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Sample records for pseudotuberculosis serogroup va

  1. Studies of the biosynthesis of 3,6-dideoxyhexoses: molecular cloning and characterization of the asc (ascarylose) region from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis serogroup VA.

    PubMed Central

    Thorson, J S; Lo, S F; Ploux, O; He, X; Liu, H W

    1994-01-01

    The 3,6-dideoxyhexoses are found in the lipopolysaccharides of gram-negative bacteria, where they have been shown to be the dominant antigenic determinants. Of the five 3,6-dideoxyhexoses known to occur naturally, four have been found in various strains of Salmonella enterica (abequose, tyvelose, paratose, and colitose) and all five, including ascarylose, are present among the serotypes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Although there exists one report of the cloning of the rfb region harboring the abequose biosynthetic genes from Y. pseudotuberculosis serogroup HA, the detailed genetic principles underlying a 3,6-dideoxyhexose polymorphism in Y. pseudotuberculosis have not been addressed. To extend the available information on the genes responsible for 3,6-dideoxyhexose formation in Yersinia spp. and facilitate a comparison with the established rfb (O antigen) cluster of Salmonella spp., we report the production of three overlapping clones containing the entire gene cluster required for CDP-ascarylose biosynthesis. On the basis of a detailed sequence analysis, the implications regarding 3,6-dideoxyhexose polymorphism among Salmonella and Yersinia spp. are discussed. In addition, the functional cloning of this region has allowed the expression of Ep (alpha-D-glucose cytidylyltransferase), Eod (CDP-D-glucose 4,6-dehydratase), E1 (CDP-6-deoxy-L-threo-D-glycero-4- hexulose-3-dehydrase), E3 (CDP-6-deoxy-delta 3,4-glucoseen reductase), Eep (CDP-3,6-dideoxy-D-glycero-D- glycero-4-hexulose-5-epimerase), and Ered (CDP-3,6-dideoxy-L-glycero-D-glycero-4-hexulose-4-reductase), facilitating future mechanistic studies of this intriguing biosynthetic pathway. Images PMID:8071227

  2. YERSINIA PSEUDOTUBERCULOSIS, SEROGROUP O:1A, INFECTION IN TWO AMAZON PARROTS (AMAZONA AESTIVA AND AMAZONA ORATRIX) WITH HEPATIC HEMOSIDEROSIS.

    PubMed

    Galosi, Livio; Farneti, Silvana; Rossi, Giacomo; Cork, Susan Catherine; Ferraro, Stefano; Magi, Gian Enrico; Petrini, Stefano; Valiani, Andrea; Cuteri, Vincenzo; Attili, Anna-Rita

    2015-09-01

    Necropsies were conducted on a female blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) and a female yellow-headed Amazon (Amazona oratrix) that died after depression, ruffled feathers, diarrhea, and biliverdin in the urine. Gross and microscopic examinations revealed multifocal necrosis in the liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, intestines, and heart caused by acute bacteremia. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, serogroup O:1a, was isolated by culturing from the visceral lesions in the liver, intestines, and spleen. Virulence gene analysis showed the presence of the inv gene and the complete pathogenicity island: IS100, psn, yptE, irp1, irp2 ybtP-ybtQ, ybtX-ybtS, and int asnT-Int. Histopathologic findings and chemical analysis also demonstrated hepatic hemosiderosis. As has been demonstrated in other species, hemosiderosis may predispose Amazona spp. to systemic infection with Y. pseudotuberculosis after enteric disease. PMID:26352966

  3. Immunochemical Nature of Receptors of Pseudotuberculosis Diagnostic Bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Byvalov, A A; Dudina, L G; Konyshev, I V; Litvinets, S G; Martinson, E A

    2016-03-01

    The effect of treatment of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis cells with antibodies of various specificities on adhesiveness of pseudotuberculosis bacteriophage was analyzed by competitive inhibition technique. Bacteriophage adsorption to bacteria was sterically inhibited by monoclonal antibodies to protein epitopes of Y. pseudotuberculosis outer membrane. These results suggest that receptors of pseudotuberculosis diagnostic bacteriophage are localized on the LPS core of microbial cell. PMID:27021089

  4. Meningococcal disease serogroup C

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Félix O; Pérez, Antonio E; Cuevas, Iván E

    2012-01-01

    Despite current advances in antibiotic therapy and vaccines, meningococcal disease serogroup C (MDC) remains a serious threat to global health, particularly in countries in North and Latin America, Europe, and Asia. MDC is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and neurological sequelae and it is a heavy economic burden. At the individual level, despite advances in antibiotics and supportive therapies, case fatality rate remains nearly 10% and severe neurological sequelae are frequent. At the population level, prevention and control of infection is more challenging. The main approaches include health education, providing information to the public, specific treatment, chemoprophylaxis, and the use of vaccines. Plain and conjugate meningococcal C polysaccharide vaccines are considered safe, are well tolerated, and have been used successfully for over 30 years. Most high-income countries use vaccination as a part of public health strategies, and different meningococcal C vaccination schedules have proven to be effective in reducing incidence. This is particularly so with conjugate vaccines, which have been found to induce immunogenicity in infants (the age group with the highest incidence rates of disease), stimulate immunologic memory, have longer effects, not lead to hyporesponsiveness with repeated dosing, and decrease acquisition of nasopharyngeal carriage, inducing herd immunity. Antibiotics are considered a cornerstone of MDC treatment and must be administered empirically as soon as possible. The choice of which antibiotic to use should be made based on local antibiotic resistance, availability, and circulating strains. Excellent options for a 7-day course are penicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone and cefotaxime) intravenously, although the latter are considerably more expensive than the others. The use of steroids as adjunctive therapy for MDC is still controversial and remains a topic of debate. A

  5. Difficulties in diagnosing terminal ileitis due to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wunderink, H F; Oostvogel, P M; Frénay, I H M E; Notermans, D W; Fruth, A; Kuijper, E J

    2014-02-01

    We report three patients with terminal ileitis and positive fecal cultures with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. From one patient, a virulence plasmid (pYV)-negative Y. pseudotuberculosis was isolated, which represents the second finding of a pYV-negative isolate associated with human disease. All patients were treated with ciprofloxacin and fully recovered. Since conventional culture methods for yersiniosis are gradually replaced with molecular tests not recognizing Y. pseudotuberculosis, we recommend to include a specific culture medium or to apply a specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay on fecal samples from patients suspected of terminal ileitis. PMID:23925588

  6. Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis liver abscess in a mature alpaca (Lama pacos)

    PubMed Central

    Sprake, Philippa; Gold, Jenifer R.

    2012-01-01

    A mature female alpaca was evaluated for weight loss and a 10-day history of anorexia, diarrhea, abdominal distension, and ventral edema. Ultrasonography revealed a hepatic mass, culture of which identified Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. This is the first reported case of an internal caseous lymphadenitis lesion resulting in clinical disease in a camelid. PMID:23024384

  7. Experimental transmission of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in horses by house flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The route of infection of pigeon fever remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to investigate house flies (Musca domestica L.) as vectors of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in horses. Eight ponies were used in a randomized, controlled, blinded experimental study. Ten wounds were creat...

  8. Multiplex PCR serogrouping of Listeria monocytogenes isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Yukako; Ida, Miki; Nishino, Yukari; Ishitsuka, Rie; Kuroda, Sumiyo; Hirai, Akihiko; Sadamasu, Kenji; Nakama, Akiko; Kai, Akemi

    2016-04-01

    PCR serogrouping methods were used to examine strains of L. monocytogenes isolated in Japan. Among 187 strains, 99.5% were classified into 4 PCR serogroups corresponding to conventional serotypes. Only one isolate had a new PCR profile, which may be a variant of serogroup IVb. PMID:26537550

  9. Multiplex PCR serogrouping of Listeria monocytogenes isolated in Japan

    PubMed Central

    SHIMOJIMA, Yukako; IDA, Miki; NISHINO, Yukari; ISHITSUKA, Rie; KURODA, Sumiyo; HIRAI, Akihiko; SADAMASU, Kenji; NAKAMA, Akiko; KAI, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    PCR serogrouping methods were used to examine strains of L. monocytogenes isolated in Japan. Among 187 strains, 99.5% were classified into 4 PCR serogroups corresponding to conventional serotypes. Only one isolate had a new PCR profile, which may be a variant of serogroup IVb. PMID:26537550

  10. Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Pneumonia in a Veterinary Student Infected During Laboratory Work

    PubMed Central

    Heggelund, Lars; Gaustad, Peter; Håvelsrud, Othilde Elise; Blom, Jochen; Borgen, Lars; Sundset, Arve; Sørum, Henning; Frøland, Stig Sophus

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis pneumonia in a veterinary student, with molecular genetic evidence of acquisition during laboratory work, an observation relevant for laboratory personnel working with C pseudotuberculosis isolates. The patient was clinically cured with 14 months trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and rifampicin combination treatment. PMID:26380345

  11. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP32953 survives and replicates in trophozoites and persists in cysts of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Montañez, Jennifer; Benavides-Montaño, Javier A.; Hinz, Angela K.; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a foodborne enteric pathogen that causes a mild self-limiting diarrhea in humans. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is able to persist in soil and water and in association with fresh produce, but the mechanism by which it persists is unknown. It has been shown that Y. pseudotuberculosis co-occurs with protozoans in these environments; therefore, this study investigates if bacterivorous free-living amoeba (FLA) are able to support persistence of Y. pseudotuberculosis. Coculture studies of Y. pseudotuberculosis and the prototype FLA, Acanthamoeba castellanii revealed that bacteria had an enhanced capacity to survive in association with amoeba and in the absence of any cytotoxic effects. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is able to survive and replicate in trophozoites specifically localized within vacuoles, and persists within cysts over a period of at least a week. These data present the first evidence that Y. pseudotuberculosis is able to resist the bacterivorous nature of FLA and instead exhibits an enhanced ability to replicate and persist in coculture with amoeba. This study sheds light on the potential role of FLA in the ecology of Y. pseudotuberculosis which may have implications for food safety. PMID:26025069

  12. Sensitive and specific detection of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Horisaka, Tomoko; Fujita, Kayoko; Iwata, Taketoshi; Nakadai, Aya; Okatani, Alexandre T; Horikita, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Takahide; Honda, Eiichi; Yokomizo, Yuichi; Hayashidani, Hideki

    2004-11-01

    We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method able to detect Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains in 30 min by using six primers designed by targeting the inv gene. This method is more sensitive than PCR and might be a useful tool for detecting and identifying Y. pseudotuberculosis. PMID:15528740

  13. Progression of ‘OMICS’ methodologies for understanding the pathogenicity of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis: the Brazilian experience

    PubMed Central

    Dorella, Fernanda A.; Gala-Garcia, Alfonso; Pinto, Anne C.; Sarrouh, Boutros; Antunes, Camila A.; Ribeiro, Dayana; Aburjaile, Flavia F.; Fiaux, Karina K.; Guimarães, Luis C.; Seyffert, Núbia; El-Aouar, Rachid A.; Silva, Renata; Hassan, Syed S.; Castro, Thiago L. P.; Marques, Wanderson S.; Ramos, Rommel; Carneiro, Adriana; de Sá, Pablo; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2013-01-01

    Since the first successful attempt at sequencing the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis genome, large amounts of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data have been generated. C. pseudotuberculosis is an interesting bacterium due to its great zoonotic potential and because it causes considerable economic losses worldwide. Furthermore, different strains of C. pseudotuberculosis are capable of causing various diseases in different hosts. Currently, we seek information about the phylogenetic relationships between different strains of C. pseudotuberculosis isolates from different hosts across the world and to employ these data to develop tools to diagnose and eradicate the diseases these strains cause. In this review, we present the latest findings on C. pseudotuberculosis that have been obtained with the most advanced techniques for sequencing and genomic organization. We also discuss the development of in silico tools for processing these data to prompt a better understanding of this pathogen. PMID:24688721

  14. [Demonstration of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in in cultivated soils].

    PubMed

    Barre, N; Louzis, C; Treignier, M; Dubois-Darnaudpeys, A

    1977-06-13

    The bacteriological analysis of 37 pools of cultivated soils collected in a limited area in the Parisian district permits the isolation of 14 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis: 9 strains are of serotype II, 3 of serotype I, 1 of serotype III, and of serotype IV. This diversity contrasts with the prevalence of serotype I in infections of man and animals and the scarcity of type III and IV in these species. The abundance of our isolates is in favour of a large distribution of the germ in this substratum, which can be considered as a potential contamination source. PMID:408041

  15. Pathogenesis of Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis in Human Yersiniosis

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Cristi L.; Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2011-01-01

    Yersiniosis is a food-borne illness that has become more prevalent in recent years due to human transmission via the fecal-oral route and prevalence in farm animals. Yersiniosis is primarily caused by Yersinia enterocolitica and less frequently by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Infection is usually characterized by a self-limiting acute infection beginning in the intestine and spreading to the mesenteric lymph nodes. However, more serious infections and chronic conditions can also occur, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis are both heterogeneous organisms that vary considerably in their degrees of pathogenicity, although some generalizations can be ascribed to pathogenic variants. Adhesion molecules and a type III secretion system are critical for the establishment and progression of infection. Additionally, host innate and adaptive immune responses are both required for yersiniae clearance. Despite the ubiquity of enteric Yersinia species and their association as important causes of food poisoning world-wide, few national enteric pathogen surveillance programs include the yersiniae as notifiable pathogens. Moreover, no standard exists whereby identification and reporting systems can be effectively compared and global trends developed. This review discusses yersinial virulence factors, mechanisms of infection, and host responses in addition to the current state of surveillance, detection, and prevention of yersiniosis. PMID:22567322

  16. Long-Term Persistence of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Entomopathogenic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Gengler, Samuel; Laudisoit, Anne; Batoko, Henri; Wattiau, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) are small worms whose ecological behaviour consists to invade, kill insects and feed on their cadavers thanks to a species-specific symbiotic bacterium belonging to any of the genera Xenorhabdus or Photorhabdus hosted in the gastro-intestinal tract of EPNs. The symbiont provides a number of biological functions that are essential for its EPN host including the production of entomotoxins, of enzymes able to degrade the insect constitutive macromolecules and of antimicrobial compounds able to prevent the growth of competitors in the insect cadaver. The question addressed in this study was to investigate whether a mammalian pathogen taxonomically related to Xenorhabdus was able to substitute for or “hijack” the symbiotic relationship associating Xenorhabdus and Steinernema EPNs. To deal with this question, a laboratory experimental model was developed consisting in Galleria mellonella insect larvae, Steinernema EPNs with or without their natural Xenorhabdus symbiont and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis brought artificially either in the gut of EPNs or in the haemocoel of the insect larva prior to infection. The developed model demonstrated the capacity of EPNs to act as an efficient reservoir ensuring exponential multiplication, maintenance and dissemination of Y. pseudotuberculosis. PMID:25635766

  17. Temperature-responsive in vitro RNA structurome of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Righetti, Francesco; Nuss, Aaron M; Twittenhoff, Christian; Beele, Sascha; Urban, Kristina; Will, Sebastian; Bernhart, Stephan H; Stadler, Peter F; Dersch, Petra; Narberhaus, Franz

    2016-06-28

    RNA structures are fundamentally important for RNA function. Dynamic, condition-dependent structural changes are able to modulate gene expression as shown for riboswitches and RNA thermometers. By parallel analysis of RNA structures, we mapped the RNA structurome of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis at three different temperatures. This human pathogen is exquisitely responsive to host body temperature (37 °C), which induces a major metabolic transition. Our analysis profiles the structure of more than 1,750 RNAs at 25 °C, 37 °C, and 42 °C. Average mRNAs tend to be unstructured around the ribosome binding site. We searched for 5'-UTRs that are folded at low temperature and identified novel thermoresponsive RNA structures from diverse gene categories. The regulatory potential of 16 candidates was validated. In summary, we present a dynamic bacterial RNA structurome and find that the expression of virulence-relevant functions in Y. pseudotuberculosis and reprogramming of its metabolism in response to temperature is associated with a restructuring of numerous mRNAs. PMID:27298343

  18. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection intractable by antibiotics: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Jiro; Sasaki, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection is usually cured spontaneously or with administration of antibiotics. Presentation of case The patient is a twelve-year-old boy with right lower quadrant pain who had enterocolitis one month previously. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography showed a distended and edematous ileum and an intra-abdominal abscess adjacent to the mesentery with a normal appendix. The patient’s general condition did not improve with antibiotics, so an ileocecectomy was performed. Discussion Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection requiring an operation is rare. In our case, antibiotics were not effective in treating the abscess therefore surgery was required. An early diagnosis using serological studies, ultrasound of the abdomen, and fecal culture, with appropriate administration of antibiotics, may have avoided the need for surgery. Considering YP infection as a differential diagnosis is therefore important when encountering patients with enterocolitis, especially with right lower quadrant pain. Early diagnosis may assist in avoiding unnecessary operations. Conclusion Diagnosis of YP infection may be missed or delayed because it is rare and difficult to detect, and must be distinguished from appendicitis. Although most YP infections are self-limiting, some rare cases will require surgery, therefore early diagnosis is essential. PMID:27002288

  19. Experimental inoculation of house flies Musca domestica with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis serovar equi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Actinomycetales: Corynebacteriaceae) infection in horses causes external abscesses, infection of internal organs and ulcerative lymphangitis. The exact mechanism of infection remains unknown, but fly transmission is suspected. Scientists at Auburn University and U...

  20. Experimental transmission of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis biovar equi in horses by house flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The route of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in horses remains undetermined, but transmission by insects is suspected. Scientists from CMAVE and Auburn University investigated house flies (Musca domestica L.) as possible vectors. Three ponies were directly inoculated with C. pseudotuber...

  1. Experimental inoculation of house flies, Musca domestica L., with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis serovar equi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Actinomycetales: Corynebacteriaceae) infection in horses causes three different disease syndromes: external abscesses, infection of internal organs and ulcerative lymphangitis. The route of infection in horses remains undetermined, but transmission by insect vecto...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain E19, Isolated from a Horse in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Q.; Dias, Larissa M.; Alves, Jorianne T. C.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; Guimarães, Luis C.; Rocha, Flávia S.; Gala-García, Alfonso; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is related to several diseases infecting horses and small ruminants, causing economic losses to agribusiness. Here, we present the genome sequence of C. pseudotuberculosis strain E19. The genome includes one circular chromosome 2,367,956 bp (52.1% G+C content), with 2,112 genes predicted, 12 rRNAs, and 48 tRNAs. PMID:26607893

  3. Whole-Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis 262 Biovar equi Isolated from Cow Milk

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Carlos Leonardo de A.; Dias, Larissa M.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; Alves, Jorianne T. C.; Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Q.; Dowson, Christopher G.; Azevedo, Vasco; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Silva, Artur

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis 262, isolated from a bovine host. C. pseudotuberculosis is an etiological agent of diseases with medical and veterinary relevance. The genome contains 2,325,749 bp, 52.8% G+C content, 2,022 coding sequences (CDS), 50 pseudogenes, 48 tRNAs, and 12 rRNAs. PMID:27013052

  4. Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup X in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Agnememel, Alain; Hong, Eva; Giorgini, Dario; Nuñez-Samudio, Viginia; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of meningococcal disease varies by geography and time. Whole-genome sequencing of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup X isolates from sub-Saharan Africa and Europe showed that serogroup X emergence in sub-Saharan Africa resulted from expansion of particular variants within clonal complex 181. Virulence of these isolates in experimental mouse models was high. PMID:26982628

  5. Mapping phosphoproteins in Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Giulia; Laschi, Marcella; Serchi, Tommaso; Arena, Simona; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Braconi, Daniela; Scaloni, Andrea; Santucci, Annalisa

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the phosphorylation capability of serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis (MenA) and to implement our knowledge in meningococcal biology and in bacterial post-translational modifications, cell extracts were separated by 2-DE and 51 novel phosphoproteins were revealed by the use of the highly specific Ser/Thr/Tyr-phosphorylated proteins staining by Pro-Q Diamond and identified by MALDI-ToF/MS. Our results indicate that phosphorylation in MenA is comparable to that of other bacterial species. A first functional characterization of the identified modified proteins was also given, in order to understand their role in meningococcal physiopathology. PMID:21365747

  6. Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis RNA-seq data from abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Pablo H C G; Veras, Adonney A O; Carneiro, Adriana R; Barúna, Rafael A; Guimarães, Luís C; Pinheiro, Kenny C; Pinto, Anne C; Soares, Siomar C; Schneider, Maria P C; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2015-12-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causes significant loss to goat and sheep farmers because it is the causal agent of the infectious disease caseous lymphadenitis, which may lead to outcomes ranging from skin injury to animal death (Ruiz et al., 2011) [1]. This bacterium was grown under osmotic (2 M), acid (pH) and heat (50 °C) stress and under control (Normal-BHI brain heart infusion) conditions, which simulate the conditions faced by the bacteria during the infectious process. Subsequently, cDNA of each condition was sequenced by the SOLiD3 Plus platform using the RNA-Seq technique [2], [3], [4]. The data produced was processed to evaluate the differential gene expression, which is helpful to understand the adaptation mechanisms during the infection in the host. The sequencing data of all conditions are available in the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) repository under accession number E-MTAB-2017. PMID:26702428

  7. Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection: a regulatory RNA perspective

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Chavarría, Luary C.; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, responsible for causing fulminant plague, has evolved clonally from the enteric pathogen, Y. pseudotuberculosis, which in contrast, causes a relatively benign enteric illness. An ~97% nucleotide identity over 75% of their shared protein coding genes is maintained between these two pathogens, leaving much conjecture regarding the molecular determinants responsible for producing these vastly different disease etiologies, host preferences and transmission routes. One idea is that coordinated production of distinct factors required for host adaptation and virulence in response to specific environmental cues could contribute to the distinct pathogenicity distinguishing these two species. Small non-coding RNAs that direct posttranscriptional regulation have recently been identified as key molecules that may provide such timeous expression of appropriate disease enabling factors. Here the burgeoning field of small non-coding regulatory RNAs in Yersinia pathogenesis is reviewed from the viewpoint of adaptive colonization, virulence and divergent evolution of these pathogens. PMID:26441890

  8. Typing and Clustering of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Isolates by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis Using Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Voskresenskaya, E.; Savin, C.; Leclercq, A.; Tseneva, G.

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is an enteropathogen that has an animal reservoir and causes human infections, mostly in temperate and cold countries. Most of the methods previously used to subdivide Y. pseudotuberculosis were performed on small numbers of isolates from a specific geographical area. One aim of this study was to evaluate the typing efficiency of restriction fragment length polymorphism of insertion sequence hybridization patterns (IS-RFLP) compared to other typing methods, such as serotyping, ribotyping, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST), on the same set of 80 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis of global origin. We found that IS100 was not adequate for IS-RFLP but that both IS285 and IS1541 efficiently subtyped Y. pseudotuberculosis. The discriminatory index (DI) of IS1541-RFLP (0.980) was superior to those of IS285-RFLP (0.939), ribotyping (0.944), MLST (0.861), and serotyping (0.857). The combination of the two IS (2IS-RFLP) further increased the DI to 0.998. Thus, IS-RFLP is a powerful tool for the molecular typing of Y. pseudotuberculosis and has the advantage of exhibiting well-resolved banding patterns that allow for a reliable comparison of strains of worldwide origin. The other aim of this study was to assess the clustering power of IS-RFLP. We found that 2IS-RFLP had a remarkable capacity to group strains with similar genotypic and phenotypic markers, thus identifying robust populations within Y. pseudotuberculosis. Our study thus demonstrates that 2IS- and even IS1541-RFLP alone might be valuable tools for the molecular typing of global isolates of Y. pseudotuberculosis and for the analysis of the population structure of this species. PMID:24671793

  9. Serogroups of Escherichia coli from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, P W; Tewari, Suman

    2007-07-01

    Fifty seven isolates of thermotolerant E. coli were recovered from 188 drinking water sources, 45 (78.9%) were typable of which 15 (26.3%) were pathogenic serotypes. Pathogenic serogroup obtained were 04 (Uropathogenic E. coli, UPEC), 025 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC), 086 (Enteropathogenic E. coli, EPEC), 0103 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 0157 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 08 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC) and 0113 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC). All the pathogenic serotypes showed resistance to bacitracin and multiple heavy metal ions. Resistance to streptomycin and cotrimazole was detected in two strains whereas resistance to cephaloridine, polymixin-B and ampicillin was detected in one strain each. Transfer of resistances to drugs and metallic ions was observed in 9 out of 12 strains studied. Resistances to bacitracin were transferred in all nine strains. Among heavy metals resistance to As(3+) followed by Cr(6+) were transferred more frequently. PMID:17057960

  10. Growth of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in human plasma: impacts on virulence and metabolic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Marie-Laure; Chauvaux, Sylvie; Dessein, Rodrigue; Laurans, Caroline; Frangeul, Lionel; Lacroix, Céline; Schiavo, Angèle; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Foulon, Jeannine; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Médigue, Claudine; Carniel, Elisabeth; Simonet, Michel; Marceau, Michaël

    2008-01-01

    Background In man, infection by the Gram-negative enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is usually limited to the terminal ileum. However, in immunocompromised patients, the microorganism may disseminate from the digestive tract and thus cause a systemic infection with septicemia. Results To gain insight into the metabolic pathways and virulence factors expressed by the bacterium at the blood stage of pseudotuberculosis, we compared the overall gene transcription patterns (the transcriptome) of bacterial cells cultured in either human plasma or Luria-Bertani medium. The most marked plasma-triggered metabolic consequence in Y. pseudotuberculosis was the switch to high glucose consumption, which is reminiscent of the acetogenic pathway (known as "glucose overflow") in Escherichia coli. However, upregulation of the glyoxylate shunt enzymes suggests that (in contrast to E. coli) acetate may be further metabolized in Y. pseudotuberculosis. Our data also indicate that the bloodstream environment can regulate major virulence genes (positively or negatively); the yadA adhesin gene and most of the transcriptional units of the pYV-encoded type III secretion apparatus were found to be upregulated, whereas transcription of the pH6 antigen locus was strongly repressed. Conclusion Our results suggest that plasma growth of Y. pseudotuberculosis is responsible for major transcriptional regulatory events and prompts key metabolic reorientations within the bacterium, which may in turn have an impact on virulence. PMID:19055764

  11. Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A capsular polysaccharide acetyltransferase, methods and compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, David S.; Gudlavalleti, Seshu K.; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Datta, Anup K.; Carlson, Russell W.

    2011-02-08

    Provided are methods for recombinant production of an O-acetyltransferase and methods for acetylating capsular polysaccharides, especially those of a Serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis using the recombinant O-acetyltransferase, and immunogenic compositions comprising the acetylated capsular polysaccharide.

  12. Meningitis due to Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B in India.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Meenakshi; Manchanda, Vikas; Talukdar, B

    2013-06-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease has a fulminant course and high mortality. Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A is predominantly responsible for meningococcal disease in India and the developing countries. Group B meningococcus, which is prevalent in the developing world is uncommon in India. We herein report the second case of group B meningococcal infection from the country, two decades after the reporting of the first case. Ineffective vaccines against serogroup B warrant the need for close surveillance of this disease. PMID:23942404

  13. Yersiniosis due to infection by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis 4b in captive meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shin-Ichi; Hayashidani, Hideki; Yonezawa, Aya; Suzuki, Isao; Une, Yumi

    2015-09-01

    Two meerkats (Suricata suricatta) housed in the same zoological garden in Japan died due to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis serotype 4b infection. Gross and microscopic lesions included necrotizing enteritis and enlargement of the spleen and liver with multifocal necrosis. Inflammatory cells, primarily neutrophils, and nuclear debris were associated with clusters of Gram-negative bacilli. Additionally, there were aberrant organism forms that were larger than bacilli and appeared as basophilic globular bodies. Immunohistochemical examination showed that the bacilli and globular bodies were strongly positive for Y. pseudotuberculosis O4 antigen. The globular bodies were considered a shape-changed form of Y. pseudotuberculosis, and these morphologically abnormal bacteria could present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:26179097

  14. Evidence for Reductive Genome Evolution and Lateral Acquisition of Virulence Functions in Two Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Artur; Ali, Amjad; Pinto, Anne C.; Santos, Anderson R.; Rocha, Aryanne A. M. C.; Lopes, Débora O.; Dorella, Fernanda A.; Pacheco, Luis G. C.; Costa, Marcília P.; Turk, Meritxell Z.; Seyffert, Núbia; Moraes, Pablo M. R. O.; Soares, Siomar C.; Almeida, Sintia S.; Castro, Thiago L. P.; Abreu, Vinicius A. C.; Trost, Eva; Baumbach, Jan; Tauch, Andreas; Schneider, Maria Paula C.; McCulloch, John; Cerdeira, Louise T.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Zerlotini, Adhemar; Dominitini, Anderson; Resende, Daniela M.; Coser, Elisângela M.; Oliveira, Luciana M.; Pedrosa, André L.; Vieira, Carlos U.; Guimarães, Cláudia T.; Bartholomeu, Daniela C.; Oliveira, Diana M.; Santos, Fabrício R.; Rabelo, Élida Mara; Lobo, Francisco P.; Franco, Glória R.; Costa, Ana Flávia; Castro, Ieso M.; Dias, Sílvia Regina Costa; Ferro, Jesus A.; Ortega, José Miguel; Paiva, Luciano V.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Almeida, Juliana Franco; Ferro, Maria Inês T.; Carneiro, Newton P.; Falcão, Paula R. K.; Grynberg, Priscila; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.; Brommonschenkel, Sérgio; Oliveira, Sérgio C.; Meyer, Roberto; Moore, Robert J.; Miyoshi, Anderson; Oliveira, Guilherme C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular pathogen, is the etiologic agent of the disease known as caseous lymphadenitis (CL). CL mainly affects small ruminants, such as goats and sheep; it also causes infections in humans, though rarely. This species is distributed worldwide, but it has the most serious economic impact in Oceania, Africa and South America. Although C. pseudotuberculosis causes major health and productivity problems for livestock, little is known about the molecular basis of its pathogenicity. Methodology and Findings We characterized two C. pseudotuberculosis genomes (Cp1002, isolated from goats; and CpC231, isolated from sheep). Analysis of the predicted genomes showed high similarity in genomic architecture, gene content and genetic order. When C. pseudotuberculosis was compared with other Corynebacterium species, it became evident that this pathogenic species has lost numerous genes, resulting in one of the smallest genomes in the genus. Other differences that could be part of the adaptation to pathogenicity include a lower GC content, of about 52%, and a reduced gene repertoire. The C. pseudotuberculosis genome also includes seven putative pathogenicity islands, which contain several classical virulence factors, including genes for fimbrial subunits, adhesion factors, iron uptake and secreted toxins. Additionally, all of the virulence factors in the islands have characteristics that indicate horizontal transfer. Conclusions These particular genome characteristics of C. pseudotuberculosis, as well as its acquired virulence factors in pathogenicity islands, provide evidence of its lifestyle and of the pathogenicity pathways used by this pathogen in the infection process. All genomes cited in this study are available in the NCBI Genbank database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/) under accession numbers CP001809 and CP001829. PMID:21533164

  15. Creation of a producent, optimization of expression, and purification of recombinant Yersinia pseudotuberculosis L-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Sidoruk, K V; Pokrovsky, V S; Borisova, A A; Omeljanuk, N M; Aleksandrova, S S; Pokrovskaya, M V; Gladilina, Ju A; Bogush, V G; Sokolov, N N

    2011-12-01

    Recombinant E. coli strain producing Y. pseudotuberculosis Q66CJ2 (YpA) L-asparaginase II was created. Gene ansB homologue encoding Y. pseudotuberculosis IP 32953 L-asparaginase precursor was synthesized. The gene was cloned in pBad24 expression vector and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain. Optimal conditions for the producer strain culturing were selected. An effective method for isolation and purification of the enzyme by two-staged column chromatography was developed. PMID:22808465

  16. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis aortitis in a patient with diverticulosis and polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Sarah; Haslam, Philip; Price, David A; Sayer, John A

    2015-04-01

    An 81-year-old gentleman with chronic kidney disease presented with pyrexia and a new systolic cardiac murmur. Investigations revealed infective aortitis of a pre-existing aortic aneurysm graft repair. Peripheral blood cultures were positive for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and the patient was successfully treated with an extended course of antibiotics. Abdominal imaging also revealed progressive bilateral polycystic kidney disease with associated diverticular disease, which was postulated as the source of the Y. pseudotuberculosis. An autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may present late in life and extra-renal manifestations of this disease are an important cause of morbidity. PMID:26634143

  17. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Identifies Genetic Traits to Elucidate Their Different Ecologies

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Kaisa; Somervuo, Panu; Korkeala, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are both etiological agents for intestinal infection known as yersiniosis, but their epidemiology and ecology bear many differences. Swine are the only known reservoir for Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains, which are the most common cause of human disease, while Y. pseudotuberculosis has been isolated from a variety of sources, including vegetables and wild animals. Infections caused by Y. enterocolitica mainly originate from swine, but fresh produce has been the source for widespread Y. pseudotuberculosis outbreaks within recent decades. A comparative genomic hybridization analysis with a DNA microarray based on three Yersinia enterocolitica and four Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genomes was conducted to shed light on the genomic differences between enteropathogenic Yersinia. The hybridization results identified Y. pseudotuberculosis strains to carry operons linked with the uptake and utilization of substances not found in living animal tissues but present in soil, plants, and rotting flesh. Y. pseudotuberculosis also harbors a selection of type VI secretion systems targeting other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. These genetic traits are not found in Y. enterocolitica, and it appears that while Y. pseudotuberculosis has many tools beneficial for survival in varied environments, the Y. enterocolitica genome is more streamlined and adapted to their preferred animal reservoir. PMID:26605338

  18. Protection of sheep against caseous lymphadenitis by use of a single oral dose of live recombinant Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, A L; Tachedjian, M; Corner, L A; Radford, A J

    1994-01-01

    An inactive form of the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis phospholipase D (PLD) gene was constructed and expressed in a PLD-negative strain (designated Toxminus) of C. pseudotuberculosis. Antibody responses specific to Toxminus and both Toxminus and PLD proteins were detected in sheep following oral administration of Toxminus or Toxminus expressing the PLD toxoid, respectively. However, only those sheep vaccinated with Toxminus expressing PLD toxoid were protected against wild-type challenge. These results confirm the importance of PLD as a protective antigen and demonstrate both the potential for developing an oral caseous lymphadenitis vaccine and C. pseudotuberculosis Toxminus as a live vaccine vector. Images PMID:7960105

  19. GROWTH MODEL OF A PLASMID-BEARING VIRULENT STRAIN OF YERSINIA PSEUDOTUBERCULOSIS IN RAW GROUND BEEF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth kinetics of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YPT) in sterile ground beef were studied at temperatures ranging from 0 to 30 C. In irradiated sterile ground beef, YP replicated from 0 to 30 degree C, with corresponding growth rates (GR) ranging from 0.0227 to 0.6221 log10 CFU/h at 0 to 25 degr...

  20. Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain PA02 Isolated from an Ovine Host in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Muge, Gabriel R. S.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; de Sá, Pablo H. C. G.; Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Queiroz; Alves, Jorianne Thyeska Castro; Morais, Ezequiel; Silva, André G. M.; Azevedo, Vasco; Folador, Adriana Ribeiro Carneiro; Silva, Artur

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain PA02 isolated from an ovine host. The genome contains 2,328,435 bp, a 52.2% G+C content, 2,035 coding sequences, 12 rRNA operons, 45 tRNAs, and 14 predicted pseudogenes. PMID:27516524

  1. Insights into the evolution of Yersinia pestis through whole-genome comparison with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, Patrick S. G.; Carniel, E.; Larimer, Frank W; Lamerdin, Jane; Vergez, Lisa; Land, Miriam L; Motin, V. L.; Brubaker, R. R.; Fowler, J.; Hinnebusch, J.; Marceau, M.; Medigue, Claudine; Chenal-Francisque, V.; Souza, B.; Dacheux, D.; Elliott, J. M.; Derbise, A.; Hauser, Loren John; Garcia, Emilio

    2004-09-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a highly uniform clone that diverged recently from the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Despite their close genetic relationship, they differ radically in their pathogenicity and transmission. Here, we report the complete genomic sequence of Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 and its use for detailed genome comparisons with available Y. pestis sequences. Analyses of identified differences across a panel of Yersinia isolates from around the world reveal 32 Y. pestis chromosomal genes that, together with the two Y. pestis-specific plasmids, to our knowledge, represent the only new genetic material in Y. pestis acquired since the the divergence from Y. pseudotuberculosis. In contrast, 149 other pseudogenes (doubling the previous estimate) and 317 genes absent from Y. pestis were detected, indicating that as many as 13% of Y. pseudotuberculosis genes no longer function in Y. pestis. Extensive insertion sequence-mediated genome rearrangements and reductive evolution through massive gene loss, resulting in elimination and modification of preexisting gene expression pathways, appear to be more important than acquisition of genes in the evolution of Y. pestis. These results provide a sobering example of how a highly virulent epidemic clone can suddenly emerge from a less virulent, closely related progenitor.

  2. Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain PA02 Isolated from an Ovine Host in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Muge, Gabriel R S; Veras, Adonney A O; de Sá, Pablo H C G; Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Queiroz; Alves, Jorianne Thyeska Castro; Morais, Ezequiel; Silva, André G M; Guimarães, Luís C; Azevedo, Vasco; Folador, Adriana Ribeiro Carneiro; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain PA02 isolated from an ovine host. The genome contains 2,328,435 bp, a 52.2% G+C content, 2,035 coding sequences, 12 rRNA operons, 45 tRNAs, and 14 predicted pseudogenes. PMID:27516524

  3. Insights into the genome evolution of Yersinia pestis through whole genome comparison with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, B; Stoutland, P; Derbise, A; Georgescu, A; Elliott, J; Land, M; Marceau, M; Motin, V; Hinnebusch, J; Simonet, M; Medigue, C; Dacheux, D; Chenal-Francisque, V; Regala, W; Brubaker, R R; Carniel, E; Chain, P; Verguez, L; Fowler, J; Garcia, E; Lamerdin, J; Hauser, L; Larimer, F

    2004-01-24

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a highly uniform clone that diverged recently from the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Despite their close genetic relationship, they differ radically in their pathogenicity and transmission. Here we report the complete genomic sequence of Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 and its use for detailed genome comparisons to available Y. pestis sequences. Analyses of identified differences across a panel of Yersinia isolates from around the world reveals 32 Y. pestis chromosomal genes that, together with the two Y. pestis-specific plasmids, represent the only new genetic material in Y. pestis acquired since the divergence from Y. pseudotuberculosis. In contrast, 149 new pseudogenes (doubling the previous estimate) and 317 genes absent from Y. pestis were detected, indicating that as many as 13% of Y. pseudotuberculosis genes no longer function in Y. pestis. Extensive IS-mediated genome rearrangements and reductive evolution through massive gene loss, resulting in elimination and modification of pre-existing gene expression pathways appear to be more important than acquisition of new genes in the evolution of Y. pestis. These results provide a sobering example of how a highly virulent epidemic clone can suddenly emerge from a less virulent, closely related progenitor.

  4. Growth Model of a Plasmid-bearing Virulent Strain of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Raw Ground Beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YPST) has been implicated in foodborne illnesses associated with various foods, including raw beef. A 70-kb virulence plasmid (pYV) is involved in expression of virulence phenotypes. However, increased growth temperatures (30 degree C) facilitate the loss...

  5. Mice and moles inhabiting mountainous areas of Shimane Peninsula as sources of infection with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, H; Gomyoda, M; Kaneko, S

    1990-01-01

    A total of 1,835 Yersinia spp. were isolated from 925 (60.5%) of 1,530 wild mice and from 139 (79.9%) of 174 moles living in mountainous areas of eastern Shimane Prefecture, Japan. The Yersinia spp. included 1,106 Yersinia enterocolitica, 26 Y. enterocolitica-like, 176 Yersinia mollaretii, 149 Yersinia frederiksenii, 70 Yersinia intermedia, 231 Yersinia kristensenii, 5 Yersinia aldovae, and 72 Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica was not isolated. Y. pseudotuberculosis was divided into 10 virulent 40- to 50-MDa plasmid-positive (P+) strains (serotypes 1b, 4b, and untypeable) and 62 plasmid-negative (P-) strains (serotypes 1b, 2b, 2c, 4a, 5a, 5b, 6, 7, and untypeable). P+ strains of serotypes 1b (two strains), 4b (seven strains), and untypeable (one strain) were isolated from nine Apodemus specious and one Apodemus argenteus. The isolates of Yersinia spp. were more frequently detected in newborn mice and during the breeding season. The P+ Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were recovered at less than 10(4) cells per g of the cecal contents. Thus, the prevalence of Yersinia spp. in small wild animals depends on the newborn animals born during the cold months, and wild mice in mountainous areas are important reservoirs of Y. pseudotuberculosis. Images PMID:2254420

  6. Far East Scarlet-Like Fever Caused by a Few Related Genotypes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Timchenko, Nelly F.; Adgamov, Ruslan R.; Popov, Alexander F.; Psareva, Ekaterina K.; Sobyanin, Konstantin A.; Gintsburg, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    We used multivirulence locus sequence typing to analyze 68 Yersinia pseudotuberculosis isolated in Russia during 1973–2014, including 41 isolates from patients with Far East scarlet-like fever. Four genotypes were found responsible, with 1 being especially prevalent. Evolutionary analysis suggests that epidemiologic advantages could cause this genotype’s dominance. PMID:26889961

  7. Superantigenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis induces the expression of granzymes and perforin by CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Goubard, Agathe; Loïez, Caroline; Abe, Jun; Fichel, Caroline; Herwegh, Stéphanie; Faveeuw, Christelle; Porte, Rémi; Cayet, Delphine; Sebbane, Florent; Penet, Sylvie; Foligné, Benoit; Desreumaux, Pierre; Saito, Hirohisa; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Simonet, Michel; Carnoy, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial superantigens (SAgs) are immunostimulatory toxins that induce acute diseases mainly through the massive release of inflammatory cytokines. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is the only Gram-negative bacterium known to produce a SAg (Y. pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen [YPM]). This SAg binds major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells and T cell receptors (TcR) bearing the variable region Vβ3, Vβ9, Vβ13.1, or Vβ13.2 (in humans) and Vβ7 or Vβ8 (in mice). We have previously shown that YPM exacerbates the virulence of Y. pseudotuberculosis in mice. With a view to understanding the mechanism of YPM's toxicity, we compared the immune response in BALB/c mice infected with a YPM-producing Y. pseudotuberculosis or the corresponding isogenic, SAg-deficient mutant. Five days after infection, we observed strong CD4(+) Vβ7(+) T cell expansion and marked interleukin-4 (IL-4) production in mice inoculated with SAg-producing Y. pseudotuberculosis. These phenomena were correlated with the activation of ypm gene transcription in liver and spleen. A transcriptomic analysis revealed that the presence of YPM also increased expression of granzyme and perforin genes in the host's liver and spleen. This expression was attributed to a CD4(+) T cell subset, rather than to natural killer T (NKT) cells that display a TcR with a Vβ region that is potentially recognized by YPM. Increased production of cytotoxic molecules was correlated with hepatotoxicity, as demonstrated by an increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase activity. Our results demonstrate that YPM activates a potentially hepatotoxic CD4(+) T cell population. PMID:25754199

  8. Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B bivalent factor H binding protein vaccine.

    PubMed

    Brendish, Nathan James; Read, Robert Charles

    2015-04-01

    With the successful development of meningococcal vaccines against other serogroups, disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B now accounts for a disproportionate frequency compared with other serogroups, particularly in the US and Europe. Infants and adolescents bear the highest incidence of disease, which typically manifests as meningitis and septicemia. This vaccine profile article examines a bivalent factor H binding protein (fHbp; also known as LP2086) vaccine that has now been approved by the US FDA for use in 10- to 25-year olds. The manufacturer has shelved plans for further investigation of its use in infants because of high rates of fever in Phase I and II trials in that age group. PMID:25703792

  9. PRODUCTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO 'LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA' SEROGROUPS 1 AND 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better define the surface antigens of Legionella pneumophila for clinical and experimental purposes, were produced monoclonal antibodies to L. pneumophila serogroups 1 and 6. Two hybridomas were produced in serogroup 1. One antibody, LP-I-17, recognized a serogroup-common anti...

  10. Yersiniosis caused by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in captive toucans (Ramphastidae) and a Japanese squirrel (Sciurus lis) in zoological gardens in Japan

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, Shin-ichi; HAYASHIDANI, Hideki; SOTOHIRA, Yukari; UNE, Yumi

    2015-01-01

    Two captive Keel-billed toucans and a Chestnut-mandibled toucan in another zoological garden died suddenly without any pre-existing symptoms, and three months later, a Japanese squirrel died of diarrhea. All these animals showed necrotic enteritis and multifocal necrosis in the liver and spleen with Gram negative bacilli. The bacilli showed strong positive immunolabeling for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis O4 in the Keel-billed toucans, Y. pseudotuberculosis O2 in the Chestnut-mandibled toucan and Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 in the Japanese squirrel, while Y. pseudotuberculosis 4b, 2b and 1b were respectively isolated from the lesions. To our knowledge, this might be the first reported case of fatal yersiniosis in a Japanese squirrel in the world as well as in toucans in Japan. PMID:26346565

  11. Whole-Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain 226, Isolated from the Abscess of a Goat in California

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Larissa M.; Alves, Jorianne T. C.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; Baraúna, Rafael A.; Sá, Pablo H. C. G.; Spier, Sharon; Edman, Judy M.; Guimarães, Luis C.; Rocha, Flávia S.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the etiological agent of a caseous lymphadenitis disease. Herein, we present the first complete genome sequencing of C. pseudotuberculosis strain 226, isolated from an abscess of the sub-iliac lymph node of a goat from California (USA). The genome contains 2,138 coding sequences (CDSs), 12 rRNAs, 49 tRNAs, and 72 pseudogenes. PMID:26950327

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain PA01, Isolated from Sheep in Pará, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Jorianne T. C.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Q.; de Sá, Pablo H. C. G.; Dias, Larissa M.; Guimarães, Luis C.; Morais, Ezequiel; Silva, André G. M.; Azevedo, Vasco; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Silva, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the etiological agent of caseous lymphadenitis disease. In this work, we present the first complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain PA01, isolated in northern Brazil from an infected sheep. The genome length is 2,337,920 bp, and 2,003 coding sequences (CDS), 12 rRNAs, and 49 tRNAs were predicted. PMID:26823595

  13. Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis MB20 bv. equi Isolated from a Pectoral Abscess of an Oldenburg Horse in California

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Luís C.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; de Sá, Pablo H. C. G.; Graças, Diego A.; Pinheiro, Kenny C.; Silva, Andreia S. S.; Folador, Edson L.; Benevides, Leandro J.; Viana, Marcus V. C.; Carneiro, Adriana R.; Schneider, Maria P. C.; Spier, Sharon J.; Edman, Judy M.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis MB20 bv. equi was sequenced using the Ion Personal Genome Machine (PGM) platform, and showed a size of 2,363,089 bp, with 2,365 coding sequences and a GC content of 52.1%. These results will serve as a basis for further studies on the pathogenicity of C. pseudotuberculosis bv. equi. PMID:25395628

  14. Distribution of Pseudomonas syringae pathovars into twenty-three O serogroups.

    PubMed Central

    Saunier, M; Malandrin, L; Samson, R

    1996-01-01

    Serological reactions of Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas viridiflava were studied by Ouchterlony double diffusion. A total of 55 polyclonal antisera, containing anti-lipopolysaccharide (anti-LPS) precipitating antibodies, were cross-tested against antigenic suspensions of 51 strains. Twenty-three O serogroups were defined, primarily on the reaction of the type strains. Two families of O serogroups showed antigenic crossreactivities (PHA, MOP1, MOP2, MOP3, HEL1, HEL2, and SYR1; PERSAVTOM1, PERSAVTOM2, DEL, POR, and SYR2). Ten O serogroups showed a clearcut specificity: APTPIS, TAB, VIR1, VIR2, VIR3, SYR3, SYR4, SYR5, HUS, and LAC. The last serogroup (RIB) contained strains with rough colony morphology and side chain-deficient LPSs, as evidenced by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polycrylamide gel electrophoresis. The LPS basis of the O serogroups was demonstrated by immunoblotting. Serological reference strains were designated for all of the O serogroups and correspondence was established between the O serogroups studied and seven previous serogroups (L. T. Pastushenko and I.D. Simonovich, Mikrobiol, Zh. 41:222-229 and 330-339, 1979). A total of 355 strains of P. syringae (sensu lato) belonging to 15 pathovars, not including pathovar syringae, were typed into the 23 described O serogroups. O serogroups were assigned after double-diffusion reactions, with each strain compared with serological references. The utility of O serogrouping to study P. syringae pathovar structure and diversity is discussed. PMID:8779574

  15. Meningitis Serogroup W135 Outbreak, Burkina Faso, 2002

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Nicolas; Rose, Angela M.C.; Legros, Dominique; Tiendrebeogo, Sylvestre R.M.; Bachy, Catherine; Bjørløw, Egil; Firmenich, Peter; Caugant, Dominique A.

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, the largest epidemic of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W135 occurred in Burkina Faso. The highest attack rate was in children <5 years of age. We describe cases from 1 district and evaluate the performance of the Pastorex test, which had good sensitivity (84%) and specificity (89%) compared with culture or PCR. PMID:17553237

  16. Fatal coinfection with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 8 and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Bemer, Pascale; Gay-Andrieu, Françoise; Bretonnière, Cédric; Lepelletier, Didier; Mahé, Pierre-Joachim; Villers, Daniel; Jarraud, Sophie; Reynaud, Alain; Corvec, Stéphane

    2008-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. We report on a patient who simultaneously developed L. pneumophila serogroup 8 pneumonia and Aspergillus fumigatus lung abscesses. Despite appropriate treatments, Aspergillus disease progressed with metastasis. Coinfections caused by L. pneumophila and A. fumigatus remain exceptional. In apparently immunocompetent patients, corticosteroid therapy is a key risk factor for aspergillosis. PMID:17945454

  17. Serogroup distribution of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis in urban ethnic groups in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Verweij, S P; Quint, K D; Bax, C J; Van Leeuwen, A P; Mutsaers, J A E M; Jansen, C L; Oostvogel, P M; Ouburg, S; Morré, S A; Peters, R P H

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis varies between ethnic groups in The Netherlands. It is, however, unknown whether this is associated with specific serogroups. The objective of this study was to determine whether serogroup distribution is associated with ethnic origin in the region of The Hague, The Netherlands. Serogroups of 370 microbiologically confirmed C. trachomatis-positive samples were analysed. The samples were obtained from 247 women and 123 men between January and October 2008, of self-reported Dutch Caucasian, Dutch Antillean, Surinamese, N. African/Turkish or other descent. We observed a difference in serogroup distribution comparing Dutch Caucasian women to Dutch Antillean women (χ2 for distribution P = 0·035). Serogroup C was more common in Dutch Antillean women, whereas serogroup B was less common (P = 0·03). This difference was not observed for Dutch Antillean men. The observed difference in distribution of C. trachomatis serogroups between ethnic groups is relevant for further transmission studies. PMID:23611401

  18. Genome assortment, not serogroup, defines Vibrio cholerae pandemic strains

    SciTech Connect

    Brettin, Thomas S; Bruce, David C; Challacombe, Jean F; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Munik, A C; Chertkov, Olga; Meincke, Linda; Saunders, Elizabeth; Choi, Seon Y; Haley, Bradd J; Taviani, Elisa; Jeon, Yoon - Seong; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Jae - Hak; Walters, Ronald A; Hug, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a bacterium autochthonous to the aquatic environment, and a serious public health threat. V. cholerae serogroup O1 is responsible for the previous two cholera pandemics, in which classical and El Tor biotypes were dominant in the 6th and the current 7th pandemics, respectively. Cholera researchers continually face newly emerging and re-emerging pathogenic clones carrying combinations of new serogroups as well as of phenotypic and genotypic properties. These genotype and phenotype changes have hampered control of the disease. Here we compare the complete genome sequences of 23 strains of V. cholerae isolated from a variety of sources and geographical locations over the past 98 years in an effort to elucidate the evolutionary mechanisms governing genetic diversity and genesis of new pathogenic clones. The genome-based phylogeny revealed 12 distinct V. cholerae phyletic lineages, of which one, designated the V. cholerae core genome (CG), comprises both O1 classical and EI Tor biotypes. All 7th pandemic clones share nearly identical gene content, i.e., the same genome backbone. The transition from 6th to 7th pandemic strains is defined here as a 'shift' between pathogenic clones belonging to the same O1 serogroup, but from significantly different phyletic lineages within the CG clade. In contrast, transition among clones during the present 7th pandemic period can be characterized as a 'drift' between clones, differentiated mainly by varying composition of laterally transferred genomic islands, resulting in emergence of variants, exemplified by V.cholerae serogroup O139 and V.cholerae O1 El Tor hybrid clones that produce cholera toxin of classical biotype. Based on the comprehensive comparative genomics presented in this study it is concluded that V. cholerae undergoes extensive genetic recombination via lateral gene transfer, and, therefore, genome assortment, not serogroup, should be used to define pathogenic V

  19. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a protective 40-kilodalton antigen from Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M J; Brandon, M R; Walker, J

    1995-01-01

    A 40-kDa protein from Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis has been previously identified as a protective antigen against ovine caseous lymphadenitis. From genomic DNA libraries of C. pseudotuberculosis, we have cloned and sequenced the 40-kDa protein gene, which was found to contain an open reading frame of 1,137 bp encoding a protein of 379 amino acids. No significant homology with previously published DNA or amino acid sequence data was found in databases, suggesting that this is a novel protein. Recombinant 40-kDa protein was overexpressed as a fusion protein to 15% of total cell proteins in Escherichia coli. Biochemical analysis of native and recombinant 40-kDa proteins has revealed associated proteolytic activity, which was shown to be of the serine protease type through the use of specific inhibitors. We suggest that this novel protective antigen be termed corynebacterial protease 40 (CP40). PMID:7806359

  20. Expression, purification and characterization of cold shock protein A of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lindae, Antje; Eberle, Raphael J; Caruso, Icaro P; Coronado, Monika A; de Moraes, Fabio R; Azevedo, Vasco; Arni, Raghuvir K

    2015-08-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the causative agent of different diseases that cause dramatically reduced yields of wool and milk, and results in weight loss, carcass condemnation and also death mainly in sheep, equids, cattle and goats and therefore globally results in considerable economical loss. Cold shock proteins are conserved in many bacteria and eukaryotic cells and they help to restore normal cell functions after cold shock in which some appear to have specific functions at normal growth temperature as well. Cold shock protein A from C. pseudotuberculosis was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The thermal unfolding/refolding process characterized by circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy techniques indicated that the refolding process was almost completely reversible. PMID:25907380

  1. Trypsin-like proteinase and its endogenous inhibitor from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Biological activity.

    PubMed

    Burtseva, T I; Loenko, Y N

    1999-09-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase (YPTP) and its endogenous inhibitor (ITYP) were isolated from the culture filtrate of the pathogenic bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and their biological activities were studied. YPTP was found to be highly toxic for random-bred white mice. Under in vitro conditions the proteolytic enzyme destroyed protective proteins of the immune system of the animals--IgG, IgA, and proteins of the complement system (CIq, C3, and C5)--and, consequently, was a pathogenetic factor in yersinioses. The inhibitor ITYP was shown to manifest antibacterial activity against virulent forms of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium. The ITYP preparation was harmless and nontoxic. PMID:10521713

  2. The Twin Arginine Translocation System Is Essential for Virulence of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lavander, Moa; Ericsson, Solveig K.; Bröms, Jeanette E.; Forsberg, Åke

    2006-01-01

    Yersinia species pathogenic to humans have been extensively characterized with respect to type III secretion and its essential role in virulence. This study concerns the twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway utilized by gram-negative bacteria to secrete folded proteins across the bacterial inner membrane into the periplasmic compartment. We have shown that the Yersinia Tat system is functional and required for motility and contributes to acid resistance. A Yersinia pseudotuberculosis mutant strain with a disrupted Tat system (tatC) was, however, not affected in in vitro growth or more susceptible to high osmolarity, oxidative stress, or high temperature, nor was it impaired in type III secretion. Interestingly, the tatC mutant was severely attenuated via both the oral and intraperitoneal routes in the systemic mouse infection model and highly impaired in colonization of lymphoid organs like Peyer's patches and the spleen. Our work highlights that Tat secretion plays a key role in the virulence of Y. pseudotuberculosis. PMID:16495550

  3. Inactivation of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis 197 and Francisella tularensis LVS in beverages by high pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Schlesser, Joseph E; Parisi, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced a new research program to develop technologies and strategies to prevent and minimize potential food safety and security threats. The threat of terrorist attacks against the nation's food supplies has created the need to study microorganisms not typically associated with foodborne illness. High-pressure processing has been proposed as a treatment to reduce Yersinia pestis and Francisella tularensis LVS levels in beverages. The objectives of this work were to determine the pressure resistance of Y. pseudotuberculosis 197 (surrogate for Y. pestis) and F. tularensis LVS (vaccine strain). For each bacterium, samples of ultrahigh-temperature pasteurized skim milk and pasteurized reduced-acid orange juice (pH ca. 4.2) were inoculated at a minimum level of 5 log CFU/ml. Ten-milliliter samples of the inoculated product were vacuum sealed in polyester pouches and subjected to pressures of 300 and 500 MPa for holding times ranging from 30 s to 6 min. One set of trials was performed at an initial temperature of 10 degrees C and another at 25 degrees C. Processed samples were immediately plated and enumerated. A pressure treatment of 300 MPa at 25 degrees C for less than 6 min was not sufficient to achieve a 5-log reduction of Y. pseudotuberculosis 197 or F. tularensis LVS in milk. However, a pressure treatment of 500 MPa was effective at hold times as low as 30 s. Overall, F. tularensis LVS demonstrated less pressure resistance than Y. pseudotuberculosis 197. Based on these findings, a high-pressure process designed to inactivate 5 log CFU of Y. pseudotuberculosis 197 per ml and F. tularensis LVS in orange juice or milk should be set at or above 500 MPa with a hold time of 2 min or greater. PMID:19205479

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Attenuated Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain T1.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sintia; Loureiro, Dan; Portela, Ricardo W; Mariano, Diego C B; Sousa, Thiago J; Pereira, Felipe L; Dorella, Fernanda A; Carvalho, Alex F; Moura-Costa, Lilia F; Leal, Carlos A G; Figueiredo, Henrique C; Meyer, Roberto; Azevedo, Vasco

    2016-01-01

    We present here the genome sequence of the attenuated Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain T1. The sequencing was performed with an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine platform. The genome is a circular chromosome of 2,337,201 bp, with a G+C content of 52.85% and a total of 2,125 coding sequences (CDSs), 12 rRNAs, 49 tRNAs, and 24 pseudogenes. PMID:27609922

  5. Reproductive Pathological Changes Associated with Experimental Subchronic Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection in Nonpregnant Boer Does.

    PubMed

    Othman, A M; Abba, Y; Jesse, F F A; Ilyasu, Y M; Saharee, A A; Haron, A W; Zamri-Saad, M; Lila, M A M

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), which is a contagious and chronic disease in sheep and goats. In order to assess the histopathological changes observed in the reproductive organs of nonpregnant does infected with the bacteria, 20 apparently healthy adult Boer does were divided into four inoculation groups, intradermal, intranasal, oral, and control, consisting of five goats each. Excluding the control group, which was unexposed, other does were inoculated with 10(7) CFU/1 mL of live C. pseudotuberculosis through the various routes stated above. Thirty days after infection, the ovaries, uterus, and iliac lymph nodes were collected for bacterial recovery and molecular detection, as well as histopathological examination. The mean changes in necrosis, congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and oedema varied in severity among the ovaries, uterus, and iliac lymph nodes following different inoculation routes. Overall, the intranasal route of inoculation showed more severe (p < 0.05) lesions in all the organs examined. The findings of this study have shown that C. pseudotuberculosis could predispose to infertility resulting from pathological lesions in the uterus and ovaries of does. PMID:27006831

  6. Evaluation of ERIC-PCR as Genotyping Method for Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Santana, Jordana A.; Ribeiro, Dayana; Dorella, Fernanda Alves; Guimarães, Alessandro S.; Moawad, Mohamed S.; Selim, Salah A.; Garaldi, Ana Luiza M.; Miyoshi, Anderson; Ribeiro, Márcio G.; Gouveia, Aurora M. G.; Azevedo, Vasco; Heinemann, Marcos B.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC-PCR) as a tool for molecular typing of C. pseudotuberculosis isolates from eight different hosts in twelve countries. Ninety-nine C. pseudotuberculosis field strains, one type strain (ATCC 19410T) and one vaccine strain (1002) were fingerprinted using the ERIC-1R and ERIC-2 primers, and the ERIC-1R+ERIC-2 primer pair. Twenty-nine different genotypes were generated by ERIC 1-PCR, 28 by ERIC 2-PCR and 35 by ERIC 1+2-PCR. The discriminatory index calculated for ERIC 1, ERIC 2, and ERIC 1+2-PCR was 0.89, 0.86, and 0.92, respectively. Epidemiological concordance was established for all ERIC-PCR assays. ERIC 1+2-PCR was defined as the best method based on suitability of the amplification patterns and discriminatory index. Minimal spanning tree for ERIC 1+2-PCR revealed three major clonal complexes and clustering around nitrate-positive (biovar Equi) and nitrate-negative (biovar Ovis) strains. Therefore, ERIC 1+2-PCR proved to be the best technique evaluated in this study for genotyping C. pseudotuberculosis strains, due to its usefulness for molecular epidemiology investigations. PMID:24901343

  7. Reproductive Pathological Changes Associated with Experimental Subchronic Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection in Nonpregnant Boer Does

    PubMed Central

    Othman, A. M.; Abba, Y.; Jesse, F. F. A.; Ilyasu, Y. M.; Saharee, A. A.; Haron, A. W.; Zamri-Saad, M.; Lila, M. A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), which is a contagious and chronic disease in sheep and goats. In order to assess the histopathological changes observed in the reproductive organs of nonpregnant does infected with the bacteria, 20 apparently healthy adult Boer does were divided into four inoculation groups, intradermal, intranasal, oral, and control, consisting of five goats each. Excluding the control group, which was unexposed, other does were inoculated with 107 CFU/1 mL of live C. pseudotuberculosis through the various routes stated above. Thirty days after infection, the ovaries, uterus, and iliac lymph nodes were collected for bacterial recovery and molecular detection, as well as histopathological examination. The mean changes in necrosis, congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and oedema varied in severity among the ovaries, uterus, and iliac lymph nodes following different inoculation routes. Overall, the intranasal route of inoculation showed more severe (p < 0.05) lesions in all the organs examined. The findings of this study have shown that C. pseudotuberculosis could predispose to infertility resulting from pathological lesions in the uterus and ovaries of does. PMID:27006831

  8. Sequence Type 4821 Clonal Complex Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis in China, 1978–2013

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bingqing; Xu, Zheng; Du, Pengcheng; Xu, Li; Sun, Xiaofang; Gao, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis strains belonging to sequence type 4821 clonal complex (CC4821), a hyperinvasive lineage first identified for serogroup C in 2003, have been increasingly isolated in China. We characterized the outer membrane protein genes of 48 serogroup B and 214 serogroup C strains belonging to CC4821 and analyzed the genomic sequences of 22 strains. Four serogroup B strains had porin A (i.e., PorA), PorB, and ferric enterobactin transport (i.e., FetA) genotypes identical to those for serogroup C. Phylogenetic analysis of the genomic sequences showed that the 22 CC4821 strains from patients and healthy carriers were unevenly clustered into 2 closely related groups; each group contained serogroup B and C strains. Serogroup B strains appeared variable at the capsule locus, and several recombination events had occurred at uncertain breakpoints. These findings suggest that CC4821 serogroup C N. meningitidis is the probable origin of highly pathogenic CC4821 serogroup B strains. PMID:25989189

  9. Identification and characterization of Dichelobacter nodosus serogroup H from ovine footrot in India.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, N; Sreenivasulu, D; Karthik, A

    2016-08-01

    A total of 56 foot swabs were collected from inter digital spaces of sheep with footrot lesions were screened for 16 rRNA of Dichelobacter nodosus by PCR. Out of the 56 samples, 38(67.85%) were found to be positive. All the positive samples were subjected to multiplex PCR targeting fimA gene for identification of serogroups of D. nodosus. Serogroup H was found along with serogroup B in 12 (55.26%) samples and with serogroup I in 8 (22.2%) samples. The serogroup H was identified for the first time from the Indian subcontinent. The phylogenetic analysis of the present sequence with the available serogroup H sequences of GenBank revealed to be in close association with the serotype H1. PMID:27259362

  10. Is the microagglutination test (MAT) good for predicting the infecting serogroup for leptospirosis in Brazil?

    PubMed

    Blanco, Roberta Morozetti; dos Santos, Luis Fernando; Galloway, Renee Lynn; Romero, Eliete Caló

    2016-02-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infection caused by pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira spp. Knowledge of the prevalent serovars and their maintenance hosts is essential to understand the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of serology by the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) to predict the serogroups compared with results of identification of leptospires in São Paulo, Brazil. MAT correctly assigned the serogroup of the infecting isolate in 49/52 cases (94.23%). The serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae was the predominant serogroup (88.46%). This study showed the usefulness of the MAT to correctly identify the infecting serogroup with a good overall agreement between the serologically-identified infecting serogroup and by identification of the isolate and can be used in epidemiological surveys in São Paulo. However, it should be complemented by the identification of Leptospira isolates. PMID:26851592

  11. Distribution of Leptospira Serogroups in Cattle Herds and Dogs in France

    PubMed Central

    Ayral, Florence C.; Bicout, Dominique J.; Pereira, Helena; Artois, Marc; Kodjo, Angeli

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to identify and describe the distribution pattern of Leptospira serogroups in domestic animals in France. The population consisted of cattle herds and dogs with clinically suspected leptospirosis that were tested at the “Laboratoire des Leptospires” between 2008 and 2011. The laboratory database was queried for records of cattle and dogs in which seroreactivity in Leptospira microagglutination tests was consistent with a recent or current infection, excluding vaccine serogroups in dogs. A total of 394 cattle herds and 232 dogs were diagnosed with clinical leptospirosis, and the results suggested infection by the Leptospira serogroup Australis in 43% and 63%, respectively; by the Leptospira serogroup Grippotyphosa in 17% and 9%, respectively; and by the Leptospira serogroup Sejroe in 33% and 6%, respectively. This inventory of infecting Leptospira serogroups revealed that current vaccines in France are not fully capable of preventing the clinical form of the disease. PMID:25092816

  12. Distribution of Leptospira serogroups in cattle herds and dogs in France.

    PubMed

    Ayral, Florence C; Bicout, Dominique J; Pereira, Helena; Artois, Marc; Kodjo, Angeli

    2014-10-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to identify and describe the distribution pattern of Leptospira serogroups in domestic animals in France. The population consisted of cattle herds and dogs with clinically suspected leptospirosis that were tested at the "Laboratoire des Leptospires" between 2008 and 2011. The laboratory database was queried for records of cattle and dogs in which seroreactivity in Leptospira microagglutination tests was consistent with a recent or current infection, excluding vaccine serogroups in dogs. A total of 394 cattle herds and 232 dogs were diagnosed with clinical leptospirosis, and the results suggested infection by the Leptospira serogroup Australis in 43% and 63%, respectively; by the Leptospira serogroup Grippotyphosa in 17% and 9%, respectively; and by the Leptospira serogroup Sejroe in 33% and 6%, respectively. This inventory of infecting Leptospira serogroups revealed that current vaccines in France are not fully capable of preventing the clinical form of the disease. PMID:25092816

  13. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia associated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chee-Kin

    2013-03-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon condition. This is a report of a 29-year-old woman diagnosed with endogenous lipoid pneumonia associated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 infection. The patient's endogenous lipoid pneumonia resolved completely after treatment for Legionella pneumophila infection. This suggests that early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of the underlying infection may prevent any long-term sequelae of lipoid pneumonia. PMID:23546039

  14. Far East Scarlet-Like Fever: A Review of the Epidemiology, Symptomatology, and Role of Superantigenic Toxin: Yersinia pseudotuberculosis-Derived Mitogen A

    PubMed Central

    Amphlett, A.

    2016-01-01

    Far East scarlet-like fever (FESLF) is a severe inflammatory disease that occurs sporadically and in outbreaks in Russia and Japan. Far East scarlet-like fever is caused by Yersinia pseudotubuclosis infection, an organism that typically causes self-limiting gastroenteritis in Europe. Studies suggest the ability of Far Eastern strains to produce superantigen toxin Y pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen A is integral to FESLF pathogenesis. In Europe, human Y pseudotuberculosis infection typically occurs sporadically, in the form of a self-limiting gastroenteritis. In Russia and Japan, outbreaks of Y pseudotuberculosis infection cause severe systemic inflammatory symptoms. This disease variant is called FESLF. Geographical heterogeneity exists between virulence factors produced by European and Far Eastern Y pseudotuberculosis strains, implicating superantigen Y pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen A (YPMa) in the pathogenesis of FESLF. This article describes the epidemiology and clinical features of FESLF, and it presents the evidence for the role of YPMa in FESLF pathogenesis. PMID:26819960

  15. [Modified EMJH medium for cultivation of Leptospira interrogans serogroup ballum].

    PubMed

    González, A; Borrero, R; Ruiz, J; Batista, N; Fernández, Y; Valdés, Y; González, M

    2006-01-01

    Strains within the Ballum serogroup of spirochete Leptospira show fastidious growth with more exigent nutritional requirements than those of other Leptospira pathogenic strains. The influence of 37 nutritional compounds on the growth of Leptospira interrogans serogroup Ballum was investigated employing the synthetic EMJH medium as the base for the study. Microbial growth was estimated spectrophotometrically and direct counts were performed with a Petroff-Hausser counting chamber. Virulence stability was evaluated by calculating the mean lethal dose in hamsters. Antigenicity stability was evaluated by Western blotting using a specific antiserum. Cell yields commonly obtained in EMJH were triplicated without virulence or antigenicity depletions after culturing in a modified EMJH medium with an increased concentration of Tween 80, and the incorporation of sodium acetate and beef extract. Neither the increased concentration of at least 6 components of EMJH nor the incorporation of a variety of new nutrients stimulated cell yields or the growth rate of the microorganism. The results allow us to make use of an enriched culture medium that promotes high cell yields of this fastidious serogroup most prevalent in humans in Cuba. PMID:17037250

  16. Bayesian Geostatistical Analysis and Ecoclimatic Determinants of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection among Horses.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Courtney; Davis, Elizabeth G; Beard, Laurie A; Lubbers, Brian V; Raghavan, Ram K

    2015-01-01

    Kansas witnessed an unprecedented outbreak in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection among horses, a disease commonly referred to as pigeon fever during fall 2012. Bayesian geostatistical models were developed to identify key environmental and climatic risk factors associated with C. pseudotuberculosis infection in horses. Positive infection status among horses (cases) was determined by positive test results for characteristic abscess formation, positive bacterial culture on purulent material obtained from a lanced abscess (n = 82), or positive serologic evidence of exposure to organism (≥ 1:512)(n = 11). Horses negative for these tests (n = 172)(controls) were considered free of infection. Information pertaining to horse demographics and stabled location were obtained through review of medical records and/or contact with horse owners via telephone. Covariate information for environmental and climatic determinants were obtained from USDA (soil attributes), USGS (land use/land cover), and NASA MODIS and NASA Prediction of Worldwide Renewable Resources (climate). Candidate covariates were screened using univariate regression models followed by Bayesian geostatistical models with and without covariates. The best performing model indicated a protective effect for higher soil moisture content (OR = 0.53, 95% CrI = 0.25, 0.71), and detrimental effects for higher land surface temperature (≥ 35°C) (OR = 2.81, 95% CrI = 2.21, 3.85) and habitat fragmentation (OR = 1.31, 95% CrI = 1.27, 2.22) for C. pseudotuberculosis infection status in horses, while age, gender and breed had no effect. Preventative and ecoclimatic significance of these findings are discussed. PMID:26473728

  17. Bayesian Geostatistical Analysis and Ecoclimatic Determinants of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection among Horses

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Courtney; Davis, Elizabeth G.; Beard, Laurie A.; Lubbers, Brian V.; Raghavan, Ram K.

    2015-01-01

    Kansas witnessed an unprecedented outbreak in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection among horses, a disease commonly referred to as pigeon fever during fall 2012. Bayesian geostatistical models were developed to identify key environmental and climatic risk factors associated with C. pseudotuberculosis infection in horses. Positive infection status among horses (cases) was determined by positive test results for characteristic abscess formation, positive bacterial culture on purulent material obtained from a lanced abscess (n = 82), or positive serologic evidence of exposure to organism (≥1:512)(n = 11). Horses negative for these tests (n = 172)(controls) were considered free of infection. Information pertaining to horse demographics and stabled location were obtained through review of medical records and/or contact with horse owners via telephone. Covariate information for environmental and climatic determinants were obtained from USDA (soil attributes), USGS (land use/land cover), and NASA MODIS and NASA Prediction of Worldwide Renewable Resources (climate). Candidate covariates were screened using univariate regression models followed by Bayesian geostatistical models with and without covariates. The best performing model indicated a protective effect for higher soil moisture content (OR = 0.53, 95% CrI = 0.25, 0.71), and detrimental effects for higher land surface temperature (≥35°C) (OR = 2.81, 95% CrI = 2.21, 3.85) and habitat fragmentation (OR = 1.31, 95% CrI = 1.27, 2.22) for C. pseudotuberculosis infection status in horses, while age, gender and breed had no effect. Preventative and ecoclimatic significance of these findings are discussed. PMID:26473728

  18. Proteome scale comparative modeling for conserved drug and vaccine targets identification in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Syed Shah; Tiwari, Sandeep; Guimarães, Luís Carlos; Jamal, Syed Babar; Folador, Edson; Sharma, Neha Barve; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Almeida, Síntia; Ali, Amjad; Islam, Arshad; Póvoa, Fabiana Dias; de Abreu, Vinicius Augusto Carvalho; Jain, Neha; Bhattacharya, Antaripa; Juneja, Lucky; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Barh, Debmalya; Turjanski, Adrian Gustavo; Azevedo, Vasco; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Cp) is a pathogenic bacterium that causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), ulcerative lymphangitis, mastitis, and edematous to a broad spectrum of hosts, including ruminants, thereby threatening economic and dairy industries worldwide. Currently there is no effective drug or vaccine available against Cp. To identify new targets, we adopted a novel integrative strategy, which began with the prediction of the modelome (tridimensional protein structures for the proteome of an organism, generated through comparative modeling) for 15 previously sequenced C. pseudotuberculosis strains. This pan-modelomics approach identified a set of 331 conserved proteins having 95-100% intra-species sequence similarity. Next, we combined subtractive proteomics and modelomics to reveal a set of 10 Cp proteins, which may be essential for the bacteria. Of these, 4 proteins (tcsR, mtrA, nrdI, and ispH) were essential and non-host homologs (considering man, horse, cow and sheep as hosts) and satisfied all criteria of being putative targets. Additionally, we subjected these 4 proteins to virtual screening of a drug-like compound library. In all cases, molecules predicted to form favorable interactions and which showed high complementarity to the target were found among the top ranking compounds. The remaining 6 essential proteins (adk, gapA, glyA, fumC, gnd, and aspA) have homologs in the host proteomes. Their active site cavities were compared to the respective cavities in host proteins. We propose that some of these proteins can be selectively targeted using structure-based drug design approaches (SBDD). Our results facilitate the selection of C. pseudotuberculosis putative proteins for developing broad-spectrum novel drugs and vaccines. A few of the targets identified here have been validated in other microorganisms, suggesting that our modelome strategy is effective and can also be applicable to other pathogens. PMID:25573232

  19. Salmonella Serogroup C: Current Status of Vaccines and Why They Are Needed.

    PubMed

    Fuche, Fabien J; Sow, Ousmane; Simon, Raphael; Tennant, Sharon M

    2016-09-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS; i.e., Salmonella enterica organisms that do not cause typhoid or paratyphoid) are responsible for 94 million infections and 155,000 deaths worldwide annually, 86% of which are estimated to be foodborne. Although more than 50 serogroups and 2,600 serovars have been described, not all Salmonella serovars cause disease in humans and animals. Efforts are being made to develop NTS vaccines, with most approaches eliciting protection against serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis (serogroups B [O:4] and D [O:9], respectively), as they are widely considered the most prevalent. Here, we show that serogroup C (O:6,7, O:6,8, or O:8 epitopes) is the most common serogroup in the United States, and the prevalence of serovars from this serogroup has been increasing in Europe and the United States over the last decade. They are also the most commonly isolated serovars from healthy cattle and poultry, indicating the underlying importance of surveillance in animals. Four out of the 10 most lethal serovars in the United States are serogroup C, and reports from African countries suggest that strains within this serogroup are highly antibiotic resistant. Serogroup C consists of highly diverse organisms among which 37 serovars account for the majority of human cases, compared to 17 and 11 serovars for serogroups B and D, respectively. Despite these concerning data, no human vaccines targeting serogroup C NTS are available, and animal vaccines are in limited use. Here, we describe the underestimated burden represented by serogroup C NTS, as well as a discussion of vaccines that target these pathogens. PMID:27413069

  20. Caprine Abscess Model of Tulathromycin Concentrations in Interstitial Fluid from Tissue Chambers Inoculated with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis following Subcutaneous or Intrachamber Administration

    PubMed Central

    Fajt, V. R.; Lawhon, S. D.; Adams, L. G.; Tell, L. A.; Bissett, W. T.

    2013-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causes chronic, suppurative, abscessing conditions in livestock and humans. We used an in vivo model to evaluate antimicrobial efficacy for focal abscesses caused by C. pseudotuberculosis. Tissue chambers were surgically implanted in the subcutaneous tissues of the right and left paralumbar fossa of 12 goats to serve as a model for isolated, focal abscesses. For each goat, one tissue chamber was inoculated with C. pseudotuberculosis, while the contralateral chamber served as an uninoculated control. Six goats were administered a single dose of tulathromycin at 2.5 mg/kg of body weight subcutaneously, while the other six received the same dose by injection directly into the inoculated chambers. Our objective was to compare the effects and tulathromycin concentrations in interstitial fluid (IF) samples collected from C. pseudotuberculosis-infected and control chambers following subcutaneous or intrachamber injection of tulathromycin. In addition, the effects of tulathromycin on the quantity of C. pseudotuberculosis reisolated from inoculated chambers were assessed over time. Tulathromycin IF concentrations from C. pseudotuberculosis-infected and control tissue chambers were similar to those in plasma following subcutaneous administration. Following intrachamber administration, tulathromycin IF concentrations in infected chambers were continuously above the MIC for the C. pseudotuberculosis isolate for 15 days. There were no significant differences for plasma area under the curve and elimination half-lives between subcutaneous and intrachamber administration. Six of the 12 infected chambers had no growth of C. pseudotuberculosis 15 days postadministration. Results of this study indicate that tulathromycin may be beneficial in the treatment of focal infections such as those caused by C. pseudotuberculosis. PMID:24100501

  1. Characterisation of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis isolated from animals with yersiniosis during 1996-2013 indicates the presence of pathogenic and Far Eastern strains in Italy.

    PubMed

    Magistrali, C F; Cucco, L; Pezzotti, G; Farneti, S; Cambiotti, V; Catania, S; Prati, P; Fabbi, M; Lollai, S; Mangili, P; Sebastiani, C; Bano, L; Dionisi, A M; Luzzi, I

    2015-10-22

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a pathogen that infects both animals and humans worldwide. The epidemiology of infection caused by Y. pseudotuberculosis is poorly understood; however, its outbreaks have been traced back to a probable source in wildlife. This study aimed to characterise Y. pseudotuberculosis isolates collected from animals with yersiniosis. This study included 90 isolates of Y. pseudotuberculosis collected from different animals with yersiniosis between 1996 and 2013 in Italy. The isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and were biotyped. Genes associated with virulence plasmid pYV and those encoding O-antigen, high pathogenicity island (HPI), and superantigenic toxin (YPM) were determined by performing PCR. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed using NotI and SpeI enzymes, and 3 dendrograms were generated. No antibiotic resistance was found. The presence of pYV was shown in 57 out of 90 isolates. Virulence profiles of majority of the isolates indicated that they belonged to O:1a and O:1b serotypes, biotype 1, and genetic type 2. Isolates belonging to O:2a serotype were detected in sheep and cattle and were found to be associated (for the first time) with septicemia in hares. Y. pseudotuberculosis isolates belonging to O:5a and O:12-O13 serotypes were also detected in hares. To our knowledge, this is the first study to detect Y. pseudotuberculosis isolates belonging to the O:12-O13 serotype from a clinical case in Europe. Results of PFGE indicated that it was a reliable method for investigating the genetic relatedness of Y. pseudotuberculosis isolates. Thus, characterisation of Y. pseudotuberculosis infection in animals should be considered a possible tool for the surveillance of pseudotuberculosis. PMID:26344040

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Legionella pneumophila D-5864, a Serogroup 6 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shatavia S.; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Sammons, Scott; Rowe, Lori A.; Frace, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the leading etiology of legionellosis infections in North America and Europe. Here we report the draft genome sequence of L. pneumophila D-5864, a serogroup 6 strain, which was isolated from a bronchial alveolar lavage specimen of a male patient from Arizona in 2009. Genes within the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-biosynthesis region could potentially be determinants of serogroup specificity. PMID:25573935

  3. In Vitro Susceptibility of Equine-Obtained Isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis to Gallium Maltolate and 20 Other Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Batista, M.; Lawhon, S. D.; Zhang, S.; Kuskie, K. R.; Swinford, A. K.; Bernstein, L. R.; Cohen, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of gallium maltolate (GaM) and 20 other antimicrobial agents against clinical equine isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The growth of cultured isolates was not inhibited by any concentration of GaM. MIC data revealed susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials. PMID:24829243

  4. Role of YopK in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Resistance against Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Defense

    PubMed Central

    Thorslund, Sara E.; Ermert, David; Fahlgren, Anna; Erttmann, Saskia F.; Nilsson, Kristina; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Urban, Constantin F.

    2013-01-01

    The enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis can survive in the harsh environment of lymphoid compartments that abounds in immune cells. This capacity is dependent on the plasmid-encoded Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) that are delivered into the host cell via a mechanism involving the Yersinia type III secretion system. We show that the virulence protein YopK has a role in the mechanism by which Y. pseudotuberculosis avoids the polymorphonuclear leukocyte or neutrophil (PMN) defense. A yopK mutant, which is attenuated in the mouse infection model, where it fails to cause systemic infection, was found to colonize Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes more rapidly than the wild-type strain. Further, in mice lacking PMNs, the yopK mutant caused full disease with systemic spread and typical symptoms. Analyses of effects on PMNs revealed that both the wild-type strain and the yopK mutant inhibited internalization and reactive oxygen species production, as well as neutrophil extracellular trap formation by PMNs. However, the wild-type strain effectively avoided induction of PMN death, whereas the mutant caused a necrosis-like PMN death. Taken together, our results indicate that YopK is required for the ability of Yersinia to resist the PMN defense, which is critical for the virulence of the pathogen. We suggest a mechanism whereby YopK functions to prevent unintended Yop delivery and thereby PMN disruption, resulting in necrosis-like cell death, which would enhance the inflammatory response favoring the host. PMID:23090955

  5. Targeting Improves the Efficacy of a DNA Vaccine against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Paul J.; De Rose, Robert; Boyle, Jefferey S.; McWaters, Peter; Kelly, Julie; Tennent, Jan M.; Lew, Andrew M.; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y.

    1999-01-01

    A large-scale DNA vaccination trial was performed with sheep to investigate whether an antigen targeted by CTLA-4 enhanced and accelerated the humoral immune response. Vaccination with genetically detoxified phospholipase D (ΔPLD) has been shown to be effective, at least partially, against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, the causal agent of caseous lymphadenitis in sheep. CTLA-4 binds to B7 on antigen-presenting cells and thus was used to direct the fusion antigens to sites of immune induction. Here we demonstrated that targeting ΔPLD as a CTLA-4 fusion protein significantly enhanced the speed, magnitude, and longevity of the antibody response compared to that obtained with DNA encoding ΔPLD. While all groups of sheep vaccinated with DNA encoding ΔPLD were afforded better protection against an experimental challenge with C. pseudotuberculosis than those immunized with an irrelevant plasmid or those left unimmunized, the best protection was provided by the targeted DNA vaccine. We propose that targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells offers a generic strategy for enhancing the efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:10569760

  6. Cloning, expression and characterization of the recombinant Yersinia pseudotuberculosis L-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Pokrovskaya, M V; Aleksandrova, S S; Pokrovsky, V S; Omeljanjuk, N M; Borisova, A A; Anisimova, N Yu; Sokolov, N N

    2012-03-01

    We have cloned ansB (YPTB1411) gene from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Q66CJ2 and constructed stable inducible expression system that overproduce L-asparaginase from Y. pseudotuberculosis (YpA) in Escherichiacoli BL21 (DE3) cells. For purification of YpA we used Q-Sepharose and DEAE-Toyopearl column chromatography. We examined kinetics of the enzyme reaction, catalytic activity as a function of pH, temperature and ionic strength, thermostability and other enzyme properties. Biochemical properties of YpA are similar with those of E. coli type II L-asparaginase. K(m) for L-asparagine is 17 ± 0.9 μM and pI 5.4 ± 0.3. Enzyme demonstrates maximum activity at pH 8.0 and 60 °C. YpA L-glutaminase activity is relatively low and more than 15 times less than specific activity towards L-asn. We evaluated also the antiproliferative effect of YpA in vitro and in vivo with E. colil-asparaginase (EcA) as the reference substance at similar conditions. PMID:22226870

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, David L.; Lew, Cynthia S.; Kartchner, Brittany; Porter, Nathan T.; McDaniel, S. Wade; Jones, Nathan M.; Mason, Sara; Wu, Erin; Wilson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs) are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface. PMID:27275606

  8. In silico identification of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis antigenic targets and application in immunodiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Andrea de Fátima Silva; Brum, Alexandre Antunes; Reis, Carlos Guilherme; Angelo, Henrique Ramos; Leal, Karen Silva; Silva, Mara Thais de Oliveira; Simionatto, Simone; Azevedo, Vasco; Santos, Anderson; Portela, Ricardo Wagner; Dellagostin, Odir; Borsuk, Sibele

    2016-06-01

    Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) is a disease caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. It affects mainly small ruminants and causes significant economic losses worldwide. Because symptoms are not immediately noticeable, CLA clinical diagnosis is not effective. Numerous serological tests are being developed to detect the disease in asymptomatic animals, but currently available immunoassays have problems with sensitivity. Current ELISA formats use native bacterial antigens, and recombinant proteins could be useful for improving the immunoassay parameters. The C. pseudotuberculosis proteins CP0126a, CP0369 and CP1957 were identified from 2097 candidate proteins by mature epitope density (MED) analysis, expressed in Escherichia coli and evaluated in an indirect immunoenzymic system. The CP0126a, CP0369 and CP1957 ELISAs showed 77.5 %, 92.5 % and 92.5 % specificity and 95 %, 90 % and 85 % sensitivity, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.874, 0.951 and 0.881, respectively. The proteins identified in silico were recognized by antibodies in the sera from infected animals without being recognized in negative samples. The ELISA assay using the rCP0369 protein as antigen had the greatest specificity and sensitivity values, followed by rCP1957. This is an interesting strategy for seroepidemiological investigations in sheep flocks due to its significant specificity and sensitivity. PMID:27071381

  9. An iron-acquisition-deficient mutant of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis efficiently protects mice against challenge.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Dayana; Rocha, Flávia de Souza; Leite, Kátia Morais Costa; Soares, Siomar de Castro; Silva, Artur; Portela, Ricardo Wagner Dias; Meyer, Roberto; Miyoshi, Anderson; Oliveira, Sérgio Costa; Azevedo, Vasco; Dorella, Fernanda Alves

    2014-01-01

    Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) is a chronic disease that affects sheep and goats worldwide, and its etiological agent is Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. Despite the economic losses caused by CLA, there is little information about the molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis, and current immune prophylaxis against infection has been unable to reduce the incidence of CLA in goats. Recently, 21 different mutant strains of C. pseudotuberculosis were identified by random mutagenesis. In this study, these previously generated mutants were used in mice vaccination trials to develop new immunogens against CLA. Based on this analysis, CZ171053, an iron-acquisition-deficient mutant strain, was selected. After challenge with a virulent strain, 80% of the animals that were immunized with the CZ171053 strain survived. Furthermore, this vaccination elicited both humoral and cellular responses. Intracellular survival of the bacterium was determined using murine J774 cells; in this assay, the CZ171053 had reduced intracellular viability. Because iron acquisition in intracellular bacteria is considered one of their most important virulence factors during infection, these results demonstrate the immunogenic potential of this mutant against CLA. PMID:24597857

  10. Molecular Serogrouping of Listeria monocytogenes from Brazil Using PCR.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Vallim, Deyse Christina; Hofer, Ernesto; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the serotype distribution of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from clinical, beef, and environment samples using two PCR-based protocols for serogrouping. A panel of 134 isolates (22 clinical samples, 79 samples of beef cuts, and 33 samples from the beef processing environment) were subjected to conventional serology and identified as serotypes 1/2a (n = 12), 1/2b (n = 21), 1/2c (n = 71), and 4b (n = 30). Isolates from clinical samples were predominantly serotype 4b, and the most prevalent serotype among the beef cut and environment samples was 1/2c. The protocol described by M. Doumith, C. Buchrieser, P. Glaser, C. Jacquet, and P. Martin (J. Clin. Microbiol. 42:3819-3822, 2004) produced contradictory results for seven 1/2a isolates, which were positive for lmo1118 and had the profile IIc (serotypes 1/2c and 3c). Fifteen serotype 4b isolates amplified the target lmo0737, with the atypical profile IVb variant 1. The results obtained with the protocol described by M. K. Borucki and D. R. Call (J. Clin. Microbiol. 41:5537-5540, 2003) were in full agreement with those of the conventional serology. We recommend using this multiplex PCR approach by adding one pair of the reported primers to the panel to reduce total effort by one PCR while maintaining specificity. We present additional recommendations to improve the efficiency and reproducibility of this serogrouping assay. PMID:26735041

  11. Subcellular proteomic analysis of host-pathogen interactions using human monocytes exposed to Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C G; Gonzales, A D; Choi, M W; Chromy, B A; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2004-05-20

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is of concern to human health both from an infectious disease and a civilian biodefense perspective. While Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis share more than 90% DNA homology, they have significantly different clinical manifestations. Plague is often fatal if untreated, yet Y. pseudotuberculosis causes severe intestinal distress and is rarely fatal. A better understanding of host response to these closely related pathogens may help explain the different mechanisms of virulence and pathogenesis that result in such different clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to characterize host protein expression changes in human monocyte-like U937 cells after exposure to Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. In order to gain global proteomic coverage of host response, proteins from cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane fractions of host cells were studied by 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and relative protein expression differences were quantitated. Differentially expressed proteins, with at least 1.5 fold expression changes and p values of 0.01 or less, were identified by MALDI-MS or LC/MS/MS. With these criteria, differential expression was detected in 16 human proteins after Y. pestis exposure and 13 human proteins after Y. pseudotuberculosis exposure, of which only two of the differentially expressed proteins identified were shared between the two exposures. Proteins identified in this study are reported to be involved in a wide spectrum of cellular functions and host defense mechanisms including apoptosis, cytoskeletal rearrangement, protein synthesis and degradation, DNA replication and transcription, metabolism, protein folding, and cell signaling. Notably, the differential expression patterns observed can distinguish the two pathogen exposures from each other and from unexposed host cells. The functions of the differentially expressed proteins identified provide insight on the different

  12. Epidemiology of serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease in Ontario, Canada, 2000 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) caused by serogroup B is the last major serogroup in Canada to become vaccine-preventable. The anticipated availability of vaccines targeting this serogroup prompted an assessment of the epidemiology of serogroup B disease in Ontario, Canada. Methods We retrieved information on confirmed IMD cases reported to Ontario’s reportable disease database between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010 and probabilistically-linked these cases to Public Health Ontario Laboratory records. Rates were calculated with denominator data obtained from Statistics Canada. We calculated a crude number needed to vaccinate using the inverse of the infant (<1 year) age-specific incidence multiplied by expected vaccine efficacies between 70% and 80%, and assuming only direct protection (no herd effects). Results A total of 259 serogroup B IMD cases were identified in Ontario over the 11-year period. Serogroup B was the most common cause of IMD. Incidence ranged from 0.11 to 0.27/100,000/year, and fluctuated over time. Cases ranged in age from 13 days to 101 years; 21.4% occurred in infants, of which 72.7% were <6 months. Infants had the highest incidence (3.70/100,000). Case-fatality ratio was 10.7% overall. If we assume that all infant cases would be preventable by vaccination, we would need to vaccinate between 33,784 and 38,610 infants to prevent one case of disease. Conclusions Although rare, the proportion of IMD caused by serogroup B has increased and currently causes most IMD in Ontario, with infants having the highest risk of disease. Although serogroup B meningococcal vaccines are highly anticipated, our findings suggest that decisions regarding publicly funding serogroup B meningococcal vaccines will be difficult and may not be based on disease burden alone. PMID:22928839

  13. New Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Neisseria meningitidis Serogroups A, W135, C, and Y

    PubMed Central

    Chanteau, Suzanne; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Mahamane, Ali Elhadj; Djibo, Saacou; Boisier, Pascal; Nato, Farida

    2006-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis (meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis) are a major public health concern in the African “meningitis belt,” which includes 21 countries from Senegal to Ethiopia. Of the several species that can cause meningitis, N. meningitidis is the most important cause of epidemics in this region. In choosing the appropriate vaccine, accurate N. meningitidis serogroup determination is key. To this end, we developed and evaluated two duplex rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for detecting N. meningitidis polysaccharide (PS) antigens of several important serogroups. Methods and Findings Mouse monoclonal IgG antibodies against N. meningitidis PS A, W135/Y, Y, and C were used to develop two immunochromatography duplex RDTs, RDT1 (to detect serogroups A and W135/Y) and RDT2 (to detect serogroups C and Y). Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy criteria were used to determine diagnostic accuracy of RDTs on reference strains and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples using culture and PCR, respectively, as reference tests. The cutoffs were 105 cfu/ml for reference strains and 1 ng/ml for PS. Sensitivities and specificities were 100% for reference strains, and 93.8%–100% for CSF serogroups A, W135, and Y in CSF. For CSF serogroup A, the positive and negative likelihood ratios (± 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were 31.867 (16.1–63.1) and 0.065 (0.04–0.104), respectively, and the diagnostic odds ratio (± 95% CI) was 492.9 (207.2–1,172.5). For CSF serogroups W135 and Y, the positive likelihood ratio was 159.6 (51.7–493.3) Both RDTs were equally reliable at 25 °C and 45 °C. Conclusions These RDTs are important new bedside diagnostic tools for surveillance of meningococcus serogroups A and W135, the two serogroups that are responsible for major epidemics in Africa. PMID:16953658

  14. The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis cytotoxic necrotizing factor (CNFY) selectively activates RhoA.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Claudia; Pop, Marius; Leemhuis, Jost; Schirmer, Jörg; Aktories, Klaus; Schmidt, Gudula

    2004-04-16

    The cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNF)1 and CNF2 from pathogenic Escherichia coli strains activate RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 by deamidation of Gln63 (RhoA) or Gln61 (Rac and Cdc42). Recently, a novel cytotoxic necrotizing factor termed CNFY was identified in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains (Lockman, H. A., Gillespie, R. A., Baker, B. D., and Shakhnovich, E. (2002) Infect. Immun. 70, 2708-2714). We amplified the cnfy gene from genomic DNA of Y. pseudotuberculosis, cloned and expressed the recombinant protein, and studied its activity. Recombinant GST-CNFY induced morphological changes in HeLa cells and caused an upward shift of RhoA in SDS-PAGE, as is known for GST-CNF1 and GST-CNF2. Mass spectrometric analysis of GST-CNFY-treated RhoA confirmed deamidation at Glu63. Treatment of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 with GST-CNFY decreased their GTPase activities, indicating that all of these Rho proteins could serve as substrates for GST-CNFY in vitro. In contrast, RhoA, but not Rac or Cdc42, was the substrate of GST-CNFY in culture cells. GST-CNFY caused marked stress fiber formation in HeLa cells after 2 h. In contrast to GST-CNF1, formation of filopodia or lamellipodia was not induced with GST-CNFY. Accordingly, effector pull-down experiments with lysates of toxin-treated cells revealed strong activation of RhoA but no activation of Rac1 or Cdc42 after 6 h of GST-CNFY-treatment. Moreover, in rat hippocampal neurons, GST-CNFY results in the retraction of neurites, indicating RhoA activation. In contrast, no activation of Rac or Cdc42 was found. Altogether, our data suggest that CNFY from Y. pseudotuberculosis is a strong, selective activator of RhoA, which can be used as a powerful tool for constitutive RhoA activation without concomitant activation of Rac1 or Cdc42. PMID:14761941

  15. Serogroup identification of Neisseria meningitidis: comparison of an antiserum agar method with bacterial slide agglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Craven, D E; Frasch, C E; Robbins, J B; Feldman, H A

    1978-01-01

    A serum agar method for serogrouping Neisseria meningitidis is described and compared with conventional bacterial slide agglutination. There was 93% agreement for 300 strains examined individually by each method. Among strains from serogroups A, B, C, Y, and W135, there was 100% correlation, whereas strains from serogroup 29E (Z') had only 67% correlation. The serum agar method was rapid, as well as easy to perform and interpret. The potential benefits of this method for epidemiological studies and reference laboratories processing large numbers of meningococcal isolates are emphasized. Images PMID:96123

  16. Challenges and progress in the development of a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susan; Sadarangani, Manish; Hoe, J Claire; Pollard, Andrew J

    2009-06-01

    Serogroup B meningococci cause the majority of the meningococcal disease burden in developed countries. Production of an effective and safe vaccine for serogroup B organisms has been hampered by the poor immunogenicity of the capsular polysaccharide that defines this group of bacteria. Previous efforts have focused on outer membrane vesicle vaccines, which have been implemented successfully during clonal outbreaks. However, the search for a universal vaccine against endemic polyclonal serogroup B meningococcal disease continues. In this review, we have highlighted recent development of outer membrane vesicle vaccines and progress in the evaluation of recombinant outer membrane protein vaccines. PMID:19485754

  17. [Characterization of the lipopolysaccharides of serogroup II Azospirillum].

    PubMed

    Sigida, E N; Fedonenko, Iu P; Zdorovenko, É L; Butygin, G L; Konnova, S A; Ignatov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides of six Azospirillum strains (A. brasilense SR50, SR80, SR88, SR109, SR111, SR115, and A. lipoferum SR 42) isolated from the rhizosphere of cereal plants of Saratov oblast, Russia and assigned to serogroup II by serological analysis were studied. In the lipid A fatty acid composition, the lipopolysaccharides under study were similar to those of other Azospirillum strains and were characterized by predominance of 3-hydroxytetradecanoic, 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic, and octadecenoic acids. Monosaccharide analysis of the O-specific polysaccharides (including determination of the absolute configurations, methylation analysis, and one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy) revealed the presence of two types of repeating units in varying ratios. High degree of serological similarity between the strains under study was shown to result from the presence of repeating units with identical structure in their O antigens. PMID:25844452

  18. Susceptibility of Various Serogroups of Streptococci to Clindamycin and Lincomycin

    PubMed Central

    Karchmer, Adolf W.; Moellering, Robert C.; Watson, Barbara K.

    1975-01-01

    The minimal inhibitory concentration of lincomycin and clindamycin for a large number of strains from multiple serogroups of streptococci was determined. The median minimal inhibitory concentration for streptococci from groups A, B, C, F, G, H, L, and M and nongroupable organisms ranged from 0.02 to 0.39 μg of lincomycin per ml and from ≤0.01 to 0.09 μg of clindamycin per ml. Among the group D strains, Streptococcus faecium and Streptococcus faecalis were resistant to lincomycin and clindamycin, whereas Streptococcus bovis and four American strains of Streptococcus durans resembled nongroup D isolates in their susceptibility to these agents. Occasional strains of nongroup D streptococci were highly resistant to lincomycin and clindamycin. PMID:1137367

  19. Tyrosine binding and promiscuity in the arginine repressor from the pathogenic bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mariutti, Ricardo Barros; Ullah, Anwar; Araujo, Gabriela Campos; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy

    2016-07-01

    The arginine repressor (ArgR) regulates arginine biosynthesis in a number of microorganisms and consists of two domains interlinked by a short peptide; the N-terminal domain is involved in DNA binding and the C-terminal domain binds arginine and forms a hexamer made-up of a dimer of trimers. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of ArgR from the pathogenic Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis determined at 1.9 Å resolution contains a tightly bound tyrosine at the arginine-binding site indicating hitherto unobserved promiscuity. Structural analysis of the binding pocket displays clear molecular adaptations to accommodate tyrosine binding suggesting the possible existence of an alternative regulatory process in this pathogenic bacterium. PMID:27233609

  20. [Isolation and physico-chemical properties of a protein, included in an endotoxin from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Fedoreeva, L I; Solov'eva, T F; Ovodov, Iu S

    1989-06-01

    A major protein of the endotoxin from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis was isolated from the complex lipid A--protein by treatment with SDS and triton X-100 followed by gel-chromatography on Sephacryl S-300. Protein has apparent molecular mass 40 kDa and alanine as N-terminal amino acid residue. CD and IR spectroscopy conformational changes of the protein molecule in the process of its isolation. The thermal and pH stabilities of the protein were investigated by the methods of intrinsic fluorescence and differential scanning microcalorimetry. The isolated protein revealed two thermal transitions (at 30-35 and 50-55 degrees C), which depend on Ca2+ concentration. PMID:2783172

  1. The core stimulon of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain 1002 identified using ab initio methodologies.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Anne Cybelle; Ramos, Rommel T J; Silva, Wanderson Marques; Rocha, Flávia Souza; Barbosa, Silvanira; Miyoshi, Anderson; Schneider, Maria P C; Silva, Artur; Azevedo, Vasco

    2012-07-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is a bacterium which causes diseases such as caseous lymphadenitis in small ruminants, resulting in large-scale economic losses for agribusiness worldwide. Consequently, this bacterium including its transcriptional profile analysis has been the focus of various studies. Identification of the transcripts that appear under conditions that simulate the environment encountered by this bacterial species in the host is of great importance in discovering new targets for the production of more efficient vaccines. We sequenced the cDNA of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain 1002, using the SOLiD V3 system, under the following conditions: osmotic stress (2 M), acidity (pH), heat shock (50 °C) and control condition (N). To identify the transcripts shared among the stimulons and integrate this information with the results from BLAST and BLAST2GO, we developed the software CoreStImulon (CSI) which allows the user to individually distinguish the genes in terms of their participation in biological processes, their function and cellular location. In the biosynthetic processes, eleven genes represented in the core stimulon and twenty genes in the control were observed. This validates the hypothesis that the organisms strategy for surviving in a hostile environment is through growth reduction. The oxidation reduction process, response to stress process, and cell adhesion are controlled by genes that contribute to bacterial cell maintenance under stress conditions; these could be involved in their pathogenicity. The methodology for identification of transcripts obtained by ab initio assembly and shared among the stimulons permitted candidates selection for vaccine studies. CSI is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/corestimulon/. PMID:22641428

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Dichelobacter nodosus serogroup-specific fimA gene from ovine footrot in Andhra Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Vinod; Karthik, A.; Vijayalakhsmi, S.; Sreenivasulu, D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Identification of different serogroups of Dichelobacter nodosus prevailing in the region and to understand the degree of genetic heterogeneities among the different isolates of D. nodosus. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 exudate samples of footrot lesions with a lesion score of 2-4 were collected from naturally infected sheep. The samples were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting D. nodosus specific 16srRNA. Of 150 samples screened, 70 samples were found to be positive. The positive samples were attempted for isolation of D. nodosus, out of which 16 isolates were recovered. All the isolates were subjected to serogrouping by multiplex PCR targeting fimA gene using A-I serogroup specific primers. Results: Of 16 isolates, 7 (43.75%) isolates were serogroup B, 4 (25.00%) isolates were serogroup A, 3 isolates (18.75%) were serogroup I and 2 (12.5%) isolates yielded both serogroup A and B. phylogenetic analysis was performed using neighbor-joining algorithm of the ClustelX2 software in order to study whether the serogroups isolated in the present investigation differed genetically from other published serogroups. The fimA gene sequence of present isolates of serogroups A, B, and I were segregated into three distinct groups with high bootstrap values. The serogroup B clustered with Australian isolate of serotype B1 suggesting high genetic similarity of the present isolate with serotype B1. Conclusions: The clinical samples were collected from suspected outbreaks of footrot and identified the prevalence of D. nodosus by PCR targeting 16srRNA gene. Identified serogroups A, B, and I from different districts of Andhra Pradesh. The phylogenetic analysis will help for the tentative identification of serotypes present in the serogroup and to understand the degree of genetic heterogeneities among the different isolates of D. nodosus. PMID:27047136

  3. Genome-Based Characterization of Emergent Invasive Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup Y Isolates in Sweden from 1995 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Törös, Bianca; Hedberg, Sara T.; Unemo, Magnus; Jacobsson, Susanne; Hill, Dorothea M. C.; Olcén, Per; Fredlund, Hans; Bratcher, Holly B.; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y has increased in Europe, especially in Scandinavia. In Sweden, serogroup Y is now the dominating serogroup, and in 2012, the serogroup Y disease incidence was 0.46/100,000 population. We previously showed that a strain type belonging to sequence type 23 was responsible for the increased prevalence of this serogroup in Sweden. The objective of this study was to investigate the serogroup Y emergence by whole-genome sequencing and compare the meningococcal population structure of Swedish invasive serogroup Y strains to those of other countries with different IMD incidence. Whole-genome sequencing was performed on invasive serogroup Y isolates from 1995 to 2012 in Sweden (n = 186). These isolates were compared to a collection of serogroup Y isolates from England, Wales, and Northern Ireland from 2010 to 2012 (n = 143), which had relatively low serogroup Y incidence, and two isolates obtained in 1999 in the United States, where serogroup Y remains one of the major causes of IMD. The meningococcal population structures were similar in the investigated regions; however, different strain types were prevalent in each geographic region. A number of genes known or hypothesized to have an impact on meningococcal virulence were shown to be associated with different strain types and subtypes. The reasons for the IMD increase are multifactorial and are influenced by increased virulence, host adaptive immunity, and transmission. Future genome-wide association studies are needed to reveal additional genes associated with serogroup Y meningococcal disease, and this work would benefit from a complete serogroup Y meningococcal reference genome. PMID:25926489

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Brazilian Leptospira noguchii Serogroup Panama Strain U73, Isolated from Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Luisa Z.; Loureiro, Ana P.; Miraglia, Fabiana; Matajira, Carlos E. C.; Kremer, Frederico S.; Eslabao, Marcos R.; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Lilenbaum, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Leptospira noguchii is a current zoonotic pathogen in Brazil. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the Brazilian L. noguchii serogroup Panama strain U73, isolated from asymptomatic cattle urine. PMID:26472831

  5. The lipopolysaccharide O side chain of Vibrio vulnificus serogroup E is a virulence determinant for eels.

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, C; Fouz, B; Biosca, E G; Marco-Noales, E; Collado, R

    1997-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a gram-negative bacterium capable of producing septicemic infections in eels and immunocompromised humans. Two biotypes are classically recognized, with the virulence for eels being specific to strains belonging to biotype 2, which constitutes a homogeneous lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-based O serogroup (which we have designated serogroup E). In the present study we demonstrated that the O side chain of this LPS determines the selective virulence of biotype 2 for eels: (i) biotype 1 strains (which do not belong to serogroup E) are destroyed by the bactericidal action of nonimmune eel serum (NIS) through activation of the alternative pathway of complement, (ii) biotype 2 strains (of serogroup E) are resistant to NIS, and (iii) rough mutants of biotype 2 lacking the O polysaccharide side chain are sensitive to NIS and avirulent for eels. PMID:9169795

  6. Presence of Salmonella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in wild boars.

    PubMed

    Sannö, A; Aspán, A; Hestvik, G; Jacobson, M

    2014-12-01

    The European wild boar populations are growing and spreading to new areas, which might constitute a threat to public health, since wild boar can harbour pathogens with the potential to cause serious illness in humans. Tonsils, ileocaecal lymph nodes and faecal samples were collected from 88 Swedish wild boars and analysed for the presence of the zoonotic pathogens Salmonella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. pseudotuberculosis and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). A combination of cultivation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was used and overall, 20% of sampled individuals tested positive for Y. enterocolitica, 20% for Y. pseudotuberculosis and 10% for Salmonella spp. A total of 41% of sampled individuals tested positive for one or more of these three pathogens. No EHEC were detected. Samples PCR-positive for Salmonella spp. were cultivated further and six isolates were obtained, belonging to Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica and subspecies diarizone. The pathogens were most commonly detected in tonsil samples. PMID:24512817

  7. Homology analysis and cross-immunogenicity of OmpA from pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhuang; Duan, Ran; Li, Xu; Li, Kewei; Liang, Junrong; Liu, Chang; Qiu, Haiyan; Xiao, Yuchun; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is one of the intra-species conserved proteins with immunogenicity widely found in the family of Enterobacteriaceae. Here we first confirmed OmpA is conserved in the three pathogenic Yersinia: Yersinia pestis, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica, with high homology at the nucleotide level and at the amino acid sequence level. The identity of ompA sequences for 262 Y. pestis strains, 134 Y. pseudotuberculosis strains and 219 pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains are 100%, 98.8% and 97.7% similar. The main pattern of OmpA of pathogenic Yersinia are 86.2% and 88.8% identical at the nucleotide and amino acid sequence levels, respectively. Immunological analysis showed the immunogenicity of each OmpA and cross-immunogenicity of OmpA for pathogenic Yersinia where OmpA may be a vaccine candidate for Y. pestis and other pathogenic Yersinia. PMID:26435220

  8. Development of a DNA Microarray for Molecular Identification of All 46 Salmonella O Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dan; Liu, Bin; Liu, Fenxia; Cao, Boyang; Chen, Min; Hao, Xiyan; Feng, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of food-borne disease in many countries. Serotype determination of Salmonella is important for disease assessment, infection control, and epidemiological surveillance. In this study, a microarray system that targets the O antigen-specific genes was developed for simultaneously detecting and identifying all 46 Salmonella O serogroups. Of these, 40 serogroups can be confidently identified, and the remaining 6, in three pairs (serogroups O67 and B, E1 and E4, and A and D1), need to be further distinguished from each other using PCR methods or conventional serotyping methods. The microarray was shown to be highly specific when evaluated against 293 Salmonella strains, 186 Shigella strains, representative Escherichia coli strains, and 10 strains of other bacterial species. The assay correctly identified 288 (98%) of the Salmonella strains. The detection sensitivity was determined to be 50 ng genomic DNA per sample. By testing simulated samples in a tomato background, 2 to 8 CFU per gram inoculated could be detected after enrichment. This newly developed microarray assay is the first molecular protocol that can be used for the comprehensive detection and identification of all 46 Salmonella O serogroups. Compared to the traditional serogrouping method, the microarray provides a reliable, high-throughput, and sensitive approach that can be used for rapid identification of multiple Salmonella O serogroups simultaneously. PMID:23524674

  9. Assessment of blood changes post-challenge with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and its exotoxin (phospholipase D): A comprehensive study in goat

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Z. K. H.; Jesse, F. F.; Saharee, A. A.; Jasni, S.; Yusoff, R.; Wahid, H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: There is very little information regarding blood changes during the challenge of phospholipase D (PLD) in goats. Therefore, this experiment was conducted to study the changes in blood after the challenge with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and its exotoxin, PLD to fill in the gap of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) research. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six crossbred Boer goats aged 12-14 months were divided into 3 groups; the first group n=6 was inoculated with 1 ml phosphate buffered solution s.c. as the control. The second group n=10 was inoculated with C. pseudotuberculosis 1 × 109 cfu s.c. The third group n=10 was intravenous injected with PLD 1 ml/20 kg body weight. Serial blood collections were done at 1 h, 3 h, 5 h, 8 h, and 12 h then every 24 h post-inoculation for the first 30 days of the experiment. Subsequently, the blood collection continued twice a week till the end of the experiment (90 days post-challenge). Results: Both C. pseudotuberculosis and PLD treated groups showed significant changes (p<0.05) in red blood cell count, hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular Hb concentration, white blood cell count, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, globulin, and total plasma proteins. Similarly, both treated groups showed significant changes (p<0.05) in alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate transaminase, total bilirubin, calcium concentration, creatine phosphokinase, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, urea concentration, lactate dehydrogenase, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time. Conclusion: It concluded that C. pseudotuberculosis and PLD have a negative impact on the goat’s health in general reflected by all those changes recorded in the hemogram, leukogram, and the blood chemistry. PMID:27047206

  10. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Predisposes Mice to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infection Even in the Absence of the Type III Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Miller, Halie K; Schwiesow, Leah; Au-Yeung, Winnie; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) predisposes humans to serious disseminated infection with pathogenic Yersinia as well as several other pathogens. Recently, we showed that the iron-sulfur cluster coordinating transcription factor IscR is required for type III secretion in Y. pseudotuberculosis by direct control of the T3SS master regulator LcrF. In E. coli and Yersinia, IscR levels are predicted to be regulated by iron bioavailability, oxygen tension, and oxidative stress, such that iron depletion should lead to increased IscR levels. To investigate how host iron overload influences Y. pseudotuberculosis virulence and the requirement for the Ysc type III secretion system (T3SS), we utilized two distinct murine models of HH: hemojuvelin knockout mice that mimic severe, early-onset HH as well as mice with the Hfe (C282Y∕C282Y) mutation carried by 10% of people of Northern European descent, associated with adult-onset HH. Hjv (-∕-) and Hfe (C282Y∕C282Y) transgenic mice displayed enhanced colonization of deep tissues by Y. pseudotuberculosis following oral inoculation, recapitulating enhanced susceptibility of humans with HH to disseminated infection with enteropathogenic Yersinia. Importantly, HH mice orally infected with Y. pseudotuberculosis lacking the T3SS-encoding virulence plasmid, pYV, displayed increased deep tissue colonization relative to wildtype mice. Consistent with previous reports using monocytes from HH vs. healthy donors, macrophages isolated from Hfe (C282Y∕C282Y) mice were defective in Yersinia uptake compared to wildtype macrophages, indicating that the anti-phagocytic property of the Yersinia T3SS plays a less important role in HH animals. These data suggest that Yersinia may rely on distinct virulence factors to cause disease in healthy vs. HH hosts. PMID:27446816

  11. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Predisposes Mice to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infection Even in the Absence of the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Halie K.; Schwiesow, Leah; Au-Yeung, Winnie; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) predisposes humans to serious disseminated infection with pathogenic Yersinia as well as several other pathogens. Recently, we showed that the iron-sulfur cluster coordinating transcription factor IscR is required for type III secretion in Y. pseudotuberculosis by direct control of the T3SS master regulator LcrF. In E. coli and Yersinia, IscR levels are predicted to be regulated by iron bioavailability, oxygen tension, and oxidative stress, such that iron depletion should lead to increased IscR levels. To investigate how host iron overload influences Y. pseudotuberculosis virulence and the requirement for the Ysc type III secretion system (T3SS), we utilized two distinct murine models of HH: hemojuvelin knockout mice that mimic severe, early-onset HH as well as mice with the HfeC282Y∕C282Y mutation carried by 10% of people of Northern European descent, associated with adult-onset HH. Hjv−∕− and HfeC282Y∕C282Y transgenic mice displayed enhanced colonization of deep tissues by Y. pseudotuberculosis following oral inoculation, recapitulating enhanced susceptibility of humans with HH to disseminated infection with enteropathogenic Yersinia. Importantly, HH mice orally infected with Y. pseudotuberculosis lacking the T3SS-encoding virulence plasmid, pYV, displayed increased deep tissue colonization relative to wildtype mice. Consistent with previous reports using monocytes from HH vs. healthy donors, macrophages isolated from HfeC282Y∕C282Y mice were defective in Yersinia uptake compared to wildtype macrophages, indicating that the anti-phagocytic property of the Yersinia T3SS plays a less important role in HH animals. These data suggest that Yersinia may rely on distinct virulence factors to cause disease in healthy vs. HH hosts. PMID:27446816

  12. KaVA ESTEMA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyadomari, Miyako; Imai, Hiroshi; Cho, Se-Hyung; Asaki, Yoshiharu; Choi, Yoon-Kyong; Kim, Jaeheon; Yun, Youngjoo; Matsumoto, Naoko; Min, Cheul-Hong; Oyama, Tomoaki; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Yoon, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Jin; Dodson, Richard; Rioja, Maria; Burns, Ross; Orosz, Gabor; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Chibueze O, James; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Sobolev, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    The ESTEMA (Expanded Study on Stellar Masers) project is one of three Large Programs of the KaVA (the combined array of the Korean VLBI Network and Japanese VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry), and conducted in 2015-2016. It aims to publish a database of the largest sample of VLBI images of circumstellar water (H2O) and silicon-monoxide (SiO) maser sources towards circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of 80 evolved stars in late AGB to early post-AGB phase. Here we present the specifications of the ESTEMA observations and the planned scientific goals in order to share the basic information of the ESTEMA with astronomical community and encourage future collaborations with the ESTEMA and future follow-up observations for the targeted stars.

  13. Homology Analysis of Pathogenic Yersinia Species Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Yersinia pestis Based on Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Ran; Liang, Junrong; Shi, Guoxiang; Cui, Zhigang; Hai, Rong; Wang, Peng; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Kewei; Qiu, Haiyan; Gu, Wenpeng; Du, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme and used it to study the population structure and evolutionary relationships of three pathogenic Yersinia species. MLST of these three Yersinia species showed a complex of two clusters, one composed of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis and the other composed of Yersinia enterocolitica. Within the first cluster, the predominant Y. pestis sequence type 90 (ST90) was linked to Y. pseudotuberculosis ST43 by one locus difference, and 81.25% of the ST43 strains were from serotype O:1b, supporting the hypothesis that Y. pestis descended from the O:1b serotype of Y. pseudotuberculosis. We also found that the worldwide-prevalent serotypes O:1a, O:1b, and O:3 were predominated by specific STs. The second cluster consisted of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains, two of which may not have identical STs. The pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains formed a relatively conserved group; most strains clustered within ST186 and ST187. Serotypes O:3, O:8, and O:9 were separated into three distinct blocks. Nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica STs were more heterogeneous, reflecting genetic diversity through evolution. By providing a better and effective MLST procedure for use with the Yersinia community, valuable information and insights into the genetic evolutionary differences of these pathogens were obtained. PMID:24131695

  14. Generation of a CRISPR database for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis complex and role of CRISPR-based immunity in conjugation.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Katja A; Mattinen, Laura; Kalin-Mänttäri, Laura; Vergnaud, Gilles; Gorgé, Olivier; Nikkari, Simo; Skurnik, Mikael

    2015-11-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat - CRISPR-associated genes (CRISPR-Cas) system is used by bacteria and archaea against invading conjugative plasmids or bacteriophages. Central to this immunity system are genomic CRISPR loci that contain fragments of invading DNA. These are maintained as spacers in the CRISPR loci between direct repeats and the spacer composition in any bacterium reflects its evolutionary history. We analysed the CRISPR locus sequences of 335 Yersinia pseudotuberculosis complex strains. Altogether 1902 different spacer sequences were identified and these were used to generate a database for the spacer sequences. Only ∼10% of the spacer sequences found matching sequences. In addition, surprisingly few spacers were shared by Yersinia pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis strains. Interestingly, 32 different protospacers were present in the conjugative plasmid pYptb32953. The corresponding spacers were identified from 35 different Y. pseudotuberculosis strains indicating that these strains had encountered pYptb32953 earlier. In conjugation experiments, pYptb32953-specific spacers generally prevented conjugation with spacer-positive and spacer-free strains. However, some strains with one to four spacers were invaded by pYptb32953 and some spacer-free strains were fully resistant. Also some spacer-positive strains were intermediate resistant to conjugation. This suggests that one or more other defence systems are determining conjugation efficiency independent of the CRISPR-Cas system. PMID:25712141

  15. The VA-Medical School Partnership: The Medical School Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersdorf, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    Issues in the relationship between the Veterans' Administration (VA) and medical schools are discussed, including VA faculty recruitment and retention, ambulatory care in VA teaching hospitals, governance and growth of research within VA medical centers, and effects of cost containment and competition on teaching and training in VA hospitals. (MSE)

  16. 76 FR 75509 - Autopsies at VA Expense

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... that amendment, VA promulgated 38 CFR 17.38, on October 6, 1999, 64 FR 54212. Section 17.38, inter alia... procedure; Alcohol abuse; Alcoholism; Claims; Day care; Dental health; Drug abuse; Government contracts...-reference to VA regulations that authorize certain outpatient and ambulatory care. The proposed rule...

  17. 78 FR 32126 - VA Dental Insurance Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... in the Federal Register (77 FR 12517) a proposed rule to amend VA regulations to establish VADIP, a... coverage capabilities as determined during the Federal contracting process. See 77 FR 12518. Although VA... 510(b). See 77 FR 12520. We will conduct the Federal contracting process anticipating this...

  18. Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica 2/O:9 and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis 1/O:1 strains isolated from human and non-human sources in the Plateau State of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okwori, Ameh E J; Martínez, Pilar Ortiz; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria; Agina, Samuel E; Korkeala, Hannu

    2009-12-01

    Foodborne yersiniosis, caused by enteropathogenic Yersinia, especially Yersinia enterocolitica, is an important cause of diarrhea in developed countries, especially in temperate zones. Since studies concerning the presence of enteropathogenic Yersinia in humans and foods are rare in developing countries and tropical areas, human and non-human samples were studied in Plateau state of Nigeria to obtain information on the epidemiology of Y. enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Surprisingly, ail-positive Y. enterocolitica and inv-positive Y. pseudotuberculosis were isolated in Plateau state of Nigeria from several samples of human and non-human origin. Bioserotype 1/O:1 was the only Y. pseudotuberculosis type found. Y. enterocolitica belonging to bioserotype 2/O:9 was the dominating type found in most samples. Bioserotype 4/O:3 was isolated only from one pig and one sheep. Using PFGE, 5 genotypes were obtained among 45 Y. enterocolitica 2/O:9 strains with NotI, ApaI and XhoI enzymes and 3 among 20 Y. pseudotuberculosis 1/O:1 strains with NotI and SpeI enzymes. All human Y. pseudotuberculosis 1/O:1 strains were indistinguishable from pig, sheep or food strains. The dominating genotype of Y. enterocolitica 2/O:9 strains among humans was also found among strains isolated from pig, fermented cow milk and traditional intestine pepper soap samples. PMID:19835774

  19. Detection, seroprevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in pig tonsils in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonardi, S; Bruini, I; D'Incau, M; Van Damme, I; Carniel, E; Brémont, S; Cavallini, P; Tagliabue, S; Brindani, F

    2016-10-17

    Yersiniosis is the third most common reported zoonoses in Europe, with Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis responsible for 98.66% and 0.94% of the confirmed human cases in 2013. From June 2013 to October 2014, 201 pigs at slaughter belonging to 67 batches were tested for Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis in tonsils. Diaphragm muscle samples were tested for antibodies against Yersinia by a commercially available ELISA test. Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 was detected in 55/201 pig tonsils (27.4%; 95% CI 23.1-37.1). The positive pigs came from 38/67 batches (56.7%) and were reared in 36/61 farms (59.0%). There was no statistical difference between farrow-to-finish and finishing farms. The mean count of Y. enterocolitica was 3.56±0.85log10CFU/g with a minimum of 2.0log10CFU/g and a maximum of 4.78log10CFU/g. Y. pseudotuberculosis was isolated from 4/201 pig tonsils (2.0%; 95% CI 0.0-4.5). Three isolates belonged to serotype O:3 and one to serotype O:1. The positive pigs belonged to 4/67 batches (6.0%) and came from finishing farms only. Y. pseudotuberculosis could be enumerated in one sample only (4.27log10CFU/g). The ELISA test demonstrated that 56.1% of the meat juice samples were positive for Yersinia antibodies. Serological positivity was found in 67.9% (36/53) of the Y. enterocolitica- and 75.0% (3/4) of the Y. pseudotuberculosis positive pigs. A significant association was found between serological results and the presence of Y. enterocolitica in tonsils (OR=1.97, p=0.044). All the Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, gentamicin, ceftazidime, ertapenem and meropenem, 94.5% to cefotaxime, 89.1% to kanamycin and 78.2% to tetracycline. The highest resistance rates were observed for ampicillin (100%), sulphonamides (98.2%) and streptomycin (78.2%). Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were sensitive to all the antimicrobials tested, i.e. amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, azithromycin, cephalothin, cefoxitin

  20. Vibrio anguillarum serogroup O3 and V. anguillarum-like serogroup O3 cross-reactive species--comparison and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tiainen, T; Pedersen, K; Larsen, J L

    1997-02-01

    Forty-five Vibrio anguillarum-like isolates reacting with V. anguillarum serogroup O3 antiserum were examined in 30 characters to clarify their phenotypical properties, while their genotype was examined by ribotyping. The strains were isolated from diseased and dead fish or from environmental sources such as water, sediment, plankton, and faeces and gills of healthy fish. Phenotypically, the similarity of all the strains was more than 90%. However, significant differences between the fish-associated and environmental strains were detected. Biochemically, deviations were found in the Voges-Proskauer test and lysine decarboxylase reaction. Clustering analysis of the ribotypes showed two distinct clusters with a similarity of only 32%. Two strains representing each of these groups were used in a LD50 study, which showed some difference also in the pathogenicity between environmental and fish strains. It is suggested that the environmental strains belong to another species than V. anguillarum, but serologically cross-reacting with the V. anguillarum serogroup O3. The ribotyping as well as biochemical results indicated that the environmental strains possibly belong to Vibrio aestuarianus. The bona fide V. anguillarum serogroup O3 strains proved to be very homogeneous both phenotypically and genotypically, and the similarity of ribotypes was more than 96%. The V. anguillarum-like, serogroup O3-reactive strains from the environment were more heterogeneous in their biochemical behaviour, and showed an approximately 70% similarity in ribotypes. PMID:12452596

  1. Recommendations for Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine for Persons 10 Years and Older.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    This policy statement provides recommendations for the prevention of serogroup B meningococcal disease through the use of 2 newly licensed serogroup B meningococcal vaccines: MenB-FHbp (Trumenba; Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Pfizer, Philadelphia, PA) and MenB-4C (Bexsero; Novartis Vaccines, Siena, Italy). Both vaccines are approved for use in persons 10 through 25 years of age. MenB-FHbp is licensed as a 2- or 3-dose series, and MenB-4C is licensed as a 2-dose series for all groups. Either vaccine is recommended for routine use in persons 10 years and older who are at increased risk of serogroup B meningococcal disease (category A recommendation). Persons at increased risk of meningococcal serogroup B disease include the following: (1) persons with persistent complement component diseases, including inherited or chronic deficiencies in C3, C5-C9, properdin, factor D, or factor H or persons receiving eculizumab (Soliris; Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Cheshire, CT), a monoclonal antibody that acts as a terminal complement inhibitor by binding C5 and inhibiting cleavage of C5 to C5A; (2) persons with anatomic or functional asplenia, including sickle cell disease; and (3) healthy persons at increased risk because of a serogroup B meningococcal disease outbreak. Both serogroup B meningococcal vaccines have been shown to be safe and immunogenic and are licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration for individuals between the ages of 10 and 25 years. On the basis of epidemiologic and antibody persistence data, the American Academy of Pediatrics agrees with the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that either vaccine may be administered to healthy adolescents and young adults 16 through 23 years of age (preferred ages are 16 through 18 years) to provide short-term protection against most strains of serogroup B meningococcal disease (category B recommendation). PMID:27573083

  2. Genetic relationships among pathogenic Escherichia coli of serogroup O157.

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, T S; Wilson, R A

    1988-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains of serotype O157:H7 are a newly described clonal pathogenic form associated with recent outbreaks of hemorrhagic colitis in humans. Although O157 strains of various H types have long been recognized as enterotoxigenic in animals, little is known about how these pathogenic animal strains are related to those of serotype O157:H7. To determine the genetic relatedness of O157:H7 isolates to animal O157 strains, we examined 194 O157 isolates, representing 12 distinct flagellar antigens (H serotypes), obtained from a variety of animal and human infections. To characterize isolates, we assayed allelic variation at 19 enzyme loci by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Genotypic comparisons of isolates revealed extensive variation among 33 distinct clonal genotypes that differed, on average, at 44% of the enzyme loci. K88 fimbriae were expressed in 72% of the isolates and occurred in a diversity of chromosomal genotypic backgrounds. Five major clonal groups were recognized; one group was clearly associated with porcine colibacillosis, and another was associated with human urinary tract infections. The O157:H7 genotype was not closely allied with any of the major groups of clones. The results indicate that O157 E. coli are genetically diverse and strongly suggest that the O157:H7 lineage was not recently derived from other pathogenic strains of the O157 serogroup. PMID:2457555

  3. Legionella longbeachae serogroup 1 infections linked to potting compost.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S J; Brown, A W; Brown, D J; Pravinkumar, S J; Anderson, E; Edwards, G F S

    2012-02-01

    Four cases of legionellosis caused by Legionella longbeachae serogroup (sg) 1 were identified in Scotland from 2008 to 2010. All case patients had exposure to commercially manufactured growing media or potting soils, commonly known as multipurpose compost (MPC), in greenhouse conditions, prior to disease onset. Two patients had been using the same brand of MPC but the clinical isolates were distinct genotypically by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. However, an indistinguishable AFLP profile was also found in an environmental isolate from the supply of MPC used by each patient. The third patient was diagnosed by immunofluorescent antibody serology only; however, the MPC to which this patient was exposed contained L. longbeachae sg 1 in large quantities (80 000 c.f.u. g(-1)). The fourth patient was L. longbeachae sg 1 culture-positive, but L. longbeachae was not identified from 10 samples of garden composting material. As compost is commonly used, but L. longbeachae infection seemingly rare, further work is required to ascertain (i) the prevalence and predictors of L. longbeachae in compost and (ii) the conditions which facilitate transmission and generate an aerosol of the bacteria. As most cases of legionellosis are diagnosed by urinary antigen that is Legionella pneumophila-specific and does not detect infection with L. longbeachae, patients in cases of community-acquired pneumonia with a history of compost exposure should have serum and respiratory samples sent to a specialist Legionella reference laboratory for analysis. PMID:21940651

  4. Characteristics of a new meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, bivalent rLP2086 (MenB-FHbp; Trumenba®).

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Ashesh; Balmer, Paul; York, Laura J

    2016-08-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a common cause of bacterial meningitis, often leading to permanent sequelae or death. N. meningitidis is classified into serogroups based on the composition of the bacterial capsular polysaccharide; the 6 major disease-causing serogroups are designated A, B, C, W, X, and Y. Four of the 6 disease-causing serogroups (A, C, Y, and W) can be effectively prevented with available quadrivalent capsular polysaccharide protein conjugate vaccines; however, capsular polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are not effective against meningococcal serogroup B (MnB). There is no vaccine available for serogroup X. The public health need for an effective serogroup B vaccine is evident, as MnB is the most common cause of meningococcal disease in the United States and is responsible for almost half of all cases in persons aged 17 to 22 years. In fact, serogroup B meningococci were responsible for the recent meningococcal disease outbreaks on college campuses. However, development of a suitable serogroup B vaccine has been challenging, as serogroup B polysaccharide-based vaccines were found to be poorly immunogenic. Vaccine development for MnB focused on identifying potential outer membrane protein targets that elicit broadly protective immune responses across strains from the vast number of proteins that exist on the bacterial surface. Human factor H binding protein (fHBP; also known as LP2086), a conserved surface-exposed bacterial lipoprotein, was identified as a promising vaccine candidate. Two recombinant protein-based serogroup B vaccines that contain fHBP have been successfully developed and licensed in the United States under an accelerated approval process: bivalent rLP2086 (MenB-FHbp; Trumenba®) and 4CMenB (MenB-4 C; Bexsero®). This review will focus on bivalent rLP2086 only, including vaccine components, mechanism of action, and potential coverage across serogroup B strains in the United States. PMID:27467048

  5. The Development of an Experimental Multiple Serogroups Vaccine for Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Valerian B.; Burden, Robert; Wagner, Allyn; Moran, Elizabeth E.; Lee, Che-Hung

    2013-01-01

    A native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) vaccine was developed from three antigenically diverse strains of Neisseria meningitidis that express the L1,8, L2, and L3,7 lipooligosaccharide (LOS) immunotypes, and whose synX, and lpxL1 genes were deleted.. Immunogenicity studies in mice showed that the vaccine induced bactericidal antibody against serogroups B, C, W, Y and X N. meningitidis strains. However, this experimental NOMV vaccine was not effective against serogroup A N. meningitidis strains. N. meningitidis capsular polysaccharide (PS) from serogroups A, C, W and Y were effective at inducing bactericidal antibody when conjugated to either tetanus toxoid or the fHbp1-fHbp2 fusion protein fHbp(1+2). The combination of the NOMV vaccine and the N. meningitidis serogroup A capsular polysaccharide (MAPS) protein conjugate was capable of inducing bactericidal antibodies against a limited number of N. meningitidis strains from serogroups A, B, C, W, Y and X tested in this study. PMID:24244473

  6. The development of an experimental multiple serogroups vaccine for Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Valerian B; Burden, Robert; Wagner, Allyn; Moran, Elizabeth E; Lee, Che-Hung

    2013-01-01

    A native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) vaccine was developed from three antigenically diverse strains of Neisseria meningitidis that express the L1,8, L2, and L3,7 lipooligosaccharide (LOS) immunotypes, and whose synX, and lpxL1 genes were deleted.. Immunogenicity studies in mice showed that the vaccine induced bactericidal antibody against serogroups B, C, W, Y and X N. meningitidis strains. However, this experimental NOMV vaccine was not effective against serogroup A N. meningitidis strains. N. meningitidis capsular polysaccharide (PS) from serogroups A, C, W and Y were effective at inducing bactericidal antibody when conjugated to either tetanus toxoid or the fHbp1-fHbp2 fusion protein fHbp(1+2). The combination of the NOMV vaccine and the N. meningitidis serogroup A capsular polysaccharide (MAPS) protein conjugate was capable of inducing bactericidal antibodies against a limited number of N. meningitidis strains from serogroups A, B, C, W, Y and X tested in this study. PMID:24244473

  7. Identification of the integrin binding domain of the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis invasin protein.

    PubMed

    Leong, J M; Fournier, R S; Isberg, R R

    1990-06-01

    The invasin protein of the pathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis mediates entry of the bacterium into cultured mammalian cells by binding several beta 1 chain integrins. In this study, we identified the region of invasin responsible for cell recognition. Thirty-two monoclonal antibodies directed against invasin were isolated, and of those, six blocked cell attachment to invasin. These six antibodies recognized epitopes within the last 192 amino acids of invasin. Deletion mutants of invasin and maltose-binding protein (MBP)--invasin fusion proteins were generated and tested for cell attachment. All of the invasin derivatives that carried the carboxyl-terminal 192 amino acids retained cell binding activity. One carboxyl-terminal invasin fragment and seven MBP--invasin fusion proteins were purified. The purified derivatives that retained binding activity inhibited bacterial entry into cultured mammalian cells. These results indicated that the carboxyl-terminal 192 amino acids of invasin contains the integrin-binding domain, even though this region does not contain the tripeptide sequence Arg-Gly-Asp. PMID:1693333

  8. Single channel activity of OmpF-like porin from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Kotova, Elena A; Naberezhnykh, Gennadiy A; Khomenko, Valentina A; Gorbach, Vladimir I; Firsov, Alexander M; Zelepuga, Elena A; Antonenko, Yuri N; Novikova, Olga D

    2016-04-01

    To gain a mechanistic insight in the functioning of the OmpF-like porin from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YOmpF), we compared the effect of pH variation on the ion channel activity of the protein in planar lipid bilayers and its binding to lipid membranes. The behavior of YOmpF channels upon acidification was similar to that previously described for Escherichia coli OmpF. In particular, a decrease in pH of the bathing solution resulted in a substantial reduction of YOmpF single channel conductance, accompanied by the emergence of subconductance states. Similar subconductance substates were elicited by the addition of lysophosphatidylcholine. This observation, made with porin channels for the first time, pointed to the relevance of lipid-protein interactions, in particular, the lipid curvature stress, to the appearance of subconductance states at acidic pH. Binding of YOmpF to membranes displayed rather modest dependence on pH, whereas the channel-forming potency of the protein tremendously decreased upon acidification. PMID:26854962

  9. Outbreak of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis O:1 infection associated with raw milk consumption, Finland, spring 2014.

    PubMed

    Pärn, Triin; Hallanvuo, Saija; Salmenlinna, Saara; Pihlajasaari, Annika; Heikkinen, Seija; Telkki-Nykänen, Hanna; Hakkinen, Marjaana; Ollgren, Jukka; Huusko, Sari; Rimhanen-Finne, Ruska

    2015-01-01

    In March 2014, a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YP) outbreak was detected by a municipal authority in southern Finland. We conducted epidemiological, microbiological and traceback investigations to identify the source. We defined a case as a person with YP infection notified to the National Infectious Disease Registry between February and April 2014, or their household member, with abdominal pain and fever≥38 °C or erythema nodosum. Healthy household members were used as household-matched controls. We identified 43 cases and 50 controls. The illness was strongly associated with the consumption of raw milk from a single producer. The odds ratio of illness increased with the amount of raw milk consumed. Also previously healthy adults became infected by consuming raw milk. Identical YP strains were identified from cases' stool samples, raw milk sampled from a case's refrigerator and from the milk filter at the producer's farm. The producer fulfilled the legal requirements for raw milk production and voluntarily recalled the raw milk and stopped its production. We advised consumers to heat the raw milk to 72 °C for 15 s. Current legislation for raw milk producers should be reviewed and public awareness of health risks linked to raw milk consumption should be increased. PMID:26537540

  10. Effects of three oxidizing biocides on Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, E L; Tyndall, R L; Mayberry, W R; Pancorbo, O C

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the bactericidal effects of ozone and hydrogen peroxide relative to that of free chlorine on Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. In laboratory batch-type experiments, organisms seeded at various densities were exposed to different concentrations of these biocides in demand-free buffers. Bactericidal effects were measured by determining the ability of L. pneumophila to grow on buffered charcoal-yeast extract agar supplemented with alpha-ketoglutarate. Ozone was the most potent of the three biocides, with a greater than 99% kill of L. pneumophila occurring during a 5-min exposure to 0.10 to 0.30 micrograms of O3 per ml. The bactericidal action of O3 was not markedly affected by changes in pH or temperature. Concentrations of 0.30 and 0.40 micrograms of free chlorine per ml killed 99% of the L. pneumophila after 30- and 5-min exposures, respectively. A 30-min exposure to 1,000 micrograms of H2O2 per ml was required to effect a 99% reduction of the viable L. pneumophila population. However, no viable L. pneumophila could be detected after a 24-h exposure to 100 or 300 micrograms of H2O2 per ml. Attempts were made to correlate the biocidal effects of O3 and H2O2 with the oxidation of L. pneumophila fatty acids. These tests indicated that certain biocidal concentrations of O3 and H2O2 resulted in a loss or severe reduction of L. pneumophila unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:3377492

  11. Genomic Epidemiology of Hypervirulent Serogroup W, ST-11 Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Mustapha M; Marsh, Jane W; Krauland, Mary G; Fernandez, Jorge O; de Lemos, Ana Paula S; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C; Wang, Xin; Mayer, Leonard W; Lawrence, Jeffrey G; Hiller, N Luisa; Harrison, Lee H

    2015-10-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading bacterial cause of sepsis and meningitis globally with dynamic strain distribution over time. Beginning with an epidemic among Hajj pilgrims in 2000, serogroup W (W) sequence type (ST) 11 emerged as a leading cause of epidemic meningitis in the African 'meningitis belt' and endemic cases in South America, Europe, Middle East and China. Previous genotyping studies were unable to reliably discriminate sporadic W ST-11 strains in circulation since 1970 from the Hajj outbreak strain (Hajj clone). It is also unclear what proportion of more recent W ST-11 disease clusters are caused by direct descendants of the Hajj clone. Whole genome sequences of 270 meningococcal strains isolated from patients with invasive meningococcal disease globally from 1970 to 2013 were compared using whole genome phylogenetic and major antigen-encoding gene sequence analyses. We found that all W ST-11 strains were descendants of an ancestral strain that had undergone unique capsular switching events. The Hajj clone and its descendants were distinct from other W ST-11 strains in that they shared a common antigen gene profile and had undergone recombination involving virulence genes encoding factor H binding protein, nitric oxide reductase, and nitrite reductase. These data demonstrate that recent acquisition of a distinct antigen-encoding gene profile and variations in meningococcal virulence genes was associated with the emergence of the Hajj clone. Importantly, W ST-11 strains unrelated to the Hajj outbreak contribute a significant proportion of W ST-11 cases globally. This study helps illuminate genomic factors associated with meningococcal strain emergence and evolution. PMID:26629539

  12. Genomic Epidemiology of Hypervirulent Serogroup W, ST-11 Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Mustapha, Mustapha M.; Marsh, Jane W.; Krauland, Mary G.; Fernandez, Jorge O.; de Lemos, Ana Paula S.; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C.; Wang, Xin; Mayer, Leonard W.; Lawrence, Jeffrey G.; Hiller, N. Luisa; Harrison, Lee H.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading bacterial cause of sepsis and meningitis globally with dynamic strain distribution over time. Beginning with an epidemic among Hajj pilgrims in 2000, serogroup W (W) sequence type (ST) 11 emerged as a leading cause of epidemic meningitis in the African ‘meningitis belt’ and endemic cases in South America, Europe, Middle East and China. Previous genotyping studies were unable to reliably discriminate sporadic W ST-11 strains in circulation since 1970 from the Hajj outbreak strain (Hajj clone). It is also unclear what proportion of more recent W ST-11 disease clusters are caused by direct descendants of the Hajj clone. Whole genome sequences of 270 meningococcal strains isolated from patients with invasive meningococcal disease globally from 1970 to 2013 were compared using whole genome phylogenetic and major antigen-encoding gene sequence analyses. We found that all W ST-11 strains were descendants of an ancestral strain that had undergone unique capsular switching events. The Hajj clone and its descendants were distinct from other W ST-11 strains in that they shared a common antigen gene profile and had undergone recombination involving virulence genes encoding factor H binding protein, nitric oxide reductase, and nitrite reductase. These data demonstrate that recent acquisition of a distinct antigen-encoding gene profile and variations in meningococcal virulence genes was associated with the emergence of the Hajj clone. Importantly, W ST-11 strains unrelated to the Hajj outbreak contribute a significant proportion of W ST-11 cases globally. This study helps illuminate genomic factors associated with meningococcal strain emergence and evolution. PMID:26629539

  13. Preliminary Characterization of Mus musculus–Derived Pathogenic Strains of Leptospira borgpetersenii Serogroup Ballum in a Hamster Model

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Éverton F.; Félix, Samuel R.; Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; Fagundes, Michel Q.; Neto, Amilton C. P. S.; Grassmann, André A.; Amaral, Marta G.; Gallina, Tiago; Dellagostin, Odir A.

    2010-01-01

    Human and animal leptospirosis caused by Leptospira spp. belonging to serogroup Ballum has increased worldwide in the past decade. We report the isolation and serologic and molecular characterization of four L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum isolates obtained from Mus musculus, and preliminary virulence studies. These isolates are useful for diagnosis of leptospirosis and for epidemiologic studies of its virulence and pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:20682877

  14. A Novel Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Serogroup Identification of Neisseria meningitidis in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, DoKyung; Kim, Eun Jin; Kilgore, Paul E.; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohnishi, Makoto; Tomono, Jun; Miyamoto, Shigehiko; Omagari, Daisuke; Kim, Dong Wook; Seki, Mitsuko

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a novel Neisseria meningitidis serogroup-specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for six of the most common meningococcal serogroups (A, B, C, W, X, and Y). The assay was evaluated using a set of 31 meningococcal LAMP assay positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 1574 children with suspected meningitis identified in prospective surveillance between 1998 and 2002 in Vietnam, China, and Korea. Primer specificity was validated using 15 N. meningitidis strains (including serogroups A, B, C, E, W, X, Y, and Z) and 19 non-N. meningitidis species. The N. meningitidis serogroup LAMP detected down to ten copies and 100 colony-forming units per reaction. Twenty-nine CSF had N. meningitidis serogroup identified by LAMP compared with two CSF in which N. meningitidis serogroup was identified by culture and multi-locus sequence typing. This is the first report of a serogroup-specific identification assay for N. meningitidis using the LAMP method. Our results suggest that this assay will be a rapid, sensitive, and uniquely serogroup-specific assay with potential for application in clinical laboratories and public health surveillance systems. PMID:26793181

  15. Rapid O serogroup identification of the six clinically relevant Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli by antibody microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibody array was developed for the detection of the top six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O serogroups. Sensitivity of the array was 10**5 CFU, and the limit of detection of serogroups in ground beef was 1-10 CFU following 12 h of enrichment. The array utilized a minimal amount...

  16. A Novel Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Serogroup Identification of Neisseria meningitidis in Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Lee, DoKyung; Kim, Eun Jin; Kilgore, Paul E; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohnishi, Makoto; Tomono, Jun; Miyamoto, Shigehiko; Omagari, Daisuke; Kim, Dong Wook; Seki, Mitsuko

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel Neisseria meningitidis serogroup-specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for six of the most common meningococcal serogroups (A, B, C, W, X, and Y). The assay was evaluated using a set of 31 meningococcal LAMP assay positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 1574 children with suspected meningitis identified in prospective surveillance between 1998 and 2002 in Vietnam, China, and Korea. Primer specificity was validated using 15 N. meningitidis strains (including serogroups A, B, C, E, W, X, Y, and Z) and 19 non-N. meningitidis species. The N. meningitidis serogroup LAMP detected down to ten copies and 100 colony-forming units per reaction. Twenty-nine CSF had N. meningitidis serogroup identified by LAMP compared with two CSF in which N. meningitidis serogroup was identified by culture and multi-locus sequence typing. This is the first report of a serogroup-specific identification assay for N. meningitidis using the LAMP method. Our results suggest that this assay will be a rapid, sensitive, and uniquely serogroup-specific assay with potential for application in clinical laboratories and public health surveillance systems. PMID:26793181

  17. Vibrio cholerae Serogroup O139: Isolation from Cholera Patients and Asymptomatic Household Family Members in Bangladesh between 2013 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Fahima; Mather, Alison E.; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Baby, Nabilah; Sharmin, Salma; Biswas, Rajib; Ikhtear Uddin, Muhammad; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Ryan, Edward T.; Clemens, John D.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholera is endemic in Bangladesh, with outbreaks reported annually. Currently, the majority of epidemic cholera reported globally is El Tor biotype Vibrio cholerae isolates of the serogroup O1. However, in Bangladesh, outbreaks attributed to V. cholerae serogroup O139 isolates, which fall within the same phylogenetic lineage as the O1 serogroup isolates, were seen between 1992 and 1993 and in 2002 to 2005. Since then, V. cholerae serogroup O139 has only been sporadically isolated in Bangladesh and is now rarely isolated elsewhere. Methods Here, we present case histories of four cholera patients infected with V. cholerae serogroup O139 in 2013 and 2014 in Bangladesh. We comprehensively typed these isolates using conventional approaches, as well as by whole genome sequencing. Phenotypic typing and PCR confirmed all four isolates belonging to the O139 serogroup. Findings Whole genome sequencing revealed that three of the isolates were phylogenetically closely related to previously sequenced El Tor biotype, pandemic 7, toxigenic V. cholerae O139 isolates originating from Bangladesh and elsewhere. The fourth isolate was a non-toxigenic V. cholerae that, by conventional approaches, typed as O139 serogroup but was genetically divergent from previously sequenced pandemic 7 V. cholerae lineages belonging to the O139 or O1 serogroups. Conclusion These results suggest that previously observed lineages of V. cholerae O139 persist in Bangladesh and can cause clinical disease and that a novel disease-causing non-toxigenic O139 isolate also occurs. PMID:26562418

  18. Clonal Analysis of Meningococci during a 26 Year Period Prior to the Introduction of Meningococcal Serogroup C Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Christopher B.; Diggle, Mathew A.; Davies, Robert L.; Clarke, Stuart C.

    2015-01-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a public health burden in the UK and elsewhere. Invasive Neisseria meningitidis, isolated in Scotland between 1972 and 1998, were characterised retrospectively to examine the serogroup and clonal structure of the circulating population. 2607 isolates causing invasive disease were available for serogroup and MLST analysis whilst 2517 were available for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis only. Serogroup distribution changed from year to year but serogroups B and C were dominant throughout. Serogroup B was dominant throughout the 1970s and early 1980s until serogroup C became dominant during the mid-1980s. The increase in serogroup C was not associated with one particular sequence type (ST) but was associated with a number of STs, including ST-8, ST-11, ST-206 and ST-334. This is in contrast to the increase in serogroup C disease seen in the 1990s that was due to expansion of the ST-11 clonal complex. While there was considerable diversity among the isolates (309 different STs among the 2607 isolates), a large proportion of isolates (59.9%) were associated with only 10 STs. These data highlight meningococcal diversity over time and the need for ongoing surveillance during the introduction of new meningococcal vaccines. PMID:25615448

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of Brazilian Leptospira kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Kremer, Frederico S; Miraglia, Fabiana; Loureiro, Ana P; Eslabao, Marcus R; Dellagostin, Odir A; Lilenbaum, Walter; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-08-01

    Leptospira kirschneri is one of the pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus. Human and animal infection from L. kirschneri gained further attention over the last few decades. Here we present the isolation and characterisation of Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok strain M36/05 and the comparative genomic analysis with Brazilian human strain 61H. The M36/05 strain caused pulmonary hemorrhagic lesions in the hamster model, showing high virulence. The studied genomes presented high symmetrical identity and the in silico multilocus sequence typing analysis resulted in a new allelic profile (ST101) that so far has only been associated with the Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok strains. Considering the environmental conditions and high genomic similarity observed between strains, we suggest the existence of a Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok lineage that could represent a high public health risk; further studies are necessary to confirm the lineage significance and distribution. PMID:27581124

  20. Comparative genomic analysis of Brazilian Leptospira kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Kremer, Frederico S; Miraglia, Fabiana; Loureiro, Ana P; Eslabao, Marcus R; Dellagostin, Odir A; Lilenbaum, Walter; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-07-11

    Leptospira kirschneri is one of the pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus. Human and animal infection from L. kirschneri gained further attention over the last few decades. Here we present the isolation and characterisation of Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok strain M36/05 and the comparative genomic analysis with Brazilian human strain 61H. The M36/05 strain caused pulmonary hemorrhagic lesions in the hamster model, showing high virulence. The studied genomes presented high symmetrical identity and the in silico multilocus sequence typing analysis resulted in a new allelic profile (ST101) that so far has only been associated with the Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok strains. Considering the environmental conditions and high genomic similarity observed between strains, we suggest the existence of a Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok lineage that could represent a high public health risk; further studies are necessary to confirm the lineage significance and distribution. PMID:27409843

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of Brazilian Leptospira kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Kremer, Frederico S; Miraglia, Fabiana; Loureiro, Ana P; Eslabao, Marcus R; Dellagostin, Odir A; Lilenbaum, Walter; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    Leptospira kirschneri is one of the pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus. Human and animal infection from L. kirschneri gained further attention over the last few decades. Here we present the isolation and characterisation of Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok strain M36/05 and the comparative genomic analysis with Brazilian human strain 61H. The M36/05 strain caused pulmonary hemorrhagic lesions in the hamster model, showing high virulence. The studied genomes presented high symmetrical identity and the in silico multilocus sequence typing analysis resulted in a new allelic profile (ST101) that so far has only been associated with the Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok strains. Considering the environmental conditions and high genomic similarity observed between strains, we suggest the existence of a Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok lineage that could represent a high public health risk; further studies are necessary to confirm the lineage significance and distribution. PMID:27581124

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Specific Immunochromatography Based Lateral Flow Assay for Serogroup Specific Diagnosis of Leptospirosis in India

    PubMed Central

    Vanithamani, Shanmugam; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Narayanan, Ramasamy; Raja, Veerapandian; Kanagavel, Murugesan; Sivasankari, Karikalacholan; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a re-emerging infectious disease that is under-recognized due to low-sensitivity and cumbersome serological tests. MAT is the gold standard test and it is the only serogroup specific test used till date. Rapid reliable alternative serogroup specific tests are needed for surveillance studies to identify locally circulating serogroups in the study area. Methods/Principal Findings In the present investigation the serological specificity of leptospiral lipopolysaccharides (LPS) was evaluated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), dot blot assay and rapid immunochromatography based lateral flow assay (ICG-LFA). Sera samples from 120 MAT positive cases, 174 cases with febrile illness other than leptospirosis, and 121 seronegative healthy controls were evaluated for the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the developed assays. LPS was extracted from five locally predominant circulating serogroups including: Australis (27.5%), Autumnalis (11.7%), Ballum (25.8%), Grippotyphosa (12.5%), Pomona (10%) and were used as antigens in the diagnostics to detect IgM antibodies in patients’ sera. The sensitivity observed by IgM ELISA and dot blot assay using various leptospiral LPS was >90% for homologous sera. Except for Ballum LPS, no other LPS showed cross-reactivity to heterologous sera. An attempt was made to develop LPS based ICG-LFA for rapid and sensitive serogroup specific diagnostics of leptospirosis. The developed ICG-LFA showed sensitivity in the range between 93 and 100% for homologous sera. The Wilcoxon analysis showed LPS based ICG-LFA did not differ significantly from the gold standard MAT (P>0.05). Conclusion The application of single array of LPS for serogroup specific diagnosis is first of its kind. The developed assay could potentially be evaluated and employed for as MAT alternative. PMID:26340095

  3. Development of a standardized subgrouping scheme for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Joly, J R; McKinney, R M; Tobin, J O; Bibb, W F; Watkins, I D; Ramsay, D

    1986-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and a subclassification scheme were developed in a collaborative project among three laboratories. The seven most useful monoclonal antibodies were selected from three previously developed panels on the basis of indirect fluorescent antibody patterns with 83 strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 that were obtained from widely distributed geographic locations. The isolates were divided into 10 major subgroups on the basis of reactivity patterns that can be readily reproduced in any laboratory and are not subject to major inconsistencies of interpretation of staining intensity. A standard protocol for the indirect fluorescent antibody procedure was also developed. PMID:3517064

  4. The Discovery and Development of a Novel Vaccine to Protect against Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnick, Gary W; Jones, Thomas R; Liberator, Paul; Hao, Li; Harris, Shannon; McNeil, Lisa K; Zhu, Duzhang; Perez, John; Eiden, Joseph; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines have had a major impact on the reduction of many diseases globally. Vaccines targeted against invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) due to serogroups A, C, W, and Y are used to prevent these diseases. Until recently no vaccine had been identified that could confer broad protection against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB). MnB causes IMD in the very young, adolescents and young adults and thus represents a significant unmet medical need. In this brief review, we describe the discovery and development of a vaccine that has the potential for broad protection against this devastating disease. PMID:25483509

  5. Immunization for meningococcal serogroup B: What does the practitioner need to know?

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan L

    2014-01-01

    Most invasive meningococcal disease in Canada is now caused by serogroup B organisms. A vaccine directed against this serogroup (4CMenB) is newly licensed in Canada. A decision will need to be made by all provinces and territories regarding whether a routine infant immunization program is warranted. This decision will need to take into account factors such as uncertain estimates for the effectiveness of the vaccine, the high incidence of fever from the vaccine and the burden of introducing more injections into the current immunization schedule, and consider them against the potentially preventable mortality and morbidity that result from a rare but very serious disease. PMID:24596484

  6. An integrated structural proteomics approach along the druggable genome of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis species for putative druggable targets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Cp) causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), mastitis, ulcerative lymphangitis, and oedema in a number of hosts, comprising ruminants, thereby intimidating economic and dairy industries worldwide. So far there is no effective drug or vaccine available against Cp. Previously, a pan-genomic analysis was performed for both biovar equi and biovar ovis and a Pathogenicity Islands (PAIS) analysis within the strains highlighted a large set of proteins that could be relevant therapeutic targets for controlling the onset of CLA. In the present work, a structural druggability analysis pipeline was accomplished along 15 previously sequenced Cp strains from both biovar equi and biovar ovis. Methods and results We computed the whole modelome of a reference strain Cp1002 (NCBI Accession: NC_017300.1) and then the homology models of proteins, of 14 different Cp strains, with high identity (≥ 85%) to the reference strain were also done. Druggability score of all proteins pockets was calculated and only those targets that have a highly druggable (HD) pocket in all strains were kept, a set of 58 proteins. Finally, this information was merged with the previous PAIS analysis giving two possible highly relevant targets to conduct drug discovery projects. Also, off-targeting information against host organisms, including Homo sapiens and a further analysis for protein essentiality provided a final set of 31 druggable, essential and non-host homologous targets, tabulated in table S4, additional file 1. Out of 31 globally druggable targets, 9 targets have already been reported in other pathogenic microorganisms, 3 of them (3-isopropylmalate dehydratase small subunit, 50S ribosomal protein L30, Chromosomal replication initiator protein DnaA) in C. pseudotuberculosis. Conclusion Overall we provide valuable information of possible targets against C. pseudotuberculosis where some of these targets have already been reported in other

  7. Do Older Rural and Urban Veterans Experience Different Rates of Unplanned Readmission to VA and Non-VA Hospitals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, William B.; Lee, Richard E.; Wallace, Amy E.; West, Alan N.; Bagian, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Unplanned readmission within 30 days of discharge is an indicator of hospital quality. Purpose: We wanted to determine whether older rural veterans who were enrolled in the VA had different rates of unplanned readmission to VA or non-VA hospitals than their urban counterparts. Methods: We used the combined VA/Medicare dataset to examine…

  8. 75 FR 61859 - Proposed Information Collection (Create Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ...), Department of Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20420 or email nancy.kessinger@va.gov... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Create Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA... (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public comment on...

  11. Oral administration of a recombinant attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strain elicits protective immunity against plague.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Sanapala, Shilpa; Rahav, Hannah; Curtiss, Roy

    2015-11-27

    A Yersinia pseudotuberculosis PB1+ (Yptb PB1+) mutant strain combined with chromosome insertion of the caf1R-caf1A-caf1M-caf1 operon and deletions of yopJ and yopK, χ10068 [pYV-ω2 (ΔyopJ315 ΔyopK108) ΔlacZ044::caf1R-caf1M-caf1A-caf1] was constructed. Results indicated that gene insertion and deletion did not affect the growth rate of χ10068 compared to wild-type Yptb cultured at 26 °C. In addition, the F1 antigen in χ10068 was synthesized and secreted on the surface of bacteria at 37 °C (mammalian body temperature), not at ambient culture temperature (26 °C). Immunization with χ10068 primed antibody responses and specific T-cell responses to F1 and YpL (Y. pestis whole cell lysate). Oral immunization with a single dose of χ10068 provided 70% protection against a subcutaneous (s.c.) challenge with ∼ 2.6 × 10(5) LD50 of Y. pestis KIM6+ (pCD1Ap) (KIM6+Ap) and 90% protection against an intranasal (i.n.) challenge with ∼ 500 LD50 of KIM6+Ap in mice. Our results suggest that χ10068 can be used as an effective precursor to make a safe vaccine to prevent plague in humans and to eliminate plague circulation among humans and animals. PMID:26514425

  12. Estimation of the Impact of Meningococcal Serogroup C Universal Vaccination in Italy and Suggestions for the Multicomponent Serogroup B Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Domenico; Fortunato, Francesca; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Cozza, Vanessa; Chironna, Maria; Prato, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (MenC) has been offered in most regions since 2009-2010. The incidence of Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD) was 0.25 confirmed cases per 100,000 in 2011, but this may be considerably underestimated due to underdetection and underreporting. This study estimates the impact of the MenC universal vaccination (URV) in the Puglia region by assessing the completeness of three registration sources (notifications, hospitalizations, and laboratory surveillance). Capture-recapture analysis was performed on meningococcal meningitis collected within 2001–2013. The impact of URV among ≤18-year-olds was assessed by attributable benefit, preventable fraction, and prevented fraction. Missed opportunities for vaccination were evaluated from surveillance of IMD. The proportion of detected serogroups was applied to the number of IMD in the postvaccination period to compute the cases still preventable. The sensitivity of the three sources was 36.7% (95% CI: 17.5%–57.9%) and registrations lost nearly 28 cases/year in the period. Attributable benefit of URV was −0.5 cases per 100,000, preventable fraction 19.6%, and prevented fraction 31.3%. Three adolescent cases missed the opportunity to be vaccinated. The multicomponent serogroup B meningococcal vaccine has the potential to further prevent at least three other cases/year. Vaccination strategy against serogroup B together with existing programmes makes IMD a 100% vaccine-preventable disease. PMID:26351649

  13. A Survey of Serum Bactericidal Antibodies against Neisseria meningitidis Serogroups A, C, W and Y in Adolescents and Adults in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background This descriptive epidemiological study aimed to assess the prevalence of serum bactericidal antibodies against Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W and Y in adolescents and adults in the Republic of Korea. Materials and Methods In total, 987 subjects aged 11-55 years from five geographical regions of Korea were included in the study. Human serum bactericidal assay (hSBA) was used to measure hSBA titres for serogroups A, C, W and Y. Percentages of subjects with hSBA titres ≥4 and ≥8, geometric mean titres (GMTs), and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were estimated. Analysis was performed for the entire study population and stratified by age group or region. No statistical hypotheses were tested. Results The highest percentage of subjects with hSBA titres ≥8 was observed for serogroup W (74%), was similar for serogroups C (34%) and Y (36%), and was lowest for serogroup A (9%). The percentages of subjects with hSBA titres ≥4 were similar to those with hSBA titres ≥8 for all serogroups. GMTs were 2.56 µg/mL (serogroup A), 5.14 µg/mL (serogroup C), 22.63 µg/mL (serogroup W) and 5.28 µg/mL (serogroup Y). Similar trends in GMTs across serogroups were seen for individual regions and age groups. The highest GMTs for serogroups A, W and Y were recorded in the >19-29 years group, and for serogroup C in the >49-55 years group. Across all regions, GMTs were very similar for serogroups A, C and Y, while more variation was seen for serogroup W. Conclusion In the Korean population, among Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W and Y, serum bactericidal antibodies were most prevalent against serogroup W and least prevalent against serogroup A. These trends were maintained across age groups and regions. The highest GMTs for serogroups A, W and Y were observed in the >19-29 years group. The reasons behind the observed differences in prevalence of bactericidal antibodies against the serogroups are currently not understood, although carriage

  14. A direct link between the global regulator PhoP and the Csr regulon in Y. pseudotuberculosis through the small regulatory RNA CsrC.

    PubMed

    Nuss, Aaron M; Schuster, Franziska; Kathrin Heroven, Ann; Heine, Wiebke; Pisano, Fabio; Dersch, Petra

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the influence of the global response regulator PhoP on the complex regulatory cascade controlling expression of early stage virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis via the virulence regulator RovA. Our analysis revealed the following novel features: (1) PhoP activates expression of the CsrC RNA in Y. pseudotuberculosis, leading to activation of RovA synthesis through the CsrABC-RovM cascade, (2) activation of csrC transcription is direct and PhoP is shown to bind to two separate PhoP box-like sites, (3) PhoP-mediated activation results in transcription from two different promoters closely downstream of the PhoP binding sites, leading to two distinct CsrC RNAs, and (4) the stability of the CsrC RNAs differs significantly between the Y. pseudotuberculosis strains YPIII and IP32953 due to a 20 nucleotides insertion in CsrC(IP32953), which renders the transcript more susceptible to degradation. In summary, our study showed that PhoP-mediated influence on the regulatory cascade controlling the Csr system and RovA in Y. pseudotuberculosis varies within the species, suggesting that the Csr system is a focal point to readjust and adapt the genus to different hosts and reservoirs. PMID:24786463

  15. [Diagnostic value of a novel nutrient medium for isolation and cultivation of pathogens causing enteric yersiniosis and pseudotuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Saiapina, L V; Anisimova, T I; Sergeeva, G M; Kasina, I V; Shvedun, G P; Khramov, M V

    2000-01-01

    A new nutrient medium for isolation and cultivation of the causative agents of enteric yersiniosis and pseudotuberculosis was found to have advantages over Endo medium in its differentiating and inhibiting properties. This medium permitted the easy differentiation of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis from Y. enterocolitica, as well as from Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Klebsiella pneumoniae, K. rhinoscleromatis, Hafnia, Enterobacter and Citrobacter by color; from Proteus inconstans by swarming. In addition, weakly swarming of P. vulgaris differed by their light bluish color and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, by the brilliance and size of colonies. Endo medium could be used only for differentiation of E. coli from lactose-negative Yersinia colonies, Klebsiella (by mucous growth) and, to a certain extent, all Proteus species (by swarming). The medium under test and the control medium inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast to Endo medium, the medium under test partially inhibited the growth of K. rhinoscleromatis and the swarming of P. inconstans. The new medium is now introduced into practice. PMID:11210625

  16. Structure and function of cytidine monophosphate kinase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, essential for virulence but not for survival

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Nicola J.; Clark, Elizabeth A.; Ford, Donna C.; Bullifent, Helen L.; McAlister, Erin V.; Duffield, Melanie L.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Oyston, Petra C. F.

    2012-01-01

    The need for new antibiotics has become pressing in light of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of human pathogens. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a public health threat and also an agent of concern in biodefence. It is a recently emerged clonal derivative of the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Previously, we developed a bioinformatic approach to identify proteins that may be suitable targets for antimicrobial therapy and in particular for the treatment of plague. One such target was cytidine monophosphate (CMP) kinase, which is an essential gene in some organisms. Previously, we had thought CMP kinase was essential for Y. pseudotuberculosis, but by modification of the mutagenesis approach, we report here the production and characterization of a Δcmk mutant. The isogenic mutant had a growth defect relative to the parental strain, and was highly attenuated in mice. We have also elucidated the structure of the CMP kinase to 2.32 Å, and identified three key residues in the active site that are essential for activity of the enzyme. These findings will have implications for the development of novel CMP kinase inhibitors for therapeutic use. PMID:23271832

  17. The Resveratrol Tetramer (-)-Hopeaphenol Inhibits Type III Secretion in the Gram-Negative Pathogens Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zetterström, Caroline E.; Hasselgren, Jenny; Salin, Olli; Davis, Rohan A.; Quinn, Ronald J.; Sundin, Charlotta; Elofsson, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Society faces huge challenges, as a large number of bacteria have developed resistance towards many or all of the antibiotics currently available. Novel strategies that can help solve this problem are urgently needed. One such strategy is to target bacterial virulence, the ability to cause disease e.g., by inhibition of type III secretion systems (T3SSs) utilized by many clinically relevant gram-negative pathogens. Many of the antibiotics used today originate from natural sources. In contrast, most virulence-blocking compounds towards the T3SS identified so far are small organic molecules. A recent high-throughput screening of a prefractionated natural product library identified the resveratrol tetramer (-)-hopeaphenol as an inhibitor of the T3SS in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. In this study we have investigated the virulence blocking properties of (-)-hopeaphenol in three different gram-negative bacteria. (-)-Hopeaphenol was found to have micromolar activity towards the T3SSs in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cell-based infection models. In addition (-)-hopeaphenol reduced cell entry and subsequent intracellular growth of Chlamydia trachomatis. PMID:24324737

  18. KENO V.a certification package

    SciTech Connect

    Niemer, K.A.

    1994-04-01

    KENO V.a has been certified. KENO V.a is a multigroup Monte Carlo criticality program used to calculate the k-effective of a 3-D system. It is part of the SCALE modular code system for performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation. SCALE was developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to satisfy a need for a standardized method of analysis for the evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. In its present form, the system has the capability to perform criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses using well established functional modules tailored to the SCALE system. KENO V.a will be used at SRS to perform critical calculations related to nuclear criticality safety.

  19. Improvements to a PCR-based serogrouping scheme for Salmonella enterica from dairy farm samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The PCR method described by Herrera-León, et al. (Research in Microbiology 158:122-127, 2007) has proved to be a simple and useful technique for characterizing isolates of Salmonella enterica enterica belonging to serogroups B, C1, C2, D1, and E1, groups which encompass a majority of the isolates fr...

  20. A Seroepidemiological Study of Serogroup A Meningococcal Infection in the African Meningitis Belt.

    PubMed

    Manigart, Olivier; Trotter, Caroline; Findlow, Helen; Assefa, Abraham; Mihret, Wude; Moti Demisse, Tesfaye; Yeshitela, Biruk; Osei, Isaac; Hodgson, Abraham; Quaye, Stephen Laryea; Sow, Samba; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Diallo, Kanny; Traore, Awa; Collard, Jean-Marc; Moustapha Boukary, Rahamatou; Djermakoye, Oumarou; Mahamane, Ali Elhaji; Jusot, Jean-François; Sokhna, Cheikh; Alavo, Serge; Doucoure, Souleymane; Ba, El Hadj; Dieng, Mariétou; Diallo, Aldiouma; Daugla, Doumagoum Moto; Omotara, Babatunji; Chandramohan, Daniel; Hassan-King, Musa; Nascimento, Maria; Woukeu, Arouna; Borrow, Ray; Stuart, James M; Greenwood, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of epidemic meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt may be influenced by the background level of population immunity but this has been measured infrequently. A standardised enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibodies was established at five centres within the meningitis belt. Antibody concentrations were then measured in 3930 individuals stratified by age and residence from six countries. Seroprevalence by age was used in a catalytic model to determine the force of infection. Meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high in each country but showed heterogeneity across the meningitis belt. The geometric mean concentration (GMC) was highest in Ghana (9.09 μg/mL [95% CI 8.29, 9.97]) and lowest in Ethiopia (1.43 μg/mL [95% CI 1.31, 1.57]) on the margins of the belt. The force of infection was lowest in Ethiopia (λ = 0.028). Variables associated with a concentration above the putative protective level of 2 μg/mL were age, urban residence and a history of recent vaccination with a meningococcal vaccine. Prior to vaccination with the serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high across the African meningitis belt and yet the region remained susceptible to epidemics. PMID:26872255

  1. Host Response in Rabbits to Infection with Pasteurella multocida Serogroup F Strains Originating from Fowl Cholera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of two avian Pasteurella multocida serogroup F strains to induce disease in rabbits was investigated in this study. Two groups of 18 Pasteurella-free rabbits each were intranasally challenged with strains isolated from chicken and turkey, respectively. Half the animals in each challenge ...

  2. The porA gene in serogroup A meningococci: evolutionary stability and mechanism of genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Suker, J; Feavers, I M; Achtman, M; Morelli, G; Wang, J F; Maiden, M C

    1994-04-01

    Molecular analyses were applied to the genes encoding variants of the serosubtyping antigen, the class 1 outer membrane protein (PorA), from 55 serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis strains. These genes were evolutionarily stable and exhibited a limited range of genetic variation, primarily generated by recombination. Translation of the gene sequences revealed a total of 19 distinct amino acid sequences in the variable regions of the protein, 6 of which were not recognized by currently available serosubtyping monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of these amino acid sequences permitted a rational re-assignment of serosubtype names. Comparison of the complete genes with porA gene sequences from serogroup B and C meningococci showed that serogroup A possessed a limited number of the possible porA genes from a globally distributed gene pool. Each serogroup A subgroup was characterized by one of four porA gene types, probably acquired upon subgroup divergence, which was stable over periods of decades and during epidemiological spread. Comparison with other variable genes (pil and iga) indicated that the three alleles were independently assorted within the subgroup, suggesting that their gene types were older than the subgroups in which they occurred. PMID:8057850

  3. [Evaluation of the vaccine potentiality of 2 strains from Leptospira interrogans serogroup Ballum].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Andrés González; Jiménez, Yoandra Rodríguez; Santiesteban, Niurka Batista; Abreu, Yolanda Valdés; Osenes, Juan Francisco Núñez; González, Marta González

    2005-01-01

    Two vacine candidate strains from Ballum serogroup were characterized and their immunogenicity and protective power were studied in hamster. The monovalent vaccine formulations obtained showed a high immunogenicity and capacity of homologous protection and, in a lesser degree, of cross protection. PMID:17966485

  4. Widespread molecular detection of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in cold water taps across the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States 3,522 cases of legionellosis were reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009. Of these reports, it is estimated that 84% are caused by the microorganism Legionella pneumophila Serogroup (Sg) 1. Legionella spp. have been isolated and r...

  5. Optimization of the conjugation method for a serogroup B/C meningococcal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Lucila O; Schenkman, Rocilda P F; Perciani, Catia T; Carneiro, Sylvia M; Dias, Waldely O; Tanizaki, Martha M

    2006-11-01

    A conjugate meningococcal vaccine against serogroup B/C consisting of capsular PS (polysaccharide) from serogroup C conjugated to OMV (outer membrane vesicle) from serogroup B would be a very useful vaccine in regions where there is a prevalence of both serogroups, for example in Brazil. For this purpose, the conjugation method that uses ADHy (adipic acid dihydrazide) as spacer and a carbodi-imide derivative, EDAC [1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide], as catalyser was optimized looking for synthesis yield and maintenance of the antigenicity of both components. The best synthesis conditions preserving the vaccine immunogenicity resulted in a final yield of approx. 17%. Immunogenicity of the vaccine was highest when 10% of the sialic acid residues of the PS were occupied by the ADHy spacer. Sterilization of the conjugate by filtration through a 0.22-microm-pore-size membrane resulted in a low recovery of protein and PS (approximately 50%), although the vaccine immunogenicity was maintained. Using gamma irradiation on freeze-dried sample, it was possible to maintain the integrity of OMV structure and, consequently, its ability to induce bactericidal antibodies. PMID:16776648

  6. Lack of virulence factors in Escherichia coli strains of enteropathogenic serogroups isolated from water.

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, S R; Gomes, T A; Falcão, D P

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-eight Escherichia coli strains belonging to 14 human enteropathogenic serogroups were isolated from 33 of 208 water samples studied. No virulence factor or virulence-related gene sequences were found in any of the 38 strains analyzed. The results point out the importance of detecting specific virulence factors before incriminating water as a source of human diarrhea. PMID:1539989

  7. Surveillance of invasive Neisseria meningitidis with a serogroup Y update, Sweden 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Törös, B; Thulin Hedberg, S; Jacobsson, S; Fredlund, H; Olcén, P; Mölling, P

    2014-01-01

    An increase of invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y has been noted in Sweden since 2005, and to a lower extent throughout Europe. The present study describes the epidemiology of invasive N. meningitidis isolates in Sweden in the period between 2010 and 2012, with a focus on serogroup Y. We also aimed to find an optimal molecular typing scheme for both surveillance and outbreak investigations. All invasive N. meningitidis isolates in Sweden during the study period (n=208) were genetically characterised. Serogroup Y predominated with 22/57, 31/61 and 44/90 of all invasive isolates (incidence 0.23, 0.33 and 0.46 per 100,000 population) in 2010, 2011 and 2012 respectively. In each of these years, 15/22, 22/31 and 19/44 of serogroup Y isolates were genetically clonal (Y: P1.5–2,10–1,36–2: F4–1: ST-23(cc23), ‘porB allele 3–36, fHbp allele 25 and penA allele 22). Our findings further support those of others that currently recommended FetA typing could be replaced by FHbp. Moreover, in line with a previous study that we conducted, the current results indicate that highly variable multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (HV-MLVA) can be used as a first-hand rapid method for small outbreak investigations. PMID:25358044

  8. Sensitivity and selectivity of cultivation methods to recovery a specific Salmonella serogroup from hatchery plenum samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have shown that Salmonella serotypes exhibit different growth characteristics in the same enrichment (selective or non-selective) and this can cause certain serotypes like S. Enteritidis to go undetected in a sample. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the serogroup diversity reco...

  9. A Seroepidemiological Study of Serogroup A Meningococcal Infection in the African Meningitis Belt

    PubMed Central

    Manigart, Olivier; Trotter, Caroline; Findlow, Helen; Assefa, Abraham; Mihret, Wude; Moti Demisse, Tesfaye; Yeshitela, Biruk; Osei, Isaac; Hodgson, Abraham; Quaye, Stephen Laryea; Sow, Samba; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Diallo, Kanny; Traore, Awa; Collard, Jean-Marc; Moustapha Boukary, Rahamatou; Djermakoye, Oumarou; Mahamane, Ali Elhaji; Jusot, Jean-François; Sokhna, Cheikh; Alavo, Serge; Doucoure, Souleymane; Ba, El Hadj; Dieng, Mariétou; Diallo, Aldiouma; Daugla, Doumagoum Moto; Omotara, Babatunji; Chandramohan, Daniel; Hassan-King, Musa; Nascimento, Maria; Woukeu, Arouna; Borrow, Ray; Stuart, James M.; Greenwood, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of epidemic meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt may be influenced by the background level of population immunity but this has been measured infrequently. A standardised enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibodies was established at five centres within the meningitis belt. Antibody concentrations were then measured in 3930 individuals stratified by age and residence from six countries. Seroprevalence by age was used in a catalytic model to determine the force of infection. Meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high in each country but showed heterogeneity across the meningitis belt. The geometric mean concentration (GMC) was highest in Ghana (9.09 μg/mL [95% CI 8.29, 9.97]) and lowest in Ethiopia (1.43 μg/mL [95% CI 1.31, 1.57]) on the margins of the belt. The force of infection was lowest in Ethiopia (λ = 0.028). Variables associated with a concentration above the putative protective level of 2 μg/mL were age, urban residence and a history of recent vaccination with a meningococcal vaccine. Prior to vaccination with the serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high across the African meningitis belt and yet the region remained susceptible to epidemics. PMID:26872255

  10. Preclinical evidence for the potential of a bivalent fHBP vaccine to prevent Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C Disease.

    PubMed

    Harris, Shannon L; Zhu, Duzhang; Murphy, Ellen; McNeil, Lisa K; Wang, Xin; Mayer, Leonard W; Harrison, Lee H; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2011-01-01

    A bivalent factor H binding protein (fHBP) vaccine for the prevention of disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B is currently in clinical development. Since fHBP is also expressed by other meningococcal serogroups, anti-fHBP antibodies may have bactericidal activity against meningococci independent of serogroup. To begin examining the susceptibility of other meningococcal serogroups to anti-fHBP antibodies, meningococcal serogroup C invasive isolates (n = 116) were collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) sites during 2000-2001. These isolates were analyzed for the presence of the fhbp gene. All serogroup C isolates contained the gene, and sequence analysis grouped the proteins into two subfamilies, A and B. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that fHBP was expressed on the surface of ~70% of isolates in vitro with varying levels of expression. fHBP was accessible to antibodies on the cell surface even in the presence of the polysaccharide capsule. Nine isolates from different geographic regions were identified which harboured an identical single nucleotide deletion that could result in a truncated subfamily B fHBP. Analysis by flow cytometry using a polyclonal fHBP antibody preparation revealed that a subpopulation of each of these isolates expressed fHBP. Rabbit and non-human primate immune sera generated with bivalent fHBP vaccine were tested for bactericidal activity against a panel of diverse serogroup C clinical isolates using human complement. Sera from both species demonstrated serum bactericidal antibody activity against the serogroup C isolates tested. These promising findings suggest that a bivalent fHBP vaccine may be capable of providing protection against meningococcal disease caused by both serogroup C and B. PMID:21245657

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Dipstick Diagnostic Test for Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup X

    PubMed Central

    Agnememel, Alain; Traincard, François; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Mulard, Laurence; Mahamane, Ali Elhaji; Oukem-Boyer, Odile Ouwe Missi; Denizon, Mélanie; Kacou-N′douba, Adèle; Dosso, Mireille; Gake, Bouba; Lombart, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup X (NmX) in the African meningitis belt has urged the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines for this serogroup, especially following the introduction of a conjugate vaccine against N. meningitidis serogroup A (NmA). We have developed and evaluated a new rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for detecting the capsular polysaccharide (cps) antigen of this emerging serogroup. Whole inactivated NmX bacteria were used to immunize rabbits. Following purification by affinity chromatography, the cpsX-specific IgG antibodies were utilized to develop an NmX-specific immunochromatography dipstick RDT. The test was validated against purified cpsX and meningococcal strains of different serogroups. Its performance was evaluated against that of PCR on a collection of 369 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from patients living in countries within the meningitis belt (Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, and Niger) or in France. The RDT was highly specific for NmX strains. Cutoffs of 105 CFU/ml and 1 ng/ml were observed for the reference NmX strain and purified cpsX, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 94%, respectively. A high agreement between PCR and RDT (Kappa coefficient, 0.98) was observed. The RDT gave a high positive likelihood ratio and a low negative likelihood (0.07), indicating almost 100% probability of declaring disease or not when the test is positive or negative, respectively. This unique NmX-specific test could be added to the available set of RDT for the detection of meningococcal meningitis in Africa as a major tool to reinforce epidemiological surveillance after the introduction of the NmA conjugate vaccine. PMID:25411183

  12. Evaluation of the Role of the opgGH Operon in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Its Deletion during the Emergence of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Quintard, Kévin; Dewitte, Amélie; Reboul, Angéline; Madec, Edwige; Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Dondeyne, Jacqueline; Marceau, Michaël; Simonet, Michel; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Sebbane, Florent

    2015-09-01

    The opgGH operon encodes glucosyltransferases that synthesize osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) from UDP-glucose, using acyl carrier protein (ACP) as a cofactor. OPGs are required for motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in various bacteria. OpgH also sequesters FtsZ in order to regulate cell size according to nutrient availability. Yersinia pestis (the agent of flea-borne plague) lost the opgGH operon during its emergence from the enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. When expressed in OPG-negative strains of Escherichia coli and Dickeya dadantii, opgGH from Y. pseudotuberculosis restored OPGs synthesis, motility, and virulence. However, Y. pseudotuberculosis did not produce OPGs (i) under various growth conditions or (ii) when overexpressing its opgGH operon, its galUF operon (governing UDP-glucose), or the opgGH operon or Acp from E. coli. A ΔopgGH Y. pseudotuberculosis strain showed normal motility, biofilm formation, resistance to polymyxin and macrophages, and virulence but was smaller. Consistently, Y. pestis was smaller than Y. pseudotuberculosis when cultured at ≥ 37°C, except when the plague bacillus expressed opgGH. Y. pestis expressing opgGH grew normally in serum and within macrophages and was fully virulent in mice, suggesting that small cell size was not advantageous in the mammalian host. Lastly, Y. pestis expressing opgGH was able to infect Xenopsylla cheopis fleas normally. Our results suggest an evolutionary scenario whereby an ancestral Yersinia strain lost a factor required for OPG biosynthesis but kept opgGH (to regulate cell size). The opgGH operon was presumably then lost because OpgH-dependent cell size control became unnecessary. PMID:26150539

  13. Evaluation of the Role of the opgGH Operon in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Its Deletion during the Emergence of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Quintard, Kévin; Dewitte, Amélie; Reboul, Angéline; Madec, Edwige; Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Dondeyne, Jacqueline; Marceau, Michaël; Simonet, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The opgGH operon encodes glucosyltransferases that synthesize osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) from UDP-glucose, using acyl carrier protein (ACP) as a cofactor. OPGs are required for motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in various bacteria. OpgH also sequesters FtsZ in order to regulate cell size according to nutrient availability. Yersinia pestis (the agent of flea-borne plague) lost the opgGH operon during its emergence from the enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. When expressed in OPG-negative strains of Escherichia coli and Dickeya dadantii, opgGH from Y. pseudotuberculosis restored OPGs synthesis, motility, and virulence. However, Y. pseudotuberculosis did not produce OPGs (i) under various growth conditions or (ii) when overexpressing its opgGH operon, its galUF operon (governing UDP-glucose), or the opgGH operon or Acp from E. coli. A ΔopgGH Y. pseudotuberculosis strain showed normal motility, biofilm formation, resistance to polymyxin and macrophages, and virulence but was smaller. Consistently, Y. pestis was smaller than Y. pseudotuberculosis when cultured at ≥37°C, except when the plague bacillus expressed opgGH. Y. pestis expressing opgGH grew normally in serum and within macrophages and was fully virulent in mice, suggesting that small cell size was not advantageous in the mammalian host. Lastly, Y. pestis expressing opgGH was able to infect Xenopsylla cheopis fleas normally. Our results suggest an evolutionary scenario whereby an ancestral Yersinia strain lost a factor required for OPG biosynthesis but kept opgGH (to regulate cell size). The opgGH operon was presumably then lost because OpgH-dependent cell size control became unnecessary. PMID:26150539

  14. Serum antibody prevalence for Herpesvirus sylvilagus, Bacillus piliformis and California serogroup arboviruses in cottontail rabbits from Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Dressler, R L; Ganaway, J R; Storm, G L; Tzilkowski, W M

    1988-04-01

    A serologic survey of 60 eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) from three counties in Pennsylvania was conducted in March 1983. Serum antibody prevalences for Herpesvirus sylvilagus and La Crosse virus (California serogroup) were less than 4%. There was no evidence of previous exposure to either Jamestown Canyon or snowshoe hare viruses (California serogroup). Antibody to trivittatus virus (California serogroup) was found in 60% of the 20 cottontails from York County. No cottontails had antibodies to Bacillus piliformis, the etiologic agent of Tyzzer's disease. PMID:3373643

  15. 76 FR 56861 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA-4024-DR), dated 09/03/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/26..., Southampton, Suffolk City, Sussex, Virginia Beach City, Westmoreland, Williamsburg City, York. The...

  16. 77 FR 73510 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Virginia (FEMA- 4092-DR), dated 11/26/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy Incident Period:...

  17. 76 FR 70804 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Commonwealth of Virginia... Economic Injury Loans): Louisa. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Virginia:...

  18. 75 FR 24757 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00029 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA-1905-DR), dated 04/27/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storms and...

  19. 77 FR 47489 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00048 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is... State of Virginia (FEMA- 4072-DR), dated 07/27/2012. Incident: Severe Storms and Straight-line...

  20. 75 FR 9006 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00028 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA-1874-DR), dated 02/16/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and...

  1. 76 FR 40766 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00032

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00032 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of Virginia dated... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Pulaski. Contiguous Counties:...

  2. 76 FR 72020 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of Virginia dated... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Fairfax, Prince William. Contiguous Counties:...

  3. 76 FR 59765 - Virginia Disaster # VA-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00036 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of Virginia dated...: Virginia: Charles City, Chesterfield, Colonial Heights City, Dinwiddie, Hanover, Henrico, James City,...

  4. 76 FR 72022 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Virginia (FEMA- 4042-DR), dated 11/10/2011. Incident: Earthquake. Incident Period:...

  5. 76 FR 40765 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00034

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00034 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of Virginia dated...: Virginia: Bristol City, Grayson, Russell, Scott, Smyth. Tennessee: Johnson, Sullivan. The Interest...

  6. 77 FR 74908 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00051 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of Virginia dated... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Accomack. Contiguous Counties: Virginia:...

  7. 76 FR 72994 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster VA-00041 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Virginia (FEMA- 4045-DR), dated 11/17/2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee....

  8. 77 FR 38179 - Autopsies at VA Expense

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... document published in the Federal Register on December 2, 2011 (76 FR 75509), VA proposed the above... abuse; Alcoholism; Claims; Day care; Dental health; Drug abuse; Government contracts; Grant programs... statute that previously authorized certain outpatient and ambulatory care, which included...

  9. First isolation of Legionella species, including L. pneumophila serogroup 1, in Greek potting soils: possible importance for public health.

    PubMed

    Velonakis, E N; Kiousi, I M; Koutis, C; Papadogiannakis, E; Babatsikou, F; Vatopoulos, A

    2010-06-01

    A total of 21 Legionella isolates were recovered from six out of 22 samples of potting soil from the Athens area, Greece. Legionella pneumophila (serogroups 1 and 2-15) and species and serotypes included in the group of L. longbeachae serogroups 1 and 2, L. bozemanii serogroups 1 and 2, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. micdadei and L. anisa were isolated on BCYEalpha agar containing cysteine, GVPC and natamycin and on BCYEalpha agar containing cysteine, Wadowsky Yee supplement and natamycin. The bacterial load was 4000-120 000 CFU/g of potting soil. The isolation of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 from Greek potting soils is reported here for the first time. PMID:19747214

  10. Telephone Enrollment in the VA Healthcare System. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-16

    This rulemaking amends VA's medical regulations to allow veterans to complete applications for health care enrollment by telephone by providing application information to a VA employee, agreeing to VA's provisions regarding copayment liability and assignment of third-party insurance benefits, and attesting to the accuracy and authenticity of the information provided over the phone. This action will make it easier for veterans to apply to enroll and will speed VA processing of applications. PMID:26987128

  11. Molecular Characterization and Serology of Leptospira kirschneri (Serogroup Grippotyphosa) Isolated from Urine of a Mare Post-Abortion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hamond, C; Martins, G; Bremont, S; Medeiros, M A; Bourhy, P; Lilenbaum, W

    2016-05-01

    A strain of Leptospira kirschneri (serogroup Grippotyphosa) was cultured from urine of a mare post-abortion in Brazil and characterized by serogrouping, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis, PGFE, and sequencing of genes rrs and secY. Strains of L. kirschneri have apparently never been recovered from horses in tropical area, only in Europe and USA. Knowledge of local epidemiology is important to interpret genetic profiles of leptospires circulating in an area. PMID:26355500

  12. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a) VA OSDBU will review the information to establish the mentor and protégé eligibility and to ensure... charge to apply for the Mentor-Protégé Program. (b) After OSDBU completes its review and provides...

  13. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a) VA OSDBU will review the information to establish the mentor and protégé eligibility and to ensure... charge to apply for the Mentor-Protégé Program. (b) After OSDBU completes its review and provides...

  14. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a) VA OSDBU will review the information to establish the mentor and protégé eligibility and to ensure... charge to apply for the Mentor-Protégé Program. (b) After OSDBU completes its review and provides...

  15. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a) VA OSDBU will review the information to establish the mentor and protégé eligibility and to ensure... charge to apply for the Mentor-Protégé Program. (b) After OSDBU completes its review and provides...

  16. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a) VA OSDBU will review the information to establish the mentor and protégé eligibility and to ensure... charge to apply for the Mentor-Protégé Program. (b) After OSDBU completes its review and provides...

  17. Crystal Structures of the Outer Membrane Domain of Intimin and Invasin from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli and Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fairman, James W.; Dautin, Nathalie; Wojtowicz, Damian; Liu, Wei; Noinaj, Nicholas; Barnard, Travis J.; Udho, Eshwar; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2012-12-10

    Intimins and invasins are virulence factors produced by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. They contain C-terminal extracellular passenger domains that are involved in adhesion to host cells and N-terminal {beta} domains that are embedded in the outer membrane. Here, we identify the domain boundaries of an E. coli intimin {beta} domain and use this information to solve its structure and the {beta} domain structure of a Y. pseudotuberculosis invasin. Both {beta} domain structures crystallized as monomers and reveal that the previous range of residues assigned to the {beta} domain also includes a protease-resistant domain that is part of the passenger. Additionally, we identify 146 nonredundant representative members of the intimin/invasin family based on the boundaries of the highly conserved intimin and invasin {beta} domains. We then use this set of sequences along with our structural data to find and map the evolutionarily constrained residues within the {beta} domain.

  18. Effect of phenol-induced changes in lipid composition on conformation of OmpF-like porin of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sanina, Nina; Nina, Sanina; Davydova, Ludmila; Ludmila, Davydova; Bakholdina, Svetlana; Svetlana, Bakholdina; Novikova, Olga; Olga, Novikova; Pornyagina, Olga; Olga, Pornyagina; Solov'eva, Tamara; Tamara, Solov'eva; Shnyrov, Valery; Valery, Shnyrov; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Mikhail, Bogdanov

    2013-07-11

    The present work aimed to compare the effects of different lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) content in lipids derived from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis cells exposed and not exposed to phenol on the conformation of OmpF-like porin of these bacteria. Differential scanning calorimetry and intrinsic protein fluorescence showed that the 2.5-fold increase of LPE content and the corresponding increase in the phase transition temperature of bacterial lipids were accompanied by enhanced protein thermostability. Integral conformational rearrangement of protein was supported by drastic changes in the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues, likely resulting in a convergence of monomers in trimeric porin and exposure of outer tryptophan residues to the water environment. These conformational changes may impede the porin channel permeability under stress conditions in bacteria. PMID:23742936

  19. [Biological and physico-chemical properties of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis bacterial culture having the fra-operon Yersinia pestis].

    PubMed

    Byvalov, A A; Gavrilov, K E; Krupin, V V; Chebotarev, E V; Zheludkova, E V; Drubkov, V I; Smirnov, A E; Mal'kov, V N; Dupiasheva, T Iu; Pechenkin, D V; Bondarev, V P

    2008-01-01

    The biological and physico-chemical properties of cultures of two isogenous recombinant variants of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis were studied. The cell genomes of the cultures are distinguished from one another only by the presence or by the absence of the fra-operon, which is a determined attribute of the plague microbe capsule-forming process. The expression of the attribute is amplified by rising the microbial biomass cultivation temperature and stimulates the decrease in the viability of the bacteria and adaptation potential in vitro. In the warm-blooded owner organism the microbes of the capsule-forming recombinant variant are characterized by the greater residual pathogenicity and immunogenic ability to the experimental plague of the laboratory animals as compared to the reference-variant cells. These specific features could be explained by more expressed colonizing ability of the capsule-forming microbes provided by owner cells' stability to the phagocyte process. PMID:18368776

  20. Sequence analysis of the gene for a novel superantigen produced by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and expression of the recombinant protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuhiko, Ito; Abe, Jun; Kohsaka, Takao

    1995-06-01

    We previously reported that the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis produces a superantigen (YPM, Y. pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen) that expands T cells bearing V{beta}s 3, 9, 13.1, and 13.2 in an MHC class II-dependent manner. Based on the previously determined N-terminal 23 amino acids of YPM (T-D-Y-D-N-T-L-N-S-I-P-S-L-R-I-P-N-I-A-T-Y-T-G- (one-letter code)), we cloned the ypm gene and analyzed the nucleotide sequence. The gene encodes a 151-amino acid protein with a 20-amino acid signal peptide at its N terminus. The recombinant YPM expressed by the cloned gene exerted a mitogenic activity on human PBMC at a concentration of approximately 1 pg/ml. T cells bearing V{beta} 13.3 were preferentially expanded as well as T cells bearing the same V{beta} repertoires stimulated by native YPM. T cells were stimulated by the recombinant YPM in the presence of either fixed or unfixed HLA class II-transfected mouse fibroblasts. Furthermore, sequence diversity in the junctional region of the TCR {beta}-chain containing the V{beta}3 element could be observed after stimulation by the recombinant YPM. These results indicate that YPM belongs to the category of superantigens and should be included as a novel member. The amino acid sequence of the mature protein showed no significant homology to other superantigens derived from Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. This observation, together with the substantially smaller m.w. suggest that ypm must have evolved from a different ancestral gene. 67 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. The Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (CNFY) Enhances Inflammation and Yop Delivery during Infection by Activation of Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Schweer, Janina; Kulkarni, Devesha; Kochut, Annika; Pezoldt, Joern; Pisano, Fabio; Pils, Marina C.; Genth, Harald; Huehn, Jochen; Dersch, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Some isolates of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis produce the cytotoxic necrotizing factor (CNFY), but the functional consequences of this toxin for host-pathogen interactions during the infection are unknown. In the present study we show that CNFY has a strong influence on virulence. We demonstrate that the CNFY toxin is thermo-regulated and highly expressed in all colonized lymphatic tissues and organs of orally infected mice. Most strikingly, we found that a cnfY knock-out variant of a naturally toxin-expressing Y. pseudotuberculosis isolate is strongly impaired in its ability to disseminate into the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and spleen, and has fully lost its lethality. The CNFY toxin contributes significantly to the induction of acute inflammatory responses and to the formation of necrotic areas in infected tissues. The analysis of the host immune response demonstrated that presence of CNFY leads to a strong reduction of professional phagocytes and natural killer cells in particular in the spleen, whereas loss of the toxin allows efficient tissue infiltration of these immune cells and rapid killing of the pathogen. Addition of purified CNFY triggers formation of actin-rich membrane ruffles and filopodia, which correlates with the activation of the Rho GTPases, RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. The analysis of type III effector delivery into epithelial and immune cells in vitro and during the course of the infection further demonstrated that CNFY enhances the Yop translocation process and supports a role for the toxin in the suppression of the antibacterial host response. In summary, we highlight the importance of CNFY for pathogenicity by showing that this toxin modulates inflammatory responses, protects the bacteria from attacks of innate immune effectors and enhances the severity of a Yersinia infection. PMID:24244167

  2. Notes from the Field: Outbreak of Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease at a University - California, 2016.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Hope H; Han, George S; Wendorf, Kristen; Winter, Kathleen; Zipprich, Jennifer; Perti, Tara; Martinez, Linda; Arellano, Aileen; Kyle, Jennifer L; Zhang, Peng; Harriman, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    On January 31, 2016, the Santa Clara County Public Health Department (SCCPHD) was notified of a suspected case of meningococcal disease in a university undergraduate student. By February 2, two additional suspected cases had been reported in undergraduate students living on the same campus. The index patient (patient A) required intensive care, whereas patients B and C had milder illness; there were no deaths. All three patients were part of overlapping social networks and had attended the same events during the week before the onset of patient A's symptoms, but whether they had direct contact with one another could not be verified. Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis was identified in cerebrospinal fluid and blood from patient A and in blood from patient B. Serogroup B has been responsible for all U.S. college outbreaks of meningococcal disease since 2011 (1). Laboratory results for patient C were inconclusive. PMID:27227576

  3. Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C in China.

    PubMed

    Shan, X Y; Zhou, H J; Zhang, J; Zhu, B Q; Xu, L; Xu, Z; Hu, G C; Bai, A Y; Shi, Y W; Jiang, B F; Shao, Z J

    2015-10-01

    This study characterized Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C strains in China in order to establish their genetic relatedness and describe the use of multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) to provide useful epidemiological information. A total of 215 N. meningitidis serogroup C strains, obtained from 2003 to 2012 in China, were characterized by MLVA with different published schemes as well as multilocus sequence typing. (i) Based on the MLVA scheme with a combination of five highly variable loci, 203 genotypes were identified; this level of discrimination supports its use for resolving closely related isolates. (ii) Based on a combination of ten low variable loci, clear phylogenetic relationships were established within sequence type complexes. In addition, there was evidence of microevolution of VNTR loci over the decade as strain lineages spread from Anhui to other provinces, the more distant the provinces from Anhui, the higher the genetic variation. PMID:25778999

  4. Evaluation of meningitis surveillance before introduction of serogroup a meningococcal conjugate vaccine - Burkina Faso and Mali.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    Each year, 450 million persons in a region of sub-Saharan Africa known as the "meningitis belt" are at risk for death and disability from epidemic meningitis caused by serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis. In 2009, the first serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) developed solely for Africa (MenAfriVac, Serum Institute of India, Ltd.), was licensed for persons aged 1-29 years. During 2010-2011, the vaccine was introduced in the hyperendemic countries of Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger through mass campaigns. Strong meningitis surveillance is critical for evaluating the impact of PsA-TT because it was licensed based on safety and immunogenicity data without field effectiveness trials. Case-based surveillance, which includes the collection of epidemiologic and laboratory data on individual cases year-round, is recommended for countries that aim to evaluate the vaccine's impact. A key component of case-based surveillance is expansion of laboratory confirmation to include every case of bacterial meningitis because multiple meningococcal serogroups and different pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae cause meningitis that is clinically indistinguishable from that caused by serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis. Before the introduction of PsA-TT, evaluations of the existing meningitis surveillance in Burkina Faso and Mali were conducted to assess the capacity for case-based surveillance. This report describes the results of those evaluations, which found that surveillance infrastructures were strong but opportunities existed for improving data management, handling of specimens shipped to reference laboratories, and laboratory capacity for confirming cases. These findings underscore the need to evaluate surveillance before vaccine introduction so that activities to strengthen surveillance are tailored to a country's needs and capacities. PMID:23254257

  5. Cluster of Legionnaires disease cases caused by Legionella longbeachae serogroup 1, Scotland, August to September 2013.

    PubMed

    Potts, A; Donaghy, M; Marley, M; Othieno, R; Stevenson, J; Hyland, J; Pollock, K G; Lindsay, D; Edwards, G; Hanson, M F; Helgason, K O

    2013-01-01

    We report six confirmed cases of Legionnaires' disease in Scotland caused by Legionella longbeachae serogroup 1, identified over a four-week period in August–September 2013. All cases required admission to hospital intensive care facilities. All cases were amateur gardeners with frequent exposure to horticultural growing media throughout their incubation period. L. longbeachae was identified in five samples of growing media linked to five cases. Product tracing did not identify a common product or manufacturer. PMID:24342515

  6. Response Strategies against Meningitis Epidemics after Elimination of Serogroup A Meningococci, Niger.

    PubMed

    Maïnassara, Halima Boubacar; Paireau, Juliette; Idi, Issa; Pelat, Jean-Paul Moulia; Oukem-Boyer, Odile Ouwe Missi; Fontanet, Arnaud; Mueller, Judith E

    2015-08-01

    To inform epidemic response strategies for the African meningitis belt after a meningococcal serogroup A conjugate vaccine was introduced in 2010, we compared the effectiveness and efficiency of meningitis surveillance and vaccine response strategies at district and health area levels using various thresholds of weekly incidence rates. We analyzed reports of suspected cases from 3 regions in Niger during 2002-2012 (154,392 health area weeks), simulating elimination of serogroup A meningitis by excluding health area years with identification of such cases. Effectiveness was highest for health area surveillance and district vaccination (58-366 cases; thresholds 7-20 cases/100,000 doses), whereas efficiency was optimized with health area vaccination (5.6-7.7 cases/100,000 doses). District-level intervention prevented <6 cases (0.2 cases/100,000 doses). Reducing the delay between epidemic signal and vaccine protection by 2 weeks doubled efficiency. Subdistrict surveillance and response might be most appropriate for meningitis epidemic response after elimination of serogroup A meningitis. PMID:26196461

  7. DISTRIBUTION OF LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA SEROGROUPS ISOLATED FROM WATER SYSTEMS OF PUBLIC FACILITIES IN BUSAN, SOUTH KOREA.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Yeong; Park, Eun-Hee; Park, Yon-Koung; Park, Sun-Hee; Sung, Gyung-Hye; Park, Hye-Young; Lee, Young-Choon

    2016-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the major causes of legionellosis worldwide. The distribution of L. pneumophila was investigated in water systems of public facilities in Busan, South Korea during 2007 and 2013-2014. L. pneumophila was isolated from 8.3% of 3,055 samples, of which the highest isolation rate (49%) was from ships and the lowest 4% from fountains. Serogroups of L. pneumophila isolated in 2007 were distributed among serogroups (sgs) 1-7 with the exception of sg 4, while those of isolates during 2013 and 2014 included also 11 sgs ( 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 15). L. pneumophila sg 1 was predominated among isolates from fountains (75%), hotels (60%), buildings (44%), hospitals (38%), and public baths (37%), whereas sg 3 and sg 7 was the most prevalent from ships (46%) and factories (40%), respectively. The predominated serogroup of L. pneumophila isolates from hot and cooling tower water was sg 1 (35% and 46%, respectively), while from cold water was sg 3 (29%). These results should be useful for epidemiological surveys to identify sources of outbreaks of legionellosis in Busan, South Korea. PMID:27405130

  8. Response Strategies against Meningitis Epidemics after Elimination of Serogroup A Meningococci, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Paireau, Juliette; Idi, Issa; Pelat, Jean-Paul Moulia; Oukem-Boyer, Odile Ouwe Missi; Fontanet, Arnaud; Mueller, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    To inform epidemic response strategies for the African meningitis belt after a meningococcal serogroup A conjugate vaccine was introduced in 2010, we compared the effectiveness and efficiency of meningitis surveillance and vaccine response strategies at district and health area levels using various thresholds of weekly incidence rates. We analyzed reports of suspected cases from 3 regions in Niger during 2002–2012 (154,392 health area weeks), simulating elimination of serogroup A meningitis by excluding health area years with identification of such cases. Effectiveness was highest for health area surveillance and district vaccination (58–366 cases; thresholds 7–20 cases/100,000 doses), whereas efficiency was optimized with health area vaccination (5.6–7.7 cases/100,000 doses). District-level intervention prevented <6 cases (0.2 cases/100,000 doses). Reducing the delay between epidemic signal and vaccine protection by 2 weeks doubled efficiency. Subdistrict surveillance and response might be most appropriate for meningitis epidemic response after elimination of serogroup A meningitis. PMID:26196461

  9. Recognition of serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis serotype antigens by human antisera.

    PubMed Central

    Sugasawara, R J

    1985-01-01

    The antigens of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A which were recognized by human antisera were identified by Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques. The components of six prototype strains used for serotyping serogroup A meningococci were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then transferred to nitrocellulose for immunoperoxidase staining with sera collected from 10 acute-phase and 14 convalescent-phase patients. Six acute-phase sera detected six major antigens having apparent molecular weights between 14,000 and 82,000. In addition to recognizing these antigens, the convalescent-phase sera detected a protease-sensitive antigen with an apparent molecular weight of 20,000 for one strain and 27,000 for five strains, lipopolysaccharide, and the heat-modifiable proteins. The sera recognized lipopolysaccharide in a serotype-specific manner, whereas their reactions with the heat-modifiable protein were not serotype specific. Convalescent-phase sera recognized components from eight meningococcal serogroups. The concentrations of immunoglobulin G directed to capsular polysaccharide were determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; seven acute-phase sera had less than 0.39 micrograms of antibody per ml, whereas the average concentration in convalescent-phase sera was 3.22 micrograms/ml and the range was 0.40 to 7.50 micrograms/ml. Images PMID:3920147

  10. Microbiological and epidemiological investigation of the Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A epidemic in Niger in 2009: last wave before the introduction of the serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine?

    PubMed

    Collard, J M; Maman, Z; Abani, A; Mainasara, H B; Djibo, S; Yacouba, H; Maitournam, R; Sidikou, F; Nicolas, P; Rocourt, J; Jusot, J F

    2011-11-01

    The 2009 meningitis season in Niger was characterized by an early onset, beginning in the very first weeks of the year and peaking from the 12th to the 15th week with 5655 clinical cases over the 4 weeks. From 1 January 2009 to 28 June 2009 (week 26), a total of 13,733 clinical cases of meningitis were reported to the national epidemiological surveillance system with a case-fatality rate of 4·2%. During the season 25 of the 42 health districts reached the epidemic threshold and 11 the alert threshold. Reactive mass vaccination campaigns involving a total of 5 166,741 doses of the polysaccharide meningococcal bivalent (A+C) vaccine progressively controlled the outbreak in most parts of the country. A total of 3755 cerebrospinal fluid samples representing 28·1% of the suspected meningitis cases were analysed. Serogroup A meningococci were the causative agent in 97·5% of the meningococcal cases. Multi-locus sequence typing of 26 meningococal serogroup A strains showed 25 sequence type (ST)7 and one ST2859, both sequence types belonging to the ST5 clonal complex (CC5) of subgroup III. This is the largest epidemic observed in Niger since those of 1995-1996 (59,948 notified cases) and 2000 (14,633 notified cases). PMID:21251346

  11. How Involved are Non-VA Chaplains in Supporting Veterans?

    PubMed

    Kopacz, Marek S; Feldstein, Bruce D; Asekoff, Cecille Allman; Kaprow, Maurice S; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Kathy A

    2016-08-01

    In terms of supporting veteran populations, little is known of the experiences of chaplains professionally active outside of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare settings. The present study looks to examine how involved non-VA chaplains are in supporting veterans as well as their familiarity with the VA. An online survey was distributed in a convenience sample of chaplains, of which n = 39 met the inclusion criterion for this study (i.e., no past or present VA affiliation). The results find that most of the non-VA chaplains encounter veteran service users either on a weekly or monthly basis. Though familiar with VA services, non-VA chaplains were not sure of their veteran service users' VA enrollment status nor did they feel able to adequately advise their veteran service users on VA enrollment. The results suggest that non-VA chaplains actively support veteran populations. Opportunities for enhancing chaplaincy services and VA outreach programs are discussed. PMID:27023459

  12. [Use of immunomodulators isolated from marine invertebrates for reducing the toxic effects of thermostable toxin and lipopolysaccharides from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis on a macroorganism].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, T A; Logvinenko, A A; Timchenko, N F; Epshteĭn, L M; Besednova, N N

    2001-01-01

    The possibility to use immunomodulators isolated from marine invertebrates for the lowering of the toxic effects caused by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis thermoresistant toxin and lipopolysaccharide was investigated. Effects were evaluated by the animals survival rate in per cent and mice average lifetime after toxin lethal dose injection. It was shown that polypeptide gangleen when compared to timalin as well as glycanes mitilane and strombus had dose-dependent protective effect. These substances increased animals survival rate to 15-17 per cent and prolonged life period for about two times when compared to control group. These results demonstrates the possibility to use investigated immunomodulators is clinical practice at the treatment of the patients with pseudotuberculosis. PMID:11697237

  13. Molecular characterization of the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis hsp60-hsp10 operon, and evaluation of the immune response and protective efficacy induced by hsp60 DNA vaccination in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are important candidates for the development of vaccines because they are usually able to promote both humoral and cellular immune responses in mammals. We identified and characterized the hsp60-hsp10 bicistronic operon of the animal pathogen Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, a Gram-positive bacterium of the class Actinobacteria, which causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in small ruminants. Findings To construct the DNA vaccine, the hsp60 gene of C. pseudotuberculosis was cloned in a mammalian expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized by intramuscular injection with the recombinant plasmid (pVAX1/hsp60). Conclusion This vaccination induced significant anti-hsp60 IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a isotype production. However, immunization with this DNA vaccine did not confer protective immunity. PMID:21774825

  14. Prevalence and Serogroup Diversity of Salmonella for Broiler Neck Skin, Whole Carcass Rinse, and Whole Carcass Enrichment Sampling Methodologies following Air or Immersion Chilling.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, D V; Holmes, J M; Cason, J A; Cox, N A; Rigsby, L L; Buhr, R J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck skin (NS), whole carcass rinse (WCR), and whole carcass enrichment (WCE) sampling procedures for Salmonella isolation and serogroup identification from the same broiler chicken carcass treated with air or immersion chilling. Commercially processed and eviscerated broiler carcasses were collected from a commercial processing plant, individually bagged, and transported to the pilot processing plant. In experiment 1, carcasses were air chilled to 4°C. In experiment 2, carcasses were immersion chilled with or without chlorine. After air chilling, Salmonella was detected on 78% of NS and 89% of WCE samples. Only one Salmonella serogroup was detected from each of 13 Salmonella-positive NS samples, and two serogroups were detected on 1 Salmonella-positive NS sample. Only one Salmonella serogroup was detected from each of 13 Salmonella-positive WCE samples, and two serogroups were detected from 3 Salmonella-positive WCE samples. After immersion chilling without chlorine, Salmonella was detected on 38% of NS, 45% of WCR, and 100% of WCE samples. Without chlorine, the 15 Salmonella-positive NS samples included 14 samples with one serogroup and 1 sample with two serogroups. Only one Salmonella serogroup was detected from WCR samples after immersion chilling. Of 40 Salmonella-positive WCE samples, 23 had a one, 14 had two, and 3 had three Salmonella serogroups. After immersion chilling with chlorine, Salmonella was detected on 35% of NS, 0% of WCR, and 90% of WCE samples. With chlorine, the 14 Salmonella-positive NS samples included 11 samples with one serogroup and 3 samples with two serogroups. No Salmonella serogroups were detected from WCR samples after immersion chilling with 20 mg/liter free chlorine. The 36 Salmonella-positive WCE samples included 21 samples with one serogroup and 15 samples with two serogroups. NS and WCE sampling methodologies yielded similar prevalence and serogroup diversity after air chilling. However

  15. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Eurasian Collared Doves (Streptopelia decaocto) and Retrospective Study of Avian Yersiniosis at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (1990-2015).

    PubMed

    Stoute, Simone T; Cooper, George L; Bickford, Arthur A; Carnaccini, Silvia; Shivaprasad, H L; Sentíes-Cué, C Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    In February 2015, two Eurasian collared doves (Streptopelia decaocto) were submitted dead to the California Animal Health and Food Safety (CAHFS) Laboratory, Turlock branch, from a private aviary experiencing sudden, high mortality (4/9) in adult doves. In both doves, the gross and histologic lesions were indicative of acute, fatal septicemia. Grossly, there were numerous pale yellow foci, 1 to 2 mm in diameter, in the liver and spleen. Microscopically, these foci were composed of acute severe multifocal coagulative necrosis of hepatocytes and splenic pulp with infiltration of heterophils mixed with fibrin and dense colonies of gram-negative bacteria. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis was isolated from the lung, liver, spleen, heart, ovary, kidney, and trachea. The organism was susceptible to most antibiotics it was tested against, except erythromycin. Based on a retrospective study of necropsy submissions to CAHFS between 1990 and 2015, there were 77 avian case submissions of Y. pseudotuberculosis. There were 75/77 cases identified from a wide range of captive avian species from both zoo and private facilities and 2/77 cases from two backyard turkeys submitted from one premise. The largest number of cases originated from psittacine species (31/77). The lesions most commonly described were hepatitis (63/77), splenitis (49/77), pneumonia (30/77), nephritis (16/77), and enteritis (12/77). From 1990 to 2015, there was an average of three cases of avian pseudotuberculosis per year at CAHFS. Although there were no cases diagnosed in 1993 and 1994, in all other years, there were between one and eight cases of Y. pseudotuberculosis detected from avian diagnostic submissions. PMID:26953950

  16. 48 CFR 853.215-70 - VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. 853.215-70 Section 853.215-70 Federal... 853.215-70 VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA, will be used...

  17. 48 CFR 853.215-70 - VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. 853.215-70 Section 853.215-70 Federal... 853.215-70 VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA, will be used...

  18. 48 CFR 853.215-70 - VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. 853.215-70 Section 853.215-70 Federal... 853.215-70 VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA, will be used...

  19. 48 CFR 853.215-70 - VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. 853.215-70 Section 853.215-70 Federal... 853.215-70 VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA, will be used...

  20. 48 CFR 853.215-70 - VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. 853.215-70 Section 853.215-70 Federal... 853.215-70 VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA, will be used...

  1. Development of an in vitro assay based on humoral immunity for quality control of oil-adjuvant Pseudotuberculosis vaccine in Yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Fumiya; Imamura, Saiki; Nakajima, Nao; Yamamoto, Kinya; Uchiyama, Mariko; Nagai, Hidetaka; Kijima, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida is an infectious pathogen that causes Pseudotuberculosis in Yellowtail fish. In Japan, several oil-adjuvant vaccines for Pseudotuberculosis have been approved for control of infectious diseases in aquaculture. Before distribution of an approved fish vaccine, an artificial challenge test for quality control is performed by the manufacturer and National Veterinary Assay Laboratory under Pharmaceutical Law of Japan to confirm potency. In this study, artificial challenge tests with a range of five diluted or undiluted approved vaccines was performed to determine the relationship between antigen levels and vaccine efficacy. Immunization of fish with the undiluted vaccine prevented Pseudotuberculosis. Results of artificial challenge tests demonstrated vaccine efficiency was dose dependent. Agglutination assays using immune sera were performed to determine agglutination titers, which were also dose dependent. These results suggest a link between survival rate in the artificial challenge tests and agglutination titers. Western blotting analysis identified a specific protein approximately 37 kDa in size in vaccinated fish. We confirmed antibodies were produced in vaccinated fish by immunoreactions with the approved vaccine. An agglutination assay based on humoral immunoreactions would be a useful alternative to the artificial challenge test for quality control of vaccines for aquaculture. PMID:24325870

  2. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability ( R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  3. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A. Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R{sub work} = 16.2, R{sub free} = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  4. Role of VAMP3 and VAMP7 in the commitment of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to LC3-associated pathways involving single- or double-membrane vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Ligeon, Laure-Anne; Moreau, Kevin; Barois, Nicolas; Bongiovanni, Antonino; Lacorre, Delphine-Armelle; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Galli, Thierry; Lafont, Frank

    2014-09-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis can replicate inside macrophages by hijacking autophagy and blocking autophagosome acidification. In bone marrow-derived macrophages, the bacteria are mainly observed inside double-membrane vacuoles positive for LC3, a hallmark of autophagy. Here, we address the question of the membrane traffic during internalization of Yersinia investigating the role of vesicle- associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). First, we show that as in epithelial cells, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis replicates mainly in nonacidic LC3-positive vacuoles. Second, in these cells, we unexpectedly found that VAMP3 localizes preferentially to Yersinia-containing vacuoles (YCVs) with single membranes using correlative light-electron microscopy. Third, we reveal the precise kinetics of VAMP3 and VAMP7 association with YCVs positive for LC3. Fourth, we show that VAMP7 knockdown alters LC3's association with single-and multimembrane-YCVs. Finally, in uninfected epithelial cells stimulated for autophagy, VAMP3 overexpression and knockdown led respectively to a lower and higher number of double-membrane, LC3-positive vesicles. Hence, our results highlight the role that VAMPs play in selection of the pathways leading to generation of ultrastructurally different LC3 compartments and pave the way for determining the full set of docking and fusion proteins involved in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis' intravesicular life cycle. PMID:25046114

  5. Medical Student Psychiatry Examination Performance at VA and Non-VA Clerkship Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Phebe; von Schlageter, Margo Shultes; Park, EunMi; Rosenberg, Emily; Benjamin, Ashley B.; Nawar, Ola

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the effects of medical student assignment to U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center inpatient and outpatient psychiatry clerkship sites versus other university and community sites on the performance outcome measure of National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject examination scores. Methods:…

  6. LcrV Delivered via Type III Secretion System of Live Attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Enhances Immunogenicity against Pneumonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Sanapala, Shilpa; Henderson, Jeremy C.; Sam, Shandiin; Olinzock, Joseph; Trent, M. Stephen; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Here, we constructed a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis mutant strain with arabinose-dependent regulated and delayed shutoff of crp expression (araC PBAD crp) and replacement of the msbB gene with the Escherichia coli msbB gene to attenuate it. Then, we inserted the asd mutation into this construction to form χ10057 [Δasd-206 ΔmsbB868::PmsbB msbB(EC) ΔPcrp21::TT araC PBAD crp] for use with a balanced-lethal Asd-positive (Asd+) plasmid to facilitate antigen synthesis. A hybrid protein composed of YopE (amino acids [aa]1 to 138) fused with full-length LcrV (YopENt138-LcrV) was synthesized in χ10057 harboring an Asd+ plasmid (pYA5199, yopENt138-lcrV) and could be secreted through a type III secretion system (T3SS) in vitro and in vivo. Animal studies indicated that mice orally immunized with χ10057(pYA5199) developed titers of IgG response to whole-cell lysates of Y. pestis (YpL) and subunit LcrV similar to those seen with χ10057(pYA3332) (χ10057 plus an empty plasmid). However, only immunization of mice with χ10057(pYA5199) resulted in a significant secretory IgA response to LcrV. χ10057(pYA5199) induced a higher level of protection (80% survival) against intranasal (i.n.) challenge with ∼240 median lethal doses (LD50) (2.4 × 104 CFU) of Y. pestis KIM6+(pCD1Ap) than χ10057(pYA3332) (40% survival). Splenocytes from mice vaccinated with χ10057(pYA5199) produced significant levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-17 (IL-17) after restimulation with LcrV and YpL antigens. Our results suggest that it is possible to use an attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis strain delivering the LcrV antigen via the T3SS as a potential vaccine candidate against pneumonic plague. PMID:25114109

  7. Evidence from ITS sequence analysis of 31 and 110 serogroup soybean strains that extant members of the genus Bradyrhizobium are likely the products of reticulate evolutionary events

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Internally Transcribed Space (ITS) sequence of several members within each of seventeen soybean bradyrhizobial serogroups was determined to establish whether this region within each genome would serve as a convenient marker for distinguishing serogroup affinity of new isolates. With the excepti...

  8. Effect of serogroup, surface material and disinfectant on biofilm formation by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Oosterik, Leon H; Tuntufye, Huruma N; Butaye, Patrick; Goddeeris, Bruno M

    2014-12-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are responsible for significant economic losses in the poultry industry and are difficult to eradicate. Biofilm formation by APEC has the potential to reduce the efficacy of cleaning and disinfection. In this study, biofilm formation on materials used in poultry facilities by APEC strains from laying hens was determined. APEC strains were analysed for an association between biofilm forming capacity and O serogroup. The abilities of two routinely used disinfectants, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and a quaternary ammonium compound (QAC), to kill adherent cells of two strong APEC biofilm producers (05/503 and 04/40) and a non-biofilm producer (05/293) on polystyrene (PS) and polyvinylchloride (PVC) surfaces were tested. Most APEC strains were moderate (PS) or strong biofilm producers (polypropylene, PP, and PVC). Strains in serogroup O2 more often belonged to the moderate (PS) or strong (PP and PVC) biofilm producers than to other groups, while most O78 strains were weak biofilm producers. O78 strains were stronger biofilm producers on stainless steel than on PP and PVC, while O2 strains were stronger biofilm producers on PP and PVC. A concentration of 1% H2O2 killed all adherent bacteria of strains 05/503 and 04/40 on PP and PVC, while 0.5% H2O2 killed all adherent bacteria of strain 05/293. QAC at a concentration of 0.01% killed all adherent cells of strains 05/503, 04/40 and 05/293 under equal conditions. In conclusion, biofilm formation by APEC was affected by serogroup and surface material, and inactivation of APEC was dependent on the disinfectant and surface material. PMID:25455385

  9. Serogroups and virulence genotypes of Escherichia coli isolated from patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ananias, M; Yano, T

    2008-10-01

    Sixty strains of Escherichia coli, isolated by hemoculture, from septicemic Brazilian patients were evaluated to determine their serogroup and invasivity to Vero cells. All 60 patients died within 2 days of hospitalization. Furthermore, the molecular study of the following extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli-associated virulence factor (VF) genes was performed by PCR: i) adhesins: type 1 fimbria (fimH), S fimbria (sfaD/E), P fimbria (papC and papG alleles) and afimbrial adhesin (afaB/C); ii) capsule K1/K5 (kpsMTII); iii) siderophores: aerobactin (iucD), yersiniabactin (fyuA) and salmochelin (iroN); iv) toxins hemolysin (hlyA), necrotizing cytotoxic factor type 1 (cnf1) and secreted autotransporter toxin (sat); v) miscellaneous: brain microvascular endothelial cells invasion (ibeA), serum resistance (traT), colicin V (cvaC) and specific uropathogenic protein (usp). Our results showed that isolates are able to invade Vero cells (96.6%), differing from previous research on uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). The O serogroups associated with UPEC were prevalent in 60% of strains vs 11.7% of other serogroups. The PCR results showed a conserved virulence subgroup profile and a prevalence above 75% for fimH, fyuA, kpsMTII and iucD, and between 35-65% for papC, papG, sat, iroN, usp and traT. The evasion from the immunological system of the host and also iron uptake are essential for the survival of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains. Interestingly, among our isolates, a low prevalence of VF genes appeared. Therefore, the present study contributes to the identification of a bacterial profile for sepsis-associated E. coli. PMID:19030710

  10. Molecular Typing of Pathogenic Leptospira Serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae Strains Circulating in China during the Past 50 Years

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cuicai; Yang, Huimian; Li, Xiuwen; Cao, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Haijian; Zeng, Linzi; Xu, Jianmin; Xu, Yinghua; Chang, Yung-Fu; Guo, Xiaokui; Zhu, Yongzhang; Jiang, Xiugao

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is one of the most important neglected tropical infectious diseases worldwide. Icterohaemorrhagiae has been throughout recent history, and still is, the predominant serogroup of this pathogen in China. However, very little in detail is known about the serovars or genotypes of this serogroup. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, 120 epidemic strains from five geographically diverse regions in China collected over a 50 year period (1958~2008), and 8 international reference strains characterized by 16S rRNA sequencing and MLST analysis. 115, 11 and 2 strains were identified as L. interrogans, L. borgpetersenii, and L. kirschneri, respectively. 17 different STs were identified including 69 ST1 strains, 18 ST17, 18 ST128, 9 ST143 and 2 ST209. The remaining 12 strains belonged to 12 different STs. eBURST analysis demonstrated that, among the clonal complexes isolated (CCs), CC1 accounted for 73.3% (88/120) strains representing three STs: ST1, ST128 and ST98. ST1 was the most likely ancestral strain of this CC, followed by singleton CC17 (17/120) and CC143 (11/120). Further analysis of adding 116 serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae strains in the MLST database and studies previously described using global eBURST analysis and MST dendrogram revealed relatively similar ST clustering patterns with five main CCs and 8 singletons among these 244 strains. CC17 was found to be the most prevalent clone of pathogenic Leptospira circulating worldwide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that ST1 and ST17 strains were distributed among 4 distinct serovars, indicating a highly complicated relationship between serovars and STs. Conclusions/Significance Our studies demonstrated a high level of genetic diversity in the serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae strains. Distinct from ST17 or ST37 circulating elsewhere, ST1 included in CC1, has over the past 50 years or so, proven to be the most prevalent ST of pathogenic leptospires isolated in China. Moreover, the

  11. Predominant Leptospiral Serogroups Circulating among Humans, Livestock and Wildlife in Katavi-Rukwa Ecosystem, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Assenga, Justine A.; Matemba, Lucas E.; Muller, Shabani K.; Mhamphi, Ginethon G.; Kazwala, Rudovick R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease and a serious, under-reported public health problem, particularly in rural areas of Tanzania. In the Katavi-Rukwa ecosystem, humans, livestock and wildlife live in close proximity, which exposes them to the risk of a number of zoonotic infectious diseases, including leptospirosis. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional epidemiological study was carried out in the Katavi region, South-west Tanzania, to determine the seroprevalence of Leptospira spp in humans, domestic ruminants and wildlife. Blood samples were collected from humans (n = 267), cattle (n = 1,103), goats (n = 248), buffaloes (n = 38), zebra (n = 2), lions (n = 2), rodents (n = 207) and shrews (n = 11). Decanted sera were tested using the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT) for antibodies against six live serogroups belonging to the Leptospira spp, with a cutoff point of ≥ 1:160. The prevalence of leptospiral antibodies was 29.96% in humans, 30.37% in cattle, 8.47% in goats, 28.95% in buffaloes, 20.29% in rodents and 9.09% in shrews. Additionally, one of the two samples in lions was seropositive. A significant difference in the prevalence P<0.05 was observed between cattle and goats. No significant difference in prevalence was observed with respect to age and sex in humans or any of the sampled animal species. The most prevalent serogroups with antibodies of Leptospira spp were Sejroe, Hebdomadis, Grippotyphosa, Icterohaemorrhagie and Australis, which were detected in humans, cattle, goats and buffaloes; Sejroe and Grippotyphosa, which were detected in a lion; Australis, Icterohaemorrhagie and Grippotyphosa, which were detected in rodents; and Australis, which was detected in shrews. Antibodies to serogroup Ballum were detected only in humans. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that leptospiral antibodies are widely prevalent in humans, livestock and wildlife from the Katavi-Rukwa ecosystem. The disease poses a serious

  12. Molecular characterization of virulent Leptospira interrogans serogroup icterohaemorrhagiae isolated from Cavia aperea.

    PubMed

    Monte, Leonardo G; Jorge, Sérgio; Xavier, Marina A; Leal, Fernanda M A; Amaral, Marta G; Seixas, Fabiana K; Dellagostin, Odir A; Hartleben, Cláudia P

    2013-05-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonotic infection caused by pathogenic Leptospira. Synanthropic rodents are recognized carriers of leptospires; however, the role of wild rodents in the epidemiology of the disease is still incipient. In this work, we describe Leptospira strain isolated from Cavia aperea (Brazilian guinea pig). The isolated strain was characterized by partial rpoB gene sequencing, variable-number tandem-repeats and histopathological analysis. The strain was identified as Leptospira interrogans, serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae and caused clinical signs of leptospirosis in the hamster model, attesting to its virulence. In conclusion, these findings could be useful for elucidating the epidemiological role of C. aperea in leptospirosis. PMID:23435256

  13. Unusual non-serogroup O1 Vibrio cholerae bacteremia associated with liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, R; Ghafoor, M A; Nasralah, A Y

    1989-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman and a 31-year-old man with underlying liver disease presented with fever and signs of liver failure. The blood cultures in both cases yielded non-serogroup O1 Vibrio cholerae strains which were biochemically identical except that one strain was nonmotile. Despite treatment with antibiotics, the older patient died; the other patient survived. Both strains were found to be susceptible to most antibiotics tested in vitro. No apparent source of infection could be identified in either case. PMID:2592546

  14. Novel identification of expressed genes and functional classification of hypothetical proteins from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Giulia; Arena, Simona; Braconi, Daniela; Scaloni, Andrea; Santucci, Annalisa

    2007-09-01

    To implement the 2-DE database of serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis (MenA) and improve its potential of investigation in bacterial biology, cell extracts were separated by tricine-SDS-PAGE and 131 novel proteins were identified by microLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS. These identifications extended to 404, the number of MenA gene expression products characterized at the proteome level, approximately covering 20% of the total ORFs predicted from genome sequence. This technical approach was particularly useful in ascertaining expression of ribosomal as well as hypothetical proteins. Particular attention was paid to functional characterization of hypothetical proteins by means of software analyses and database searches. PMID:17849410

  15. Influence of Season and Feedlot Location on Prevalence and Virulence Factors of Seven Serogroups of Escherichia coli in Feces of Western-Canadian Slaughter Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Roger P.; Alexander, Trevor W.; McAllister, Tim A.; Reuter, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Pooled feces collected over two years from 1749 transport trailers hauling western-Canadian slaughter cattle were analysed by PCR for detection of Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157. Sequential immunomagnetic separation was then used to collect bacterial isolates (n = 1035) from feces positive for target serogroups. Isolated bacteria were tested by PCR to confirm serogroup and the presence of eae, ehxA, stx1, and stx2 virulence genes. Based on PCR screening, serogroup prevalence in feces ranged from 7.0% (O145) to 94.4% (O103) with at least 3 serogroups present in 79.5% of samples. Origin of cattle affected serogroup PCR prevalence and O157 was most prevalent in feces from south-west Alberta (P < 0.001). All serogroups demonstrated seasonal variations in PCR prevalence, with O26, O45, O103, O121, and O157 least prevalent (P < 0.001) in cooler winter months, while uncommon serogroups O111 and O145 increased in prevalence during winter (P < 0.001). However, isolates collected during winter were predominantly from serogroups O103 and O45. No seasonal variation was noted in proportion of isolates which were Shiga toxin containing E. coli (STEC; P = 0.18) or positive for Shiga toxin and eae (enterohemorrhagic E. coli; EHEC; P = 0.29). Isolates of serogroups O111, O145, and O157 were more frequently EHEC than were others, although 37.6–54.3% of isolates from other serogroups were also EHEC. Shiga-toxin genes present also varied by geographic origin of cattle (P < 0.05) in all serogroups except O157. As cattle within feedlots are sourced from multiple regions, locational differences in serogroup prevalence and virulence genes imply existence of selection pressures for E. coli and their virulence in western-Canadian cattle. Factors which reduce carriage or expression of virulence genes, particularly in non-O157 serogroups, should be investigated. PMID:27482711

  16. Immunogenicity and safety of investigational vaccine formulations against meningococcal serogroups A, B, C, W, and Y in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Saez-Llorens, Xavier; Aguilera Vaca, Diana Catalina; Abarca, Katia; Maho, Emmanuelle; Graña, Maria Gabriela; Heijnen, Esther; Smolenov, Igor; Dull, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    This phase 2 study assessed the immunogenicity, safety, and reactogenicity of investigational formulations of meningococcal ABCWY vaccines, consisting of recombinant proteins (rMenB) and outer membrane vesicle (OMV) components of a licensed serogroup B vaccine, combined with components of a licensed quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM). A total of 495 healthy adolescents were randomized to 6 groups to receive 2 doses (Months 0, 2) of one of 4 formulations of rMenB antigens, with or without OMV, combined with MenACWY-CRM, or 2 doses of rMenB alone or one dose of MenACWY-CRM then a placebo. Immunogenicity was assessed by serum bactericidal assay with human complement (hSBA) against serogroups ACWY and serogroup B test strains; solicited reactions and any adverse events (AEs) were assessed. Two MenABCWY vaccinations elicited robust ACWY immune responses, with higher seroresponse rates than one dose of MenACWY-CRM. Bactericidal antibody responses against the rMenB antigens and OMV components were highest in subjects who received 2 doses of OMV-containing MenABCWY formulations, with ≥68% of subjects achieving hSBA titers ≥5 against each of the serogroup B test strains. After the first dose, solicited local reaction rates were higher in the MenABCWY or rMenB groups than the MenACWY-CRM group, but similar across groups after the second dose, consisting mainly of transient injection site pain. Fever (≥38.0°C) was rare and there were no vaccine-related serious AEs. In conclusion, investigational MenABCWY formulations containing OMV components elicited highly immunogenic responses against meningococcal serogroups ACWY, as well as serogroup B test strains, with an acceptable safety profile. [NCT01210885]. PMID:25969894

  17. Immunogenicity and safety of investigational vaccine formulations against meningococcal serogroups A, B, C, W, and Y in healthy adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Saez-Llorens, Xavier; Aguilera Vaca, Diana Catalina; Abarca, Katia; Maho, Emmanuelle; Graña, Maria Gabriela; Heijnen, Esther; Smolenov, Igor; Dull, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    This phase 2 study assessed the immunogenicity, safety, and reactogenicity of investigational formulations of meningococcal ABCWY vaccines, consisting of recombinant proteins (rMenB) and outer membrane vesicle (OMV) components of a licensed serogroup B vaccine, combined with components of a licensed quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM). A total of 495 healthy adolescents were randomized to 6 groups to receive 2 doses (Months 0, 2) of one of 4 formulations of rMenB antigens, with or without OMV, combined with MenACWY-CRM, or 2 doses of rMenB alone or one dose of MenACWY-CRM then a placebo. Immunogenicity was assessed by serum bactericidal assay with human complement (hSBA) against serogroups ACWY and serogroup B test strains; solicited reactions and any adverse events (AEs) were assessed. Two MenABCWY vaccinations elicited robust ACWY immune responses, with higher seroresponse rates than one dose of MenACWY-CRM. Bactericidal antibody responses against the rMenB antigens and OMV components were highest in subjects who received 2 doses of OMV-containing MenABCWY formulations, with ≥68% of subjects achieving hSBA titers ≥5 against each of the serogroup B test strains. After the first dose, solicited local reaction rates were higher in the MenABCWY or rMenB groups than the MenACWY-CRM group, but similar across groups after the second dose, consisting mainly of transient injection site pain. Fever (≥38.0°C) was rare and there were no vaccine-related serious AEs. In conclusion, investigational MenABCWY formulations containing OMV components elicited highly immunogenic responses against meningococcal serogroups ACWY, as well as serogroup B test strains, with an acceptable safety profile. [NCT01210885] PMID:25969894

  18. First Use of a Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine in the US in Response to a University Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Lucy A.; Shumate, Alice M.; Johnsen, Peter; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Patel, Manisha; Bhavsar, Tina; Cohn, Amanda C.; Dinitz-Sklar, Jill; Duffy, Jonathan; Finnie, Janet; Garon, Denise; Hary, Robert; Hu, Fang; Kamiya, Hajime; Kim, Hye-Joo; Kolligian, John; Neglia, Janet; Oakley, Judith; Wagner, Jacqueline; Wagner, Kathy; Wang, Xin; Yu, Yon; Montana, Barbara; Tan, Christina; Izzo, Robin; Clark, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2013–2014, an outbreak of serogroup B meningococcal disease occurred among persons linked to a New Jersey university (University A). In the absence of a licensed serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine in the US, the Food and Drug Administration authorized use of an investigational MenB vaccine to control the outbreak. An investigation of the outbreak and response was undertaken to determine the population at risk and assess vaccination coverage. Methods The epidemiologic investigation relied on compilation and review of case and population data, laboratory typing of meningococcal isolates, and unstructured interviews with university staff. Vaccination coverage data were collected during the vaccination campaign held under an expanded access Investigational New Drug protocol. Results Between March 25, 2013 and March 10, 2014, 9 cases of serogroup B meningococcal disease occurred in persons linked to University A. Laboratory typing results were identical for all 8 isolates available. Through May 14, 2014, 89.1% coverage with the two-dose vaccination series was achieved in the target population. From the initiation of MenB vaccination through February 1, 2015, no additional cases of serogroup B meningococcal disease occurred in University A students. However, the 9th case occurred in March 2014 in an unvaccinated close contact of University A students. Conclusions No serogroup B meningococcal disease cases occurred in persons who received 1 or more doses of 4CMenB vaccine, suggesting 4CMenB may have protected vaccinated individuals from disease. However, the 9th case demonstrates that carriage of serogroup B Nesisseria meningitidis among vaccinated persons was not eliminated. PMID:25917990

  19. Sequential Outbreaks Due to a New Strain of Neisseria Meningitidis Serogroup C in Northern Nigeria, 2013-14

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Anna; Uadiale, Kennedy; Kamau, Charity; Caugant, Dominique A.; Ango, Umar; Greig, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (NmC) outbreaks occur infrequently in the African meningitis belt; the most recent report of an outbreak of this serogroup was in Burkina Faso, 1979. Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) has been responding to outbreaks of meningitis in northwest Nigeria since 2007 with no reported cases of serogroup C from 2007-2012. MenAfrivac®, a serogroup A conjugate vaccine, was first used for mass vaccination in northwest Nigeria in late 2012. Reactive vaccination using polysaccharide ACYW135 vaccine was done by MSF in parts of the region in 2008 and 2009; no other vaccination campaigns are known to have occurred in the area during this period. We describe the general characteristics of an outbreak due to a novel strain of NmC in Sokoto State, Nigeria, in 2013, and a smaller outbreak in 2014 in the adjacent state, Kebbi. Methods Information on cases and deaths was collected using a standard line-list during each week of each meningitis outbreak in 2013 and 2014 in northwest Nigeria. Initial serogroup confirmation was by rapid Pastorex agglutination tests. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from suspected meningitis patients were sent to the WHO Reference Laboratory in Oslo, where bacterial isolates, serogrouping, antimicrobial sensitivity testing, genotype characterisation and real-time PCR analysis were performed. Results In the most highly affected outbreak areas, all of the 856 and 333 clinically suspected meningitis cases were treated in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Overall attack (AR) and case fatality (CFR) rates were 673/100,000 population and 6.8% in 2013, and 165/100,000 and 10.5% in 2014. Both outbreaks affected small geographical areas of less than 150km2 and populations of less than 210,000, and occurred in neighbouring regions in two adjacent states in the successive years. Initial rapid testing identified NmC as the causative agent. Of the 21 and 17 CSF samples analysed in Oslo, NmC alone was confirmed in 11 and 10

  20. Characterization of vaccine antigens of meningococcal serogroup W isolates from Ghana and Burkina Faso from 2003 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Ispasanie, Emma; Pluschke, Gerd; Hodgson, Abraham; Sie, Ali; MacLennan, Calman; Koeberling, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial meningitis and a considerable health problem in the 25 countries of the 'African Meningitis Belt' that extends from Senegal in West Africa to Ethiopia in the East. Approximately 80% of cases of meningococcal meningitis in Africa have been caused by strains belonging to capsular serogroup A. After the introduction of a serogroup A conjugate polysaccharide vaccine, MenAfriVac (™), that began in December 2010, the incidence of meningitis due to serogroup A has markedly declined in this region. Currently, serogroup W of N. meningitidis accounts for the majority of cases. Vaccines based on sub-capsular antigens, such as Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA), are under investigation for use in Africa. To analyse the antigenic properties of a serogroup W wave of colonisation and disease, we investigated the molecular diversity of the protein vaccine antigens PorA, Neisserial Adhesin A (NadA), Neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA) and factor H binding protein (fHbp) of 31 invasive and carriage serogroup W isolates collected as part of a longitudinal study from Ghana and Burkina Faso between 2003 and 2009. We found that the isolates all expressed fHbp variant 2 ID 22 or 23, differing from each other by only one amino acid, and a single PorA subtype of P1.5,2. Of the isolates, 49% had a functional nhbA gene and 100% had the nadA allele 3, which contained the insertion sequence IS1301 in five isolates. Of the W isolates tested, 41% had high fHbp expression when compared with a reference serogroup B strain, known to be a high expresser of fHbp variant 2. Our results indicate that in this collection of serogroup W isolates, there is limited antigenic diversification over time of vaccine candidate outer membrane proteins (OMP), thus making them promising candidates for inclusion in a protein-based vaccine against meningococcal meningitis for Africa. PMID:25901274

  1. Characterization of vaccine antigens of meningococcal serogroup W isolates from Ghana and Burkina Faso from 2003 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Ispasanie, Emma; Pluschke, Gerd; Hodgson, Abraham; Sie, Ali; MacLennan, Calman; Koeberling, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial meningitis and a considerable health problem in the 25 countries of the ‘African Meningitis Belt’ that extends from Senegal in West Africa to Ethiopia in the East. Approximately 80% of cases of meningococcal meningitis in Africa have been caused by strains belonging to capsular serogroup A. After the introduction of a serogroup A conjugate polysaccharide vaccine, MenAfriVac ™, that began in December 2010, the incidence of meningitis due to serogroup A has markedly declined in this region. Currently, serogroup W of N. meningitidis accounts for the majority of cases. Vaccines based on sub-capsular antigens, such as Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA), are under investigation for use in Africa. To analyse the antigenic properties of a serogroup W wave of colonisation and disease, we investigated the molecular diversity of the protein vaccine antigens PorA, Neisserial Adhesin A (NadA), Neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA) and factor H binding protein (fHbp) of 31 invasive and carriage serogroup W isolates collected as part of a longitudinal study from Ghana and Burkina Faso between 2003 and 2009. We found that the isolates all expressed fHbp variant 2 ID 22 or 23, differing from each other by only one amino acid, and a single PorA subtype of P1.5,2. Of the isolates, 49% had a functional nhbA gene and 100% had the nadA allele 3, which contained the insertion sequence IS1301 in five isolates. Of the W isolates tested, 41% had high fHbp expression when compared with a reference serogroup B strain, known to be a high expresser of fHbp variant 2. Our results indicate that in this collection of serogroup W isolates, there is limited antigenic diversification over time of vaccine candidate outer membrane proteins (OMP), thus making them promising candidates for inclusion in a protein-based vaccine against meningococcal meningitis for Africa. PMID:25901274

  2. YscU/FlhB of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Harbors a C-terminal Type III Secretion Signal.

    PubMed

    Login, Frédéric H; Wolf-Watz, Hans

    2015-10-23

    All type III secretion systems (T3SS) harbor a member of the YscU/FlhB family of proteins that is characterized by an auto-proteolytic process that occurs at a conserved cytoplasmic NPTH motif. We have previously demonstrated that YscUCC, the C-terminal peptide generated by auto-proteolysis of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis YscU, is secreted by the T3SS when bacteria are grown in Ca(2+)-depleted medium at 37 °C. Here, we investigated the secretion of this early T3S-substrate and showed that YscUCC encompasses a specific C-terminal T3S signal within the 15 last residues (U15). U15 promoted C-terminal secretion of reporter proteins like GST and YopE lacking its native secretion signal. Similar to the "classical" N-terminal secretion signal, U15 interacted with the ATPase YscN. Although U15 is critical for YscUCC secretion, deletion of the C-terminal secretion signal of YscUCC did neither affect Yop secretion nor Yop translocation. However, these deletions resulted in increased secretion of YscF, the needle subunit. Thus, these results suggest that YscU via its C-terminal secretion signal is involved in regulation of the YscF secretion. PMID:26338709

  3. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis uses Ail and YadA to circumvent neutrophils by directing Yop translocation during lung infection.

    PubMed

    Paczosa, Michelle K; Fisher, Michael L; Maldonado-Arocho, Francisco J; Mecsas, Joan

    2014-02-01

    A Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yptb) murine model of lung infection was previously developed using the serotype III IP2666NdeI strain, which robustly colonized lungs but only sporadically disseminated to the spleen and liver. We demonstrate here that a serotype Ib Yptb strain, IP32953, colonizes the lungs at higher levels and disseminates more efficiently to the spleen and liver compared with IP2666NdeI . The role of adhesins was investigated during IP32953 lung infection by constructing isogenic Δail, Δinv, ΔpsaE and ΔyadA mutants. An IP32953ΔailΔyadA mutant initially colonized but failed to persist in the lungs and disseminate to the spleen and liver. Yptb expressing these adhesins selectively bound to and targeted neutrophils for translocation of Yops. This selective targeting was critical for virulence because persistence of the ΔailΔyadA mutant was restored following intranasal infection of neutropenic mice. Furthermore, Ail and YadA prevented killing by complement-mediated mechanisms during dissemination to and/or growth in the spleen and liver, but not in the lungs. Combined, these results demonstratethat Ail and YadA are critical, redundant virulence factors during lung infection, because they thwart neutrophils by directing Yop-translocation specifically into these cells. PMID:24119087

  4. [Outbreaks of pseudotuberculosis and intestinal yersiniosis among Soviet specialists and members of their families in the Mongolian People's Republic].

    PubMed

    Markov, I S; Tkachenko, V I; Silin, D D

    1989-08-01

    In summer and winter of 1986 two outbreaks of alimentary enteric diseases occurred among Soviet specialists and members of their families in Ulan Bator. These diseases were identified as Yersinia infections registered in Mongolia for the first time. In July 114 children in a kindergarten fell ill after being fed with salad prepared from vegetables and spring onions supplied from a nearby state farm. 20 Y. pseudotuberculosis cultures, serovar 1, were isolated, and in 25 persons antibodies to the isolated microorganisms were detected; altogether 32% of cases were confirmed by laboratory methods. During the December outbreak 187 persons were affected, among them 90% of children, through the consumption of imported oranges and tangerines, simultaneous infection with Y. enterocolitica, serovars 05.27 and 09, and hepatitis A virus being observed. The fact of associated infection was registered after the simultaneous detection of the markers of viral hepatitis A and Yersinia infection in 61 patients. In the kindergarten the disease produced a typical clinical picture of Far Eastern scarlatiniform fever, and in winter the abdominal forms of the disease prevailed. In cases of combined Yersinia and viral infection a specific variant of acute hepatitis developed; as regards this variant, the authors present heretofore unknown information on its epidemiology, clinical features and outcome. PMID:2686302

  5. 38 CFR 1.203 - Information to be reported to VA Police.

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    2014-07-01

    ... reported to VA Police. 1.203 Section 1.203 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... be reported to VA Police. Information about actual or possible violations of criminal laws related to... occurs on VA premises, will be reported by VA management officials to the VA police component...

  6. 38 CFR 1.203 - Information to be reported to VA Police.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reported to VA Police. 1.203 Section 1.203 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... be reported to VA Police. Information about actual or possible violations of criminal laws related to... occurs on VA premises, will be reported by VA management officials to the VA police component...

  7. 38 CFR 1.203 - Information to be reported to VA Police.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reported to VA Police. 1.203 Section 1.203 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... be reported to VA Police. Information about actual or possible violations of criminal laws related to... occurs on VA premises, will be reported by VA management officials to the VA police component...

  8. 38 CFR 1.203 - Information to be reported to VA Police.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reported to VA Police. 1.203 Section 1.203 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... be reported to VA Police. Information about actual or possible violations of criminal laws related to... occurs on VA premises, will be reported by VA management officials to the VA police component...

  9. 38 CFR 1.203 - Information to be reported to VA Police.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reported to VA Police. 1.203 Section 1.203 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... be reported to VA Police. Information about actual or possible violations of criminal laws related to... occurs on VA premises, will be reported by VA management officials to the VA police component...

  10. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  11. 12 CFR 3.205 - VaR-based measure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... portfolio of correlation trading positions that is modeled under § 3.209. A national bank or Federal savings... proxies are used. (b) Quantitative requirements for VaR-based measure. (1) The VaR-based measure must be... association's trading portfolio over a full business cycle. A national bank or Federal savings...

  12. 12 CFR 324.205 - VaR-based measure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of correlation trading positions that is modeled under § 324.209. An FDIC-supervised institution may.... (b) Quantitative requirements for VaR-based measure. (1) The VaR-based measure must be calculated on... of at least six months representing the volatility of the FDIC-supervised institution's...

  13. 38 CFR 17.71 - Revocation of VA approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... revocation of VA approval, VA health care personnel shall: (1) Cease referring veterans to the community residential care facility; and, (2) Notify any veteran residing in the community residential care facility of... health care personnel shall notify that person or entity of the community residential care...

  14. 38 CFR 17.71 - Revocation of VA approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... revocation of VA approval, VA health care personnel shall: (1) Cease referring veterans to the community residential care facility; and, (2) Notify any veteran residing in the community residential care facility of... health care personnel shall notify that person or entity of the community residential care...

  15. 38 CFR 17.71 - Revocation of VA approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... revocation of VA approval, VA health care personnel shall: (1) Cease referring veterans to the community residential care facility; and, (2) Notify any veteran residing in the community residential care facility of... health care personnel shall notify that person or entity of the community residential care...

  16. 38 CFR 17.71 - Revocation of VA approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... revocation of VA approval, VA health care personnel shall: (1) Cease referring veterans to the community residential care facility; and, (2) Notify any veteran residing in the community residential care facility of... health care personnel shall notify that person or entity of the community residential care...

  17. 76 FR 60713 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bumpass, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Airspace at Bumpass, VA, to accommodate the new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures serving Lake Anna... establish Class E airspace at Bumpass, VA (76 FR 45479) Docket No. FAA-2011-0377. Interested parties were... for Lake Anna Airport. This action is necessary for the safety and management of IFR operations at...

  18. 78 FR 76061 - Authorization for Non-VA Medical Services

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    2013-12-16

    ..., Health professions, Health records, Homeless, Mental health programs, Nursing homes, Reporting and.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On November 28, 2012, VA proposed a rule in the Federal Register, at 77 FR 70967, to... for that disability. On the same date, VA published a companion direct final rule at 77 FR 70893...

  19. 78 FR 63143 - VA Dental Insurance Program-Federalism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AO86 VA Dental Insurance Program--Federalism AGENCY: Department of... its regulations related to the VA Dental Insurance Program (VADIP), a pilot program to offer premium-based dental insurance to enrolled veterans and certain survivors and dependents of...

  20. 76 FR 34576 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Waynesboro, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ...) to amend Class E airspace at Eagle's Nest Airport, Waynesboro, VA (75 FR 14820) Docket No. FAA-2010..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Waynesboro, VA...

  1. 77 FR 25592 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; James River, Hopewell, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; James River, Hopewell, VA AGENCY... Memorial Bridge, at mile 65.0, across the James River, at Hopewell, VA. This deviation is necessary to... schedule, the SR 156/Benjamin Harrison Memorial Bridge, at mile 65.0, across the James River, at...

  2. 76 FR 52230 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Forest, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ... Airspace at Forest, VA, to accommodate the new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS..., VA (76 FR 34196) Docket No. FAA-2011-0378. Interested parties were invited to participate in this... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory...

  3. 33 CFR 80.510 - Chesapeake Bay Entrance, VA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay Entrance, VA. 80.510 Section 80.510 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.510 Chesapeake Bay Entrance, VA....

  4. FACILITIES FOR EDUCATION IN VA HOSPITALS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GREEN, ALAN C.; AND OTHERS

    THIS STUDY WAS AUTHORIZED BY THE VA DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY FOR THE PURPOSE OF IDENTIFYING AND DETERMINING THE FACILITIES NEEDED TO PROPERLY HOUSE AND SUPPORT EDUCATION ACTIVITIES IN EXISTING AND FUTURE VA HOSPITALS AND TO PRODUCE ARCHITECTURAL GUIDANCE IN THE DESIGN OF THE FACILITIES. CURRENT PRACTICES AND SIGNIFICANT TRENDS IN MEDICAL…

  5. Altodouro, a new Leptospira serovar of the Pomona serogroup isolated from rodents in northern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Paiva-Cardoso, Maria das Neves; Arent, Zbigniew; Gilmore, Colm; Hartskeerl, Rudy; Ellis, William A

    2013-01-01

    A Leptospira strain (designated RIM 139) was isolated from the kidney of a house-mouse, Mus musculus, in Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro region of northern Portugal. The isolate showed typical leptospiral motility and morphology under dark-field microscopy and was pathogenic for hamsters. Species determination was carried out on basis of PCR products generated by species-specific primers and by sequencing of the secY gene. Putative serogroup typing was performed using the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) with a panel of rabbit anti-Leptospira sera representative of the major pathogenic serogroups. Serovar identification was carried out by a combination of monoclonal antibodies and cross-agglutinin absorption test (CAAT). The novel nature of the strain was confirmed by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA). Results showed that RIM 139 represents a new serovar. The name Altodouro is proposed for this new serovar. Speciation findings - PCR analysis of the ompL1 gene and sequencing of the secY gene - indicated that it belonged to Leptospira kirschneri as did amplification with G1/G2 and B64-I/B64-II the primer sets. PMID:23070280

  6. Genomic resolution of an aggressive, widespread, diverse and expanding meningococcal serogroup B, C and W lineage

    PubMed Central

    Lucidarme, Jay; Hill, Dorothea M.C.; Bratcher, Holly B.; Gray, Steve J.; du Plessis, Mignon; Tsang, Raymond S.W.; Vazquez, Julio A.; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Efron, Adriana M.; Gorla, Maria C.; Findlow, Jamie; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C.J.; Borrow, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of meningitis and septicaemia. The hyperinvasive ST-11 clonal complex (cc11) caused serogroup C (MenC) outbreaks in the US military in the 1960s and UK universities in the 1990s, a global Hajj-associated serogroup W (MenW) outbreak in 2000–2001, and subsequent MenW epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa. More recently, endemic MenW disease has expanded in South Africa, South America and the UK, and MenC cases have been reported among European and North American men who have sex with men (MSM). Routine typing schemes poorly resolve cc11 so we established the population structure at genomic resolution. Methods Representatives of these episodes and other geo-temporally diverse cc11 meningococci (n = 750) were compared across 1546 core genes and visualised on phylogenetic networks. Results MenW isolates were confined to a distal portion of one of two main lineages with MenB and MenC isolates interspersed elsewhere. An expanding South American/UK MenW strain was distinct from the ‘Hajj outbreak’ strain and a closely related endemic South African strain. Recent MenC isolates from MSM in France and the UK were closely related but distinct. Conclusions High resolution ‘genomic’ multilocus sequence typing is necessary to resolve and monitor the spread of diverse cc11 lineages globally. PMID:26226598

  7. [THE INFECTION INDUCED BY STREPTOCOCCUS OF SEROGROUP B IN PREGNANT WOMEN, PUERPERA AND NEWBORNS].

    PubMed

    Naumkina, E V; Abrosimova, O A; Pakhalkova, E V; Rogatikh, N A; Mironov A Yu

    2016-02-01

    The streptococci of serogroup B (Streptococcus agalactiae) are one of major etiologic agents responsible for occurrence of severe perinatal infections in puerpera and newborns. The prevalence of streptococci of group B is analyzed in various categories of women (stage of preconception training, pregnancy, puerpera) and newborns transferred for particular reasons to second stage of raising. The data of microbiological monitoring during four years was involved. It is established that prevalence of carriage of streptococci of serogroup B in genital tracts of women of reproductive age on territory of Omsk consists 6-8% in different categories of female patients and has no tendency to decrease. In most cases, high or moderate level of dissemination, association with other opportunistic microorganisms. The perinatal infection of premature newborns with low body mass at birth with S. agalactiae results in clinical manifestation of generalized infectious process. The infection of healthy premature newborns most often does not result in severe infectious pathology. However; in the half of all cases development of local (significantly more rarely - generalized) pyoinflammatory induced by S. agalactiae as both isolated and in association with other opportunistic microorganisms. The relatively high rate of realization of potential of agent in newborns of risk group requires attention to the issues of diagnostic of carriage of streptococci group B in pregnant women, inclusion of this type of analysis into standards of observation for given category of female patients with purpose of timely sanitation, development and elaboration of standards of laboratory analysis on this agent. PMID:27455565

  8. Characterization of Leptospira santarosai Serogroup Grippotyphosa Serovar Bananal Isolated from Capybara ( Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris ) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Miraglia, Fabiana; Marvulo, Maria F V; Silva, Jean C R; Paula, Catia D; Costa, Barbara L P; Morais, Zenaide M; Ferreira, Fernando; Neto, José S Ferreira; Dellagostin, Odir A; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-07-01

    Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonosis caused by bacteria of the genus Leptospira. Rodents appear to be the most important reservoirs of infection. They contaminate the environment and food and can transmit the pathogen when they are consumed by carnivores. Capybara ( Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris ) are efficient reservoirs of Leptospira, and because they are in close contact with farm animals and are found in semiurban areas, they represent a risk to public health. We isolated five Leptospira strains from capybara kidneys in Sao Paulo State, Brazil, in 2001 and typed them using serologic and molecular techniques. These strains include the Leptospira santarosai serogroup Grippotyphosa serovar Bananal. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis resulted in a unique pattern distinct from the reference strains, and the isolates clustered with greater than 85% similarity. The isolates also presented higher growth rates than other Leptospira serovars, with high minimal inhibitory concentration values for most of the tested antibiotics, with the exception of penicillin and ampicillin. This isolation and characterization of the L. santarosai serogroup Grippotyphosa serovar Bananal from capybara, highlights the importance of wild and sinantropic rodents as carriers of pathogenic leptospires. PMID:27258408

  9. Meningococcal serogroup B vaccine in Italy: state-of-art, organizational aspects and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, C; Chiesa, V; Odone, A

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes severe invasive meningococcal diseases (IMDs) in humans including meningitis and septicemia, responsible for serious clinical conditions and leading to life-long disabilities and death. Serogroup B dominates IMDs burden in Italy, accounting for over 60% of total cases. On January 2013 the European Medicine Agency (EMA) licensed the first serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine in Europe. A number of European countries and Regions have introduced the new MenB vaccine in their immunization schedule, including Italy. In this paper we present the state of art, related critical issues and future perspectives of MenB vaccine introduction in Italy, in the context of the most recent available epidemiological data. In particular, we systematically assess the ongoing processes in the 8 Italian regions and one autonomous province that have already introduced MenB vaccine. With the new 2014-2018 National Vaccine Prevention Plan including active MenB vaccine offer about to be adopted, it is of fundamental importance to gather further evidence on MenB vaccine clinical effectiveness, duration of protection and cost-effectiveness. Italian regions are called to organize and manage MenB immunization programs. Careful consideration will need to be devoted on timing, doses, and co-administration with other vaccines but also to economic assessments and strengthened communication to the general public. Our data will help to plan, implement and evaluate MenB immunization programmes in other Italian and international settings. PMID:26788733

  10. Global incidence of serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Shruti; Greenwood, Brian; Head, Christopher; Plotkin, Stanley A; Sáfadi, Marco A; Saha, Samir; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Tomori, Oyewale; Gessner, Bradford D

    2015-11-01

    Use of recently licensed vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (NmB) will depend partly on disease burden estimates. We systematically reviewed NmB incidence and mortality worldwide between January, 2000, and March, 2015, incorporating data from 37 articles and 12 websites. Most countries had a yearly invasive NmB incidence of less than 2 per 100,000 people. Within these relatively low incidence rates (compared with common causes of invasive bacterial diseases), substantial variation was detected between countries, with a notably higher incidence in Australia, Europe, North America, and South America. China and India had reports only of sporadic cases, and except for South Africa, sub-Saharan Africa showed a near absence of disease. In countries with consistently collected data, NmB incidence has tended to decrease, even as the proportion of invasive meningococcal disease cases caused by serogroup B has increased. With few exceptions, case-fatality ratios were fairly consistent, ranging between 3% and 10%. In high-income countries, incidence rates of NmB were relatively low compared with other vaccine-preventable diseases and might be decreasing. High case-fatality ratios, substantial disease-related morbidity, and the threat of outbreaks could nevertheless make NmB an attractive target for preventive and reactive immunisation programmes. The low availability of data from low-income and middle-income countries suggests the need for improved surveillance before vaccination strategies are designed. PMID:26453240

  11. Vector and host relationships of California serogroup viruses in western Siberia.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, C J; Lvov, S D; Savage, H M; Calisher, C H; Smith, G C; Lvov, D K; Gubler, D J

    1993-07-01

    During 1990 and 1991, adult mosquitoes were collected along the Ob River and its tributaries in western Siberia from approximately 51 degrees 18'N to 66 degrees 4'N. Fifteen virus strains were isolated from 74,196 mosquitoes tested in 1,874 pools. These included Tahyna virus from Aedes cataphylla-punctor subgroup (one) and Ae. excrucians (one), and Inkoo (INK) virus from Ae. communis (one), Ae. communis subgroup (one), Ae. hexodontus (two), Ae. punctor subgroup (two), Ae. punctor complex (one), and unidentified Aedes species (three). In addition, a single Ae. euedes yielded a strain of snowshoe hare (SSH) virus and a strain of Getah, an alphavirus. A Bunyamwera serogroup virus was isolated from Ae. excrucians. With the exception of the two isolates from a single mosquito, minimum infection rates among mosquito taxa ranged from 0.4 to 16.7 per 1,000. The INK virus isolates were widely distributed geographically; however, seven of the 10 isolates were from two sites north of the Arctic Circle. During 1991, sera from two mouse species, five vole species, and four shrew species were collected along the upper Ob River for serologic tests. The prevalence of neutralizing antibody to SSH virus in these sera was 80%. Prevalence rates in the four most abundant species were Apodemus agrarius, 73%; Clethrionomys rutilus, 71%; Microtus arvalis, 80%; and Sorex araneus, 91%. This is the first attempt to clarify the vector and vertebrate host relationships of California serogroup viruses in western Siberia. PMID:8352392

  12. Escherichia coli O-antigen gene clusters of serogroups O62, O68, O131, O140, O142, and O163: DNA sequences and similarity between O62 and O68, and PCR-based serogrouping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The DNA sequences of the O-antigen gene clusters of the Escherichia coli serogroups O62, O131, O140, O142 and O163 were determined. There were 9-14 open reading frames (ORFs) identified, encoding genes required for O-antigen sugar biosynthesis, transfer, and processing. Primers based on the wzx (O...

  13. Molecular Characterization of the Escherichia coli Serogroup O117, O126, and O146 O Antigen Gene Clusters and Development of PCR Assays Targeting Serogroup O117-, O126-, and O146-Specific DNA Sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The O antigen gene clusters of Escherichia coli serogroups O117, O126, and O146 were sequenced, and eleven, ten, and eleven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, respectively. Genes required for O antigen sugar biosynthesis, sugar transfer and sugar processing in these O-antigen gene clusters...

  14. Use of Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccines in Persons Aged ≥10 Years at Increased Risk for Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2015.

    PubMed

    Folaranmi, Temitope; Rubin, Lorry; Martin, Stacey W; Patel, Manisha; MacNeil, Jessica R

    2015-06-12

    In October 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensed the first serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine (MenB-FHbp [Trumenba, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, Inc.]) as a 3-dose series. In January 2015, FDA licensed a second MenB vaccine (MenB-4C [Bexsero, Novartis Vaccines]) as a 2-dose series. Both vaccines were approved for use in persons aged 10-25 years. Following outbreaks of serogroup B meningococcal disease on two college campuses in 2013, both MenB vaccines were granted Breakthrough Therapy designations, which expedites drug development and review by FDA, and were licensed based on accelerated approval regulations. On February 26, 2015, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended use of MenB vaccines among certain groups of persons aged ≥10 years who are at increased risk for serogroup B meningococcal disease. This report summarizes information on MenB administration and provides recommendations and guidance for use of these vaccines among persons aged ≥10 years in certain groups who are at increased risk for serogroup B meningococcal disease, and reviews the evidence considered by ACIP to make these recommendations. Recommendations for broader use of MenB vaccines in adolescents and college students will be considered separately by ACIP. PMID:26068564

  15. DNA sequence and analysis of the O-antigen gene clusters of Escherichia coli serogroups O62, O68, O131, O140, O142, and O163 and serogroup-specific PCR assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The DNA sequence of the O-antigen gene clusters of Escherichia coli serogroups O62, O68, O131, O140, O142, and O163 was determined. There were 9 to 12 open reading frames (ORFs) identified, encoding genes required for O-antigen sugar biosynthesis, transfer, and processing. Primers based on the wzx...

  16. CD8(+) T cells specific to a single Yersinia pseudotuberculosis epitope restrict bacterial replication in the liver but fail to provide sterilizing immunity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haiqian; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Blanchette, Krystle; Crimmins, Gregory; Bergman, Molly A; Isberg, Ralph R; Orihuela, Carlos J; Dube, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    CD8(+) T cells use contact-dependent cytolysis of target cells to protect the host against intracellular pathogens. We have previously shown that CD8(+) T cells and perforin are required to protect against the extracellular pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Here we establish an experimental system where CD8(+) T cells specific to a single model antigen are the only memory response present at time of challenge. Using mice immunized with a vaccine strain of Listeria monocytogenes that expresses secreted ovalbumin (Lm-OVA), we show that OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells are generated and provide limited protection against challenge with virulent OVA(+)Y. pseudotuberculosis. Perforin expression by OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells was required, as Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-deficient mice showed higher bacterial burden as compared to Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-sufficient mice. Surprisingly, antigen-specific T cell protection waned over time, as Lm-OVA-immune mice eventually succumbed to Yersinia infection. Kinetic analysis of infection in mice with and without OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells revealed that bacterial numbers increased sharply in OVA-naïve mice until death, while OVA-immune mice held bacterial burden to a lower level throughout the duration of illness until death. Clonal analysis of bacterial populations in OVA-naïve and OVA-immune mice at distinct time points revealed equivalent and severe bottle-neck effects for bacteria in both sets of mice immediately after intravenous challenge, demonstrating a dominant role for other aspects of the immune system regardless of CD8(+) T cell status. These studies indicate that CD8(+) T cells against a single antigen can restrict Y. pseudotuberculosis colonization in a perforin-dependent manner, but ultimately are insufficient in their ability to provide sterilizing immunity and protect against death. PMID:27268148

  17. 76 FR 79067 - Payment or Reimbursement for Emergency Treatment Furnished by Non-VA Providers in Non-VA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...- connected conditions. As explained in a notice of proposed rulemaking published on June 11, 2010 (75 FR... with Non- VA Outpatient Care''. 75 FR 7218 (Feb. 18, 2010). Second, section 402(b)(3) made the... proposed rule published on June 11, 2010 (75 FR 33216), we proposed to amend the following VA...

  18. Development of a multiplexed fluorescent immunoassay for the quantitation of antibody responses to four Neisseria meningitidis serogroups.

    PubMed

    Martins, Thomas B; Jaskowski, Troy D; Tebo, Anne; Hill, Harry R

    2009-03-15

    Neisseria meningitidis is a gram-negative bacterium causing disease world wide with a fatality rate of 5-10%. Five serogroups, A, B, C, Y and W-135 are responsible for virtually all cases of the disease in humans. We have developed a multiplexed assay for the simultaneous quantitation of IgG antibody responses to the four most immunogenic (A, C, Y, and W-135) N. meningitidis serogroups. A simple and less manipulative method was employed for conjugation of the capsular polysaccharide antigens to the microspheres. The multiplex assay compared well with traditional individual ELISAs, but demonstrated greater than 1 log increase in dynamic range and sensitivity. Specificity studies of the multiplex assay showed greater than 95% homologous inhibition and less than 5% heterologous inhibition for all four serogroups. Intra and inter-assay CVs were generally less than 10% and the limit of detection was <600 pg/ml. The multiplexed assay proved to be reproducible as well as specific and sensitive when compared to the standardized ELISAs. Advantages included a greater dynamic range and simultaneous detection of antibody responses to the four serogroups contained in the tetravalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine. PMID:19159627

  19. Differentiating non-0157:H7 STEC serogroups from ground beef plated on agar media by hyperspetral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: The development of an assay to detect and confirm a positive non-O157:H7 isolate is challenging when mixed morphologically results are obtained from the serogroups growing on Rainbow agar. Rainbow agar is only claimed by the manufacturer to be very specific for E.coli O157:H7 strain...

  20. Neisseria meningitidis serogroup 29E (Z') septicemia in a patient with far advanced multiple myeloma (plasma cell leukemia).

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, E; Brown, A E; Kiehn, T E; Lee, B J; Armstrong, D

    1985-01-01

    A case of septicemia caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup 29E (Z') in a patient with plasma cell leukemia is described. The patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation, had a cardiopulmonary arrest, and died. The effects of altered immune function leading to a predisposition to meningococcal infections are discussed. PMID:3920242

  1. Phenotypic and Genotypic Diversity of the Flagellin Gene (fliC) among Clostridium difficile Isolates from Different Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Tasteyre, Albert; Karjalainen, Tuomo; Avesani, Véronique; Delmée, Michel; Collignon, Anne; Bourlioux, Pierre; Barc, Marie-Claude

    2000-01-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic diversity of the flagellin gene (fliC) of Clostridium difficile was studied in 47 isolates from various origins belonging to the serogroups A, B, C, D, F, G, H, I, K, X, and S3. Electron microscopy revealed 17 nonflagellated strains and 30 flagellated strains. PCR and reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the flagellin gene was present in all strains and that the fliC gene was expressed in both flagellated and nonflagellated strains. Southern blotting showed the presence of only one copy of the gene and three different hybridization patterns. DNA sequence analysis of fliC from the strains belonging to serogroups C, D, and X, representative of each profile, disclosed great variability in the central domain, whereas the N- and C-terminal domains were conserved. The variability of the flagellin gene fliC was further studied in the isolates by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Nine different RFLP groups were identified (I to IX), among which three (I, VII, and VIII) corresponded to numerous serogroups whereas the six others (II, III, IV, V, VI, and IX) belonged to a single serogroup. Flagellin gene RFLP analysis could constitute an additional typing method employable in conjunction with other typing methods currently available. PMID:10970353

  2. Structural comparison of O-antigen gene clusters of Legionella pneumophila and its application of a serogroup-specific multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Tian, Zhenyang; Wang, Suwei; Zhu, Zhiyan; Sun, Yamin; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2015-12-01

    The Legionella pneumophila serogroups O1, O4, O6, O7, O10 and O13 are pathogenic strains associated with pneumonia. The surface O-antigen gene clusters of L. pneumophila serogroups O4, O6, O7, O10 and O13 were sequenced and analyzed, with the function annotated on the basis of homology to that of the genes of L. pneumophila serogroup O1 (L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1). The gene locus of the six L. pneumophila serogroups contains genes of yvfE, neuABCD, pseA-like for nucleotide sugar biosynthesis, wecA for sugar transfer, and wzm as well as wzt for O-antigen processing. The detection of O-antigen genes allows the fine differentiation at species and serogroup level without the neccessity of nucleotide sequencing. The O-antigen-processing genes wzm and wzt, which were found to be distinctive for different for different serogroups, have been used as the target genes for the detection and identification of L. pneumophila strains of different O serogroups. In this report, a multiplex PCR assay based on wzm or wzt that diferentiates all the six serogroups by amplicon size was developed with the newly designed specific primer pairs for O1 and O7, and the specific primer pairs for O4, O6, O10, and O13 reported previously. The array was validated by analysis of 34 strains including 15 L. pneumophila O-standard reference strains, eight reference strains of other Legionella non-pneumophila species, six other bacterial species, and five L. pneumophila environmental isolates. The detection sensitivity was one ng genomic DNA. The accurate and sensitive assay is suitable for the identification and detection of strains of these serogroups in environmental and clinical samples. PMID:26415652

  3. Approach to the Discovery, Development, and Evaluation of a Novel Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Green, Luke R; Eiden, Joseph; Hao, Li; Jones, Tom; Perez, John; McNeil, Lisa K; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a research and development pathway to identify and demonstrate the efficacy of a Neisseria meningitidis non-capsular vaccine, the recently licensed N. meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) vaccine, Trumenba(®). While other approaches have been followed in the identification of a MnB vaccine (Pizza et al. Science 287:1816-1820, 2000), the methods described here reflect the distinctive approach and experiences in discovering and developing Trumenba(®). In contrast to the development and licensure of polysaccharide-conjugate vaccines against meningococcal serotypes A, C, W, and Y, the development of a vaccine to produce broadly protective antibodies against meningococcal serogroup B has proved difficult, due to the antigenic mimicry of the serogroup B polysaccharide capsule, which is composed of polysialic acid structures similar to those expressed on human neuronal cells. Early development efforts for these vaccines failed because the MnB polysaccharide structures resemble autoantigens and thus were poorly immunogenic. The development of an MnB vaccine has therefore focused on non-polysaccharide approaches. It was critical to identify MnB cell surface-exposed antigens capable of inducing a protective response against diverse, circulating strains of invasive MnB to ensure global coverage. Once candidate antigens were identified, it was important to characterize antigenic variation and expression levels, and subsequently to assure that antigens were expressed broadly among diverse clinical isolates. Prior to the initiation of clinical trials in humans, candidate vaccine antigens were tested in functional immunogenicity assays and yielded responses that were correlated with protection from meningococcal disease. These functional immunogenicity assays (serum bactericidal assays using human complement, hSBAs) measure the titer of complement-dependent bactericidal antibodies in serum from immunized test animals using diverse clinical MnB isolates as

  4. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 subgrouping by monoclonal antibodies--an epidemiological tool.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, I. D.; Tobin, J. O.; Dennis, P. J.; Brown, W.; Newnham, R.; Kurtz, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies was used to subgroup 326 strains of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. All but two strains could be classified into three major subgroups named after their representative strains Pontiac 1, Olda and Bellingham 1. Of the 50 isolates from patients, 44 representing 32 separate incidents were of the Pontiac subgroup. This subgroup was also found in 16 of 18 buildings epidemiologically associated with Legionnaires' Disease. In contrast, strains of the Olda subgroup predominated in buildings where no infections had occurred. In 9 of the 11 incidents where isolates were available from at least one patient as well as from the suspected environmental source, the monoclonal antibody reaction patterns of strains from patients were identical to those of one or more of their environmental counterparts. PMID:3905954

  5. Proteus mirabilis RMS 203 as a new representative of the O13 Proteus serogroup.

    PubMed

    Palusiak, Agata; Siwińska, Małgorzata; Zabłotni, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The unique feature of some Proteus O-polysaccharides is occurrence of an amide of galacturonic acid with N(ε)-[(S/R)-1-Carboxyethyl]-L-lysine, GalA6(2S,8S/R-AlaLys). The results of the serological studies presented here, with reference to known O-antigens structures suggest that GalA6(2S,8S/R-AlaLys) or 2S,8R-AlaLys contribute to cross-reactions of O13 Proteus antisera, and Proteeae LPSs. It was also revealed that the Proteus mirabilis RMS 203 strain can be classified into the O13 serogroup, represented so far by two strains: Proteus mirabilis 26/57 and Proteus vulgaris 8344. The O13 LPS is a serologically important antigen with a fragment common to LPSs of different species in the Proteeae tribe. PMID:26645323

  6. Purification of capsular polysaccharide from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pato, Tânia Pinheiro; Barbosa, Antonio de Pádua R; da Silva Junior, José Godinho

    2006-03-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C capsular polysaccharide (MenCPS) is an important antigen against meningococcal infection. This paper describes a new purification methodology employing liquid chromatography that resulted in a polysaccharide showing the characteristics recommended by the World Health Organization for vaccine purposes. In this method, steps of the traditional procedure that yield low recovery and use toxic materials were modified. The present process consists in the following steps: (1) continuous flow centrifugation of the culture for removal of the cells; (2) supernatant concentration by tangential filtration (100 kDa cutoff); (3) addition of 0.5% DOC, heating to 55 degrees C during 30 min and tangential filtration (100 kDa cutoff); (4) anion exchange chromatography (Source 15Q) and (5) size exclusion chromatography (Sepharose CL-4B). The polysaccharide C fraction obtained in that way was dialyzed and freeze-dried. The structural identity of the polysaccharide was demonstrated by (1)H-NMR spectrometry. PMID:16469547

  7. Characterization of epidemic and nonepidemic Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A strains from Sudan and Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Salih, M A; Danielsson, D; Bäckman, A; Caugant, D A; Achtman, M; Olcén, P

    1990-01-01

    A random selection of 25 strains isolated during an epidemic caused by serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis in Sudan (1988), 3 preepidemic meningococcal strains (1985), and 26 serogroup A strains isolated from sporadic cases of meningitis in Sweden (1973 to 1987) were assessed for multilocus enzyme genotypes (ETs), DNA restriction enzyme patterns, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharides, pilus formation, and antibiograms. All of the 25 Sudanese epidemic isolates and 22 of the Swedish strains were of the same or closely related ETs (ETs 3, 4, and 5), corresponding to clone III-1, which has been responsible for two pandemic waves in the last three decades. The earlier pandemic involved Scandinavia, and the last one caused an outbreak during the pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia (August 1987), spreading to Sudan, Chad, and Ethiopia. The three Sudanese preepidemic isolates (1985) were clone IV-1 (sulfonamide susceptible), which has been resident in the African meningitis belt for the last 25 years. The uniformity of clone III-1 strains (all sulfonamide resistant) from Sudan and Sweden was confirmed by DNA restriction enzyme patterns. ETs 3, 4, and 5 from Sudan and Sweden had 86 to 100% similarity to a Swedish clone III-1 reference strain, whereas ETs 1, 2, 6, and 7 showed 50 to 80% similarity. Class 1 protein for clone III-1 showed serosubtype antigens P1.9 and P1.x, whereas ET6 strains (clone IV-1) had serosubtype P1.7. Lipopolysaccharides were variable in the Sudanese and Swedish strains. Pili were expressed in all clone III-1 isolates from Sudan and Sweden but in none of the clone IV-1 isolates (Sudan, 1985). Images PMID:1975593

  8. Development of a glycoconjugate vaccine to prevent meningitis in Africa caused by meningococcal serogroup X.

    PubMed

    Micoli, Francesca; Romano, Maria Rosaria; Tontini, Marta; Cappelletti, Emilia; Gavini, Massimiliano; Proietti, Daniela; Rondini, Simona; Swennen, Erwin; Santini, Laura; Filippini, Sara; Balocchi, Cristiana; Adamo, Roberto; Pluschke, Gerd; Norheim, Gunnstein; Pollard, Andrew; Saul, Allan; Rappuoli, Rino; MacLennan, Calman A; Berti, Francesco; Costantino, Paolo

    2013-11-19

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide, especially in the African meningitis belt, and has a high associated mortality. The meningococcal serogroups A, W, and X have been responsible for epidemics and almost all cases of meningococcal meningitis in the meningitis belt over the past 12 y. Currently no vaccine is available against meningococcal X (MenX). Because the development of a new vaccine through to licensure takes many years, this leaves Africa vulnerable to new epidemics of MenX meningitis at a time when the epidemiology of meningococcal meningitis on the continent is changing rapidly, following the recent introduction of a glycoconjugate vaccine against serogroup A. Here, we report the development of candidate glycoconjugate vaccines against MenX and preclinical data from their use in animal studies. Following optimization of growth conditions of our seed MenX strain for polysaccharide (PS) production, a scalable purification process was developed yielding high amounts of pure MenX PS. Different glycoconjugates were synthesized by coupling MenX oligosaccharides of varying chain length to CRM197 as carrier protein. Analytical methods were developed for in-process control and determination of purity and consistency of the vaccines. All conjugates induced high anti-MenX PS IgG titers in mice. Antibodies were strongly bactericidal against African MenX isolates. These findings support the further development of glycoconjugate vaccines against MenX and their assessment in clinical trials to produce a vaccine against the one cause of epidemic meningococcal meningitis that currently cannot be prevented by available vaccines. PMID:24191022

  9. A serological survey of Australian wildlife for antibodies to Leptospires of the Hebdomadis serogroup.

    PubMed

    Durfee, P T; Presidente, P J

    1979-04-01

    A serological survey for antibodies to Leptospira interrograns serovar hardjo was conducted on 574 serum samples from 10 native and 4 introduced wildlife species in south-eastern Australia. The microscopic agglutination (MA) test was used, and titres to hardjo antigen were detected in 33.5% of 352 brushtailed possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) sampled in several areas of Victoria. Prevalence of reactors ranged from 14 to 66% in 4 populations examined intensively. Serovar balcanica was isolated from possums with hardjo antibodies from two different areas. Of 20 wombats Vombatus ursinus) examined in Victoria, antibodies to hardjo were found in sera from 4 and titres to Pyrogenes and Pomona serogroups were detected in another. Hardjo antibodies were demonstrated in sera from 13 of 19 rusa deer (Cervus timorensis). Negative MA test results to hardjo antigens were recorded in 55 mountain possums (T. caninus), 63 macropods (Macropus spp.), 17 water rats (Hydrmys chrysogaster), 39 fallow deer (Dama dama), 2 hog deer (Axis porcinus) and 2 water buffalo (Bubalus bubalus). No MA antibodies to any of 16 leptospiral serogroups were detected in 17 water rats tested. Kidneys were examined from 330 of these animals and focal interstitial nephritis suggestive of leptospirosis was found in kidneys of 63 of 169 T. vulpecula, 3 of 55 T. caninus, 12 of 18 V. ursinus, 6 of 22 Macropus spp., 9 of 16 H. chrysogaster, 5 of 11 C. timorensis and 3 of 39 D. dama. A statistical association between focal interstitial nephritis and MA antibodies to hardjo was found in T. vulpecula. PMID:485984

  10. Development of a glycoconjugate vaccine to prevent meningitis in Africa caused by meningococcal serogroup X

    PubMed Central

    Micoli, Francesca; Romano, Maria Rosaria; Tontini, Marta; Cappelletti, Emilia; Gavini, Massimiliano; Proietti, Daniela; Rondini, Simona; Swennen, Erwin; Santini, Laura; Filippini, Sara; Balocchi, Cristiana; Adamo, Roberto; Pluschke, Gerd; Norheim, Gunnstein; Pollard, Andrew; Saul, Allan; Rappuoli, Rino; MacLennan, Calman A.; Berti, Francesco; Costantino, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide, especially in the African meningitis belt, and has a high associated mortality. The meningococcal serogroups A, W, and X have been responsible for epidemics and almost all cases of meningococcal meningitis in the meningitis belt over the past 12 y. Currently no vaccine is available against meningococcal X (MenX). Because the development of a new vaccine through to licensure takes many years, this leaves Africa vulnerable to new epidemics of MenX meningitis at a time when the epidemiology of meningococcal meningitis on the continent is changing rapidly, following the recent introduction of a glycoconjugate vaccine against serogroup A. Here, we report the development of candidate glycoconjugate vaccines against MenX and preclinical data from their use in animal studies. Following optimization of growth conditions of our seed MenX strain for polysaccharide (PS) production, a scalable purification process was developed yielding high amounts of pure MenX PS. Different glycoconjugates were synthesized by coupling MenX oligosaccharides of varying chain length to CRM197 as carrier protein. Analytical methods were developed for in-process control and determination of purity and consistency of the vaccines. All conjugates induced high anti-MenX PS IgG titers in mice. Antibodies were strongly bactericidal against African MenX isolates. These findings support the further development of glycoconjugate vaccines against MenX and their assessment in clinical trials to produce a vaccine against the one cause of epidemic meningococcal meningitis that currently cannot be prevented by available vaccines. PMID:24191022

  11. A structural comparison of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis loci of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major immuno-dominant antigen of all Legionella species including L. pneumophila. Its diversity is the basis for the classification of L. pneumophila into serogroups and monoclonal subgroups and is thought to be involved in strain specific virulence. The understanding of the genetic basis of the LPS-antigen is incomplete. Thus, we analyzed the genetic locus involved in LPS-biosynthesis of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (Sg1) strains with the focus on strain specific gene composition. Results The LPS-biosynthesis loci of 14 L. pneumophila Sg1 strains comprise two distinct regions: A 15 kb region containing LPS-biosynthesis genes that can be found in all L. pneumophila strains and a Sg1-specific 18 kb region. The 15 kb region is highly conserved among Sg1 strains as reflected by high homologies of single ORFs and by a consistent ORF arrangement. In contrast, the Sg1 specific 18 kb region is variable and partially disrupted by phage related genes. We propose that the region spanning from ORF 6 to ORF 11 of the Sg1-specific region is likely involved in late LPS-modification. Due to the high variability of this small region and various combinations of single ORFs within this region a strain specific LPS-structure could be synthesized including modifications of legionaminic acid derivates. Conclusions Our data clearly demonstrate that the gene structure of the LPS-biosynthesis locus of L. pneumophila Sg1 strains show significant interstrain variability. These data can be used for further functional analysis of the LPS synthesis to understand pathogenesis and reactivity with monoclonal antibodies. Moreover, variable but strain specific regions can serve as basis for the development of novel genotyping assays. PMID:24069939

  12. Genomic characterization of a large outbreak of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in Quebec City, 2012.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Simon; Plante, Pier-Luc; Mendis, Nilmini; Cantin, Philippe; Marchand, Geneviève; Charest, Hugues; Raymond, Frédéric; Huot, Caroline; Goupil-Sormany, Isabelle; Desbiens, François; Faucher, Sébastien P; Corbeil, Jacques; Tremblay, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2012, a major Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 outbreak occurred in Quebec City, Canada, which caused 182 declared cases of Legionnaire's disease and included 13 fatalities. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates from 23 patients as well as from 32 cooling towers located in the vicinity of the outbreak were recovered for analysis. In addition, 6 isolates from the 1996 Quebec City outbreak and 4 isolates from patients unrelated to both outbreaks were added to allow comparison. We characterized the isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, sequence-based typing, and whole genome sequencing. The comparison of patients-isolated strains to cooling tower isolates allowed the identification of the tower that was the source of the outbreak. Legionella pneumophila strain Quebec 2012 was identified as a ST-62 by sequence-based typing methodology. Two new Legionellaceae plasmids were found only in the epidemic strain. The LVH type IV secretion system was found in the 2012 outbreak isolates but not in the ones from the 1996 outbreak and only in half of the contemporary human isolates. The epidemic strains replicated more efficiently and were more cytotoxic to human macrophages than the environmental strains tested. At least four Icm/Dot effectors in the epidemic strains were absent in the environmental strains suggesting that some effectors could impact the intracellular replication in human macrophages. Sequence-based typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis combined with whole genome sequencing allowed the identification and the analysis of the causative strain including its likely environmental source. PMID:25105285

  13. Three-dimensional structures of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis at 1.4 Å resolution and its complex with an antibacterial drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Uridine phosphorylases play an essential role in the cellular metabolism of some antibacterial agents. Acute infectious diseases (bubonic plague, yersiniosis, pseudotuberculosis, etc., caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia) are treated using both sulfanilamide medicines and antibiotics, including trimethoprim. The action of an antibiotic on a bacterial cell is determined primarily by the character of its interactions with cellular components, including those which are not targets (for example, with pyrimidine phosphorylases). This type of interaction should be taken into account in designing drugs. The three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) with the free active site was determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography and refined at 1.40 Å resolution (DPI = 0.062 Å; ID PDB: 4OF4). The structure of the complex of YptUPh with the bacteriostatic drug trimethoprim was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics methods. The trimethoprim molecule was shown to be buffered by the enzyme YptUPh, resulting in a decrease in the efficiency of the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia with trimethoprim.

  14. DNA sequencing of the gene encoding a bacterial superantigen, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen (YPM), and characterization of the gene product, cloned YPM

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kato, Hidehito; Uchiyama, Takehiko

    1995-05-15

    Previously, we found a novel bacterial superantigen from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, designated Y. pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen (YPM). In the present study, we analyzed the DNA sequence of the gene encoding YPM. The YPM gene was cloned into a plasmid vector pMW119 and expressed in Escherichia coli DH10B. Like the native YPM, the cloned YPM required the expression of MHC class II molecules on accessory cells in the induction of IL-2 production by human T cells. TCR-V{beta} repertoire of human T cells reactive with the cloned YPM was V{beta}3, V{beta}9, V{beta}13.1, and V{beta}13.2. This repertoire is the same as that of T cells reactive with the native YPM. These results indicate that the cloned YPM expressed in E. coli is identical to the native YPM. Sequencing of the YPM gene revealed that the gene contained an open reading frame of 456 base pairs encoding a precursor form of 151 amino acid residues with m.w. 16,679 that is processed into a mature form of 131 amino acid residues with m.w. 14,529. Homology analysis revealed that the homology of amino acid sequence is quite low among YPM and other well known bacterial superantigens. We designated the gene encoding YPM as ypm. 30 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Role of VAMP3 and VAMP7 in the commitment of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to LC3-associated pathways involving single- or double-membrane vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Ligeon, Laure-Anne; Moreau, Kevin; Barois, Nicolas; Bongiovanni, Antonino; Lacorre, Delphine-Armelle; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Galli, Thierry; Lafont, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis can replicate inside macrophages by hijacking autophagy and blocking autophagosome acidification. In bone marrow-derived macrophages, the bacteria are mainly observed inside double-membrane vacuoles positive for LC3, a hallmark of autophagy. Here, we address the question of the membrane traffic during internalization of Yersinia investigating the role of vesicle- associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). First, we show that as in epithelial cells, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis replicates mainly in nonacidic LC3-positive vacuoles. Second, in these cells, we unexpectedly found that VAMP3 localizes preferentially to Yersinia-containing vacuoles (YCVs) with single membranes using correlative light-electron microscopy. Third, we reveal the precise kinetics of VAMP3 and VAMP7 association with YCVs positive for LC3. Fourth, we show that VAMP7 knockdown alters LC3′s association with single-and multimembrane-YCVs. Finally, in uninfected epithelial cells stimulated for autophagy, VAMP3 overexpression and knockdown led respectively to a lower and higher number of double-membrane, LC3-positive vesicles. Hence, our results highlight the role that VAMPs play in selection of the pathways leading to generation of ultrastructurally different LC3 compartments and pave the way for determining the full set of docking and fusion proteins involved in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis’ intravesicular life cycle. PMID:25046114

  16. Policy Recommendations to VA Leave NAS at Odds with Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, John

    1978-01-01

    Describes adverse congressional reaction to a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommendation that the Veteran's Administration's (VA) health care system be phased into a general health care system. (SL)

  17. Exploration Day at Busch Gardens, Williamsburg, Va. - Aug. 5, 2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    Friday, August 8, was NASA Days at Busch Gardens Williamsburg, Va. NASA exhibits and educational specialists worked to inspire young and old, and NASA astronaut Susan Kilrain -- a veteran of two Sp...

  18. 76 FR 72838 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Luray, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Luray, VA, to accommodate the new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard... accommodate the new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Instrument Approach... FR 52292). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by...

  19. 78 FR 42455 - Medications Prescribed by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... Administrative practice and procedure, Alcohol abuse, Alcoholism, Claims, Day care, Dental health, Drug abuse... section to read as follows: Sec. 17.96 Medication prescribed by non-VA physicians. * * * * * (a) * * *...

  20. 76 FR 48204 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... availability of funds for currently operational fiscal year (FY) 2009 VA Grant and Per Diem Special Need Grant Recipients in conjunction with their collaborative VA Special Need partners and currently operational VA... under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program for FY 2009 operational Grant and Per...

  1. 78 FR 38452 - Agency Information Collection (VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist) Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist) Activities... ``OMB Control No. 2900-0524.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: VA Police Officer Pre-Employment... checks on applicants seeking employment as VA police officers. VA will use the data collected...

  2. 78 FR 18425 - Proposed Information Collection VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist); Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist); Comment... applicant's qualification and suitability as a VA police officer. DATES: Written comments and... information technology. Title: VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist, VA Form 0120. OMB...

  3. Outbreak of Serogroup C Meningococcal Disease Primarily Affecting Men Who Have Sex with Men - Southern California, 2016.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Srinivas; Foo, Chelsea; Ngo, Van; Jarashow, Claire; Civen, Rachel; Schwartz, Ben; Holguin, John; Shearer, Eric; Zahn, Matt; Harriman, Kathleen; Winter, Kathleen; Kretz, Cecilia; Chang, How Yi; Meyer, Sarah; MacNeil, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    During March 4-August 11, 2016, 25 outbreak-associated cases of meningococcal disease, including two deaths (8% case-fatality ratio), were reported in Southern California. Twenty-four of the cases were caused by serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis (NmC) and one by N. meningitidis with an undetermined serogroup (Figure). On June 24, 2016, in response to this increase in NmC cases, primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Los Angeles County, the city of Long Beach, and Orange County, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) issued a press release and health advisory, declaring an outbreak of NmC in Southern California (1). PMID:27606798

  4. Occurrence of virulent genes among environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains from various parts of peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Arushothy, Revathy; Ahmad, Norazah

    2008-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila are intracellular pathogens, associated with human disease, attributed to the presence and absence of certain virulent genes. In this study, virulent gene loci (lvh and rtxA regions) associated with human disease were determined. Thirty-three cooling tower water isolates, isolated between 2004 to 2006, were analyzed for the presence of these genes by PCR method. Results showed that 19 of 33 (57.5%) of the L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates have both the genes. Six (18.2%) of the isolates have only the lvh gene and 2 (6.1%) of the isolates have only the rtxA gene. However, both genes were absent in 6 (18.2%) of the L. pneumophila isolates. The result of our study provides some insight into the presence of the disease causing L. pneumophila serogroup 1 in the environment. Molecular epidemiological studies will provide better understanding of the prevalence of the disease in Malaysia. PMID:19287368

  5. Serotype/serogroup-specific antibiotic non-susceptibility of invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae, Switzerland, 2004 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Christoph; Kronenberg, Andreas; Allemann, Aurélie; Mühlemann, Kathrin; Hilty, Markus

    2016-05-26

    Concurrent analysis of antibiotic resistance of colonising and invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae gives a more accurate picture than looking at either of them separately. Therefore, we analysed 2,129 non-invasive and 10,996 invasive pneumococcal isolates from Switzerland from 2004 to 2014, which spans the time before and after the introduction of the heptavalent (PCV7) and 13-valent (PCV13) conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines. Serotype/serogroup information was linked with all antibiotic resistance profiles. During the study period, the proportion of non-susceptible non-invasive and invasive isolates significantly decreased for penicillin, ceftriaxone, erythromycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). This was most apparent in non-invasive isolates from study subjects younger than five years (penicillin (p = 0.006), erythromycin (p = 0.01) and TMP-SMX (p = 0.002)). Resistant serotypes/serogroups included in PCV7 and/or PCV13 decreased and were replaced by non-PCV13 serotypes (6C and 15B/C). Serotype/serogroup-specific antibiotic resistance rates were comparable between invasive and non-invasive isolates. Adjusted odds ratios of serotype/serogroup-specific penicillin resistance were significantly higher in the west of Switzerland for serotype 6B (1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4-4.8), 9V (3.4; 95% CI: 2.0-5.7), 14 (5.3; 95% CI: 3.8-7.5), 19A (2.2; 95% CI: 1.6-3.1) and 19F (3.1; 95% CI: 2.1-4.6), probably due to variations in the antibiotic consumption. PMID:27254535

  6. Characterization of Invasive Pneumococci of Serogroup 6 from Adults in Barcelona, Spain, in 1994 to 2008▿

    PubMed Central

    Rolo, Dora; Ardanuy, Carmen; Calatayud, Laura; Pallares, Román; Grau, Immaculada; García, Ernesto; Fenoll, Asunción; Martín, Rogelio; Liñares, Josefina

    2011-01-01

    A total of 91 of 1,480 invasive isolates (6.1%) collected from adults in Barcelona, Spain, in the period of 1994 to 2008 were of serogroup 6 (6B, 47 isolates; 6A, 28; and 6C, 16). Throughout this period, serotype 6B (Spain6B-ST90) decreased, and serotype 6A remained stable. An increase in serotype 6C (ST224) in the 2004-2008 period was observed. PMID:21450964

  7. Drug and drug-related supply promotion by pharmaceutical company representatives at VA facilities. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-03-01

    This final rule amends the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations regarding access to VA facilities by pharmaceutical company representatives. The purposes of the rule are to reduce or eliminate any potential for disruption in the patient care environment, manage activities and promotions at VA facilities, and provide pharmaceutical company representatives with a consistent standard of permissible business practice at VA facilities. The amendments will facilitate mutually beneficial relationships between VA and pharmaceutical company representatives. PMID:22420057

  8. Legionella species and serogroups in Malaysian water cooling towers: identification by latex agglutination and PCR-DNA sequencing of isolates.

    PubMed

    Yong, Stacey Foong Yee; Goh, Fen-Ning; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the distribution of Legionella species in water cooling towers located in different parts of Malaysia to obtain information that may inform public health policies for the prevention of legionellosis. A total of 20 water samples were collected from 11 cooling towers located in three different states in east, west and south Malaysia. The samples were concentrated by filtration and treated with an acid buffer before plating on to BCYE agar. Legionella viable counts in these samples ranged from 100 to 2,000 CFU ml(-1); 28 isolates from the 24 samples were examined by latex agglutination as well as 16S rRNA and rpoB PCR-DNA sequencing. These isolates were identified as Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (35.7%), L. pneumophila serogroup 2-14 (39%), L. pneumophila non-groupable (10.7%), L. busanensis, L. gormanii, L. anisa and L. gresilensis. L. pneumophila was clearly the predominant species at all sampling sites. Repeat sampling from the same cooling tower and testing different colonies from the same water sample showed concurrent colonization by different serogroups and different species of Legionella in some of the cooling towers. PMID:20009251

  9. Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolated from Bovine Mastitic Milk: Serogroups, Virulence Factors, and Antibiotic Resistance Properties

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Hassan; Safarpoor Dehkordi, Farhad; Taktaz, Taghi; Rezvani, Amir; Yarali, Sajad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the virulence factors, serogroups, and antibiotic resistance properties of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, by using 268 bovine mastitic milk samples which were diagnosed using California Mastitis Test. After E. coli identification, PCR assays were developed for detection of different virulence genes, serogroups, and antibiotic resistance genes of Escherichia coli. The antibiotic resistance pattern was studied using disk diffusion method. Out of 268 samples, 73 (27.23%) were positive for Escherichia coli, and, out of 73 positive samples, 15 (20.54%) were O26 and 11 (15.06%) were O157 so they were the highest while O111 was not detected in any sample so it was the lowest serogroup. Out of 73 STEC strains, 11 (15.06%) and 36 (49.31%) were EHEC and AEEC, respectively. All of the EHEC strains had stx1, eaeA, and ehly, virulence genes, while in AEEC strains stx1 had the highest prevalence (77.77%), followed by eaeA (55.55%). Totally, aadA1 (65.95%) had the highest while blaSHV (6.38%) had the lowest prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes. The disk diffusion method showed that the STEC strains had the highest resistance to penicillin (100%), followed by tetracycline (57.44%), while resistance to cephalothin (6.38%) was the lowest. PMID:23213293

  10. A Comparison of Culture- and PCR-Based Methods to Detect Six Major Non-O157 Serogroups of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Cattle Feces

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Lance W.; Shridhar, Pragathi B.; Dewsbury, Diana M.; Shi, Xiaorong; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Renter, David G.; Nagaraja, T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Culture-based methods to detect the six major non-O157 (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145) Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) are not well established. Our objectives of this study were to develop a culture-based method to detect the six non-O157 serogroups in cattle feces and compare the detection with a PCR method. Fecal samples (n = 576) were collected in a feedlot from 24 pens during a 12-week period and enriched in E. coli broth at 40° C for 6 h. Enriched samples were subjected to immunomagnetic separation, spread-plated onto a selective chromogenic medium, and initially pooled colonies, and subsequently, single colonies were tested by a multiplex PCR targeting six serogroups and four virulence genes, stx1, stx2, eae, and ehxA (culture method). Fecal suspensions, before and after enrichment, were also tested by a multiplex PCR targeting six serogroups and four virulence genes (PCR method). There was no difference in the proportions of fecal samples that tested positive (74.3 vs. 77.4%) for one or more of the six serogroups by either culture or the PCR method. However, each method detected one or more of the six serogroups in samples that were negative by the other method. Both culture method and PCR indicated that O26, O45, and O103 were the dominant serogroups. Higher proportions (P < 0.05) of fecal samples were positive for O26 (44.4 vs. 22.7%) and O121 (22.9 vs. 2.3%) serogroups by PCR than by the culture method. None of the fecal samples contained more than four serogroups. Only a small proportion of the six serogroups (23/640; 3.6%) isolated carried Shiga toxin genes. The culture method and the PCR method detected all six serogroups in samples negative by the other method, highlighting the importance of subjecting fecal samples to both methods for accurate detection of the six non-O157 STEC in cattle feces. PMID:26270482

  11. VA opsin-based photoreceptors in the hypothalamus of birds.

    PubMed

    Halford, Stephanie; Pires, Susana S; Turton, Michael; Zheng, Lei; González-Menéndez, Irene; Davies, Wayne L; Peirson, Stuart N; García-Fernández, José M; Hankins, Mark W; Foster, Russell G

    2009-08-25

    Studies in the 1930s demonstrated that birds possess photoreceptors that are located within the hypothalamus and regulate photoperiodic responses to day length. Most recently, photoperiod has been shown to alter the activity of the pars tuberalis to release thyrotrophin, which ultimately drives a reproductive response. Despite these significant findings, the cellular and molecular identity of the hypothalamic photoreceptors has remained a mystery. Action spectra implicated an opsin-based photopigment system, but further identification based on rod- or cone-opsin probes failed, suggesting the utilization of a novel opsin. The vertebrate ancient (VA) opsin photopigments were isolated in 1997 but were thought to have a restricted taxonomic distribution, confined to the agnatha and teleost fish. Here, we report the isolation of VA opsin from chicken and show that the two isoforms spliced from this gene (cVAL and cVA) are capable of forming functional photopigments. Further, we show that VA opsin is expressed within a population of hypothalamic neurons with extensive projections to the median eminence. These results provide the most complete cellular and molecular description of a deep brain photoreceptor in any vertebrate and strongly implicate VA opsin in mediating the avian photoperiodic response. PMID:19664923

  12. Serologic evidence of Jamestown Canyon and Keystone virus infection in vertebrates of the DelMarVa Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Watts, D M; LeDuc, J W; Bailey, C L; Dalrymple, J M; Gargan, T P

    1982-11-01

    Serological data accumulated during the past decade indicated that a variety of feral and domestic animals of the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia (DelMarVa) Peninsula were infected with Jamestown Canyon (JC) and/or Keystone (KEY) viruses (Bunyaviridae, California serogroup). Neutralizing (N) antibody to JC virus was most prevalent in white-tailed deer, sika deer, cottontail rabbits and horses. KEY virus N antibody was detected most frequently in gray squirrels and domestic goats. N antibody indicative of past infection by one or both viruses also was found in raccoons, horses and humans. JC and/or KEY virus N antibodies were not demonstrable in sera of several other species of small mammals and reptiles. Investigations were extended to evaluate the role of domestic goats as an amplifying host of JC and KEY viruses and to assess their potential as sentinels of virus transmission. Goats maintained in the Pocomoke Cypress Swamp during the summer season of 1978, acquired N antibodies to JC and KEY viruses. Following experimental inoculation with either JC or KEY virus, all goats developed N antibody despite the absence of a demonstrable viremia in most animals. Goats proved to be effective as sentinels for monitoring the transmission of JC and KEY viruses; however, the exceptionally low titers or absence of viremia following inoculation with these viruses would seem to preclude a potential virus-amplifying role for this species. Although findings implicated primarily gray squirrels and white-tailed deer as possible amplifying hosts of KEY and JC virus, respectively, further investigations will be required to clarify their role, particularly since both viruses may be maintained entirely by transovarial transmission. PMID:7149110

  13. The Impact of Private Insurance Coverage on Veterans' Use of VA Care: Insurance and Selection Effects

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yujing; Hendricks, Ann; Wang, Fenghua; Gardner, John; Kazis, Lewis E

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine private insurance coverage and its impact on use of Veterans Health Administration (VA) care among VA enrollees without Medicare coverage. Data Sources The 1999 National Health Survey of Veteran Enrollees merged with VA administrative data, with other information drawn from American Hospital Association data and the Area Resource File. Study Design We modeled VA enrollees' decision of having private insurance coverage and its impact on use of VA care controlling for sociodemographic information, patients' health status, VA priority status and access to VA and non-VA alternatives. We estimated the true impact of insurance on the use of VA care by teasing out potential selection bias. Bias came from two sources: a security selection effect (sicker enrollees purchase private insurance for extra security and use more VA and non-VA care) and a preference selection effect (VA enrollees who prefer non-VA care may purchase private insurance and use less VA care). Principal Findings VA enrollees with private insurance coverage were less likely to use VA care. Security selection dominated preference selection and naïve models that did not control for selection effects consistently underestimated the insurance effect. Conclusions Our results indicate that prior research, which has not controlled for insurance selection effects, may have underestimated the potential impact of any private insurance policy change, which may in turn affect VA enrollees' private insurance coverage and consequently their use of VA care. From the decline in private insurance coverage from 1999 to 2002, we projected an increase of 29,400 patients and 158 million dollars for VA health care services. PMID:18211529

  14. Prevention of rare diseases: how revolutionary techniques can help vulnerable individuals—the example of serogroup B meningococcal infection

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Victor; Toneatto, Daniela; Dull, Peter; Wassil, James

    2015-01-01

    In countries with established programmes for vaccination of infants, toddlers and adolescents with meningococcal conjugate vaccines, serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease remains the major cause of septicaemia and meningitis in the paediatric and adolescent age groups. Novartis has developed a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine, 4CMenB, to meet this need. We reviewed all 4CMenB studies. The studies found 4CMenB to be highly immunogenic when administered in all schedules, with protective antibody levels (serum bactericidal antibody titres ≥4 or ≥5 with human complement, hSBA) against serogroup B strains expressing vaccine antigens in >95% of vaccinated cohorts. When antibody levels waned, all tested groups demonstrated booster responses. Although possibly an underestimation, the Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS) technique predicts that global coverage of 4CMenB against all serogroup B strains is in the range 66% (Canada) to 91% (USA). The vaccine was found to be generally well tolerated, although local and systemic reactions, notably fever in infants, typical of many vaccines, were increased following concomitant administration of 4CMenB with routine vaccines. When tested, prophylactic paracetamol significantly decreased the frequency and severity of reactions in infants, with no clinically significant impact on immunogenicity of 4CMenB or concomitant routine vaccines. The vaccine is approved for use in the following age groups in the European Union (2 months+), Canada (2 months through 17 years), Australia (2 months+) and Chile (2 months+), following clinical evaluation in 4843 infants and toddlers, and 1712 adolescents and adults, in schedules including a three-dose (2, 3, 4 or 2, 4, 6 months) and a two-dose (6–11 months) infant series with a booster in the second year of life, a two-dose series in toddlers (12–23 months) and children (2–10 years) given 2 months apart (with a booster at least in the EU), and a two-dose series in

  15. Prevalence of serogroups, virulence genotypes, antimicrobial resistance, and phylogenetic background of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli in south of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Mei; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Wan-Jiang; Jiang, Hong-Xia; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Mei-Jun; He, Xue-Fang; Lao, Dong-Xing; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2010-09-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is an important respiratory pathogen of poultry. A variety of virulence-associated genes and serogroups are associated with avian colibacillosis caused by APEC strains. One hundred forty-eight E. coli isolates recovered from diagnosed cases of avian colibacillosis from Guangdong province between 2005 and 2008 were serotyped, and characterized for virulence-associated genes, phylogenetic backgrounds, antibiotic susceptibility, and genetic relatedness. Associations between virulence-associated genes and antimicrobial resistance were further analyzed. Although 148 APEC isolates belonged to 21 different serogroups, 81% were of one of eight serogroups: O65 (27%), O78 (10%), O8 (9%), O120 (9%), O2 (7%), O92 (6%), O108 (5%), and O26 (5%). Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the most prevalent gene was traT (90%), followed by iroN (63%), fimH (58%), hlyF (55%), cvaC (54%), and sitA (51%). The APEC strains mainly belonged to groups A (73%) and D (14%). Multiple antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes (greater than or equal to three antimicrobials) were detected in all E. coli isolates, with the majority of isolates displaying resistance to tetracycline (97%), sulfamethoxazole (93%) and fluoroquinolones (87% for ciprofloxacin and 84% for enrofloxacin), chloramphenicol (74%), and florfenicol (66%). All E. coli isolates were further genetically characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 125 different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles were obtained, implying that the multiresistant E. coli isolates carrying virulence-associated genes and belonging to multiple serogroups were not derived from a specific clone, but represented a wide variety of chromosomal backgrounds. Statistical analysis showed that several virulence-associated genes were significantly present in APEC isolates susceptibility to multiple antimicrobials. The findings demonstrate that a wide variety of serogroups and potential virulence

  16. The cost of hospital readmissions: evidence from the VA.

    PubMed

    Carey, Kathleen; Stefos, Theodore

    2016-09-01

    This paper is an examination of hospital 30-day readmission costs using data from 119 acute care hospitals operated by the U.S. Veterans Administration (VA) in fiscal year 2011. We applied a two-part model that linked readmission probability to readmission cost to obtain patient level estimates of expected readmission cost for VA patients overall, and for patients discharged for three prevalent conditions with relatively high readmission rates. Our focus was on the variable component of direct patient cost. Overall, managers could expect to save $2140 for the average 30-day readmission avoided. For heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia patients, expected readmission cost estimates were $3432, $2488 and $2278. Patient risk of illness was the dominant driver of readmission cost in all cases. The VA experience has implications for private sector hospitals that treat a high proportion of chronically ill and/or low income patients, or that are contemplating adopting bundled payment mechanisms. PMID:25576391

  17. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect PCR products of the rfbS gene from serogroup D salmonellae: a rapid screening prototype.

    PubMed Central

    Luk, J M; Kongmuang, U; Tsang, R S; Lindberg, A A

    1997-01-01

    We describe a digoxigenin-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DIG-ELISA) following a PCR to detect the amplified lipopolysaccharide rfbS gene as a means for rapid screening of serogroup D salmonellae in stool specimens. For pure bacterial cultures, the sensitivity of the PCR DIG-ELISA was approximately 10 bacteria. In the presence of stool materials, the salmonellae were first isolated by an immunomagnetic separation technique with an O9-specific monoclonal antibody. MATy-O9, followed by PCR and DIG-ELISA. The corresponding sensitivity was about 10 to 100 bacteria. To evaluate the assay performance clinically, 203 stool samples from patients with diarrhea were subjected to the routine culture techniques and the PCR ELISA method with overnight enrichment. The conventional culture method identified 145 salmonellae (31 serogroup B, 27 serogroup C, 83 serogroup D, and 5 serogroup E isolates) and 58 non-salmonella bacteria. The PCR ELISA method correctly identified all 82 serogroup D salmonellae (A405 by ELISA, 2.54 +/- 0.74) but was negative for the other Salmonella serogroups (A405, 0.26 +/- 0.08; n = 63) and non-Salmonella isolates (A405, 0.16 +/- 0.04; n = 58). In order to obtain a visible result, the assay takes approximately 6 h (PCR, 4 h; ELISA, 2 h), along with brief enrichment cultivation of the samples (from 4 to 16 h). Thus, the PCR DIG-ELISA offers a fast, accurate, semiquantitative means of detecting infectious agents such as salmonellae, and future robotic automation is possible. PMID:9041418

  18. Prevalence of nontyphoidal Salmonella serogroups and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in a university teaching hospital in Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Elhadi, Nasreldin; Aljindan, Reem; Aljeldah, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Background Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) species are important food-borne pathogens that cause gastroenteritis and bacteremia, and are responsible for a huge global burden of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalent serogroups and antibiotic resistance of NTS in our region. Methods We reviewed the serogroup distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of NTS strains obtained from 158 stool specimens of patients with acute diarrheal infection attending the outpatient and inpatient department at a university hospital in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia in the period from September, 2008 to April, 2011. A retrospective analysis of the 158 patients with NTS infection was conducted to determine the most prevalent NTS serogroups causing acute gastroenteritis and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Results At this teaching hospital, a total of 17,436 fecal samples were analyzed during the 2008–2011 study period. Of these specimens, 158 tested positive for NTS, giving an overall prevalence of 9.06 per 1,000. Of 158 NTS cases, serogroup D1 (25.3%) was the most prevalent, followed by serogroup B (19.6%), and serogroup C1 (18.9). One third of all NTS serogroup strains tested were resistant to tetracycline. The NTS strains showed resistance to ampicillin (31.3%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (29.9%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (20.9%), and cefotaxime (14.93%). Conclusion The findings of this study support the concern that use of antibiotics in animal feeds may contribute to acquisition of resistance in food-borne bacteria, such as Salmonella. Our study also concludes that the prevalence of NTS in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia is very low compared with other studies worldwide. PMID:24285925

  19. Crp Induces Switching of the CsrB and CsrC RNAs in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Links Nutritional Status to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Sest, Maike; Pisano, Fabio; Scheb-Wetzel, Matthias; Steinmann, Rebekka; Böhme, Katja; Klein, Johannes; Münch, Richard; Schomburg, Dietmar; Dersch, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Colonization of the intestinal tract and dissemination into deeper tissues by the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis demands expression of a special set of virulence factors important for the initiation and the persistence of the infection. In this study we demonstrate that many virulence-associated functions are coregulated with the carbohydrate metabolism. This link is mediated by the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system, including the regulatory RNAs CsrB and CsrC, and the cAMP receptor protein (Crp), which both control virulence gene expression in response to the nutrient composition of the medium. Here, we show that Crp regulates the synthesis of both Csr RNAs in an opposite manner. A loss of the crp gene resulted in a strong upregulation of CsrB synthesis, whereas CsrC levels were strongly reduced leading to downregulation of the virulence regulator RovA. Switching of the Csr RNA involves Crp-mediated repression of the response regulator UvrY which activates csrB transcription. To elucidate the regulatory links between virulence and carbon metabolism, we performed comparative metabolome, transcriptome, and phenotypic microarray analyses and found that Crp promotes oxidative catabolism of many different carbon sources, whereas fermentative patterns of metabolism are favored when crp is deleted. Mouse infection experiments further demonstrated that Crp is pivotal for a successful Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. In summary, placement of the Csr system and important virulence factors under control of Crp enables this pathogen to link its nutritional status to virulence in order to optimize biological fitness and infection efficiency through the infectious life cycle. PMID:23251905

  20. An NF-κB-Based High-Throughput Screen Identifies Piericidins as Inhibitors of the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Miles C.; Wong, Weng Ruh; Dupzyk, Allison J.; Bray, Walter M.; Linington, Roger G.

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a bacterial appendage used by dozens of Gram-negative pathogens to subvert host defenses and cause disease, making it an ideal target for pathogen-specific antimicrobials. Here, we report the discovery and initial characterization of two related natural products with T3SS-inhibitory activity that were derived from a marine actinobacterium. Bacterial extracts containing piericidin A1 and the piericidin derivative Mer-A 2026B inhibited Yersinia pseudotuberculosis from triggering T3SS-dependent activation of the host transcription factor NF-κB in HEK293T cells but were not toxic to mammalian cells. As the Yersinia T3SS must be functional in order to trigger NF-κB activation, these data indicate that piericidin A1 and Mer-A 2026B block T3SS function. Consistent with this, purified piericidin A1 and Mer-A 2026B dose-dependently inhibited translocation of the Y. pseudotuberculosis T3SS effector protein YopM inside CHO cells. In contrast, neither compound perturbed bacterial growth in vitro, indicating that piericidin A1 and Mer-A 2026B do not function as general antibiotics in Yersinia. In addition, when Yersinia was incubated under T3SS-inducing culture conditions in the absence of host cells, Mer-A 2026B and piericidin A1 inhibited secretion of T3SS cargo as effectively as or better than several previously described T3SS inhibitors, such as MBX-1641 and aurodox. This suggests that Mer-A 2026B and piericidin A1 do not block type III secretion by blocking the bacterium-host cell interaction, but rather inhibit an earlier stage, such as T3SS needle assembly. In summary, the marine-derived natural products Mer-A 2026B and piericidin A1 possess previously uncharacterized activity against the bacterial T3SS. PMID:24295981

  1. Polysaccharide Production in Pilot Scale Bioreactor Cultivations of Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C

    PubMed Central

    Baruque-Ramos, Julia; Juncioni de Arauz, Luciana; Fossa da Paz, Marcelo; Vicentin, Marcio Alberto; Hiss, Haroldo

    2016-01-01

    Serogroup C polysaccharide from Neisseria meningitidis (PS) constitutes the antigen for the respective vaccine production. In order to investigate the enhancement of the final PS concentration (Pf), as well as the overall yield factor (PS/biomass) (YP/X), 13 total cultivations distributed in 6 series (from A to F) were carried out in Frantz medium (40 L plus inoculum) in a 80L bioreactor at 35oC, 0.4 atm, 120 rpm, airflow rate of 5 L/min and KLa = 4.2 h-1. The series (A-F) correspond to different experimental conditions as follows: A) without pH and dissolved O2 controls; B) pH control at 6.5; C) pH control at 6.5 and glucose pulse at the 10th hour; D) dissolved O2 control at 10% saturation value; E) pH control at 7.4; F) dissolved O2 limitation (set rotation at 55 rpm). Concentrations of dry biomass, PS, cellular nitrogen, residual glucose, organic and inorganic nitrogen in the medium were measured. The best results were represented by series A (averages of Pf = 0.15 g/L and YP/X = 107 mg/g). The presented findings could be useful for a proper Frantz medium reformulation in order to obtain a greater amount of PS and improve the vaccine development in industrial scale-up production.

  2. Escherichia coli Serogroups Isolated from Streams in Pennsylvania, 1965 to 19721

    PubMed Central

    Glantz, Paul J.

    1973-01-01

    Of 3,200 cultures of Escherichia coli isolated from streams in Pennsylvania over a 7-year period, 82.46% or 2,639 were O serogrouped. The largest number of cultures (33.4%) belonged to O groups 1 to 26, and the second highest number (16.8%) belonged to O groups 60 to 88. The individual E. coli O groups most frequently isolated were ADO3, 18ac, 2a, 3, 7, 73, 139, and OX13. Practically every known standard E. coli O group was found in the streams. It was not possible to identify the K and H antigen of every E. coli isolate. Serotypes of E. coli O2a:K1:H6, O26:K60:H11, O55:K59:H27, O86:K62:H2, 112ab:K68:H2, 125ab:K70:H21, 128ab:K67:H2, and O138:K81:H14 known to be pathogenic for humans and animals were identified. Cultures having the same K antigen but a different H antigen for enteropathogenic E. coli O groups 6, 18ab, 18ac, 111ab, 126, 127a, 139, 141, and 147 were also isolated. PMID:4586930

  3. Meningococcal disease in South Australia: incidence and serogroup distribution 1971-1980.

    PubMed Central

    Hansman, D.

    1983-01-01

    During the ten-year period 1971-80 isolates of meningococci from 85 cases of meningococcal disease (MD) in South Australia, from 66 children, 6 adolescents and 13 adults, were examined. These comprised 69 cases of meningitis and 16 cases of bacteraemia without meningitis. Thirty-three (39%) of all cases of MD occurred in children less than 1 year of age, the median age was 19 months. Serogroup B accounted for 61 (72%) cases of MD, group A seven (8%), group C seven (8%), group W135 five (6%), group Y three (4%) and group X one (1%); in addition there was a single case of Neisseria lactamica infection. The annual prevalence of MD in South Australia for the period was 11 cases per 100000 for children under the age of 2 years and 0.7 cases per 100000 overall. The prevalence was highest in winter (45% cases) and spring (26%) and lowest in summer (13%). The overall mortality rate was 8%. Four of the 21 infants under the age of 6 months died (mortality rate 19%) whereas none of the 32 children aged from 6 months to 14 years died (P = 0.02). Amongst the survivors, three children had deafness, which was bilateral and severe in two. PMID:6401776

  4. Carriage rate and effects of vaccination after outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal disease, Brazil, 2010.

    PubMed

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurelio Palazzi; Carvalhanas, Telma Regina Marques Pinto; Paula de Lemos, Ana; Gorla, Maria Cecilia Outeiro; Salgado, Maristela; Fukasawa, Lucila O; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Higa, Fabio; Brandileone, Maria Cristina Cunto; Sacchi, Claudio Tavares; Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Sato, Helena Keico; Bricks, Lucia Ferro; Cassio de Moraes, José

    2014-05-01

    During 2010, outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal (MenC) disease occurred in 2 oil refineries in São Paulo State, Brazil, leading to mass vaccination of employees at 1 refinery with a meningococcal polysaccharide A/C vaccine. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of meningococci carriage among workers at both refineries and to investigate the effect of vaccination on and the risk factors for pharyngeal carriage of meningococci. Among the vaccinated and nonvaccinated workers, rates of overall meningococci carriage (21.4% and 21.6%, respectively) and of MenC carriage (6.3% and 4.9%, respectively) were similar. However, a MenC strain belonging to the sequence type103 complex predominated and was responsible for the increased incidence of meningococcal disease in Brazil. A low education level was associated with higher risk of meningococci carriage. Polysaccharide vaccination did not affect carriage or interrupt transmission of the epidemic strain. These findings will help inform future vaccination strategies. PMID:24751156

  5. Prevention and control of meningococcal outbreaks: The emerging role of serogroup B meningococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto; Ahmed, Sohail; Rappuoli, Rino; Black, Steven

    2015-07-17

    Recently an investigational meningococcal B vaccine has been used in two college outbreaks in the US. This is the first time that a meningococcal B vaccine has been used for outbreak control in the US. However, strain specific vaccines for meningococcal B outbreaks have been developed in Norway, Cuba and to control a large prolonged outbreak in New Zealand. Although meningococcal disease is mostly endemic and baseline rates in the US have fallen over the past decade, outbreaks are not uncommon in the US and globally. In an outbreak, disease risk can rise 1000 fold or more and such outbreaks can last a decade or longer causing significant morbidity and mortality. Here we review the evolution of several serogroup B outbreaks, and, when applicable, the development and impact of meningococcal B vaccines to control these outbreaks. Prior to the availability of "broad spectrum" meningococcal B vaccines, vaccines developed to control meningococcal B outbreaks were strain specific. With the development of two newly licensed meningococcal B vaccines - a four component meningococcal B vaccine (Bexsero, Novartis) and the two component fHBP vaccine (Trumenba, Pfizer) that target a broad array of meningococcal B strains, there is now the potential to prevent outbreaks and as well as to shorten the delay between identification of an outbreak and availability of a vaccine. PMID:26093201

  6. A multi-component meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB): the clinical development program.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Stoddard, Jeffrey; Toneatto, Daniela; Wassil, James; Dull, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Recently approved in Europe and Australia, the multi-component meningococcal B vaccine, 4CMenB (Bexsero®, Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics), contains three surface-exposed recombinant proteins (fHbp, NadA, and NHBA) and New Zealand strain outer membrane vesicles (NZ OMV) with PorA 1.4 antigenicity. This comprehensive review of the 4CMenB clinical development program covers pivotal phase I/IIb/III studies in over 7,000 adults, adolescents, and infants. The immunological correlate for clinical protection used was human complement-mediated serum bactericidal activity titers ≥4 or 5 against indicator strains for individual antigens. Based on achievement of protective titers, a four-dose schedule (three primary doses and one booster dose) for infants and a two-dose schedule for adolescents provided the best results. Observed increases in injection site pain/tenderness and fever in infants, and injection site pain, malaise, and headache in adolescents compared with routine vaccines, were mostly mild to moderate; frequencies of rare events (Kawasaki disease, juvenile arthritis) were not significantly different from non-vaccinated individuals. 4CMenB is conservatively estimated to provide 66-91 % coverage against meningococcal serogroup B strains worldwide. PMID:24338083

  7. Multiplex Quantitative PCR Assays for the Detection and Quantification of the Six Major Non-O157 Escherichia coli Serogroups in Cattle Feces.

    PubMed

    Shridhar, P B; Noll, L W; Shi, X; An, B; Cernicchiaro, N; Renter, D G; Nagaraja, T G; Bai, J

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, called non-O157 STEC, are important foodborne pathogens. Cattle, a major reservoir, harbor the organisms in the hindgut and shed them in the feces. Although limited data exist on fecal shedding, concentrations of non-O157 STEC in feces have not been reported. The objectives of our study were (i) to develop and validate two multiplex quantitative PCR (mqPCR) assays, targeting O-antigen genes of O26, O103, and O111 (mqPCR-1) and O45, O121, and O145 (mqPCR-2); (ii) to utilize the two assays, together with a previously developed four-plex qPCR assay (mqPCR-3) targeting the O157 antigen and three virulence genes (stx1, stx2, and eae), to quantify seven serogroups and three virulence genes in cattle feces; and (iii) to compare the three mqPCR assays to a 10-plex conventional PCR (cPCR) targeting seven serogroups and three virulence genes and culture methods to detect seven E. coli serogroups in cattle feces. The two mqPCR assays (1 and 2) were shown to be specific to the target genes, and the detection limits were 4 and 2 log CFU/g of pure culture-spiked fecal samples, before and after enrichment, respectively. A total of 576 fecal samples collected from a feedlot were enriched in E. coli broth and were subjected to quantification (before enrichment) and detection (after enrichment). Of the 576 fecal samples subjected, before enrichment, to three mqPCR assays for quantification, 175 (30.4%) were quantifiable (≥4 log CFU/g) for at least one of the seven serogroups, with O157 being the most common serogroup. The three mqPCR assays detected higher proportions of postenriched fecal samples (P > 0.01) as positive for one or more serogroups compared with cPCR and culture methods. This is the first study to assess the applicability of qPCR assays to detect and quantify six non-O157 serogroups in cattle feces and to generate data on fecal concentration of the six serogroups. PMID

  8. VA Library Service--Today's look at Tomorrow's Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration, Washington, DC.

    The Conference Poceedings are divided into three broad topics: systems planning, audiovisuals in biomedical communication, and automation and networking. Speakers from within the Veterans Administration (VA), from the National Medical Audiovisual Center, and the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, National Library of…

  9. 77 FR 67063 - VA Directive 0005 on Scientific Integrity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... April 9, 2012 (77 FR 21158). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Billy E. Jones, M.D., Senior Advisor to... was announced in the Federal Register on April 9, 2012 (77 FR 21158). All of the public comments have... AFFAIRS VA Directive 0005 on Scientific Integrity AGENCY: Office of Policy and Planning, Department...

  10. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS AND VA MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cucumber seeds were treated with rifampin-resistant derivatives of Pseudomonas puntida (A12, N1R or R-20) or P. fluorescens (2-79 or 3871) and planted in soils with and without added inoculum of the VA mycorrhizal fungi Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith or G. etunicatum Becker ...

  11. 76 FR 77270 - Board Meeting; January 9, 2012, Arlington, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... REVIEW BOARD Board Meeting; January 9, 2012, Arlington, VA The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board... Waste Technical Review Board will hold a public meeting in Arlington, Virginia, on Monday, January 9... on technical issues related to nuclear waste management and to review the technical validity of...

  12. 78 FR 62441 - VA Dental Insurance Program-Federalism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... of veterans. Specifically, this rule will add language to clarify the limited preemptive effect of... CFR 17.169 to add language to clarify the limited preemptive effect of certain criteria in the VA... business of insurance. Although section 510 does not include express preemption language, Congress...

  13. 77 FR 70967 - Authorization for Non-VA Medical Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... regulatory action under Executive Order 12866. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act... specify veterans' eligibility for non-VA care. Administrative Procedure Act Concurrent with this proposed... documents will speed notice and comment rulemaking under section 553 of the Administrative Procedure...

  14. 75 FR 41247 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00028 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... Only for the Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA-1874-DR), dated 02/16/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the Commonwealth of Virginia, dated...

  15. 76 FR 58557 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA-4024-DR), dated 09/03/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene... Private Non-Profit organizations in the Commonwealth of Virginia, dated 09/03/2011, is hereby amended...

  16. 77 FR 530 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Virginia (FEMA-4042-DR), dated 11/04/2011. Incident: Earthquake. Incident Period: 08/23/2011 through 10/25... major disaster declaration for the Commonwealth of Virginia, dated 11/04/2011 is hereby amended...

  17. 77 FR 7229 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Virginia (FEMA-4042-DR), dated 11/04/2011. Incident: Earthquake. Incident Period: 08/23/2011 through 10/25... disaster declaration for the Commonwealth of Virginia, dated 11/04/2011 is hereby amended to include...

  18. 76 FR 62132 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... only for the State of Virginia (FEMA-4024-DR), dated 09/03/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Virginia, dated 09/03/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  19. 75 FR 41559 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00029 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA-1905-DR), dated 04/27/2010. Incident: Severe winter storms... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the Commonwealth of Virginia, dated...

  20. 75 FR 26813 - VIRGINIA Disaster Number VA-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION VIRGINIA Disaster Number VA-00028 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the Commonwealth of VIRGINIA (FEMA-1874-DR), dated 02/16/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the Commonwealth of VIRGINIA, dated...

  1. 77 FR 51100 - Virginia Disaster No. VA-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster No. VA-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of VIRGINIA (FEMA-4072-DR), dated 07/27/2012. Incident: Severe Storms and Straight... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of VIRGINIA, dated 07/27/2012, is hereby amended to...

  2. 76 FR 74837 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Virginia (FEMA-4042-DR), dated 11/10/2011. Incident: Earthquake. Incident Period... non-profit organizations in the State of Virginia, dated 11/10/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  3. 75 FR 2895 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00027

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00027 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA-1862-DR), dated 12/09/2009. Incident: Severe Storms and... the Commonwealth of ] Virginia, dated 12/09/2009, is hereby amended to establish the incident...

  4. 77 FR 1547 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA--4042-DR), dated 11/10/2011. Incident: Earthquake. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the Commonwealth of Virginia, dated 11/10/2011, is hereby amended...

  5. 78 FR 2708 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Virginia (FEMA--4092--DR), dated 11/26/2012 . Incident: Hurricane Sandy Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Virginia, dated 11/26/2012, is hereby amended to include...

  6. 75 FR 35511 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00028 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA-1874-DR), dated 02/16/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the Commonwealth of Virginia, dated...

  7. 77 FR 1547 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Virginia (FEMA-4042-DR), dated 11/04/ 2011. Incident: Earthquake. Incident Period: 08/23/2011 Through 10/25... disaster declaration for the State of Virginia, dated 11/04/2011 is hereby amended to include the...

  8. 75 FR 21370 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00028 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA-1874-DR), dated 02/16/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the Commonwealth of Virginia, dated...

  9. 76 FR 78957 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Virginia Disaster Number VA-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA--4042--DR), dated 11/10/2011. Incident: Earthquake... Private Non-Profit organizations in the Commonwealth of Virginia, dated 11/10/2011, is hereby amended...

  10. Geropsychology Training in a VA Nursing Home Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karel, Michele J.; Moye, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing need for professional psychology training in nursing home settings, and nursing homes provide a rich environment for teaching geropsychology competencies. We describe the nursing home training component of our Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Predoctoral Internship and Geropsychology Postdoctoral Fellowship programs. Our…

  11. 76 FR 30534 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Kenbridge, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace 700 feet above the surface, at Kenbridge, VA (75 FR 14823...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of...

  12. 75 FR 79295 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Crewe, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to establish Class E airspace at Crewe, VA (75 FR 57215...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3)...

  13. 32 CFR 105.10 - SARC and SAPR VA procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... directly to the installation commander in accordance with 32 CFR part 103, to include providing regular... CIVILIAN SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION AND RESPONSE PROGRAM PROCEDURES § 105.10 SARC and SAPR VA procedures. (a) SARC procedures. The SARC shall: (1) Serve as the single point of contact to coordinate sexual...

  14. 76 FR 43575 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Staunton, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Valley Regional Airport, Staunton, VA (76 FR 14822) Docket No. FAA- 2010-1285. Interested parties were... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  15. Military and VA General Dentistry Training: A National Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Bachand, William; Buchanan, C. Richard; Lefever, Karen H.; Lin, Sylvia; Engelhardt, Rita

    2002-01-01

    Compared the program characteristics of the postgraduate general dentistry (PGD) training programs sponsored by the military and the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Gathered information on program infrastructure and emphasis, resident preparation prior to entering the program, and patients served and types of services provided. Programs…

  16. Kinetics of antibody persistence following administration of a combination meningococcal serogroup C and haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine in healthy infants in the United Kingdom primed with a monovalent meningococcal serogroup C vaccine.

    PubMed

    Borrow, Ray; Andrews, Nick; Findlow, Helen; Waight, Pauline; Southern, Joanna; Crowley-Luke, Annette; Stapley, Lorraine; England, Anna; Findlow, Jamie; Miller, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of antibody persistence following the administration of a combination meningococcal serogroup C and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine (Menitorix) in the second year of life in children primed with two doses of one of three monovalent meningococcal serogroup C (MCC) vaccines was investigated. The study subjects were administered either Menitorix at 12 to 15 months of age, followed by the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine 4 to 6 weeks later, or all three vaccines concomitantly at 12 to 15 months of age. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, 12, and 24 months after the boosting. Sera were analyzed for meningococcal serogroup C serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) and IgG as well as Hib-polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP)-specific IgG. The antibody persistence data from this study were compared to those of a prior study of Southern et al. (Clin. Vaccine Immunol. 14:1328-1333, 2007) in which children were given three primary doses of a vaccine containing both the MCC and the Hib vaccines but were boosted only with a Hib conjugate vaccine. The magnitude of the meningococcal SBA geometric mean titer was higher for those subjects primed with the MCC vaccine conjugated to tetanus toxoid (NeisVac-C) than for those primed with one of two MCC vaccines conjugated to CRM(197) (Menjugate or Meningitec) up to 1 year following boosting. Two years after boosting, the percentages of subjects with putatively protective SBA titers of > or =8 for children primed with NeisVac-C, Menjugate, and Meningitec were 43%, 22%, and 23%, respectively. Additional booster doses of the MCC vaccine may be required in the future to maintain good antibody levels; however, there is no immediate need for a booster during adolescence, as mathematical modeling has shown that persisting herd immunity is likely to control disease for a number of years. PMID:19906895

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Solithromycin against Clinical Isolates of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1

    PubMed Central

    Mallegol, Julia; Fernandes, Prabhavathi

    2014-01-01

    The activity of solithromycin was evaluated against clinical Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) isolates (n = 196) collected in Ontario, Canada, from 1980 to 2011. Its in vitro activity was compared to that of azithromycin (AZM) using the broth microdilution method. Solithromycin had a MIC50 of ≤0.015 μg/ml and a MIC90 of 0.031 μg/ml, making its activity at least 8-fold to 32-fold higher than that of AZM (MIC50 and MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively). Ninety-nine percent of the isolates had MICs for solithromycin ranging from ≤0.015 μg/ml to 0.031 μg/ml, whereas 83.6% of the isolates showed MICs for AZM ranging from 0.062 μg/ml to 0.25 μg/ml. Interestingly, 96.7% (30 out of 31 clinical isolates) identified with higher AZM MICs (0.5 μg/ml to 2 μg/ml) belonged to the clinically prevalent sequence type 1. To investigate the intracellular activity of solithromycin, in vitro invasion assays were also performed against a subset of representative Lp1 isolates internalized within human lung epithelial cells. Solithromycin and AZM both inhibited growth of all intracellular Lp1 isolates at 1× or 8× MICs, displaying bacteriostatic effects, as would be expected with protein synthesis inhibitor rather than bactericidal activity. Solithromycin demonstrated the highest in vitro and intracellular potency against all Lp1 isolates compared to AZM. Given the rapid spread of resistance mechanisms among respiratory pathogens and the reported treatment failures in legionellosis, the development of this new fluoroketolide, already in phase 3 oral clinical studies, constitutes a promising alternative option for the treatment of legionellosis. PMID:24277019

  18. Acceptability of meningococcal serogroup B vaccine among parents and health care workers in Italy: a survey.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Chiara; Faccini, Marino; Mazzali, Cristina; Picca, Marina; Colella, Giacomo; Duca, Pier Giorgio; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    A new meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4 CMenB) has recently been licensed. This study assessed the acceptability of 4 CMenB vaccine among parents and healthcare workers (HCWs). From May to July 2013 in Milan, Italy, self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 2050 parents of infants presenting at immunization clinics for the mandatory hexavalent vaccination and submitted to 350 HCWs involved in immunization practices. 1842 parents (89.1%) responded to the survey; 64.4% of parents wanted their child to receive the 4 CMenB vaccine and 5.1% would not vaccinate their children. Multivariate analysis showed that recognition of the severity of meningitis [a life threatening vs a mild or unthreatening disease (Odds ratio (OR): 2.3; confidence interval (CI): 1.4-3.6], awareness of vaccination as a beneficial preventive measure (very beneficial vs not beneficial OR = 6.4; CI 3.0-13.7) and knowledge of the Meningococcal C vaccine (OR = 1.4; CI 1.1-1.8) were strongly associated to willingness to receive 4 CMenB vaccine. On the contrary, level of education was associated with refusal of immunization (university vs education level lower than middle school OR = 0.68; CI 0.47-0.97). Among the parents who were willing to immunize their children, 66.9% would agree with three injections to be administered during the same visit. A total of 291 HCWs (83.1%) agreed to participate in the survey; 73% considered 4 CMenB vaccine a priority in infants' immunization schedule; 26.8% of HCWs suggested the concomitant administration with routine infant immunization. Parental and HCWs acceptability of 4 CMenB vaccine was high. Increasing knowledge about meningitis and vaccine prevention might further increase the acceptability of this vaccine. PMID:25483638

  19. A phase 2 randomized controlled trial of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (I).

    PubMed

    Prymula, Roman; Esposito, Susanna; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Xie, Fang; Toneatto, Daniela; Kohl, Igor; Dull, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    The novel meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB, Bexsero(®)), recently approved in Europe and Australia, may soon be included in routine infant immunization schedules, subject to guidance from national or regional recommending bodies. In the development of 4CMenB and consistent with other newly introduced vaccines, clinical studies have shown concomitant administration with routine infant vaccines induces an incremental increase in some reactions, including fever. As this may hinder acceptability, we examined the impact of prophylactic paracetamol on the occurrence of fever and other solicited reactions, as well as the immune responses to study vaccines, in a prospectively designed study. 4CMenB was administered as a 4-dose series at 2, 3, 4, and 12 months of age concomitantly with routine infant vaccines: DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib and PCV7, with or without prophylactic paracetamol; a third group received MenC vaccine. Immune responses to 4CMenB were not decreased by the use of paracetamol prophylaxis and there were no clinically relevant effects on immune responses to routine vaccines. Occurrence of fever was higher in infants co-administered with 4CMenB compared with those given MenC vaccine, but was significantly decreased by prophylactic paracetamol, as were other solicited reactions to vaccination, both local and systemic. Co-administration of 4CMenB had an acceptable tolerability profile, with no withdrawals due to vaccination-related adverse events. Inclusion of 4CMenB in routine infant immunization schedules will be a major advance in the control of meningococcal disease, and our study indicates that by using paracetamol prophylaxis, post-vaccination reactions are reduced without clinically relevant negative consequences on vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:25424809

  20. A phase 2 randomized controlled trial of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (I)

    PubMed Central

    Prymula, Roman; Esposito, Susanna; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Xie, Fang; Toneatto, Daniela; Kohl, Igor; Dull, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    The novel meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB, Bexsero®), recently approved in Europe and Australia, may soon be included in routine infant immunization schedules, subject to guidance from national or regional recommending bodies. In the development of 4CMenB and consistent with other newly introduced vaccines, clinical studies have shown concomitant administration with routine infant vaccines induces an incremental increase in some reactions, including fever. As this may hinder acceptability, we examined the impact of prophylactic paracetamol on the occurrence of fever and other solicited reactions, as well as the immune responses to study vaccines, in a prospectively designed study. 4CMenB was administered as a 4-dose series at 2, 3, 4, and 12 months of age concomitantly with routine infant vaccines: DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib and PCV7, with or without prophylactic paracetamol; a third group received MenC vaccine. Immune responses to 4CMenB were not decreased by the use of paracetamol prophylaxis and there were no clinically relevant effects on immune responses to routine vaccines. Occurrence of fever was higher in infants co-administered with 4CMenB compared with those given MenC vaccine, but was significantly decreased by prophylactic paracetamol, as were other solicited reactions to vaccination, both local and systemic. Co-administration of 4CMenB had an acceptable tolerability profile, with no withdrawals due to vaccination-related adverse events. Inclusion of 4CMenB in routine infant immunization schedules will be a major advance in the control of meningococcal disease, and our study indicates that by using paracetamol prophylaxis, post-vaccination reactions are reduced without clinically relevant negative consequences on vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:25424809

  1. Detection by multiplex real-time PCR assays and isolation of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 in ground beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups, which include serogroup O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, are responsible for the majority of non-O157 STEC infections in the United States, representing a growing public health concern. Cattle and other ruminants are reservoirs for ...

  2. 77 FR 2348 - Agency Information Collection (VA Enrollment Certification): Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... or email denise.mclamb@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0073.'' SUPPLEMENTARY... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (VA Enrollment Certification): Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY..., 2012. ADDRESSES: Submit written comments on the collection of information through...

  3. 31. FELGATES CREEK BRIDGE (HAER No. VA48I), VIEW FROM WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. FELGATES CREEK BRIDGE (HAER No. VA-48-I), VIEW FROM WEST END. NOTE ALUMINUM RAILING ON EAST SIDE FOR CANTILEVERED BIKE PATH. - Colonial Parkway, Yorktown to Jamestown Island, Yorktown, York County, VA

  4. Epidemiology and microbiology of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli other than serogroup O157 in England, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Lisa; Vanstone, Gemma L; Perry, Neil T; Launders, Naomi; Adak, Goutam K; Godbole, Gauri; Grant, Kathie A; Smith, Robin; Jenkins, Claire

    2014-09-01

    The implementation of direct testing of clinical faecal specimens for gastrointestinal (GI) pathogens by PCR offers a sensitive and comprehensive approach for the detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). The introduction of a commercial PCR assay, known as GI PCR, for the detection of GI pathogens at three frontline hospital laboratories in England between December 2012 and December 2013 led to a significant increase in detection of STEC other than serogroup O157 (non-O157 STEC). In 2013, 47 isolates were detected in England, compared with 57 in the preceding 4 years (2009-2012). The most common non-O157 STEC serogroup detected was O26 (23.2 %). A total of 47 (47.5 %) STEC isolates had stx2 only, 28 (28.3 %) carried stx1 and stx2, and the remaining 24 (24.2 %) had stx1 only. Stx2a (64.0 %) was the most frequently detected Stx2 subtype. The eae (intimin) gene was detected in 52 (52.5 %) non-O157 STEC isolates. Six strains of STEC O104 had aggR, but this gene was not detected in any other STEC serogroups in this study. Haemolytic ureamic syndrome was significantly associated with STEC strains possessing eae [odds ratio (OR) 5.845, P = 0.0235] and/or stx2a (OR 9.56, P = 0.0034) subtypes. A matched case-control analysis indicated an association between non-O157 STEC cases and contact with farm animals. Widespread implementation of the PCR approach in England will determine the true incidence of non-O157 STEC infection, highlight the burden in terms of morbidity and mortality, and facilitate the examination of risk factors to indicate whether there are niche risk exposures for particular strains. PMID:24928216

  5. Comparative Genomics Reveal That Host-Innate Immune Responses Influence the Clinical Prevalence of Legionella pneumophila Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Adil; Knox, Natalie; Prashar, Akriti; Alexander, David; Abdel-Nour, Mena; Duncan, Carla; Tang, Patrick; Amatullah, Hajera; Dos Santos, Claudia C.; Tijet, Nathalie; Low, Donald E.; Pourcel, Christine; Van Domselaar, Gary; Terebiznik, Mauricio; Ensminger, Alexander W.; Guyard, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the primary etiologic agent of legionellosis, a potentially fatal respiratory illness. Amongst the sixteen described L. pneumophila serogroups, a majority of the clinical infections diagnosed using standard methods are serogroup 1 (Sg1). This high clinical prevalence of Sg1 is hypothesized to be linked to environmental specific advantages and/or to increased virulence of strains belonging to Sg1. The genetic determinants for this prevalence remain unknown primarily due to the limited genomic information available for non-Sg1 clinical strains. Through a systematic attempt to culture Legionella from patient respiratory samples, we have previously reported that 34% of all culture confirmed legionellosis cases in Ontario (n = 351) are caused by non-Sg1 Legionella. Phylogenetic analysis combining multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis and sequence based typing profiles of all non-Sg1 identified that L. pneumophila clinical strains (n = 73) belonging to the two most prevalent molecular types were Sg6. We conducted whole genome sequencing of two strains representative of these sequence types and one distant neighbour. Comparative genomics of the three L. pneumophila Sg6 genomes reported here with published L. pneumophila serogroup 1 genomes identified genetic differences in the O-antigen biosynthetic cluster. Comparative optical mapping analysis between Sg6 and Sg1 further corroborated this finding. We confirmed an altered O-antigen profile of Sg6, and tested its possible effects on growth and replication in in vitro biological models and experimental murine infections. Our data indicates that while clinical Sg1 might not be better suited than Sg6 in colonizing environmental niches, increased bloodstream dissemination through resistance to the alternative pathway of complement mediated killing in the human host may explain its higher prevalence. PMID:23826259

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of a tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y conjugate vaccine in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Bermal, Nancy; Huang, Li-Min; Dubey, A P; Jain, Hermant; Bavdekar, Ashish; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Bianco, Veronique; Baine, Yaela; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2011-02-01

    The highest incidence of invasive meningococcal disease is in young children, with a second peak in adolescents/young adults. All five major disease-causing serogroups (A, B, C, W-135 and Y) have been described in Asia. Immunogenicity and safety of the investigational meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (ACWY-TT, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) was evaluated in healthy, meningococcal conjugate vaccine-naïve adolescents in the Philippines, India and Taiwan. 1025 adolescents were randomized (3:1) to receive one dose of ACWY-TT or tetravalent ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (Mencevax™, Men-PS). Serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (rSBA) was measured. Local and systemic adverse reactions were recorded for 4 days. Safety data were pooled with results from a second, similarly designed study in adults for evaluation of grade 3 systemic events. The pre-specified immunogenicity criterion for non-inferiority to Men-PS was met. One month post-vaccination, ≥85.4%-97.1% had a vaccine response (post-titre ≥1:8 in initially seronegative and ≥4-fold increase in seropositive), versus 78.0%-96.6% after Men-PS, against each vaccine serogroup. Exploratory comparisons showed statistically significantly higher post-vaccination rSBA geometric mean titres against all serogroups following ACWY-TT versus Men-PS. Exploratory analysis showed no statistically significant differences between groups in grade 3 general symptoms; however, the statistical criterion for non-inferiority between pooled treatment groups in terms of the ratio of incidences of grade 3 general symptoms was not demonstrated. No SAEs were related to vaccination. ACWY-TT was immunogenic in Asian adolescents with a reactogenicity profile that was clinically acceptable and similar to that of licensed Men-PS. The results of this study indicate that ACWY-TT could be used as a third conjugate vaccine in the protection of adolescents against meningococcal disease. PMID:21343698

  7. Immunogenicity of meningococcal quadrivalent (serogroup A, C, W135 and Y) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Perrone, Valentina; Radice, Sonia; Capuano, Annalisa; Clementi, Emilio

    2015-02-01

    Meningococcal meningitis represents one of the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in developed countries. Among the thirteen described serogroups, only five are usually responsible of invasive infections making immunisation against multiple serogroups the best strategy to protect individuals from this disease. Herein we carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis, in accordance with the PRISMA statement, of the recently EU-licensed meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT). We included 15 randomised clinical trials, comparing MenACWY-TT and Men-PS (ten studies), MenACWY-TT and MenC-CRM197 (four studies) and MenACWY-TT and MenACWY-DT (one study). All studies included in the meta-analysis showed high immunogenicity for MenACWY-TT vaccines in all tested serogroups. Our results suggest that the MenACWY-TT vaccine is as immunogenic as the other commercial available meningococcal vaccines. PMID:25447792

  8. Molecular analysis of leptospires from serogroup Sejroe obtained from asymptomatic cattle in Rio de Janeiro - Brazil reveals genetic proximity to serovar Guaricura.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, A P; Hamond, C; Pinto, P; Bremont, S; Bourhy, P; Lilenbaum, W

    2016-04-01

    Bovine leptospirosis causes substantial reproductive failure in cattle, mainly due to infections with serovar (sv) Hardjo infection. Notwithstanding, other serovars from the serogroup (sg) Sejroe could also have important roles in bovine leptospirosis. The objective was to investigate genetic diversity of serogroup Sejroe isolates obtained from asymptomatic cattle in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Urine and vaginal fluid (VF) were collected from clinically healthy cattle immediately after slaughter. Five isolates were recovered and characterized (serogrouping) as belonging to sg Sejroe. Sequencing of rrs and secY genes further identified them as Leptospira santarosai. Analysis of secY sequences indicated a high level of sequence homology to sv Guaricura strains. Based on culture and sequence data, we inferred that other members of sg Sejroe may be important in bovine leptospiral infection, particularly genotypes of L. santarosai serovar Guaricura. PMID:27033941

  9. Priorities for research on meningococcal disease and the impact of serogroup A vaccination in the African meningitis belt.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Danny; Aseffa, Abraham; Bash, Margaret; Basta, Nicole; Borrow, Ray; Broome, Claire; Caugant, Dominique; Clark, Tom; Collard, Jean-Marc; Djingarey, Mamoudou; Goldblatt, David; Greenwood, Brian; Griffiths, Ulla; Hajjeh, Rana; Hassan-King, Musa; Hugonnet, Stephane; Kimball, Ann Marie; LaForce, Marc; MacLennan, Calman; Maiden, Martin C J; Manigart, Olivier; Mayer, Leonard; Messonnier, Nancy; Moisi, Jennifer; Moore, Katie; Moto, Daugla Doumagoum; Mueller, Judith; Nascimento, Maria; Obaro, Stephen; Ouedraogo, Rasmata; Page, Anne-Laure; Perea, Willima; Pluschke, Gerd; Preziosi, Mari-Pierre; Sow, Samba; Stephens, David; Stuart, James; Thomson, Madeleiene; Tiendrebeogo, Sylvestre; Trape, Jean-Francois; Vernet, Guy

    2013-03-01

    For over 100 years, large epidemics of meningococcal meningitis have occurred every few years in areas of the African Sahel and sub-Sahel known as the African meningitis belt. Until recently, the main approach to the control of these epidemics has been reactive vaccination with a polysaccharide vaccine after an outbreak has reached a defined threshold and provision of easy access to effective treatment but this approach has not prevented the occurrence of new epidemics. Meningococcal conjugate vaccines, which can prevent meningococcal carriage and thus interrupt transmission, may be more effective than polysaccharide vaccines at preventing epidemics. Because the majority of African epidemics have been caused by serogroup A meningococci, a serogroup A polysaccharide/tetanus toxoid protein conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) has recently been developed. Results from an initial evaluation of the impact of this vaccine on meningococcal disease and meningococcal carriage in Burkina Faso have been encouraging. To review how the research agenda for meningococcal disease in Africa has been changed by the advent of PsA-TT and to define a new set of research priorities for study of meningococcal infection in Africa, a meeting of 41 scientists was held in Dakar, Senegal on April 24th and 25th 2012. The research recommendations developed during the course of this meeting are presented in this paper. The need for enhanced surveillance for meningitis in defined populations with good diagnostic facilities in African countries at risk of epidemics was identified as the highest priority. This is needed to determine the duration of protection against serogroup A meningococcal disease provided by PsA-TT and to determine the risk of disease and carriage caused by meningococci of other serogroups. Other research areas given high priority included identification and validation of serological correlates of protection against meningococcal disease and carriage, development of improved methods for

  10. Phenotypic variation amongst genotypically homogeneous Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates: implications for the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, T. G.; Saunders, N. A.; Haththotuwa, A.; Hallas, G.; Birtles, R. J.; Taylor, A. G.

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, obtained from a site associated with an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, were examined by monoclonal antibody subgrouping, restriction fragment length polymorphism typing, restriction endonuclease analysis and plasmid content. Nine distinct phenotypes were detected but at the genotypic level all strains were closely related. The data presented indicate that phenotypic variation of a single parent strain can occur within an environmental site. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1969803

  11. Viruses isolated from Aedeomyia squamipennis mosquitoes collected in Panama, Ecuador, and Argentina: establishment of the Gamboa serogroup.

    PubMed

    Calisher, C H; Lazuick, J S; Justines, G; Francy, D B; Monath, T P; Gutierrez, E; Sabattini, M S; Bowen, G S; Jakob, W L

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-four virus strains were isolated from Aedeomyia squamipennis mosquitoes collected in Ecuador. One additional strain each was isolated from this species from Panama and ARgentina. All 26 isolates were shown to be related serologically to prototype Gamboa virus, originally isolated from Ad. squamipennis mosquitoes collected in Panama. Antigenic comparisons of eight strains, including prototype Gamboa virus, indicated the existence of four distinct viruses. Neutralization tests with sera from a variety of mammalian and avian species from Argentina provided further evidence that Gamboa serogroup viruses are transmitted between Ad. squamipennis and birds. PMID:6111232

  12. 12 CFR 3.206 - Stressed VaR-based measure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stressed VaR-based measure. 3.206 Section 3.206... Risk-Weighted Assets-Market Risk § 3.206 Stressed VaR-based measure. (a) General requirement. At least... calculate its VaR-based measure to calculate a stressed VaR-based measure. (b) Quantitative requirements...

  13. 48 CFR 852.219-71 - VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false VA mentor-protégÃ....219-71 VA mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in 819.7115(a), insert the following clause: VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC 2009) (a) Large businesses are encouraged to participate in the VA...

  14. 48 CFR 852.219-71 - VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false VA mentor-protégÃ....219-71 VA mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in 819.7115(a), insert the following clause: VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC 2009) (a) Large businesses are encouraged to participate in the VA...

  15. 48 CFR 852.219-71 - VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false VA mentor-protégÃ....219-71 VA mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in 819.7115(a), insert the following clause: VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC 2009) (a) Large businesses are encouraged to participate in the VA...

  16. 48 CFR 852.219-71 - VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false VA mentor-protégÃ....219-71 VA mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in 819.7115(a), insert the following clause: VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC 2009) (a) Large businesses are encouraged to participate in the VA...

  17. 48 CFR 852.219-71 - VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false VA mentor-protégÃ....219-71 VA mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in 819.7115(a), insert the following clause: VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC 2009) (a) Large businesses are encouraged to participate in the VA...

  18. Further development of sample preparation and detection methods for O157 and the top 6 non-O157 STEC serogroups in cattle feces.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Cheyenne C; Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A; Thomas, James; Reuter, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are food-borne pathogens responsible for outbreaks of human infections worldwide. Ruminant livestock harbor STEC in their intestinal tract, and through fecal contamination possess the potential to compromise the safety of food and water. As a human health safety risk, STEC detection methods on beef carcasses and trim are needed as mandated by the USDA-FSIS. In order to monitor STEC prior to harvest and human consumption, our goal was to evaluate and/or improve detection of seven STEC serogroups in cattle feces. In comparison to traditional approaches, sample processing methods in bovine feces were evaluated using a multi-factorial Latin square design which involved freezing or freeze drying feces. Autoclaved versus non-autoclaved feces were spiked with O26:H11 or O157:H7 serotypes in various dilutions and enriched for up to 6h. Each hour, enriched aliquots were compared using traditional culture methods and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Furthermore, a 7-serogroup multiplex PCR (mPCR) was developed to detect O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 and O157 serogroups simultaneously. The diagnostic sensitivity of our mPCR assay following 6h enrichment was superior (10CFU/g across all serogroups) compared to a previously established PCR assay (10CFU/g for O26, and O103; ≥10(4)CFU/g for all other serogroups). Obtaining viable isolates appeared to be limited by the efficiency of current immunomagnetic separation (IMS) methods, which ranged from 20 to 100% effectiveness at retrieving colonies depending on serogroup. After IMS, 70 putative STEC isolates were screened for Shiga toxin and attachment genes by mPCR. Sixty-five isolates contained one or both Shiga toxin genes. PMID:25026274

  19. The Impact of VA's Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers on Academic Affiliates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Elizabeth J.; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Shay, Kenneth; Gilman, Stuart C.; Zeiss, Robert A.; Hettler, Debbie L.

    2011-01-01

    The education mission of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is to train health professionals to benefit VA and the United States. One approach for achieving that mission, along with VA's research and clinical missions, was the establishment of Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers (GRECCs) in 1975. These were developed at VA…

  20. 78 FR 48543 - Veterans Health Administration Fund Availability Under the VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Veterans Affairs (VA) is announcing the availability of 1-year renewal funding for currently operational... Special Need partners and currently operational VA GPD Special Need Grant Recipients which do not involve... under VA's Homeless Providers GPD Program for FY 2011 operational GPD Special Need grant recipients...

  1. 12 CFR 324.206 - Stressed VaR-based measure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stressed VaR-based measure. 324.206 Section 324... Stressed VaR-based measure. (a) General requirement. At least weekly, an FDIC-supervised institution must use the same internal model(s) used to calculate its VaR-based measure to calculate a stressed...

  2. 78 FR 6849 - Agency Information Collection (Verification of VA Benefits) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Verification of VA Benefits) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY... abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The PRA submission... VA Benefits, VA Form 26-8937. OMB Control Number: 2900-0406. ] Type of Review: Extension of...

  3. 75 FR 17832 - Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0021'' in any correspondence. During the... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity.... SUMMARY: The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing...

  4. 77 FR 60746 - Proposed Information Collection (VA/DOD Joint Disability Evaluation Board Claim) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... 20420 or email to ] nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0704'' in any... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA/DOD Joint Disability Evaluation Board Claim) Activity: Comment...: The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing...

  5. 77 FR 64383 - Proposed Information Collection (Verification of VA Benefits) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Verification of VA Benefits) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public... name prior to the closing of any VA-guaranteed loans on an automatic basis. DATES: Written comments...

  6. 75 FR 60171 - Proposed Information Collection (Credit Underwriting Standards and Procedures for Processing VA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ...., Washington, DC 20420 or e-mail nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0521'' in any... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Credit Underwriting Standards and Procedures for Processing VA... Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the proposed collection of...

  7. 78 FR 79563 - Proposed Information Collection (VA MATIC Authorization); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...), Department of Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20420 or email nancy.kessinger@va.gov... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA MATIC Authorization); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans... Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public comment on...

  8. 78 FR 53506 - Agency Information Collection (HUD/VA Addendum to Uniform Residential Loan Application) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ....rennie@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0144.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: HUD/VA... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (HUD/VA Addendum to Uniform Residential Loan Application) Activity... information through www.Regulations.gov , or to Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office...

  9. 76 FR 24570 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for VA Education Benefits) Activity; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ...., Washington, DC 20420 or email to nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0154'' in... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Application for VA Education Benefits) Activity; Comment Request... Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an...

  10. 78 FR 60379 - Proposed Information Collection (Credit Underwriting Standards and Procedures for Processing VA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ...., Washington, DC 20420 or email nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0521'' in any... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Credit Underwriting Standards and Procedures for Processing VA... Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the proposed collection of...

  11. 76 FR 67561 - Proposed Information Collection (VA Enrollment Certification) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ..., 810 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20420 or email to nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA Enrollment Certification) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for...

  12. 75 FR 54965 - Proposed Information Collection (Statement of Purchaser or Owner Assuming Seller's Loans, VA Form...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...., Washington, DC 20420 or e-mail nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0111'' in any... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Statement of Purchaser or Owner Assuming Seller's Loans, VA Form... Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the proposed collection of...

  13. 76 FR 27381 - Proposed Information Collection (Notice of Waiver of VA Compensation or Pension To Receive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ...., Washington, DC 20420 or e-mail to nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0463'' in... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Notice of Waiver of VA Compensation or Pension To Receive... of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the proposed...

  14. 78 FR 29436 - Proposed Information Collection (HUD/VA Addendum to Uniform Residential Loan Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ...), Department of Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20420 or email nancy.kessinger@va.gov... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (HUD/VA Addendum to Uniform Residential Loan Application) Activity.... SUMMARY: The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing...

  15. 77 FR 56711 - Proposed Information Collection (VA MATIC Enrollment/Change); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20420 or email nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA MATIC Enrollment/Change); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans... Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public comment on...

  16. 76 FR 67557 - Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Veteran Enrollees' Health and Reliance Upon VA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ..., 810 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20420; or email: cynthia.harvey-pryor@va.gov . Please refer to... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Veteran Enrollees' Health and Reliance Upon VA...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Veterans Health Administration (VHA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA),...

  17. 75 FR 33898 - Agency Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... through http://www.Regulations.gov ; or to VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch..., (202) 461-7485, FAX (202) 273-0443 or e-mail denise.mclamb@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System)...

  18. 78 FR 36642 - Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0021'' in any correspondence. During the... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity.... SUMMARY: The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing...

  19. 75 FR 48413 - Agency Information Collection (HUD/VA Addendum to Uniform Residential Loan Application) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... information through www.Regulations.gov ; or to VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch..., (202) 461-7485, FAX (202) 273-0443 or e-mail denise.mclamb@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (HUD/VA Addendum to Uniform Residential Loan Application)...

  20. 78 FR 21817 - Amendment of Restricted Area R-6601; Fort A.P. Hill, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... limits and increase the time of designation of restricted area R-6601, Fort A.P. Hill, VA, (77 FR 35308... Administration 14 CFR Part 73 RIN 2120-AA66 Amendment of Restricted Area R-6601; Fort A.P. Hill, VA AGENCY... limits and time of designation of restricted area R-6601, Fort A.P. Hill, VA. The U.S. Army...

  1. 75 FR 78808 - Agency Information Collection (VA Request for Determination of Reasonable Value) Activity Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (VA Request for Determination of Reasonable Value) Activity Under.... SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3521), this notice... INFORMATION: Title: VA Request for Determination of Reasonable Value VA Form 26- 1805 and 26-1805-1....

  2. 38 CFR 26.7 - VA environmental decision making and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false VA environmental decision making and documents. 26.7 Section 26.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) ACTIONS § 26.7 VA environmental decision making and...

  3. 48 CFR 853.236-70 - VA Form 10-6298, Architect-Engineer Fee Proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false VA Form 10-6298, Architect... VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 853.236-70 VA Form 10-6298, Architect-Engineer Fee Proposal. VA Form 10-6298, Architect-Engineer Fee Proposal, shall be used as prescribed in...

  4. 48 CFR 853.236-70 - VA Form 10-6298, Architect-Engineer Fee Proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false VA Form 10-6298, Architect... VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 853.236-70 VA Form 10-6298, Architect-Engineer Fee Proposal. VA Form 10-6298, Architect-Engineer Fee Proposal, shall be used as prescribed in...

  5. 48 CFR 853.236-70 - VA Form 10-6298, Architect-Engineer Fee Proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false VA Form 10-6298, Architect... VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 853.236-70 VA Form 10-6298, Architect-Engineer Fee Proposal. VA Form 10-6298, Architect-Engineer Fee Proposal, shall be used as prescribed in...

  6. 78 FR 11094 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; James River, Between Isle of Wight and Newport News, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... and Newport News, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation from drawbridge regulation... News, VA. This deviation is necessary to facilitate generator replacement on the James River Draw... operating schedule, the James River Bridge, mile 5.0, between Isle of Isle and Newport News, VA opens...

  7. 77 FR 58773 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; James River, Newport News, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; James River, Newport News, VA AGENCY... James River, mile 5.0, at Newport News, VA. The deviation is necessary to facilitate the structural... regular operating schedule, the US 17/258 Bridge over the James River, mile 5.0, at Newport News, VA...

  8. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... November 21, 2011 (76 FR 71920), VA proposed to amend its regulations concerning the billing methodology... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers... services and hospice care. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA...

  9. 38 CFR 21.1032 - VA has a duty to assist claimants in obtaining evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false VA has a duty to assist claimants in obtaining evidence. 21.1032 Section 21.1032 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Educational Assistance Claims § 21.1032 VA has a duty to assist claimants in obtaining evidence. (a) VA's...

  10. 38 CFR 21.33 - VA has a duty to assist claimants in obtaining evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false VA has a duty to assist... Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Claims § 21.33 VA has a duty to assist claimants in obtaining evidence... claimant either orally or in writing when VA: (i) Has made reasonable efforts to obtain relevant...

  11. 38 CFR 26.9 - Information on and public participation in VA environmental process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... participation in VA environmental process. 26.9 Section 26.9 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) ACTIONS § 26.9 Information on and public participation in VA environmental process. (a) During...

  12. 38 CFR 26.9 - Information on and public participation in VA environmental process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... participation in VA environmental process. 26.9 Section 26.9 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) ACTIONS § 26.9 Information on and public participation in VA environmental process. (a) During...

  13. 38 CFR 26.9 - Information on and public participation in VA environmental process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... participation in VA environmental process. 26.9 Section 26.9 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) ACTIONS § 26.9 Information on and public participation in VA environmental process. (a) During...

  14. 38 CFR 26.9 - Information on and public participation in VA environmental process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... participation in VA environmental process. 26.9 Section 26.9 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) ACTIONS § 26.9 Information on and public participation in VA environmental process. (a) During...

  15. 38 CFR 26.9 - Information on and public participation in VA environmental process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... participation in VA environmental process. 26.9 Section 26.9 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) ACTIONS § 26.9 Information on and public participation in VA environmental process. (a) During...

  16. 77 FR 23204 - VA Acquisition Regulation: Electronic Submission of Payment Requests

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... using under VA's current interim electronic invoicing clause. See 74 FR 32223. VA's Electronic Invoice... INFORMATION: On July 7, 2009, VA published a notice, in the Federal Register at 74 FR 32223, of a class... interchange (EDI) formats; or (3) another electronic form as prescribed by the contract administration...

  17. 48 CFR 852.219-9 - VA Small business subcontracting plan minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false VA Small business... Provisions and Clauses 852.219-9 VA Small business subcontracting plan minimum requirements. As prescribed in subpart 819.709, insert the following clause: VA Small Business Subcontracting Plan Minimum...

  18. 38 CFR 17.106 - VA collection rules; third-party payers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false VA collection rules; third-party payers. 17.106 Section 17.106 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Charges, Waivers, and Collections § 17.106 VA collection rules; third-party payers. (a)(1) General rule. VA has the right to...

  19. 38 CFR 17.106 - VA collection rules; third-party payers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false VA collection rules; third-party payers. 17.106 Section 17.106 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Charges, Waivers, and Collections § 17.106 VA collection rules; third-party payers. (a)(1) General rule. VA has the right to...

  20. 76 FR 63357 - VA National Academic Affiliations Council; Notice of Establishment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... AFFAIRS VA National Academic Affiliations Council; Notice of Establishment As required by Section 9(a)(2... establishment of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) National Academic Affiliations Council. The Secretary... partnerships between VA and its academic affiliates. The Council will provide a forum for discussion and...

  1. 'Baby talk' attracts neighbors to new Manassas, Va., birthing center.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    An dollar 80 million expansion plan recently was launched by Prince William Hospital, Manassas, Va. The cornerstone of the plan is the new Hylton Family Birthing Center. The hospital employed a full range of tactics to promote the opening of the birthing center. These ranged from quarterly newsletters to billboards; from tours and radio spots to a newly revised web site. The campaign is characterized by infant testimonials, gentle humor and bright colors. PMID:15971721

  2. A proposed sero-grouping scheme for epidemiological investigation of food poisoning due to Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, A K; Narayan, K G

    1979-10-01

    Serological studies with soluble and particulate antigens of Cl. perfringens type A revealed that enterotoxin and spore antigens could be used as a suitable marker for epidemiological studies. 94% of the food poisoning strains of Cl. perfringens type A could be grouped into 3 groups with the help of 2 enterotoxin-specific sera and 90% in 4 groups with antispore sera. Heat-sensitive strains were found to be antigenically more homogenous than the heat-resistant ones. Sera raised against spores of heat-resistant strains could not agglutinate spore of any of the heat-sensitive strains. Similarly no spores of heat-resistant strains were agglutinable by serum raised against spores of heat-sensitive strains. On the basis of typing efficiency the two antigen, viz enterotoxin and spore antigens were used in the serogrouping scheme proposed for the epidemiological investigation of food poisoning with Cl. perfringens type A. Used together, enterotoxin and spore agglutinogen form an antigenic formula for each strain showing the serogroup to which it belongs. PMID:44603

  3. Genomic Characterisation of Three Mapputta Group Viruses, a Serogroup of Australian and Papua New Guinean Bunyaviruses Associated with Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, Penelope J.; McAllister, Jane; Mitchell, Ian R.; Boyle, David B.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Weir, Richard P.; Melville, Lorna F.; Gubala, Aneta J.

    2015-01-01

    The Mapputta serogroup tentatively contains the mosquito-associated viruses Mapputta, Maprik, Trubanaman and Gan Gan. Interestingly, this serogroup has previously been associated with an acute epidemic polyarthritis-like illness in humans; however, there has been no ensuing genetic characterisation. Here we report the complete genome sequences of Mapputta and Maprik viruses, and a new Mapputta group candidate, Buffalo Creek virus, previously isolated from mosquitoes and detected by serology in a hospitalised patient. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the group is one of the earliest diverged groups within the genus Orthobunyavirus of the family Bunyaviridae. Analyses show that these three viruses are related to the recently sequenced Australian bunyaviruses from mosquitoes, Salt Ash and Murrumbidgee. A notable feature of the Mapputta group viruses is the absence of the NSs (non-structural) ORF commonly found on the S segment of other orthobunyaviruses. Viruses of the Mapputta group have been isolated from geographically diverse regions ranging from tropical Papua New Guinea to the semi-arid climate of south-eastern Australia. The relevance of this group to human health in the region merits further investigation. PMID:25588016

  4. Cloning, Sequencing, and Role in Virulence of Two Phospholipases (A1 and C) from Mesophilic Aeromonas sp. Serogroup O:34

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Aguilar, Alicia; Nogueras, Maria Mercedes; Regue, Miguel; Swift, Simon; Tomás, Juan M.

    1999-01-01

    Two different representative recombinant clones encoding Aeromonas hydrophila lipases were found upon screening on tributyrin (phospholipase A1) and egg yolk agar (lecithinase-phospholipase C) plates of a cosmid-based genomic library of Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3 (serogroup O34) introduced into Escherichia coli DH5α. Subcloning, nucleotide sequencing, and in vitro-coupled transcription-translation experiments showed that the phospholipase A1 (pla) and C (plc) genes code for an 83-kDa putative lipoprotein and a 65-kDa protein, respectively. Defined insertion mutants of A. hydrophila AH-3 defective in either pla or plc genes were defective in phospholipase A1 and C activities, respectively. Lecithinase (phospholipase C) was shown to be cytotoxic but nonhemolytic or poorly hemolytic. A. hydrophila AH-3 plc mutants showed a more than 10-fold increase in their 50% lethal dose on fish and mice, and complementation of the plc single gene on these mutants abolished this effect, suggesting that Plc protein is a virulence factor in the mesophilic Aeromonas sp. serogroup O:34 infection process. PMID:10417167

  5. Immunogenicity and safety of a meningococcal serogroup A, C, Y and W glycoconjugate vaccine, ACWY-TT.

    PubMed

    Findlow, Helen; Borrow, Ray

    2013-05-01

    A quadrivalent meningococcal serogroup A, C, W and Y conjugate vaccine (ACWY), utilising tetanus toxoid (TT) as its carrier protein (ACWY-TT; Nimenrix™, GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, Rixensart, Belgium) has been demonstrated to be safe and immunogenic when administered to young children from 12 months of age, older children, adolescents, and adults. Administration of a single dose of ACWY-TT induces protective serum bactericidal antibodies against all four serogroups as well as good antibody persistence. Coadministration studies have demonstrated that ACWY-TT can be administered with diphtheria, tetanus, three-component acellular pertussis, hepatitis B, inactivated polio virus and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (DTaP3-IPV-HBV/Hib, Infanrix™ hexa; GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, Rixensart, Belgium); measles, mumps, rubella, varicella vaccine (Priorix-Tetra™; GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, Rixensart, Belgium); 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Synflorix(®); GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, Rixensart, Belgium); hepatitis A and B vaccine (Twinrix(®); GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, Rixensart, Belgium); and seasonal influenza vaccine (Fluarix™; GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, Rixensart, Belgium). Studies in young infants from 2 months of age have now commenced but immunisation with a single dose of ACWY-TT from 12 months of age is a safe and immunogenic option in the prevention of meningococcal disease. PMID:23712402

  6. Similarities in Leptospira Serogroup and Species Distribution in Animals and Humans in the Indian Ocean Island of Mayotte

    PubMed Central

    Desvars, Amélie; Naze, Florence; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Cardinale, Eric; Picardeau, Mathieu; Michault, Alain; Bourhy, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to identify local animal reservoirs of leptospirosis to explain the unusual features of Leptospira strains recently described among patients on the island of Mayotte. By means of a microscopic agglutination test using local clinical isolates, we found that 11.2% of black rats were seropositive to Leptospira, whereas 10.2% of flying foxes, 2% of lemurs, 93.1% of domestic dogs, and 87.5% of stray dogs were seropositive. As observed in humans, Mini was the main serogroup circulating in animals, whereas serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae was absent. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we also showed that 29.8% of rats carried leptospires in their kidneys. The sequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences of Leptospira found in black rat kidneys identified four genomospecies (Leptospira borgpetersenii, Leptospira interrogans, Leptospira kirschneri, and L. borgpetersenii group B), which established black rats as the major source of leptospirosis transmission to humans. The origins of such a genetic diversity in Leptospira strains are discussed. PMID:22764304

  7. Serogroup-specific interaction of Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharide with host cell microtubules and effects on tubulin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Talà, Adelfia; Cogli, Laura; De Stefano, Mario; Cammarota, Marcella; Spinosa, Maria Rita; Bucci, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that during late stages of the infectious process, serogroup B meningococci (MenB) are able to escape the phagosome of in vitro-infected human epithelial cells. They then multiply in the cytosolic environment and spread intracellularly and to surrounding cells by exploiting the microtubule cytoskeleton, as suggested by results of infections in the presence of microtubule inhibitors and evidence of nanotubes connecting neighboring cells. In this study, by using microtubule binding assays with purified microtubule asters and bundles and microtubule bundles synthesized in vitro, we demonstrate that the MenB capsule directly mediates the interaction between bacteria and microtubules. The direct interaction between the microtubules and the MenB capsular polysaccharide was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Unexpectedly, serogroup C meningococci (MenC), which have a capsular polysaccharide that differs from that of MenB only by its anomeric linkage, α(2→9) instead of α(2→8), were not able to interact with the microtubules, and the lack of interaction was not due to capsular polysaccharide O-acetylation that takes place in most MenC strains but not in MenB strains. Moreover, we demonstrate that the MenB capsular polysaccharide inhibits tubulin polymerization in vitro. Thus, at variance with MenC, MenB may interfere with microtubule dynamics during cell infection. PMID:24166951

  8. Women's veteran identity and utilization of VA health services.

    PubMed

    Di Leone, Brooke A L; Wang, Joyce M; Kressin, Nancy; Vogt, Dawne

    2016-02-01

    Women have participated in the United States military since its founding. However, until the mid-20th century, there had been limited recognition of women as official members of the military, and women remain a statistical minority within military and veteran populations. It is therefore important to better understand women's veteran identity (which we define here as one's self-concept as derived from their veteran status) and associated implications for service use and experiences in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care setting. The present research examined the centrality of, and positive regard for, women's veteran identity among 407 female veterans deployed in support of the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Data were collected via a mailed national survey. Positive regard for veteran identity, but not veteran identity centrality,was positively associated with participants' age and length of time spent in the military. Results also showed that the centrality of women's veteran identity was positively related to their choice to use VA for health care and their feelings of belonging within VA, and that veteran identity centrality and positive regard for veteran identity are differentially associated with participants' military experiences (e.g., combat exposure, deployment sexual harassment) and mental health symptomatology (e.g., depression). PMID:25729892

  9. Validation of KENO V.a Comparison with Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    Section 1 of this report documents the validation of KENO V.a against 258 critical experiments. Experiments considered were primarily high or low enriched uranium systems. The results indicate that the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Criticality Program accurately calculates a broad range of critical experiments. A substantial number of the calculations showed a positive or negative bias in excess of 1 1/2% in k-effective (k{sub eff}). Classes of criticals which show a bias include 3% enriched green blocks, highly enriched uranyl fluoride slab arrays, and highly enriched uranyl nitrate arrays. If these biases are properly taken into account, the KENO V.a code can be used with confidence for the design and criticality safety analysis of uranium-containing systems. Section 2 of this report documents the results of investigation into the cause of the bias observed in Sect. 1. The results of this study indicate that the bias seen in Sect. 1 is caused by code bias, cross-section bias, reporting bias, and modeling bias. There is evidence that many of the experiments used in this validation and in previous validations are not adequately documented. The uncertainty in the experimental parameters overshadows bias caused by the code and cross sections and prohibits code validation to better than about 1% in k{sub eff}.

  10. Changing Emergence of Shigella Sero-Groups in Bangladesh: Observation from Four Different Diarrheal Disease Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sumon Kumar; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Ferdous, Farzana; Farzana, Fahmida Dil; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Leung, Daniel T.; Malek, Mohammad Abdul; Talukder, Kaisar Ali; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Raqib, Rubhana

    2013-01-01

    Background Shigellosis continues to be a public health challenge for developing countries, including Bangladesh. The aim of the study is to demonstrate recent changes in Shigella sero-groups and their geographical diversity. Methods Data were extracted from data archive of four diarrheal disease surveillance systems. A 2% sub sample from urban Dhaka Hospital (2008–2011; n = 10,650), and 10% from urban Mirpur Treatment Centre (2009–2011; n = 3,585), were enrolled systematically; whereas, all patients coming from the Health and Demographic Surveillance System area in rural Matlab (2008–2011; n = 6,399) and rural Mirzapur (2010–2011; n = 2,812) were included irrespective of age, sex, and disease severity. A fresh stool specimen was collected for identification of Shigella spp. Of them, 315 (3%) were positive for Shigella in Dhaka, 490 (8%) from Matlab, 109 (3%) from Mirpur and 369 (13%) from Mirzapur and considered as analyzable sample size. Results Among all Shigella isolates regardless of age, significant decreases in percentage of S. flexneri over time was observed in Mirpur (55→29%; p value of χ2-for trend = 0.019) and Mirzapur (59→47%; p = 0.025). A non-significant decrease was also seen in Dhaka (58→48%), while in Matlab there was a non-significant increase (73→81%). Similar patterns were observed among under-5 children at all sites. Emergence of S. sonnei was found in Dhaka (8→25%; p<0.001) and Mirpur (10→33%; p = 0.015), whereas it decreased in Mirzapur (32→23%; p = 0.056). The emergence of S. boydii was seen in all ages in Mirzapur [(3→28%; p<0.001); (3→27%; p<0.001)]. On the other hand, we saw non-significant percent reductions in S. boydii in Dhaka [overall (25→16%); under-5 (16→9%)]. Decreasing rates of Shigella dysenteriae were observed in Matlab, Mirpur and Mirzapur; whereas, in Dhaka it remained unchanged. Conclusion and Significance Emergence of S. sonnei and S. boydii as important

  11. Risk Factors for Serogroup C Meningococcal Disease during Outbreak among Men who Have Sex with Men, New York City, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, Alison; Greene, Sharon K; Robinson, Byron F; Weiss, Don

    2015-08-01

    Risk factors for illness during a serogroup C meningococcal disease outbreak among men who have sex with men in New York City, New York, USA, in 2012-2013 included methamphetamine and cocaine use and sexually transmitted infections. Outbreak investigations should consider routinely capturing information regarding drug use and sex-related risk factors. PMID:26196855

  12. Ecological aspects of the epidemiology of infection with leptospires of the Ballum serogroup in the black rat (Rattus rattus) and the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) in New Zealand.

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, S. C.; Blackmore, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Epidemiological aspects of infection with leptospires of the Ballum serogroup in black rats (Rattus rattus) and brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) are described. Rats inhabiting a variety of habitats were investigated and isolates identifed as belonging to the Ballum serogroup were obtained from 21 of 61 black rats (34%) and 63 of 243 brown rats (26%). The high level of endemic ballum serogroup infection in these species reported here has not been described in other countries. A statistical relationship was shown between the prevalence of infection in brown rat populations and population density but this was not evident for black rats. Epidemiological data indicates that the black rat is a maintenance host for leptospires of the Ballum serogroup in New Zealand. The brown rat does not appear to be an efficient maintenance host for these leptospires, however endemic infection can be maintained in high-density populations inhabiting synanthropic foci. An hypothesis of 'competitive exclusion' (preferential maintenance of a particular serovar by a host species) is introduced with regard to leptospiral infection in brown rats. It is concluded that the establishment and maintenance of an endemic focus of leptospirosis is dependant on: introduction of a particular serovar; a suitable host; and a suitable host habitat. Within a maintenance population direct transmission appears to be more important than indirect transmission via the environment. PMID:7310125

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Legionella pneumophila environmental isolates representing nine different serogroups determined by automated ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Boccia, S.; Stenico, A.; Amore, R.; Moroder, L.; Orsini, M.; Romano-Spica, V.; Ricciardi, G.

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of the study were (i) to describe the abundance and epidemiology of Legionellaceae in the man-made environment in a northern Italian area, (ii) to assess the concordance between pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and automated ribotyping (AR) techniques for genotyping L. pneumophila and (iii) to investigate the correlation between serogrouping and genotyping data. Water was sampled from reservoirs in 12 buildings across an area of 80-km radius. Despite the water temperature always being maintained above 55 degrees C, all of the buildings sampled were contaminated with Legionellaceae on at least one occasion and 63 L. pneumophila isolates representing nine different serogroups were collected. The two DNA methods revealed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity, even though identical L. pneumophila clones were recovered at different sites. The AR technique provided a fairly reliable approximation of PFGE results (73% concordance), however there was poor correlation between serogrouping and genotyping data as identical DNA fingerprints were shared by isolates of different serogroups. PMID:16274507

  14. Prevalence and serogroup diversity of Salmonella for broiler neck skin, whole carcass rinse, and whole carcass enrichment sampling methodologies following air or immersion chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck skin (NS), whole carcass rinse (WCR), and whole carcass enrichment (WCE) sampling procedures for Salmonella isolation and serogroup from the same broiler carcass following either air or immersion chilling. Commercially processed and eviscerated broiler ...

  15. Genetic and Phylogenetic Characterization of Tataguine and Witwatersrand Viruses and Other Orthobunyaviruses of the Anopheles A, Capim, Guamá, Koongol, Mapputta, Tete, and Turlock Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Shchetinin, Alexey M.; Lvov, Dmitry K.; Deriabin, Petr G.; Botikov, Andrey G.; Gitelman, Asya K.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Alkhovsky, Sergey V.

    2015-01-01

    The family Bunyaviridae has more than 530 members that are distributed among five genera or remain to be classified. The genus Orthobunyavirus is the most diverse bunyaviral genus with more than 220 viruses that have been assigned to more than 18 serogroups based on serological cross-reactions and limited molecular-biological characterization. Sequence information for all three orthobunyaviral genome segments is only available for viruses belonging to the Bunyamwera, Bwamba/Pongola, California encephalitis, Gamboa, Group C, Mapputta, Nyando, and Simbu serogroups. Here we present coding-complete sequences for all three genome segments of 15 orthobunyaviruses belonging to the Anopheles A, Capim, Guamá, Kongool, Tete, and Turlock serogroups, and of two unclassified bunyaviruses previously not known to be orthobunyaviruses (Tataguine and Witwatersrand viruses). Using those sequence data, we established the most comprehensive phylogeny of the Orthobunyavirus genus to date, now covering 15 serogroups. Our results emphasize the high genetic diversity of orthobunyaviruses and reveal that the presence of the small nonstructural protein (NSs)-encoding open reading frame is not as common in orthobunyavirus genomes as previously thought. PMID:26610546

  16. Hyperspectral imaging of shiga toxin-producing escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 on Rainbow Agar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety Inspection Service has determined that six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) are adulterants in raw beef. Isolate and phenotypic discrimination of non-O157 STEC is problematic due ...

  17. Increase in the nasopharyngeal carriage of non-vaccine serogroup 15 Streptococcus pneumoniae after introduction of children pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Chiu, Susan S; Law, Pierra Y; Chan, Eunice L; Lai, Eileen L; Chow, Kin-Hung

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed pneumococcal carriage in the early periods after routine use of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in Hong Kong. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained from 1110 children (<5 years) admitted with acute illness during September 2010-August 2013. Pneumococcal carriage rate was 13.5% in unvaccinated children, 14.1% in children who had ≥1 PCV dose and 15.3% in children who had ≥3 PCV doses. Nonv-PCV13 serotypes comprised 56.4% of all isolates. The most common serogroup/types were 15 (15A, 5.1%; 15B, 10.3%; 15C, 9.6%; 15F, 0.6%), 19F (17.9%), 6A (7.1%) and 6C (7.1%). Carriage of serogroup 15 was more common among vaccinated children (4.1% versus 0.6%, P = 0.033). Molecular typing revealed that expansion of several clones (clonal complex, CC63, CC199, CC1262, CC3397) was responsible for the increase in serogroup 15. Almost all CC63 and CC3397 isolates were nonsusceptible to both penicillin and erythromycin. The finding highlights the emergence of serogroup 15 following PCV13 use. PMID:25483278

  18. DNA SEQUENCING, ANALYSIS, AND IDENTIFICATION OF SEROGROUP-SPECIFIC GENES IN THE ESCHERICHIA COLI O28AC AND O118 O ANTIGEN GENE CLUSTERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The DNA sequence of the O antigen gene clusters of Escherichia coli serogroups O28ac and O118 was determined, and 7 and 13 ORFs were identified, respectively, encoding genes required for O antigen sugar biosynthesis, transfer, and processing. Analysis of the DNA sequence revealed that the wzx (O ...

  19. Progressive Decrease in the Potential Usefulness of Meningococcal Serogroup B Vaccine (4CMenB, Bexsero®) in Gipuzkoa, Northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Esnal, Olatz; Marimón, José M.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of a vaccine is determined not only by the immunogenicity of its components, but especially by how widely it covers the disease-causing strains circulating in a given region. Because vaccine coverage varies over time, this study aimed to detect possible changes that could affect vaccine protection during a specific period in a southern European region. The 4CMenB vaccine is licensed for use in Europe, Canada, and Australia and is mainly directed against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. This vaccine contains four main immunogenic components: three recombinant proteins, FHbp, Nhba and NadA, and an outer membrane vesicle [PorA P1.4]. The allelic distribution of FHbp, Nhba, NadA, and PorA antigens in 82 invasive isolates (B and non-B serogroups) isolated from January 2008 to December 2013 were analyzed. 4CMenB was likely protective against 61.8% and 50% of serogroup B and non-B meningococci, respectively, in the entire period, but between 2012 and 2013, the predicted protection fell below 45% (42.1% for serogroup B isolates).The observed decreasing trend in the predicted protection during the 6 years of the study (Χ2 for trend  = 4.68, p = 0.03) coincided with a progressive decrease of several clonal complexes (e.g., cc11, cc32 and cc41/44), which had one or more antigens against which the vaccine would offer protection. PMID:25541709

  20. Progressive decrease in the potential usefulness of meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB, Bexsero®) in Gipuzkoa, Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Esnal, Olatz; Marimón, José M

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of a vaccine is determined not only by the immunogenicity of its components, but especially by how widely it covers the disease-causing strains circulating in a given region. Because vaccine coverage varies over time, this study aimed to detect possible changes that could affect vaccine protection during a specific period in a southern European region. The 4CMenB vaccine is licensed for use in Europe, Canada, and Australia and is mainly directed against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. This vaccine contains four main immunogenic components: three recombinant proteins, FHbp, Nhba and NadA, and an outer membrane vesicle [PorA P1.4]. The allelic distribution of FHbp, Nhba, NadA, and PorA antigens in 82 invasive isolates (B and non-B serogroups) isolated from January 2008 to December 2013 were analyzed. 4CMenB was likely protective against 61.8% and 50% of serogroup B and non-B meningococci, respectively, in the entire period, but between 2012 and 2013, the predicted protection fell below 45% (42.1% for serogroup B isolates).The observed decreasing trend in the predicted protection during the 6 years of the study (Χ2 for trend  = 4.68, p = 0.03) coincided with a progressive decrease of several clonal complexes (e.g., cc11, cc32 and cc41/44), which had one or more antigens against which the vaccine would offer protection. PMID:25541709

  1. Hyperspectral imaging for detection of non-O157 shiga-toxin producing escherichia coli(STEC) serogroups on spread plates of mixed cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the feasibility of visible and near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging for rapid presumptive-positive screening of six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) on spread plates of mixed cultures. Althou...

  2. Light scattering sensor for direct identification of colonies of Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 and O157

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) have emerged as important foodborne pathogens, among which seven serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, O157) are most frequently implicated in human infection. The aim of this study was to determine if a light scattering sensor can be...

  3. Genetic and Phylogenetic Characterization of Tataguine and Witwatersrand Viruses and Other Orthobunyaviruses of the Anopheles A, Capim, Guamá, Koongol, Mapputta, Tete, and Turlock Serogroups.

    PubMed

    Shchetinin, Alexey M; Lvov, Dmitry K; Deriabin, Petr G; Botikov, Andrey G; Gitelman, Asya K; Kuhn, Jens H; Alkhovsky, Sergey V

    2015-11-01

    The family Bunyaviridae has more than 530 members that are distributed among five genera or remain to be classified. The genus Orthobunyavirus is the most diverse bunyaviral genus with more than 220 viruses that have been assigned to more than 18 serogroups based on serological cross-reactions and limited molecular-biological characterization. Sequence information for all three orthobunyaviral genome segments is only available for viruses belonging to the Bunyamwera, Bwamba/Pongola, California encephalitis, Gamboa, Group C, Mapputta, Nyando, and Simbu serogroups. Here we present coding-complete sequences for all three genome segments of 15 orthobunyaviruses belonging to the Anopheles A, Capim, Guamá, Kongool, Tete, and Turlock serogroups, and of two unclassified bunyaviruses previously not known to be orthobunyaviruses (Tataguine and Witwatersrand viruses). Using those sequence data, we established the most comprehensive phylogeny of the Orthobunyavirus genus to date, now covering 15 serogroups. Our results emphasize the high genetic diversity of orthobunyaviruses and reveal that the presence of the small nonstructural protein (NSs)-encoding open reading frame is not as common in orthobunyavirus genomes as previously thought. PMID:26610546

  4. A role for Toll-like receptor 4 in the host response to the lung infection of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-A; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Kim, Jae-Eun; Kang, Min-Jung; Kim, Jee-Cheon; Oh, Sang-Muk; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Although a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yptb) lung infection model has been developed to study Y. pestis pathogenesis, it is still necessary to establish a new animal model to mimic the pathophysiological features induced by Y. pestis infection. Here, we provide a new lung infection model using the Yptb strain, IP2777, which displayed rapid spread of bacteria to the liver, spleen, and blood. In addition, we examined whether TLR4 is involved in Yptb-induced pathogenesis in the lung infection model of mice we generated. Following lung infection of WT and TLR4-deficient mice with the Yptb strain IP2777, the survival rate, bacterial colonization, histopathology, and level of cytokines and chemokines in the lung, spleen, liver, and blood were analyzed. TLR4-deficient mice had a lower survival rate than WT mice in response to Yptb lung infection. Although the bacterial colonization and pathology of the lung were comparable between WT and TLR4-deficient mice, those of the spleen and liver were more severe in TLR4-deficient mice. In addition, the levels of TNF-α and CXCL2 in the liver and IL-6 and CXCL2 in the blood were higher in TLR4-deficient mice than in WT mice. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 is necessary for optimal host protection against Yptb lung infection and TLR4-deficient mice may serve as a better genetic model of Yptb infection for mimicking Y. pestis infection. PMID:26851596

  5. Evaluation of the humoral and cellular immune response to different antigens of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in Canindé goats and their potential protection against caseous lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Moura-Costa, L F; Bahia, R C; Carminati, R; Vale, V L C; Paule, B J A; Portela, R W; Freire, S M; Nascimento, I; Schaer, R; Barreto, L M S; Meyer, R

    2008-11-15

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the etiologic agent of caseous lymphadenitis, a disease that affects goats and sheep, and can cause severe economic losses. In this study, four different antigenic extracts were obtained from the attenuated strain T1, which was isolated in the state of Bahia (Brazil). Forty-four Canindé breed goats were divided in five groups, each receiving a different antigen solution and saline buffer as a control. The humoral response was monitored through the identification of specific IgG by indirect ELISA and Western Blotting, and the production of IFN-gamma was followed in order to observe the activation of cellular response. After twelve weeks of antigen inoculation, the animals were challenged with 2 x 10(5)CFU of a wild strain, also isolated in Bahia, and necropsy was performed on all animals twelve weeks afterwards. It was observed that the attenuated bacteria gave a protection of 33.3%, in addition to the weak humoral response elicited. Animals inoculated with secreted antigen associated with Freund's incomplete adjuvant and oligodeoxynucleotide containing unmethylated CpG dinucleotides (CpG ODN) showed a strong humoral response, but this inoculation could not prevent the spread of challenge bacteria in the majority of animals. These results demonstrate the immunogenic potential of the attenuated T1 strain in the development of a vaccine against caseous lymphadenitis in goats. PMID:18752855

  6. Vascular and biochemical risk factors of vascular dementia after lacunar strokes (S-VaD) and after multiinfarcts in strategic areas (M-VaD).

    PubMed

    Graban, Ałła; Bednarska-Makaruk, Małgorzata; Bochyńska, Anna; Lipczyńska-Łojkowska, Wanda; Ryglewicz, Danuta; Wehr, Hanna

    2009-08-15

    Vascular cognitive impairment is an important cause of cognitive decline in the elderly. Ischemic lesions in the brain have an influence on the natural history of dementia. Vascular dementia can be caused by small-vessels disease (S-VaD) or by large-artery atherosclerosis with vascular lesions in strategic areas of the brain (M-VaD). In both cases changes in white matter are observed. In 60 patients with S-VaD and in 34 with M-VaD the presence of vascular and biochemical risk factors was evaluated and compared to age and sex matched 126 controls without dementia. Coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, hypertension and strokes were observed more frequently in both investigated groups. Of biochemical risk factors, hyperhomocysteinemia (associated with low levels of folic acid and vitamin B 12) and low HDL cholesterol levels were found in both forms of VaD. PMID:19339023

  7. Assessment of 2 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-based vaccines against necrotic enteritis in reducing colonization of chickens by Salmonella serovars of different serogroups.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanfen; Kulkarni, Raveendra R; Parreira, Valeria R; Poppe, Cornelius; Roland, Kenneth L; Prescott, John F

    2010-10-01

    This study assessed the protective efficacy of oral vaccination with 2 experimental attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium-vectored vaccines for necrotic enteritis in protecting chickens against intestinal colonization by common serovars of Salmonella belonging to the 4 major serogroups affecting chickens. Birds were vaccinated orally with 1 × 10⁸ colony-forming units (CFU) of 1 of the vaccine strains χ9241 and χ9352, which express a plasmid-encoded partial recombinant hypothetical protein gene (tHP) of Clostridium perfringens, at days 1 and 7 of age, and then were challenged at 14 d of age with 10⁶ CFU of Salmonella serovars Anatum, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Kentucky, or Typhimurium (representative serovars of serogroups B, C, D, and E). Birds were necropsied at 4 wk of age, and samples were collected to determine reduction in tissue and intestinal colonization. The chickens vaccinated with χ9241-tHP showed reduced colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis (serogroup D) and by Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium (serogroup B) compared with the control birds. No reduction in colonization was observed in the chickens vaccinated with χ9352-tHP. There was an association between the efficacy of these vaccine strains in protecting against necrotic enteritis, assessed on an earlier occasion, and their efficacy in protecting against Salmonella colonization. Thus, the choice of an attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine vector for delivery of heterologous antigens to chickens should be based partly on the vaccine's value in protecting against colonization by serovars within serogroups B and D. Such vectors would have the additional benefit of reducing colonization of important Salmonella serovars. PMID:21197226

  8. Pooling of Immunomagnetic Separation Beads Does Not Affect Detection Sensitivity of Six Major Serogroups of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Cattle Feces.

    PubMed

    Noll, Lance W; Baumgartner, William C; Shridhar, Pragathi B; Cull, Charley A; Dewsbury, Diana M; Shi, Xiaorong; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Renter, David G; Nagaraja, T G

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) of the serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, often called non-O157 STEC, are foodborne pathogens. Cattle are asymptomatic reservoirs for STEC; the organisms reside in the hindgut and are shed in the feces, which serve as the source of food product contaminations. Culture-based detection of non-O157 STEC involves an immunomagnetic separation (IMS) step to capture the specific serogroups in complex matrices, such as feces. The IMS procedure is time consuming and labor intensive because of the need to subject each fecal sample to six individual beads. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate whether pooling of IMS beads affects sensitivity of non-O157 STEC detection compared with using individual IMS beads. The evaluation was done by comparing detection of serogroups in feces spiked with pure cultures (experiments 1 and 2) and from feces (n = 384) of naturally shedding cattle (experiment 3). In spiked fecal samples, detection with pools of three, four, six, or seven beads was similar to, or at times higher than, detection with individual IMS beads. In experiment 3, the proportions of fecal samples that tested positive for the six serogroups as detected by individual or pooled beads were similar. Based on noninferiority tests, detection with pooled beads was not substantially inferior to detection with individual beads (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the pooling of IMS beads is a better option for detection of STEC serogroups in fecal samples compared with individual beads because the procedure saves time and labor and has the prospect of a higher throughput. PMID:26735030

  9. Detection and serogroup differentiation of Salmonella spp. in food within 30 hours by enrichment-immunoassay with a T6 monoclonal antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, S P; Tsui, C O; Roberts, D; Chau, P Y; Ng, M H

    1996-01-01

    We previously described an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which makes use of monoclonal antibody T6, which recognizes an epitope on the outer core polysaccharide of Salmonella lipopolysaccharide molecules that is common to almost all Salmonella serovars. In this paper, we show that this assay can detect between 10(5) and 10(7) Salmonella cells per ml even in the presence of excess Escherichia coli. A total of 153 of 154 (99%) serogroup A to E strains and 51 of 78 (71%) serogroup F to 67 strains were reactive as determined by this assay. This corresponds to a detection rate of approximately 98% of all salmonellae known to affect humans. None of the 65 strains of non-Salmonella bacteria tested positive. Taking advantage of the O-factor polysaccharides also present on the antigen captured by the immobilized T6 antibody, we showed that 136 of 154 Salmonella serogroup A to E strains (88%) were correctly differentiated according to their serogroups by use of enzyme conjugates of a panel of O-factor-specific monoclonal antibodies. We evaluated this assay for the detection and serogroup differentiation of salmonellae directly from enrichment cultures of simulated food, eggs, pork, and infant formula milk. All 26 samples which had been contaminated with Salmonella spp. were detected by T6 (100% sensitivity), with only one false-positive result from 101 samples not contaminated by Salmonella spp. (99% specificity). The detection time was substantially reduced to between 17 and 29 h, depending on the enrichment methods used. Since there were no false-negative results, we concluded that this enrichment-immunoassay method can afford rapid screening for Salmonella spp. in food samples. PMID:8779567

  10. Invasive serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis in Quebec, Canada, 2003 to 2010: persistence of the ST-269 clone since it first emerged in 2003.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianwei; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Deng, Saul; Gilca, Rodica; Deceuninck, Genevieve; Law, Dennis K S; De Wals, Philippe; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2012-05-01

    In the era after the introduction of the meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine, from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2010, serogroup B meningococci were the major cause of invasive meningococcal disease in the province of Québec, Canada, being responsible for 72% of all meningococcal disease cases. Of the 334 invasive serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis strains analyzed, 53.9% belonged to the ST-269 clonal complex (CC). Since it first emerged in 2003, the percentage of invasive serogroup B isolates that belonged to the ST-269 CC had increased from 35% in 2003 to 76% in 2010. Among the 180 meningococci in the ST-269 CC, 91.7% belonged to a single ST (ST-269). The most common PorA genotypes identified in the ST-269 CC were (i) VR1 19-1, VR2 15-11, VR3 36 (84%) and (ii) VR1 18-7, VR2 9, VR3 35-1 (9%). Cases of invasive disease due to the ST-269 CC were commonly found in those aged 11 to 19 years (30.5%) and 20 to 40 years (25.5%). Meningococci of the ST-269 CC were uncommon in other Canadian provinces. In contrast to the ST-269 CC, invasive serogroup B meningococci that belonged to the ST-41/44 CC were much more diverse genetically. However, one ST (ST-571), which is uncommon in the United States, accounted for 35% of all cases due to this CC. The current finding suggests that the ST-269 clone may indeed represent an emerging hypervirulent clone of meningococci. PMID:22337990

  11. Evaluation of Pastorex meningitis kit performance for the rapid identification of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Uadiale, Kennedy; Bestman, Agatha; Kamau, Charity; Caugant, Dominique A.; Greig, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (NmC) has caused outbreaks in Nigeria of increasing size in three consecutive years since 2013. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for meningitis can facilitate quick identification of the causative pathogen; Pastorex can detect N. meningitidis serogroups A, C (NmC), Y/W135, N. meningitidis serogroup B/Escherichia coli K1, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Streptococcus pneumoniae, and group B Streptococcus. There is no published field evaluation of Pastorex in the identification of NmC. We report our experience with Pastorex in detecting NmC in field conditions. Methods During sequential outbreaks of NmC in Nigeria in 2013, 2014 and 2015, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from suspected cases of meningitis that met the case definition. Pastorex latex agglutination rapid test was done in the field and trans-isolate media were inoculated with CSF for culture and/or PCR, which was used as the reference standard for 63 paired samples. Results The sensitivity of Pastorex for NmC was 80.0% (95% CI 65.4–90.4%) and the specificity was 94.4% (95% CI 72.7–99.9%). The positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 14.4 (95% CI 2.1–97.3) and negative LR was 0.2 (95% CI 0.1–0.4). The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 97.3% (95% CI 85.8–99.9) and 65.4% (95% CI 44.3–82.8), respectively, with a prevalence estimate of 71.4% (95% CI 58.6–82.1). Conclusion Pastorex showed good performance in detecting NmC under field conditions. Prepositioning Pastorex at peripheral health facilities during non-epidemic periods is constrained by a short shelf-life of 1 month after the kit is opened. There is need for development of RDTs that are cheaper and with less challenging requirements for storage and usage. PMID:27496511

  12. In silico analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in the ligand-free state and in a complex with 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis is an acute infectious disease characterized by a lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. A positive therapeutic effect can be achieved by selectively suppressing the activity of uridine phosphorylase from the causative agent of the disease Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The synergistic effect of a combination of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil and antimicrobial drugs, which block the synthesis of pyrimidine bases, on the cells of pathogenic protozoa and bacteria is described in the literature. The three-dimensional structures of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) both in the ligand-free state and in complexes with pharmacological agents are unknown, which hinders the search for and design of selective inhibitors of YptUPh. The three-dimensional structure of the ligand-free homodimer of YptUPh was determined by homology-based molecular modeling. The three-dimensional structure of the subunit of the YptUPh molecule belongs to α/β proteins, and its topology is a three-layer α/β/α sandwich. The subunit monomer of the YptUPh molecule consists of 38% helices and 24% β strands. A model of the homodimer structure of YptUPh in a complex with 5-FU was obtained by the molecular docking. The position of 5-FU in the active site of the molecule is very consistent with the known data on the X-ray diffraction structures of other bacterial uridine phosphorylases (the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium ( StUPh) with 5-FU, ID PDB: 4E1V and the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli ( EcUPh) with 5-FU and ribose 1-phosphate, ID PDB: 1RXC).

  13. In silico analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in the ligand-free state and in a complex with 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkov, A. A. Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2013-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis is an acute infectious disease characterized by a lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. A positive therapeutic effect can be achieved by selectively suppressing the activity of uridine phosphorylase from the causative agent of the disease Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The synergistic effect of a combination of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil and antimicrobial drugs, which block the synthesis of pyrimidine bases, on the cells of pathogenic protozoa and bacteria is described in the literature. The three-dimensional structures of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) both in the ligand-free state and in complexes with pharmacological agents are unknown, which hinders the search for and design of selective inhibitors of YptUPh. The three-dimensional structure of the ligand-free homodimer of YptUPh was determined by homology-based molecular modeling. The three-dimensional structure of the subunit of the YptUPh molecule belongs to {alpha}/{beta} proteins, and its topology is a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich. The subunit monomer of the YptUPh molecule consists of 38% helices and 24% {beta} strands. A model of the homodimer structure of YptUPh in a complex with 5-FU was obtained by the molecular docking. The position of 5-FU in the active site of the molecule is very consistent with the known data on the X-ray diffraction structures of other bacterial uridine phosphorylases (the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium (StUPh) with 5-FU, ID PDB: 4E1V and the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli (EcUPh) with 5-FU and ribose 1-phosphate, ID PDB: 1RXC).

  14. A cluster of invasive meningococcal disease revealed by the characterization of a novel serogroup B meningococcal clone.

    PubMed

    Valinsky, L; Jaffe, J; Keller, N; Block, C; Abramson, N; Stein-Zamir, C

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of invasive infections due to Neisseria meningitidis in Israel is about 1/100 000 population annually. Three cases of meningococcal meningitis were reported in employees at a single plant; the first case appeared in March 2013 and the second and third cases appeared in December, almost 9 months later. N. meningitidis serogroup B was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid samples. Multilocus sequence typing assigned the three meningococcal isolates to ST10418, a new sequence type and a member of the ST32 clonal complex. The clonality was confirmed by performance of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Post-exposure antibiotic prophylaxis was administered to close contacts of the first case. Upon the diagnosis of the additional two cases, post-exposure prophylaxis was administered to all the plant employees. This report demonstrates the importance of combining public health measures and advanced laboratory studies to confirm clonality and to prevent further disease spread in a closed setting. PMID:26113514

  15. Is a single dose of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine sufficient for protection? experience from the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The first meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) conjugate vaccine was licensed in 1999 and introduced in the United Kingdom. Countries that have implemented the MenC vaccine since then in their national immunisation programmes use different schedules. Nevertheless, all involved countries seem to experience substantial declines in the incidence of MenC disease. Discussion Since 2001, the MenC conjugate vaccine has been implemented in the Netherlands by offering a single dose to all children aged 14 months. Prior to the introduction of the vaccine into the national immunisation programme, a catch-up vaccination campaign was initiated in which a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine was offered to all children aged from 14 months up to and including 18 years. Since then, there has been no report of any case of MenC disease among immunocompetent vaccinees. Administration of a single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine after infancy could be beneficial considering the already complex immunisation schedules with large numbers of vaccinations in the first year of life. The present paper deals with the advantages and critical aspects of a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine. Summary A single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine at the age of 14 months in combination with a catch up vaccine campaign appeared to be a successful strategy to prevent MenC disease in the Netherlands, thereby confirming that a single dose of the vaccine could sufficiently protect against disease. Nevertheless, this approach can only be justified in countries with a relatively low incidence of serogroup C meningococcal disease in the first year of life. Furthermore, a good surveillance programme is recommended for timely detection of vaccine breakthroughs and outbreaks among non-vaccinees, since long-term protection after a single dose in the second year of life cannot currently be guaranteed. PMID:22316426

  16. High predicted strain coverage by the multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) in Poland.

    PubMed

    Waśko, Izabela; Hong, Eva; De Paola, Rosita; Stella, Maria; Moschioni, Monica; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Skoczyńska, Anna

    2016-01-20

    Neisseria meningitidis of serogroup B (MenB) is currently responsible for more than 70% of cases of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Poland and Europe as a whole. The aim of this study was to estimate strain coverage of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) in Poland; the meningococcal antigen typing system (MATS) was used to test a panel of 196 invasive MenB strains isolated in Poland in 2010 and 2011. The strains were also characterized by MLST and sequencing of porA, factor H-binding protein (fHbp), Neisserial heparin-binding antigen (nhba) and Neisserial adhesin A (nadA) genes. MATS and molecular data were analyzed independently and in combination. The MATS results predicted that 83.7% (95% CI: 78.6-91.0%) of isolates would be covered by the 4CMenB vaccine; 59.2% by one vaccine antigen, 19.9% by two and 4.6% by three antigens. Coverage by each antigen was as follows: fHbp 73.0% (95% CI: 68.9-77.5%), NHBA 28.6% (95% CI: 13.3-47.4%), NadA 1.0% (95% CI: 1.0-2.0%) and PorA 10.2%. Molecular analysis revealed that the most frequent clonal complexes (ccs) were cc32 (33.2%), cc18 (17.9%) and cc41/44 (15.8%) with estimated coverage of 98.5%, 88.6% and 93.5%, respectively. Consistent with findings for other European countries, our study predicts high coverage by the 4CMenB vaccine in Poland. PMID:26686998

  17. Diversity of greek meningococcal serogroup B isolates and estimated coverage of the 4CMenB meningococcal vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) isolates currently account for approximately 90% of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Greece with ST-162 clonal complex predominating. The potential of a multicomponent meningococcal B vaccine (4CMenB) recently licensed in Europe was investigated in order to find whether the aforementioned vaccine will cover the MenB strains circulating in Greece. A panel of 148 serogroup B invasive meningococcal strains was characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and PorA subtyping. Vaccine components were typed by sequencing for factor H-binding protein (fHbp), Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen (NHBA) and Neisseria adhesin A (NadA). Their expression was explored by Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS). Results Global strain coverage predicted by MATS was 89.2% (95% CI 63.5%-98.6%) with 44.6%, 38.5% and 6.1% of strains covered by one, two and three vaccine antigens respectively. NHBA was the antigen responsible for the highest coverage (78.4%), followed by fHbp (52.7%), PorA (8.1%) and NadA (0.7%). The coverage of the major genotypes did not differ significantly. The most prevalent MLST genotype was the ST-162 clonal complex , accounting for 44.6% of the strains in the panel and with a predicted coverage of 86.4%, mainly due to NHBA and fHbp. Conclusions 4CMenB has the potential to protect against a significant proportion of Greek invasive MenB strains. PMID:24779381

  18. A phase II randomized controlled trial of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, 4CMenB, in infants (II)

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Prymula, Roman; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Xie, Fang; Barone, Michelangelo; Dull, Peter M; Toneatto, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The licensed meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, 4CMenB (Bexsero®), contains recombinant membrane proteins (rMenB) and outer membrane vesicles (OMV) of the New Zealand serogroup B strain. We investigated whether reducing the OMV and/or protein content influences 4CMenB immunogenicity and reactogenicity in healthy two month-old infants. Six formulations were studied: 4CMenB, rMenB with 0, ¼ or ½ the OMV dose in 4CMenB, a half-dose of 4CMenB or a prelicensure formulation of 4CMenB, as a 4-dose primary/booster series, concomitantly with routine vaccines (DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib and 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate) at 2, 3, 4 and 12 months of age. Immunogenicity was assessed as serum bactericidal activity measured with human complement (hSBA) against indicator strains for Men B vaccine antigens before and after the 2,3,4-month series and 12-month dose. Parents recorded solicited reactions for 7 days after each vaccination, and any adverse events throughout the study period. All formulations elicited robust immune response against rMenB components at 5 months, there was some evidence of OMV and protein dose-dependence for Men B indicator strains tested. Titers waned up to the 12-month dose, which elicited further strong responses, which were still OMV and protein dose-dependent. Groups with no, or low-dose OMV displayed slightly lower reactogenicity profiles, but all formulations were generally well-tolerated, high fever was rare and transient, and only three transient SAEs were considered possibly vaccine-related. Decreasing or removing the OMV content reduced reactogenicity of 4CMenB to a certain extent, but had an unacceptable negative impact on the immunogenicity profile. Trial: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00937521 PMID:25424810

  19. Use of Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccines in Adolescents and Young Adults: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2015.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Jessica R; Rubin, Lorry; Folaranmi, Temitope; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R; Patel, Manisha; Martin, Stacey W

    2015-10-23

    At its June 2015 meeting, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended that adolescents and young adults aged 16–23 years may be vaccinated with a serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine to provide short-term protection against most strains of serogroup B meningococcal disease. This report summarizes the deliberations of ACIP, the rationale for its decision, and recommendations for use of MenB vaccines in adolescents and young adults. Two MenB vaccines have recently been licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the United States and approved for use in persons aged 10–25 years: MenB-FHbp (Trumenba, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) and MenB-4C (Bexsero, Novartis Vaccines). Both MenB vaccines were licensed based on statutory regulations for accelerated approval, which enabled FDA to approve the MenB vaccines for serious or life-threatening diseases based on safety and demonstration that vaccine effectiveness, as measured by bactericidal antibody responses with assays using several MenB test strains that were representative of prevalent strains in the United States, is reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit. As a requirement for accelerated approval, confirmatory studies in the postmarketing period will be conducted to verify and further describe the effectiveness of the vaccines against an extended number of MenB strains that represent a broader diversity of endemic disease. Additional postlicensure safety data are also needed and will be reviewed by ACIP as they become available. PMID:26492381

  20. KENO V.a Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO V.a Using CSPAN for Input

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, R.D.

    2003-01-17

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO V.a three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is the primary criticality safety analysis tool in SCALE. The KENO V.a primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO V.a Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO V.a in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO V.a that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 4.4a, which includes the Criticality Safety Processor for Analysis (CSPAN) input processor for Windows personal computers (PCs). A second edition of the primer, which uses the new KENO Visual Editor, is currently under development at ORNL and is planned for publication in late 2003. Each example in this first edition of the primer uses CSPAN to provide the framework for data input. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO V.a input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO V.a. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO V.a features which are covered in detail in the example problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using CSPAN to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO V.a.

  1. Communication between VA providers and sexual and gender minority veterans: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michelle D; Kauth, Michael R; Shipherd, Jillian C; Street, Richard L

    2014-05-01

    Approximately one million gay and lesbian Americans are veterans, and rates of engagement in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system may be increasing for both sexual and gender minority veterans. Very little research has examined the experience of these veterans when receiving care at VA health care facilities. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences, beliefs, and preferences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) veterans in their communication with VA health care providers. LGBT veterans (n = 58) participated in focus groups or individual interviews and completed self-report measures at two southern VA hospitals. Approximately 2/3 of veterans report that none of their VA providers have specifically asked about their sexual orientation, and 24% of the veterans indicate that they have not disclosed their orientation to any VA provider. Although some veterans want providers to initiate these discussions, veterans also expressed fears about disclosure and its possible negative consequences. Similarly, LGBT veterans report varied opinions about the appropriateness of routine assessment of minority status. Only 28% of these veterans experience VA as welcoming to them as LGBT veterans. Systematic training is needed for all VA providers about the rationale for assessing sexual and gender orientation. Staff education should include specific skills for initiating these assessments, and ways of responding to veteran concerns about discussing this topic in the VA health care system. PMID:24588107

  2. Detection by hyperspectral imaging of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 on rainbow agar.

    PubMed

    Windham, William R; Yoon, Seung-Chul; Ladely, Scott R; Haley, Jennifer A; Heitschmidt, Jerry W; Lawrence, Kurt C; Park, Bosoon; Narrang, Neelam; Cray, William C

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety Inspection Service has determined that six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) are adulterants in raw beef. Isolate and phenotypic discrimination of non-O157 STEC is problematic due to the lack of suitable agar media. The lack of distinct phenotypic color variation among non-O157serogroups cultured on chromogenic agar poses a challenge in selecting colonies for confirmation. In this study, visible and near-infrared hyperspectral imaging and chemometrics were used to detect and classify non-O157 STEC serogroups grown on Rainbow agar O157. The method was first developed by building spectral libraries for each serogroup obtained from ground-truth regions of interest representing the true identity of each pixel and thus each pure culture colony in the hyperspectral agar-plate image. The spectral library for the pure-culture non-O157 STEC consisted of 2,171 colonies, with spectra derived from 124,347 of pixels. The classification models for each serogroup were developed with a k nearest-neighbor classifier. The overall classification training accuracy at the colony level was 99%. The classifier was validated with ground beef enrichments artificially inoculated with 10, 50, and 100 CFU/ml STEC. The validation ground-truth regions of interest of the STEC target colonies consisted of 606 colonies, with 3,030 pixels of spectra. The overall classification accuracy was 98%. The average specificity of the method was 98% due to the low false-positive rate of 1.2%. The sensitivity ranged from 78 to 100% due to the false-negative rates of 22, 7, and 8% for O145, O45, and O26, respectively. This study showed the potential of visible and near-infrared hyperspectral imaging for detecting and classifying colonies of the six non-O157 STEC serogroups. The technique needs to be validated with bacterial cultures directly extracted from meat products and positive

  3. Optimization of Molecular Approaches to Genogroup Neisseria meningitidis Carriage Isolates and Implications for Monitoring the Impact of New Serogroup B Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Eduardo; Hoyos, Johanna; Oldfield, Neil J.; Lee, Philip; Flint, Mike; Jones, C. Hal; Ala’Aldeen, Dlawer A. A.; Jansen, Kathrin U.; Anderson, Annaliesa S.

    2015-01-01

    The reservoir for Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is the human oropharynx. Implementation of Nm serogroup C (NmC) glycoconjugate vaccines directly reduced NmC carriage. Prophylactic vaccines are now available to prevent disease caused by the five major Nm disease causing serogroups (ABCWY). Nm serogroup B (NmB) vaccines are composed of antigens that are conserved across Nm serogroups and therefore have the potential to impact all Nm carriage. To assess the effect of these vaccines on carriage, standardized approaches to identify and group Nm are required. Real-time PCR (rt-PCR) capsule grouping assays that were internally controlled to confirm Nm species were developed for eight serogroups associated with carriage (A, B, C, E, W, X, Y and Z). The grouping scheme was validated using diverse bacterial species associated with carriage and then used to evaluate a collection of diverse Nm carriage isolates (n=234). A scheme that also included porA and ctrA probes was able to speciate the isolates, while ctrA also provided insights on the integrity of the polysaccharide loci. Isolates were typed for the Nm vaccine antigen factor H binding protein (fHbp), and were found to represent the known diversity of this antigen. The porA rt-PCR yielded positive results with all 234 of the Nm carriage isolates. Genogrouping assays classified 76.5% (179/234) of these isolates to a group, categorized 53 as nongenogroupable (NGG) and two as mixed results. Thirty seven NGG isolates evidenced a disrupted capsular polysaccharide operon judged by a ctrA negative result. Only 28.6% (67/234) of the isolates were serogrouped by slide agglutination (SASG), highlighting the reduced capability of carriage strains to express capsular polysaccharide. These rt-PCR assays provide a comprehensive means to identify and genogroup N. meningitidis in carriage studies used to guide vaccination strategies and to assess the impact of novel fHbp containing vaccines on meningococcal carriage. PMID:26147212

  4. Optimization of Molecular Approaches to Genogroup Neisseria meningitidis Carriage Isolates and Implications for Monitoring the Impact of New Serogroup B Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Eduardo; Hoyos, Johanna; Oldfield, Neil J; Lee, Philip; Flint, Mike; Jones, C Hal; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A A; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2015-01-01

    The reservoir for Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is the human oropharynx. Implementation of Nm serogroup C (NmC) glycoconjugate vaccines directly reduced NmC carriage. Prophylactic vaccines are now available to prevent disease caused by the five major Nm disease causing serogroups (ABCWY). Nm serogroup B (NmB) vaccines are composed of antigens that are conserved across Nm serogroups and therefore have the potential to impact all Nm carriage. To assess the effect of these vaccines on carriage, standardized approaches to identify and group Nm are required. Real-time PCR (rt-PCR) capsule grouping assays that were internally controlled to confirm Nm species were developed for eight serogroups associated with carriage (A, B, C, E, W, X, Y and Z). The grouping scheme was validated using diverse bacterial species associated with carriage and then used to evaluate a collection of diverse Nm carriage isolates (n=234). A scheme that also included porA and ctrA probes was able to speciate the isolates, while ctrA also provided insights on the integrity of the polysaccharide loci. Isolates were typed for the Nm vaccine antigen factor H binding protein (fHbp), and were found to represent the known diversity of this antigen. The porA rt-PCR yielded positive results with all 234 of the Nm carriage isolates. Genogrouping assays classified 76.5% (179/234) of these isolates to a group, categorized 53 as nongenogroupable (NGG) and two as mixed results. Thirty seven NGG isolates evidenced a disrupted capsular polysaccharide operon judged by a ctrA negative result. Only 28.6% (67/234) of the isolates were serogrouped by slide agglutination (SASG), highlighting the reduced capability of carriage strains to express capsular polysaccharide. These rt-PCR assays provide a comprehensive means to identify and genogroup N. meningitidis in carriage studies used to guide vaccination strategies and to assess the impact of novel fHbp containing vaccines on meningococcal carriage. PMID:26147212

  5. Biofilm Formation, Virulence Gene Profiles, and Antimicrobial Resistance of Nine Serogroups of Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaying; Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A; Johnson, Roger P; Chen, Jinding; Hou, Hongman; Zhang, Gongliang; Niu, Yan D

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the phenotype and genotype of 36 non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains isolated from humans, ovines, or bovines, including the top 6 (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) and three other serogroups implicated in serious illness (O91, O113, and O128). Biofilms were formed by all strains with intermediate to strong biofilm producers (n = 24) more common at 22°C than at 37°C (p < 0.001) and 48 and 72 h (p < 0.001) than 24 h of incubation time. Biofilm-forming potential differed by serogroup and origin with O113 and human strains exhibiting the highest potential (p < 0.001). Biofilm-associated genes, csgA/csgD/crl/fimH (100%), flu (94%), rpoS (92%), ehaA(α) (89%), and cah (72%), were most prevalent, while mlrA (22%) and ehaA(β) (14%) were least prevalent, although there was no clear compliment of genes associated with strains exhibiting the greatest biofilm-forming capacity. Among 12 virulence genes screened, iha and ehxA were present in 92% of the strains. The occurrence of stx1 in the top 6 serogroups (8/12, 67%) did not differ (p = 0.8) from other serogroups (17/24, 71%), but stx2 was less likely (confidence interval [CI] = 0.14-1.12; p = 0.04) to be in the former (9/24, 38%) than the latter (9/12, 75%). Excluding serogroups, O91 and O121, at least one strain per serogroup was resistant to between three and six antimicrobials. Streptomycin (31%), sulfisoxazole (31%), and tetracycline (25%) resistance was most common and was 35-50% less likely (p < 0.05) in human than animal strains. All non-O157 STEC strains were able to form biofilms on an abiotic surface, with some exhibiting resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Potential as a reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes may be another hazard of biofilms in food-processing plants. As a result, future strategies to control these pathogens may include measures to prevent biofilms. PMID:27023165

  6. A Csr-type regulatory system, including small non-coding RNAs, regulates the global virulence regulator RovA of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis through RovM.

    PubMed

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Böhme, Katja; Rohde, Manfred; Dersch, Petra

    2008-06-01

    The MarR-type regulator RovA controls expression of virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in response to environmental signals. Using a genetic strategy to discover components that influence rovA expression, we identified new regulatory factors with homology to components of the carbon storage regulator system (Csr). We showed that overexpression of a CsrB- or a CsrC-type RNA activates rovA, whereas a CsrA-like protein represses RovA synthesis. We further demonstrate that influence of the Csr system on rovA is indirect and occurs through control of the LysR regulator RovM, which inhibits rovA transcription. The CsrA protein had also a major influence on the motility of Yersinia, which was independent of RovM. The CsrB and CsrC RNAs are differentially expressed in Yersinia. CsrC is highly induced in complex but not in minimal media, indicating that medium-dependent rovM expression is mediated through CsrC. CsrB synthesis is generally very low. However, overexpression of the response regulator UvrY was found to activate CsrB production, which in turn represses CsrC synthesis independent of the growth medium. In summary, the post-transcriptional Csr-type components were shown to be key regulators in the co-ordinated environmental control of physiological processes and virulence factors, which are crucial for the initiation of Yersinia infections. PMID:18430141

  7. Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and electrochemically driven melting to discriminate Yersinia pestis from Y. pseudotuberculosis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms within unpurified polymerase chain reaction amplicons.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Evanthia; Goodchild, Sarah A; Cleary, David W; Weller, Simon A; Gale, Nittaya; Stubberfield, Michael R; Brown, Tom; Bartlett, Philip N

    2015-02-01

    The development of sensors for the detection of pathogen-specific DNA, including relevant species/strain level discrimination, is critical in molecular diagnostics with major impacts in areas such as bioterrorism and food safety. Herein, we use electrochemically driven denaturation assays monitored by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to target single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that distinguish DNA amplicons generated from Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, from the closely related species Y. pseudotuberculosis. Two assays targeting SNPs within the groEL and metH genes of these two species have been successfully designed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to produce Texas Red labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) amplicons of 262 and 251 bases for the groEL and metH targets, respectively. These amplicons were used in an unpurified form to hybridize to immobilized probes then subjected to electrochemically driven melting. In all cases electrochemically driven melting was able to discriminate between fully homologous DNA and that containing SNPs. The metH assay was particularly challenging due to the presence of only a single base mismatch in the middle of the 251 base long PCR amplicon. However, manipulation of assay conditions (conducting the electrochemical experiments at 10 °C) resulted in greater discrimination between the complementary and mismatched DNA. Replicate data were collected and analyzed for each duplex on different days, using different batches of PCR product and different sphere segment void (SSV) substrates. Despite the variability introduced by these differences, the assays are shown to be reliable and robust providing a new platform for strain discrimination using unpurified PCR samples. PMID:25551670

  8. CDP-6-deoxy-delta 3,4-glucoseen reductase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis: enzyme purification and characterization of the cloned gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, S F; Miller, V P; Lei, Y; Thorson, J S; Liu, H W; Schottel, J L

    1994-01-01

    The 3,6-dideoxyhexoses, usually confined to the cell wall lipopolysaccharide of gram-negative bacteria, are essential to serological specificity and are formed via a complex biosynthetic pathway beginning with CDP-D-hexoses. In particular, the biosynthesis of CDP-ascarylose, one of the naturally occurring 3,6-dideoxyhexoses, consists of five enzymatic steps, with CDP-6-deoxy-delta 3,4-glucoseen reductase (E3) participating as the key enzyme in this catalysis. This enzyme has been previously purified from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by an unusual procedure (protocol I) including a trypsin digestion step (O. Han, V.P. Miller, and H.-W. Liu, J. Biol. Chem. 265:8033-8041, 1990). However, the cloned gene showed disparity with the expected gene characteristics, and upon expression, the resulting gene product exhibited no E3 activity. These findings strongly suggested that the protein isolated by protocol I may have been misidentified as E3. A reinvestigation of the purification protocol produced a new and improved procedure (protocol II) consisting of DEAE-Sephacel, phenyl-Sepharose, Cibacron blue A, and Sephadex G-100 chromatography, which efficiently yielded a new homogeneous enzyme composed of a single polypeptide with a molecular weight of 39,000. This highly purified protein had a specific activity nearly 8,000-fold higher than that of cell lysates, and more importantly, the corresponding gene (ascD) was found to be part of the ascarylose biosynthetic cluster. Presented are the identification and confirmation of the E3 gene through cloning and overexpression and the culminating purification and unambiguous assignment of homogeneous E3. The nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of the genuine E3 are also presented. Images PMID:8288541

  9. Escherichia coli serogroup O2 and O28ac O-antigen gene cluster sequences and detection of pathogenic E. coli O2 and O28ac by PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The O antigen gene clusters of Escherichia coli serogroups O2 and O28ac were sequenced. Thirteen open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the O antigen gene cluster of E. coli O2 strain O2:H4 U 9-41, and 7 ORFs were identified in the O antigen gene cluster of E. coli serogroup O28ac strain O2...

  10. Interrogation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in gnd provides a novel method for molecular serogrouping of clinically important Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) targeted by regulation in the United States, including the "big six" non-O157 STEC and STEC O157.

    PubMed

    Elder, J R; Bugarel, M; den Bakker, H C; Loneragan, G H; Nightingale, K K

    2016-10-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 has frequently been associated with foodborne infections and is considered an adulterant in raw non-intact beef in the U.S. Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) belonging to serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 (known as the "big six" non-O157) were estimated to cause >70% of foodborne infections attributed to non-O157 serogroups in the U.S., as a result, these six serogroups have also been targeted by regulation in the U.S. The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid and high-throughput molecular method to group STEC isolates into seven clinically important serogroups (i.e., O157 and the "big six" non-O157 serogroups) targeted by regulation in the U.S. by interrogating single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gnd. A collection of 195 STEC isolates, including isolates belonging to O157:H7 (n=18), O26 (n=21), O45 (n=19), O103 (n=24), O111 (n=24), O121 (n=23), O145 (n=21), and ten other STEC serogroups (n=45), was assembled and characterized by full gnd sequencing to identify informative SNPs for molecular serogrouping. A multiplex SNP typing assay was developed to interrogate twelve informative gnd SNPs by single base pair extension chemistry and used to characterize the STEC isolate collection assembled here. SNP types were assigned to each isolate by the assay and polymorphisms were confirmed with gnd sequence data. O-serogroup-specific SNP types were identified for each of the seven clinically important STEC serogroups, which allowed the differentiation of these seven STEC serogroups from other non-O157 STEC serogroups. Although serogroups of the "big six" non-O157 STEC and O157:H7 contained multiple SNP types per O-serogroup, there were no overlapping SNP types between serogroups. Our results demonstrate that molecular serogrouping of STEC isolates by interrogation of informative SNPs in gnd represents an alternative to traditional serogrouping by agglutination for rapid and high-throughput identification of clinically

  11. Parallelization of KENO-Va Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón, Javier; Peña, Jorge

    1995-07-01

    KENO-Va is a code integrated within the SCALE system developed by Oak Ridge that solves the transport equation through the Monte Carlo Method. It is being used at the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) to perform criticality calculations for fuel storage pools and shipping casks. Two parallel versions of the code: one for shared memory machines and other for distributed memory systems using the message-passing interface PVM have been generated. In both versions the neutrons of each generation are tracked in parallel. In order to preserve the reproducibility of the results in both versions, advanced seeds for random numbers were used. The CONVEX C3440 with four processors and shared memory at CSN was used to implement the shared memory version. A FDDI network of 6 HP9000/735 was employed to implement the message-passing version using proprietary PVM. The speedup obtained was 3.6 in both cases.

  12. Development of 30 kVA class fully superconducting generator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, O.; Amemiya, N.; Takao, T. . Faculty of Engineering); Akita, S. ); Ohishi, K.; Shimuzu, H.; Tanaka, Y. ); Uchikawa, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the authors are developing a 4 poles 30 kVA class fully superconducting generator to investigate the characteristics of superconducting armature winding subject to the rotating magnetic field produced by the superconducting rotor and behavior of a superconducting generator connected to an electric power utility grid. A static test of the armature winding have been performed by applying 50 Hz AC current. AC quench currents of the armature windings have reached to 200 Arms after several quenches which was well over the rated current. A static test of the field windings have been also performed to verify its rated performance. In the paper, detailed configurations and electrical test results of the generator are shown.

  13. Characterization of serovars of the genus Leptospira by DNA hybridization with hardjobovis and icterohaemorrhagiae recombinant probes with special attention to serogroup sejroe.

    PubMed Central

    Van Eys, G J; Gerritsen, M J; Korver, H; Schoone, G J; Kroon, C C; Terpstra, W J

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant DNA probes derived from genomic libraries of serovars hardjobovis and icterohaemorrhagiae were applied for the characterization of leptospires. Differences in hybridization signals in combination with the banding pattern appear to provide good characteristics for strain typing. The banding patterns were easy to distinguish, since the recombinant DNA probes hybridized with a limited number of fragments. They were also indicative of genomic relationships between serovars. The probes suggested the existence of four subgroups with extensive genomic homology within the serogroup Sejroe. A number of serovars outside the serogroup Sejroe showed genomic homology with these subgroups. Amplification with the polymerase chain reaction showed a correlation with the genomic homologies demonstrated by Southern analysis. Knowledge about genomic relationships between leptospiral strains, as revealed by Southern analysis, may lead to a more rational approach for primer selection for polymerase chain reaction or cloning of particular genes. Images PMID:2056039

  14. Clonal and antigenic analysis of serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis with particular reference to epidemiological features of epidemic meningitis in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J F; Caugant, D A; Li, X; Hu, X; Poolman, J T; Crowe, B A; Achtman, M

    1992-01-01

    Representative strains of serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis were chosen from all major meningitis epidemics worldwide since 1960 and subjected to analysis for the electrophoretic variation of 15 cytoplasmic allozymes and four outer membrane proteins. The 290 strains defined 84 unique electrophoretic types which were classified in nine subgroups. Tests with monoclonal antibodies specific for conserved pilin epitopes showed that the class I, IIa, and IIb epitopes were uniform within the subgroups. Similarly, the subgroups were uniform for expression of different variable regions of class 1 outer membrane protein, with a few minor exceptions. Many of the bacteria tested were isolated in the People's Republic of China, and the epidemiology of Chinese epidemics of meningococcal meningitis is described. The analysis approaches a global description of epidemic meningitis caused by serogroup A meningococci in the past 30 years. Images PMID:1452360

  15. An outbreak of Pontiac fever due to Legionella longbeachae serogroup 2 found in potting mix in a horticultural nursery in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Cramp, G J; Harte, D; Douglas, N M; Graham, F; Schousboe, M; Sykes, K

    2010-01-01

    Previous outbreaks of Pontiac fever have invariably been associated with water droplet spread of Legionella spp. In January 2007 three workers from a horticultural nursery were admitted to hospital with non-pneumonic legionellosis. Investigations showed that a working party of ten people had been exposed to aerosolized potting mix; nine of these workers met the case definition for Pontiac fever. The presence of genetically indistinguishable Legionella longbeachae serogroup 2 was demonstrated in clinical specimens from two hospitalized workers and in the potting mix to which they had been exposed. A further seven cases were diagnosed by serological tests. This is the first documented outbreak of Pontiac fever from L. longbeachae serogroup 2 confirmed from inhalation of potting mix. Pontiac fever is likely to be under-diagnosed. We advocate the introduction of an industry standard that ensures the use of face masks when handling potting mix and attaching masks and warning labels to potting mix bags sold to the public. PMID:19781115

  16. PCR-Based Serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae from Culture-Negative Specimens: Novel Primers for Detection of Serotypes within Serogroup 18.

    PubMed

    Tanmoy, Arif M; Saha, Senjuti; Darmstadt, Gary L; Whitney, Cynthia G; Saha, Samir K

    2016-08-01

    Six multiplex-compatible PCR primers were designed to distinguish Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes within serogroup 18 from culturable/nonculturable pneumococcal specimens, with no cross-reactivity with other serotypes and respiratory organisms. These primers will aid in the generation of better data on vaccine/nonvaccine serotypes in invasive and carriage pneumococcal surveillance and contribute to future vaccine formulation and impact studies. PMID:27252464

  17. Correlation between serum bactericidal activity against Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y measured using human versus rabbit serum as the complement source.

    PubMed

    Gill, C J; Ram, S; Welsch, J A; Detora, L; Anemona, A

    2011-12-01

    The surrogate of protection against invasive meningococcal disease is the presence of serum bactericidal activity (SBA) at a titer ≥4 in an assay using human serum as the complement source (hSBA). However, for various practical and logistical reasons, many meningococcal vaccines in use today were licensed based on a modified SBA assay that used baby rabbit serum as the complement source (rSBA). To assess the strength of correlation between the two assay systems for serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y, we analyzed a subset of samples from adolescent subjects enrolled in a Phase II study of Novartis' MenACWY-CRM conjugate vaccine vs. an ACWY polysaccharide vaccine; samples were analyzed in parallel using hSBA and rSBA. We compared geometric mean titers (GMTs), calculated Pearson correlation coefficients between paired hSBA and rSBA results, and calculated sensitivity/specificity and likelihood ratios for an rSBA ≥8 or ≥128 for classifying hSBA ≥4, taking hSBA as the 'gold standard'. Correlations between hSBA and rSBA ranged from 0.46 to 0.78 for serogroup C, but were weaker for serogroups A, W-135 and Y (range -0.15 to 0.57). In post vaccination samples, nearly all subjects had rSBA titers ≥8, though up to 15% remained seronegative by hSBA. In post vaccination settings, rSBA titers at ≥8 or ≥128 was highly sensitive for an hSBA titer ≥4, but non-specific. In conclusion, results generated by rSBA did not accurately classify serostatus according to hSBA for serogroups A, W-135 and Y. PMID:22075087

  18. PCR-Based Serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae from Culture-Negative Specimens: Novel Primers for Detection of Serotypes within Serogroup 18

    PubMed Central

    Tanmoy, Arif M.; Saha, Senjuti; Darmstadt, Gary L.; Whitney, Cynthia G.

    2016-01-01

    Six multiplex-compatible PCR primers were designed to distinguish Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes within serogroup 18 from culturable/nonculturable pneumococcal specimens, with no cross-reactivity with other serotypes and respiratory organisms. These primers will aid in the generation of better data on vaccine/nonvaccine serotypes in invasive and carriage pneumococcal surveillance and contribute to future vaccine formulation and impact studies. PMID:27252464

  19. Acid resistance and molecular characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and different Non-O157 shiga toxin-producing E. coli serogroups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the acid resistance (AR) of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains belonging to serogroups O26, O45, O103, O104, O111, O121, and O145 with O157:H7 STEC isolated from various sources in 400 mM acetic acid solutions (AAS) at pH 3.2 and...

  20. Acid Resistance and molecular characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and different non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli serogroups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the acid resistance (AR) of seven non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains belonging to serogroups O26, O45, O103, O104, O111, O121 and O145 with O157:H7 STEC isolated from various sources in 400 mM acetic acid solutions (AAS) at pH 3.2 and 30°...

  1. 38 CFR 62.32 - Supportive service: Assistance in obtaining VA benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; and (4) Health care services. (b) Grantees are not permitted to represent participants before VA with... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Supportive service: Assistance in obtaining VA benefits. 62.32 Section 62.32 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...

  2. 38 CFR 62.32 - Supportive service: Assistance in obtaining VA benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; and (4) Health care services. (b) Grantees are not permitted to represent participants before VA with... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Supportive service: Assistance in obtaining VA benefits. 62.32 Section 62.32 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; and (4) Health care services. (b) Grantees are not permitted to represent participants before VA with... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Supportive service: Assistance in obtaining VA benefits. 62.32 Section 62.32 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

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  5. 30 CFR 57.22229 - Weekly testing (I-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weekly testing (I-A, III, and V-A mines). 57.22229 Section 57.22229 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-A, III, and V-A mines). (a) The mine atmosphere shall be tested for methane and carbon monoxide...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Weekly testing (I-A, III, and V-A mines). 57.22229 Section 57.22229 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-A, III, and V-A mines). (a) The mine atmosphere shall be tested for methane and carbon monoxide...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22229 - Weekly testing (I-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Weekly testing (I-A, III, and V-A mines). 57.22229 Section 57.22229 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-A, III, and V-A mines). (a) The mine atmosphere shall be tested for methane and carbon monoxide...

  8. 38 CFR 58.16 - VA Form 10-0144-Certification Regarding Lobbying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  9. 48 CFR 803.7000 - Display of the VA Hotline poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... poster. 803.7000 Section 803.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Improper Business Practices 803.7000 Display of the VA Hotline poster. (a) Under the circumstances described in paragraph (b) of this section, a contractor must display prominently a VA Hotline...

  10. 48 CFR 803.7000 - Display of the VA Hotline poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... poster. 803.7000 Section 803.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Improper Business Practices 803.7000 Display of the VA Hotline poster. (a) Under the circumstances described in paragraph (b) of this section, a contractor must display prominently a VA Hotline...

  11. 48 CFR 803.7000 - Display of the VA Hotline poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... poster. 803.7000 Section 803.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Improper Business Practices 803.7000 Display of the VA Hotline poster. (a) Under the circumstances described in paragraph (b) of this section, a contractor must display prominently a VA Hotline...

  12. 48 CFR 803.7000 - Display of the VA Hotline poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... poster. 803.7000 Section 803.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Improper Business Practices 803.7000 Display of the VA Hotline poster. (a) Under the circumstances described in paragraph (b) of this section, a contractor must display prominently a VA Hotline...

  13. 48 CFR 803.7000 - Display of the VA Hotline poster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... poster. 803.7000 Section 803.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Improper Business Practices 803.7000 Display of the VA Hotline poster. (a) Under the circumstances described in paragraph (b) of this section, a contractor must display prominently a VA Hotline...

  14. 75 FR 47461 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Elizabeth River, Eastern Branch, Norfolk, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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