; Gross, Harald; De Mot, René

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the draft genome ofPseudomonas putidaBW11M1, a banana rhizosphere isolate producing various antimicrobial compounds, including a lectin-like bacteriocin, an R-type tailocin, the cyclic lipopeptide xantholysin, and the fatty acid-derived pseudopyronine. PMID:27081131

  16. New insights on the reorganization of gene transcription in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 at elevated pressure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated pressure, elevated oxygen tension (DOT) and elevated carbon dioxide tension (DCT) are readily encountered at the bottom of large industrial bioreactors and during bioprocesses where pressure is applied for enhancing the oxygen transfer. Yet information about their effect on bacteria and on the gene expression thereof is scarce. To shed light on the cellular functions affected by these specific environmental conditions, the transcriptome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a bacterium of great relevance for the production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates, was thoroughly investigated using DNA microarrays. Results Very well defined chemostat cultivations were carried out with P. putida to produce high quality RNA samples and ensure that differential gene expression was caused exclusively by changes of pressure, DOT and/or DCT. Cellular stress was detected at 7 bar and elevated DCT in the form of heat shock and oxidative stress-like responses, and indicators of cell envelope perturbations were identified as well. Globally, gene transcription was not considerably altered when DOT was increased from 40 ± 5 to 235 ± 20% at 7 bar and elevated DCT. Nevertheless, differential transcription was observed for a few genes linked to iron-sulfur cluster assembly, terminal oxidases, glutamate metabolism and arginine deiminase pathway, which shows their particular sensitivity to variations of DOT. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive overview on the changes occurring in the transcriptome of P. putida upon mild variations of pressure, DOT and DCT. Interestingly, whereas the changes of gene transcription were widespread, the cell physiology was hardly affected, which illustrates how efficient reorganization of the gene transcription is for dealing with environmental changes that may otherwise be harmful. Several particularly sensitive cellular functions were identified, which will certainly contribute to the understanding of the

  17. Screening and optimization of low-cost medium for Pseudomonas putida Rs-198 culture using RSM

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanjie; He, Yanhui; Wu, Zhansheng; Lu, Jianjiang; Li, Chun

    2014-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterial strain Pseudomonas putida Rs-198 was isolated from salinized soils from Xinjiang Province. We optimized the composition of the low-cost medium of P. putida Rs-198 based on its bacterial concentration, as well as its phosphate-dissolving and indole acetic acid (IAA)-producing capabilities using the response surface methodology (RSM), and a mathematical model was developed to show the effect of each medium component and its interactions on phosphate dissolution and IAA production. The model predicted a maximum phosphate concentration in medium containing 63.23 mg/L inorganic phosphate with 49.22 g/L corn flour, 14.63 g/L soybean meal, 2.03 g/L K2HPO4, 0.19 g/L MnSO4 and 5.00 g/L NaCl. The maximum IAA concentration (18.73 mg/L) was predicted in medium containing 52.41 g/L corn flour, 15.82 g/L soybean meal, 2.40 g/L K2HPO4, 0.17 g/L MnSO4 and 5.00 g/L NaCl. These predicted values were also verified through experiments, with a cell density of 1013 cfu/mL, phosphate dissolution of 64.33 mg/L, and IAA concentration of 18.08 mg/L. The excellent correlation between predicted and measured values of each model justifies the validity of both the response models. The study aims to provide a basis for industrialized fermentation using P. putida Rs-198. PMID:25763026

  18. Expression, purification, and characterization of alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Shi, Ya-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alanine racemase catalyzes the interconversion of D: - and L: -alanine and plays an important role in supplying D: -alanine, a component of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, to most bacteria. Alanine racemase exists mostly in prokaryotes and is generally absent in higher eukaryotes; this makes it an attractive target for the design of new antibacterial drugs. Here, we present the cloning and characterization of a new gene-encoding alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26. An open reading frame (ORF) of 1,230 bp, encoding a protein of 410 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 44,217.3 Da, was cloned into modified vector pET32M to form the recombinant plasmid pET-alr. After introduction into E.coli BL21, the strain pET-alr/E.coli BL21 expressed His(6)-tagged alanine racemase. The recombinant alanine racemase was efficiently purified to homogeneity using Ni(2+)-NTA and a gel filtration column, with 82.5% activity recovery. The amino acid sequence deduced from the alanine racemase gene revealed identity similarities of 97.0, 93, 23, and 22.0% with from P. putida F1, P. putida200, P. aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. The recombinant alanine racemase is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa. The enzyme exhibited activity with L: -alanine and L: -isoleucine, and showed higher specificity for the former compared with the latter. The enzyme was stable from pH 7.0-11.0; its optimum pH was at 9.0. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 37°C, and its activity was rapidly lost at temperatures above 40°C. Divalent metals, including Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) obviously enhanced enzymatic activity, while the Cu(2+) ion showed inhibitory effects. PMID:22806802

  19. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of the heat shock response in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ito, Fumihiro; Tamiya, Takayuki; Ohtsu, Iwao; Fujimura, Makoto; Fukumori, Fumiyasu

    2014-12-01

    Molecular chaperones function in various important physiological processes. Null mutants of genes for the molecular chaperone ClpB (Hsp104), and those that encode J-domain proteins (DnaJ, CbpA, and DjlA), which may act as Hsp40 co-chaperones of DnaK (Hsp70), were constructed from Pseudomonas putida KT2442 (KT) to elucidate their roles. The KTΔclpB mutant showed the same heat shock response (HSR) as the wild-type, both in terms of heat-shock protein (Hsp) synthesis (other than ClpB) and in hsp gene expression; however, the mutant was quite sensitive to high temperatures and was unable to disaggregate into thermo-mediated protein aggregates, indicating that ClpB is important for cell survival after heat stress and essential for solubilization of protein aggregates. On the other hand, the KTΔdnaJ mutant was temperature-sensitive, and formed more protein aggregates (especially of high molecular weight) upon heat stress than did KT. P. putida CbpA, a probable Hsp, partially substituted the functions of DnaJ in cell growth and solubilization of thermo-mediated protein aggregates, and might be involved in the HSR which was regulated by a fine-tuning system(s) that could sense subtle changes in the ambient temperature and control the levels of σ(32) activity and quantity, as well as the mRNA levels of hsp genes. PMID:25303383

  20. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of the heat shock response in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Fumihiro; Tamiya, Takayuki; Ohtsu, Iwao; Fujimura, Makoto; Fukumori, Fumiyasu

    2014-01-01

    Molecular chaperones function in various important physiological processes. Null mutants of genes for the molecular chaperone ClpB (Hsp104), and those that encode J-domain proteins (DnaJ, CbpA, and DjlA), which may act as Hsp40 co-chaperones of DnaK (Hsp70), were constructed from Pseudomonas putida KT2442 (KT) to elucidate their roles. The KTΔclpB mutant showed the same heat shock response (HSR) as the wild-type, both in terms of heat-shock protein (Hsp) synthesis (other than ClpB) and in hsp gene expression; however, the mutant was quite sensitive to high temperatures and was unable to disaggregate into thermo-mediated protein aggregates, indicating that ClpB is important for cell survival after heat stress and essential for solubilization of protein aggregates. On the other hand, the KTΔdnaJ mutant was temperature-sensitive, and formed more protein aggregates (especially of high molecular weight) upon heat stress than did KT. P. putida CbpA, a probable Hsp, partially substituted the functions of DnaJ in cell growth and solubilization of thermo-mediated protein aggregates, and might be involved in the HSR which was regulated by a fine-tuning system(s) that could sense subtle changes in the ambient temperature and control the levels of σ32 activity and quantity, as well as the mRNA levels of hsp genes. PMID:25303383

  1. A Pseudomonas putida Strain Genetically Engineered for 1,2,3-Trichloropropane Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M. Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P.; Damborsky, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida MC4. For this purpose, the dehalogenase gene (dhaA31) was cloned behind the constitutive dhlA promoter and was introduced into the genome of strain MC4 using a transposon delivery system. The transposon-located antibiotic resistance marker was subsequently removed using a resolvase step. Growth of the resulting engineered bacterium, P. putida MC4-5222, on TCP was indeed observed, and all organic chlorine was released as chloride. A packed-bed reactor with immobilized cells of strain MC4-5222 degraded >95% of influent TCP (0.33 mM) under continuous-flow conditions, with stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride. The results demonstrate the successful use of a laboratory-evolved dehalogenase and genetic engineering to produce an effective, plasmid-free, and stable whole-cell biocatalyst for the aerobic bioremediation of a recalcitrant chlorinated hydrocarbon. PMID:24973068

  2. Cd adsorption onto Pseudomonas putida in the presence and absence of extracellular polymeric substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueshima, Masato; Ginn, Brian R.; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2008-12-01

    The role of bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in metal adsorption was determined by studying Cd adsorption onto the gram-negative bacterial species Pseudomonas putida with and without enzymatic removal of EPS from the biomass material. A range of experimental approaches were used to characterize the Cd adsorption reactions, including bulk proton and Cd adsorption measurements, FTIR spectroscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. The proton-reactivities of the biomass samples with EPS are not significantly different from those obtained for EPS-free biomass. Similarly, the presence of EPS does not significantly affect the extent of Cd removal from solution by the biomass on a mass-normalized basis, based on bulk Cd adsorption measurements conducted as a function of pH, nor does it appear to strongly affect the Cd-binding groups as observed by FTIR. However, fluorescence microscopy indicates that Cd, although concentrated on cell walls, is also bound to some extent to EPS. Together, the results from this study suggest that the P. putida EPS can bind significant concentrations of Cd from solution, and that the nature and mass-normalized extent of the binding is similar to that of the cell wall. Therefore, the EPS-bearing systems do not exhibit enhanced mass-normalized removal of Cd from solution relative to the EPS-free systems. The presence of the EPS effectively increases the viability of cells exposed to aqueous Cd, likely due to sequestration of the Cd away from the cells due to Cd-EPS binding.

  3. Removal of mercury from chloralkali electrolysis wastewater by a mercury-resistant Pseudomonas putida strain

    SciTech Connect

    Canstein, H. von; Li, Y.; Timmis, K.N.; Deckwer, W.D.; Wagner-Doebler, I.

    1999-12-01

    A mercury-resistant bacterial strain which is able to reduce ionic mercury to metallic mercury was used to remediate in laboratory columns mercury-containing wastewater produced during electrolytic production of chlorine. Factory effluents from several chloralkali plants in Europe were analyzed, and these effluents contained total mercury concentrations between 1.6 and 7.6 mg/liter and high chloride concentrations and had pH values which were either acidic or alkaline. A mercury-resistant bacterial strain, Pseudomonas putida Spi3, was isolated from polluted river sediments. Biofilms of P.putida Spi3 were grown on porous carrier material in laboratory column bioreactors. The bioreactors were continuously fed with sterile synthetic model wastewater or nonsterile, neutralized, aerated chloralkali wastewater. The authors found that sodium chloride concentrations up to 24 g/liter did not inhibit microbial mercury retention and that mercury concentrations up to 7 mg/liter could be treated with the bacterial biofilm with no loss of activity. When wastewater samples from three different chloralkali plants in Europe were used, levels of mercury retention efficiency between 90 and 98% were obtained. Thus, microbial mercury removal is a potential biological treatment for chloralkali electrolysis wastewater.

  4. The cytochrome c maturation operon is involved in manganese oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    SciTech Connect

    Vrind, J.P.M. de; Brouwers, G.J.; Corstijens, P.L.A.M.; Dulk, J. den; Vrind-de Jong, E.W. de

    1998-10-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain, strain GB-1, oxidizes Mn{sup 2+} to Mn oxide in the early stationary growth phase. It also secretes a siderophore (identified as pyoverdine) when it is subjected to iron limitation. After transposon (Tn5) mutagenesis several classes of mutants with differences in Mn{sup 2+} oxidation and/or secretion of the Mn{sup 2+}-oxidizing activity were identified. Preliminary analysis of the Tn5 insertion site in one of the nonoxidizing mutants suggested that a multicopper oxidase-related enzyme is involved in Mn{sup 2+} oxidation. The insertion site in another mutant was preliminarily identified as a gene involved in the general protein secretion pathway. Two mutants defective in Mn{sup 2+}-oxidizing activity also secreted porphyrins into the medium and appeared to be derepressed for pyoverdine production. These strains were chosen for detailed analysis. Both mutants were shown to contain Tn5 insertions in the ccmF gene, which is part of the cytochrome c maturation operon. They were cytochrome oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Complementation with part of the ccm operon isolated from the wild type restored the phenotype of the parent strain. These results indicate that a functional ccm operon is required for Mn{sup 2+} oxidation in P. putida GB-1. A possible relationship between porphyrin secretion resulting from the ccm mutation and stimulation of pyoverdine production is discussed.

  5. Identification and molecular characterization of an efflux system involved in Pseudomonas putida S12 multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kieboom, J; de Bont, J

    2001-01-01

    The authors previously described srpABC, an operon involved in proton-dependent solvent efflux in the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12. Recently, it was shown that organic solvents and not antibiotics induce this operon. In the present study, the authors characterize a new efflux pump, designated ArpABC, on the basis of two isolated chloramphenicol-sensitive transposon mutants. The arpABC operon is involved in the active efflux of multiple antibiotics, such as tetracycline, chloramphenicol, carbenicillin, streptomycin, erythromycin and novobiocin. The deduced amino acid sequences encoded by the three genes involved show a striking resemblance to proteins of the resistance/nodulation/cell division family, which are involved in both organic solvent and multiple drug efflux. These findings demonstrate that ArpABC is highly homologous to the MepABC and TtgABC efflux systems for organic solvents and multiple antibiotics. However, ArpABC does not contribute to organic solvent tolerance in P. putida S12 but is solely involved in multidrug resistance. PMID:11160799

  6. The Cytochrome c Maturation Operon Is Involved in Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    PubMed Central

    de Vrind, J. P. M.; Brouwers, G. J.; Corstjens, P. L. A. M.; den Dulk, J.; de Vrind-de Jong, E. W.

    1998-01-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain, strain GB-1, oxidizes Mn2+ to Mn oxide in the early stationary growth phase. It also secretes a siderophore (identified as pyoverdine) when it is subjected to iron limitation. After transposon (Tn5) mutagenesis several classes of mutants with differences in Mn2+ oxidation and/or secretion of the Mn2+-oxidizing activity were identified. Preliminary analysis of the Tn5 insertion site in one of the nonoxidizing mutants suggested that a multicopper oxidase-related enzyme is involved in Mn2+ oxidation. The insertion site in another mutant was preliminarily identified as a gene involved in the general protein secretion pathway. Two mutants defective in Mn2+-oxidizing activity also secreted porphyrins into the medium and appeared to be derepressed for pyoverdine production. These strains were chosen for detailed analysis. Both mutants were shown to contain Tn5 insertions in the ccmF gene, which is part of the cytochrome c maturation operon. They were cytochrome oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Complementation with part of the ccm operon isolated from the wild type restored the phenotype of the parent strain. These results indicate that a functional ccm operon is required for Mn2+ oxidation in P. putida GB-1. A possible relationship between porphyrin secretion resulting from the ccm mutation and stimulation of pyoverdine production is discussed. PMID:9758767

  7. Removal of Mercury from Chloralkali Electrolysis Wastewater by a Mercury-Resistant Pseudomonas putida Strain

    PubMed Central

    von Canstein, H.; Li, Y.; Timmis, K. N.; Deckwer, W.-D.; Wagner-Döbler, I.

    1999-01-01

    A mercury-resistant bacterial strain which is able to reduce ionic mercury to metallic mercury was used to remediate in laboratory columns mercury-containing wastewater produced during electrolytic production of chlorine. Factory effluents from several chloralkali plants in Europe were analyzed, and these effluents contained total mercury concentrations between 1.6 and 7.6 mg/liter and high chloride concentrations (up to 25 g/liter) and had pH values which were either acidic (pH 2.4) or alkaline (pH 13.0). A mercury-resistant bacterial strain, Pseudomonas putida Spi3, was isolated from polluted river sediments. Biofilms of P. putida Spi3 were grown on porous carrier material in laboratory column bioreactors. The bioreactors were continuously fed with sterile synthetic model wastewater or nonsterile, neutralized, aerated chloralkali wastewater. We found that sodium chloride concentrations up to 24 g/liter did not inhibit microbial mercury retention and that mercury concentrations up to 7 mg/liter could be treated with the bacterial biofilm with no loss of activity. When wastewater samples from three different chloralkali plants in Europe were used, levels of mercury retention efficiency between 90 and 98% were obtained. Thus, microbial mercury removal is a potential biological treatment for chloralkali electrolysis wastewater. PMID:10583977

  8. Production of toluene cis-glycol by Pseudomonas putida in glucose fed-batch culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.O.; Stephens, G.M.; Dalton, H.

    1987-05-01

    Toluene was oxidized by a mutant strain of Pseudomonas putida (strain NG1) to toluene cis-glycol (TCG). Product was accumulated in fed-batch cultures to concentrations (18-24 g/L) higher than hitherto achieved. In vitro activities of toluene dioxygenase from P. putida NG1 were fivefold lower than that from the toluene-grown wild-type organism, whereas comparable activities of both catechol 2,3- and catechol 1,2-oxygenase were obtained; irreversible inhibition of toluene dioxygenase activity by TCG was shown in vitro. Ammonia deprivation during the production phase limited the growth of revertant organisms but had little effect on either the duration (25 h) of the process or the final concentration of TCG achieved. The rates of glucose utilization decreased throughout the biotransformation and cell death accompanied the cessation of TCG accumulation in cultures. The results suggest that TCG is the mediator of a gradual deterioration in the state of the culture which leads to a loss of both in vivo and in vitro toluene dioxygenase activity and a marked decrease in culture viability.

  9. A Pseudomonas putida strain genetically engineered for 1,2,3-trichloropropane bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P; Damborsky, Jiri; Janssen, Dick B

    2014-09-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida MC4. For this purpose, the dehalogenase gene (dhaA31) was cloned behind the constitutive dhlA promoter and was introduced into the genome of strain MC4 using a transposon delivery system. The transposon-located antibiotic resistance marker was subsequently removed using a resolvase step. Growth of the resulting engineered bacterium, P. putida MC4-5222, on TCP was indeed observed, and all organic chlorine was released as chloride. A packed-bed reactor with immobilized cells of strain MC4-5222 degraded >95% of influent TCP (0.33 mM) under continuous-flow conditions, with stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride. The results demonstrate the successful use of a laboratory-evolved dehalogenase and genetic engineering to produce an effective, plasmid-free, and stable whole-cell biocatalyst for the aerobic bioremediation of a recalcitrant chlorinated hydrocarbon. PMID:24973068

  10. Tracing explosives in soil with transcriptional regulators of Pseudomonas putida evolved for responding to nitrotoluenes

    PubMed Central

    Garmendia, Junkal; De Las Heras, Aitor; Galvão, Teca Calcagno; De Lorenzo, Víctor

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although different biological approaches for detection of anti‐personnel mines and other unexploded ordnance (UXO) have been entertained, none of them has been rigorously documented thus far in the scientific literature. The industrial 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) habitually employed in the manufacturing of mines is at all times tainted with a small but significant proportion of the more volatile 2,4 dinitrotoluene (2,4 DNT) and other nitroaromatic compounds. By using mutation‐prone PCR and DNA sequence shuffling we have evolved in vitro and selected in vivo variants of the effector recognition domain of the toluene‐responsive XylR regulator of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida that responds to mono‐, bi‐ and trinitro substituted toluenes. Re‐introduction of such variants in P. putida settled the transcriptional activity of the cognate promoters (Po and Pu) as a function of the presence of nitrotoluenes in the medium. When strains bearing transcriptional fusions to reporters with an optical output (luxAB, GFP) were spread on soil spotted with nitrotoluenes, the signal triggered by promoter activation allowed localization of the target compounds on the soil surface. Our data provide a proof of concept that non‐natural transcription factors evolved to respond to nitroaromatics can be engineered in soil bacteria and inoculated on a target site to pinpoint the presence of explosives. This approach thus opens new ways to tackle this gigantic humanitarian problem. PMID:21261843

  11. Pseudomonas putida response in membrane bioreactors under salicylic acid-induced stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Collado, Sergio; Rosas, Irene; González, Elena; Gutierrez-Lavin, Antonio; Diaz, Mario

    2014-02-28

    Starvation and changing feeding conditions are frequently characteristics of wastewater treatment plants. They are typical causes of unsteady-state operation of biological systems and provoke cellular stress. The response of a membrane bioreactor functioning under feed-induced stress conditions is studied here. In order to simplify and considerably amplify the response to stress and to obtain a reference model, a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida was selected instead of an activated sludge and a sole substrate (salicylic acid) was employed. The system degraded salicylic acid at 100-1100mg/L with a high level of efficiency, showed rapid acclimation without substrate or product inhibition phenomena and good stability in response to unsteady states caused by feed variations. Under starvation conditions, specific degradation rates of around 15mg/gh were achieved during the adaptation of the biomass to the new conditions and no biofilm formation was observed during the first days of experimentation using an initial substrate to microorganisms ratio lower than 0.1. When substrate was added to the reactor as pulses resulting in rapidly changing concentrations, P. putida growth was observed only for substrate to microorganism ratios higher than 0.6, with a maximum YX/S of 0.5g/g. Biofilm development under changing feeding conditions was fast, biomass detachment only being significant for biomass concentrations on the membrane surface that were higher than 16g/m(2). PMID:24413046

  12. Homology modeling and function of trehalose synthase from Pseudomonas putida P06.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Wang, Tengfei; Ma, Chunling; Li, Zhongkui; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Ruiming

    2014-05-01

    Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide that has wide applications in the food industry and pharmaceutical manufacturing. Trehalose synthase (TreS) from Pseudomonas putida P06 catalyzes the reversible interconversion of maltose and trehalose and may have applications in the food industry. However, the catalytic mechanism of TreS is not well understood. Here, we investigated the structural characteristics of this enzyme by homology modeling. The highly conserved Asp294 residue was identified to be critical for catalytic activity. In addition, flexible docking studies of the enzyme-substrate system were performed to predict the interactions between TreS and its substrate, maltose. Amino acids that interact extensively with the substrate and stabilize the substrate in an orientation suitable for enzyme catalysis were identified. The importance of these residues for catalytic activity was confirmed by the biochemical characterization of the relevant mutants generated by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:24563286

  13. Sequential utilization of substrates by Pseudomonas putida CSV86: signatures of intermediate metabolites and online measurements.

    PubMed

    Basu, Aditya; Das, Debasish; Bapat, Prashant; Wangikar, Pramod P; Phale, Prashant S

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CSV86 preferentially utilizes aromatics over glucose and co-metabolizes them with organic acids. On aromatics plus glucose, CSV86 utilized aromatics first with concomitant appearance of transient metabolites such as salicylate, benzaldehyde and benzoate. Citrate was the main extracellular metabolite observed during glucose uptake. The strain showed simultaneous utilization of organic acids and aromatic compounds. Based on the metabolite analysis and growth profiles, we hypothesize that the repression of glucose utilization could be due to organic acid intermediates generated from aromatic compound metabolism. The online measurements indicate the instantaneous metabolic state of the culture. For example, the CO(2) evolution and agitation speed show peak values during the two growth phases in the diauxic growth while dissolved oxygen values show decrease at the corresponding durations. These measurements correlated well with the offline measurements but provided a better time resolution of the process. PMID:17467253

  14. Variation in chlorobenzoate catabolism by Pseudomonas putida P111 as a consequence of genetic alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, V.; Focht, D.D. ); Hernandez, B.S. )

    1993-09-01

    Chlorobenzoates are key intermediates in the degradative pathways of polychlorinated biphenyls and benzoate herbicides. Bacteria that cometabolize these pollutants generally accumulate chlorobenzoates because they are not able to grow on them. Special interest has been focused on ortho-chlorobenzoates because they are more refractory to biodegradation. In all of these studies the enzyme responsible for the first attack on the ortho-chlorobenzoates possesses minimal or negligible activity with meta- or para-chlorobenzoates. This study reports evidence for the existence of two separate benzoate dioxygenases in Pseudomonas putida P111 and for the transpostional nature of the clc operon, on the basis of genetic investigations of different phenotypic variants of this strain. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Characterization of Pseudooxynicotine Amine Oxidase of Pseudomonas putida S16 that Is Crucial for Nicotine Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haiyang; Wang, Weiwei; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Pseudooxynicotine amine oxidase (Pnao) is essential to the pyrrolidine pathway of nicotine degradation of Pseudomonas putida strain S16, which is significant for the detoxification of nicotine, through removing the CH3NH2 group. However, little is known about biochemical mechanism of this enzyme. Here, we characterized its properties and biochemical mechanism. Isotope labeling experiments provided direct evidence that the newly introduced oxygen atom in 3-succinoylsemialdehyde-pyridine is derived from H2O, but not from O2. Pnao was very stable at temperatures below 50 °C; below this temperature, the enzyme activity increased as temperature rose. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that residue 180 is important for its thermal stability. In addition, tungstate may enhance the enzyme activity, which has rarely been reported before. Our findings make a further understanding of the crucial Pnao in nicotine degradation. PMID:26634650

  16. Novel polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymers produced in Pseudomonas putida by metagenomic polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiujun; Charles, Trevor C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterially produced biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with versatile properties can be achieved using different PHA synthases (PhaCs). This work aims to expand the diversity of known PhaCs via functional metagenomics and demonstrates the use of these novel enzymes in PHA production. Complementation of a PHA synthesis-deficient Pseudomonas putida strain with a soil metagenomic cosmid library retrieved 27 clones expressing either class I, class II, or unclassified PHA synthases, and many did not have close sequence matches to known PhaCs. The composition of PHA produced by these clones was dependent on both the supplied growth substrates and the nature of the PHA synthase, with various combinations of short-chain-length (SCL) and medium-chain-length (MCL) PHA. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate diverse genes for PHA synthesis by functional metagenomics and their use for the production of a variety of PHA polymer and copolymer mixtures. PMID:27333909

  17. Immobilization of mercuric reductase from a pseudomonas putida strain on different activated carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Anspach, F.B.; Hueckel, M.; Brunke, M.

    1994-02-01

    Mercuric reductase was isolated from Pseudomonas putida KT2442::mer-73 and immobilized on chromatographic carriers activated by various methods. The immobilization methods for covalent coupling were compared with regard to preservation of enzymatic activity and coupling yields. Highest yields were obtained with carriers bearing the most reactive functional groups. Best results were achieved with tresyl chloride-activated carriers. The optimum binding conditions were found at pH 8. Application of the immobilized mercuric reductase for continuous treatment of Hg(II)-containing water was examined in a fixed bed reactor. Space-time yields up to 510 nmol/min{center_dot}mL were attained. The kinetics of immobilized enzyme systems were not diffusion-controlled. 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. c-Type cytochromes and manganese oxidation in Pseudomonas putida MnB1

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, R.; Tebo, B.M.; Haygood, M.G.

    1998-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida MnB1 is an isolate from an Mn oxide-encrusted pipeline that can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn oxides. The authors used transposon mutagenesis to construct mutants of strain MnB1 that are unable to oxidize manganese, and they characterized some of these mutants. The mutants were divided into three groups: mutants defective in the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes, mutants defective in genes that encode key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and mutants defective in the biosynthesis of tryptophan. The mutants in the first two groups were cytochrome c oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Mn(II) oxidation capability could be recovered in a c-type cytochrome biogenesis-defective mutant by complementation of the mutation.

  19. Oxidative stress in bacteria (Pseudomonas putida) exposed to nanostructures of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Szala, Mateusz; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Cłapa, Tomasz; Narożna, Dorota; Selwet, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanostructures produced by combustion synthesis can cause oxidative stress in the bacterium Pseudomonas putida. The results of this study showed that SiC nanostructures damaged the cell membrane, which can lead to oxidative stress in living cells and to the loss of cell viability. As a reference, micrometric SiC was also used, which did not exhibit toxicity toward cells. Oxidative stress was studied by analyzing the activity of peroxidases, and the expression of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (zwf1) using real-time PCR and northern blot techniques. Damage to nucleic acid was studied by isolating and hydrolyzing plasmids with the formamidopyrimidine [fapy]-DNA glycosylase (also known as 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase) (Fpg), which is able to detect damaged DNA. The level of viable microbial cells was investigated by propidium iodide and acridine orange staining. PMID:25965002

  20. c-Type Cytochromes and Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida MnB1

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Ron; Tebo, Bradley M.; Haygood, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida MnB1 is an isolate from an Mn oxide-encrusted pipeline that can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn oxides. We used transposon mutagenesis to construct mutants of strain MnB1 that are unable to oxidize manganese, and we characterized some of these mutants. The mutants were divided into three groups: mutants defective in the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes, mutants defective in genes that encode key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and mutants defective in the biosynthesis of tryptophan. The mutants in the first two groups were cytochrome c oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Mn(II) oxidation capability could be recovered in a c-type cytochrome biogenesis-defective mutant by complementation of the mutation. PMID:9758766

  1. The purification and characterization of 4-ethylphenol methylenehydroxylase, a flavocytochrome from Pseudomonas putida JD1.

    PubMed

    Reeve, C D; Carver, M A; Hopper, D J

    1989-10-15

    The enzyme 4-ethylphenol methylenehydroxylase was purified from Pseudomonas putida JD1 grown on 4-ethylphenol. It is a flavocytochrome c for which the Mr was found to be 120,000 by ultracentrifuging and 126,000 by gel filtration. The enzyme consists of two flavoprotein subunits each of Mr 50,000 and two cytochrome c subunits each of Mr 10,000. The redox potential of the cytochrome is 240 mV. Hydroxylation proceeds by dehydrogenation and hydration to give 1-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol, which is also dehydrogenated by the same enzyme to 4-hydroxyacetophenone. The enzyme will hydroxylate p-cresol but is more active with alkylphenols with longer-chain alkyl groups. It is located in the periplasm of the bacterium. PMID:2556994

  2. Competition Triggers Plasmid-Mediated Enhancement of Substrate Utilisation in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Hiren; Dave, Rachna; Venugopalan, Vayalam P.

    2009-01-01

    Competition between species plays a central role in the activity and structure of communities. Stable co-existence of diverse organisms in communities is thought to be fostered by individual tradeoffs and optimization of competitive strategies along resource gradients. Outside the laboratory, microbes exist as multispecies consortia, continuously interacting with one another and the environment. Survival and proliferation of a particular species is governed by its competitive fitness. Therefore, bacteria must be able to continuously sense their immediate environs for presence of competitors and prevailing conditions. Here we present results of our investigations on a novel competition sensing mechanism in the rhizosphere-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, harbouring gfpmut3b-modified KanR TOL plasmid. We monitored benzyl alcohol (BA) degradation rate, along with GFP expression profiling in mono species and dual species cultures. Interestingly, enhanced plasmid expression (monitored using GFP expression) and consequent BA degradation were observed in dual species consortia, irrespective of whether the competitor was a BA degrader (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) or a non-degrader (E. coli). Attempts at elucidation of the mechanistic aspects of induction indicated the role of physical interaction, but not of any diffusible compounds emanating from the competitors. This contention is supported by the observation that greater induction took place in presence of increasing number of competitors. Inert microspheres mimicking competitor cell size and concentration did not elicit any significant induction, further suggesting the role of physical cell-cell interaction. Furthermore, it was also established that cell wall compromised competitor had minimal induction capability. We conclude that P. putida harbouring pWW0 experience a competitive stress when grown as dual-species consortium, irrespective of the counterpart being BA degrader or not. The immediate effect of this

  3. Cosubstrate-induced dynamics of D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Paithankar, Karthik S; Feller, Claudia; Kuettner, E Bartholomeus; Keim, Antje; Grunow, Marlis; Sträter, Norbert

    2007-11-01

    D-3-Hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida belongs to the family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases. We have determined X-ray structures of the D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida, which was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, in three different crystal forms to resolutions between 1.9 and 2.1 A. The so-called substrate-binding loop (residues 187-210) was partially disordered in several subunits, in both the presence and absence of NAD(+). However, in two subunits, this loop was completely defined in an open conformation in the apoenzyme and in a closed conformation in the complex structure with NAD(+). Structural comparisons indicated that the loop moves as a rigid body by about 46 degrees . However, the two small alpha-helices (alphaFG1 and alphaFG2) of the loop also re-orientated slightly during the conformational change. Probably, the interactions of Val185, Thr187 and Leu189 with the cosubstrate induced the conformational change. A model of the binding mode of the substrate D-3-hydroxybutyrate indicated that the loop in the closed conformation, as a result of NAD(+) binding, is positioned competent for catalysis. Gln193 is the only residue of the substrate-binding loop that interacts directly with the substrate. A translation, libration and screw (TLS) analysis of the rigid body movement of the loop in the crystal showed significant librational displacements, describing the coordinated movement of the substrate-binding loop in the crystal. NAD(+) binding increased the flexibility of the substrate-binding loop and shifted the equilibrium between the open and closed forms towards the closed form. The finding that all NAD(+) -bound subunits are present in the closed form and all NAD(+) -free subunits in the open form indicates that the loop closure is induced by cosubstrate binding alone. This mechanism may contribute to the sequential binding of cosubstrate followed by substrate. PMID:17958702

  4. Understanding butanol tolerance and assimilation in Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1: an integrated omics approach.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, María del Sol; Roca, Amalia; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Duque, Estrella; Armengaud, Jean; Gómez-Garcia, María R; Ramos, Juan L

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1 has the potential to be used for the industrial production of butanol due to its solvent tolerance and ability to metabolize low-cost compounds. However, the strain has two major limitations: it assimilates butanol as sole carbon source and butanol concentrations above 1% (v/v) are toxic. With the aim of facilitating BIRD-1 strain design for industrial use, a genome-wide mini-Tn5 transposon mutant library was screened for clones exhibiting increased butanol sensitivity or deficiency in butanol assimilation. Twenty-one mutants were selected that were affected in one or both of the processes. These mutants exhibited insertions in various genes, including those involved in the TCA cycle, fatty acid metabolism, transcription, cofactor synthesis and membrane integrity. An omics-based analysis revealed key genes involved in the butanol response. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies were carried out to compare short and long-term tolerance and assimilation traits. Pseudomonas putida initiates various butanol assimilation pathways via alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases that channel the compound to central metabolism through the glyoxylate shunt pathway. Accordingly, isocitrate lyase - a key enzyme of the pathway - was the most abundant protein when butanol was used as the sole carbon source. Upregulation of two genes encoding proteins PPUBIRD1_2240 and PPUBIRD1_2241 (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA synthetase respectively) linked butanol assimilation with acyl-CoA metabolism. Butanol tolerance was found to be primarily linked to classic solvent defense mechanisms, such as efflux pumps, membrane modifications and control of redox state. Our results also highlight the intensive energy requirements for butanol production and tolerance; thus, enhancing TCA cycle operation may represent a promising strategy for enhanced butanol production. PMID:26986205

  5. Modeling of TCE and Toluene Toxicity to Pseudomonas putida F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Olson, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    Prediction of viable bacterial distribution with respect to contaminants is important for efficient bioremediation of contaminated ground-water aquifers, particularly those contaminated with residual NAPLs. While bacterial motility and chemotaxis may help situate bacteria close to high concentrations of contaminant thereby enhancing bioremediation, prolonged exposure to high concentrations of contaminates is toxic to contaminant-degrading bacteria. The purpose of this work is to model the toxicity of trichloroethylene and toluene to Pseudomonas putida F1. The Live/Dead® bacterial viability assay was used to determine the toxic effect of chemical contaminants on the viability of P. putida F1 in a sealed zero head-space experimental environment. Samples of bacterial suspensions were exposed to common ground-water pollutants, TCE and toluene, for different durations. Changes in live and dead cell populations were monitored over the course of experiments using fluorescence microscopy. Data obtained from these toxicity experiments were fit to simple linear and exponential bacterial decay models using non-linear regression to describe loss of bacterial viability. TCE toxicity to P. putida F1 was best described with an exponential decay model (Figure 1a), with a decay constant kTCE = 0.025 h-4.95 (r2 = 0.956). Toluene toxicity showed a marginally better fit to the linear decay model (Figure 1b) (r2 = 0.971), with a decay constant ktoluene = 0.204 h-1. Best-fit model parameters obtained for both TCE and toluene were used to predict bacterial viability in toxicity experiments with higher contaminant concentrations and matched well with experimental data. Results from this study can be used to predict bacterial accumulation and viability near NAPL sources, and thus may be helpful in improving bioremediation performance assessment of contaminated sites. Figure 1: Survival ratios (S = N/No) of P. putida F1 in TCE- (a) and toluene- (b) stressed samples (observed (

  6. Pyoverdine synthesis by the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Geszvain, Kati; Davis, Richard E.; Gruffaz, Christelle; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Torpey, Justin W.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2014-01-01

    When iron-starved, the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida strains GB-1 and MnB1 produce pyoverdines (PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1), siderophores that both influence iron uptake and inhibit manganese(II) oxidation by these strains. To explore the properties and genetics of a PVD that can affect manganese oxidation, LC-MS/MS, and various siderotyping techniques were used to identify the peptides of PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1 as being (for both PVDs): chromophore-Asp-Lys-OHAsp-Ser-Gly-aThr-Lys-cOHOrn, resembling a structure previously reported for P. putida CFML 90-51, which does not oxidize Mn. All three strains also produced an azotobactin and a sulfonated PVD, each with the peptide sequence above, but with unknown regulatory or metabolic effects. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequenced genome of P. putida GB-1 suggested that a particular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), coded by the operon PputGB1_4083-4086, could produce the peptide backbone of PVDGB-1. To verify this prediction, plasmid integration disruption of PputGB1_4083 was performed and the resulting mutant failed to produce detectable PVD. In silico analysis of the modules in PputGB1_4083-4086 predicted a peptide sequence of Asp-Lys-Asp-Ser-Ala-Thr-Lsy-Orn, which closely matches the peptide determined by MS/MS. To extend these studies to other organisms, various Mn(II)-oxidizing and non-oxidizing isolates of P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. marincola, P. fluorescens-syringae group, P. mendocina-resinovorans group, and P. stutzerii group were screened for PVD synthesis. The PVD producers (12 out of 16 tested strains) were siderotyped and placed into four sets of differing PVD structures, some corresponding to previously characterized PVDs and some to novel PVDs. These results combined with previous studies suggested that the presence of OHAsp or the flexibility of the pyoverdine polypeptide may enable efficient binding of Mn(III). PMID:24847318

  7. A kinetic study on the bioremediation of sodium cyanide and acetonitrile by free and immobilized cells of pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.; Babu, G.R.V.; Armstead, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Pseudomonas putida capable of utilizing organic nitrile (acetonitrile) and inorganic cyanide (sodium cyanide) as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen was isolated from contaminated industrial sites and waste water. The bacterium possesses nitrile aminohydrolase (EC 3.5.5.1) and amidase (EC 3.5.1.4), which are involved in the transformation of cyanides and nitrites into ammonia and CO{sub 2} through the formation of amide as an intermediate. Both of the enzymes have a high selectivity and affinity toward the {sup -}CN group. The rate of degradation of acetonitrile and sodium cyanide to ammonia and CO{sub 2} by the calcium-alginate immobilized cells of P. putida was studied. The rate of reaction during the biodegradation of acetonitrile and sodium cyanide, and the substrate- and product-dependent kinetics of these toxic compounds were studied using free and immobilized cells of P. putida and modeled using a simple Michaelis-Menten equation.

  8. Metal binding by pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic acid), a biochelator produced by Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, J C; Paszczynsk, A; Korus, R; Crawford, R L

    2001-01-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic acid) (pdtc), a natural metal chelator produced by Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas putida that promotes the degradation of carbon tetrachloride, was synthesized and studied by potentiometric and spectrophotometric techniques. The first two stepwise protonation constants (pK) for successive proton addition to pdtc were found to be 5.48 and 2.58. The third stepwise protonation constant was estimated to be 1.3. The stability (affinity) constants for iron(III), nickel(II), and cobalt(III) were determined by potentiometric or spectrophotometric titration. The results show that pdtc has strong affinity for Fe(III) and comparable affinities for various other metals. The stability constants (log K) are 33.93 for Co(pdtc)2(1-); 33.36 for Fe(pdtc)2(1-); and 33.28 for Ni(pdtc)2(2-). These protonation constants and high affinity constants show that over a physiological pH range the ferric pdtc complex has one of the highest effective stability constants for iron binding among known bacterial chelators. PMID:12051647

  9. Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposable phages in Pseudomonas putida cells. I. Establishment of lysogeny and lytic growth efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunova, S.A.; Yanenko, A.S.; Akhverdyan, V.Z.; Reulets, M.A.; Krylov, V.N.

    1986-03-01

    Expression of the genomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposable phages (TP) in the cells of a heterologous host, P. putida PpGl, was studied. A high efficiency of TP lytic growth in PpGl cells was obtained both after zygotic induction following RP4::TP plasmid transfer and after thermoinduction of PpGl cells lysogenic for thermoinducible prophage D3112cts15. Characteristic for PpGl cells was a high TP yield (20-25 phage D3112cts15 particles per cell), which was evidence of a high level of TP transposition in cells of this species. The frequency of RP4::TP transfer into PpGl and PA01 cells was equal, but the lysogeny detection rat was somewhat lower in PpGl. Pseudomonas aeruginosa TP can integrate into the PpGl chromosome, producing inducible lysogens. The presence of RP4 is not necessary for the expression of the TP genome in PpGl cells. The D3112cts15 TP may be used for interspecific transduction of plasmids and chromosomal markers.

  10. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Ángeles, Martínez-Toledo; Refugio, Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils) supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = −0.54; p < 0.019) between TPH concentration (mg/kg) and surface tension (mN/m), When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = −0.64; p < 0.009) was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil. PMID:24294259

  11. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ángeles, Martínez-Toledo; Refugio, Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils) supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p < 0.019) between TPH concentration (mg/kg) and surface tension (mN/m), When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p < 0.009) was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil. PMID:24294259

  12. A genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Pseudomonas putida KT2440: iJN746 as a cell factory

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Juan; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Thiele, Ines

    2008-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas putida is the best studied pollutant degradative bacteria and is harnessed by industrial biotechnology to synthesize fine chemicals. Since the publication of P. putida KT2440's genome, some in silico analyses of its metabolic and biotechnology capacities have been published. However, global understanding of the capabilities of P. putida KT2440 requires the construction of a metabolic model that enables the integration of classical experimental data along with genomic and high-throughput data. The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) approach has been successfully used to build and analyze in silico genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. Results We present a genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida KT2440's metabolism, iJN746, which was constructed based on genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. This manually-curated reconstruction accounts for 746 genes, 950 reactions, and 911 metabolites. iJN746 captures biotechnologically relevant pathways, including polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis and catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds (e.g., toluene, benzoate, phenylacetate, nicotinate), not described in other metabolic reconstructions or biochemical databases. The predictive potential of iJN746 was validated using experimental data including growth performance and gene deletion studies. Furthermore, in silico growth on toluene was found to be oxygen-limited, suggesting the existence of oxygen-efficient pathways not yet annotated in P. putida's genome. Moreover, we evaluated the production efficiency of polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources and found fatty acids as the most prominent candidates, as expected. Conclusion Here we presented the first genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida, a biotechnologically interesting all-surrounder. Taken together, this work illustrates the utility of iJN746 as i) a knowledge-base, ii) a discovery tool, and iii) an engineering platform to explore P. putida's potential in

  13. The Role of CzcRS Two-Component Systems in the Heavy Metal Resistance of Pseudomonas putida X4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pulin; Chen, Xi; Huang, Qiaoyun; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    The role of different czcRS genes in metal resistance and the cross-link between czcRS and czcCBA in Pseudomonas putida X4 were studied to advance understanding of the mechanisms by which P. putida copes with metal stress. Similar to P. putida KT2440, two complete czcRS1 and czcRS2 two-component systems, as well as a czcR3 without the corresponding sensing component were amplified in P. putida X4. The histidine kinase genes czcS1 and czcS2 were inactivated and fused to lacZ by homologous recombination. The lacZ fusion assay revealed that Cd2+ and Zn2+ caused a decrease in the transcription of czcRS1, whereas Cd2+ treatment enhanced the transcription of czcRS2. The mutation of different czcRSs showed that all czcRSs are necessary to facilitate full metal resistance in P. putida X4. A putative gene just downstream of czcR3 is related to metal ion resistance, and its transcription was activated by Zn2+. Data from quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) strongly suggested that czcRSs regulate the expression of czcCBA, and a cross-link exists between different czcRSs. PMID:26225958

  14. Identification of camphor oxidation and reduction products in Pseudomonas putida: new activity of the cytochrome P450cam system.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Brinda; Rojubally, Adina; Plettner, Erika

    2011-06-01

    P450 enzymes are known for catalyzing hydroxylation reactions of non-activated C-H bonds. For example, P450(cam) from Pseudomonas putida oxidizes (1R)-(+)-camphor to 5-exo-hydroxy camphor and further to 5-ketocamphor. This hydroxylation reaction proceeds via a catalytic cycle in which the reduction of dioxygen (O(2)) is coupled to the oxidation of the substrate. We have observed that under conditions of low oxygen, P. putida and isolated P450(cam) reduce camphor to borneol. We characterized the formation of borneol under conditions of low oxygen or when the catalytic cycle is shunted by artificial oxidants like m-chloro perbenzoic acid, cumene hydroperoxide, etc. We also tested the toxicity of camphor and borneol with P. putida and Escherichia coli. We have found that in P. putida borneol is less toxic than camphor, whereas in E. coli borneol is more toxic than camphor. We discuss a potental ecological advantage of the camphor reduction reaction for P. putida. PMID:21562741

  15. Crude glycerol as feedstock for the sustainable production of p-hydroxybenzoate by Pseudomonas putida S12.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Suzanne; Gao, Nisi; Ruijssenaars, Harald J; de Winde, Johannes H

    2014-01-25

    Crude glycerol is a promising renewable feedstock in bioconversion processes for the production of fuels and chemicals. Impurities present in crude glycerol can however, negatively impact the fermentation process. Successful crude glycerol utilization requires robust microbial production hosts that tolerate and preferably, can utilize such impurities. We investigated utilization of crude, unpurified glycerol as a substrate for the production of aromatic compounds by solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12. In high-cell density fed-batch fermentations, P. putida S12 surprisingly performed better on crude glycerol than on purified glycerol. By contrast, growth of Escherichia coli was severely compromised under these high cell density cultivation conditions on crude glycerol. For P. putida S12 the biomass-to-substrate yield, maximum biomass production rate and substrate uptake rate were consistently higher on crude glycerol. Moreover, production of p-hydroxybenzoate by engineered P. putida S12palB5 on crude glycerol showed a 10% yield improvement over production on purified glycerol. P. putida S12 is a favorable host for bioconversion processes utilizing crude glycerol as a substrate. Its intrinsic stress-tolerance properties provide the robustness required for efficient growth and metabolism on this renewable substrate. PMID:23999132

  16. Metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas putida for the simultaneous biodegradation of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.Y.; Roh, J.R.; Kim, H.S. . Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1994-05-01

    For the complete biodegradation of a mixture of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene (BTX), a critical metabolic step that can connect two existing metabolic pathways of aromatic compounds (the tod and the tol pathways) was determined. Toluate-cis-glycol dehydrogenase in the tol pathway was found to attack benzene-cis-glycol, toluene-cis-glycol, and p-xylene-cis-glycol, which are metabolic intermediates of the tod pathway. Based on this observation, a hybrid strain, Pseudomonas putida TB101, was constructed by introduction of the TOL plasmid pWW0 into P. putida F39/D, a derivative of P. putida F1, which is unable to transform cis-glycol compounds to corresponding catechols. The metabolic flux of BTX into the tod pathway was redirected to the tol pathway at the level of cis-glycol compounds by the action of toluate-cis-glycol dehydrogenase in P. putida TB101, resulting in the simultaneous mineralization of BTX mixture without accumulation of any metabolic intermediates. The profile of specific degradation rates showed a similar pattern as that of the specific growth rate of the microorganism, and the maximum specific degradation rates of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene were determined to be about 0.27, 0.86, and 2.89 mg/mg biomass/h, respectively. P. putida TB101 is the first reported microorganisms that mineralizes BTX mixture simultaneously.

  17. Biodegradation of cyanides, cyanates and thiocyanates to ammonia and carbon dioxide by immobilized cells of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Chapatwala, K D; Babu, G R; Vijaya, O K; Kumar, K P; Wolfram, J H

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida utilizes cyanide as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Agar, alginate, and carrageenan were screened as the encapsulating matrices for P. putida. Alginate-immobilized cells of P. putida degraded sodium cyanide (NaCN) more efficiently than non-immobilized cells or cells immobilized in agar or carrageenan. The end products of biodegradation of cyanide were identified as ammonia (NH3) and carbon dioxide (CO2). These products changed the medium pH. In bioreactors, the rate of cyanide degradation increased with an increase in the rate of aeration. Maximum utilization of cyanide was observed at 200 ml min-1 of aeration. Immobilized cells of P. putida degraded cyanides, cyanates and thiocyanates to NH3 and CO2. Use of Na[14C]-CN showed that 70% of carbon of Na[14C]-CN was converted into 14CO2 and only 10% was associated with the cell biomass. The substrate-dependent kinetics indicated that the Km and Vmax values of P. putida for the substrate, NaCN were 14 mM and 29 nmol of oxygen consumed mg protein-1 min-1 respectively. PMID:9523454

  18. Integrated foam fractionation for heterologous rhamnolipid production with recombinant Pseudomonas putida in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Beuker, Janina; Steier, Anke; Wittgens, Andreas; Rosenau, Frank; Henkel, Marius; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Heterologeous production of rhamnolipids in Pseudomonas putida is characterized by advantages of a non-pathogenic host and avoidance of the native quorum sensing regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Yet, downstream processing is a major problem in rhamnolipid production and increases in complexity at low rhamnolipid titers and when using chemical foam control. This leaves the necessity of a simple concentrating and purification method. Foam fractionation is an elegant method for in situ product removal when producing microbial surfactants. However, up to now in situ foam fractionation is nearly exclusively reported for the production of surfactin with Bacillus subtilis. So far no cultivation integrated foam fractionation process for rhamnolipid production has been reported. This is probably due to excessive bacterial foam enrichment in that system. In this article a simple integrated foam fractionation process is reported for heterologous rhamnolipid production in a bioreactor with easily manageable bacterial foam enrichments. Rhamnolipids were highly concentrated in the foam during the cultivation process with enrichment factors up to 200. The described process was evaluated at different pH, media compositions and temperatures. Foam fractionation processes were characterized by calculating procedural parameter including rhamnolipid and bacterial enrichment, rhamnolipid recovery, YX/S, YP/X, and specific as well as volumetric productivities. Comparing foam fractionation parameters of the rhamnolipid process with the surfactin process a high effectiveness of the integrated foam fractionation for rhamnolipid production was demonstrated. PMID:26860613

  19. Cell envelope changes in solvent-tolerant and solvent-sensitive Pseudomonas putida strains following exposure to o-xylene

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkart, H.C.; Wolfram, J.W.; Rogers, R.

    1996-03-01

    Solvent-tolerant and sensitive Pseudomonas putida strains were studied to determine their cell envelope changes following exposure to o-xylene. Both strains produced trans-unsaturated fatty acids. The tolerant strain showed an increase in total fatty acids, an increase in saturated fatty acids, and modified lipopolysaccharide. It is suggested that these envelope modification aid in survival at high concentrations of organic solvents. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 ref.

  20. Adaptation of Pseudomonas putida S12 to ethanol and toluene at the level of fatty acid composition of membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Heipieper, H.J.; De Bont, J.A.M.

    1994-12-01

    Many organic solvents are toxic to organisms because the partition preferentially in membranes. However, microorganisms can adapt to different organic substances. In this paper, the authors investigate the effects of both ethanol and toluene on these adaptation mechanisms in Pseudomonas putida S12 and demonstrated that isomerization allows a swifter adaptation than the growth-dependent system, which relies on changes in the degree of saturation. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  1. The glycerophospholipid inventory of Pseudomonas putida is conserved between strains and enables growth condition‐related alterations

    PubMed Central

    Rühl, Jana; Hein, Eva‐Maria; Hayen, Heiko; Schmid, Andreas; Blank, Lars M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Microorganisms, such as Pseudomonas putida, utilize specific physical properties of cellular membrane constituents, mainly glycerophospholipids, to (re‐)adjust the membrane barrier to environmental stresses. Building a basis for membrane composition/function studies, we inventoried the glycerophospholipids of different Pseudomonas and challenged membranes of growing cells with n‐butanol. Using a new high‐resolution liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) method, 127 glycerophospholipid species [e.g. phosphatidylethanolamine PE(32:1)] with up to five fatty acid combinations were detected. The glycerophospholipid inventory consists of 305 distinct glycerophospholipids [e.g. PE(16:0/16:1)], thereof 14 lyso‐glycerophospholipids, revealing conserved compositions within the four investigated pseudomonads P. putida KT2440, DOT‐T1E, S12 and Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120. Furthermore, we addressed the influence of environmental conditions on the glycerophospholipid composition of Pseudomonas via long‐time exposure to the sublethal n‐butanol concentration of 1% (v/v), focusing on: (i) relative amounts of glycerophospholipid species, (ii) glycerophospholipid head group composition, (iii) fatty acid chain length, (iv) degree of saturation and (v) cis/trans isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids. Observed alterations consist of changing head group compositions and for the solvent‐sensitive strain KT2440 diminished fatty acid saturation degrees. Minor changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of the solvent‐tolerant strains P. putida S12 and Pseudomonas sp. VLB120 suggest different strategies of the investigated Pseudomonas to maintain the barrier function of cellular membranes. PMID:21895997

  2. The Regulation of para-Nitrophenol Degradation in Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiongzhen; Tu, Hui; Luo, Xue; Zhang, Biying; Huang, Fei; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Shen, Wenjing; Wu, Jiale; Cui, Zhongli

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4 can efficiently degrade para-nitrophenol and its intermediate metabolite hydroquinone. The regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation was studied, and PNP induced a global change in the transcriptome of P. putida DLL-E4. When grown on PNP, the wild-type strain exhibited significant downregulation of 2912 genes and upregulation of 845 genes, whereas 2927 genes were downregulated and 891 genes upregulated in a pnpR-deleted strain. Genes related to two non-coding RNAs (ins1 and ins2), para-nitrophenol metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the outer membrane porin OprB, glucose dehydrogenase Gcd, and carbon catabolite repression were significantly upregulated when cells were grown on para-nitrophenol plus glucose. pnpA, pnpR, pnpC1C2DECX1X2, and pnpR1 are key genes in para-nitrophenol degradation, whereas pnpAb and pnpC1bC2bDbEbCbX1bX2b have lost the ability to degrade para-nitrophenol. Multiple components including transcriptional regulators and other unknown factors regulate para-nitrophenol degradation, and the transcriptional regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation is complex. Glucose utilization was enhanced at early stages of para-nitrophenol supplementation. However, it was inhibited after the total consumption of para-nitrophenol. The addition of glucose led to a significant enhancement in para-nitrophenol degradation and up-regulation in the expression of genes involved in para-nitrophenol degradation and carbon catabolite repression (CCR). It seemed that para-nitrophenol degradation can be regulated by CCR, and relief of CCR might contribute to enhanced para-nitrophenol degradation. In brief, the regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation seems to be controlled by multiple factors and requires further study. PMID:27191401

  3. Proton coupling in the ligand-binding reaction of ferric cytochrome P-450 from Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Totani, K.; Iizuka, T.; Shimada, H.; Makino, R.; Ishimura, Y.

    1983-04-01

    Effects of pH on the ligand-binding reactions of ferric heme in cytochrome P-450 from Pseudomonas putida (camphor 5-monooxygenase, EC 1.14.15.1) were studied by using cyanide, N-methylimidazole, pyridine, and ethylisocyanide as ligands. In all cases, affinity of the ferric heme for the ligand was found to increase as pH of the medium was raised from around 6 to 9. Depending on the ligand, the increase was 10- to 1000-fold and the shapes of their pH-affinity curves were remarkably different. Analyses such pH profiles disclosed the presence of a dissociable group in the enzyme with a pK value of approximately 9.5 and that its ionization greatly enhanced the affinity of the heme for ligands. When a dissociable ligand such as hydrogen cyanide and N-methylimidazole was used, the dissociated form of the ligand had a higher affinity toward the heme than the undissociated form. The shapes of the pH-affinity curves were successfully simulated as overlapping curves of ionization reactions of the ligand and the dissociable group. In addition, size of the ligand molecule was shown to be also important in the binding reaction: relatively large molecules such as pyridine, ethylisocyanide, and N-methylimidazole bound to the enzyme in a competitive manner against d-camphor concentration, whereas the binding of a smaller molecule such as cyanide was inhibited by the substrate in a noncompetitive manner. On the basis of these findings, control mechanisms for the ligand-binding reactions of the cytochrome P-450 from P. putida are discussed.

  4. Physiological and transcriptomic characterization of a fliA mutant of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Herva, José Juan; Duque, Estrella; Molina-Henares, María Antonia; Navarro-Avilés, Gloria; Van Dillewijn, Pieter; De La Torre, Jesús; Molina-Henares, Antonio J; La Campa, Ana Sánchez-de; Ran, F Ann; Segura, Ana; Shingler, Victoria; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2010-06-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 encodes 23 alternative sigma factors. The fliA gene, which encodes σ(28) , is in a cluster with other genes involved in flagella biosynthesis and chemotaxis. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that this cluster is comprised of four independent transcriptional units: flhAF, fleNfliA, cheYZA and cheBmotAB. We generated a nonpolar fliA mutant by homologous recombination and tested its motility, adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces, and responses to various stress conditions. The mutant strain was nonmotile and exhibited decreased capacity to bind to corn seeds, although its ability to colonize the rhizosphere of plants was unaffected. The mutant was also affected in binding to abiotic surfaces and its ability to form biofilms decreased by almost threefold. In the fliA mutant background expression of 25 genes was affected: two genes were upregulated and 23 genes were downregulated. In addition to a number of motility and chemotaxis genes, the fliA gene product is also necessary for the expression of some genes potentially involved in amino acid utilization or stress responses; however, we were unable to assign specific phenotypes linked to these genes since the fliA mutant used the same range of amino acids as the parental strain, and was as tolerant as the wild type to stress imposed by heat, antibiotics, NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, H2 O2 and benzoate. Based on the sequence alignment of promoters recognized by FliA and genome in silico analysis, we propose that P. putidaσ(28) recognizes a TCAAG-t-N12 -GCCGATA consensus sequence located between -34 and -8 and that this sequence is preferentially associated with an AT-rich upstream region. PMID:23766109

  5. Potential of Pseudomonas putida PCI2 for the Protection of Tomato Plants Against Fungal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Nicolás; Masciarelli, Oscar; Fischer, Sonia; Luna, Virginia; Rovera, Marisa

    2016-09-01

    Tomato is one of the most economically attractive vegetable crops due to its high yields. Diseases cause significant losses in tomato production worldwide. We carried out Polymerase Chain Reaction studies to detect the presence of genes encoding antifungal compounds in the DNA of Pseudomonas putida strain PCI2. We also used liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry to detect and quantify the production of compounds that increase the resistance of plants to diseases from culture supernatants of PCI2. In addition, we investigated the presence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase in PCI2. Finally, PCI2 was used for inoculation of tomato seeds to study its potential biocontrol activity against Fusarium oxysporum MR193. The obtained results showed that no fragments for the encoding genes of hydrogen cyanide, pyoluteorin, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, or phenazine-1-carboxylic acid were amplified from the DNA of PCI2. On the other hand, PCI2 produced salicylic acid and jasmonic acid in Luria-Bertani medium and grew in a culture medium containing ACC as the sole nitrogen source. We observed a reduction in disease incidence from 53.33 % in the pathogen control to 30 % in tomato plants pre-inoculated with PCI2 as well as increases in shoot and root dry weights in inoculated plants, as compared to the pathogenicity control. This study suggests that inoculation of tomato seeds with P. putida PCI2 increases the resistance of plants to root rot caused by F. oxysporum and that PCI2 produces compounds that may be involved at different levels in increasing such resistance. Thus, PCI2 could represent a non-contaminating management strategy potentially applicable in vegetable crops such as tomato. PMID:27246499

  6. Solution Structure of the Pseudomonas putida protein PpPutA45 and its DNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Halouska, Steven; Zhou, Yuzhen; Becker, Donald F.; Powers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) is a membrane associated multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate in a two step process. In certain Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas putida, PutA also acts as an auto repressor in the cytoplasm when an insufficient concentration of proline is available. Here the N-terminal residues 1–45 of PutA from P. putida (PpPutA45), are shown to be responsible for DNA binding and dimerization. The solution structure of PpPutA45 was determined using NMR methods, where the protein is shown to be a symmetrical homodimer (12 kDa) consisting of two ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) structures. DNA sequence recognition by PpPutA45 was determined using DNA gel mobility shift assays and NMR chemical shift perturbations. PpPutA45 was shown to bind a 14 base-pair DNA oligomer (5′-GCGGTTGCACCTTT-3′). A model of the PpPutA45-DNA oligomer complex was generated using Haddock 2.1. The antiparallel β-sheet that results from PpPutA45 dimerization serves as the DNA recognition binding site by inserting into the DNA major groove. The dimeric core of four α-helices provides a structural scaffold for the β-sheet from which residues Thr5, Gly7, and Lys9 make sequence specific contacts with the DNA. The structural model implies flexibility of Lys9 which can either make hydrogen bond contacts with guanine or thymine. The high sequence and structure conservation of the PutA RHH domain suggest interdomain interactions play an important role in the evolution of the protein. PMID:18767154

  7. The T7-Related Pseudomonas putida Phage ϕ15 Displays Virion-Associated Biofilm Degradation Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Anneleen; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; T'Syen, Jeroen; Van Praet, Helena; Noben, Jean-Paul; Shaburova, Olga V.; Krylov, Victor N.; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage ϕ15, a ‘T7-like virus’ with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS) depolymerase. Phage ϕ15 forms plaques surrounded by growing opaque halo zones, indicative for EPS degradation, on seven out of 53 P. putida strains. The absence of haloes on infection resistant strains suggests that the EPS probably act as a primary bacterial receptor for phage infection. Independent of bacterial strain or biofilm age, a time and dose dependent response of ϕ15-mediated biofilm degradation was observed with generally a maximum biofilm degradation 8 h after addition of the higher phage doses (104 and 106 pfu) and resistance development after 24 h. Biofilm age, an in vivo very variable parameter, reduced markedly phage-mediated degradation of PpG1 biofilms, while degradation of RD5PR2 biofilms and ϕ15 amplification were unaffected. Killing of the planktonic culture occurred in parallel with but was always more pronounced than biofilm degradation, accentuating the need for evaluating phages for therapeutic purposes in biofilm conditions. EPS degrading activity of recombinantly expressed viral tail spike was confirmed by capsule staining. These data suggests that the addition of high initial titers of specifically selected phages with a proper EPS depolymerase are crucial criteria in the development of phage therapy. PMID:21526174

  8. Effects of Cobalt on Manganese Oxidation by Pseudomonas putida MnB1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, J.; Bargar, J.; Sposito, G.

    2005-12-01

    The oxidation of Mn(II) in the environment is thought to occur predominantly through biologically mediated pathways. During the stationary phase of growth, the well-characterized freshwater and soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida MnB1 oxidizes soluble Mn(II) to a poorly crystalline layer type Mn(IV) oxide. These Mn oxide particles (2 - 5 nm thickness) are deposited in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) surrounding the cell, creating a multi-component system distinct from commonly studied synthetic Mn oxides. Accurate characterization of the reactivity of these biomineral assemblages is essential to understanding trace metal biogeochemistry in natural waters and sediments. Moreover, these biogenic oxides may potentially be used for the remediation of surface and ground waters impacted by mining, industrial pollution, and other anthropogenic activities. In this study, we consider the interactions between Co, P. putida MnB1, and its biogenic Mn oxide. Cobalt is a redox-active transition metal which exists in the environment as Co(II) and Co(III). While Co is not generally found in the environment at toxic concentrations, it may be released as a byproduct of mining activities (e.g. levels of up to 20 μM are found in Pinal Creek, AZ, a stream affected by copper mining). In addition, the radionuclide 60Co, formed by neutron activation in nuclear reactors, is of concern at Department of Energy sites, such as that at Hanford, and has several industrial applications, including radiotherapy. We address the following questions: Do high levels of Co inhibit enzymatic processes such as Mn(II) oxidation? Can the multicopper oxidase enzyme involved in Mn(II) oxidation facilitate Co(II) oxidation? Lastly, does the organic matter surrounding the oxides affect Co or Mn oxide reactivity? These issues were approached via wet chemical analysis, synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In the

  9. Molecular characterization of the gallate dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida KT2440. The prototype of a new subgroup of extradiol dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Nogales, Juan; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2005-10-21

    In this work we have characterized the galA gene product from Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a ring-cleavage dioxygenase that acts specifically on gallate to produce 4-oxalomesaconate. The protein is a trimer composed by three identical subunits of 47.6 kDa (419 amino acids) that uses Fe2+ as the main cofactor. The gallate dioxygenase showed maximum activity at pH 7.0, and the Km and Vmax values for gallate were 144 microM and 53.2 micromol/min/mg of protein, respectively. A phylogenetic study suggests that the gallate dioxygenase from P. putida KT2440 is the prototype of a new subgroup of type II extradiol dioxygenases that share a common ancestor with protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenases and whose two-domain architecture might have evolved from the fusion of the large and small subunits of the latter. A three-dimensional model for the N-terminal domain (residues 1-281) and C-terminal domain (residues 294-420) of the gallate dioxygenase from P. putida KT2440 was generated by comparison with the crystal structures of the large (LigB) and small (LigA) subunits of the protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6. The expression of the galA gene was specifically induced when P. putida KT2440 cells grew in the presence of gallate. A P. putida KT2440 galA mutant strain was unable to use gallate as the sole carbon source and it did not show gallate dioxygenase activity, suggesting that the GalA protein is the only dioxygenase involved in gallate cleavage in this bacterium. This work points to the existence of a new pathway that is devoted to the catabolism of gallic acid and that remained unknown in the paradigmatic P. putida KT2440 strain. PMID:16030014

  10. Antioxidative enzyme profiling and biosorption ability of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Saba; Rehman, Abdul

    2015-03-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 were used as cadmium (Cd)-resistant and -sensitive bacteria, respectively, to study their biosorption ability and their antioxidative enzymes. The minimal inhibitory concentration of C. metallidurans CH34 for Cd was found to be 30 mM, and for P. putida mt2 it was 1.25 mM. The tube dilution method revealed the heavy-metal resistance pattern of C. metallidurans CH34 as Ni(2+) (10 mM)>Zn(2+) (4 mM)>Cu(2+) (2 mM)>Hg(2+) (1 mM)>Cr(2+) (1 mM)>Pb(2+) (0 mM), whereas P. putida mt2 was only resistant to Zn(2+) (1 mM). Under Cd stress, the induction of GSH was higher in C. metallidurans CH34 (0.359 ± 0.010 mM g(-1)  FW) than in P. putida mt2 (0.286 ± 0.005 mM g(-1)  FW). Glutathione reductase was more highly expressed in the mt2 strain, in contrast to non-protein thiols and peroxidase. Unlike dead bacterial cells, live cells of both bacteria showed significant Cd biosorption, i.e. more than 80% at 48 h. C. metallidurans CH34 used only catalase, whereas P. putida mt2 used superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase to combat Cd stress. This study investigated the Cd biosorption ability and enzymes involved in the Cd detoxification mechanisms of C. metallidurans CH34 and P. putida mt2. PMID:23832807

  11. Simultaneous chromium reduction and phenol degradation in a coculture of Escherichia coli ATCC 33456 and Pseudomonas putida DMP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Hai; Wang, Yi-Tin

    1995-07-01

    In a defined coculture of a Cr(VI) reducer, Escherichia coli ATCC 33456, and a phenol degrader, Pseudomonas putida DMP-1, simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and degradation of phenol was observed. When Cr(VI) was present in the coculture, quantitative transformation of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) proceeded with simultaneous degradation of phenol. Cr(VI) reduction was correlated to phenol degradation in the coculture as demonstrated by a regression analysis of the cumulative Cr(VI) reduction and the cumulative phenol degradation. Both the rate and extent of Cr(VI) reduction and phenol degradation were significantly influenced by the population composition of the coculture. Although Cr(VI) reduction occurred as a result of E. coli metabolism, the rate of phenol degradation by P. putida may become a rate-limiting factor for Cr(VI) reduction at a low population ratio of P. putida to E. coli. Phenol degradation by P. putida was very susceptible to the presence of Cr(VI), whereas Cr(VI) reduction by E. coli was significantly influenced by phenol only when phenol was present at high concentrations (>9 mM). 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Engineering Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for simultaneous degradation of organophosphates and pyrethroids and its application in bioremediation of soil.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhenqiang; Gong, Ting; Che, You; Liu, Ruihua; Xu, Ping; Jiang, Hong; Qiao, Chuanling; Song, Cunjiang; Yang, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Agricultural soils are usually co-contaminated with organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid pesticides. To develop a stable and marker-free Pseudomonas putida for co-expression of two pesticide-degrading enzymes, we constructed a suicide plasmid with expression cassettes containing a constitutive promoter J23119, an OP-degrading gene (mpd), a pyrethroid-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase gene (pytH) that utilizes the upp gene as a counter-selectable marker for upp-deficient P. putida. By introduction of suicide plasmid and two-step homologous recombination, both mpd and pytH genes were integrated into the chromosome of a robust soil bacterium P. putida KT2440 and no selection marker was left on chromosome. Functional expression of mpd and pytH in P. putida KT2440 was demonstrated by Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays. Degradation experiments with liquid cultures showed that the mixed pesticides including methyl parathion, fenitrothion, chlorpyrifos, permethrin, fenpropathrin, and cypermethrin (0.2 mM each) were degraded completely within 48 h. The inoculation of engineered strain (10(6) cells/g) to soils treated with the above mixed pesticides resulted in a higher degradation rate than in noninoculated soils. All six pesticides could be degraded completely within 15 days in fumigated and nonfumigated soils with inoculation. Theses results highlight the potential of the engineered strain to be used for in situ bioremediation of soils co-contaminated with OP and pyrethroid pesticides. PMID:25917649

  13. Knockout of Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor ECF-10 Affects Stress Resistance and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Tettmann, Beatrix; Dötsch, Andreas; Armant, Olivier; Fjell, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a Gram-negative soil bacterium which is well-known for its versatile lifestyle, controlled by a large repertoire of transcriptional regulators. Besides one- and two-component regulatory systems, the genome of P. putida reveals 19 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors involved in the adaptation to changing environmental conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that knockout of extracytoplasmic function sigma factor ECF-10, encoded by open reading frame PP4553, resulted in 2- to 4-fold increased antibiotic resistance to quinolone, β-lactam, sulfonamide, and chloramphenicol antibiotics. In addition, the ECF-10 mutant exhibited enhanced formation of biofilms after 24 h of incubation. Transcriptome analysis using Illumina sequencing technology resulted in the detection of 12 genes differentially expressed (>2-fold) in the ECF-10 knockout mutant strain compared to their levels of expression in wild-type cells. Among the upregulated genes were ttgA, ttgB, and ttgC, which code for the major multidrug efflux pump TtgABC in P. putida KT2440. Investigation of an ECF-10 and ttgA double-knockout strain and a ttgABC-overexpressing strain demonstrated the involvement of efflux pump TtgABC in the stress resistance and biofilm formation phenotypes of the ECF-10 mutant strain, indicating a new role for this efflux pump beyond simple antibiotic resistance in P. putida KT2440. PMID:24907323

  14. Reconstruction of lactate utilization system in Pseudomonas putida KT2440: a novel biocatalyst for l-2-hydroxy-carboxylate production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujiao; Lv, Min; Zhang, Yingxin; Xiao, Xieyue; Jiang, Tianyi; Zhang, Wen; Hu, Chunhui; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    As an important method for building blocks synthesis, whole cell biocatalysis is hindered by some shortcomings such as unpredictability of reactions, utilization of opportunistic pathogen, and side reactions. Due to its biological and extensively studied genetic background, Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is viewed as a promising host for construction of efficient biocatalysts. After analysis and reconstruction of the lactate utilization system in the P. putida strain, a novel biocatalyst that only exhibited NAD-independent d-lactate dehydrogenase activity was prepared and used in l-2-hydroxy-carboxylates production. Since the side reaction catalyzed by the NAD-independent l-lactate dehydrogenase was eliminated in whole cells of recombinant P. putida KT2440, two important l-2-hydroxy-carboxylates (l-lactate and l-2-hydroxybutyrate) were produced in high yield and high optical purity by kinetic resolution of racemic 2-hydroxy carboxylic acids. The results highlight the promise in biocatalysis by the biotechnologically important organism P. putida KT2440 through genomic analysis and recombination. PMID:25373400

  15. Interesterification of butter fat by partially purified extracellular lipases from Pseudomonas putida, Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Pabai, F; Kermasha, S; Morin, A

    1995-11-01

    Three extracellular lipases were produced by batch fermentation of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 795, Aspergillus niger CBS 131.52 and Rhizopus oryzae ATCC 34612 during the late phase of growth, at 72, 96 and 96 h, respectively. The lipases were partially purified by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation. The lipase of P. putida was optimal at pH 8.0 whereas those from A. niger and R. oryzae were optimal at pH 7.5. The A. niger lipase had the lowest V max value (0.51×10(-3) U/min) and R. oryzae the highest (1.86×10(-3) U/min). The K m values for P. putida, A. niger and R. oryzae lipases were 1.18, 0.97, and 0.98 mg/ml, respectively. Native PAGE of the partially-purified lipase extracts showed two to four major bands. The interesterification of butter fat by A. niger lipase decreased the water activity as well as the hydrolytic activity. The A. niger lipase had the highest interesterification yield value (26%) and the R. oryzae lipase the lowest (4%). In addition, A. niger lipase exhibited the highest decrease (17%) in long-chain hypercholesterolemic fatty acids (C12:0, C14:0 and C16:0) at the sn-2-position; the P. putida lipase demonstrated the least favourable changes in specificity at the same position. PMID:24415019

  16. Conjugative transfer of preferential utilization of aromatic compounds from Pseudomonas putida CSV86.

    PubMed

    Basu, Aditya; Phale, Prashant S

    2008-02-01

    Pseudomonas putida CSV86 utilizes naphthalene (Nap), salicylate (Sal), benzyl alcohol (Balc), and methylnaphthalene (MN) preferentially over glucose. Methylnaphthalene is metabolized by ring-hydroxylation as well as side-chain hydroxylation pathway. Although the degradation property was found to be stable, the frequency of obtaining Nap(-)Sal(-)MN(-)Balc(-) phenotype increased to 11% in the presence of curing agents. This property was transferred by conjugation to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia CSV89 with a frequency of 7 x 10(-8) per donor cells. Transconjugants were Nap(+)Sal(+)MN(+)Balc(+) and metabolized MN by ring- as well as side-chain hydroxylation pathway. Transconjugants also showed the preferential utilization of aromatic compounds over glucose indicating transfer of the preferential degradation property. The transferred properties were lost completely when transconjugants were grown on glucose or 2YT. Attempts to detect and isolate plasmid DNA from CSV86 and transconjugants were unsuccessful. Transfer of degradation genes and its subsequent loss from the transconjugants was confirmed by PCR using primers specific for 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene dioxygenase and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) as well as by DNA-DNA hybridizations using total DNA as template and C23O PCR fragment as a probe. These results indicate the involvement of a probable conjugative element in the: (i) metabolism of aromatic compounds, (ii) ring- and side-chain hydroxylation pathways for MN, and (iii) preferential utilization of aromatics over glucose. PMID:17487554

  17. Synergistic effect of Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ameliorates drought stress in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Mishra, Sankalp; Dixit, Vijaykant; Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Lalit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Pseudomonas putida NBRIRA and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRISN13 with ability to tolerate abiotic stress along with multiple PGP traits like ACC deaminase activity, minerals solubilisation, hormones production, biofilm formation, siderophore activity were evaluated for their synergistic effect to ameliorate drought stress in chickpea. Earlier we have reported both the strains individually for their PGP attributes and stress amelioration in host plants. The present study explains in detail the possibilities and benefits of utilizing these 2 PGPR in consortium for improving the chickpea growth under control and drought stressed condition. In vitro results clearly demonstrate that both the PGPR strains are compatible to each other and their synergistic growth enhances the PGP attributes. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of inoculation of both strains individually and consortia in drought tolerant and sensitive cultivars (BG362 and P1003). The growth parameters were observed significantly higher in consortium as compared to individual PGPR. Colonization of both PGPR in chickpea rhizosphere has been visualized by using gfp labeling. Apart from growth parameters, defense enzymes, soil enzymes and microbial diversity were significantly modulated in individually PGPR and in consortia inoculated plants. Negative effects of drought stress has been ameliorated and apparently seen by higher biomass and reversal of stress indicators in chickpea cultivars treated with PGPR individually or in consortia. Findings from the present study demonstrate that synergistic application has better potential to improve plant growth promotion under drought stress conditions. PMID:26362119

  18. Examining the fate of released Pseudomonas putida F1 in rhizosphere environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Davis, L.C.; Erickson, L.E.

    1997-12-31

    Bioremediation, especially plant-based bioremediation, is receiving increasing attention because compared to traditional soil and groundwater remediation techniques, it is rapid, safe, and cost-effective. A soil microcosm study was conducted to see the fate of released bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida F1 in soil. Although the P. p F1 population died off to low levels within the experimental period, the presence of alfalfa and poplar trees helped the survival of P. p F1 in soil. The P. p F1 populations were significantly higher (p = 0.05) in soil samples from the poplar tree soil microcosms than from unplanted control soil microcosms. There was no significant difference observed between soil microcosms planted with alfalfa and unplanted control. The better survival of P. p F1 in planted soil is due to the rhizosphere effect, and therefore, is dependent on the root density in soil. This study shows the beneficial effect of vegetation on the survival of a laboratory cultured strain under conditions close to field condition.

  19. Purification to homogeneity and characterization of a novel Pseudomonas putida chromate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.H.; Keyhan, M.; Wielinga, B.; Fendorf, S.; Matin, A.

    2000-05-01

    Cr(VI) (chromate) is a widespread environmental contaminant. Bacterial chromate reductases can convert soluble and toxic chromate to the insoluble and less toxic Cr(III). Bioremediation can therefore be effective in removing chromate from the environment, especially if the bacterial propensity for such removal is enhanced by genetic and biochemical engineering. To clone the chromate reductase-encoding gene, the authors purified to homogeneity and characterized a novel soluble chromate reductase from Pseudomonas putida, using ammonium sulfate precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, chromatofocusing, and gel filtration. The enzyme activity was dependent on NADH or NADPH; the temperature and pH optima for chromate reduction were 80 C and 5, respectively; and the K{sub m} was 374 {micro}M, with a V{sub max} of 1.72 {micro}mol/min/mg of protein. Sulfate inhibited the enzyme activity noncompetitively. The reductase activity remained virtually unaltered after 30 min of exposure to 50 C; even exposure to higher temperatures did not immediately inactivate the enzyme. X-ray absorption near-edge-structure spectra showed quantitative conversion of chromate to Cr(III) during the enzyme reaction.

  20. Pseudomonas putida biofilm dynamics following a single pulse of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mallevre, Florian; Fernandes, Teresa F; Aspray, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    Pseudomonas putida mono-species biofilms were exposed to silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) in artificial wastewater (AW) under hydrodynamic conditions. Specifically, 48 h old biofilms received a single pulse of Ag NPs at 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mg L(-1) for 24 h in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) compatible flow-cells. The biofilm dynamics (in terms of morphology, viability and activity) were characterised at 48, 72 and 96 h. Consistent patterns were found across flow-cells and experiments at 48 h. Dose dependent impacts of NPs were then shown at 72 h on biofilm morphology (e.g. biomass, surface area and roughness) from 0.01 mg L(-1). The microbial viability was not altered below 10 mg L(-1) Ag NPs. The activity (based on the d-glucose utilisation) was impacted by concentrations of Ag NPs equal and superior to 10 mg L(-1). Partial recovery of morphology, viability and activity were finally observed at 96 h. Comparatively, exposure to Ag salt resulted in ca. one order of magnitude higher toxicity when compared to Ag NPs. Consequently, the use of a continuous culture system and incorporation of a recovery stage extends the value of biofilm assays beyond the standard acute toxicity assessment. PMID:27031799

  1. Quantitative analysis of chemotaxis towards toluene by Pseudomonas putida in a convection-free microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaopu; Atencia, Javier; Ford, Roseanne M

    2015-05-01

    Chemotaxis has been shown to be beneficial for the migration of soil-inhabiting bacteria towards industrial chemical pollutants, which they degrade. Many studies have demonstrated the importance of this microbial property under various circumstances; however, few quantitative analyses have been undertaken to measure the two essential parameters that characterize the chemotaxis of bioremediation bacteria: the chemotactic sensitivity coefficient χ(0) and the chemotactic receptor constant K(c). The main challenge to determine these parameters is that χ(0) and K(c) are coupled together in non-linear mathematical models used to evaluate them. In this study we developed a method to accurately measure these parameters for Pseudomonas putida in the presence of toluene, an important pollutant in groundwater contamination. Our approach uses a multilayer microfluidic device to expose bacteria to a convection-free linear chemical gradient of toluene that is stable over time. The bacterial distribution within the gradient is measured in terms of fluorescence intensity, and is then used to fit the parameters Kc and χ(0) with mathematical models. Critically, bacterial distributions under chemical gradients at two different concentrations were used to solve for both parameters independently. To validate the approach, the chemotaxis parameters of Escherichia coli strains towards α-methylaspartate were experimentally derived and were found to be consistent with published results from related work. PMID:25408100

  2. Structural and kinetic characterization of recombinant 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida G7.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Simara Semíramis de; Neves, Cíntia Mara Leal; Guimarães, Samuel Leite; Whitman, Christian P; Johnson, William H; Aparicio, Ricardo; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto

    2015-08-01

    The first enzyme in the oxalocrotonate branch of the naphthalene-degradation lower pathway in Pseudomonas putida G7 is NahI, a 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase which converts 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde to 2-hydroxymuconate in the presence of NAD(+). NahI is in family 8 (ALDH8) of the NAD(P)(+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily. In this work, we report the cloning, expression, purification and preliminary structural and kinetic characterization of the recombinant NahI. The nahI gene was subcloned into a T7 expression vector and the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli ArcticExpress as a hexa-histidine-tagged fusion protein. After purification by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments were conducted to analyze the oligomeric state and the overall shape of the enzyme in solution. The protein is a tetramer in solution and has nearly perfect 222 point group symmetry. Protein stability and secondary structure content were evaluated by a circular dichroism spectroscopy assay under different thermal conditions. Furthermore, kinetic assays were conducted and, for the first time, KM (1.3±0.3μM) and kcat (0.9s(-1)) values were determined at presumed NAD(+) saturation. NahI is highly specific for its biological substrate and has no activity with salicylaldehyde, another intermediate in the naphthalene-degradation pathway. PMID:26032336

  3. Complete biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by engineered Pseudomonas putida cells expressing surface-immobilized laccases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Tan, Luming; Wang, Jing; Wang, Zhiyong; Ni, Hong; Li, Lin

    2016-08-01

    The long-term abuse use of chlorpyrifos-like pesticides in agriculture and horticulture has resulted in significant soil or water contamination and a worldwide ecosystem threat. In this study, the ability of a solvent-tolerant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida MB285, with surface-displayed bacterial laccase, to biodegrade chlorpyrifos was investigated. The results of compositional analyses of the degraded products demonstrate that the engineered MB285 was capable of completely eliminating chlorpyrifos via direct biodegradation, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assays. Two intermediate metabolites, namely 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethyl phosphate, were temporarily detectable, verifying the joint and stepwise degradation of chlorpyrifos by surface laccases and certain cellular enzymes, whereas the purified free laccase incompletely degraded chlorpyrifos into TCP. The degradation reaction can be conducted over a wide range of pH values (2-7) and temperatures (5-55 °C) without the need for Cu(2+). Bioassays using Caenorhabditis elegans as an indicator organism demonstrated that the medium was completely detoxified of chlorpyrifos by degradation. Moreover, the engineered cells exhibited a high capacity of repeated degradation and good performance in continuous degradation cycles, as well as a high capacity to degrade real effluents containing chlorpyrifos. Therefore, the developed system exhibited a high degradation capacity and performance and constitutes an improved approach to address chlorpyrifos contamination in chlorpyrifos-remediation practice. PMID:27231878

  4. Regulation of the pcaIJ genes for aromatic acid degradation in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Parales, R E; Harwood, C S

    1993-01-01

    Six of the genes encoding enzymes of the beta-ketoadipate pathway for benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation in Pseudomonas putida are organized into at least three separate transcriptional units. As an initial step to defining this pca regulon at the molecular level, lacZ fusions were made with the pcaI and pcaJ genes, which encode the two subunits of beta-ketoadipate:succinyl-coenzyme A transferase, the enzyme catalyzing the next-to-last step in the beta-ketoadipate pathway. Fusion analyses showed that pcaI and pcaJ constitute an operon which requires beta-ketoadipate or its nonmetabolizable analog, adipate, as well as the pcaR regulatory gene for induction. The pcaIJ promoter is likely to be a sigma 70-type promoter; it has a sigma 70-type consensus sequence and did not require the alternative sigma factor, RpoN, for induction. Deletion analysis of the promoter region of a pcaI-lacZ transcriptional fusion indicated that no specific DNA sequences upstream of the -35 region were required for full induction. This implies that the binding site for the activator protein, PcaR, is unusually close to the transcriptional start site of pcaIJ. PMID:8376330

  5. Nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the repressor for the histidine utilization genes of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, S L; Phillips, A T

    1990-01-01

    The hutC gene of Pseudomonas putida encodes a repressor which, in combination with the inducer urocanate, regulates expression of the five structural genes necessary for conversion of histidine to glutamate, ammonia, and formate. The nucleotide sequence of the hutC region was determined and found to contain two open reading frames which overlapped by one nucleotide. The first open reading frame (ORF1) appeared to encode a 27,648-dalton protein of 248 amino acids whose sequence strongly resembled that of the hut repressor of Klebsiella aerogenes (A. Schwacha and R. A. Bender, J. Bacteriol. 172:5477-5481, 1990) and contained a helix-turn-helix motif that could be involved in operator binding. The gene was preceded by a sequence which was nearly identical to that of the operator site located upstream of hutU which controls transcription of the hutUHIG genes. The operator near hutC would presumably allow the hut repressor to regulate its own synthesis as well as the expression of the divergent hutF gene. A second open reading frame (ORF2) would encode a 21,155-dalton protein, but because this region could be deleted with only a slight effect on repressor activity, it is not likely to be involved in repressor function or structure. PMID:2203753

  6. Electricity Generation and Wastewater Treatment of Oil Refinery in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm2 in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm2 in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10−2% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation. PMID:25247576

  7. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm² in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm² in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10⁻²% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation. PMID:25247576

  8. Quorum sensing triggers the stochastic escape of individual cells from Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Lumjiaktase, Putthapoom; Kümmerli, Rolf; Eberl, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘quorum sensing’ (QS) is generally used to describe the phenomenon that bacteria release and perceive signal molecules to coordinate cooperative behaviour in response to their population size. QS-based communication has therefore been considered a social trait. Here we show that QS signals (N-acyl-homoserine lactones, AHLs) are stochastically produced in young biofilms of Pseudomonas putida and act mainly as self-regulatory signals rather than inducing neighbouring cells. We demonstrate that QS induces the expression of putisolvin biosurfactants that are not public goods, thereby triggering asocial motility of induced cells out of microcolonies. Phenotypic heterogeneity is most prominent in the early stages of biofilm development, whereas at later stages behaviour patterns across cells become more synchronized. Our findings broaden our perspective on QS by showing that AHLs can control the expression of asocial (self-directed) traits, and that heterogeneity in QS can serve as a mechanism to drive phenotypic heterogeneity in self-directed behaviour. PMID:25592773

  9. Physiological states and energetic adaptation during growth of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 on glucose.

    PubMed

    Latrach Tlemçani, Leith; Corroler, David; Barillier, Daniel; Mosrati, Ridha

    2008-08-01

    Kinetic study of growth of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 was investigated in batch culture under aerobic conditions, on glucose as initial carbon and energy source. Cell growth was continuous and three phases were found regarding accumulation of intermediates: (1) glucose was largely converted to gluconate and 2-ketogluconate, (2) then gluconate was converted to 2-ketogluconate and (3) the latter was consumed after gluconate depletion. Examination of growth kinetics and yields showed that glucose flux was mainly oriented to oxidation reduction in the periplasm and less towards biosynthesis. Values of respiratory quotient and of CO2/biomass and O2/biomass yields were characteristic of each phase. Main enzymatic activities involved in the use of these substrates were always detected meaning that concomitant assimilation is possible. However the levels of these activities varied during growth. Membrane conversions seem to have a significant energetic contribution explaining the higher specific growth rate obtained in glucose phase compared to gluconate and 2-ketogluconate ones. This is also noticeable through the evolution of the yields Y(O2)/X and Y(CO2)/X. Although the three convergent pathways are operational and can be genetically controlled, the progression of the culture in successive phases highlights an overall level of regulation in response to the energetic needs. PMID:18493743

  10. Addition of Aromatic Substrates Restores Trichloroethylene Degradation Activity in Pseudomonas putida F1

    PubMed Central

    Morono, Yuki; Unno, Hajime; Tanji, Yasunori; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2004-01-01

    The rate of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation by toluene dioxygenase (TDO) in resting cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 gradually decreased and eventually stopped within 1.5 h, as in previous reports. However, the subsequent addition of toluene, which is the principal substrate of TDO, resulted in its immediate degradation without a lag phase. After the consumption of toluene, degradation of TCE restarted at a rate similar to its initial degradation, suggesting that this degradation was mediated by TDO molecules that were present before the cessation of TCE degradation. The addition of benzene and cumene, which are also substrates of TDO, also caused restoration of TCE degradation activity: TCE was degraded simultaneously with cumene, and a larger amount of TCE was degraded after cumene was added than after toluene or benzene was added. But substrates that were expected to supply the cells with NADH or energy did not restore TCE degradation activity. This cycle of pseudoinactivation and restoration of TCE degradation was observed repeatedly without a significant decrease in the number of viable cells, even after six additions of toluene spread over 30 h. The results obtained in this study demonstrate a new type of restoration of TCE degradation that has not been previously reported. PMID:15128539

  11. Functional analysis of aromatic biosynthetic pathways in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Molina-Henares, M Antonia; García-Salamanca, Adela; Molina-Henares, A Jesús; de la Torre, Jesús; Herrera, M Carmen; Ramos, Juan L; Duque, Estrella

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a non-pathogenic prototrophic bacterium with high potential for biotechnological applications. Despite all that is known about this strain, the biosynthesis of essential chemicals has not been fully analysed and auxotroph mutants are scarce. We carried out massive mini-Tn5 random mutagenesis and screened for auxotrophs that require aromatic amino acids. The biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids was analysed in detail including physical and transcriptional organization of genes, complementation assays and feeding experiments to establish pathway intermediates. There is a single pathway from chorismate leading to the biosynthesis of tryptophan, whereas the biosynthesis of phenylalanine and tyrosine is achieved through multiple convergent pathways. Genes for tryptophan biosynthesis are grouped in unlinked regions with the trpBA and trpGDE genes organized as operons and the trpI, trpE and trpF genes organized as single transcriptional units. The pheA and tyrA gene-encoding multifunctional enzymes for phenylalanine and tyrosine biosynthesis are linked in the chromosome and form an operon with the serC gene involved in serine biosynthesis. The last step in the biosynthesis of these two amino acids requires an amino transferase activity for which multiple tyrB-like genes are present in the host chromosome. PMID:21261884

  12. Characterization of a plasmid-specified pathway for catabolism of isopropylbenzene in Pseudomonas putida RE204

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.W.; Timmis, K.N.

    1986-10-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain designated RE204, able to utilize isopropylbenzene as the sole carbon and energy source, was isolated. Tn5 transposon mutagenesis by means of the suicide transposon donor plasmid pLG221 yielded mutant derivatives defective in isopropylbenzene metabolism. These were characterized by the identification of the products which they accumulated when grown in the presence of isopropylbenzene and by the assay of enzyme activities in cell extracts. Based on the results obtained, the following metabolic pathway is proposed: isopropylbenzene ..-->.. 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyisopropylbenzene ..-->.. 3-isopropylcatechol ..-->.. 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-7-methylocta-2,4-dienoate ..-->.. isobutyrate + 2-oxopent-4-enoate ..-->.. amphibolic intermediates. Plasmid DNA was isolated from strain RE204 and mutant derivatives and characterized by restriction enzyme cleavage analysis. Isopropylbenzene-negative isolates carried a Tn5 insert within a 15-kilobase region of a 105-kilobase plasmid designated pRE4. DNA fragments of pRE4 carrying genes encoding isopropylbenzene catabolic enzymes were cloned in Escherichia coli with various plasmid vectors. These clones were subsequently used to generate a transposon insertion and restriction enzyme cleavage map of the isopropylbenzene metabolic region of pRE4.

  13. Toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1: genetic organization of the tod operon

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, G.J.; McCombie, W.R.; Gibson, D.T.; Finette, B.A.

    1988-06-01

    Pseudomonas putida PpF1 degrades toluene through cis-toluene dihydrodiol to 3-methylcatechol. The latter compound is metabolized through the well-established meta pathway for catechol degradation. The first four steps in the pathway involve the sequential action of toluene dioxygenase (todABC1C2), cis-toluene, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (todD), 3-methylcatechol 2,3-dioxygenase (todE), and 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-2,4-heptadienoate hydrolase (todF). The genes for these enzymes form part of the tod operon which is responsible for the degradation of toluene by this organism. A combination of transposon mutagenesis of the PpF1 chromosome, was well as the analysis of cloned chromosomal fragments, was used to determine the physical order of the genes in the tod operon. The genes were determined to be transcribed in the order todF, todC1, todC2, todB, todA, todD, todE.

  14. Suicide inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-halocatechols

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, I.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Reineke, W.

    1984-03-01

    The inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-chloro- and 3-fluorocatechol and the iron-chelating agent Tiron (catechol-3,5-disulfonate) was studied. Whereas inactivation by Tiron is an oxygen-independent and mostly reversible process, inactivation by the 3-halocatechols was only observed in the presence of oxygen and was largely irreversible. The rate constants for inactivation (K/sub 2/) were 1.62 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-chlorocatechol and 2.38 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-fluorocatechol. The inhibitor constants (K/sub i/) were 23 ..mu..M for 3-chlorocatechol and 17 ..mu..M for 3-fluorocatechol. The kinetic data for 3-fluorocatechol could only be obtained in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Besides inactivated enzyme, some 2-hydroxyhexa-2,4-dienoic acid as the actual suicide product of meta-cleavage. A side product of 3-fluorocatechol cleavage is a yellow compound with the spectral characteristics of a 2-hydroxy-6-oxohexa-2,4-dienoci acid indicating 1,6-cleavage. Rates of inactivation by 3-fluorocatechol were reduced in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, formate, and mannitol, which implies that superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical exhibit additional inactivation. 64 references.

  15. Synergistic effect of Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ameliorates drought stress in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Mishra, Sankalp; Dixit, Vijaykant; Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Lalit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Pseudomonas putida NBRIRA and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRISN13 with ability to tolerate abiotic stress along with multiple PGP traits like ACC deaminase activity, minerals solubilisation, hormones production, biofilm formation, siderophore activity were evaluated for their synergistic effect to ameliorate drought stress in chickpea. Earlier we have reported both the strains individually for their PGP attributes and stress amelioration in host plants. The present study explains in detail the possibilities and benefits of utilizing these 2 PGPR in consortium for improving the chickpea growth under control and drought stressed condition. In vitro results clearly demonstrate that both the PGPR strains are compatible to each other and their synergistic growth enhances the PGP attributes. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of inoculation of both strains individually and consortia in drought tolerant and sensitive cultivars (BG362 and P1003). The growth parameters were observed significantly higher in consortium as compared to individual PGPR. Colonization of both PGPR in chickpea rhizosphere has been visualized by using gfp labeling. Apart from growth parameters, defense enzymes, soil enzymes and microbial diversity were significantly modulated in individually PGPR and in consortia inoculated plants. Negative effects of drought stress has been ameliorated and apparently seen by higher biomass and reversal of stress indicators in chickpea cultivars treated with PGPR individually or in consortia. Findings from the present study demonstrate that synergistic application has better potential to improve plant growth promotion under drought stress conditions. PMID:26362119

  16. A role for the regulator PsrA in the polyhydroxyalkanoate metabolism of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Pilar; de la Peña, Fernando; Prieto, María Auxiliadora

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of producing medium-chain-length-polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA). When fatty acids are used as growth and polymer precursors, the biosynthesis is linked to fatty acid metabolism via ß-oxidation route. In the close-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the transcriptional repressor PsrA regulates the ß-oxidation, but little is known about the regulatory system in P. putida. To analyze the effect of the absence of psrA gene on the growth and PHA production in P. putida, a set of different carbon sources were assayed in the wild type strain and in a generated psrA deficient strain (KT40P). The growth rates were in all cases, lower for the mutant. The amount of PHA produced by the mutant strain is lower than the wild type. Moreover, the monomeric composition seems to be different among the strains, as there is enrichment in monomers with shorter carbon length in the mutant strain. To understand the role of the psrA gene on the metabolism of fatty acids, we have determined the expression profile of several genes related to fatty acid metabolism in the wild type and in the mutant strain. The results indicated that PsrA mostly negatively regulate genes related to fatty acid metabolism. PMID:24751507

  17. Evaluation of Zosteric Acid for Mitigating Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas putida Isolated from a Membrane Bioreactor System

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Andrea; Foladori, Paola; Ponti, Benedetta; Bettinetti, Roberta; Gambino, Michela; Villa, Federica; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This study provides data to define an efficient biocide-free strategy based on zosteric acid to counteract biofilm formation on the membranes of submerged bioreactor system plants. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that gammaproteobacteria was the prevalent taxa on fouled membranes of an Italian wastewater plant. Pseudomonas was the prevalent genus among the cultivable membrane-fouler bacteria and Pseudomonas putida was selected as the target microorganism to test the efficacy of the antifoulant. Zosteric acid was not a source of carbon and energy for P. putida cells and, at 200 mg/L, it caused a reduction of bacterial coverage by 80%. Biofilm experiments confirmed the compound caused a significant decrease in biomass (−97%) and thickness (−50%), and it induced a migration activity of the peritrichous flagellated P. putida over the polycarbonate surface not amenable to a biofilm phenotype. The low octanol-water partitioning coefficient and the high water solubility suggested a low bioaccumulation potential and the water compartment as its main environmental recipient and capacitor. Preliminary ecotoxicological tests did not highlight direct toxicity effects toward Daphnia magna. For green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata an effect was observed at concentrations above 100 mg/L with a significant growth of protozoa that may be connected to a concurrent algal growth inhibition. PMID:24879523

  18. Draft genome sequence analysis of a Pseudomonas putida W15Oct28 strain with antagonistic activity to Gram-positive and Pseudomonas sp. pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lumeng; Hildebrand, Falk; Dingemans, Jozef; Ballet, Steven; Laus, George; Matthijs, Sandra; Berendsen, Roeland; Cornelis, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a member of the fluorescent pseudomonads known to produce the yellow-green fluorescent pyoverdine siderophore. P. putida W15Oct28, isolated from a stream in Brussels, was found to produce compound(s) with antimicrobial activity against the opportunistic pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, an unusual characteristic for P. putida. The active compound production only occurred in media with low iron content and without organic nitrogen sources. Transposon mutants which lost their antimicrobial activity had the majority of insertions in genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine, although purified pyoverdine was not responsible for the antagonism. Separation of compounds present in culture supernatants revealed the presence of two fractions containing highly hydrophobic molecules active against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the draft genome confirmed the presence of putisolvin biosynthesis genes and the corresponding lipopeptides were found to contribute to the antimicrobial activity. One cluster of ten genes was detected, comprising a NAD-dependent epimerase, an acetylornithine aminotransferase, an acyl CoA dehydrogenase, a short chain dehydrogenase, a fatty acid desaturase and three genes for a RND efflux pump. P. putida W15Oct28 genome also contains 56 genes encoding TonB-dependent receptors, conferring a high capacity to utilize pyoverdines from other pseudomonads. One unique feature of W15Oct28 is also the presence of different secretion systems including a full set of genes for type IV secretion, and several genes for type VI secretion and their VgrG effectors. PMID:25369289

  19. Draft Genome Sequence Analysis of a Pseudomonas putida W15Oct28 Strain with Antagonistic Activity to Gram-Positive and Pseudomonas sp. Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lumeng; Hildebrand, Falk; Dingemans, Jozef; Ballet, Steven; Laus, George; Matthijs, Sandra; Berendsen, Roeland; Cornelis, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a member of the fluorescent pseudomonads known to produce the yellow-green fluorescent pyoverdine siderophore. P. putida W15Oct28, isolated from a stream in Brussels, was found to produce compound(s) with antimicrobial activity against the opportunistic pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, an unusual characteristic for P. putida. The active compound production only occurred in media with low iron content and without organic nitrogen sources. Transposon mutants which lost their antimicrobial activity had the majority of insertions in genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine, although purified pyoverdine was not responsible for the antagonism. Separation of compounds present in culture supernatants revealed the presence of two fractions containing highly hydrophobic molecules active against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the draft genome confirmed the presence of putisolvin biosynthesis genes and the corresponding lipopeptides were found to contribute to the antimicrobial activity. One cluster of ten genes was detected, comprising a NAD-dependent epimerase, an acetylornithine aminotransferase, an acyl CoA dehydrogenase, a short chain dehydrogenase, a fatty acid desaturase and three genes for a RND efflux pump. P. putida W15Oct28 genome also contains 56 genes encoding TonB-dependent receptors, conferring a high capacity to utilize pyoverdines from other pseudomonads. One unique feature of W15Oct28 is also the presence of different secretion systems including a full set of genes for type IV secretion, and several genes for type VI secretion and their VgrG effectors. PMID:25369289

  20. Expression of the iorAB genes from Brevundimonas diminuta 7 encoding the molybdenum hydroxylase isoquinoline 1-oxidoreductase in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Israel, Ilka; Sohni, Monika; Fetzner, Susanne

    2002-04-23

    Isoquinoline 1-oxidoreductase (Ior) from Brevundimonas diminuta 7, encoded by iorAB, is a molybdenum hydroxylase containing a molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide molybdenum cofactor (Mo-MCD) and two distinct [2Fe2S] clusters. The iorAB genes were inserted into pJB653, generating pIL1. Pseudomonas putida KT2440, and P. putida 86 which produces a Mo-MCD-containing quinoline 2-oxidoreductase when grown on quinoline, were used as recipients for pIL1. Upon induction of gene expression, both clones produced Ior protein, but Ior activity was not detectable in P. putida KT2440 pIL1. In P. putida 86 pIL1, formation of catalytically active Ior required the presence of quinoline, suggesting that accessory gene(s) encoding product(s) essential for the assembly of catalytically competent Ior is (are) part of the quinoline regulon in P. putida 86. PMID:12023088

  1. Calcium Causes Multimerization of the Large Adhesin LapF and Modulates Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Gil, Marta; Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    LapF is a large secreted protein involved in microcolony formation and biofilm maturation in Pseudomonas putida. Its C-terminal domain shows the characteristics of proteins secreted through a type I secretion system and includes a predicted calcium binding motif. We provide experimental evidence of specific binding of Ca2+ to the purified C-terminal domain of LapF (CLapF). Calcium promotes the formation of large aggregates, which disappear in the presence of the calcium chelator EGTA. Immunolocalization of LapF also shows the tendency of this protein to accumulate in vivo in certain extracellular regions. These findings, along with results showing that calcium influences biofilm formation, lead us to propose a model in which P. putida cells interact with each other via LapF in a calcium-dependent manner during the development of biofilms. PMID:23042991

  2. Subcloning of bph genes from Pseudomonas testoseroni B-356 in Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli: Evidence for dehalogenation during initial attack on chlorobiphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, D.; Sylvestre, M.; Sondossi, M. )

    1991-10-01

    The bphA, -B, -C, and -D genes from Pseudomonas testosteroni B-356 were mapped to a 5.5-kb DNA fragment of cloned plasmids pDA1 and pDA2 by use of deletion and insertion mutants of these plasmids. The expression of each of these genes was evaluated in Escherichia coli and in Pseudomonas putida, and it was found that the bphC and bph genes are well expressed in both E. Cole and P. putida cells while the bphA and bphB genes are very poorly expressed in E. coli, even when placed downstream of a tac promotor. P. putida clones carrying the bphA gene were used to study the metabolites produced from 4,4{prime}-dichlorobiphenyl, 2,2{prime}-dichlorobiphenyl, and 2,4{prime}-dichlorobiphenyl. It was shown that dehalogenation of 4-Cl and 2-Cl occurs in the course of the initial oxygenase attack on these molecules, which always occurs on carbons 2 and 3, independently of the positions of the chlorine atoms. The authors data also suggest that in the case of polychlorobiphenyl cogeners carrying chlorine atoms on both rings, it appears that, depending on the chlorine positions, dioxygenation will occur predominantly on one ring over the other. However, attack of the more resistant ring is not excluded, resulting in multiple conversion pathways.

  3. Proteomic analysis of the response of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas putida UW4 to nickel stress

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Wei, Yi-Yun C; Sung, Wilson WL; Glick, Bernard R; McConkey, Brendan J

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant growth-promoting bacteria can alleviate the inhibitory effects of various heavy metals on plant growth, via decreasing levels of stress-induced ethylene. However, little has been done to detect any mechanisms specific for heavy metal resistance of this kind of bacteria. Here, we investigate the response of the wild-type plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas putida UW4 to nickel stress using proteomic approaches. The mutant strain P. putida UW4/AcdS-, lacking a functional 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase gene, was also assessed for its response to nickel stress. Results Two dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) was used to detect significantly up- or down- regulated proteins (p < 0.05, | ratio | > 1.5) in P. putida in response to the presence of 2 mM Ni. Out of a total number of 1,702 proteins detected on the analytical gels for P. putida UW4, the expression levels of 82 (4.82%) proteins increased significantly while the expression of 81 (4.76%) proteins decreased significantly. Of 1,575 proteins detected on the analytical gels for P. putida UW4/AcdS-, the expression levels of 74 (4.70%) proteins increased and 51 (3.24%) proteins decreased significantly. Thirty-five proteins whose expression was altered were successfully identified by mass spectrometry and sequence comparisons with related species. Nineteen of the identified proteins were detected as differentially expressed in both wild-type and mutant expression profiles. Conclusion Functional assessment of proteins with significantly altered expression levels revealed several mechanisms thought to be involved in bacterial heavy metal detoxification, including general stress adaptation, anti-oxidative stress and heavy metal efflux proteins. This information may contribute to the development of plant growth-promoting bacteria mediated phytoremediation processes. PMID:19422705

  4. blaVIM-2 Cassette-Containing Novel Integrons in Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida Isolates Disseminated in a Korean Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Lim, Jong Back; Yum, Jong Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Chong, Yunsop; Kim, June Myung; Livermore, David M.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the phenotypic and genetic properties of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas isolates collected at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea since 1995. The prevalence of imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates reached 16% in 1997, when 9% of the resistant organisms were found to produce VIM-2 β-lactamase, a class B enzyme previously found only in P. aeruginosa isolates from Europe. VIM-2-producing isolates of Pseudomonas putida were also detected. Resistance was transferable from both these species to P. aeruginosa PAO4089Rp by filter mating, although the resistance determinant could not be found on any detectable plasmid. Serotyping showed that many of the VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates belonged to serotypes O:11 and O:12, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI-digested genomic DNA revealed that many had identical profiles, whereas the P. putida isolates were diverse. Sequencing showed that the blaVIM-2 genes resided as cassettes in class 1 integrons. In contrast to previous VIM-encoding integrons, the integron sequenced from a P. aeruginosa isolate had blaVIM located downstream of a variant of aacA4. blaVIM also lay in a class 1 integron in a representative P. putida strain, but the organization of this integron was different from that sequenced from the P. aeruginosa strain. In conclusion, the metallo-β-lactamase produced by these imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas isolates was VIM-2, and the accumulation of producers reflected clonal dissemination as well as horizontal spread. Strict measures are required in order to control a further spread of resistance. PMID:11897589

  5. Isolation and characterization of spontaneously occurring TOL plasmid mutants of Pseudomonas putida HS1.

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, D A; Chapman, P J

    1981-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas (P. putida HS1) was found to resemble P. putida (arvilla) mt-2 in its ability to degrade toluene, m- and p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (pseudocumene), and 3-ethyltoluene via oxidation of a methyl substituent and reactions of the meta-fission pathway. The ability to degrade these substrates by P. putida HS1 (PpC1) was shown to be encoded by a TOL (pDK1) plasmid as evidenced by: (i) spontaneous loss of the TOL-related phenotype after growth with benzoate, (ii) transfer of the TOL character from the wild type into cured recipients by conjugation, and (iii) isolation of a plasmid of identical molecular weight (120 X 10(6)) from both the wild type and an exconjugant obtained by mating wild type with a putative cured recipient. In addition to the isolation of apparent cured strains having lost the entire TOL-related phenotype, two additional mutant classes were observed after growth on benzoate. One class, represented by PpCT1, was unable to utilize the alkyl-substituted aromatic compounds but retained the ability to grow with toluene and benzyl alcohol. Analysis of PpCT1 revealed that it was unable to synthesize the TOL-encoded toluate oxidase and enzymes of the meta pathway but retained the ability to elaborate activities for toluene hydroxylase, benzyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase, thereby mediating initial oxidation of toluene to benzoate, which was then further metabolized via enzymes of the chromosomally encoded ortho-fission pathway. A second class of mutants had lost the ability to utilize the hydrocarbons but could still grow with m-toluate but not p-toluate, 3,4-dimethylbenzoate, or 3-ethylbenzoate, intermediates in the oxidation of the corresponding hydrocarbons. Our such mutant, PpCM1, could no longer synthesize enzymes required for initial oxidation of the hydrocarbons, but was able to produce the toluate oxidase and enzymes of the meta pathway, thereby facilitating degradation of m-toluate. Neither PpCT1, PpCM1, nor a

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains PA4C2 and PA3G8 and Pseudomonas putida PA14H7, Three Biocontrol Bacteria against Dickeya Phytopathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cigna, Jérémy; Raoul des Essarts, Yannick; Mondy, Samuel; Hélias, Valérie; Beury-Cirou, Amélie

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains PA4C2 and PA3G8 and Pseudomonas putida strain PA14H7 were isolated from potato rhizosphere and show an ability to inhibit the growth of Dickeya phytopathogens. Here, we report their draft genome sequences, which provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in antibiosis against Dickeya. PMID:25635023

  7. Synthesis and biotransformation of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones by recombinant Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Niewerth, Heiko; Bergander, Klaus; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Williams, Paul; Fetzner, Susanne

    2011-09-01

    2-Alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones (AQs) and related derivatives, which exhibit a variety of biological properties, are secondary metabolites produced by, e.g., Pseudomonas and Burkholderia spp. Due to their main role as signaling molecules in the quorum sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) and its 3-hydroxy derivative, termed the "Pseudomonas quinolone signal" (PQS), have received considerable attention. Since chemical synthesis of different AQs is complex, we assessed the applicability of recombinant P. putida KT2440 strains for the biosynthetic production of AQs. In mineral salts medium supplemented with octanoate and anthranilate, batch cultures of P. putida KT2440 [pBBR-pqsABCD] produced about 45 μM HHQ, 30% and 70% of which were localized in the culture supernatant and methanolic cell extract, respectively. 2,4-Dihydroxyquinoline and minor amounts of C₃- to C₁₃-saturated and C₇:₁ to C₁₃:₁ monounsaturated AQs were formed as by-products. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses spectroscopy indicated that unsaturated AQs having the same molecular mass are cis and trans isomers rather than position isomers, with the double bond located between the α and β carbon of the alkyl chain. Supplementing the cultures with hexanoate instead of octanoate shifted the AQ profile towards increased formation of C₅-AQ. Individual AQs can be prepared from concentrated methanolic extracts by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Regioselective hydroxylation of HHQ to PQS can be achieved in > 90% yield by biotransformation with P. putida KT2440 [pBBR-pqsH]. PQS can be isolated from methanolic cell extracts by HPLC, or be precipitated as Fe(III)-PQS complex. Preparation of a library of AQs will facilitate studies on the biological functions of these compounds. PMID:21670979

  8. Influence of oxygen transfer on Pseudomonas putida effects on growth rate and biodesulfurization capacity.

    PubMed

    Escobar, S; Rodriguez, A; Gomez, E; Alcon, A; Santos, V E; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-04-01

    The growth rate and desulfurization capacity accumulated by the cells during the growth of Pseudomonas putida KTH2 under different oxygen transfer conditions in a stirred and sparged tank bioreactor have been studied. Hydrodynamic conditions were changed using different agitation conditions. During the culture, several magnitudes associated to growth, such as the specific growth rate, the dissolved oxygen concentration and the carbon source consumption have been measured. Experimental results indicate that cultures are influenced by the fluid dynamic conditions into the bioreactor. An increase in the stirrer speed from 400 to 700 rpm has a positive influence on the cell growth rate. Nevertheless, the increase of agitation from 700 to 2000 rpm hardly has any influence on the growth rate. The effect of fluid dynamics on the cells development of the biodesulfurization (BDS) capacity of the cells during growth is different. The activities of the intracellular enzymes involved in the 4S pathway change with dissolved oxygen concentration. The enzyme activities have been evaluated in cells at several growth time and different hydrodynamic conditions. An increase of the agitation from 100 to 300 rpm has a positive influence on the development of the overall BDS capacity of the cells during growth. This capacity shows a decrease for higher stirrer speeds and the activity of the enzymes monooxygenases DszC and DszA decreases dramatically. The highest value of the activity of DszB enzyme was obtained with cells cultured at 100 rpm, while this activity decreases when the stirrer speed was increased higher than this value. PMID:26762940

  9. Metabolism of and inhibition by chlorobenzoates in Pseudomonas putida P111

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, B.S. ); Higson, F.K.; Kondrat, R.; Focht, D.D. )

    1991-11-01

    Pseudomonas putida P111 was isolated by enrichment culture on 2,5-dichlorobenzoate and was also able to grow on 2-chloro-, 3-chloro-, 4-chloro-, 2,3-dichloro-, 2,4-dichloro-, and 2,3,5-trichlorobenzoates. However, 3,5-dichlorobenzoate completely inhibited growth of P111 on all ortho-substituted benzoates that were tested. When 3,5-dichlorobenzoate was added as a cosubstrate with either monochlorobenzoate alone. Moreover, resting cells of P111 grown on 4-chlorobenzoate released chloride from 3,5-dichlorobenzoate and produced no identifiable intermediate. In contrast, resting cells grown on 2,5-dichlorobenzoate metabolized 3,5-dicholorobenzoate without release of chloride and accumulated a degradation product, which was identified as 1-carboxy-1, 2-dihydroxy-3,5-dichlorocyclohexadiene on the basis of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmation of its two acid-hydrolyzed products., 3,5- and 2,4-dichlorophenol. Since 3,5-dichlorocatechol was rapidly metabolized by cells grown on 2,5-dichlorobenzoate, it is apparent that 1-carboxy-1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-dichlorocyclohexadiene is not further metabolized by these cells. Moreover, induction of a functional dihyrodiol dehydrogenase would not be required for growth of P111 on other ortho-chlorobenzoates since the corresponding chlorodihydrodiols produced from a 1,2-dioxygenase attack would spontaneously decompose to the corresponding catechols. In contrast, growth on 3-chloro-, 4-chloro-, or 3,5-dichlorobenzoate requires a functional dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, yet only the two monochlorobenzoates appear to induce for it.

  10. Structural and kinetic characterization of recombinant 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida G7

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Simara Semíramis; Neves, Cíntia Mara Leal; Guimarães, Samuel Leite; Whitman, Christian P.; Johnson, William H.; Aparicio, Ricardo; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto

    2016-01-01

    The first enzyme in the oxalocrotonate branch of the naphthalene-degradation lower pathway in Pseudomonas putida G7 is NahI, a 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase required for conversion of 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde to 2-hydroxymuconate in the presence of NAD+. NahI is in one family of the NAD(P)+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily (ALDH8). In this work, we report the cloning, expression, purification and preliminary structural and kinetic characterization of the recombinant NahI. The nahI gene was subcloned into a T7 expression vector and the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli ArcticExpress at 12 ºC as an N-terminal hexa-histidine-tagged fusion protein (6xHis-NahI). After the soluble protein was purified by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments were conducted to analyze the oligomeric state and the overall shape of the enzyme in solution. The protein is a tetramer in solution and has nearly perfect 222 point group symmetry. Protein stability and secondary structure content were also evaluated by a circular dichroism spectroscopy assay under different thermal conditions. Furthermore, kinetic assays were conducted for the recombinant enzyme and, for the first time, KM (1.3 ± 0.3 μM) and kcat (0.9 s−1) values were determined for this enzyme (at presumed NAD+ saturation). NahI is highly specific for its biological substrate (2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde) and has no activity with salicylaldehyde, another intermediate in the naphthalene-degradation pathway. PMID:26032336

  11. Protective role of glycerol against benzene stress: insights from the Pseudomonas putida proteome.

    PubMed

    Bhaganna, Prashanth; Bielecka, Agata; Molinari, Gabriella; Hallsworth, John E

    2016-05-01

    Chemical activities of hydrophobic substances can determine the windows of environmental conditions over which microbial systems function and the metabolic inhibition of microorganisms by benzene and other hydrophobes can, paradoxically, be reduced by compounds that protect against cellular water stress (Bhaganna et al. in Microb Biotechnol 3:701-716, 2010; Cray et al. in Curr Opin Biotechnol 33:228-259, 2015a). We hypothesized that this protective effect operates at the macromolecule structure-function level and is facilitated, in part at least, by genome-mediated adaptations. Based on proteome profiling of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida, we present evidence that (1) benzene induces a chaotrope-stress response, whereas (2) cells cultured in media supplemented with benzene plus glycerol were protected against chaotrope stress. Chaotrope-stress response proteins, such as those involved in lipid and compatible-solute metabolism and removal of reactive oxygen species, were increased by up to 15-fold in benzene-stressed cells relative to those of control cultures (no benzene added). By contrast, cells grown in the presence of benzene + glycerol, even though the latter grew more slowly, exhibited only a weak chaotrope-stress response. These findings provide evidence to support the hypothesis that hydrophobic substances induce a chaotropicity-mediated water stress, that cells respond via genome-mediated adaptations, and that glycerol protects the cell's macromolecular systems. We discuss the possibility of using compatible solutes to mitigate hydrocarbon-induced stresses in lignocellulosic biofuel fermentations and for industrial and environmental applications. PMID:26612269

  12. Characterization of the manganese oxide produced by pseudomonas putida strain MnB1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Mario; Toner, Brandy; Bargar, John; Sposito, Garrison

    2003-07-01

    Manganese oxides form typically in natural aqueous environments via Mn(II) oxidation catalyzed by microorganisms, primarily bacteria, but little is known about the structure of the incipient solid-phase products. The Mn oxide produced by a Pseudomonas species representative of soils and freshwaters was characterized as to composition, average Mn oxidation number, and N 2 specific surface area. Electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy were applied to complement the physicochemical data with morphological and structural information. A series of synthetic Mn oxides also was analyzed by the same methods to gain better comparative understanding of the structure of the biogenic oxide. The latter was found to be a poorly crystalline layer type Mn(IV) oxide with hexagonal symmetry, significant negative structural charge arising from cation vacancies, and a relatively small number of randomly stacked octahedral sheets per particle. Its properties were comparable to those of δ-MnO 2 (vernadite) and a poorly crystalline hexagonal birnessite ("acid birnessite") synthesized by reduction of permanganate with HCl, but they were very different from those of crystalline triclinic birnessite. Overall, the structure and composition of the Mn oxide produced by P. putida were similar to what has been reported for other freshly precipitated Mn oxides in natural weathering environments, yielding further support to the predominance of biological oxidation as the pathway for Mn oxide formation. Despite variations in the degree of sheet stacking and Mn(III) content, all poorly crystalline oxides studied showed hexagonal symmetry. Thus, there is a need to distinguish layer type Mn oxides with structures similar to those of natural birnessites from the synthetic triclinic variety. We propose designating the unit cell symmetry as an addition to the current nomenclature for these minerals.

  13. Enhanced Exopolymer Production and Chromium Stabilization in Pseudomonas putida Unsaturated Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Priester, John H.; Olson, Scott G.; Webb, Samuel M.; Neu, Mary P.; Hersman, Larry E.; Holden, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    Chromium-contaminated soils threaten surface and groundwater quality at many industrial sites. In vadose zones, indigenous bacteria can reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III), but the subsequent fate of Cr(III) and the roles of bacterial biofilms are relatively unknown. To investigate, we cultured Pseudomonas putida, a model organism for vadose zone bioremediation, as unsaturated biofilms on membranes overlaying iron-deficient solid media either containing molecular dichromate from potassium dichromate (Cr-only treatment) or with deposits of solid, dichromate-coated hematite (Fe+Cr treatment) to simulate vadose zone conditions. Controls included iron-deficient solid medium and an Fe-only treatment using solid hematite deposits. Under iron-deficient conditions, chromium exposure resulted in lower cell yield and lower amounts of cellular protein and carbohydrate, but providing iron in the form of hematite overcame these toxic effects of Cr. For the Cr and Fe+Cr treatments, Cr(VI) was completely reduced to Cr(III) that accumulated on biofilm cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). Chromium exposure resulted in elevated extracellular carbohydrates, protein, DNA, and EPS sugars that were relatively enriched in N-acetyl-glucosamine, rhamnose, glucose, and mannose. The proportions of EPS protein and carbohydrate relative to intracellular pools suggested Cr toxicity-mediated cell lysis as the origin. However, DNA accumulated extracellularly in amounts far greater than expected from cell lysis, and Cr was liberated when extracted EPS was treated with DNase. These results demonstrate that Cr accumulation in unsaturated biofilms occurs with enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI), cellular lysis, cellular association, and extracellular DNA binding of Cr(III), which altogether can facilitate localized biotic stabilization of Cr in contaminated vadose zones. PMID:16517647

  14. New dye-decolorizing peroxidases from Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida MET94: towards biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana; Mendes, Sónia; Brissos, Vânia; Martins, Lígia O

    2014-03-01

    This work provides spectroscopic, catalytic, and stability fingerprints of two new bacterial dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) from Bacillus subtilis (BsDyP) and Pseudomonas putida MET94 (PpDyP). DyPs are a family of microbial heme-containing peroxidases with wide substrate specificity, including high redox potential aromatic compounds such as synthetic dyes or phenolic and nonphenolic lignin units. The genes encoding BsDyP and PpDyP, belonging to subfamilies A and B, respectively, were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant PpDyP is a 120-kDa homotetramer while BsDyP enzyme consists of a single 48-kDa monomer. The optimal pH of both enzymes is in the acidic range (pH 4-5). BsDyP has a bell-shape profile with optimum between 20 and 30 °C whereas PpDyP shows a peculiar flat and broad (10-30 °C) temperature profile. Anthraquinonic or azo dyes, phenolics, methoxylated aromatics, and also manganese and ferrous ions are substrates used by the enzymes. In general, PpDyP exhibits higher activities and accepts a wider scope of substrates than BsDyP; the spectroscopic data suggest distinct heme microenvironments in the two enzymes that might account for the distinctive catalytic behavior. However, the Bs enzyme with activity lasting for up to 53 h at 40 °C is more stable towards temperature or chemical denaturation than the PpDyP. The results of this work will guide future optimization of the biocatalytis towards their utilization in the fields of environmental or industrial biotechnology. PMID:23820555

  15. Metabolite Profiling Reveals Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Tn5 Mutant of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Vasvi; Bhatia, Anil; Bharti, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Shashank Kumar; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Mishra, Aradhana; Sidhu, Om Prakash; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas is an efficient plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR); however, intolerance to drought and high temperature limit its application in agriculture as a bioinoculant. Transposon 5 (Tn5) mutagenesis was used to generate a stress tolerant mutant from a PGPR Pseudomonas putida NBRI1108 isolated from chickpea rhizosphere. A mutant NBRI1108T, selected after screening of nearly 10,000 transconjugants, exhibited significant tolerance towards high temperature and drought. Southern hybridization analysis of EcoRI and XhoI restricted genomic DNA of NBRI1108T confirmed that it had a single Tn5 insertion. The metabolic changes in the polar and non-polar extracts of NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T were examined using 1H, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thirty six chemically diverse metabolites consisting of amino acids, fatty acids and phospholipids were identified and quantified. Insertion of Tn5 influenced amino acid and phospholipid metabolism and resulted in significantly higher concentration of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycinebetaine, glycerophosphatidylcholine (GPC) and putrescine in NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. The concentration of glutamic acid, glycinebetaine and GPC increased by 34%, 95% and 100%, respectively in the NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. High concentration of glycerophosphatidylethanolamine (GPE) and undetected GPC in NBRI1108 indicates that biosynthesis of GPE may have taken place via the methylation pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis. However, high GPC and low GPE concentration in NBRI1108T suggest that methylation pathway and phosphatidylcholine synthase (PCS) pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis are being followed in the NBRI1108T. Application of multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) on the quantified metabolites revealed clear variations in NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T in polar and non-polar metabolites. Identification of abiotic stress

  16. Evaluation of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate production by Pseudomonas putida LS46 using biodiesel by-product streams.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jilagamazhi; Sharma, Umesh; Sparling, Richard; Cicek, Nazim; Levin, David B

    2014-07-01

    Medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate (mcl-PHA) production by Pseudomonas putida LS46 was analyzed in shake-flask-based batch reactions, using pure chemical-grade glycerol (PG), biodiesel-derived "waste" glycerol (WG), and biodiesel-derived "waste" free fatty acids (WFA). Cell growth, substrate consumption, mcl-PHA accumulation within the cells, and the monomer composition of the synthesized biopolymers were monitored. The patterns of mcl-PHA synthesis in P. putida LS46 cells grown on PG and WG were similar but differed from that of cells grown with WFA. Polymer accumulation in glycerol-based cultures was stimulated by nitrogen limitation and plateaued after 48 h in both PG and WG cultures, with a total accumulation of 17.9% cell dry mass and 16.3% cell dry mass, respectively. In contrast, mcl-PHA synthesis was independent of nitrogen concentration in P. putida LS46 cells cultured with WFA, which accumulated to 29% cell dry mass. In all cases, the mcl-PHAs synthesized consisted primarily of 3-hydroxyoctanoate (C(8)) and 3-hydroxydecanoate (C(10)). WG and WFA supported similar or greater cell growth and mcl-PHA accumulation than PG under the experimental conditions used. These results suggest that biodiesel by-product streams could be used as low-cost carbon sources for sustainable mcl-PHA production. PMID:24983445

  17. Pumping iron to keep fit: modulation of siderophore secretion helps efficient aromatic utilization in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Hiren; Dave, Rachna; Venugopalan, V P

    2014-07-01

    Studies of biotechnology applications of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 have been predominantly focused on regulation and expression of the toluene degradation (TOL) pathway. Unfortunately, there is limited information on the role of other physiological factors influencing aromatic utilization. In this report, we demonstrate that P. putida KT2440 increases its siderophore secretion in response to the availability of benzyl alcohol, a model aromatic substrate. It is argued that accelerated siderophore secretion in response to aromatic substrates provides an iron 'boost' which is required for the effective functioning of the iron-dependent oxygenases responsible for ring opening. Direct evidence for the cardinal role of siderophores in aromatic utilization is provided by evaluation of per capita siderophore secretion and comparative growth assessments of wild-type and siderophore-negative mutant strains grown on an alternative carbon source. Accelerated siderophore secretion can be viewed as a compensatory mechanism in P. putida in the context of its inability to secrete more than one type of siderophore (pyoverdine) or to utilize heterologous siderophores. Stimulated siderophore secretion might be a key factor in successful integration and proliferation of this organism as a bio-augmentation agent for aromatic degradation. It not only facilitates efficient aromatic utilization, but also provides better opportunities for iron assimilation amongst diverse microbial communities, thereby ensuring better survival and proliferation. PMID:24742959

  18. Protein as chemical cue: non-nutritional growth enhancement by exogenous protein in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Hiren; Dave, Rachna; Venugopalan, Vayalam P

    2014-01-01

    Research pertaining to microbe-microbe and microbe-plant interactions has been largely limited to small molecules like quorum sensing chemicals. However, a few recent reports have indicated the role of complex molecules like proteins and polysaccharides in microbial communication. Here we demonstrate that exogenous proteins present in culture media can considerably accelerate the growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, even when such proteins are not internalized by the cells. The growth enhancement is observed when the exogenous protein is not used as a source of carbon or nitrogen. The data show non-specific nature of the protein inducing growth; growth enhancement was observed irrespective of the protein type. It is shown that growth enhancement is mediated via increased siderophore secretion in response to the exogenous protein, leading to better iron uptake. We highlight the ecological significance of the observation and hypothesize that exogenous proteins serve as chemical cues in the case of P.putida and are perceived as indicator of the presence of competitors in the environment. It is argued that enhanced siderophore secretion in response to exogenous protein helps P.putida establish numerical superiority over competitors by way of enhanced iron assimilation and quicker utilization of aromatic substrates. PMID:25117434

  19. Protein as Chemical Cue: Non-Nutritional Growth Enhancement by Exogenous Protein in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Hiren; Dave, Rachna; Venugopalan, Vayalam P.

    2014-01-01

    Research pertaining to microbe-microbe and microbe-plant interactions has been largely limited to small molecules like quorum sensing chemicals. However, a few recent reports have indicated the role of complex molecules like proteins and polysaccharides in microbial communication. Here we demonstrate that exogenous proteins present in culture media can considerably accelerate the growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, even when such proteins are not internalized by the cells. The growth enhancement is observed when the exogenous protein is not used as a source of carbon or nitrogen. The data show non-specific nature of the protein inducing growth; growth enhancement was observed irrespective of the protein type. It is shown that growth enhancement is mediated via increased siderophore secretion in response to the exogenous protein, leading to better iron uptake. We highlight the ecological significance of the observation and hypothesize that exogenous proteins serve as chemical cues in the case of P.putida and are perceived as indicator of the presence of competitors in the environment. It is argued that enhanced siderophore secretion in response to exogenous protein helps P.putida establish numerical superiority over competitors by way of enhanced iron assimilation and quicker utilization of aromatic substrates. PMID:25117434

  20. Biotransformation of Hydroxylaminobenzene and Aminophenol by Pseudomonas putida 2NP8 Cells Grown in the Presence of 3-Nitrophenol

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian-Shen; Singh, Ajay; Huang, Xiao-Dong; Ward, Owen P.

    2000-01-01

    Biotransformation products of hydroxylaminobenzene and aminophenol produced by 3-nitrophenol-grown cells of Pseudomonas putida 2NP8, a strain grown on 2- and 3-nitrophenol, were characterized. Ammonia, 2-aminophenol, 4-aminophenol, 4-benzoquinone, N-acetyl-4-aminophenol, N-acetyl-2-aminophenol, 2-aminophenoxazine-3-one, 4-hydroquinone, and catechol were produced from hydroxylaminobenzene. Ammonia, N-acetyl-2-aminophenol, and 2-aminophenoxazine-3-one were produced from 2-aminophenol. All of these metabolites were also found in the nitrobenzene transformation medium, and this demonstrated that they were metabolites of nitrobenzene transformation via hydroxylaminobenzene. Production of 2-aminophenoxazine-3-one indicated that oxidation of 2-aminophenol via imine occurred. Rapid release of ammonia from 2-aminophenol transformation indicated that hydrolysis of the imine intermediate was the dominant reaction. The low level of 2-aminophenoxazine-3-one indicated that formation of this compound was probably due to a spontaneous reaction accompanying oxidation of 2-aminophenol via imine. 4-Hydroquinone and catechol were reduction products of 2- and 4-benzoquinones. Based on these transformation products, we propose a new ammonia release pathway via oxidation of aminophenol to benzoquinone monoimine and subsequent hydrolysis for transformation of nitroaromatic compounds by 3-nitrophenol-grown cells of P. putida 2NP8. We propose a parallel mechanism for 3-nitrophenol degradation in P. putida 2NP8, in which all of the possible intermediates are postulated. PMID:10831408

  1. Bioconversion of styrene to poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) by the new bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida NBUS12.

    PubMed

    Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Chen, Chia-Lung; Ge, Liya; Li, Ling; Tan, Swee Ngin; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Styrene is a toxic pollutant commonly found in waste effluents from plastic processing industries. We herein identified and characterized microorganisms for bioconversion of the organic eco-pollutant styrene into a valuable biopolymer medium-chain-length poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (mcl-PHA). Twelve newly-isolated styrene-degrading Pseudomonads were obtained and partial phaC genes were detected by PCR in these isolates. These isolates assimilated styrene to produce mcl-PHA, forming PHA contents between 0.05±0.00 and 23.10±3.25% cell dry mass (% CDM). The best-performing isolate was identified as Pseudomonas putida NBUS12. A genetic analysis of 16S rDNA and phaZ genes revealed P. putida NBUS12 as a genetically-distinct strain from existing phenotypically-similar bacterial strains. This bacterium achieved a final biomass of 1.28±0.10 g L(-1) and PHA content of 32.49±2.40% CDM. The extracted polymer was mainly comprised of 3-hydroxyhexanoate (C6 ), 3-hydroxyoctanoate (C8 ), 3-hydroxydecanoate (C10 ), 3-hydroxydodecanoate (C12 ), and 3-hydroxytetradecanoate (C14 ) monomers at a ratio of 2:42:1257:17:1. These results collectively suggested that P. putida NBUS12 is a promising candidate for the biotechnological conversion of styrene into mcl-PHA. PMID:25740622

  2. cumA, a Gene Encoding a Multicopper Oxidase, Is Involved in Mn2+ Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    PubMed Central

    Brouwers, Geert-Jan; de Vrind, Johannes P. M.; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.; Cornelis, Pierre; Baysse, Christine; de Vrind-de Jong, Elisabeth W.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida GB-1-002 catalyzes the oxidation of Mn2+. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the transposon insertion site of a nonoxidizing mutant revealed a gene (designated cumA) encoding a protein homologous to multicopper oxidases. Addition of Cu2+ increased the Mn2+-oxidizing activity of the P. putida wild type by a factor of approximately 5. The growth rates of the wild type and the mutant were not affected by added Cu2+. A second open reading frame (designated cumB) is located downstream from cumA. Both cumA and cumB probably are part of a single operon. The translation product of cumB was homologous (level of identity, 45%) to that of orf74 of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. A mutation in orf74 resulted in an extended lag phase and lower cell densities. Similar growth-related observations were made for the cumA mutant, suggesting that the cumA mutation may have a polar effect on cumB. This was confirmed by site-specific gene replacement in cumB. The cumB mutation did not affect the Mn2+-oxidizing ability of the organism but resulted in decreased growth. In summary, our data indicate that the multicopper oxidase CumA is involved in the oxidation of Mn2+ and that CumB is required for optimal growth of P. putida GB-1-002. PMID:10103278

  3. Bioconversion of Styrene to Poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) by the New Bacterial Strain Pseudomonas putida NBUS12

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Chen, Chia-Lung; Ge, Liya; Li, Ling; Tan, Swee Ngin; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Styrene is a toxic pollutant commonly found in waste effluents from plastic processing industries. We herein identified and characterized microorganisms for bioconversion of the organic eco-pollutant styrene into a valuable biopolymer medium-chain-length poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (mcl-PHA). Twelve newly-isolated styrene-degrading Pseudomonads were obtained and partial phaC genes were detected by PCR in these isolates. These isolates assimilated styrene to produce mcl-PHA, forming PHA contents between 0.05±0.00 and 23.10±3.25% cell dry mass (% CDM). The best-performing isolate was identified as Pseudomonas putida NBUS12. A genetic analysis of 16S rDNA and phaZ genes revealed P. putida NBUS12 as a genetically-distinct strain from existing phenotypically-similar bacterial strains. This bacterium achieved a final biomass of 1.28±0.10 g L−1 and PHA content of 32.49±2.40% CDM. The extracted polymer was mainly comprised of 3-hydroxyhexanoate (C6 ), 3-hydroxyoctanoate (C8 ), 3-hydroxydecanoate (C10 ), 3-hydroxydodecanoate (C12 ), and 3-hydroxytetradecanoate (C14 ) monomers at a ratio of 2:42:1257:17:1. These results collectively suggested that P. putida NBUS12 is a promising candidate for the biotechnological conversion of styrene into mcl-PHA. PMID:25740622

  4. Effect of the introduction of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Pseudomonas putida 23 on the nitrogen balance in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabayev, V. P.

    2010-04-01

    The inoculation of red beets with the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Pseudomonas putida 23 increased the activity of the nitrogen fixation in the rhizosphere of the plants grown on meadow soil in the central part of the Oka River floodplain. The yield of the red beets and the uptake by plants of nitrogen from the soil and from the 15N-labeled nitrogen fertilizer applied on the trial microplot increased significantly. A statistically significant additional fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere and a positive balance of nitrogen in the soil-plant system without significant changes in the bulk content of the soil nitrogen after the plant growing were found in a greenhouse experiment with the application of P. putida. It can be supposed that the excessive nitrogen determined in this system is related to the incorporation into plants of atmospheric nitrogen fixed in the rhizosphere of the inoculated plants. The application of P. putida 23 makes it possible to decrease the rates of NPK fertilizer by two times without losses in the yield of red beets.

  5. Biosynthetic Origin of the Antibiotic Pseudopyronines A and B in Pseudomonas putida BW11M1.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Judith S; Ghequire, Maarten G K; Nett, Markus; Josten, Michaele; Sahl, Hans-Georg; De Mot, René; Gross, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Within the framework of our effort to discover new antibiotics from pseudomonads, pseudopyronines A and B were isolated from the plant-derived Pseudomonas putida BW11M1. Pseudopyronines are 3,6-dialkyl-4-hydroxy-2-pyrones and displayed high in vitro activities against several human pathogens, and in our hands also towards the plant pathogen Pseudomonas savastanoi. Here, the biosynthesis of pseudopyronine B was studied by a combination of feeding experiments with isotopically labeled precursors, genomic sequence analysis, and gene deletion experiments. The studies resulted in the deduction of all acetate units and revealed that the biosynthesis of these α-pyrones occurs with a single PpyS-homologous ketosynthase. It fuses, with some substrate flexibility, a 3-oxo-fatty acid and a further unbranched saturated fatty acid, both of medium chain-length and provided by primary metabolism. PMID:26507104

  6. Sustainable production of valuable compound 3-succinoyl-pyridine by genetically engineering Pseudomonas putida using the tobacco waste

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Ping; Tang, Hongzhi

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of solid and liquid tobacco wastes with high nicotine content remains a longstanding challenge. Here, we explored an environmentally friendly approach to replace tobacco waste disposal with resource recovery by genetically engineering Pseudomonas putida. The biosynthesis of 3-succinoyl-pyridine (SP), a precursor in the production of hypotensive agents, from the tobacco waste was developed using whole cells of the engineered Pseudomonas strain, S16dspm. Under optimal conditions in fed-batch biotransformation, the final concentrations of product SP reached 9.8 g/L and 8.9 g/L from aqueous nicotine solution and crude suspension of the tobacco waste, respectively. In addition, the crystal compound SP produced from aqueous nicotine of the tobacco waste in batch biotransformation was of high purity and its isolation yield on nicotine was 54.2%. This study shows a promising route for processing environmental wastes as raw materials in order to produce valuable compounds. PMID:26574178

  7. Effects of low-molecular-weight organic ligands and phosphate on adsorption of Pseudomonas putida by clay minerals and iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huayong; Jiang, Daihua; Cai, Peng; Rong, Xingmin; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of Pseudomonas putida on kaolinite, montmorillonite and goethite was studied in the presence of organic ligands and phosphate. Citrate, tartrate, oxalate and phosphate showed inhibitive effect on P. putida adsorption by three minerals in a broad range of anion concentrations. The highest efficiencies of the four ligands in blocking the adsorption of P. putida on goethite, kaolinite and montmorillonite were 58-90%, 35-76% and 20-48%, respectively. The ability of organic ligands in prohibiting the binding of P. putida cells to the minerals followed the sequence of citrate>tartrate>oxalate>acetate. The significant suppressive effects on P. putida adsorption were ascribed to the increased negative charges by adsorbed ligands and the competition of ligands with bacterial surface groups for binding sites. The inhibitive effects on P. putida adsorption by organic ligands were also dependent on the steric hindrance of the molecules. Acetate presented promotive effect on P. putida adsorption by kaolinite and goethite at low anion concentrations. The results obtained in this study suggested that the adsorption of bacteria in soils especially in the rhizosphere can significantly be impacted by various organic and inorganic anions. PMID:20843669

  8. Colony morphology and transcriptome profiling of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and its mutants deficient in alginate or all EPS synthesis under controlled matric potentials

    PubMed Central

    Gulez, Gamze; Altıntaş, Ali; Fazli, Mustafa; Dechesne, Arnaud; Workman, Christopher T; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Smets, Barth F

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a versatile bacterial species adapted to soil and its fluctuations. Like many other species living in soil, P. putida often faces water limitation. Alginate, an exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by P. putida, is known to create hydrated environments and alleviate the effect of water limitation. In addition to alginate, P. putida is capable of producing cellulose (bcs), putida exopolysaccharide a (pea), and putida exopolysaccharide b (peb). However, unlike alginate, not much is known about their roles under water limitation. Hence, in this study we examined the role of different EPS components under mild water limitation. To create environmentally realistic water limited conditions as observed in soil, we used the Pressurized Porous Surface Model. Our main hypothesis was that under water limitation and in the absence of alginate other exopolysaccharides would be more active to maintain homeostasis. To test our hypothesis, we investigated colony morphologies and whole genome transcriptomes of P. putida KT2440 wild type and its mutants deficient in synthesis of either alginate or all known EPS. Overall our results support that alginate is an important exopolysaccharide under water limitation and in the absence of alginate other tolerance mechanisms are activated. PMID:24912454

  9. Biodegradation of phenoxyacetic acid in soil by pseudomonas putida PP0301(PR0103), a constitutive degrader of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate

    SciTech Connect

    Short, K.A.; King, R.J.; Seidler, R.J.; Olsen, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of using genetically engineered microbes (GEMs) to degrade recalcitrant environmental toxicants was demonstrated by the application of Pseudomonas putida PP0301(pR0103) to an Oregon agricultural soil amended with 500 microg/g of a model xenobiotic, phenoxyacetic acid (PAA). P. putida PP0301(pR0103) is a constitutive degrader of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D) and is also active on the non-inducing substrate, PAA. In unamended soil, survival of the plasmid-free parental strain P. putida PP0301 was similar to the survival of the GEM strain P. putida PP0301(pR103). However, in PAA amended soil, survival of the parent strain was over 10,000-fold lower (<3 colony forming units per gram of soil) than survival of the GEM strain after 39 days.

  10. Liquid chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry based environmental metabolomics for the analysis of Pseudomonas putida Bacteria in potable water.

    PubMed

    Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Beale, David J; Antti, Henrik; Palombo, Enzo A

    2014-09-01

    Water supply biofilms have the potential to harbour waterborne diseases, accelerate corrosion, and contribute to the formation of tuberculation in metallic pipes. One particular species of bacteria known to be found in the water supply networks is Pseudomonas sp., with the presence of Pseudomonas putida being isolated to iron pipe tubercles. Current methods for detecting and analysis pipe biofilms are time consuming and expensive. The application of metabolomics techniques could provide an alternative method for assessing biofilm risk more efficiently based on bacterial activity. As such, this paper investigates the application of metabolomic techniques and provides a proof-of-concept application using liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-ToF-MS) to three biologically independent P. putida samples, across five different growth conditions exposed to solid and soluble iron (Fe). Analysis of the samples in +ESI and -ESI mode yielded 887 and 1789 metabolite features, respectively. Chemometric analysis of the +ESI and -ESI data identified 34 and 39 significant metabolite features, respectively, where features were considered significant if the fold change was greater than 2 and obtained a p-value less than 0.05. Metabolite features were subsequently identified according to the Metabolomics Standard Initiative (MSI) Chemical Analysis Workgroup using analytical standards and standard online LC-MS databases. Possible markers for P. putida growth, with and without being exposed to solid and soluble Fe, were identified from a diverse range of different chemical classes of metabolites including nucleobases, nucleosides, dipeptides, tripeptides, amino acids, fatty acids, sugars, and phospholipids. PMID:24674937

  11. Analysis of Pseudomonas putida alkane-degradation gene clusters and flanking insertion sequences: evolution and regulation of the alk genes.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, J B; Panke, S; Lucchini, S; Franchini, A G; Röthlisberger, M; Witholt, B

    2001-06-01

    The Pseudomonas putida GPo1 (commonly known as Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1) alkBFGHJKL and alkST gene clusters, which encode proteins involved in the conversion of n-alkanes to fatty acids, are located end to end on the OCT plasmid, separated by 9.7 kb of DNA. This DNA segment encodes, amongst others, a methyl-accepting transducer protein (AlkN) that may be involved in chemotaxis to alkanes. In P. putida P1, the alkBFGHJKL and alkST gene clusters are flanked by almost identical copies of the insertion sequence ISPpu4, constituting a class 1 transposon. Other insertion sequences flank and interrupt the alk genes in both strains. Apart from the coding regions of the GPo1 and P1 alk genes (80-92% sequence identity), only the alkB and alkS promoter regions are conserved. Competition experiments suggest that highly conserved inverted repeats in the alkB and alkS promoter regions bind ALKS: PMID:11390693

  12. Synthesis of the Enzymes of the Mandelate Pathway by Pseudomonas putida I. Synthesis of Enzymes by the Wild Type

    PubMed Central

    Hegeman, G. D.

    1966-01-01

    Hegeman, G. D. (University of California, Berkeley). Synthesis of the enzymes of the mandelate pathway by Pseudomonas putida. I. Synthesis of enzymes by the wild type. J. Bacteriol. 91:1140–1154. 1966.—The control of synthesis of the five enzymes responsible for the conversion of d(−)-mandelate to benzoate by Pseudomonas putida was investigated. The first three compounds occurring in the pathway, d(−)-mandelate, l(+)-mandelate, and benzoylformate, are equipotent inducers of all five enzymes. A nonmetabolizable inducer, phenoxyacetate, also induces synthesis of these enzymes; but, unlike the metabolizable inducer-substrates, it does not elicit synthesis of enzymes that mediate steps in the pathway beyond benzoate. Under conditions of semigratuity, dl-mandelate elicits immediate synthesis at a steady rate of the first two enzymes of the pathway, but two enzymes which act below the level of benzoate are synthesized only after a considerable lag. Succinate and asparagine do not significantly repress the synthesis of the enzymes responsible for mandelate oxidation. PMID:5929747

  13. A novel papillation assay for the identification of genes affecting mutation rate in Pseudomonas putida and other pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Tagel, Mari; Tavita, Kairi; Hõrak, Rita; Kivisaar, Maia; Ilves, Heili

    2016-08-01

    Formation of microcolonies (papillae) permits easy visual screening of mutational events occurring in single colonies of bacteria. In this study, we have established a novel papillation assay employable in a wide range of pseudomonads including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida for monitoring mutation frequency in distinct colonies. With the aid of this assay, we conducted a genome-wide search for the factors affecting mutation frequency in P. putida. Screening ∼27,000 transposon mutants for increased mutation frequency allowed us to identify 34 repeatedly targeted genes. In addition to genes involved in DNA replication and repair, we identified genes participating in metabolism and transport of secondary metabolites, cell motility, and cell wall synthesis. The highest effect on mutant frequency was observed when truA (tRNA pseudouridine synthase), mpl (UDP-N-acetylmuramate-alanine ligase) or gacS (multi-sensor hybrid histidine kinase) were inactivated. Inactivation of truA elevated the mutant frequency only in growing cells, while the deficiency of gacS affected mainly stationary-phase mutagenesis. Thus, our results demonstrate the feasibility of the assay for isolating mutants with elevated mutagenesis in growing as well as stationary-phase bacteria. PMID:27447898

  14. Novel Dehalogenase Mechanism for 2,3-Dichloro-1-Propanol Utilization in Pseudomonas putida Strain MC4

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Muhammad Irfan; Samin, Ghufrana; van Leeuwen, Jan G. E.; Oppentocht, Jantien

    2012-01-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain (MC4) that can utilize 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP) and several aliphatic haloacids and haloalcohols as sole carbon and energy source for growth was isolated from contaminated soil. Degradation of DCP was found to start with oxidation and concomitant dehalogenation catalyzed by a 72-kDa monomeric protein (DppA) that was isolated from cell lysate. The dppA gene was cloned from a cosmid library and appeared to encode a protein equipped with a signal peptide and that possessed high similarity to quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs), particularly ADH IIB and ADH IIG from Pseudomonas putida HK. This novel dehalogenating dehydrogenase has a broad substrate range, encompassing a number of nonhalogenated alcohols and haloalcohols. With DCP, DppA exhibited a kcat of 17 s−1. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments indicated that DCP oxidation by DppA in the presence of 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and potassium ferricyanide [K3Fe(CN)6] yielded 2-chloroacrolein, which was oxidized to 2-chloroacrylic acid. PMID:22752160

  15. Genetic engineering of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for rapid and high-yield production of vanillin from ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Graf, Nadja; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the most important flavoring agents used today. That is why many efforts have been made on biotechnological production from natural abundant substrates. In this work, the nonpathogenic Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 was genetically optimized to convert ferulic acid to vanillin. Deletion of the vanillin dehydrogenase gene (vdh) was not sufficient to prevent vanillin degradation. Additional inactivation of a molybdate transporter, identified by transposon mutagenesis, led to a strain incapable to grow on vanillin as sole carbon source. The bioconversion was optimized by enhanced chromosomal expression of the structural genes for feruloyl-CoA synthetase (fcs) and enoyl-CoA hydratase/aldolase (ech) by introduction of the strong tac promoter system. Further genetic engineering led to high initial conversion rates and molar vanillin yields up to 86% within just 3 h accompanied with very low by-product levels. To our knowledge, this represents the highest productivity and molar vanillin yield gained with a Pseudomonas strain so far. Together with its high tolerance for ferulic acid, the developed, plasmid-free P. putida strain represents a promising candidate for the biotechnological production of vanillin. PMID:24136472

  16. Organo-mineral interactions in Pseudomonas putida-birnessite assemblages: Impact on mineral reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanova, Anna; Kroll, Alexandra; Pena, Jasquelin

    2016-04-01

    The ability of microorganisms to precipitate biogenic birnessite nanoparticles is widely spread in the bacterial and fungal trees of life, with this process accounting largely for the formation of birnessite in nature. Birnessite minerals occur typically as nanoparticles that exhibit significant chemical and structural disorder. Furthermore, the mineral is embedded within a biomass matrix composed of microbial cells and extracellular polymeric substances, where the biomass not only provides reactive surfaces but can mediate electron transfer reactions. The overarching question guiding our research is: How do nanoscale properties and admixing with microbial biomass modify the reactivity of Mn oxide minerals? In this study, we investigate the biomass-birnessite composites of Pseudomonas putida GB-1 biomass and δ-MnO2 nanoparticles. We characterized the structure and composition of the mineral fraction using X-ray diffraction, Mn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical methods. To characterize the biomass fraction, we employed FTIR spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography analysis of the extracellular polymeric substances. Finally, we measured Ni(II) sorption isotherms at pH 6 and Ni K-edge EXAFS spectra to determine the extent and mechanism of Ni sorption in the biomass-mineral composites and in biomass-only and mineral-only systems. This approach provided direct and indirect evidence for the extent of organo-mineral interactions in the composites, as well as a direct measure of sorption reactivity in the composites relative to biomass-only and mineral-only systems. We found that admixing of mineral nanoparticles with biomass reduced the reactivity of the edge sites of birnessite particles towards Ni(II) through the attachment of organic moieties to the mineral particles and/or modification of the assemblage surface charge properties. In addition, the interaction of biomass components with MnO2 particles leads to partial Mn(IV) reduction and

  17. Cadmium-resistance mechanism in the bacteria Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Pseudomonas putida mt2.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Saba; Rehman, Abdul; Qazi, Mahmood Hussain

    2014-08-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 were used as cadmium (Cd)-resistant and -sensitive bacteria, respectively, to study Cd uptake, sorption, intracellular accumulation, metallothionein (MT) induction, and bioremediation potential of both isolates. According to this research work, Cd had a stimulatory effect on the growth of CH34 cells (OD578 = 1.43) compared with mt2 cells (OD578 = 0.8). Addition of N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) along with Cd resulted in more cell growth in mt2 (OD578 = 0.71) compared with CH34 (OD578 = 0.34). DCCD and DNP inhibited this active uptake only in CH34 but not in mt2. Greater Cd interaction with the cell surface was observed in mt2 cells compared with CH34 cells. Intracellular Cd accumulation was interrupted by DCCD and DNP in CH34 (only 1.81 ± 0.04 μg L(-1) at 5 h) but not in mt2 (24.41 ± 0.01 μg L(-1) at 5 h). Intracellular Cd uptake was observed in even killed mt2 cells (7.11 ± 0.05 μg L(-1) at 5 h) compared with CH34 cells (2.50 ± 0.08 μg L(-1) at 5 h). This result showed that the Cd accumulation mechanism in CH34 is ATPase-dependent, whereas in mt2 uptake mechanism is not ATPase-dependent because mt2 ATPase was not inhibited by DCCD and DNP. CH34 removed 93 mg L(-1) of Cd after 8 days from original industrial effluent, which was more than Cd removal by CH34 from distilled water (i.e. 90 mg L(-1) after 8 days). mt2 was able to remove 80 mg L(-1) of Cd after 8 days from original industrial effluent, which was more than Cd removal by mt2 from distilled water (i.e. 77 mg L(-1) after 8 days). Cd did not induce any MT in CH34, but it did so in mt2 (14 kDa), which was thought to be a Cd-resistance mechanism operative in mt2. PMID:24595738

  18. SURVIVAL AND DEGRADATIVE CAPACITY OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA INDUCED OR CONSTITUTIVELY EXPRESSING PLASMA-MEDIATED DEGRADATION OF 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETATE (TFD) IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of genetically altered Pseudomonas putida strains harboring an inducible plasmid, PRO101, or a constitutive plasmid, PRO103, was compared. hese plasmids encode for the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (TFD) to 2-chloromaleylacetate, and the maintenance of ei...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida CBF10-2, a Soil Isolate with Bioremediation Potential in Agricultural and Industrial Environmental Settings

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CBF10-2 is a microorganism isolated from farmland soil in Fairchild, TX, found to degrade high-impact xenobiotics, including organophosphate insecticides, petroleum hydrocarbons, and both monocyclic and polycyclic aromatics. The versatility of CBF10-2 makes it useful for multipurpose bioremediation of contaminated sites in agricultural and industrial environments. PMID:27417844

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida CBF10-2, a Soil Isolate with Bioremediation Potential in Agricultural and Industrial Environmental Settings.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rupa; Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CBF10-2 is a microorganism isolated from farmland soil in Fairchild, TX, found to degrade high-impact xenobiotics, including organophosphate insecticides, petroleum hydrocarbons, and both monocyclic and polycyclic aromatics. The versatility of CBF10-2 makes it useful for multipurpose bioremediation of contaminated sites in agricultural and industrial environments. PMID:27417844

  1. Catabolite repression of the toluene degradation pathway in Pseudomonas putida harboring pWW0 under various conditions of nutrient limitation in chemostat culture

    SciTech Connect

    Duetz, W.A.; Wind, B.; Andel, J.G. van

    1996-02-01

    Many xenobiotic compounds are biodegradable in laboratory bacterial cultures, but results in the environment are not as reassuring. Actual biodegradation rates of aromatics under natural conditions may be very low. This study mimicked limiting conditions of oxygen phosphate and nitrogen in chemostat cultures of Pseudomonas putida and studied the inducibility of TOL plasmid pathway in response to the nonmetabolizable inducer-o-xylene.

  2. BIODEGRADATION OF PHENOXYACETIC ACID IN SOIL BY PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA PP0301 (PR0103), A CONSTITUTIVE DEGRADER OF 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of using genetically engineered microbes (GEMS) to degrade recalcitrant environmental toxicants was demonstrated by the application of Pseudomonas putida PP0301 (pR0103) to an Oregon agricultural soil amended with 500 ug/g of a model xenobiotic, phenoxyacetic acid (P...

  3. Altering the substrate specificity of polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase 1 derived from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 by localized semirandom mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Der-Shyan; Lee, Chia-Yin

    2004-07-01

    The substrate specificity of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 (PhaC1(Pp), class II) from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 (formerly known as Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1) was successfully altered by localized semirandom mutagenesis. The enzyme evolution system introduces multiple point mutations, designed on the basis of the conserved regions of the PHA synthase family, by using PCR-based gene fragmentation with degenerate primers and a reassembly PCR. According to the opaqueness of the colony, indicating the accumulation of large amounts of PHA granules in the cells, 13 PHA-accumulating candidates were screened from a mutant library, with Pseudomonas putida GPp104 PHA- as the host. The in vivo substrate specificity of five candidates, L1-6, D7-47, PS-A2, PS-C2, and PS-E1, was evaluated by the heterologous expression in Ralstonia eutropha PHB(-)4 supplemented with octanoate. Notably, the amount of 3-hydroxybutyrate (short-chain-length [SCL] 3-hydroxyalkanoate [3-HA] unit) was drastically increased in recombinants that expressed evolved mutant enzymes L1-6, PS-A2, PS-C2, and PS-E1 (up to 60, 36, 50, and 49 mol%, respectively), relative to the amount in the wild type (12 mol%). Evolved enzyme PS-E1, in which 14 amino acids had been changed and which was heterologously expressed in R. eutropha PHB(-)4, not only exhibited broad substrate specificity (49 mol% SCL 3-HA and 51 mol% medium-chain-length [MCL] 3-HA) but also conferred the highest PHA production (45% dry weight) among the candidates. The 3-HA and MCL 3-HA units of the PHA produced by R. eutropha PHB(-)4/pPS-E1 were randomly copolymerized in a single polymer chain, as analytically confirmed by acetone fractionation and the 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. PMID:15205419

  4. Production of medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoate in metabolic flux optimized Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomnas putida is a natural producer of medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA), a polymeric precursor of bioplastics. A two-fold increase of mcl-PHA production via inactivation of the glucose dehydrogenase gene gcd, limiting the metabolic flux towards side products like gluconate was achieved before. Here, we investigated the overproduction of enzymes catalyzing limiting steps of mcl-PHA precursor formation. Results A genome-based in silico model for P. putida KT2440 metabolism was employed to identify potential genetic targets to be engineered for the improvement of mcl-PHA production using glucose as sole carbon source. Here, overproduction of pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit AcoA in the P. putida KT2440 wild type and the Δgcd mutant strains led to an increase of PHA production. In controlled bioreactor batch fermentations PHA production was increased by 33% in the acoA overexpressing wild type and 121% in the acoA overexpressing Δgcd strain in comparison to P. putida KT2440. Overexpression of pgl-encoding 6-phosphoglucolactonase did not influence PHA production. Transcriptome analyses of engineered PHA producing P. putida in comparison to its parental strains revealed the induction of genes encoding glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, NADPH seems to be quantitatively consumed for efficient PHA synthesis, since a direct relationship between low levels of NADPH and high concentrations of the biopolymer were observed. In contrast, intracellular levels of NADH were found increased in PHA producing organisms. Conclusion Production of mcl-PHAs was enhanced in P. putida when grown on glucose via overproduction of a pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit (AcoA) in combination with a deletion of the glucose dehydrogenase (gcd) gene as predicted by in silico elementary flux mode analysis. PMID:24948031

  5. Contrasting colonization and plant growth promoting capacity between wild type and gfp-derative of the endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619 in hybrid poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Weyens N.; van der Lelie D.; Boulet, J.; Adriaensen, D.; Timmermans, J.-P.; Prinsen, E.; Van Oevelen, S.; D"Haen, J.; Smeets, K.; Taghavi, S.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2011-06-09

    This study aims to investigate the colonization of poplar by the endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619 and its capacity to promote plant growth. Poplar cuttings were inoculated with P. putida W619 (wild-type or gfp-labelled). The colonization of both strains was investigated and morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters were analyzed to evaluate plant growth promotion. Inoculation with P. putida W619 (wild-type) resulted in remarkable growth promotion, decreased activities of antioxidative defence related enzymes, and reduced stomatal resistance, all indicative of improved plant health and growth in comparison with the non-inoculated cuttings. In contrast, inoculation with gfp-labelled P. putida W619 did not promote growth; it even had a negative effect on plant health and growth. Furthermore, compared to the wildtype strain, colonization by the gfp-labelled P. putida W619::gfp1 was much lower; it only colonized the rhizosphere and root cortex while the wild-type strain also colonized the root xylem vessels. Despite the strong plant growth promoting capacity of P. putida W619 (wild-type), after gfp labelling its growth promoting characteristics disappeared and its colonization capacity was strongly influenced; for these reasons gfp labelling should be applied with sufficient caution.

  6. High cell density cultivation of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 using glucose without the need for oxygen enriched air supply.

    PubMed

    Davis, Reeta; Duane, Gearoid; Kenny, Shane T; Cerrone, Federico; Guzik, Maciej W; Babu, Ramesh P; Casey, Eoin; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2015-04-01

    High Cell Density (HCD) cultivation of bacteria is essential for the majority of industrial processes to achieve high volumetric productivity (g L(-1) h(-1) ) of a bioproduct of interest. This study developed a fed batch bioprocess using glucose as sole carbon and energy source for the HCD of the well described biocatalyst Pseudomonas putida KT2440 without the supply of oxygen enriched air. Growth kinetics data from batch fermentations were used for building a bioprocess model and designing feeding strategies. An exponential followed by linearly increasing feeding strategy of glucose was found to be effective in maintaining biomass productivity while also delaying the onset of dissolved oxygen (supplied via compressed air) limitation. A final cell dry weight (CDW) of 102 g L(-1) was achieved in 33 h with a biomass productivity of 3.1 g L(-1) h(-1) which are the highest ever reported values for P. putida strains using glucose without the supply of pure oxygen or oxygen enriched air. The usefulness of the biomass as a biocatalyst was demonstrated through the production of the biodegradable polymer polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). When nonanoic acid (NA) was supplied to the glucose grown cells of P. putida KT2440, it accumulated 32% of CDW as PHA in 11 h (2.85 g L(-1) h(-1) ) resulting in a total of 0.56 kg of PHA in 18 L with a yield of 0.56 g PHA g NA(-1) . PMID:25311981

  7. Release of outer membrane vesicles in Pseudomonas putida as a response to stress caused by cationic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Marisa Heredia, Romina; Sabrina Boeris, Paola; Sebastián Liffourrena, Andrés; Fernanda Bergero, María; Alberto López, Gastón; Inés Lucchesi, Gloria

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas putida A (ATCC 12633), a degrader of cationic surfactants, releases outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) when grown with tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) as the sole carbon, nitrogen and energy source. The OMVs exhibit a bilayer structure and were found to be composed of lipopolysaccharides, proteins and phospholipids (PLs) such as cardiolipin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). The OMVs showed a marked increase in the PG content, approximately 43 % higher than the amount registered in the parent cells from which the vesicles were derived. After growth of P. putida with TTAB, the amount of lipoprotein covalently cross-linked to the peptidoglycan showed a twofold decrease when compared with values found after growth without the surfactant [16 ± 2 and 28 ± 3 μg (mg cell envelope protein)- 1, respectively]. This decrease in the amount of lipoprotein can be related to areas of loss of contact between the outer membrane and the peptidoglycan and, therefore, to OMV production. In addition, due to its amphiphilic nature, TTAB can contribute to OMV biogenesis, through a physical mechanism, by induction of the curvature of the membrane. Taking into account that OVMs were produced when the cells were grown under external stress, caused by the surfactant, and that TTAB was detected in the vesicles [48 nmol TTAB (nmol PL)- 1], we concluded that this system of TTAB elimination is a mechanism that P. putida A (ATCC 12633) would utilize for alleviating stress caused by cationic surfactants. PMID:26925774

  8. Genome-Scale Reconstruction and Analysis of the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 Metabolic Network Facilitates Applications in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Miguel; Bielecka, Agata; Regenhardt, Daniela; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-01

    A cornerstone of biotechnology is the use of microorganisms for the efficient production of chemicals and the elimination of harmful waste. Pseudomonas putida is an archetype of such microbes due to its metabolic versatility, stress resistance, amenability to genetic modifications, and vast potential for environmental and industrial applications. To address both the elucidation of the metabolic wiring in P. putida and its uses in biocatalysis, in particular for the production of non-growth-related biochemicals, we developed and present here a genome-scale constraint-based model of the metabolism of P. putida KT2440. Network reconstruction and flux balance analysis (FBA) enabled definition of the structure of the metabolic network, identification of knowledge gaps, and pin-pointing of essential metabolic functions, facilitating thereby the refinement of gene annotations. FBA and flux variability analysis were used to analyze the properties, potential, and limits of the model. These analyses allowed identification, under various conditions, of key features of metabolism such as growth yield, resource distribution, network robustness, and gene essentiality. The model was validated with data from continuous cell cultures, high-throughput phenotyping data, 13C-measurement of internal flux distributions, and specifically generated knock-out mutants. Auxotrophy was correctly predicted in 75% of the cases. These systematic analyses revealed that the metabolic network structure is the main factor determining the accuracy of predictions, whereas biomass composition has negligible influence. Finally, we drew on the model to devise metabolic engineering strategies to improve production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, a class of biotechnologically useful compounds whose synthesis is not coupled to cell survival. The solidly validated model yields valuable insights into genotype–phenotype relationships and provides a sound framework to explore this versatile bacterium and to

  9. Immobilization of heavy metals by Pseudomonas putida CZ1/goethite composites from solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, XinCai; Chen, LiTao; Shi, JiYan; Wu, WeiXiang; Chen, YingXu

    2008-02-15

    Bacterial-mineral composites are important in the retention of heavy metals due to their large sorption capacity under a wide range of environmental conditions. This study provides the first quantitative comparison of the metal-binding capacities of P. putida CZ1-goethite composite to its individual components. When the same amount (on a dry weight basis) of living and nonliving cells of P. putida CZ1, goethite or their composites was separately exposed to solutions of 0.5 mM Cu(II) and Zn(II) in 0.01 M KNO(3), the living cells removed the largest quantity of heavy metals. The results of calculated metal retention values indicated that the adsorption of goethite to bacteria has not mask or neutralize chemically reactive adsorption sites normally available to metal ions. Moreover, the nonliving cells-goethite composite retained approximately 82% more Zn than that predicted by their individual behavior. The preferential association of Zn with P. putida CZ1 was observed by TEM and EDS analyses of a mixture consisting of the bacteria and goethite. Desorption of Cu and Zn with 1.0M CH(3)COOK solution from P. putida CZ1 and goethite indicated the differences in the functional groups able to bind heavy metals. PMID:17869490

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF CATALASE ACTIVITIES IN A ROOT-CLEANING ISOLATE OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Psuedomonas putida, a saprophytic root-colonizing bacterium, produces multiple forms of catalase Catalase A which increases in specific activity during growth phase and after treatment with H2O2, is located in the and is inhibited by 3-amino-1,2-4-triazole, EDTA, and cyanide, but...