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Sample records for psychiatric day hospital

  1. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days/month CI 1.97 to 2.70). There is no difference between day hospital care and inpatient care for the being readmitted to in/day patient care after discharge (5 RCTs, n = 667, RR 0.91 CI 0.72 to 1.15). It is likely that there is no difference between day hospital care and inpatient care for being unemployed at the end of the study (1 RCT, n = 179, RR 0.88 CI 0.66 to 1.19), for quality of life (1 RCT, n = 1117, MD 0.01 CI −0.13 to 0.15) or for treatment satisfaction (1 RCT, n = 1117, MD 0.06 CI −0.18 to 0.30). Authors’ conclusions Caring for people in acute day hospitals is as effective as inpatient care in treating acutely ill psychiatric patients. However, further data are still needed on the cost effectiveness of day hospitals. PMID:22161384

  2. Rehabilitation Needs of Chronic Female Inpatients Attending Day-care in a Tertiary Care Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Avinash; Sherine, Linda; Sivakumar, Thanapal; Kumar, C. Naveen; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Female patients hospitalized for a long duration in psychiatric hospitals are a special population with unique needs. Aims and Objectives: To assess rehabilitation needs of chronic female inpatients attending psychiatric rehabilitation services in a tertiary care psychiatric hospital. Materials and Methods: Rehabilitation needs of nine chronic female inpatients were assessed with an interview schedule developed by expert consensus. The needs were elicited from the patients. Perspectives of nursing staff, vocational instructors, and treating psychiatrists were also sought. Results and Conclusion: Most patients expressed the need for more incentives for working in day-care, variety in food and grooming items. The nursing staff felt many patients could be placed outside, and the family members should come more frequently to meet them. Vocational instructors felt that patients need more incentives, variety in food and work. Treating psychiatrists said that major barriers in discharging and placing them were nonavailability or poor involvement of family members. Services like supported housing, supported education and supported employment are necessary to cater to their complex needs. PMID:27011400

  3. Period trends in rate of suicide in first 28 days after discharge from psychiatric hospital in Scotland, 1968-92.

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J. R.; Juszczak, E.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine period trends in the rate of suicide in the first 28 days after discharge from psychiatric hospital. DESIGN--Cohort study of patients discharged from psychiatric hospital. SETTING--Scotland. SUBJECTS--All patients aged 15-84 who were discharged from Scottish psychiatric hospitals during 1968 to 1992. OUTCOME MEASURE--The rate of suicide (classified as codes E950-9 and E980-9 according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) within 28 days of discharge per 100,000 person years at risk for five year periods during 1968 to 1992. Crude, within cohort rates and externally standardised rates were calculated. RESULTS--Overall, 196 male patients committed suicide in 20,520 person years at risk, and 171 female patients committed suicide in 24,114 person years at risk. A significant linear trend was seen in period effect on externally standardised mortality ratios in both sexes: a decrease in male patients (P = 0.008) and an increase in female patients (P = 0.0001). The adjusted standardised mortality ratio in 1988-92 compared with 1968-72 was 0.62 (95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.98) in male patients and 2.73 (1.64 to 4.56) in female patients. CONCLUSION--The increase in the rate of suicide in the 28 days after discharge in female psychiatric patients makes this an increasingly important period to target. The rise has occurred against the background of a reduction of 60% in the number of psychiatric beds for adults. PMID:7640540

  4. [Restrictions during psychiatric hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Putkonen, Anu; Tuppurainen, Heli

    2012-01-01

    The Finnish Constitution affirms that everyone has the right to remain private and undisturbed. During the course of involuntary psychiatric treatment, only the exemptions stipulated in the Mental Health Act are allowed. The Act on the Status and Rights of Patients states that cooperation with the patient must also be attempted during involuntary treatment. The orders for restraints are different in psychiatric hospitals. For decades, restrictions were derived from early 19th century regulations, when all mentally ill individuals were considered to be incompetent. Nowadays, a patient's mental competence is based on functional disabilities, which should also apply to psychiatric treatment. PMID:23342480

  5. Psychiatric Hospitalization and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganz, Varda Peller; Pao, Jane

    1978-01-01

    Studies of college students hospitalized for psychiatric disturbances revealed that diagnosis did not significantly affect academic performance, nor did leave of absence following hospitalization ensure better re-entry adjustment. It is recommended that students be evaluated individually and be allowed to re-enter as soon as the acute illness

  6. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  7. Inpatient Suicide in a Chinese Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jie; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Hao, Yuantao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Guo, Yangbo; Su, Jinghua; Lu, Huixian

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors for suicide among psychiatric inpatients in China. In this study we identified the risk factors of suicide among psychiatric inpatients at Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital. All psychiatric inpatients who died by suicide during the 1956-2005 period were included in this study. Using a case-control design, 64

  8. Psychiatric hospitals and instrumental rationality.

    PubMed

    Wright, D

    1998-01-01

    Therapists in psychiatric hospitals often overuse a model borrowed from natural science, with the patient becoming an object to be examined, assessed, and altered, and underuse an interpretive psychotherapeutic approach, or misuse it to control patients. And while expressing an interest in the meaning of what patients say, they exclude most of the traditional sources of meaning, in ethics, religion, literature, art, and political thought. The author argues that therapists do these things for two ideological reasons: to maintain their position in the authoritarian structure of the hospital and to maintain the hospital as an agent of class domination. Along with other groups, therapists bring instrumental rationality, such as that of natural science, to bear on political, cultural, and personal questions for which this type of rationality is often destructive. In the long run, political participation and social integration decrease, culture traditions provide less meaning, and personality formation is disrupted. Thus the end result of the overuse of instrumental rationality is not only domination by one class of others, but a decrease in the stability of the society as a whole. Hospital therapists participate in these trends, but they could do otherwise, by working to create a more democratic form of therapy. PMID:9595349

  9. Psychiatric Hospitalization after Deliberate Self-Poisoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Gregory L.; Safranko, Ivan; Lewin, Terry J.; Whyte, Ian M.; Bryant, Jennifer L.

    2006-01-01

    The decision for psychiatric hospitalization after deliberate self-poisoning (DSP) is not well understood. This study, a longitudinal cohort study of 3,148 consecutive DSP patients found 920 (29.2%) subjects were referred for psychiatric hospitalization, 576 (18.3%) on involuntary basis. A logistic regression analysis showed increased risk for:…

  10. [Brief psychiatric hospitalization: a possible way, a strategy to evolve?].

    PubMed

    Goullieux, E; Loas, G

    2003-01-01

    The process of disinstitutionalization combined with the economic reality is responsible for the great upheaval in taking care of psychiatric patients. The repercussions are worldwide, national, and local concerning the Philippe Pinel Psychiatric Hospital (Amiens, Somme) place of this work. So the psychiatrists of this institution have to do with the following datas: a reduction of the admissions between 1991 et 1998 (around 1,5%) and a provided reduction of the hospitalization capacities upper to 40% for the following two years! Then the connection with these two figures requires the development of new therapeutic strategies, with the existing means. In this peculiar context, a study has been carried on over 2 years: 49 psychiatric patients who benefited from a brief hospitalization (less than 48 hours) have been followed up. The interest proceeds from the high frequency of the type of clinical situation which concerns 12,5% of the admissions in the studied psychiatric department. In the same time, a pilot group of 49 patients has been drawn lots among all the admissions during the same time: patients who benefited from a more traditional hospitalization (about twelve days), with strictly a same psychiatric diagnosis as in the first group, using the ICD 10 classification. The emphasis was focussed on the patient's psychiatric curing process into the 2 groups; we have compared the item rehospitalizations in a psychiatric hospital (through the number of rehospitalization, the number of days of rehospitalization, and the necessity - or not - of a rehospitalization) with the object of estimating the benefit, the inefficiency, or even the negligence of proposing a brief hospitalization. We have also studied socio-environmental datas, antecedents and effective psychiatric follow-up into the two groups. Concerning the diagnosis, mental disorders related to alcohol abuse (F10) are the most frequent (49%) into the group brief hospitalization , which diverges from the usual results taking account hospitalizations in psychiatric services. Then we have found personality disorders (14,3%), schizophrenia (12%), adaptation disorders (10,2%), anxiety (8,2%) and opiated abuse (4,3%). By that very fact, the pilot group allows exactly the same diagnosis. There's no significant difference concerning number of hospitalizations or number of days of rehospitalization; there is even a tendency in favour of patients who have been hospitalized less than 2 days: an other hospitalization is not as frequent as in the pilot group, without any exacerbation of their pathology (no less sight of patients, same number of death). It's important to emphasize that this benefit isn't related to less severe pathology for the first group: there can be a comparison between psychiatric antecedents and seniority of mental troubles. By another way, socio-environmental datas (age, sex, social and family positions) are homogenous. Lastly, circumstances of the hospitalization - inclusion between the groups are similar: same origin of the patients, who have required themselves their admission (it means the knowledge of the psychiatric hospital, distinctly one or more previous hospitalizations). The contacts with the entourage of the patients have been managed in the same way with the same results, and medical follow-up after having left hospital were identical. So we come to the conclusion that in spite of the apparent slight of this strategy, there can be a comparison between this kind of aid and a more traditional hospitalization, in many clinical situations, all the more when the emphasis is laid on the patients psychiatric curing process. Consequently a brief hospitalization can be considered as a possible therapeutic strategy. Two facts command attention now: we must clearly define the type of patients who have really benefited of this brief hospitalization, with the object of being able to plan this strategy. By another way, it seems that a brief hospitalization, just like any hospitalization, is one part of our patients curing process for the two groups. Theref

  11. Randomised controlled trial of day patient versus inpatient psychiatric treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Creed, F; Black, D; Anthony, P; Osborn, M; Thomas, P; Tomenson, B

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the proportion of acutely ill psychiatric patients who can be treated in a day hospital and compare the outcome of day patient and inpatient treatment. DESIGN--Prospective randomised controlled trial of day patient versus inpatient treatment after exclusion of patients precluded by severity of illness or other factors from being treated as day patients. All three groups assessed at three and 12 months. SETTING--Teaching hospital serving small socially deprived inner city area. Day hospital designed to take acute admissions because of few beds. PATIENTS--175 Patients were considered, of whom 73 could not be allocated. Of the remaining 102 patients, 51 were allocated to each treatment setting but only 89 became established in treatment--namely, 41 day patients and 48 inpatients. 73 Of these 89 patients were reassessed at three months and 70 at one year. INTERVENTIONS--Standard day patient and inpatient treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Discharge from hospital and return to previous level of social functioning; reduction of psychiatric symptoms, abnormal behaviour, and burden on relatives. RESULTS--33 Of 48 inpatients were discharged at three months compared with 17 of 41 day patients. But at one year 9 of 48 inpatients and three of 41 day patients were in hospital. 18 Of 35 day patients and 16 of 39 inpatients were at their previous level of social functioning at one year. The only significant difference at three months was a greater improvement in social role performance in the inpatients. At one year there was no significant difference between day patients and inpatients in present state examination summary scores and social role performance, burden, or behaviour. CONCLUSIONS--Roughly 40% of all acutely ill patients presenting for admission to a psychiatric unit may be treated satisfactorily in a well staffed day hospital. The outcome of treatment is similar to that of inpatient care but might possibly reduce readmissions. The hospital costs seem to be similar but further research is required to assess the costs in terms of extra demands on relatives, general practitioners, and other community resources. PMID:2188696

  12. [Family and psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    de Mello, Rita Mello; Schneider, Jac Fernando

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to identify the reasons that lead relatives to hospitalize patients in a psychiatric unit of a general hospital. It is a qualitative study based on Alfred Schutz' phenomenological sociology. Fourteen relatives, each with one family member hospitalized, were interviewed from August to October 2009. The guiding question of the phenomenological interview was "What do you expect from psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital?". Phenomenological sociology was used to understand and interpret the interviews. Statements showed three concrete categories, that lead to the reasons for: treatment guidelines and continuity; prospects for improvement; ideas about normality. This research shows the experiences of relatives, contributing with mental health professionals' reflection about their actions and about the involvement of families in a general hospital's psychiatric unit. PMID:21987981

  13. Whither Psychiatric Day Care? A Study of Day Patients in Birmingham

    PubMed Central

    Gath, D. H.; Hassall, Christine; Cross, K. W.

    1973-01-01

    A survey was made of the 647 patients attending the seven psychiatric day hospitals in Birmingham during a single census week, and of their patterns of attendance in day-care over the following 12 months. Marked differences were found between the day patients (583) attending the four large, traditional hospitals, and those (64) attending three small, relatively modern units. Patients attending the large hospitals were older, included the majority of schizophrenics, and carried a greater morbidity as measured by the frequency and duration of previous psychiatric care. At the end of the follow-up period 64% of patients attending the large hospitals were still in day care as against only 2 patients attending small hospital units. It is suggested that the results have important implications for the planning of future mental health services in that they highlight the extent to which different groups of patients have different requirements. A large proportion of the day hospital population had long-term needs which might be difficult to meet in the proposed general hospital units.

  14. [For a society without secure psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana Luiza Gonçalves Dos; Farias, Francisco Ramos de; Pinto, Diana de Souza

    2015-12-01

    The article explores the possibility of defending a society without secure psychiatric hospitals in Brazil. These hospitals have been sustained by persistent legal and psychiatric paradigms, including the notions "safety measure" and "dangerousness," in conjunction with particular social and historical circumstances. The open repression of so-called dangerous individuals is still practiced in the name of the principle of social defense, outdated concepts notwithstanding. Together, law and psychiatry constructed spaces of power/knowledge within these workings of social control. Addressing this topic from the transdisciplinary field of social memory means identifying the struggles within particular power/knowledge arrangements, which play out in a state of ongoing tension. PMID:26625915

  15. NAPPH (National Association of Private Psychiatric Hospitals) statement of principles of psychiatric hospital practice ethics.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    A competitive and dynamic healthcare environment requires that psychiatric hospital administrators and physicians continually monitor their hospital's ability to deliver quality services to their patients. To ensure that hospitals stand for and abide by psychiatric hospital practice ethics, the National Association of Private Psychiatric Hospitals (NAPPH) Board of Trustees has formally approved and distributed to the industry a "Statement of Principles of Psychiatric Hospital Practice Ethics." Adopted at the June 22, 1989, Board meeting, the guidelines not only summarize views long held in the industry, but are a condition of NAPPH membership. Nine critical areas are identified in the NAPPH statement: admissions, advertising, marketing and referral development, resource allocation and appropriateness of care, treatment rendered, patients' rights, family rights and involvement, competition, and financial resources. Central to ethical hospital practice is a moral responsibility--shared among administrators, trustees, physicians and staff--to ensure access to care, quality of care, and fair treatment of patients. NAPPH represents more than 300 private psychiatric hospitals throughout the United States, and the NAPPH mission includes the promotion of high-quality care and treatment, efficient hospital operation, and advocacy for the patients served by its member hospitals. Each NAPPH hospital actively supports the appropriate, safe, and compassionate treatment of the mentally ill. PMID:10296960

  16. Violent psychiatric inpatients in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    Morrison, E F

    1990-01-01

    Violence in inpatient psychiatric settings is a clinically significant and relevant problem requiring attention by the psychiatric community. Despite the prevalence of research on violent behavior, few nursing studies have been conducted that explore the components of nursing care that may influence the amount of violence occurring in inpatient psychiatric settings. The purpose of the study was to identify the characteristics of violent patients and the components of nursing care that are related to violent patient behavior. A qualitative study was conducted using participant observation and grounded theory methodology. Data were collected in a metropolitan public hospital over a 9-month period. Six categories of violent patients were identified during data analysis: (1) the user, (b) the outlaw, (c) the rebel without a cause, (d) the little big man, (e) the child, and (6) the vamp. Implications of the study for clinicians working in inpatient psychiatric settings are discussed. PMID:2326569

  17. Lunar phases and psychiatric hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Gorvin, J J; Roberts, M S

    1994-12-01

    To assess the lunar hypothesis as predictive of mental health emergencies and antisocial behavior, the relation of the lunar hypothesis and the occurrence of psychiatric hospital admissions of developmentally disabled adults was examined. The full moon phase of the lunar cycle did not explain a higher rate of hospital admission and accounted for only .007% of the variance. A critique of the methodology in prior research led to the suggestion that more immediate stressors and environmental factors are more plausible contributing factors to hospital admission. PMID:7886164

  18. Characteristics and Needs of Psychiatric Patients With Prolonged Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Afilalo, Marc; Soucy, Nathalie; Xue, Xiaoqing; Colacone, Antoinette; Jourdenais, Emmanuelle; Boivin, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the characteristics and needs prior to, on admission, during the first month in hospital, at the thirtieth day of hospitalization and posthospital discharge of psychiatric patients occupying acute beds. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in 2 tertiary care hospitals. Adult patients hospitalized on a psychiatric unit for 30 days were identified. Data was collected from their medical charts and interviews with their health care team. The categorization of acute and nonacute status at day 30 was based on the health care professional’s evaluation. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed. Results: A total of 262 patients were identified (mean age 45 years), 66% lived at home and 11% were homeless. More than one-half were cognitively impaired and a few had special medical needs. Ninety-seven per cent had been admitted from the emergency department. At day 30, 81% of patients required acute care, while 19% (95% CI 15% to 24%) occupied an acute care bed, despite the resolution of their acute condition. The main reason preventing discharge of nonacute patients was the difficulty or inability to find appropriate resources that met patients’ needs. As for patients who required acute care, the most common psychiatric issues were delusions or hallucinations (34%), inability to take medications independently (23.6%), and inadequate control of aggression or impulsivity (16.5%). Conclusions: Prevention of the discharge of nonacute patients is largely due to the difficulty in finding appropriate resources that meet patients’ needs. Improved access to community and subacute care resources could potentially facilitate the hospital discharge of psychiatric nonacute patients. PMID:26174218

  19. Comorbidity and Pattern of Substance Use in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sepehrmanesh, Zahra; Ahmadvand, Afshin; Moraveji, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Substance use in patients with psychiatric disorder is an every-day seen. Detection of this comorbidity can significantly affect the treatment of these disorders, as well as substance use. Objectives: This study has been conducted to determine the prevalence and pattern of substance use in hospitalized psychiatric patients. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 210 hospitalized psychiatric patients were selected by simple randomization from all records of hospitalized patients. The instrument of gathering data was a demographic checklist including age, gender, marital status, education, type of disorder and substance abuse and duration of psychiatric disorder. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16 using Fisher exact and Chi square tests. Results: The mean age of patients was 37.9 years. Most of the patients were male, married and unemployed. The Prevalence of substance use was 36.7%. The most prevalent pattern of substance use was opium, opioid, methamphetamines and other substances (poly substance). The prevalence of substance use in patients with mood disorders was more than the other disorders and the most prevalent substance use in these patients was opium and opioid. Poly substance use was the most prevalent pattern of use (80 %) in psychotic and mood disorders due to substance. Significant difference was seen between genders, marital status, occupation, duration of illness and frequency of substance use (P < 0.05 ), however no significant difference was seen between educational levels, age and substance use. Conclusions: The patients with mood disorders had the highest comorbidity with substance use and concurrent use of poly substance was the most prevalent pattern of use in these patients. Therefore, successful treatment of psychiatric disorders and substance use needs multimodal and more serious interventions. Regarding to the pattern of poly substance use in these patients, careful screening should be performed at admission. PMID:25389488

  20. [THE CLINICAL ORGANIZATIONAL SUBSTANTIATION OF NEW TECHNOLOGY OF HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRIC CARE].

    PubMed

    Podsevatkin, V G; Blinov, D S; Podsevatkin, D V; Podsevatkina, S V; Smirnova, O A

    2015-01-01

    The new technology of hospital psychiatric care, developed and implemented in the Mordovia republican clinical hospital, permits resolving problems of hospitalism, lethality, pharmaceutical resistance and others. The essence of this technology is in staging of hospital care under condition of intensification and standardization of curative diagnostic process, implementation of complex approach to treatment of psychiatric disorders. The patient sequentially passes through three stages: intensive diagnostics and intensive treatment (intensive care department, intensive therapy department), supportive therapy (general psychiatric department); rehabilitation measures (curative rehabilitative department). The concentration of resources at the first stage, application of intensive therapy techniques permit in the shortest period to arrest acute psychotic symptomatic. The described new technology of hospital psychiatric care permits enhancing effectiveness of treatment, significantly shorten period of hospitalization (37.5 days), to obtain lasting and qualitative remission, to rehabilitate most fully social working status of patient and to significantly decrease lethality. PMID:26411163

  1. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  2. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  3. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  4. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  5. 42 CFR 409.63 - Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days... Hospital Insurance Benefits 409.63 Reduction of inpatient psychiatric benefit days available in the initial benefit period. (a) Reduction rule. (1) If the individual was an inpatient in a...

  6. Elements of Successful School Reentry after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization is an intensive intervention designed to stabilize adolescents who are experiencing an acute mental health crisis. Reintegrating to school after discharge from psychiatric hospitalization can be overwhelming for many adolescents (E. V. Clemens, L. E. Welfare, & A. M. Williams, 2010). The authors used a consensual

  7. Elements of Successful School Reentry after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization is an intensive intervention designed to stabilize adolescents who are experiencing an acute mental health crisis. Reintegrating to school after discharge from psychiatric hospitalization can be overwhelming for many adolescents (E. V. Clemens, L. E. Welfare, & A. M. Williams, 2010). The authors used a consensual…

  8. Origins of psychiatric hospitalization in medieval Spain.

    PubMed

    Prez, Jess; Baldessarini, Ross J; Undurraga, Juan; Snchez-Moreno, Jos

    2012-12-01

    Specification of the earliest institution devoted primarily to the treatment of the mentally ill in the western world remains elusive. Uncertainty arises from limited documentation and gradual evolution of most candidate sites from hospices for the poor, foreign, or homeless, or as clinical centers for the care of a range of persons with general medical and psychiatric disorders. Plausible candidates identified in the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries include Bethlem Asylum in London. Much less often considered are two centers in medieval Spain: the Moorish Maristan at Granada (1365) and the Christian Hospital of Our Lady Mary for Lunatics, the Insane and Innocents at Valencia (1409). Since the early Spanish sites are not well known, we have summarized available information concerning their foundation, facilities, theories and practices, as arising from the cultural and political background of the times and regions. PMID:22350131

  9. Psychiatric Hospitalization among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, David S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined predictors of psychiatric hospitalization among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Data were collected from 760 caregivers of children with ASD. Cox regression was used to determine factors associated with hospitalization. Almost 11% were hospitalized. Youth in single parent homes were more likely to be hospitalized

  10. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs). Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV), reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30). Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs) completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1%) or without (47.7%) aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge) and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge) were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD) total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0%) patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7%) at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%), 686 (94.2%) and 676 (92.9%). The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%), typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%), atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8%) and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%). Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20.6% and 26.6% with two drugs, and 53.2%, 57.8% and 59.0% with > two drugs. Benzodiazepines were the most common drugs both at admission (60.0%) and during hospitalisation (85.7%), and 69.5% were prescribed at discharge. Conclusion patients with psychiatric diseases in acute phase experienced a satisfactory outcome following intensified therapeutic interventions during hospitalisation. PMID:17257438

  11. Impact of Patients’ Psychiatric Hospitalization on Caregivers: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Bridget Elizabeth; Faulkner, Madelaine; Doyle, Otima; Daniel, Stephanie S; Goldston, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article was to systematically review literature on the impact of patients’ psychiatric hospitalizations on caregivers. Implications for practice and research are presented. Methods A systematic search of Web of Knowledge, PsychInfo, and Medline (PubMed) was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published before August 31, 2013. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method studies were included if they focused on caregiver outcomes and contained data collected directly from caregivers of patients who had been psychiatrically hospitalized. Results Twenty-nine articles met the inclusion criteria. Caregivers are heterogeneous in their reaction to the psychiatric hospitalization; however, many report distress. Caregivers also often report that they experience stigma, disruptions in daily life, worse physical health, economic strain, and changes in relationships following hospitalization. Negative reactions to the hospitalization may decrease over time, but can remain elevated when compared to the general population. Nonetheless, many caregivers also experience positive changes as a result of the hospitalization. The reaction of caregivers may be influenced by the severity of the patient’s psychiatric problems as well as the caregiver’s demographics and style of coping. Conclusions Caregivers experience a range of reactions to the psychiatric hospitalizations and providing caregivers with psychoeducation on their possible reaction as well as techniques to assist them may improve clinical outcomes for patients. Future research is needed to understand the heterogeneity in caregiver’s reactions to the patient’s psychiatric hospitalization. PMID:25686810

  12. A Survey of Psychiatric Units in General Hospitals in Canada

    PubMed Central

    McKerracher, D. G.; Smith, Colin M.

    1964-01-01

    The Canadian Psychiatric Association recently recommended that all general hospitals over 200 beds should have psychiatric in-patient units. Questionnaires were sent to the administrators of the 52 existing general hospital psychiatric units in Canada. Most administrators expressed approval of these units, although some noted the existence of problems. Statistics are given on the staffing of the units. Although the number of beds was small, these facilities accounted for a very large number of admissions. Most had active teaching programs. The advantages of implementing the C.P.A. recommendation are many. General hospital psychiatric units should be encouraged to undertake comprehensive psychiatry, that is, to accept all types of psychiatric patients, and to retain responsibility for long-term care. PMID:14166462

  13. Strategies for Effective Psychiatric Hospitalization of College and University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockland-Miller, Harry; Eells, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    University and college counseling services face growing demands for services and self-reported increases in the level of presenting psychopathology, including need for psychiatric hospitalization. However, challenges in communication often occur between the systems of an inpatient psychiatric unit and an outpatient college and/or university

  14. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gabriels, Robin L.; Agnew, John A.; Beresford, Carol; Morrow, Mary Ann; Mesibov, Gary; Wamboldt, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and/or intellectual disabilities (ID) are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children's hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33%) and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days). Available data from a subset of patients (n = 43) in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes. PMID:22934179

  15. Clinical outcomes of case management in a tertiary psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Thambyrajah, Vamadevan; Hendriks, Margaret; Mahendran, Rathi

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical outcomes of inpatients on an acute psychiatric ward in a large tertiary psychiatric hospital who received a broker model of case management. The clinical outcomes monitored were readmission rates and scores on the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale. The study found a significant reduction in readmission rates and hospital lengths of stay and improved CGI scores for patients who received case management. PMID:17304984

  16. Influence of psychiatric comorbidity on 30-day readmissions for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedani, Brian K.; Solberg, Leif I.; Copeland, Laurel; Fang, Ying; Stewart, Christine; Hu, Jianhui; Nerenz, David R.; Williams, L. Keoki; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Waxmonsky, Jeanette; Lu, Christine Y.; Waitzfelder, Beth E.; Owen-Smith, Ashli A.; Coleman, Karen J.; Lynch, Frances L.; Ahmed, Ameena T.; Beck, Arne L.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Simon, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented a policy in 2012 that penalizes hospitals for excessive all-cause hospital readmissions within 30 days after discharge for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and pneumonia. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of psychiatric comorbidities on 30-day all-cause readmissions for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Methods Longitudinal study from 2009-2011 within 11 Mental Health Research Network (MHRN) affiliated health systems. Data were derived from the HMO Research Network Virtual Data Warehouse. Participants were individuals admitted to the hospital for HF, AMI, and pneumonia. All index inpatient hospitalizations for HF, AMI and pneumonia were captured (n=160,169 patient index admissions). Psychiatric diagnoses were measured for the year prior to admission. All-cause readmissions within 30 days of discharge were the outcome variable. Results Approximately 18% of all individuals with these conditions were readmitted within 30-days. The rate was 5% greater for individuals with a past-year psychiatric comorbidity (21.7%) than for those without (16.5%; p<.001). Depression, anxiety, and dementia were associated with more readmissions for those with index hospitalizations for all three conditions independently and combined (p<.05). Substance use and bipolar disorders were linked with higher readmissions for those with initial HF and pneumonia hospitalizations (p<.05). Readmission rates declined overall from 2009-2011. Conclusions Individuals with HF, AMI, and pneumonia experience high rates of readmission, but psychiatric comorbidities appear to increase that risk. Future readmission interventions should consider adding mental health components. PMID:25642610

  17. Spiritist psychiatric hospitals in Brazil: integration of conventional psychiatric treatment and spiritual complementary therapy.

    PubMed

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Aguiar, Paulo Rogrio D C; Braghetta, Camilla Casaletti; Vallada, Candido P; Moreira-Almeida, Alexander; Vallada, Homero

    2012-03-01

    In Brazil, during the XX century, dozens of Spiritist psychiatric hospitals emerged seeking to integrate conventional medical treatment with complementary spiritual therapy. This combined inpatient treatment is largely found in Brazil, where many psychiatric hospitals stem from the Spiritist movement. The present report describes the use of these spiritual practices, their operating structure, health professionals involved, modalities of care, and institutional difficulties in integrating spiritual practices with conventional treatment in six leading Brazilian Spiritist psychiatric hospitals. These hospitals combine conventional psychiatric treatment with voluntary-based spiritual approaches such as laying on of hands ("fluidotherapy"), lectures regarding spiritual and ethical issues, intercessory prayer, spirit release therapy ("disobsession") and "fraternal dialogue". The non-indoctrination and optional nature of these spiritual complementary therapies seem to increase acceptance among patients and their family members. In conclusion, the Spiritist psychiatric hospitals in Brazil have, for more than half a century, provided an integrative approach in the treatment of psychiatric disorders, associating conventional and spiritual treatments, more specifically Spiritist therapy. The lack of standardized treatment protocols and scientific studies remain a barrier to assessing the impact of this integrative approach on patients' mental health, quality of life, adherence, and perceived quality of treatment. PMID:22052248

  18. READMIT: a clinical risk index to predict 30-day readmission after discharge from acute psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Vigod, Simone N; Kurdyak, Paul A; Seitz, Dallas; Herrmann, Nathan; Fung, Kinwah; Lin, Elizabeth; Perlman, Christopher; Taylor, Valerie H; Rochon, Paula A; Gruneir, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to create a clinically useful risk index, administered prior to discharge, for determining the probability of psychiatric readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge for general psychiatric inpatients. We used population-level sociodemographic and health administrative data to develop a predictive model for 30-day readmission among adults discharged from an acute psychiatric unit in Ontario, Canada (2008-2011), and converted the final model into a risk index system. We derived the predictive model in one-half of the sample (n = 32,749) and validated it in the other half of the sample (n = 32,750). Variables independently associated with 30-day readmission (forming the mnemonic READMIT) were: (R) Repeat admissions; (E) Emergent admissions (i.e. harm to self/others); (D) Diagnoses (psychosis, bipolar and/or personality disorder), and unplanned Discharge; (M) Medical comorbidity; (I) prior service use Intensity; and (T) Time in hospital. Each 1-point increase in READMIT score (range 0-41) increased the odds of 30-day readmission by 11% (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.10-1.12). The index had moderate discriminative capacity in both derivation (C-statistic = 0.631) and validation (C-statistic = 0.630) datasets. Determining risk of psychiatric readmission for individual patients is a critical step in efforts to address the potentially avoidable high rate of this negative outcome. The READMIT index provides a framework for identifying patients at high risk of 30-day readmission prior to discharge, and for the development, evaluation and delivery of interventions that can assist with optimizing the transition to community care for patients following psychiatric discharge. PMID:25537450

  19. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special provisions applying to psychiatric... HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals 482.60 Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals. Psychiatric hospital must (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor...

  20. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special provisions applying to psychiatric... HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals 482.60 Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals. Psychiatric hospital must (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor...

  1. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special provisions applying to psychiatric... HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals 482.60 Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals. Psychiatric hospital must (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor...

  2. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special provisions applying to psychiatric... HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals 482.60 Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals. Psychiatric hospital must (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor...

  3. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special provisions applying to psychiatric... HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals 482.60 Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals. Psychiatric hospital must (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor...

  4. Should patients with chronic psychiatric disorders remain in hospital? Results from a service inquiry.

    PubMed

    Grinshpoon, Alexander; Shershevsky, Yehiel; Levinson, Daphna; Ponizovsky, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    The pattern of mental health care in Israel is undergoing major reform. In this report we explored hospitalization rates of 1,448 former long-stay psychiatric inpatients (70% of them with ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia) subsequent to their transfer from countrywide psychiatric hospitals to 57 community-based hostels or alternative community settings between the years 1996-1999. Using data from the National Psychiatric Case Registry and a mirror image design, we examined the rates of readmission and calculated the number of saved hospital days during the community residence period, which compares more than two and four years, respectively, for 80% and 48% residents. T-tests, Mann-Whitney tests and analysis of variance were performed to examine differences in hospitalization rates and associated variables. Results showed that a minority, 36.2% of the former inpatients, was readmitted during their hostel residence. In comparison with an equivalent pre-hostel period, the time spent in hospital for those hostel residents that needed readmission was significantly shorter and the related day savings were considerably higher. The rehospitalized residents tended to be younger at their first hospitalization and at referral to the hostels, compared to those nonhospitalized. In addition, age by gender interaction, and length of hostel residence affected readmission rates. We may conclude that the policy decision to move the inpatients to a community setting is supported by the fact that the majority of the hostel residents was able to stay away from hospitalization. PMID:14971128

  5. Children in Foster Care: Before, during, and after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persi, Joe; Sisson, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that foster children are at greater risk for mental health problems than are children in the general population, very little is known about the smaller group of foster children admitted to psychiatric hospitals. The present study sought to determine whether foster children admitted to inpatient care are a distinct

  6. Psychiatric hospitalization among children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Mandell, David S

    2008-07-01

    This study examined predictors of psychiatric hospitalization among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Data were collected from 760 caregivers of children with ASD. Cox regression was used to determine factors associated with hospitalization. Almost 11% were hospitalized. Youth in single parent homes were more likely to be hospitalized (OR = 2.54), as were youth diagnosed at a later age (OR = 1.10). Engaging in self-injurious behavior (OR = 2.14), aggressive behavior (OR = 4.83), and being diagnosed with depression (OR = 2.48) or obsessive compulsive disorder (OR = 2.35) increased the odds of hospitalization. Risk for hospitalization increased with age and over time. The results suggest early diagnosis and community-based interventions for aggressive and self-injurious behaviors may reduce hospitalizations. PMID:17975720

  7. Examining Outcomes of Acute Psychiatric Hospitalization among Children

    PubMed Central

    Tharayil, Priya R.; Sigrid, James; Morgan, Ronald; Freeman, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Within the past two decades, few studies have examined outcomes of acute psychiatric hospitalization among children, demonstrating change in emotional and behavioral functioning. A secondary analysis of pre-test/post-test data collected on 36 children was conducted, using the Target Symptom Rating (TSR). The TSR is a 13-item measure with two subscales Emotional Problems and Behavioral Problems and was designed for evaluation of outcome among children and adolescents in acute inpatient psychiatric settings. Results of this study, its limitations, and the barriers encountered in the implementation of the TSR scale as part of routine clinical practice are discussed. PMID:23946699

  8. Perceived coercion and need for hospitalization related to psychiatric admission.

    PubMed

    Bonsack, Charles; Borgeat, Franois

    2005-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization constitutes a moment of major stress to the point that occurrences of posttraumatic stress disorders have been described. Feelings of coercion are usual, whatever the legal status of admission. Patients may also consider afterwards that they needed hospitalization even if they refused it initially. A cross-sectional survey has been conducted among the inpatients of a Swiss psychiatric hospital to assess their subjective view of admission with emphasis on legal status, perceived coercion and need for hospitalization. Eighty-seven questionnaires were completed and analyzed. Results indicated that 74% of patients felt that they had been under pressure to be hospitalized, whether or not they were involuntarily admitted. Seventy percent felt their admission was necessary. More involuntary patients reported a subjective lack of improvement. Clinicians could decrease feelings of coercion of their patients while discussing need for hospitalization, legal status and subjective feeling of coercion as different dimensions. An argument is presented to favor positive pressure from social environment over legal involuntary commitment in many hospitalizations. PMID:15936078

  9. [40 years of toxicomania at the psychiatric hospital in Lige].

    PubMed

    Husquinet, H

    1981-12-01

    Drug abuse was observed during 40 years (1939-1979) in a psychiatric hospital for women (sanatorium Sainte-Agathe, Lige, Belgium). Seventy patients were labelled with that diagnosis, -i.e. 2,9% of 2386 admissions. The frequency of drug addiction grew with years and between 1975 and 1979, outnumbered 10% of all admissions. 3/4 of those patients were previously inmates of other psychiatric clinics and well known in medical urgency services. Morphinomaniacs were the only patients between 1939 and 1949 (11 women). As a rule, they survived and did not come back. No haschich, L.S.D. or heroin addicts were seen: their psychiatric confinement was never required. Beginning in december 1959, barbituromaniacs (58 patients) invaded the wards. Other hypnotics were used as well (e.g. metaqualone). Forty-five per cent of the patients died and the survivors came back and back again, -en masse. The illness is very serious if it starts before 30 years: the risk of death goes to 75%. Barmaids and prostitutes were definitely doing hazardous jobs (5 deaths among 6 cases). Other psychiatric illnesses interfere with toxicomania, especially depression. Four patients committed suicide without hypnotics. To conclude: barbiturates are dangerous drugs and they ought not to be used for insomnia. Benzodiazepine abuse did not occur in the hospital and did not induce fatal issues. Combined with phenothiazines, benzodiazepines can solve nearly all sleep disturbances. PMID:6127976

  10. Adult criminality among formerly hospitalized child psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lundy, M S; Pfohl, B M; Kuperman, S

    1993-05-01

    Among 170 preadolescent children (138 males, 32 females) admitted to the University of Iowa Psychiatric Hospital between 1970 and 1983, 23 males (17%), had adult prison records at follow-up in 1990. Assaultive behavior in childhood predicted adult imprisonment (odds ratio = 4.96, 95% confidence interval 1.8-13.8, p = 0.002), as did criminality in a biological parent (odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval 1.3-12.4, p = 0.015). Diagnosis, including conduct disorder, was not correlated with outcome. Among these young children, male gender, violence, and parental criminality identified persons at high risk for adult imprisonment. Psychiatric hospitalization in childhood is a risk for adult disturbance, including sociopathy. PMID:8496121

  11. Psychiatric hospitalization of children in Florida. Legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Mutch, S A; Myers, W C

    1994-07-01

    The hospitalization of children in psychiatric hospitals and their associated rights or lack thereof remains an important issue. Much attention has been focused on children's rights in Florida, most recently with the cases of Gregory K. and Kimberly Mays. On a national level, Hillary Rodham Clinton has drawn attention to children's rights through her advocacy for children. The commitment of children to mental health facilities in Florida deserves examination. This is an important issue, not only to the psychiatrist who tests youths, but also to the family practitioner, internist, or any other referring physician who is involved in the case of the child and the family. It is imperative that the primary care physician as well as the psychiatrist know and understand the limitations and requirements for civil commitment of a child in a psychiatric setting. PMID:7964573

  12. Implementing psychiatric day treatment for infants, toddlers, preschoolers and their families: a study from a clinical and organizational perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An increasing number of empirical studies indicate that infants, toddlers and preschoolers may suffer from non-transient mental illnesses featuring developmental psychopathology. A few innovative child psychiatric approaches have been developed to treat infants, toddlers and preschoolers and their families, but have not yet been conceptually presented and discussed in the framework of different healthcare systems. The organizational and clinical experience gained while developing specific approaches may be important across disciplines and guide future developments in psychiatric treatment of infants, toddlers, preschoolers and their families. Results This article introduces the Preschool Family Day Hospital for Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers and their Families at Münster University Hospital, Germany. This hospital is unique in the German healthcare system with regard to its social-service institution division of labor. Specifically, it uses an intermittent treatment approach and an integrated interactional family psychiatric approach to treat children and their parents as separate patients. This multidisciplinary, developmentally and family-oriented approach includes components of group treatments with children and separate treatments with parents. Specific techniques include video-assisted treatments of the parent–child interaction, psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatments for parents, and conjoint family therapies that include both parents and siblings. Conclusions The Family Day Hospital for infants, toddlers and preschoolers and their families offers innovative family-oriented treatments for those who suffer from a wide range of severe child psychiatric disorders that cannot be sufficiently treated in outpatient settings. Treatment is based on the need for family-oriented approaches to the early psychiatric treatment of infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Family day hospitals are an innovative approach to preschool child psychiatry that requires further evaluation. PMID:23601961

  13. 28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization...

  14. 28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization...

  15. 28 CFR 549.45 - Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment. 549.45 Section 549.45 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment 549.45 Involuntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment. (a) Hospitalization...

  16. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... other than inpatient psychiatric facilities. 424.13 Section 424.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities. (a) Content of certification and... hospital services (other than inpatient psychiatric facility services) only if a physician certifies...

  17. Intriguing model significantly reduces boarding of psychiatric patients, need for inpatient hospitalization.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    As new approaches to the care of psychiatric emergencies emerge, one solution is gaining particular traction. Under the Alameda model, which has been put into practice in Alameda County, CA, patients who are brought to regional EDs with emergency psychiatric issues are quickly transferred to a designated emergency psychiatric facility as soon as they are medically stabilized. This alleviates boarding problems in area EDs while also quickly connecting patients with specialized care. With data in hand on the model's effectiveness, developers believe the approach could alleviate boarding problems in other communities as well. The model is funded by through a billing code established by California's Medicaid program for crisis stabilization services. Currently, only 22% of the patients brought to the emergency psychiatric facility ultimately need to be hospitalized; the other 78% are able to go home or to an alternative situation. In a 30-day study of the model, involving five community hospitals in Alameda County, CA, researchers found that ED boarding times were as much as 80% lower than comparable ED averages, and that patients were stabilized at least 75% of the time, significantly reducing the need for inpatient hospitalization. PMID:25564695

  18. [Benchmarking of freedom-restricting coercive measures in psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Steinert, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    Coercive measures that restrict personal freedom have been in the focus of critical public interest since the beginning of modern psychiatry. Psychiatric hospitals have the two-fold mission to prevent danger to self or danger to others on the one side and on the other to keep optional coercive measures as little restrictive and as short as possible. Critical and regardful handling of coercive measures has both qualitative and quantitative aspects. For quantitative comparisons, we introduced benchmarking in psychiatric hospitals in Baden-Wuerttemberg, which in the meantime have been joined by hospitals in other German federal states, Switzerland, and Luxemburg. The most important quality indicators include the percentage of admissions exposed to coercive measures and the mean duration of a coercive measure. For the purpose of benchmarking, the results of four quality indicators are presented, separated for each ICD-10 principal diagnostic group, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. The project has been continuously pursued since 2004. Participating hospitals were allowed to develop their own projects to reduce coercive measures according to the benchmarking results. PMID:21767794

  19. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. “Physical restraint” is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding) in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients' and staff's perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward. PMID:26682211

  20. [Palliative care day hospital and nursing coordination].

    PubMed

    Teillet, Fabienne

    2015-11-01

    The palliative care day hospital is still underdeveloped in France, unlike in Anglo-Saxon countries. Its main mission is to help improve the quality of life at home of the patient suffering from a serious and progressive disease. It offers an inter-disciplinary and global approach in which the nurse's role is quite specific. PMID:26567073

  1. Guantanamo Bay, Cuba 1996: psychiatric services to Cuban migrants in the final days of Operation Sea Signal.

    PubMed

    Grieger, T A; Adams, B

    1997-12-01

    Conditions during the final days of Operation Sea Signal in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, presented a unique challenge for the U.S. Naval Hospital psychiatry/mental health team. The team was charged with evaluation and treatment of Cuban migrants and with determining suitability for immigration to the United States. Degradation of social support networks appeared to be a factor in the course of psychiatric symptoms. The cases of two Cuban migrant males presenting with psychiatric disorders in the final month of the operation illustrate the complexities of the operation's psychiatric mission. Our focus was on behavioral interventions and social supports rather than definitive pharmacologic management of the underlying psychiatric disorders. Suggestions for management of similar missions in the future are provided. PMID:9433091

  2. [Psychiatric hospitalization for mental illness: past, present and future].

    PubMed

    Martínez Ferretti, José María

    2011-01-01

    The use of psychiatric hospitalization for mental illness has evolved through Modernity. In the last century, indefinite and involuntary committal was a widespread practice but has now become an extraordinary and short-term therapeutic recourse. Even though law experts, doctors and other mental health professionals agree on the benefits of this shift, in practice there are disagreements rooted in the shortcomings of health service providers. The current medical and legal criteria for hospitalization of patients with mental disorders should move away from the concept of endangerment and embrace therapeutic procedures and social care. New contemporary challenges, such as drugs and violence, require the implementation of a social strategy that is more comprehensive than medical treatment. This article presents a series of case studies describing the circumstances that led to the hospitalization of mental health patients, mostly in the city of Buenos Aires. PMID:22091456

  3. Coping strategies of hospitalized people with psychiatric disabilities in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Ching; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Liao, Jing-Wei; Chang, Li-Hsin; I-Chen, Tang

    2010-03-01

    Research has found that people with psychiatric disabilities Taiwan tended to utilize passive and emotional-focused strategies to cope with their illness unlike Western studies. A self-reported questionnaire that incorporated categories: socio-demographic characteristics, the self-impact of illness, illness adaptation, and coping strategy scale was administrated to 140 persons with psychiatric disabilities routinely hospitalized over a long period of time to explore the strategies of coping with their mental disorders. Analysis of survey data found the sense of helplessness and the overall illness adaptation significantly impact negative emotion coping utilization. Those who felt highly impact by the illness, more sense of helplessness, less actively managing their illness, and more social support availability were more likely to use positive emotion as a coping strategy. The better overall adaption to the illness significantly impact procrastination and previous illness experience utilization. Only a positive coping strategy was found significantly to manage the illness. PMID:19826952

  4. Components and Characteristics of a Psychiatric Partial Hospital Military Program.

    PubMed

    Lande, R Gregory; Pourzand, Miriam

    2016-03-01

    This article describes the components of a psychiatric partial hospital military program and the characteristics of referrals received over the 5-year period from 2009 to 2013. The 5-year study period included ongoing combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan along with their subsequent troop withdrawals and change in mission. A total of 1,194 service members were referred for this level of care, and even with the changing battlefield conditions, the number of psychiatric referrals remained steady throughout the 5-year period, with a significant spike in admissions in 2013. The principal diagnoses were major depressive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. One-third of the admissions came from service members with 4 to 8 years' time in service and slightly more than one-third were employed in direct combat roles or medical support. In terms of gender, females accounted for one-quarter of the admissions. PMID:26926745

  5. Massage with aromatherapy: effectiveness on anxiety of users with personality disorders in psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Thiago da Silva; Braga, Eliana Mara

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness of aromatherapy massage using the essential oils (0.5%) of Lavandula angustifolia and Pelargonium graveolens for anxiety reduction in patients with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization. METHOD Uncontrolled clinical trial with 50 subjects submitted to six massages with aromatherapy, performed on alternate days, on the cervical and the posterior thoracic regions. Vital data (heart and respiratory rate) were collected before and after each session and an anxiety scale (Trait Anxiety Inventory-State) was applied at the beginning and end of the intervention. The results were statistically analyzed with the chi square test and paired t test. RESULTS There was a statistically significant decrease (p < 0.001) of the heart and respiratory mean rates after each intervention session, as well as in the inventory score. CONCLUSION Aromatherapy has demonstrated effectiveness in anxiety relief, considering the decrease of heart and respiratory rates in patients diagnosed with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization. PMID:26107706

  6. Transnational Disorders: Returned Migrants at Oaxaca's Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Whitney L

    2015-03-01

    This article examines experiences of returned migrants seeking mental health care at the public psychiatric hospital in Oaxaca, Mexico. Approximately one-third of the hospital's patients have migration experience, and many return to Oaxaca due to mental health crises precipitated by conditions of structural vulnerability and "illegality" in the United States. Once home, migrants, their families, and their doctors struggle to interpret and allay these "transnational disorders"-disorders structurally produced and personally experienced within the borders of more than one country. Considering how space and time shape illness and treatment among transnational migrants, I contend that a critical phenomenology of illegality must incorporate migrant experience and political economy on both sides of the border before, during, and after migration. PMID:25294096

  7. Producing Marat/Sade: theater in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Brookes, J M

    1975-07-01

    When a drama group in a small private psychiatric hospital decided to present Marat/Sade, a play about inmates in an insane asylum, some patients and many staff members reacted negatively. However, the drama group carried out its usual rehearsal activities, including improvisations, theater games, and exercises to work out characters' backgrounds, motivations, and feelings. The set and costumes were designed through elaborate improvisations during rehearsals. The group had to overcome various problems in producing the play, but they were no worse than those encountered in previous productions. The director believes that a hospital theater must have the same high standards as a good theater in any setting and that patients' drama groups can handle any aspect of theater. PMID:1150170

  8. Tough Transitions: Mental Health Care Professionals' Perception of the Psychiatric Hospital to School Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric reasons are among the most common causes of hospitalization for adolescents. A Consensual Qualitative Research approach was used to explore mental health professionals' perceptions of the needs of adolescents as they transition from psychiatric hospital to school. Academic, social, and emotional domains emerged as important areas of

  9. [Frequency of relapse among hospitalized patients at the psychiatric department].

    PubMed

    Thiam, M H; Toure, K; Gueye, M

    2002-01-01

    The study aims to assess the epidemiology of relapse occurrence among inpatients at the Department of Psychiatry of Fann Teaching Hospital, in Dakar. A retrospective and prospective study was conducted from inpatients records during the year 1998. Demographic and disease related datas were collected and analyzed using a microcomputer with WHO/CDC Epi Info 6.0 software. Among the inpatients, 160 presented a relapse representing a prevalence rate of 40.8%. The most incriminated diseases were: schizophrenia and mood trouble (56.3% and 28.7% respectively). Relapses occurs more during the first admission and decreased with readmission. As a real public health problem, there is a need for better management of all psychiatric disease to prevent relapsus: early and efficient health care, social and familial integration. PMID:15776599

  10. [Cytogenetic study of 257 mentally deficient patients in psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, M; Bnzech, M; Tournier-Zerbid, N; Constant-Boy, M; Benazet-Rissou, J

    1975-11-01

    Cytogenetic survey of 257 mentally retarded individuals. A cytogenetic inquiry was undertaken among 257 patients with mental retardation of two psychiatric hospitals. 25 patients show chromosomes anomalies (10%). We found: --18 trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome); --3 sexual chromosome anomalies: 47, XYY syndrome; 47, XYY/46, XY mosacism; 47, XXY, or Klinefelter syndrom; --1 partial delection of long arm of chromosome number 18 (46, XX, 18 q--); --3 translocations; 45, XX, t (1, 13) (p 36, q 11); 46, XX, t (5 p--, 18 p+) (p 12, p 11); 46, XY, t (9, 19) (q 21, p 18). We also found 9 large Y chromosomes (46, XY q+), 8 cases of variant chromosomes, 1 case with chromosomes associations..., we report a case of masculine Turner phenotype or Noonan syndrom. PMID:135524

  11. [Wish to change smoking behaviour among staff and patients of a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Grempler, Julia; Droste-Arndt, Hildegard; Flammer, Erich; Steinert, Tilman

    2012-05-01

    Objective To examine smoking behaviour and motivation to reach abstinence among staff and patients of a psychiatric hospital.Methods In two due day surveys all in-patients and staff of the Centre for Psychiatry Weissenau were interviewed by a questionnaire.Results The response rate was 78.5 %. 442 (48 %) out of 933 subjects (523 patients, 410 staff) were smokers. Patients were smoking more frequently than staff (58 % vs. 34 %) and were more severely nicotine-dependent. Significant gender differences were observed with regard to prevalence and nicotin dependence. 57 % said they wanted to stop smoking and 34 % would appreciate therapeutic offers. There were no significant differences between patients and staff.Conclusions Psychiatric patients are as motivated as staff for offers about smoking cessation. There is a need for therapeutic offers. PMID:22422161

  12. Effectiveness of a Brief Care Management Intervention for Reducing Psychiatric Hospitalization Readmissions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Carole; Holsinger, Brandi; Flanagan, Jenny V; Ayers, Amanda M; Hutchison, Shari L; Terhorst, Lauren

    2014-03-14

    This study examines a recovery-focused care management bridging strategy implemented during time of inpatient stay with the goal to increase engagement in aftercare and reduce early psychiatric readmissions. The sample included 195 individuals who received care from a large psychiatric specialty hospital. Eighty-seven individuals were assigned to receive the intervention, while 108 individuals were assigned to the control group. Individuals in the intervention group received a brief interview prior to inpatient discharge plus usual care, and individuals in the control group received usual care. After controlling for age, living situation, and utilization, individuals in the control group were more likely to be readmitted within 30days of an index readmission than individuals in the intervention group (OR?=?2.44, p?=?.02). Bridging strategies utilized prior to discharge for individuals at higher risk of early mental health inpatient readmission may be used as an effective alternative to more costly interventions. PMID:24627234

  13. Insurance Parity and the Use of Outpatient Mental Health Care Following a Psychiatric Hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Amal N.; Swaminathan, Shailender; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Context Mental health services are typically subject to higher cost sharing than other health services. In 2008, the US Congress enacted legislation requiring parity in insurance coverage for mental health services in group health plans and Medicare Part B. Objective To determine the relationship between mental health insurance parity and the use of timely follow-up care after a psychiatric hospitalization. Design, Setting, and Population We reviewed cost-sharing requirements for outpatient mental health and general medical services for 302 Medicare health plans from 2001 to 2006. Among 43 892 enrollees in 173 health plans who were hospitalized for a mental illness, we determined the relation between parity in cost sharing and receipt of timely outpatient mental health care after discharge using cross-sectional analyses of all Medicare plans and longitudinal analyses of 10 plans that discontinued parity compared with 10 matched control plans that maintained parity. Main Outcome Measures Outpatient mental health visits within 7 and 30 days following a discharge for a psychiatric hospitalization. Results More than three-quarters of Medicare plans, representing 79% of Medicare enrollees, required greater cost sharing for mental health care compared with primary or specialty care. The adjusted rate of follow-up within 30 days after a psychiatric hospitalization was 10.9 percentage points greater (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6-17.3; P<.001) in plans with equivalent cost sharing for mental health and primary care compared with plans with mental health cost sharing greater than primary and specialty care cost sharing. The association of parity with follow-up care was increased for enrollees from areas of low income and less education. Rates of follow-up visits within 30 days decreased by 7.7 percentage points (95% CI, ?12.9 to ?2.4; P= .004) in plans that discontinued parity and increased by 7.5 percentage points (95% CI, 2.0-12.9; P=.008) among control plans that maintained parity (adjusted difference in difference, 14.2 percentage points; 95% CI, 4.5-23.9; P=.007). Conclusion Medicare enrollees in health plans with insurance parity for mental health and primary care have markedly higher use of clinically appropriate mental health services following a psychiatric hospitalization. PMID:19109116

  14. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication. 549.44... MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication....

  15. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication. 549.44... MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication....

  16. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication. 549.44... MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment 549.44 Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication....

  17. [The practice guideline 'Consultation psychiatry' of the Dutch Psychiatric Association for psychiatric consultations in primary care and the hospital].

    PubMed

    Leentjens, A F G; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C M; Boenink, A D; van Everdingen, J J E

    2008-08-30

    Psychiatric consultation in primary care as well as in the hospital is both effective and cost-effective if certain procedures are followed. With the professional guideline 'Consultation psychiatry', the Dutch Psychiatric Association aims at setting a standard for psychiatric consultations in non-psychiatric settings. In general practice, the psychiatric consultation is preferably embedded in 'collaborative care', an integrated care model including the general practitioner and a case manager (usually a nurse), with the consultant psychiatrist being regularly available for clearly defined indications. The psychiatrist should see the patient himself or herself, establish a diagnosis and treatment plan, and provide the general practitioner and the patient with a so-called 'consultation letter', which is then discussed with both. In a general hospital, systematic screening of patients at risk of psychiatric comorbidity can be organised. Early detection of complex patients can further improve the effectiveness of psychiatric consultation. Follow-up contacts and investing in liaison contacts improve adherence to the advice provided. PMID:18808080

  18. Predictors of psychiatric hospitalization during 6 months of maintenance treatment with olanzapine long-acting injection: post hoc analysis of a randomized, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospitalization is a costly and distressing event associated with relapse during schizophrenia treatment. No information is available on the predictors of psychiatric hospitalization during maintenance treatment with olanzapine long-acting injection (olanzapine-LAI) or how the risk of hospitalization differs between olanzapine-LAI and oral olanzapine. This study aimed to identify the predictors of psychiatric hospitalization during maintenance treatment with olanzapine-LAI and assessed four parameters: hospitalization prevalence, incidence rate, duration, and the time to first hospitalization. Olanzapine-LAI was also compared with a sub-therapeutic dose of olanzapine-LAI and with oral olanzapine. Methods This was a post hoc exploratory analysis of data from a randomized, double-blind study comparing the safety and efficacy of olanzapine-LAI (pooled active depot groups: 405 mg/4 weeks, 300 mg/2 weeks, and 150 mg/2 weeks) with oral olanzapine and sub-therapeutic olanzapine-LAI (45 mg/4 weeks) during 6 months maintenance treatment of clinically stable schizophrenia outpatients (n=1064). The four psychiatric hospitalization parameters were analyzed for each treatment group. Within the olanzapine-LAI group, patients with and without hospitalization were compared on baseline characteristics. Logistic regression and Coxs proportional hazards models were used to identify the best predictors of hospitalization. Comparisons between the treatment groups employed descriptive statistics, the KaplanMeier estimator and Coxs proportional hazards models. Results Psychiatric hospitalization was best predicted by suicide threats in the 12 months before baseline and by prior hospitalization. Compared with sub-therapeutic olanzapine-LAI, olanzapine-LAI was associated with a significantly lower hospitalization rate (5.2% versus 11.1%, p < 0.01), a lower mean number of hospitalizations (0.1 versus 0.2, p = 0.01), a shorter mean duration of hospitalization (1.5 days versus 2.9 days, p < 0.01), and a similar median time to first hospitalization (35 versus 60 days, p = 0.48). Olanzapine-LAI did not differ significantly from oral olanzapine on the studied hospitalization parameters. Conclusions In clinically stable schizophrenia outpatients receiving olanzapine-LAI maintenance treatment, psychiatric hospitalization was best predicted by a history of suicide threats and prior psychiatric hospitalization. Olanzapine-LAI was associated with a significantly lower incidence of psychiatric hospitalization and shorter duration of hospitalization compared with sub-therapeutic olanzapine-LAI. Olanzapine-LAI did not differ significantly from oral olanzapine on hospitalization parameters. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00088491 PMID:24041270

  19. An analysis of relationships among peer support, psychiatric hospitalization, and crisis stabilization.

    PubMed

    Landers, Glenn M; Zhou, Mei

    2011-02-01

    This study's objective was to investigate how peer support relates to psychiatric hospitalization and crisis stabilization utilization outcomes. The likelihood of experiencing a psychiatric hospitalization or a crisis stabilization was modeled for consumers using peer support services and a control group of consumers using community mental health services but not peer support with 2003 and 2004 Georgia Medicaid claims data; 2003 and 2004 Mental Health, Developmental Disability, and Addictive Diseases (MHDDAD) Community Information System data; and 2003 and 2004 MHDDAD Hospital Information System data. Peer support was associated with an increased likelihood (odds=1.345) of crisis stabilization, a decreased but statistically insignificant likelihood (odds=0.871) of psychiatric hospitalization overall, and a decreased and statistically significant (odds=.766) likelihood of psychiatric hospitalization for those who did not have a crisis stabilization episode. PMID:19551502

  20. Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the aggressive behavior and the clinical management of FPA patients in Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura = psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). Method Cross-sectional observational multi-center study involving 62 Italian SPDCs (PERSEO – Psychiatric EmeRgency Study and EpidemiOlogy). Results 253 FPA aged <= 40 were identified among 2521 patients admitted to Italian SPDCs over the 5-month study period. About half of FPA patients showed an aggressive behavior as defined by a Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) score greater than 0 Vs 46% of non-FPA patients (p = 0.3651). The most common was verbal aggression, while about 20% of FPA patients actually engaged in physical aggression against other people. 74% of FPA patients had no diagnosis at admission, while 40% had received a previous psychopharmacological treatment, mainly benzodiazepines and antidepressants. During SPDC stay, diagnosis was established in 96% of FPA patients and a pharmacological therapy was prescribed to 95% of them, mainly benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Conclusion Subjects presenting at their first psychiatric ward admission have often not undergone previous adequate psychiatric assessment and diagnostic procedures. The first hospital admission allows diagnosis and psychopharmacological treatment to be established. In our population, aggressive behaviors were rather frequent, although most commonly verbal. Psychiatric symptoms, as evaluated by psychiatrists and patients, improved significantly from admission to discharge both for FPA and non-FPA patients. PMID:17239235

  1. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables—namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature—influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  2. Smoking bans in secure psychiatric hospitals and prisons.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Danny H; Rees, Megan A

    2014-09-01

    The proposal of complete smoking bans in closed institutions, such as prisons and psychiatric hospitals, creates a tension between individual "rights" and the health of all members of that community. Smokers in closed institutions generally smoke more, suffer more health consequences and are less likely to quit than smokers in other settings. Complete smoking bans do not cause an increase in behavioural problems, nor do bans cause worsening of mental illness or quality of life. Although infrequently tested, the responsibility of public institutions to protect others from second-hand smoke has usually outweighed any individual "right to smoke" in legal judgments. A substantial cultural shift may be required from considering smoking a "rare pleasure" during detention to the realisation that smoking is the most significant reversible health risk factor for this population. The implementation of complete smoking bans in closed institutions is challenging and requires careful and proactive planning by staff. As complete smoking bans are being considered in many institutions and jurisdictions, this column presents a review of the evidence base and ethical issues involved. PMID:25341317

  3. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables--namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature--influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed. PMID:24599495

  4. Consistency in Diagnoses for a Sample of Adolescents at a Private Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickin, Nancy; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the consistency of psychiatric, psychological, and discharge diagnoses for a sample of 97 adolescent inpatients at a private psychiatric and substance abuse hospital. Percentage agreement between initial evaluations, psychological evaluations, and the exit evaluation ranged from 61.7 to 81.6%. Encourages specialists to carefully

  5. Hospital Providers: The Day After FDA Approval

    PubMed Central

    DeKoven, Mitchell; McCagh, Brian; Zoch, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    Hospitals have a lot at stake when new biologic drugs and devices hit the market. Cooperation among medical and administrative leaders can help providers avoid some harrowing financial pitfalls while improving patient satisfaction. PMID:23393477

  6. Evaluation of patients' assessment of day hospital care.

    PubMed Central

    Peach, H; Pathy, M S

    1977-01-01

    The method of linear analogue self-assessment (LASA) was used to quantify the views concerning day care which were held by patients attending a geriatric day hospital. The results suggest that day hospitals are an acceptable form of care for the elderly. PMID:588862

  7. Pattern of Psychiatric Referrals in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Keertish, Narayana; Sathyanarayana, M.T.; Kumar, B.G. Hemanth; Singh, Nitesh; Udagave, Kaveri

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a dearth of studies which are related to consultation-liaison psychiatry in India. The psychiatric referral rates in India are very low, considering the higher rates of psychiatric morbidity in patients who attend various departments of a hospital. Studying the pattern of psychiatric referrals may pave the way for interventions to improve the current scenario. Methods: The study population comprised of all the patients who were referred for psychiatric consultation from other departments (both in-patient and out-patient) of the hospital over a period of two years. Data which was related to socio-demographic profile, source of referral, reason for referral and the psychiatric diagnosis were recorded and analyzed by using descriptive statistical methods. Results: A total of 520 patients were referred for psychiatric consultation, with a referral rate of 0.42%. A majority of the psychiatric referrals (59%) were from the department of medicine and the most common reason for referral was medically unexplained somatic complaints (23.1%), followed closely by anxiety (21%) and abnormal behaviour (13.1%). The most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorders were neurotic, stress related and somatoform disorders (41.7%) followed by mood disorders (12.9%) and substance use disorders (12.7%). Conclusion: There is a need to encourage multi-disciplinary interaction in the management of patients who attend general hospitals, so as to better identify the psychiatric morbidity. Further studies should focus on interventions that can improve referral rates through early recognition of the common psychiatric conditions, with particular emphasis on sensitizing the general physicians, who are the most common source of psychiatric referrals. PMID:24086876

  8. Adult general psychiatric patients served in Nebraska's state hospitals: patient characteristics and needs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Watkins, Kate; Ryan, Steve; Harvey, Jim; Shaffer, Blaine

    2015-02-01

    This study identified the characteristics and needs of adults discharged from state psychiatric hospitals. A retrospective analysis of data on patients discharged from adult psychiatric units of three state psychiatric hospitals in Nebraska 2005-2008 was conducted. Diagnoses were classified into six groups, and Axis III data from the state psychiatric hospitals provided information about medical comorbidity. Only 12% of admitted patients had private insurance or could pay for their own treatment. Almost all discharged patients (95%) had a diagnosis of serious mental illness, and substance abuse (68%) and personality disorder (68%) were common, as were significant general health problems. Fourteen percent of patients used emergency services five or more times during the study period. Greater efforts must be made to diagnose, treat, and monitor major somatic illnesses and to better understand the factors that contribute to readmission and emergency service use in this population. PMID:24691573

  9. Implementing the clinical nurse specialist role in a regional state psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Michael; Caldwell, Barbara; Fitzgerald, Elaine; McQuaide, Teresa A

    2008-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) are essential to enhancing psychiatric-mental health nursing within state psychiatric hospital settings. This article presents a project focused on the CNSs in a state psychiatric hospital to expand their clinical role to increase the quality of care to individuals with serious mental illness and their numbers in other state psychiatric hospitals. As the patient population served in these settings becomes more complex, it is critical that advanced practice nurses are provided with appropriate updated state-of-the-art advanced knowledge and skills to collaborate within the interdisciplinary team. Furthermore, because of the complexity of the client and systems characteristics, the CNSs' clinical leadership is critical to promote the best practices in direct care services as well as provide support to various levels of nursing through staff development and training, role modeling, and mentoring of new staff. PMID:18418116

  10. Satisfaction of patients hospitalised in psychiatric hospitals: a randomised comparison of two psychiatric-specific and one generic satisfaction questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle; Scherer, Frdy; Peer, Laurence; Cathieni, Federico; Bonsack, Charles; Clopas, Agatta; Kolly, Vronique; Perneger, Thomas V; Burnand, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Background While there is interest in measuring the satisfaction of patients discharged from psychiatric hospitals, it might be important to determine whether surveys of psychiatric patients should employ generic or psychiatry-specific instruments. The aim of this study was to compare two psychiatric-specific and one generic questionnaires assessing patients' satisfaction after a hospitalisation in a psychiatric hospital. Methods We randomised adult patients discharged from two Swiss psychiatric university hospitals between April and September 2004, to receive one of three instruments: the Saphora-Psy questionnaire, the Perceptions of Care survey questionnaire or the Picker Institute questionnaire for acute care hospitals. In addition to the comparison of response rates, completion time, mean number of missing items and mean ceiling effect, we targeted our comparison on patients and asked them to answer ten evaluation questions about the questionnaire they had just completed. Results 728 out of 1550 eligible patients (47%) participated in the study. Across questionnaires, response rates were similar (Saphora-Psy: 48.5%, Perceptions of Care: 49.9%, Picker: 43.4%; P = 0.08), average completion time was lowest for the Perceptions of Care questionnaire (minutes: Saphora-Psy: 17.7, Perceptions of Care: 13.7, Picker: 17.5; P = 0.005), the Saphora-Psy questionnaire had the largest mean proportion of missing responses (Saphora-Psy: 7.1%, Perceptions of Care: 2.8%, Picker: 4.0%; P < 0.001) and the Perceptions of Care questionnaire showed the highest ceiling effect (Saphora-Psy: 17.1%, Perceptions of Care: 41.9%, Picker: 36.3%; P < 0.001). There were no differences in the patients' evaluation of the questionnaires. Conclusion Despite differences in the intended target population, content, lay-out and length of questionnaires, none appeared to be obviously better based on our comparison. All three presented advantages and drawbacks and could be used for the satisfaction evaluation of psychiatric inpatients. However, if comparison across medical services or hospitals is desired, using a generic questionnaire might be advantageous. PMID:16938136

  11. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and Psychiatry. (2) The director must monitor and evaluate the quality and appropriateness of services... program. (d) Standard: Nursing services. The hospital must have a qualified director of psychiatric...: Psychological services. The hospital must provide or have available psychological services to meet the needs...

  12. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and Psychiatry. (2) The director must monitor and evaluate the quality and appropriateness of services... program. (d) Standard: Nursing services. The hospital must have a qualified director of psychiatric...: Psychological services. The hospital must provide or have available psychological services to meet the needs...

  13. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and Psychiatry. (2) The director must monitor and evaluate the quality and appropriateness of services... program. (d) Standard: Nursing services. The hospital must have a qualified director of psychiatric...: Psychological services. The hospital must provide or have available psychological services to meet the needs...

  14. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and Psychiatry. (2) The director must monitor and evaluate the quality and appropriateness of services... program. (d) Standard: Nursing services. The hospital must have a qualified director of psychiatric...: Psychological services. The hospital must provide or have available psychological services to meet the needs...

  15. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and Psychiatry. (2) The director must monitor and evaluate the quality and appropriateness of services... program. (d) Standard: Nursing services. The hospital must have a qualified director of psychiatric...: Psychological services. The hospital must provide or have available psychological services to meet the needs...

  16. The Use of Movies to Facilitate Family Engagement in Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, David

    2007-01-01

    Studies indicate that the impact of family involvement may be the most important predictor of successful psychiatric hospitalization of adolescents. Yet the ability to engage both an adolescent and his or her family in family therapy in the context of what is often an involuntary hospitalization is a major challenge. A number of promising

  17. Implementing an ecological approach to violence reduction at a forensic psychiatric hospital: approaches and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Bader, Shannon M; Evans, Sean E

    2015-06-01

    Existing literature on aggression within psychiatric hospitals suggests that treating an aggressive patient's symptoms could be complemented by (a) milieu environments that mitigate violence and (b) hospital-wide policies and procedures that focus on creating a safe environment. Described as an ecological approach, examples of how this broader, situational approach can reduce inpatient violence in psychiatric settings are provided throughout. The authors identify potential barriers to focusing on wards and institutional rules as well as patient treatment. Last, details of how this ecological approach has been implemented at one state hospital in California are provided. PMID:25882371

  18. Hospital staff responses to workplace violence in a psychiatric hospital in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Wang, Jung-Der

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed 222 nurses, nursing assistants, and clerks at a psychiatric hospital in Taiwan on responses to workplace violence, treatment of violent patients, and reporting behavior. Staff reported 78 incidents of physical violence (PV), 113 of verbal abuse (VA), 35 of bullying/ mobbing (BM), 21 of sexual harassment (SH), and 10 of racial harassment (RH) over the course of one year. Among affected staff, only 31% of those experiencing PV and < 10% of those experiencing other categories of violence completed a formal report. Highest levels of reporting to senior staff were among those affected by SH. Patients who were physically violent were more likely to be injected with medication than patients showing other violent behaviors. More VA-affected staff considered the incident not important enough to report. Other reasons for not reporting the incident were fear of negative consequences, especially for BM, and shame for SH. Reliable systems for responding to and reporting patient violence should be developed. PMID:19496484

  19. Prognostic Patterns in Self-Report, Relative Report, and Professional Evaluation Measures for Hospitalized and Day-Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sappington, A. A.; Michaux, Mary H.

    1975-01-01

    This study attempted to determine differences between patients who relapse and those who do not in both hospital and day-care settings. Subjects were 142 adult psychiatric patients. Three groups of measures were used: one based on professional evaluation, one based on self-report, and one based on relative report. (Author)

  20. Four-year retrospective survey of fire incidents in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Barker, A; Forshaw, D; Moxom, T

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a four-year retrospective survey of fire incidents in a psychiatric hospital. The results suggest that there were sufficient similarities between a fire incident and a violent incident for the former to be included in a hospital register of violent incidents. The authors recommend that fire incidents should be studied prospectively, and that hospital fire officers should be an integral part of the multidisciplinary team auditing such incidents. PMID:10113883

  1. Effects of Multiple Maltreatment Experiences among Psychiatrically Hospitalized Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxer, Paul; Terranova, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Relying on indicators coded from information collected routinely during intake assessments at a secure inpatient psychiatric facility, this study examined the extent to which different forms of maltreatment accounted for variations in youths' emotional and behavioral problems. Methods: Clinical information was reviewed for a large (N =

  2. Validation of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) with Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Lance P.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Hollander, Beth L. G.; Dyl, Jennifer; Rizzo, Christie J.; Steinley, Douglas L.; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the concurrent validity of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) for adolescent inpatients aged 12 to 18. The results reveal moderate agreement between ChIPS diagnoses and Schedule for Affective Disorder sand Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime version diagnoses.

  3. Impact of the Syrian Crisis on the Hospitalization of Syrians in a Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Lama, Souaiby; François, Kazour; Marwan, Zoghbi; Sami, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Determine the impact of the Syrian crisis on the hospitalization of Syrians in a psychiatric setting. All Syrians admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Lebanon between the 1st of January 2009 and the 31st of December 2013 were included. Number of admissions, psychiatric disorders and demographic and clinical data relative to patients were compared between those admitted before and after the crisis. 44 patients were admitted before the crisis and 106 after it. The distribution of diagnosis varied significantly after the crisis (p = 0.056) with the majority of patients being admitted for schizophrenia (37.7 %). The prevalence of suicidal ideation was higher after the crisis (p = 0.03) but suicidal attempts, need for electroconvulsive therapy and length of hospitalization did not differ significantly between both groups. Clinicians should be aware of the possible burden of mental illness in Syrians after the beginning of the Syrian crisis. PMID:25982832

  4. Identifying Patients in the Acute Psychiatric Hospital Who May Benefit From a Palliative Care Approach.

    PubMed

    Burton, M Caroline; Warren, Mark; Cha, Stephen S; Stevens, Maria; Blommer, Megan; Kung, Simon; Lapid, Maria I

    2016-04-01

    Identifying patients who will benefit from a palliative care approach is the first critical step in integrating palliative with curative therapy. Criteria are established that identify hospitalized medical patients who are near end of life, yet there are no criteria with respect to hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders. The records of 276 consecutive patients admitted to a dedicated inpatient psychiatric unit were reviewed to identify prognostic criteria predictive of mortality. Mortality predictors were 2 or more admissions in the past year (P = .0114) and older age (P = .0006). Twenty-two percent of patients met National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization noncancer criteria for dementia. Palliative care intervention should be considered when treating inpatients with psychiatric disorders, especially older patients who have a previous hospitalization or history of dementia. PMID:25318929

  5. Psychiatric morbidity of overseas patients in inner London: A hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Carranza, Fredy J; Parshall, Alice M

    2005-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the referral, admission, treatment, and outcome of overseas patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in central London. Ethical, legal and economic implications, and the involvement of consulates in the admission process, are discussed. Method Assessment and review of overseas patients admitted between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 1999. Non-parametric statistical tests were used, and relevant outcomes described. Results 19% of admissions were overseas patients. Mean age was 38 years. 90% were unattached; 84% were white, 71% from European countries. 45% spoke fluent English. Differences in socio-economic status between home country and England were found. 74% were unwell on arrival; 65% travelled to England as tourists. 65% of admissions came via the police. 32% had been ill for more than one year before admission; 68% had psychiatric history. 77% were admitted and 48% discharged under section of the Mental Health Act. 74% had psychotic disorders, all of them with positive symptoms. 55% showed little to moderate improvement in mental state; 10% were on Enhanced Care Programme Approach. Relatives of 48% of patients were contacted. The Hospital repatriated 52% of patients; the Mental Health Team followed up 13% of those discharged. The average length of admission was 43.4 days (range 1365). Total cost of admissions was GBP350, 600 ($577, 490); average individual cost was GBP11, 116 (range GBP200-81, 000). Conclusions Mentally ill overseas individuals are a vulnerable group that need recognition by health organisations to adapt current practice to better serve their needs. The involvement of consulates needs further evaluation. PMID:15845140

  6. [Developmental status and goals in occupational therapy. The "Guidelines for Occupational Therapy in Psychiatric Hospitals"].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, K; Kunze, H

    1987-01-01

    Work therapy, or ergotherapy, is a recognised and permanent part of psychiatric treatment and medical rehabilitation. It is also an essential part of psychiatric diagnosis and therapy; furthermore, it enables the patient to develop and stabilise a realistic image of himself and contributes to the prevention and reduction of damage caused by hospitalism. The present status of work therapy was checked in 74 psychiatric hospitals throughout the Federal Republic of Germany, resulting in the need for further development of present practical procedures. A working group was created by the Federal Ministry of Labour and National Welfare within the framework of the model programme for psychiatry, at the suggestion of a Federal Working Group of the organisations running public mental hospitals in the FRG. The aim of this working group was to develop a specialised concept of work therapy. The group consisted of experts from clinical practice as well as from the Federal German Labour Office Institution, psychiatric consultants of the Federal Government and the Land Governments, as well as from the Land Government sponsors of state social welfare services. The "Guidelines for Work Therapy in Psychiatric Hospitals and Departments of Psychiatry" are officially considered to be a suitable basis for further development work in the field of ergotherapy. PMID:3562683

  7. Patterns of psychiatric hospital service use in Finland: a national register study of hospital discharges in the early 1990s.

    PubMed

    Korkeila, J A; Lehtinen, V; Tuori, T; Helenius, H

    1998-05-01

    We were interested in studying the possible concurrent changes in the psychiatric inpatient population during a rapid phase of deinstitutionalisation, and severe economic recession with a record level unemployment rate, and after the amendment of the mental health legislation. Although there were 4540 fewer beds in the psychiatric hospitals in 1993 compared to 1990, the rate of patient admissions remained the same. There was a significant increase in readmissions (P < 0.001) to the psychiatric hospitals, and particularly in multiple (three or more) readmissions among new inpatients (P < 0.001). The prevalence of inpatients with major depression increased by 0.2/1000 in the whole cohort and by 0.12/1000 among first-timers from 1990 to 1993 (P < 0.001). In addition, the rate of involuntary admissions decreased significantly (P < 0.001). PMID:9604671

  8. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jrgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (? = .21, p < .001) and BPD (? = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important correlate of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals (B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation was associated directly with self-harm (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients. PMID:26581019

  9. The Jewish psychiatric hospital, Zofiówka, in Otwock, Poland.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V

    2015-03-01

    The T4 euthanasia programme within Nazi Germany has been well researched, but much less is known about the extermination of psychiatric patients in Nazi-occupied territories during the same period. In Poland 20,000 mentally ill patients were deliberately killed during the German occupation. This paper traces the history of one psychiatric hospital, Zofiówka, in Otwock, south-east of Warsaw. The hospital once served the Jewish population of Poland and was the largest, most prestigious neuropsychiatric centre in the country. It is now in ruins and said to be haunted by ghosts. PMID:25698689

  10. Discharge Outcomes in Seniors Hospitalized for More than 30 Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozyrskyj, Anita; Black, Charlyn; Chateau, Dan; Steinbach, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    Hospitalization is a sentinel event that leads to loss of independence for many seniors. This study of long-stay hospitalizations (more than 30 days) in seniors was undertaken to identify risk factors for not going home, to characterize patients with risk factors who did go home and to describe one year outcomes following home discharge. Using…

  11. Predicting days in hospital using health insurance claims.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yang; Schreier, Gunter; Chang, David C W; Neubauer, Sandra; Liu, Ying; Redmond, Stephen J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2015-07-01

    Health-care administrators worldwide are striving to lower the cost of care while improving the quality of care given. Hospitalization is the largest component of health expenditure. Therefore, earlier identification of those at higher risk of being hospitalized would help health-care administrators and health insurers to develop better plans and strategies. In this paper, a method was developed, using large-scale health insurance claims data, to predict the number of hospitalization days in a population. We utilized a regression decision tree algorithm, along with insurance claim data from 242 075 individuals over three years, to provide predictions of number of days in hospital in the third year, based on hospital admissions and procedure claims data. The proposed method performs well in the general population as well as in subpopulations. Results indicate that the proposed model significantly improves predictions over two established baseline methods (predicting a constant number of days for each customer and using the number of days in hospital of the previous year as the forecast for the following year). A reasonable predictive accuracy (AUC =0.843) was achieved for the whole population. Analysis of two subpopulations-namely elderly persons aged 63 years or older in 2011 and patients hospitalized for at least one day in the previous year-revealed that the medical information (e.g., diagnosis codes) contributed more to predictions for these two subpopulations, in comparison to the population as a whole. PMID:25680222

  12. Illness severity and psychiatric hospitalization rates among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

    PubMed

    Sentell, Tetine; Unick, George Jay; Ahn, Hyeong Jun; Braun, Kathryn L; Miyamura, Jill; Shumway, Martha

    2013-11-01

    OBJECTIVE The study objective was to fill research gaps about inpatient psychiatric service utilization among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AA/PIs). METHODS Rates of psychiatric hospitalization, illness severity, and length of stay were compared among AA/PI adults overall and across diagnoses (schizophrenia, depression, bipolar, anxiety, and other psychiatric disorders identified by All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups) by using discharge data from all hospitalizations in Hawaii from December 2006 to 2010. Multivariable models adjusted for gender, age, payer, and residence. RESULTS In multivariable analyses of total psychiatric hospitalizations, Chinese (rate ratio [RR]=.22), Japanese (RR=.23), Filipinos (RR=.30), and Native Hawaiians (RR=.37) had significantly lower rates than whites. Native Hawaiians had significantly higher hospitalization rates compared with other AA/PI groups. Length of stay was significantly longer for Chinese (length of stay ratio [LOSR]=1.53), Filipinos (LOSR=1.20), and Japanese (LOSR=1.19) compared with whites, whereas severity of illness was significantly higher for Japanese (odds ratio [OR]=1.36) and Filipinos (OR=1.30). Within specific diagnoses, Native Hawaiians had higher hospitalization rates than other AA/PI groups for depression, bipolar disorder, and anxiety disorder. Chinese, Japanese, and Filipinos had significantly higher illness severity or longer stays than whites for at least one diagnostic category. CONCLUSIONS AA/PI subgroups had lower psychiatric hospitalization rates than whites, but rates varied across AA/PI subgroups. Native Hawaiians had higher hospitalization rates for many diagnoses. Chinese, Japanese, and Filipinos had greater illness severity or longer stays than whites overall and for some diagnoses, whereas Native Hawaiians did not. Disaggregating AA/PI groups provides important insight into mental health services utilization and need. PMID:23945849

  13. User participation when using milieu therapy in a psychiatric hospital in Norway: a mission impossible?

    PubMed

    Oeye, Christine; Bjelland, Anne Karen; Skorpen, Aina; Anderssen, Norman

    2009-12-01

    In the past decade, the Norwegian government has emphasized user participation as an important goal in the care of mentally ill patients, through governmental strategic plans. At the same time, the governmental documents request normalization of psychiatric patients, including the re-socialization of psychiatric patients back into society outside the psychiatric hospital. Milieu therapy is a therapeutic tool to ensure user participation and re-socialization. Based on an ethnographic study in a long-term psychiatric ward in a psychiatric hospital, we identified how staff tried to implement user participation in their milieu-oriented therapy work. We have identified three major tensions and challenges in implementing user participation in milieu-therapeutic work. First, it is difficult to implement individual-based user participation and at the same time take collective house rules and codes of conduct into consideration. Second, user participation proved a difficulty when patients' viewpoints challenged staff judgements on proper conduct and goals for which patients might aim. Third, user participation becomes a challenge when trying to establish relationships based on equality when using milieu therapy in a biomedical hierarchical hospital structure. These tensions and challenges are seen in light of paradoxical political frames and demands on one side, and milieu therapy as a complex tradition anchored in different ideologies on the other. PMID:19906279

  14. [Fates at the psychiatric hospital of Klagenfurt during National Socialism].

    PubMed

    Oberlerchner, Herwig; Stromberger, Helge

    2013-01-01

    In this article the fate of Mr. B. is described as an example for the fate of hundreds of mentally ill patients of the "Landes-Irrenanstalt of Klagenfurt", murdered during the era of National Socialism. This extraordinary fate marks two outstanding aspects of history of medicine, the treatment of syphilis with malaria and the organised mass murder of mentally ill people during the cynic era of National Socialism. Beyond this historical perspective reconstructive biographical work together with relatives is presented as a proactive duty of psychiatric institutions. PMID:22990646

  15. Low serum vitamin B12 levels among psychiatric patients admitted in Butabika mental hospital in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychiatric manifestations have been noted in patients with low serum vitamin B12 levels even in the absence of other neurologic and/or haematologic abnormalities. There is no literature on low serum B12 prevalence among Ugandans with psychiatric illnesses. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical manifestations of low serum vitamin B12 among psychiatric patients admitted in a Mental Health Hospital in Uganda. Method Using a cross sectional descriptive study design, 280 in-patients selected by systematic sampling were studied using a standardized protocol. Low serum vitamin B12 was defined as a level?psychiatric diagnosis of schizophrenia (AOR 1.74 (95% C.I. 1.00, 3.02); p-value?=?0.049), duration of psychiatric illness?>?or?=?3years (AOR 2.27 (95% C.I. 1.29, 3.98); p-value?=?0.004), and hospitalization?hospitalized psychiatric patients with the majority having no haematological findings. Associated risk factors included having a psychiatric diagnosis of schizophrenia, a shorter duration of hospitalization and longer duration of psychiatric illness. Female participants were less likely to have low serum vitamin B12 levels. Routine screening for serum vitamin B12 levels should be adopted by all hospitals for admitted psychiatric patients. PMID:24533701

  16. The measurement of aggression and violence in hospitalized psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Morrison, E F

    1993-02-01

    Aggression and violence are significant clinical problems in psychiatric inpatient units. However, research exploring violent behavior is limited by the lack of an adequate research scale. This paper reports on the development and testing of the Violence Scale (VS), a behavioral rating scale which measures aggressive and violent behavior towards self, others and property. The VS has been tested in two studies of psychiatric inpatients (N = 162) and (N = 42). Tests of reliability included internal consistency, item analysis and stability. Tests of validity included content and construct validity. The psychometric results were evaluated through the application of standard statistical criteria [Carmines, E. G. and Zeller, R. A. (1979). Reliability and Validity Assessment. Sage University Press, Beverly Hills, CA; Cronbach, L. J. (1951). Coefficient alpha and the internal structure of tests. Psychometrika 16, 197-333; Nunnally J. (1978). Psychometric Theory, McGraw-Hill, New York]. Coefficient alpha was 0.91 (study 1) and 0.68 (study 2) and stability was r = 0.79 (study 1). The items met most of the established criteria for item analysis and internal consistency. In factor analysis, the items met the criteria for loading onto the three predicted factors (others, self and property). Results of predictive model testing indicated that three of the four predicted relationships were supported. Initial testing indicates the scale is moderately stable, is internally consistent, and has evidence of initial limited construct validity. PMID:8449658

  17. Enquiry about the Needs of Children Whose Mothers Are Admitted to Psychiatric Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderson, J.; McCune, N.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess whether children's needs are taken into consideration in female patients who are admitted to an adult psychiatric hospital. A retrospective case note audit of 100 female inpatients aged between 18 and 55 years over a 6-month period were randomly selected. The medical and nursing case notes of patients with

  18. Intellectual Ability and Achievement in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Children with Conduct, Anxiety, and Affective Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Kay; Plow, Jean

    1990-01-01

    Examined intelligence quotient and academic achievement of 76 psychiatrically hospitalized children (mean age 10 years). Found relative deficit in verbal abilities for conduct-disordered children. Depressed children were characterized by underachievement. Children with anxiety disorder had lower intelligence quotient than children without anxiety

  19. Racial Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes after Psychiatric Hospital Discharge among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Newhill, Christina E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial disparities in mental health outcomes have been widely documented in noninstitutionalized community psychiatric samples, but few studies have specifically examined the effects of race among individuals with the most severe mental illnesses. A sample of 925 individuals hospitalized for severe mental illness was followed for a year after…

  20. Assaultive Behavior in State Psychiatric Hospitals: Differences Between Forensic and Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhorst, Donald M.; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-01-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two

  1. Task and structural correlates of organizational effectiveness in private psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Mark, B

    1985-01-01

    This exploration of the relationships between task and structural variables and two dimensions of organizational effectiveness in 76 private psychiatric hospitals revealed that high levels of centralization were associated with patient care effectiveness. High levels of centralization and formalization were associated with administrative effectiveness. An enhancing effect of organizational structure is suggested as contributing to organizational effectiveness. PMID:3891685

  2. Racial Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes after Psychiatric Hospital Discharge among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Newhill, Christina E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial disparities in mental health outcomes have been widely documented in noninstitutionalized community psychiatric samples, but few studies have specifically examined the effects of race among individuals with the most severe mental illnesses. A sample of 925 individuals hospitalized for severe mental illness was followed for a year after

  3. Intellectual Ability and Achievement in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Children with Conduct, Anxiety, and Affective Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Kay; Plow, Jean

    1990-01-01

    Examined intelligence quotient and academic achievement of 76 psychiatrically hospitalized children (mean age 10 years). Found relative deficit in verbal abilities for conduct-disordered children. Depressed children were characterized by underachievement. Children with anxiety disorder had lower intelligence quotient than children without anxiety…

  4. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR...

  5. Working Models of Attachment in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents: Relation to Psychopathology and Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Diana S.; Horowitz, Harvey A.

    This study examined the role of attachment in adolescent psychopathology among psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Subjects consisted of 60 adolescents and 27 of their mothers. Measures included the Adult Attachment Interview classification for both the adolescents and their mothers, and a battery of diagnostic and personality assessment of…

  6. Enhancing Treatment Team Process through Mindfulness-Based Mentoring in an Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Singh, Subhashni D.; Sabaawi, Mohamed; Myers, Rachel E.; Wahler, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated changes in treatment team functioning in an adult inpatient psychiatric hospital after the implementation of a mindfulness-based mentoring intervention. Using a multiple baseline across treatment teams design, the authors assessed levels of functioning of three treatment teams using a 50-item rating scale and then

  7. Reconceptualizing Stabilization for Counseling Adolescents in Brief Psychiatric Hospitalization: A New Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkin, Richard S.; Roland, Catherine B.

    2007-01-01

    This research examined goal attainment as it is related to client stability in the process of counseling adolescents admitted to a crisis residence. Data were collected from licensed master's-level clinicians treating adolescent clients admitted to an acute care psychiatric program at 1 of 2 hospitals located in the mid-South. There was a

  8. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR...

  9. A Functional Model of Quality Assurance for Psychiatric Hospitals and Corresponding Staffing Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamis-Gould, Edna; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A model for quality assurance (QA) in psychiatric hospitals is described. Its functions (general QA, utilization review, clinical records, evaluation, management information systems, risk management, and infection control), subfunctions, and corresponding staffing requirements are reviewed. This model was designed to foster standardization in QA…

  10. Assaultive Behavior in State Psychiatric Hospitals: Differences Between Forensic and Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhorst, Donald M.; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-01-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two…

  11. White Matter Hyperintensities and Their Associations with Suicidality in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Stefan; Noam, Gil G.; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Kwon, Bae J.; Clark, Megan A.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Increasingly, researchers and clinicians are recognizing that there may be biological markers associated with increased risk of suicide. The objective of this study was to compare white matter hyperintensities in psychiatrically hospitalized children and youth with and without a history of suicide attempt while controlling for other

  12. Predictors of Treatment Response for Suicidal Youth Referred for Emergency Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Jr., Stanley J.; Henggeler, Scott W.; Rowland, Melisa D.; Halliday-Boykins, Colleen A.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Pickrel, Susan G.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated factors that predicted poor treatment response for 70 suicidal youth (ages 10 to 17 years; 67% African American) who received either multisystemic therapy (MST) or inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Following treatment, suicidal youth were classified as either treatment responders or nonresponders based on caregiver or

  13. Nurses' information retrieval skills in psychiatric hospitals - are the requirements for evidence-based practice fulfilled?

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Vlimki, Maritta; Htnen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    Nursing professionals have long recognized the importance to practice of research and the value of research evidence. Nurses still do not use research findings in practice. The purpose of this paper was to describe nurses' skills in using literature databases and the Internet in psychiatric hospitals and associations of nurses' gender, age, and job position with their information retrieval skills. The study was carried out in 2004 among nursing staff (N=183) on nine acute psychiatric wards in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland (n=180, response rate 98%). The Finnish version of the European Computer Driving Licence test (ECDL) was used as a data collection instrument. The study showed that there were clear deficits in information retrieval skills among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. Thus, nurses' competence does not support the realization of evidence-based practice in the hospitals. Therefore, it is important to increase nurses' information retrieval skills by tailoring continuing education modules. It would be also advisable to develop centralized systems for the internal dissemination of research findings for the use of nursing staff. PMID:19386551

  14. Mothers with Severe Psychiatric Illness and Their Newborns: A Hospital-Based Model of Perinatal Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Ana; Merminod, Gaelle, Schechter, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    Women with severe psychiatric illness face numerous risks and challenges during pregnancy and as parents. Mental health professionals can help these mothers and their infants by supporting the attachment relationship and by providing the external supports that are necessary for successful parenting. The authors describe a hospital-based

  15. A Functional Model of Quality Assurance for Psychiatric Hospitals and Corresponding Staffing Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamis-Gould, Edna; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A model for quality assurance (QA) in psychiatric hospitals is described. Its functions (general QA, utilization review, clinical records, evaluation, management information systems, risk management, and infection control), subfunctions, and corresponding staffing requirements are reviewed. This model was designed to foster standardization in QA

  16. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR...

  17. The Interplay of Outpatient Services and Psychiatric Hospitalization Among Medicaid-Enrolled Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, David S.; Xie, Ming; Morales, Knashawn H.; Lawer, Lindsay; McCarthy, Megan; Marcus, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether increased provision of community-based services is associated with decreased psychiatric hospitalizations among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Design Retrospective cohort study using discrete-time logistic regression to examine the association of service use in the preceding 60 days with the risk of hospitalization. Setting The Medicaid-reimbursed health care system in the continental United States. Participants Medicaid-enrolled children with an ASD diagnosis in 2004 (N=28 428). Main Exposures Use of respite care and therapeutic services, based on procedure codes. Main Outcome Measures Hospitalizations associated with a diagnosis of ASD (International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, codes 299.0, 299.8, and 299.9). Results Each $1000 increase in spending on respite care during the preceding 60 days resulted in an 8% decrease in the odds of hospitalization in adjusted analysis. Use of therapeutic services was not associated with reduced risk of hospitalization. Conclusions Respite care is not universally available through Medicaid. It may represent a critical type of service for supporting families in addressing challenging child behaviors. States should increase the availability of respite care for Medicaid-enrolled children with ASDs. The lack of association between therapeutic services and hospitalization raises concerns regarding the effectiveness of these services. PMID:22213753

  18. [Enrichment of the functions of the psychiatric department in a general hospital and collaboration within the area].

    PubMed

    Koishikawa, Hiraki; Ookami, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disease has been included in the five main diseases, and a medical care plan is required. In it, there are many problems, for example, physical complications and which general hospital should chiefly deal with it. Here, we present a way to cope with these problems on the basis of achievements in the psychiatric department of Kameda General Hospital. Specifically, we would like to assert that creating a consultation-liaison team and enriching the section of clinical psychiatry are very important and effective. The activities of the consultation-liaison team, created to address various issues after establishing a psychiatric ward, have led to the possibility of a psychiatric department in a general hospital. Experience to date indicates that, in the context of a general hospital with a psychiatric inpatient unit, the existence of a multidisciplinary liaison team working across departmental boundaries is crucial to determining and managing the treatment of patients with psychiatric emergencies, as well as patients with psychiatric issues and physical complications. Additionally, in order to increase the effectiveness of the hospital liaison team, it is critical to realize seamless, prompt collaboration with facilities outside the hospital. In this respect, the role of a patient care coordinator is expected to become increasingly important. Additionally, enriching and guarding activities of clinical psychologists have contributed to the growth of psychiatric departments in general hospitals and proved to be effective in combination with activities of the consultation-liaison team. PMID:25189042

  19. Hepatitis B virus infection among inpatients of a psychiatric hospital of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in psychiatric patients from developing countries is poorly studied. Therefore, we sought to determine the frequency of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV surface antibody (HBsAb) serological markers of HBV infection in a population of patients of a psychiatric hospital in Durango City, Durango, Mexico, and to determine whether there are any epidemiological characteristics of the subjects associated with the infection. Methods Out of 150 patients of the psychiatric hospital of Durango City, 99 were examined for HBsAg and HBsAb by AUSZYME MONOCLONAL (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL, USA) assay and AUSAB (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL, USA) assay, respectively. Epidemiological data from each participant was also obtained. For comparison purposes, 2505 blood donors were examined for HBsAg seropositivity. Results Out of the 99 patients studied, twelve showed serological evidence of HBV infection (12.1%); 7 of them (7.1%) were positive for HBsAg, and 5 (5.1%) were positive for HBsAb. Out of the 2505 blood donors, 2 (0.0008%) were HBsAg positive. Seropositivity to HBV markers was associated with an age of 45 years and older (OR = 4.27; 95%CI = 1.02–18.78). Other characteristics as gender, number of hospitalizations, duration of the last hospitalization, and clinical diagnosis were not associated with seropositivity to HBV infection markers. Patients showed a significantly higher HBsAg seropositivity than blood donors (p < 0.0000001) Conclusion HBV was found to be an important infectious agent in the Mexican psychiatric inpatient population studied. Health care strategies for prevention and control of HBV infection in psychiatric hospitals should pay special attention to patients aged forty-five years and older. PMID:16053524

  20. [Deinstitutionalization of chronic psychiatric patients exemplified by a public psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Krger, G; Kipping, H W; Rhm, J; Jacobs, G

    1993-03-01

    Basing on the multifarious phenomena of hospitalism in chronically mentally ill patients the authors report on a survey of known facts and analyses to enable focussing of appropriate on-target measures were taken to arrive at conclusions for caring for these long-term patients: 1. Fixing the deadline of the study; 2. Determining the quality of patient care; 3. Analysing the experiences collected in respect of the integrated training programme to promote cognitive, communicative and social abilities and skills among the patients in resident living quarters within the confines of the hospital. An attempt is made to arrive at an overall evaluation of the measures taken so far in respect of de-hospitalisation and in building up complementary settlements outside the hospital but close to communal institutions. PMID:8367544

  1. Psychiatric crisis intervention in the general emergency service of a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M

    1995-03-01

    An after-hours crisis intervention program staffed by psychiatric residents between 5 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. on weekdays was developed in the general emergency room at a Veterans Affairs hospital to reduce inpatient psychiatric admissions. The program offered medication, family interventions, and referrals to outpatient services. In the programs's first year, inpatient admissions during the hours covered by the program decreased by 34 percent, for a net savings of nearly $400,000 in inpatient treatment costs. PMID:7796219

  2. Exploring male and female patients' experiences of psychiatric hospital care: a critical analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Sylvia

    2009-03-01

    In a critical analysis of the literature, this paper aimed to explore male and female patients' experiences of psychiatric hospital care. A method for a systematic review of research was used and five articles fitting the inclusion criteria were found. Three themes emerged in the analysis: "Treatment specifically related to women," "To keep a façade," and "Single-sex or mixed ward." The findings were explored by highlighting some knowledge gaps and gender bias. This paper can be used in the planning of psychiatric wards, give incitements to develop strategies for caring, and promote nurses' gender sensitivity. PMID:19291494

  3. Schizophrenia and tobacco smoking in a Spanish psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    LLerena, Adrin; de la Rubia, Alfredo; Peas-Lled, Eva M; Diaz, Francisco J; de Leon, Jose

    2003-04-01

    This study in a Spanish hospital replicated two US studies suggesting that schizophrenia is associated with smoking when compared with other severe mental illnesses. Neither antipsychotics nor institutionalism could explain this relationship. Seventy of the 100 schizophrenic and 53 of the 100 non-schizophrenic inpatients were current smokers. After correcting for confounding factors, schizophrenia increased the risk of smoking by 2- to 3-fold. Heavy smoking was not associated with schizophrenia. PMID:12591592

  4. Is locating acute wards in the general hospital an essential element in psychiatric reform? The U.K. experience.

    PubMed

    Totman, Jonathan; Mann, Farhana; Johnson, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals has long been seen in many countries as a key element in the reform of services to promote community integration of the mentally ill. In the U.K., however, this is no longer a policy priority, and the recent trend has been towards small freestanding inpatient units, located either within the communities they serve, or on general hospital sites, but separate from the main building. Whether locating the psychiatric wards in the general hospital is essential to psychiatric reform has been little discussed, and we can find no relevant evidence. Perceived strengths of general hospital psychiatric wards are in normalisation of mental health problems, accessibility to local communities, better availability of physical health care resources, and integration of psychiatry with the rest of the medical profession, which may faclilitate recruitment. However, difficulties seem to have been encountered in establishing well-designed psychiatric wards with access to open space in general hospitals. Also, physical proximity may not be enough to achieve the desired reduction in stigma, and complaints from the general hospital may sometimes result in undue restrictions on psychiatric ward patients. There are strong arguments both for and against locating psychiatric wards in general hospitals: an empirical evidence base would be helpful to inform important decisions about the best setting for wards. PMID:21322499

  5. Changing trends in inpatient care for psychiatrically hospitalized youth: 1991-2008.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Susan M; Rajan, Anjana; Wyshak, Grace; Goldstein, Joel

    2013-06-01

    Research has focused on changes in the psychiatric treatment of youth in outpatient settings, but less is known about trends in inpatient care. This study documents changes in the lengths of stay (LOS), clinical profiles of youth, and medication use within an inpatient setting in Massachusetts between 1991 and 2008. A chart review of 233 medical records of psychiatrically hospitalized youth was conducted at three points in time (1991, 1998, and 2008). Sample includes youth between ages 4 and 18. Clinical data, including LOS, diagnoses and other clinical variables, and number and type of medications prescribed were compared across sample years. Findings indicate a significant decrease in the LOS coupled with a concurrent increase in psychotropic medication use between each successive sample year. The prescription of anti-psychotic medications, in particular, increased significantly. On clinical indices, findings show that there was an increase in the diagnosis of bipolar spectrum disorders and a concurrent decrease in unipolar diagnoses in the 2008 sample. Attention-deficit and developmental disorders showed little change. Trauma-related disorders were significantly less frequently diagnosed in 2008. Children hospitalized in 1998 and 2008 had more prior hospitalizations and presented with greater acuity than those in the 1991 sample. Results highlight important changes that have occurred in child/adolescent inpatient settings over the past two decades. Data suggest that these changes have not resulted in decreased rates of inpatient hospitalization for youth with more severe psychiatric disorders. PMID:22855261

  6. Post-Traumatic Stress, Trauma-Informed Care, and Compassion Fatigue in Psychiatric Hospital Staff: A Correlational Study.

    PubMed

    Jacobowitz, William; Moran, Christine; Best, Cheryl; Mensah, Lucy

    2015-11-01

    Assault of staff in psychiatric hospitals is a frequent occurrence, and studies indicate that hospital staff are at risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We performed a correlational study with a convenience sample of 172 staff in a psychiatric hospital and compared the rate of traumatic events (TEs), resilience, confidence, and compassion fatigue to PTSD symptoms (PTSS). Regression analyses identified two variables that were unique predictors of PTSS: (1) trauma-informed care (TIC) meeting attendance and (2) burnout symptoms. Severe TEs, age, and compassion satisfaction also contributed to the model. Attention to these factors may help reduce PTSS in psychiatric staff. PMID:26631861

  7. [The treatment of leukaemia in paediatric haematology day hospital].

    PubMed

    Héritier, Sébastien; Morand, Karine; Courcoux, Mary-France; Leverger, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The paediatric haematology day hospital administers almost all types of chemotherapy used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Blood transfusions, myelograms and lumbar punctures are also performed there. The prevention of pain and anxiety generated by the care is a priority. PMID:26183094

  8. Factors associated with suicide method among psychiatric patients in a general hospital in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Ahn, Myung Hee; Na, Riji; Kim, Seon-Ok; Yoon, Jin Sang; Park, Jun-Hyuk; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-12-30

    This study aims to highlight the factors associated with suicide method among psychiatric patients in a general hospital in Korea. In a sample of 467 suicides by patients who had received mental health care in a general hospital in Korea, the relationship between suicide method and time of death as well as clinical characteristics, including psychiatric adiagnosis, was examined using multinomial logistic regression analysis. Compared with the general population, psychiatric patients, regardless of disorder, committed suicide by jumping from heights more often than by hanging (OR=2.35-8.64). In particular, patients with psychotic disorders and female patients were more likely to use jumping from a height than hanging to kill themselves (OR=2.98 and 1.83, respectively). Patients were more likely to use suicide methods other than hanging (e.g., OR=6.7 for jumping, 5.3 for drowning, and 2.7 for self-poisoning) between midnight and dawn. Possible suicide-prevention strategies suggested by this study include limiting access to or fencing off tall structures in close proximity to psychiatric institutions and residential care homes. At night, limiting access to or instituting heightened supervision of tall structures is specifically indicated. PMID:24055162

  9. Neuropsychological screening as a standard of care during discharge from psychiatric hospitalization: the preliminary psychometrics of the CNS Screen.

    PubMed

    Levy, Boaz; Celen-Demirtas, Selda; Surguladze, Tinatin; Eranio, Sara; Ellison, James

    2014-03-30

    Cost-prohibitive factors currently prevent a warranted integration of neuropsychological screenings into routine psychiatric evaluations, as a standard of care. To overcome this challenge, the current study examined the psychometric properties of a new computerized measure-the CNS Screen. One hundred and twenty six psychiatric inpatients completed the CNS Screen, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Rated (QIDS-SR??) on the day of hospital discharge. Statistical analysis established convergent validity with a moderate correlation between the self-administered CNS Screen and the clinician-administered MoCA (r=0.64). Discriminant validity was implicated by a non-significant correlation with the QIDS-SR??. Concurrent validity was supported by a moderate, negative correlation with patients' age (r=-0.62). In addition, consistent with previous findings, patients with psychotic disorders exhibited significantly poorer performance on the CNS Screen than patients with a mood disorder. Similarly, patients with a formal disability status scored significantly lower than other patients. The CNS Screen was well tolerated by all patients. With further development, this type of measure may provide a cost-effective approach to expanding neuropsychological screenings on inpatient psychiatric units. PMID:24503284

  10. Effectiveness of a Psychosocial Intervention Model for Persons with Chronic Psychiatric Disorders in Long-Term Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbaz-Haddad, Merav; Savaya, Riki

    2011-01-01

    The article describes a psychosocial model of intervention with psychiatric patients in long-term hospitalization in a psychiatric ward in Israel and reports the findings of the evaluation conducted of its effectiveness. The model was aimed at maintaining or improving the patients' functioning in four main areas: personal hygiene, environmental…

  11. Staff representations and tobacco-related practices in a psychiatric hospital with an indoor smoking ban.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Ineke; Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Bruegger, Aurlia; Croquette, Patrice; Khan, Aqal Nawaz

    2014-04-01

    The present study describes representations about smoking and practices related to patient smoking among staff of a large public psychiatric hospital. A survey was performed using a specially designed questionnaire. The return rate was 72.4% (n = 155). A large proportion of staff recognized the importance of both smoking status and mental health for patient's well-being (46.9%), and believed that smoking cessation was possible for psychiatric patients (58.6%). However, the role of the psychiatric hospital was perceived as providing information (85.3%) and helping to diminish cigarette consumption (51%), rather than proposing smoking cessation (29.5%). Staff daily practice included reminding patients of smoking restrictions (43.9%), managing cigarettes (46.5%), and nicotine replacement therapy (24.3%). A principal component analysis of tobacco-related practices revealed two main factors (59.8% of variance): basic hospital actions (factor 1) and more specialized interventions (factor 2), which were significantly associated with higher worries about personally developing smoke-related illnesses (Spearman r = 0.38, P < 0.0001). Compared with non-smokers, smokers reported higher perceived vulnerability to develop an illness due to tobacco and a higher level of worry about this. The discussion highlights the need to redefine roles and expectancies of mental health staff, and improve training and collaboration with experts, in order to improve efficiency concerning tobacco issues. PMID:23773346

  12. Clinical and demographic differences between voluntary and involuntary psychiatric admissions in a university hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tais Michele Minatogawa; Ferreira, Luiz Kobuti; Ferreira, Montezuma Pimenta; Hirata, Edson Shiguemi

    2013-11-01

    To assess the frequency of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations from 2001 to 2008 and to determine associated clinical and socio-demographic characteristics, a retrospective cohort study was conducted. Adult admission data were collected from a university hospital in Brazil. Hospitalizations were classified as voluntary (VH) or involuntary (IH). Groups were compared using chi-square test for categorical variables and Mann-Whitney test for continuous non-parametric variables. The relative risk of certain events was estimated by the odds ratio statistic. Of 2,289 admissions, 13.3% were IH. The proportion of IH increased from 2.5% to 21.2% during the eight year period. IH were more frequently associated with female gender, unmarried status, unemployment, and more than 9 years of schooling. Psychotic symptoms were more common among IH. There were no differences in age, duration of hospitalization, or rate of attendance at first appointment after hospital discharge. Understanding of the characteristics associated with IH is necessary to improve the treatment of psychiatric disorders. PMID:24233048

  13. The effects of state psychiatric hospital waitlist policies on length of stay and time to readmission.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth La, Elizabeth; Zhu, Ruoqing; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Ellis, Alan R; Swartz, Marvin S; Kosorok, Michael R; Morrissey, Joseph P

    2015-05-01

    This study examined the effects of a waitlist policy for state psychiatric hospitals on length of stay and time to readmission using data from North Carolina for 2004-2010. Cox proportional hazards models tested the hypothesis that patients were discharged "quicker-but-sicker" post-waitlist, as hospitals struggled to manage admission delays and quickly admit waitlisted patients. Results refute this hypothesis, indicating that waitlists were associated with increased length of stay and time to readmission. Further research is needed to evaluate patients' clinical outcomes directly and to examine the impact of state hospital waitlists in other areas, such as state hospital case mix, local emergency departments, and outpatient mental health agencies. PMID:24965771

  14. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) survey

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). The aims of this paper are: (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii) to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46%) showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%), than in aggression toward other people (20%). A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%), followed by depression (16%) and personality disorders (14%), and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge), while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge) and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge). Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%). Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self-reported compliance increased during hospital stay. Conclusion Results confirm the widespread use of antipsychotics and the increasing trend in atypical drugs prescription, in both psychiatric in- and outpatients. PMID:17983468

  15. [Closing forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy: a new deal for mental health care?].

    PubMed

    Casacchia, Massimo; Malavolta, Maurizio; Bianchini, Valeria; Giusti, Laura; Di Michele, Vittorio; Giosuè, Patricia; Ruggeri, Mirella; Biondi, Massimo; Roncone, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The date of March 31, 2015, following the Law 81/2014, has marked a historical transition with the final closure of the six forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy. This law identifies a new pathway of care that involves small-scale high therapeutic profile facilities (Residenze per la Esecuzione della Misura di Sicurezza, REMS) instead of the old forensic psychiatric hospitals. The Law promotes a new recovery-oriented rehabilitation approach for the persons with mental disorders who committed a criminal offence, but lack criminal responsibility and deemed as socially dangerous. After a brief description of what happens abroad, this article highlights the positive aspects of the law that, as a whole, has to be considered innovative and unavoidable. The main debated problems are also reviewed, including the lack of changes to the Criminal Code; the improper equation between insanity and mental illness and social dangerousness; the evaluation of "socially dangerousness", based solely on "subjective qualities" of the person, assessed out of his/her context, without paying attention to family and social conditions suitable for discharge; the expensive implementation of the REMS, mainly based on security policies and less on care and rehabilitation, the delay in their construction, and the search for residential alternatives structures; the uncertain boundaries of professional responsibility. Finally, several actions are suggested that can support the implementation of the law: information programs addressed to the general population; training activities for mental health professionals; systematic monitoring and evaluation of the outcomes of the care provided to the forensic psychiatric population; implementation of Agreement Protocols and a better cooperation with the judiciary. Scientific societies dealing with psychosocial rehabilitation need to be involved in such issues relating to the identification of the best care and rehabilitation pathways, which should be implemented following closure of forensic psychiatric hospitals. PMID:26489069

  16. Soviet special psychiatric hospitals. Where the system was criminal and the inmates were sane.

    PubMed

    Adler, N; Gluzman, S

    1993-12-01

    The subversion of psychiatric intervention for political purposes in the USSR during the 1970s and 1980s resulted in both intra-psychic and subsequent adaptational dysfunction in those dissidents who physically survived it. Incarceration in special psychiatric hospitals subjected the inmates to a sense of helplessness under the control of a malevolent power, futility, despair, danger from close and contentious contact with hardened criminals and the violently insane, overdosage with mind-altering and body-distorting neuroleptic drugs, and a Kafkaesque ambiguity concerning the specific terms of instutionalisation. Discharge did not bring release from continued threats and the eroded social networks to which the inmates returned subjected them to a new set of stressors. While some families remained intact and provided necessary support during the re-entry period, many families had been destroyed either by the circumstances of the family member's incarceration or by the length of the victim's stay in the psychiatric hospital. Wives left, people died, friends deserted, jobs evaporated, and often there was not even a home to accept them. Social agencies were either hostile or indifferent to their plight. Many felt like they had been thrown overboard from a prison ship without a life preserver. It was the proverbial transition from the frying pan into the fire. PMID:8306112

  17. Predicting time to readmission in patients with recent histories of recurrent psychiatric hospitalization: a matched-control survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmutte, Timothy; Dunn, Christine L; Sledge, William H

    2010-12-01

    The most robust predictor of future psychiatric hospitalization is the number of previous admissions. About half of psychiatric inpatients with histories of repeated hospitalizations are readmitted within 12 months. This study sought to determine which patient characteristics predicted time-to-readmission within 12 months after controlling for the number of previous hospitalizations in 75 adults with recent histories of recurrent admissions and 75 matched controls. Results revealed multiple clinical and demographic between-group differences at index hospitalization. However, the only predictors of shorter time-to-readmission in multivariate Cox proportional hazards were unemployment (hazards ratio = 9.26) and residential living status (hazards ratio = 2.05) after controlling for prior hospitalizations (hazard ratio = 1.24). Unemployment and residential living status were not proxies of psychosis or moderated by illness severity or comorbid substance use. Results suggest that early psychiatric readmission may be more influenced by residential and employment status than by severe mental illness. PMID:21135635

  18. The outcomes of psychiatric inpatients by proportion of experienced psychiatrists and nurse staffing in hospital: New findings on improving the quality of mental health care in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Sun Jung; Jang, Sung-In; Hahm, Myung-Il; Kim, Seung Ju; Lee, Seo Yoon; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2015-10-30

    Readmission rates for mental health care are higher in South Korea than other Organization for Economic Development (OECD) countries. Therefore, it is worthwhile to continue investigating how to reduce readmissions. Taking a novel approach, we determined the relationship between psychiatrist experience and mental health care readmission rates. We used National Health Insurance claim data (N=21,315) from 81 hospitals to analyze readmissions within 30 days of discharge for "mood disorders" or "schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders" during 2010-2013. In this study, multilevel models that included both patient and hospital-level variables were analyzed to examine associations with readmission. Readmissions within 30 days of discharge accounted for 1079 (5.1%) claims. Multilevel analysis demonstrated that the proportion of experienced psychiatrists at a hospital was inversely associated with risk of readmission (OR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.74-0.84 per 10% increase in experienced psychiatrists). Readmission rates for psychiatric disorders within 30 days of discharge were lower in hospitals with a higher number of nurses (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.94-0.96 per 10 nurses). In conclusion, health policymakers and hospital managers should make an effort to reduce readmissions for psychiatric disorders and other diseases by considering the role that physician experience plays and nurse staffing. PMID:26260566

  19. Quality of community-based day centre services for people with psychiatric disabilities: psychometric properties of the Quality in Psychiatric Care - Daily Activities (QPC-DA).

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Ivarsson, Ann-Britt; Brunt, David; Rask, Mikael; Schrder, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Background/aims The aim of the present study was to test the psychometric properties and dimensionality of the instrument Quality in Psychiatric Care - Daily Activities (QPC-DA) and to briefly describe the day centre attendees' perception of the quality at community-based day centre services. Methods A sample of 218 attendees from 14 community-based day centre services in seven municipalities in Sweden participated in the study. Results Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the QPC-DA consists of six dimensions and has a factor structure that to a large extent corresponds to that found in other studies of quality in psychiatric care settings, such as inpatient, outpatient, forensic inpatient, and housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities. The internal consistency of the factors was satisfactory and thus the QPC-DA showed adequate psychometric properties. The attendees' ratings of quality of community-based day centre services were generally high. The highest rating was for the encounter dimension and the lowest for the participation and the secluded environment dimensions, indicating areas for improvement. Conclusion/significance The QPC-DA includes important aspects of the attendees' assessment of quality of community-based day centre services and offers a simple and inexpensive way to evaluate quality from their perspective. PMID:26835910

  20. Exit procedures of forensic psychiatric hospitals in The Netherlands: current problems and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Tigges, L C

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, I have outlined both the legal framework and the organizational structure of the Dutch system of hospital order treatment. I have also dealt with a number of developments, such as the changing composition of the patient population and the disappointing results achieved with sexually violent patients. In addition, I have described a number of developments in the field of exit procedures: the lack of interim rehabilitation facilities, the need for constant supervision of some patients after completion of their hospital order, and the critical attitude of the courts towards recommendations for the extension of hospital orders. Finally, I have issued a plea for comparative international research of a descriptive nature aimed at improving the quality of forensic psychiatric care worldwide. PMID:10114434

  1. Discontinuing the Use of PRN Intramuscular Medication for Agitation in an Acute Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ariel; Russ, Mark J

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the impact of eliminating intramuscular PRN medication for agitation on patient and staff safety in an acute psychiatric inpatient setting. The current retrospective chart review investigated the use of PRN medications (oral and intramuscular) to treat acute agitation, including aggression, and related outcomes before and after a mandated change in PRN practice that required real time physician input before administration of intramuscular medications. The use of both oral and intramuscular PRN medications dramatically decreased following implementation of the mandated change in practice. In particular, the use of intramuscular PRNs for agitation decreased by about half. Despite this decrease, the assault rate in the hospital was unchanged, and the utilization of restraint and seclusion continued to decrease. It is possible to reduce the utilization of PRN medications for agitation without broadly compromising safety on acute care psychiatric inpatient units. PMID:25869884

  2. Admission to psychiatric hospital in the early and late postpartum periods: Scottish national linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Langan Martin, Julie; McLean, Gary; Cantwell, Roch; Smith, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe weekly admission rates for affective and non-affective psychosis, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in the early and late postpartum periods. To assess the impact of socioeconomic status, age and parity on admission rates. Methods Scottish maternity records were linked to psychiatric hospital admissions. 3290 pregnancy-related psychiatric admissions were assessed. Weekly admission rates were calculated for the pregnancy period, early postpartum period (6 weeks after birth) and late postpartum period (up to 2 years after birth), and compared with pre-pregnancy rates (up to 2 years before pregnancy). Admission rates were generated by calculating the total number of admissions for each time period divided by the number of weeks in the period. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were generated for each time period, using deprivation, age, parity and record of previous psychiatric hospital care-adjusted Poisson regression models. Results Women from more deprived social quintiles accounted for the largest proportion of admissions across all time periods. Compared with pre-pregnancy period, admission rates fell during pregnancy, increased markedly during the early postpartum period, and remained elevated for 2 years after childbirth. Within the most affluent quintile, admission IRRs were higher in the early postpartum period (IRR=1.29, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.59) than in the late postpartum period (IRR=0.87, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.98). For the late postpartum period, there was a positive association between higher maternal age and admission IRRs (ages 20–35 years, IRR=1.35, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.54 and age>40 years IRR=1.72, 95% CI 1.41 to 2.09). Conclusions Rates of psychiatric admission fell during pregnancy and increased in the early postpartum period (particularly during the first 2 weeks after birth), and remained elevated above baseline during the 2-year late postpartum period. An understanding of how social deprivation, age and parity might influence risk of psychiatric admission at different time points could help to target perinatal mental health services more effectively. PMID:26733566

  3. Factors influencing occupational engagement in day centers for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    PubMed

    Tjrnstrand, Carina; Bejerholm, Ulrika; Eklund, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Occupational engagement is a vital factor in people's lives since it has been shown to be important for health and well-being. Community-based day centers (DCs), both meeting place-oriented and work-oriented ones, are common service alternatives in many western countries for enabling engagement in productive and leisure occupations among people with psychiatric disabilities. Little is, however, known about factors influencing occupational engagement in such settings. We aimed to investigate how factors pertaining to day center attendance, socio-demographics, motivation, clinical and self-related characteristics were related to how day center attendees rated their occupational engagement in productive occupations. These variables were assessed among day center attendees in meeting place-oriented (n=39) and work-oriented (n=54) DCs in Sweden through questionnaires and interviews. Logistic regression models showed that (1) less general psychopathology and more time spent on day center occupations were indicators of belonging to the group with a high level of occupational engagement according to a median cut; (2) higher perceived self-mastery was the only important factor with respect to ratings of occupational engagement above the third quartile. The models may be seen as creating a stepwise indication on which factors are important for reaching a medium level of occupational engagement (less severe general psychopathology and time spent at the day center) and for reaching a still higher level (a high level self-mastery), respectively, of occupational engagement. The findings may also be discussed in relation to different levels of engagement in a recovery process. PMID:25062905

  4. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospitalization when a SNF bed is not available. (1) A physician may certify or recertify need for continued hospitalization if the physician finds that the patient could receive proper treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for the physician's certification...

  5. Soldiers in psychiatric therapy: the case of Northfield military hospital 1942-1946.

    PubMed

    Thalassis, Nafsika

    2007-08-01

    This article discusses the psychiatric therapeutics of Northfield military psychiatric hospital and suggests that treatment in Northfield was characterised by ideals of citizenship typical of the period and inextricably linked to the military. The two Northfield experiments, for which Northfield has become famous, glorified the group as a social unit and promoted adaptation to the needs and values of society as the route to mental health. In the context of the Second World War, such adaptation meant accepting the duties of a soldier. In the published writings regarding the first Northfield experiment, the psychiatrist Wilfred Bion emphasised his military role in returning patients to their units, a job which he thought was best conducted by men like himself who had experience of leading men into battle. Writing about the second experiment, Tom Main emphasised the importance of including military staff in every aspect of the hospital life from therapy to administration. Some Northfield psychiatrists were less content with this strongly military approach and this led to the conflict which ended the first experiment and continued to spark disagreements throughout the hospital's existence. PMID:18605333

  6. The stability of axis I diagnoses in youth across multiple psychiatric hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Jeremy W; Morgan, Sharon; Paukert, Amber L

    2005-01-01

    The literature has yet to reach a consensus as to the stability of severe psychiatric diagnoses in youth. Previous studies among youngsters tracked over set follow-up periods have reported diagnostic stability estimates that are similar to or slightly lower than those of adults. Less is known, however, about the stability of youth psychiatric diagnoses across multiple episodes of psychopathology, such as recurrent inpatient hospitalizations. The present study investigated diagnostic stability among inpatient youth with multiple hospitalizations through longitudinal and cross-sequential designs. Results indicate that diagnostic stability, as measured by positive concordance rates and the kappa coefficient, is highest for mood disorders, especially bipolar disorder. Externalizing disorders and schizophrenia displayed moderate to low stability, with oppositional-defiant disorder displaying the lowest stability. Substance use disorders were found to have moderate stability. Overall, across-episode diagnostic stability among hospitalized youngsters appears to be lower than that of adults. This finding appears to be due to lower stability among certain externalizing disorders and substance use disorders, whereas mood disorders display stability rates resembling those of adults. Potential explanations for and implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:16049644

  7. Dromokaition Psychiatric Hospital of Athens: from its establishment in 1887 to the era of deinstitutionalization.

    PubMed

    Fiste, Markella; Ploumpidis, Dimitrios; Tsiamis, Costas; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Liappas, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Dromokaition Psychiatric Hospital opened its doors in 1887, following the donation made by Zorzis Dromokaitis from the island of Chios. Private donations and all forms of charities had contributed to a large extent in the establishment of hospitals across Greece, during the late 19th and the early 20th century. Dromokaition was one of them but it was also unique, as it was the first psychiatric hospital in Athens, admitting patients from every part of the country. This paper aimed at highlighting the long service of the institution through the different historical periods the country went through. We present the chronicle of its foundation, the development of its inner structure, and the medical and organizational influences which it received, along the way. The therapeutic methods used during the first decades of its operation reflected the corresponding European standards of the time. As a model institution from its foundation, it followed closely the prevailing European guidelines, throughout its historical path, either as an independent institution or as an integrated one within the National Health Service. PMID:25694790

  8. A Qualitative Analysis Exploring Explanatory Models of Aggression and Violence in a Small Cohort of Rural Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents, Their Parents, and Selected Hospital Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the etiology and cultural underpinnings of adolescent violence as collective case study analysis of three inter-related groups: psychiatrically hospitalized rural adolescents, their parent/guardian, and various hospital staff. Violence among adolescents is a serious societal issue that has had varying

  9. Sexual dysfunctions in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards compared to other specialized wards in Isfahan, Iran, in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, Gholamhossain; Shahin, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Having pleasurable sexual intercourses plays a major role in marital life satisfaction. Many of the medical and psychiatric disorders may affect the sexual function of the patients. The present study aims to investigate the relative frequency of sexual dysfunctions in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards and that of the patients in other specialized wards. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive-analytical, cross-sectional one, carried out on 900 patients hospitalized in psychiatric, cardiac, orthopedic, ophthalmology, and dermatology and plastic surgery wards of 5 hospitals in Isfahan. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX). Results: Sexual dysfunction in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards (38%) was significantly higher than in the patients in other wards (27%), (P = 0.00). Among the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards, those with bipolar disorder (37.3%) had the highest prevalence rate of sexual dysfunction. The patients with schizophrenia, major depression, substance abuse, and anxiety disorders had the following rates respectively. Among the patients in non-psychiatric wards, those in cardiac wards (37.1%) had the highest prevalence rate of sexual dysfunction. There was a significant relationship between the drug uses, mostly psychiatric drugs especially anti-psychotics, and the occurrence of sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: Considering the significant relative frequency of sexual dysfunction in psychiatric patients and undesired effects of simultaneous occurrence of both of these disorders in the patients, more emphasis is recommended to be placed on the prevention and proper treatment of these disorders in the patients. PMID:26623400

  10. The association between depressive symptoms in the community, non-psychiatric hospital admission and hospital outcomes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Prina, A. Matthew; Cosco, Theodore D.; Dening, Tom; Beekman, Aartjan; Brayne, Carol; Huisman, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to systematically review observational studies that have analysed whether depressive symptoms in the community are associated with higher general hospital admissions, longer hospital stays and increased risk of re-admission. Methods We identified prospective studies that looked at depressive symptoms in the community as a risk factor for non-psychiatric general hospital admissions, length of stay or risk of re-admission. The search was carried out on MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library Database, and followed up with contact with authors and scanning of reference lists. Results Eleven studies fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria, and all were deemed to be of moderate to high quality. Meta-analysis of seven studies with relevant data suggested that depressive symptoms may be a predictor of subsequent admission to a general hospital in unadjusted analyses (RR=1.36, 95% CI: 1.281.44), but findings after adjustment for confounding variables were inconsistent. The narrative synthesis also reported depressive symptoms to be independently associated with longer length of stay, and higher re-admission risk. Conclusions Depressive symptoms are associated with a higher risk of hospitalisation, longer length of stay and a higher re-admission risk. Some of these associations may be mediated by other factors, and should be explored in more details. PMID:25466985

  11. Value of the general health questionnaire in detecting psychiatric morbidity in a general hospital out-patient population.

    PubMed

    Bagadia, V N; Ayyar, K S; Lakdawala, P D; Susainathan, U; Pradhan, P V

    1985-10-01

    On administering the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) in English, Gujarati and Marathi, to 500 non-acutely ill adult patients selected randomly from a General Hospital Out-patient Department, it was found that 57% scored high (12 and above), indicating the possibility of psychiatric morbidity in this group. On subjecting 50 of these patients to blind psychiatric evaluation a misclassification rate of 30% was observed with respect to the G. H. Q. 96% of the psychiatrically ill scored high on GHQ, 37% of those scoring high on G. H. Q. were psychiatrically normal. If this misclassification rate is lowered by suitable modifications such as reducing items pertaining to Group A of the G. H. Q., then this test will be very useful as a simple tool to detect psychiatric morbidity. PMID:21927123

  12. [The psychiatric hospital: a place where language is reconstructed through the group].

    PubMed

    Herrera, F

    2015-09-16

    Within the psychiatric hospital, the caregiver is faced with difficult choices regarding the to respond to the suffering of the patient, to accompany him and sometimes forcing him to accept care. The hospital is a place of pressures from within and from outside, where the caregiver must perform a balancing act, with multiple conflicting roles. He must respect patient rights and his resources, his safety and those of others, the understanding of his difficulties, the expectations of the family and the limits of reality. This care has a fundamental ethical dimension. The team discussion allows for a conflictual cooperation between caregivers, which makes possible caring for our patients in crisis. PMID:26591080

  13. A study of the accumulation of long-stay patients in a general hospital psychiatric department.

    PubMed

    Cumella, S J; Lawrence, R; Robertson, J A

    1988-05-01

    A survey of all admissions of patients under the age of 65 years during the first 6 years of a General Hospital Psychiatric Department identified 16 'long-stay' patients (a year or more of continuous inpatient care) and 8 'medium-stay' patients (at least 6 months inpatient care in any period of a year). The most common diagnoses were organic brain disorders among long-stay patients, and affective disorders among medium-stay patients. There was no consistent accumulation of long-stay patients: those with functional disorders were usually discharged to hostel accommodation, while those with organic brain disorders died or were transferred to inpatient care in other hospitals. PMID:10312604

  14. Outcomes associated with court-ordered treatment over objection in an acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Russ, Mark J; John, Majnu

    2013-01-01

    The postdischarge outcomes of court-ordered treatment of acute psychiatric inpatients have not been adequately investigated. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who refused medication for whom a court order was sought during a recent three-year period, and compared this group to control patients who agreed to treatment and a group of patients who transiently refused medication. The principal outcome measures were successful linkage after discharge, readmission within six months of discharge, and transfer to a state hospital. The study group was less likely to link to an aftercare provider, and more likely to be transferred to a state hospital, had poorer insight on admission, had a longer average stay, and was more likely to utilize mandatory outpatient treatment and long-acting injectable medications after discharge. Patients who require court-ordered medication over objection constitute a group that is high risk for nonadherence after discharge and being refractive to treatment. PMID:23771937

  15. Recycling former psychiatric hospitals in New Zealand: echoes of deinstitutionalisation and restructuring.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Alun E; Kearns, Robin A; Moon, Graham

    2009-03-01

    This paper addresses a gap in the understanding of the geography of deinstitutionalisation: the fate of closed asylums. We contend that the closure process was an exercise in both deinstitutionalisation and welfare state restructuring, and examine discourses surrounding the re-use of two former psychiatric hospitals in New Zealand-Seaview in Hokitika and Kingseat near Auckland. Drawing on an analysis of media coverage and field observation, we consider former asylums as sites of celebrity. We find the shadow of stigma to be prominent, manifested directly in suggestions that the former hospitals be used as prisons and in the partial redevelopment of one as a 'horror theme park'. Indirectly, we see stigma reflected in the physical deterioration of the asylums prior to closure. While this stigmatising is attributable in the first instance to deinstitutionalisation, the evidence suggests strongly that it was co-opted and exploited by the forces of restructuring. PMID:18499501

  16. Developing pharmacy applications using a microcomputer relational database in a long-term care psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Salek, W

    1989-03-01

    The database applications developed with a microcomputer for a 1000 bed long-term care forensic psychiatric care hospital are described. The implementation of a microcomputer system was instituted as an interim measure prior to the development of a hospital wide minicomputer system. Primary emphasis was placed on increasing the efficiency of professional staff while enhancing clinical therapeutic monitoring. The system operates on an IBM-AT with 30 megabyte hard disk drive and an Epson FX-100 dot matrix printer. A relational database manager, Team-Up, was utilized in the development of applications that included census maintenance, scheduled drug inventory, drug regimen review, drug utilization protocols and a skilled nursing unit dose patient profile. Other ancillary functions included generation of stock labels, a literature abstract database and an on-line policy and procedure manual. Advantages of the system include an increase in staff productivity through the use of information that is readily attainable from the patient database. Possible disadvantages are the programming and hardware limitations imposed by a microcomputer system. Long term care psychiatric facilities may be able to enhance staff efficiency by computerizing existing manual systems. Because of the diverse and specialized requirements of long term care facilities, a microcomputer used in conjunction with a programmable relational database can be easily customized to fulfill this need. PMID:10292384

  17. Nursing interventions for substance use during psychiatric hospital admissions: Clinical context and predictors.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Duncan; Warren, Jonathan; Odubanwo, Adewunmi; Bowers, Len

    2015-12-01

    Empirical information about how nurses manage substance use on psychiatric wards is lacking. The aims of the study were to identify the frequency and clinical features of incidents among a sample of inpatients over a 12-month period and how nursing staff intervened. Electronic, anonymized inpatient records were searched for incidents of substance use on 17 acute psychiatric wards in four hospitals in London. Searches were conducted for all patients admitted during 2012 and details of incidents and patient characteristics were extracted for analysis. Substance use was reported for 291 patients, with 25 incidents per 100 patients admitted to hospital. Only half of the incidents were followed by a response that specifically addressed the patients' substance use behaviour. These interactions usually concerned the circumstances and reasons for use, but rarely involved specific support for patients' substance use problems. The likelihood of staff taking any form of action was increased if the patient had been formally admitted, and was reduced if the patient was subject to containment during the shift or had a history of self-harm. The results demonstrate that nurses require specific training and guidance on supporting substance using patients. PMID:26300518

  18. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for posthospital care, if appropriate. (b) Certification of need for hospitalization when a SNF bed is... physician finds that the patient could receive proper treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for the physician's certification or recertification, the...

  19. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for posthospital care, if appropriate. (b) Certification of need for hospitalization when a SNF bed is... physician finds that the patient could receive proper treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for the physician's certification or recertification, the...

  20. Evaluation of tobacco use on Chinese population through ATTOC model: a cross-sectional survey on hospitalized psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Peng, Zugui; Ziedonis, Douglas M; Wang, Chaomin; Yu, Bo; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of Addressing Tobaccos through Organizational Change (ATTOC) intervention to Chinese psychiatric patients, and to better address tobacco use through the ATTOC intervention model in the context of China. Methods: The study was conducted in Mental Health Center of West China Hospital in 2010. A total of 100 hospitalized psychiatric patients were recruited to carry out ATTOC intervention. Subjects suffers from mental illness were diagnosed by professional psychiatrists according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) criteria. Results: The prevalence of tobacco use in hospitalized psychiatric patients were closely correlated with the type of mental illness, family smoking history, sex, age, marital status, education status, etc. However, most psychiatric patients knew little about these, and tended to ignore the importance of smoking cessation. Conclusions: The ATTOC intervention program of the U.S. may be suitable for hospitalized Chinese psychiatric patients, and it could be applied for the tobacco smoking treatment in China. However, the health effects of tobacco use still did not draw amount attentions from both the clinicians and general public. It is urgently needed to raise peoples awareness and carry out ATTOC intervention to control tobacco use, and ultimately terminate tobacco use. PMID:26131197

  1. Physical symptoms in outpatients with psychiatric disorders consulting the general internal medicine division at a Japanese university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yukiko; Takeshima, Taro; Mise, Junichi; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Matsumura, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Purpose General practitioners have an important role in diagnosing a variety of patients, including psychiatric patients with complicated symptoms. We evaluated the relationship between physical symptoms and psychiatric disorders in general internal medicine (GIM) outpatients in a Japanese university hospital. Materials and methods We coded the symptoms and diagnoses of outpatients from medical documents using the International Classification of Primary Care, second edition (ICPC-2). The participants were new outpatients who consulted the GIM outpatient division at Jichi Medical University Hospital in Tochigi, Japan from JanuaryJune, 2012. We reviewed all medical documents and noted symptoms and diagnoses. These were coded using ICPC-2. Results A total of 1,194 participants were evaluated, 148 (12.4%) of whom were diagnosed as having psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of depression, anxiety disorder, and somatization was 19.6% (number [n] =29), 14.9% (n=22), and 14.2% (n=21), respectively, among the participants with psychiatric disorders. The presence of several particular symptoms was associated with having a psychiatric disorder as compared with the absence of these symptoms after adjusting for sex, age, and the presence of multiple symptoms (odds ratio [OR] =4.98 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 1.6614.89] for palpitation; OR =4.36 [95% CI: 2.059.39] for dyspnea; OR =3.46 [95% CI: 1.438.36] for tiredness; and OR =2.99 [95% CI: 1.755.13] for headache). Conclusion Not only the psychiatric symptoms, but also some physical symptoms, were associated with psychiatric disorders in GIM outpatients at our university hospital. These results may be of help to general practitioners in appropriately approaching and managing patients with psychiatric disorders. PMID:26316801

  2. Psychiatric Hospital Bed Numbers and Prison Population Sizes in 26 European Countries: A Critical Reconsideration of the Penrose Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Blüml, Victor; Waldhör, Thomas; Kapusta, Nestor D.; Vyssoki, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, there has been a revived interest in the validity of the Penrose hypothesis, which was originally postulated over 75 years ago. It suggests an inverse relationship between the numbers of psychiatric hospital beds and the sizes of prison population. This study aims to investigate the association between psychiatric hospital beds and prison populations in a large sample of 26 European countries between 1993 and 2011. Methods The association between prison population sizes and numbers of psychiatric hospital beds was assessed by means of Spearman correlations and modeled by a mixed random coefficient regression model. Socioeconomic variables were considered as covariates. Data were retrieved from Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union. Outcomes Mean Spearman correlation coefficients between psychiatric beds and prison population showed a significant negative association (-0.35; p = <0.01). However, in the mixed regression model including socioeconomic covariates there were no significant fixed parameter estimates. Meanwhile, the covariance estimates for the random coefficients psychiatric beds (σ2 = 0.75, p = <0.01) and year (σ2 = 0.0007, p = 0.03) yielded significant results. Interpretation These findings do not support the general validity of the Penrose hypothesis. Notably, the results of the mixed-model show a significant variation in the magnitude and direction of the association of psychiatric hospital bed numbers and the prison population sizes between countries. In this sense, our results challenge the prevalent opinion that a reduction of psychiatric beds subsequently leads to increasing incarcerations. These findings also work against the potential stigmatization of individuals suffering from mental disorders as criminals, which could be an unintentional byproduct of the Penrose hypothesis. PMID:26529102

  3. Discharged from a mental health admission ward: is it safe to go home? A review on the negative outcomes of psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Loch, Alexandre Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Before psychiatry emerged as a medical discipline, hospitalizing individuals with mental disorders was more of a social stigmatizing act than a therapeutic act. After the birth of the mental health disciplines, psychiatric hospitalization was legitimized and has proven to be indispensable, preventing suicides and helping individuals in need. However, despite more than a century passing since this legitimization occurred, psychiatric hospitalization remains a controversial issue. There is the question of possible negative outcomes after a psychiatric admission ceases to take its protective effect, and even of whether the psychiatric admission itself is related to a negative setback after discharge. This review aims to summarize some of the most important negative outcomes after discharge from a psychiatric institution. These experiences were organized into two groups: those after a brief psychiatric hospitalization, and those after a long-stay admission. The author further suggests possible ways to minimize these adversities, emphasizing the need of awareness related to this important issue. PMID:24812527

  4. Pathways to psychiatric care in urban north China: a general hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathway studies highlight the help-seeking behaviors of patients with physical and mental illnesses. A number of studies in this field have been completed in various parts of the world. The purpose of this study is to explore the characteristics of the help-seeking pathways of patients with mental illness from urban north China at Mental Health Professional (MHP). Methods The pathway diagrams, which accounted for more than five percent of patients, were documented for 441 subjects using the translated version of the World Health Organization (WHO) pathway encounter form. The patterns and durations of care-seeking were analyzed in different diagnostic groups. The ?2-test and the Mann-Whitney U test were employed, as needed. Results Respondents visited the MHP through a variety of pathways. Approximately three-quarters of the patients took an indirect pathway (74.8% vs 25.2%, ?2?=?108.8, p?hospitals (56.4% vs 4.1%, ?2?=?138.3, p?hospitals (24.8% vs 4.1%, ?2?=?40.96, p?psychiatric hospitals. Of the patients who first contacted with psychiatry hospital, 55.6% received a professional diagnosis and finally reached the MHP because of the poor treatment or high-cost medical care. Conclusions The majority of patients seek other pathways than to go to MHP directly and this may be due to stigma, and/or lack of knowledge. The study gives emphasis on the importance of improving skills and knowledge that will facilitate the recognition of psychiatric disorders in the community health centers, the general hospitals system and by private practitioners. The pathway described by this study may be helpful while preparing mental health programs in the future. PMID:24020825

  5. [Asylum: the Huge Psychiatric Hospital in the 19th century U.S].

    PubMed

    Kazano, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    The large-scale state psychiatric hospitals, referred to as "asylums," were built in the USA in the 19th century and generally have a bad reputation in Japan as institutions with an unpleasant environment for the patients. Asylums were not built for institutionalizing mental patients. The original meaning of the word asylum is a "retreat" or "sanctuary," and these institutions were originally built to act as sanctuaries for the protection of mental patients. The field of psychiatric medicine in western countries in the 19th century began to embrace the concept of "moral treatment" for mental patients, including no restraint of the patients and treating them in a more open environment. With this background, asylums were built according to the efforts of social activist Dorothea Dix with financial assistance from the Quakers. The psychiatrist Dr. Thomas Kirkbride had a large influence on asylum architecture, and believed that the hospital building and environment as well as location have healing effects on the patients, which he called the "therapeutic landscape". Kirkbridelater proposed an architectural plan that became the basis for subsequent mental hospital architecture, and many asylums were built according to this plan. As the architecture was considered part of the treatment, many leading architects and landscape architects at the time became involved in building asylums. In the later half of the 19th century, over 150 asylums were built across the USA. However, moral treatment fell out of favor toward the end of the 19th century, and the concept of therapeutic landscape was also neglected. The hospitals had many uncured patients, and caregivers became pessimistic about the efficacy of the treatments. Abuse and neglect of the patients were also common. The environment at the asylums deteriorated, which created the image of asylums that, we hold today. Many asylums have been demolished or abandoned. These early attempts at asylum failed due to insufficient treatment methods. However, the concept of the therapeutic landscape that comprehensively sees the architecture of the hospital building and landscape of the property as part of the treatment as well as the architectural beauty of asylum buildings may deserve reevaluation. PMID:23234200

  6. Factors affecting hospital stay in psychiatric patients: the role of active comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Research on length of stay (LOS) of psychiatric inpatients is an under-investigated issue. In this naturalistic study factors which affect LOS of two groups of patients were investigated, focusing on the impact on LOS of medical comorbidity severe enough to require referral. Methods Active medical comorbidity was quantified using referral as the criterion. The study sample consisted of 200 inpatients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia and 228 inpatients suffering from bipolar disorder (type I or II). Jonckheere and Mann–Whitney tests were used to estimate the influence of referrals on LOS, and regression analyses isolated variables associated with LOS separately for each group. Results Half of the patients needed one or more referrals for a non-psychiatric problem. The most common medical condition of patients with bipolar disorder was arterial hypertension. Inpatients with schizophrenia suffered mostly from an endocrine/metabolic disease - 12% of referrals were for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. A positive linear trend was found between LOS and number of referrals; the effect was greater for schizophrenia patients. The effect of referrals on LOS was verified by regression in both groups. Overall, referred patients showed greater improvement in GAF compared to controls. Conclusions To our knowledge this was the first study to investigate physical comorbidity in psychiatric inpatients using the criterion of referral to medical subspecialties. Comorbidity severe enough to warrant referral is a significant determinant of hospital stay. This insight may prove useful in health care planning. The results show lack of effective community care in the case of schizophrenia and negative symptoms may be the cause of this. Our findings call for more attention to be paid to the general medical needs of inpatients with severe mental health and concurrent severe medical comorbidity. PMID:22713232

  7. The experience of admission to psychiatric hospital among Chinese adult patients in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jackie Chi-Kin; Chow, Paulina Po-Ling; Lam, Linda Chiu-Wa

    2008-01-01

    Background The paper reports on a study to evaluate the psychometric properties and cultural appropriateness of the Chinese translation of the Admission Experience Survey (AES). Methods The AES was translated into Chinese and back-translated. Content validity was established by focus groups and expert panel review. The Chinese version of the Admission Experience Survey (C-AES) was administered to 135 consecutively recruited adult psychiatric patients in the Castle Peak Hospital (Hong Kong SAR, China) within 48 hours of admission. Construct validity was assessed by comparing the scores from patients admitted voluntarily versus patients committed involuntarily, and those received physical or chemical restraint versus those who did not. The relationship between admission experience and psychopathology was examined by correlating C-AES scores with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores. Results Spearman's item-to-total correlations of the C-AES ranged from 0.50 to 0.74. Three factors from the C-AES were extracted using factor analysis. Item 12 was omitted because of poor internal consistency and factor loading. The factor structure of the Process Exclusion Scale (C-PES) corresponded to the English version, while some discrepancies were noted in the Perceived Coercion Scale (C-PCS) and the Negative Pressure Scale (C-NPS). All subscales had good internal consistencies. Scores were significantly higher for patients either committed involuntarily or subjected to chemical or physical restrain, independent on severity of psychotic symptoms. Conclusion The Chinese AES is a psychometrically sound instrument assessing the three different aspects of the experience of admission, namely "negative pressure, "process exclusion" and "perceived coercion". The potential of C-AES in exploring subjective experience of psychiatric admission and effects on treatment adherence should be further explored. PMID:18928557

  8. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cimino, Nina; Di Pietro, Elena; Pollutri, Gabriella; Neviani, Vittoria; Ferri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT), and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18) who had acute hospitalizations (n=140) in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83), from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient −2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic regression). The most frequent reasons for admission were aggressive behavior in males and suicide risk in females (P=0.002). The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis at SPDT discharge was “conduct disorder”, more frequent in males, followed by “adjustment disorder”, more frequent in females (P=0.001). In SPDT, the adolescent hospitalizations progressively increased fivefold at the end of the observation period. Conclusion Our results overlap the worldwide trend of increasing adolescent psychiatric hospitalizations, suggest risk factors like parental psychiatric illness and early life stressful events, and highlight the different prevalence of aggressiveness and suicide in males and females. PMID:26848268

  9. A Geriatric Day Hospital: Who Improves the Most?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrosiers, Johanne; Hebert, Rejean; Payette, Helene; Roy, Pierre-Michel; Tousignant, Michel; Cote, Sylvie; Trottier, Lise

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the changes in some bio-psychosocial variables (functional independence, nutritional risk, pain, balance and walking, grip strength, general well-being, psychiatric profile, perception of social support, leisure satisfaction, and caregivers' feeling of burden) in four categories of clients during their program at a geriatric

  10. Investigation of Seclusion in one of the Psychiatric Wards in Razi Teaching Hospital of Tabriz

    PubMed Central

    Vahidi, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Mina

    2014-01-01

    Seclusion is one of the methods in controlling violent behavior of inpatients in psychiatric wards. In current descriptive analytic study, data collection instrument included the seclusion list of inpatients by considering individual, social and clinical characteristics in one of the psychiatry wards In the Razi teaching hospital of Tabriz in the first six months of 2012. Among 264 admitted patients, 24 patients (9.1%) had been secluded and a total of 29 isolated incidents were recorded. Most of secluded incidents occurred on weekdays (75.9%), first week of inpatient (87.7%), and during the evening shifts (48.3%). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that in 55.2% cases, the duration of isolation was two hours and the most common cause of seclusion was aggressive behaviors. Most of secluded patients (66.7%) were diagnosed with mood disorders. PMID:25717458

  11. Clinical decision-making about inpatient violence risk at admission to a public-sector acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Newton, Virginia M; Elbogen, Eric B; Brown, Carrie L; Snyder, Jennifer; Barrick, Ann Louise

    2012-01-01

    This is an examination of the extent to which patients who are violent in the hospital can be distinguished from nonviolent patients, based on information that is readily available at the time of admission to a state acute psychiatric hospital. The charts of 235 inpatients were examined retrospectively, by selecting 103 patients who had engaged in inpatient violence and comparing them with 132 randomly selected patients who had not during the same period. Data were gathered from initial psychiatric assessment and admissions face sheets in patients' charts, reflecting information available to a mental health professional within the first 24 hours of a patient's admission. Multivariate analysis showed that violent and nonviolent patients were distinguished by diagnosis, age, gender, estimated intelligence, psychiatric history, employment history, living situation, and agitated behavior. These factors led to an 80 percent correct classification of violent patients and thus may assist clinicians to structure decision-making about the risk of inpatient violence. PMID:22635292

  12. Narratives about their children by mothers hospitalized on a psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Savvidou, Ioanna; Bozikas, Vasilis P; Hatzigeleki, Sophia; Karavatos, Athanasios

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis of "mental illness" is accompanied by negative implications regarding a person's competence. Self- and other-descriptions about the "patient" are embedded within broader cultural and societal discourses, influencing his/her relationships. The parental role seems to be one of the most sensitive, especially for women. Mothers hospitalized in psychiatric units often have to separate themselves from their children either temporarily, during hospitalization, or permanently, after a loss of custody. However, many studies have shown that mothering remains important for them. We interviewed 20 women, inpatients on a psychiatric unit and mothers of 3.5-18-year-old children, recording their narratives about their children and exploring their thoughts and understanding of the concepts of motherhood and mental illness. We also explored the way in which the mother-child dyad interacted with the family and its social context. Most mothers had a consistent and coherent narrative about their children and they had certain expectations of them. The mother-child bond was strong, even when the children had been removed from their mothers' custody. However, mothers were facing great difficulties with their partner and with the broader family context. Also, the social discourses regarding mental illness, (e.g., violence and incapability for mothering), were extremely oppressive for these women. They felt that they were the victims of societal attitudes even before they became pregnant. These findings suggest the importance of listening to the voices of these women; acknowledging their competence in the therapeutic context; involving them with their families, and in legal and social contexts; and in planning supportive programs for them. PMID:14606202

  13. Assessment of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Suicidal Adolescents: Self-Report Instruments as Predictors of Suicidal Thoughts and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huth-Bocks, Alissa C.; Kerr, David C. R.; Ivey, Asha Z.; Kramer, Anne C.; King, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The validity and clinical utility of the Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-Junior, and Suicide Probability Scale (SPS) were examined longitudinally among suicidal adolescents. Method: Between 1998 and 2000, 289 psychiatrically hospitalized, suicidal youth, ages 12 to 17 years,…

  14. Assessment of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Suicidal Adolescents: Self-Report Instruments as Predictors of Suicidal Thoughts and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huth-Bocks, Alissa C.; Kerr, David C. R.; Ivey, Asha Z.; Kramer, Anne C.; King, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The validity and clinical utility of the Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-Junior, and Suicide Probability Scale (SPS) were examined longitudinally among suicidal adolescents. Method: Between 1998 and 2000, 289 psychiatrically hospitalized, suicidal youth, ages 12 to 17 years,

  15. Brief Report: Understanding Crisis Behaviors in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder--Iceberg Assessment Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Kate H.; Barnes, Julia C.; Young, Nicholas D.; Gabriels, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for emotional dysregulation and behavior problems that can escalate to levels requiring psychiatric hospitalization. Evaluating the etiology of such behaviors can be challenging for health care providers, as individuals with ASD can have difficulty self-reporting concerns.…

  16. Brief Report: Understanding Crisis Behaviors in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder--Iceberg Assessment Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Kate H.; Barnes, Julia C.; Young, Nicholas D.; Gabriels, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for emotional dysregulation and behavior problems that can escalate to levels requiring psychiatric hospitalization. Evaluating the etiology of such behaviors can be challenging for health care providers, as individuals with ASD can have difficulty self-reporting concerns.

  17. The Contribution of Children's Temperamental Fear and Effortful Control to Restraint and Seclusion during Inpatient Treatment in a Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgett, David J.; Valentino, Kristin; Hayden, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined temperament characteristics as risk factors for restraint and seclusion (R/S) events in psychiatrically hospitalized youth, extending work that has sought to identify R/S risk factors and research examining temperament-behavior problem associations that has largely relied upon community samples. It was anticipated that…

  18. Determining the number of state psychiatric hospital beds by measuring quality of care with artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Lowell, W E; Davis, G L

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a new paradigm to calculate the minimum and the optimum number of involuntary psychiatric beds at a state hospital in Maine with 5538 admissions over a 7-year period. The method measures quality of care (Q) based upon the accuracy of prediction of length-of-stay for the hospital, and of community length-of-stay for the community, each corrected for the severity of illness of the average patient. When Q in the hospital equals Q in the community, there is no net movement of patients from one phase of care to the other, analogous to a zero electromotive force, and the census at that point is the minimum number of beds (22 beds/100,000 population). When patients in the community were least ill, relative to the hospital then hospital bed census is at its optimum (31 beds/100,000) given current resources and technology. In studying specific diagnosis groups with the same methodology the authors found that patients with schizophrenia having the benefit of clozapine for most of the study period had a Q averaged over 7 years that was nearly equal in both hospital and community settings. This explains the perception that tertiary psychiatric hospitals comprised mostly of patients with schizophrenia can downsize significantly. However, affective disorders and "borderline" personality disorders clearly benefit from structured hospital care with specialized experienced staff. We make arguments for the role of the state hospital as a homeostat for the mental health care delivery system. PMID:9509590

  19. Medication burden in bipolar disorder: A chart review of patients at psychiatric hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, Lauren M.; Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Tezanos, Katherine; Celis-deHoyos, Cintly E.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) often receive complex polypharmacy regimens as part of treatment, yet few studies have sought to evaluate patient characteristics associated with this high medication burden. This retrospective chart review study examined rates of complex polypharmacy (i.e., ? 4 psychotropic medications), patterns of psychotropic medication use, and their demographic and clinical correlates in a naturalistic sample of adults with bipolar I disorder (BDI; N=230) presenting for psychiatric hospital admission. Using a computer algorithm, a hospital administrator extracted relevant demographic, clinical, and community treatment information for analysis. Patients reported taking an average of 3.31(SD=1.46) psychotropic medications, and 5.94(SD=3.78) total medications at intake. Overall, 82 (36%) met criteria for complex polypharmacy. Those receiving complex polypharmacy were significantly more likely to be female, to be depressed, to have a comorbid anxiety disorder, and to have a history of suicide attempt. Women were significantly more likely than men to be prescribed antidepressants, benzodiazepines, and stimulants, even after controlling for mood episode polarity. Study data highlight the high medication burden experienced by patients with BD, especially those who are acutely symptomatic. Data also highlight the particularly high medication burden experienced by women with BD; a burden not fully accounted for by depression. PMID:24534121

  20. Determinants of inpatient psychiatric length of stay in an urban county hospital.

    PubMed

    Compton, Michael T; Craw, Jason; Rudisch, Bruce E

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated predictors of length of stay (LOS) for two inpatient psychiatric units (a crisis stabilization unit and a longer-stay milieu unit) in a large, urban, university-affiliated, county hospital. It was hypothesized that three variables would be independently associated with shorter LOS: (1) higher Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale scores, (2) not requiring the use of seclusion or restraints, and (3) the presence of a comorbid substance use disorder. Data were collected on consecutive discharges (n=234) from the two inpatient units. Bivariate tests were conducted, and multiple linear regression models assessed the independent effects of potential determinants of LOS. The presence of a comorbid personality disorder or substance use disorder was predictive of shorter LOS on the crisis stabilization unit (n=88). Several variables were found to be predictive of shorter LOS on the longer-stay milieu unit (n=146), including: involuntary legal status on discharge, not requiring seclusion or restraints, higher admission GAF scale score, female gender, and the presence of a comorbid substance use disorder. Findings indicate that a substantial portion of the variance in LOS in this setting can be predicted from basic sociodemographic and clinical factors available in hospital medical charts. PMID:16763767

  1. Patient outcomes following discharge from secure psychiatric hospitals: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fazel, Seena; Fimi?ska, Zuzanna; Cocks, Christopher; Coid, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundSecure hospitals are a high-cost, low-volume service consuming around a fifth of the overall mental health budget in England and Wales.AimsA systematic review and meta-analysis of adverse outcomes after discharge along with a comparison with rates in other clinical and forensic groups in order to inform public health and policy.MethodWe searched for primary studies that followed patients discharged from a secure hospital, and reported mortality, readmissions or reconvictions. We determined crude rates for all adverse outcomes.ResultsIn total, 35 studies from 10 countries were included, involving 12 056 patients out of which 53% were violent offenders. The crude death rate for all-cause mortality was 1538 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 1175-1901). For suicide, the crude death rate was 325 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 235-415). The readmission rate was 7208 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 5916-8500). Crude reoffending rates were 4484 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 3679-5287), with lower rates in more recent studies.ConclusionsThere is some evidence that patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services have lower offending outcomes than many comparative groups. Services could consider improving interventions aimed at reducing premature mortality, particularly suicide, in discharged patients. PMID:26729842

  2. Patient outcomes following discharge from secure psychiatric hospitals: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Cocks, Christopher; Coid, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background Secure hospitals are a high-cost, low-volume service consuming around a fifth of the overall mental health budget in England and Wales. Aims A systematic review and meta-analysis of adverse outcomes after discharge along with a comparison with rates in other clinical and forensic groups in order to inform public health and policy. Method We searched for primary studies that followed patients discharged from a secure hospital, and reported mortality, readmissions or reconvictions. We determined crude rates for all adverse outcomes. Results In total, 35 studies from 10 countries were included, involving 12 056 patients out of which 53% were violent offenders. The crude death rate for all-cause mortality was 1538 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 1175–1901). For suicide, the crude death rate was 325 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 235–415). The readmission rate was 7208 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 5916–8500). Crude reoffending rates were 4484 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 3679–5287), with lower rates in more recent studies. Conclusions There is some evidence that patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services have lower offending outcomes than many comparative groups. Services could consider improving interventions aimed at reducing premature mortality, particularly suicide, in discharged patients. PMID:26729842

  3. Effectiveness of Time-Out: A Comparison of Psychiatric, Correctional and Day-Treatment Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespi, Tony D.

    1988-01-01

    Explored effectiveness of time-out intervention for adolescent psychiatric patients, adjudicated youth, and behaviorally disordered adolescents by investigating 813 occurrences of time-out with 274 youth. Results indicated that time-out had significant impact and that use of child-care specialist as time-out monitor improved overall effectiveness.

  4. Trends, victims, and injuries in injurious patient assaults on adult, geriatric, and child/adolescent psychiatric units in US hospitals, 2007-2013.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S

    2015-04-01

    While rates of other nurse-sensitive adverse outcomes have declined in recent years, little is known about trends in rates of assault by psychiatric inpatients. The primary purpose of this study was to examine recent trends in injurious assault rates against patients and staff on adult, geriatric, and child/adolescent psychiatric units, using data from a nationwide sample of hospitals. A secondary aim was to assess the frequency with which patients and various types of hospital staff were reported as the most severely injured victim. National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators data from 2007 to 2013 were extracted. The sample comprised 345 hospitals (324 general, 5 pediatric, 16 psychiatric), 438 adult, 75 geriatric, and 105 child/adolescent units, each with assault rate data from at least three of the seven study years. All but four states in the United States were represented. Spearman's rank coefficients were used to test for time trends. In 16.3 million patient days, nearly three-quarters of the 14,877 injurious assaults by patients involved injury only to hospital staff, whereas one-fifth resulted in injury only to patients. A registered nurse was named most frequently as the most severely injured victim (32.1% of assaults), and nursing staff of all types accounted for 64.9% of the most severely injured. Assault rates did not change significantly over time. Unlike several other nursing-sensitive adverse outcomes that have been the focus of policymakers, assault rates have not declined in recent years and remain a problem in need of more focused attention. PMID:25684103

  5. An analysis of the costs and benefits of two strategies to decrease length of stay in children's psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, L H; Petti, R D

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We analyze the costs and benefits of two strategies-intensive home-based services and increased remuneration for providers of community-based placements--to decrease excessive length of stay in a children's psychiatric hospital. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. Clinical, demographic, and financial data were collected retrospectively on all children discharged during 1987 through 1989 from the state children's psychiatric hospital that serves Wayne County, Michigan. Characteristics of the discharged children were similar to those reported in other studies of intensive home-based services. STUDY DESIGN. A sample of 22 children was used for a simulation analysis. Excessive length of stay was defined as the duration of hospitalization after readiness for discharge and associated planning were indicated in the record. For the simulated analysis of the intensive home-based program, costs included estimated charges for the program and charges for the children hospitalized due to failure of the intervention. For analysis of the increased remuneration strategy, costs included charges for the out-of-home placement and charges for hospitalization. For both strategies benefits were defined as averted hospitalization charges. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Charts of the discharged children were reviewed and 21 clinical, demographic, and financial variables were extracted. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Analysis of costs and benefits of intensive home-based services produced a favorable cost-benefit ratio of .47. Analysis of the strategy to increase remuneration for providers of community-based placements resulted in a cost-benefit ratio of 1, indicating no financial savings. CONCLUSIONS. Intensive home-based services represent an efficient strategy to decrease excessive length of stay for children in psychiatric hospitals by averting hospitalization altogether. Although increased remuneration to providers of community-based placements in order to increase the supply of placements as a means to hasten discharge from the hospital has a neutral cost-benefit ratio, the opportunity to provide care in the "least restrictive" environment argues in its favor as well. PMID:8005787

  6. A critical black feminist ethnography of treatment for women with co-occurring disorders in the psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Laryssa M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of women diagnosed with co-occurring disorders on the treatments provided by a state psychiatric hospital so that appropriate recommendations for changes in treatment may be made. Critical ethnography was used and the data was viewed through the lens of intersectionality from the black feminist perspective. Seven women hospitalized in one psychiatric hospital in the Mid-Atlantic region participated in the study. Data was collected via semistructured interviews, Consumer Perceptions of Care survey, researcher's observations, and archival data. Three major findings emerged: (1) Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) was identified as a beneficial treatment, (2) a lack of trust in the system and people in the system, and (3) housing or homelessness was perceived as a barrier. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended clinicians, administrators, and policy makers listen closely to individuals receiving treatment to make decisions regarding treatment accordingly. PMID:23686217

  7. Helpseeking of Immigrant and Native Born Parents: A Qualitative Study from a Montreal Child Day Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Guzder, Jaswant; Yohannes, Sennait; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This qualitative study of the perceptions of native-born Canadian and immigrant parents whose children attended a psychiatric day hospital for significant behavior impairment, focused on parental helpseeking pathways, explanatory models of mental health, and referral or access experiences. Methods: A sample of ten immigrant and ten native born parents were recruited for semi-structured interviews analyzed thematically to discern similarities and differences between the two groups. Results: The immigrant group more frequently reported barriers and delays in accessing mental health services. They often reported lack of primary care physicians and language barriers. They were less likely to have a biomedical perspective or to use specialized resources for their children prior to admission. Both groups reported apprehension about medication trials, though the immigrant parents were less likely to agree to psychopharmacological treatment. None of the professionals treating parents for mental health problems initiated referral of their impaired children. Conclusions: Based on the qualitative analysis of this sample, native born single parents and immigrant parents may feel especially vulnerable to lack of social support. Adjustments of primary care, schools and community resources, as well as promoting best practices of culturally competent child mental health care, may increase access and willingness to pursue treatment in both groups. PMID:24223046

  8. Excess non-psychiatric hospitalizations among employees with mental disorders: a 10-year prospective study of the GAZEL cohort

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo Da Silva, M; Lemogne, C; Melchior, M; Zins, M; Van Der Waerden, J; Consoli, S M; Goldberg, M; Elbaz, A; Singh-Manoux, A; Nabi, H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether non-psychiatric hospitalizations rates were higher in those with mental disorders. Method In a cohort of 15 811 employees, aged 3550 years in 1989, mental disorder status was defined from 1989 to 2000. Hospitalizations for all-causes, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and cancer, were recorded yearly from 2001 to 2011. Negative binomial regression models were used to estimate hospitalization rates over the follow-up. Results After controlling for baseline sociodemographic factors, health-related behaviors, self-rated health, and self-reported medical conditions, participants with a mental disorder had significantly higher rates of all-cause hospitalization [incidence rate ratio, IRR = 1.20 (95%, 1.141.26)], as well as hospitalization due to MI [IRR = 1.44 (95%, 1.121.85)]. For stroke, the IRR did not reach statistical significance [IRR = 1.37 (95%, 0.951.99)] and there was no association with cancer [IRR = 1.01 (95%, 0.861.19)]. A similar trend was observed when mental disorders groups were considered (no mental disorder, depressive disorder, mental disorders due to psychoactive substance use, other mental disorders, mixed mental disorders, and severe mental disorder). Conclusion In this prospective cohort of employees with stable employment as well as universal access to healthcare, we found participants with mental disorders to have higher rates of non-psychiatric hospitalizations. PMID:25289581

  9. Reward, cost, and self-evaluation procedures for disruptive adolescents in a psychiatric hospital school1

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Kenneth F.; O'Leary, K. Daniel

    1972-01-01

    Sixteen pupils in a psychiatric hospital were assigned to two tutorial reading classes and balanced on six pupil characteristics and teacher preferences for the children. The effects of reward and cost procedures in a token program were assessed using both within- and between-subject comparisons in the following phases: (1) Baseline; (2) Token I, teacher evaluated and reinforced children for appropriate behavior; (3) Withdrawal of Tokens; (4) Token II, same as Token I; (5) Token III, same as Token I and II, but switched order of class meeting time; and (6) Self-Evaluation, students rated their own behavior and received prizes based on their rating, rather than the teacher's rating. The token program was markedly successful in reducing disruptive behavior and in increasing reading skills in both the Reward and Cost Classes, but there were no significant differences in the effects of the reward versus the cost procedure. While cost may be seen as a punishment procedure, there were no adverse side effects observed in the Cost Class at any time when the token program was in effect. The order of the classes was unrelated to the level of disruptive behavior or academic progress. The Self-Evaluative Phase, in which the students rated their own behavior, was included as an alternative to the abrupt withdrawal of tokens. In this phase, disruptive behavior remained at the previous low level. PMID:16795351

  10. Factor structure of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in Japanese psychiatric outpatient and student populations

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Tomomi; Igarashi, Hiromi; Kikuchi, Hiroyoshi; Kano, Rikihachiro; Mitoma, Hiroshi; Ohuchi, Kiyoshi; Kitamura, Toshinori

    2009-01-01

    Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a common screening instrument excluding somatic symptoms of depression and anxiety, but previous studies have reported inconsistencies of its factor structure. The construct validity of the Japanese version of the HADS has yet to be reported. To examine the factor structure of the HADS in a Japanese population is needed. Methods Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted in the combined data of 408 psychiatric outpatients and 1069 undergraduate students. The data pool was randomly split in half for a cross validation. An exploratory factor analysis was performed on one half of the data, and the fitness of the plausible model was examined in the other half of the data using a confirmatory factor analysis. Simultaneous multi-group analyses between the subgroups (outpatients vs. students, and men vs. women) were subsequently conducted. Results A two-factor model where items 6 and 7 had dual loadings was supported. These factors were interpreted as reflecting anxiety and depression. Item 10 showed low contributions to both of the factors. Simultaneous multi-group analyses indicated a factor pattern stability across the subgroups. Conclusion The Japanese version of HADS indicated good factorial validity in our samples. However, ambiguous wording of item 7 should be clarified in future revisions. PMID:19445722

  11. Brief Report: Understanding Crisis Behaviors in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder--Iceberg Assessment Interview.

    PubMed

    Stark, Kate H; Barnes, Julia C; Young, Nicholas D; Gabriels, Robin L

    2015-11-01

    Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for emotional dysregulation and behavior problems that can escalate to levels requiring psychiatric hospitalization. Evaluating the etiology of such behaviors can be challenging for health care providers, as individuals with ASD can have difficulty self-reporting concerns. This brief report introduces the Iceberg Assessment Interview (IAI), a tool to organize and elucidate the assessment of issues potentially underlying problem behaviors. A summary of IAIs from a chart review of patients ages 5-18 with ASD (n = 23) admitted to a specialized psychiatric hospital unit illustrates the clinical utility of this tool. Summarized IAI data includes presenting crisis behaviors, caregiver-perceived environmental conditions, and underlying psychosocial and medical problems. PMID:26324248

  12. Preferences and Barriers to Care Following Psychiatric Hospitalization at Two Veterans Affairs Medical Centers: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Paul N; Bowersox, Nicholas; Birgenheir, Denis; Burgess, Jennifer; Forman, Jane; Valenstein, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    Patient preferences and barriers to care may impact receipt of adequate mental health treatment following psychiatric hospitalization and could inform quality improvement initiatives. This study assessed preferences for a broad range of post-hospital services and barriers to counseling by surveying 291 patients and interviewing 25 patients who had recently been discharged from an inpatient psychiatric stay at one of the two Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. Individual counseling was the most frequently reported service that survey respondents preferred, but did not receive; whereas, open-ended survey responses and interviews also identified telephone follow-up "check-in" calls as a frequently preferred service. Difficulty with transportation was the most commonly cited barrier to counseling among survey respondents and in interviews; however, patients strongly preferred in-person counseling to telephone or internet-video alternatives. Increasing support from family and support from an individual Veteran peer were also perceived to be helpful in the majority of survey respondents. PMID:25779387

  13. [The place of the parents at the haematology day hospital].

    PubMed

    Granjard-Goy, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Over recent years, paediatric departments have slowly opened up to parents who now have a recognised status as partners in their children's care. However, while in theory their place in the hospital is no longer brought into question, in practice some difficulties still arise. PMID:26183099

  14. Goals of inpatient treatment for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Sharfstein, Steven S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the psychiatric hospital changed dramatically during the twentieth century. Formerly the primary location for psychiatric treatment, the hospital now plays a more circumscribed role within a community-based system of care. Crisis stabilization, safety, and a focus on rapid discharge are the critical components of the acute inpatient stay. Subspecialized units focus on geriatrics, children, adolescents, dual diagnosis (substance abuse and mental illness), trauma disorders, eating disorders, and forensics. When integrated with the general medical system and a comprehensive base of community-delivered day treatment, residential services, and outpatient services, psychiatric hospitalization is a humane alternative to long-term institutional care. PMID:18729730

  15. Relation of Callous-Unemotional Traits to Length of Stay among Youth Hospitalized at a State Psychiatric Inpatient Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellwagen, Kurt K.; Kerig, Patricia K.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the association of callous-unemotional (C/U) traits with length of psychiatric hospitalization among two samples each with 50 participants: a group of 7-11 year-olds (39 males and 11 females) receiving services on a children's unit, and a group of 12-17 year-olds (27 males and 23 females) receiving services on an adolescent unit. Our

  16. United States Department of Justice findings letters in psychiatric hospital CRIPA cases: an aid or a distraction?

    PubMed

    Geller, Jeffrey; Lee, Leilani

    2013-01-01

    The Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA) of 1980 allows the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) to investigate and file lawsuits against certain institutions, including state and county psychiatric hospitals, where individuals within may face unconstitutional conditions. Subsequent to an investigation and before negotiations or litigation, the state is provided a Findings Letter generated by the DOJ that generally contains recommended remedial measures. It has never been determined to what extent a Findings Letter provides a state with a recommendation specific to the institution for corrective action before the state enters into negotiations with the DOJ. Three study groups were derived from a sample of 15 Findings Letters written to states concerning their psychiatric hospitals between 2003 and 2009. The individual recommended remedial measures, labeled texts of interest (TOI), were identified, and the degree of overlap among the Findings Letters was determined. To a surprising degree, TOIs overlapped to various extents, from exact copies of text to paraphrased versions, in Findings Letters written between 2003 and 2009 to different states and for multiple state hospitals in the same state. The recommended remedial measures provided in the DOJ's Findings Letters are not specific to each state hospital's deficiencies. The Findings Letters offer limited guidance to the state on how to remedy the deficiencies before negotiating with the DOJ. This lack of specificity causes inefficient and delayed remediation of unconstitutional conditions and other deficiencies in care and treatment in psychiatric hospitals. While the current process most often leads to improvements in state hospitals, it is a costly, inefficient remedy, despite the possibility of alternative remedial processes of less expensive and equal or greater effectiveness. PMID:23771930

  17. The Stability of Axis I Diagnoses in Youth across Multiple Psychiatric Hospitalizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettit, Jeremy W.; Morgan, Sharon; Paukert, Amber L.

    2005-01-01

    The literature has yet to reach a consensus as to the stability of severe psychiatric diagnoses in youth. Previous studies among youngsters tracked over set follow-up periods have reported diagnostic stability estimates that are similar to or slightly lower than those of adults. Less is known, however, about the stability of youth psychiatric

  18. Determinants of mental illness stigma for adolescents discharged from psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Moses, Tally

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the factors that increase the risk for enacted mental illness stigma (i.e. rejection, devaluation and exclusion) as perceived by the stigmatized person. This is particularly true for the population of adolescents diagnosed with a mental illness. The aim of this study was to address this question and examine select social and clinical factors that predict enacted stigma (self-reported) with research that follows eighty American adolescents for 6 months following a first psychiatric hospitalization. Drawing on social identity theory, and research on stigma-threatening environments, social group identification and social support, this study tested four hypotheses: affiliation or identification with higher status and lower status peers predicts more and less stigma respectively (H1); a greater and more supportive social network, and more perceived family support predict less stigma (H2); greater severity of internalizing and externalizing symptoms predicts more stigma (H3); and poorer school functioning predicts more stigma (H4). Results indicated that about 70% of adolescents reported experiencing enacted stigma (at 6 months); disrespect or devaluation was more common than outright social rejection. Using OLS regression analyses, the results provided partial support for H1, H3 and H4, while H2 was not supported. The baseline factors found to be most predictive of enacted stigma ratings at 6-months were: affiliating with more friends with mental health problems, identifying with the 'populars' peer group, higher internalizing symptom ratings, and self-reported disciplinary problems at school. These four factors remained significant when controlling for initial enacted stigma ratings, pointing to their importance in determining changes in social stigma experiences in the follow-up period. They also remained significant when controlling for perceived public stigma ratings at follow-up, indicating that the findings were not due to generalized perceptions of stigma of youth with mental illness. PMID:24695363

  19. The Relation between Psychiatric Diagnoses and Constipation in Hospitalized Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    van Harten, Peter N.; Egberts, Toine C. G.; Pijl, Ysbrand J.; Wilting, Ingeborg; Tenback, Diederik E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Constipation is a prevalent problem in patients with psychiatric disorders; it reduces quality of life and may lead to severe complications. The prevalence distribution of constipation across all psychiatric diagnoses in patients with severe mental illness (SMI) has hardly been studied. The aim of this study is to estimate the association between psychiatric disorders and constipation in SMI inpatients. Methods. The strength of the association between constipation (based on use of laxatives) and DSM-IV psychiatric diagnosis was studied in a cross-sectional study with “adjustment disorders” as the reference group. The association was analyzed using logistic regression. Results. Of the 4728 patients, 20.3% had constipation. In the stratum of patients older than 60 years, all psychiatric categories except for substance related disorders were significantly associated with a higher prevalence of constipation (odds ratios ranging from 3.38 to 6.52), whereas no significant associations were found in the stratum of patients between 18 and 60 years (odds ratios ranging from 1.00 to 2.03). Conclusion. In the elderly, all measured psychiatric diagnoses are strongly associated with an increased prevalence of constipation. Physicians should be extra alert for constipation in SMI patients, independent of specific psychiatric diagnoses.

  20. Prevalence of cannabis residues in psychiatric patients: a case study of two mental health referral hospitals in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Awuzu, Epaenetus A; Kaye, Emmanuel; Vudriko, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have reported that abuse of cannabis is a risk factor for psychosis. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of delta 9-tetrahydrocanabinol (Δ(9)-THC), a major metabolite of cannabis, in psychiatric patients in Uganda, and to assess the diagnostic capacity of two referral mental health hospitals to screen patients for exposure to cannabis in Uganda. Socio-demographic characteristics of the patients were collected through questionnaires and review of medical records. Urine samples were collected from 100 patients and analyzed using Δ(9)-THC immunochromatographic kit (Standard Diagnostics(®), South Korea). Seventeen percent of the patients tested positive for Δ(9)-THC residues in their urine. There was strong association (P < 0.05) between history of previous abuse of cannabis and presence of Δ(9)-THC residues in the urine. Alcohol, cocaine, heroin, pethidine, tobacco, khat and kuber were the other substances abused in various combinations. Both referral hospitals lacked laboratory diagnostic kits for detection of cannabis in psychiatric patients. In conclusion, previous abuse of cannabis is associated with occurrence of the residues in psychiatric patients, yet referral mental health facilities in Uganda do not have the appropriate diagnostic kits for detection of cannabis residues as a basis for evidence-based psychotherapy. PMID:24453492

  1. Effectiveness of Day Hospital Mentalization-Based Treatment for Patients with Severe Borderline Personality Disorder: A Matched Control Study.

    PubMed

    Bales, Dawn L; Timman, Reinier; Andrea, Helene; Busschbach, Jan J V; Verheul, Roel; Kamphuis, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends the body of evidence regarding the effectiveness of day hospital Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT) by documenting the treatment outcome of a highly inclusive group of severe borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients, benchmarked by a carefully matched group who received other specialized psychotherapeutic treatments (OPT). Structured diagnostic interviews were conducted to assess diagnostic status at baseline. Baseline, 18-month treatment outcome and 36-month treatment outcome (after the maintenance phase) on psychiatric symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory) and personality functioning (118-item Severity Indices of Personality Problems) were available for 29 BPD patients assigned to MBT, and an initial set of 175 BPD patients assigned to OPT. Propensity scores were used to determine the best matches for the MBT patients within the larger OPT group, yielding 29 MBT and 29 OPT patients for direct comparison. Treatment outcome was analysed using multilevel modelling. Pre to post effect sizes were consistently (very) large for MBT, with a Cohen's d of -1.06 and -1.42 for 18 and 36 months, respectively, for the reduction in psychiatric symptoms, and ds ranging from 0.81 to 2.08 for improvement in domains of personality functioning. OPT also yielded improvement across domains but generally of moderate magnitude. In conclusion, the present matched control study, executed by an independent research institute outside the UK, demonstrated the effectiveness of day hospital MBT in a highly inclusive and severe group of BPD patients, beyond the benchmark provided by a mix of specialized psychotherapy programmes. Interpretation of the (large) between condition effects warrants cautionary caveats given the non-randomized design, as well as variation in treatment dosages. PMID:25060747

  2. Dating violence victimization, dispositional aggression, and nonsuicidal self-injury among psychiatrically hospitalized male and female adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Christie J; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Swenson, Lance; Hower, Heather M; Wolff, Jennifer; Spirito, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the current study was to characterize the association between dating violence victimization and dispositional aggression in predicting nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among psychiatrically hospitalized male and female adolescents. One hundred fifty-five adolescents (ages 13-17) and their parents completed the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children clinical interview to assess NSSI and child abuse; adolescents completed self-report measures of aggression and dating violence victimization (verbal, physical, and sexual). Dating violence victimization and NSSI were found to be highly prevalent among both males and females in this psychiatric inpatient sample. Two moderational models were supported, wherein dating violence was associated with NSSI in the context of elevated trait anger in males and indirect aggression in females. Findings suggest that helping victims of dating violence acquire skills to address certain forms of dispositional aggression may attenuate NSSI. PMID:24612026

  3. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... medicine or osteopathy responsible for the care of the patient as specified in § 482.12(c), nurse,...

  4. Opinions about Treatment Modalities among Patients Involuntarily Committed to a Forensic Psychiatric Hospital in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Vuorio, Osmo; Koivisto, Hanna; Paavola, Paula; Hakola, Panu

    2004-01-01

    Patient satisfaction studies concerning various treatment modalities are few among involuntary forensic psychiatric treatment. They indicate general satisfaction with medication, interactive treatment and occupational therapy but dissatisfaction with lack of privacy, insufficiently explained rules and inadequately explained reasons of seclusion.

  5. Prevalence and Predictors of Domestic-Violence towards Wives by their Psychiatric Hospitalized Husbands

    PubMed Central

    Sahraian, Ali; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Hashemi, Seyed Hamzeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadzadeh, Laaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Violence imposed on wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands has not been studied yet. The current study surveyed the rates and predictors of violence committed by inpatient psychiatric husbands towards their wives. Methods: A convenient sample of wives of 209 married male psychiatric inpatients completed a self-reported questionnaire. They were asked about physical, emotional, social and economic abuse. Results: More than 80% of the husbands socially abused their wives; 73.0% of the wives had been regularly beaten by their husbands; the rate for humiliation was 77.2%; and only 14.1% of the wives reported that their sexual relationship with their husbands is with desire. Conclusion There is a dramatic high rate of different types of abuse toward wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands. They are commonly victimized by their husbands. Moreover, different types of violence always co-occur. Future studies should consider this important issue which is unfortunately an ignored research area. PMID:27006668

  6. The effects of a non-smoking policy on nursing staff smoking behaviour and attitudes in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Bloor, R N; Meeson, L; Crome, I B

    2006-04-01

    The UK Department of Health required that by April 2001, all NHS bodies would have implemented a smoking policy. It has been suggested that the best demonstration a hospital can make of its commitment to health is to ban smoking on its premises. This paper reports on an evaluation of the effectiveness of a non-smoking policy in a newly opened NHS psychiatric hospital. Questionnaires were sent to all 156 nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital to assess the effectiveness of the policy in terms of staff smoking behaviour, attitudes to the restriction and compliance with the policy. Of the 156 questionnaires distributed, 92 (58%) were returned; smokers, former smokers and those who have never smoked were quite evenly represented at 34.78%, 34.78% and 30.43%, respectively. Of eight critical success factors for the policy, only one, staff not smoking in Trust public areas, had been achieved. A non-smoking policy was generally accepted as necessary by nursing staff working in a mental health setting. Staff felt that the policy was not effective in motivating smoking nurses to stop and that insufficient support was given to these nurses. The study highlights the importance of introducing staff support systems as an integral part of smoking policies and the role of counterintuitive behaviour in the effectiveness of smoking policy introduction in healthcare settings. PMID:16608474

  7. Chronic status patients in a university hospital: bed-day utilization and length of stay.

    PubMed Central

    McClaran, J; Tover-Berglas, R; Glass, K C

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the lengths of stay of chronic status patients in an acute care hospital, to identify discharge stages that contribute to excessive stays, to estimate the length of stay at each discharge stage and to link hospital bed-day utilization by the discharge stage to the experience of the patient. DESIGN: Two-year prospective cohort study. The number of hospital days retrospective to the date of the current admission were included in the analysis. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: All 115 inpatients formally declared as achieving chronic status by July 31, 1987. OUTCOME MEASURES: Lengths of stay (total days and days at acute and chronic status) for chronic status patients, including those still in hospital at the end of the study period. Each bed-day was assigned to a discharge stage that corresponded to the patient's status. The disposition of each patient by the end of the study period was reviewed. RESULTS: The study population spent a total of 101 585 days in hospital. The total length of stay per patient was nearly four times that stated in the hospital's annual report, in which the figure was calculated only on the basis of discharge data. On average only 77.2 (8.7%) of the days were spent in acute care. The remaining days were at the chronic level: 24.1% were spent waiting for completion of an application to a long-term care facility, 25.3% for application approval and 41.9% for an available bed in the assigned long-term care institution. For 30 patients no initiation of the discharge process was ever undertaken. As the number of patients in each progressive discharge stage decreased, the wait per patient increased. By the end of the study period only 32 patients had been transferred to a public long-term care facility; 22 were still in hospital, and 35 had died waiting for placement. CONCLUSIONS: Although considered to be a useful measure of hospital efficiency, length of stay determined from discharge data creates an iceberg effect when applied to chronic status patients in acute care hospitals. Lack of access to the assigned resource is the most important reason for a delay in discharge. Interventions, whether undertaken at the patient, hospital or provincial level, must to some degree address this issue. Further study is required to determine which risk factors will predict lags at each discharge stage. Since our discharge staging reflects not only the experience of the patient but also the utilization of hospital bed-days and access to provincial resources, it provides a common language for clinicians, hospital administrators and systems planners. PMID:1933708

  8. A Follow-Up Study To Identify the Percentage of Appropriate Classroom Behaviors Maintained upon Return to School from Psychiatric Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seraydarian, Elizabeth

    This practicum examined the maintenance in eight emotionally disturbed children (ages 7-13) of three appropriate classroom behaviors taught during a 10-week inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. In the hospital school setting the focus was on: (1) appropriate interactions with teachers; (2) appropriate interactions with peers; and (3) appropriate

  9. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  10. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  11. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  12. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409....62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. There is a lifetime maximum of 190 days on inpatient psychiatric hospital services available to any beneficiary. Therefore, once an individual...

  13. Inpatient Readmissions and Emergency Department Visits within 30 Days of a Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Jesse J.; Chan, Theodore C.; Killeen, James P.; Castillo, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inpatient hospital readmissions have become a focus for healthcare reform and cost-containment efforts. Initiatives targeting unanticipated readmissions have included care coordination for specific high readmission diseases and patients and health coaching during the post-discharge transition period. However, little research has focused on emergency department (ED) visits following an inpatient admission. The objective of this study was to assess 30-day ED utilization and all-cause readmissions following a hospital admission. Methods This was a retrospective study using inpatient and ED utilization data from two hospitals with a shared patient population in 2011. We assessed the 30-day ED visit rate and 30-day readmission rate and compared patient characteristics among individuals with 30-day inpatient readmissions, 30-day ED discharges, and no 30-day visits. Results There were 13,449 patients who met the criteria of an index visit. Overall, 2,453 (18.2%) patients had an ED visit within 30 days of an inpatient stay. However, only 55.6% (n=1,363) of these patients were admitted at one of these 30-day visits, resulting in a 30-day all-cause readmission rate of 10.1%. Conclusion Approximately one in five patients presented to the ED within 30 days of an inpatient hospitalization and over half of these patients were readmitted. Readmission measures that incorporate ED visits following an inpatient stay might better inform interventions to reduce avoidable readmissions. PMID:26759647

  14. Lower 30-day readmission rates with roflumilast treatment among patients hospitalized for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Alex Z; Sun, Shawn X; Huang, Xingyue; Amin, Alpesh N

    2015-01-01

    Background Few data exist related to the impact of roflumilast on health care utilization. This retrospective study estimated 30-day hospital readmission rates between patients who did and did not use roflumilast among those with COPD hospitalizations. Methods Data were from MarketScan, a large US commercial health insurance claims database. Patients aged ?40 years with at least one hospitalization for COPD between 2010 and 2011 were included. The roflumilast group included patients who used roflumilast within 14 days after the first hospitalization (index), while the comparison group (non-roflumilast) included patients who did not use roflumilast during the study period. Continuous enrollment for at least 6 months before and 30 days after the index date was required. The 30-day hospitalization rate was calculated after the index hospitalization. Conditional logistic regression with propensity score 1:3 matching was employed to assess the difference in 30-day hospital readmission rates between the roflumilast and non-roflumilast groups, adjusting for baseline characteristics, comorbidity, health care utilization, and COPD medication use within 14 days after the index date. Results A total of 15,755 COPD patients met the selection criteria, ie, 366 (2.3%) in the roflumilast group and 15,389 (97.7%) in the non-roflumilast group. The mean ( standard deviation) age was 7112.5 years and 52% were female. After propensity score matching, all-cause 30-day hospitalization rates were 6.9% and 11.1% in the roflumilast and non-roflumilast groups, respectively. COPD-related 30-day hospitalization rates were 6.3% and 9.2% in the roflumilast and non-roflumilast groups, respectively. Conditional logistic regression identified a significantly lower likelihood of all-cause 30-day readmission (odds ratio 0.59, 95% confidence interval 0.370.93, P=0.023) for roflumilast patients relative to non-roflumilast patients. Conclusion This study showed, in a real-world setting, that use of roflumilast was associated with a lower rate of hospital readmission within 30 days among patients hospitalized for COPD. PMID:25999706

  15. Relation between bed use, social deprivation, and overall bed availability in acute adult psychiatric units, and alternative residential options: a cross sectional survey, one day census data, and staff interviews.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, G.; Beadsmoore, A.; Moore, C.; Hardy, P.; Muijen, M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the relation between bed use, social deprivation, and overall bed availability in acute adult psychiatric units and to explore the range of alternative residential options. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey, combined with one day census data; ratings by and interviews with staff; examination of routine data sources. SETTINGS: Nationally representative sample of acute psychiatric units. SUBJECTS: 2236 patients who were inpatients on census day. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bed occupancy levels, judged need for continuing inpatient care, reasons preventing discharge, scores on the Health of the Nation outcome scales. RESULTS: Bed occupancy was related to social deprivation and total availability of acute beds (r = 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.19 to 0.88, F = 8.72, df = 2.23; P = 0.002). However, 27% (603/2215) of current inpatients (61% (90/148) of those with stays of > 6 months) were judged not to need continuing admission. The major reasons preventing discharge were lack of suitable accommodation (37% (176/482) of patients in hospital < 6 months v 36% (31/86) of those in hospital > 6 months); inadequate domiciliary based community support (23% (113) v 9% (8)); and lack of long term rehabilitation places (21% (100) v 47% (40)). Scores on the Health of the Nation outcome scale were generally consistent with these staff judgments. CONCLUSIONS: The shortage of beds in acute psychiatric units is related to both social deprivation and the overall availability of acute beds. Patients currently inappropriately placed on acute admission wards should be relocated into more suitable accommodation, either in hospital or in the community. A range of provisions is required; simply providing more acute beds is not the answer. PMID:9022489

  16. The INDDEP study: inpatient and day hospital treatment for depression symptom course and predictors of change

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression can be treated in an outpatient, inpatient or day hospital setting. In the German health care system, episodes of inpatient or day hospital treatment are common, but there is a lack of studies evaluating effectiveness in routine care and subgroups of patients with a good or insufficient treatment response. Our study aims at identifying prognostic and prescriptive outcome predictors as well as comparative effectiveness in psychosomatic inpatient and day hospital treatment in depression. Methods/Design In a naturalistic study, 300 consecutive inpatient and 300 day hospital treatment episodes in seven psychosomatic hospitals in Germany will be included. Patients are assessed at four time points of measurement (admission, discharge, 3-months follow-up, 12-months follow-up) including a broad range of variables (self-report and expert ratings). First, the whole sample will be analysed to identify prognostic and prescriptive predictors of outcome (primary outcome criterion: Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms QIDS-total score, expert rating). Secondly, for a comparison of inpatient and day hospital treatment, samples will be matched according to known predictors of outcome. Discussion Naturalistic studies with good external validity are needed to assess treatment outcome in depression in routine care and to identify subgroups of patients with different therapeutic needs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN20317064 PMID:23531019

  17. Leisure Activity and Hospital Readmission of Short-Term Psychiatric Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMinn, Sheri B.; Lay, C. Marvin

    William Menninger (1948) reported research results indicating a significant relationship in a former patient's ability to stay well and his participation in recreation. J. Bates (1963) indicated one reason patients return to psychiatric facilities was the lack of skills that center around recreation. This study was conducted to investigate the

  18. PCL-R Psychopathy Predicts Disruptive Behavior Among Male Offenders in a Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Martin; De Ruiter, Corine; Nijman, Henk

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between psychopathy, according to the Dutch language version of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and various types of disruptive behavior during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment is investigated. Ninety-two male participants were administered the PCL-R following admission to an inpatient forensic

  19. Emergency Psychiatric Services for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: Perspectives of Hospital Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Yona; Gracey, Carolyn; Gelfand, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Strains on the mainstream mental health system can result in inaccessible services that force individuals with intellectual disabilities into the emergency room (ER) when in psychiatric crisis. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical and systemic issues surrounding emergency psychiatry services for people with intellectual disabilities,

  20. Reducing unnecessary hospital days to improve quality of care through physician accountability: a cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over 20% of hospital bed use is inappropriate, implying a waste of resources and the increase of patient iatrogenic risk. Methods This is a cluster, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial, carried out in a large University Hospital of Northern Italy, aiming to evaluate the effect of a strategy to reduce unnecessary hospital days. The primary outcome was the percentage of patient-days compatible with discharge. Among secondary objectives, to describe the strategys effect in the long-term, as well as on hospital readmissions, considered to be a marker of the quality of hospital care. The 12 medical wards with the longest length of stay participated. Effectiveness was measured at the individual level on 3498 eligible patients during monthly index days. Patients admitted or discharged on index days, or with stay >90 days, were excluded. All ward staff was blinded to the index days, while staff in the control arm and data analysts were blinded to the trials objectives and interventions. The strategy comprised the distribution to physicians of the list of their patients whose hospital stay was compatible with discharge according to a validated Delay Tool, and of physician length of stay profiles, followed by audits managed autonomously by the physicians of the ward. Results During the 12 months of data collection, over 50% of patient-days were judged to be compatible with discharge. Delays were mainly due to problems with activities under medical staff control. Multivariate analysis considering clustering showed that the strategy reduced patient-days compatible with discharge by 16% in the intervention vs control group, (OR=0.841; 95% CI, 0.735 to 0.963; P=0.012). Follow-up at 1 year did not yield a statistically significant difference between the percentages of patient-days judged to be compatible with discharge between the two arms (OR=0.818; 95% CI, 0.476 to 1.405; P=0.47). There was no significant difference in 30-day readmission and mortality rates for all eligible patients (N=3498) between the two arms. Conclusions Results indicate that a strategy, involving physician direct accountability, can reduce unnecessary hospital days. Relatively simple interventions, like the one assessed in this study, should be implemented in all hospitals with excessive lengths of stay, since unnecessary prolongation may be harmful to patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01422811. PMID:23305251

  1. Cause-Specific Hospital Admissions on Hot Days in Sydney, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Vaneckova, Pavla; Bambrick, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    Background While morbidity outcomes for major disease categories during extreme heat have received increasing research attention, there has been very limited investigation at the level of specific disease subcategories. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed daily hospital admissions for cardiovascular (CVD), respiratory (RD), genitourinary (GU) and mental diseases (MD), diabetes (DIA), dehydration (DEH) and the effects of heat and light (HEAT) in Sydney between 1991 and 2009. We further investigated the sensitivity to heat of subcategories within the major disease groups. We defined hot days as those with temperatures in the 95th and 99th percentiles within the study period. We applied time-stratified case-crossover analysis to compare the hospital admissions on hot days with those on non-hot days matched by day of the week. We calculated the odds ratios (OR) of admissions between the two types of days, accounting for other environmental variables (relative humidity, ozone and particulate matter) and non-environmental trends (public and school holidays). On hot days, hospital admissions increased for all major categories except GU. This increase was not shared homogeneously across all diseases within a major category: within RD, only other diseases of the respiratory system (includes pleurisy or empyema) increased significantly, while admissions for asthma decreased. Within MD, hospital admissions increased only for psychoses. Admissions due to some major categories increased one to three days after a hot day (e.g., DIA, RD and CVD) and on two and three consecutive days (e.g., HEAT and RD). Conclusions/Significance High ambient temperatures were associated with increased hospital admissions for several disease categories, with some within-category variation. Future analyses should focus on subgroups within broad disease categories to pinpoint medical conditions most affected by ambient heat. PMID:23408986

  2. The 23-Hour Observation Unit Admissions Within the Emergency Service at a National Tertiary Psychiatric Hospital: Clarifying Clinical Profiles, Outcomes, and Predictors of Subsequent Hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    San Thinn, Daw San; Kuswanto, Carissa Nadia; Sum, Min Yi; Chai, Suet Bin; Doris Sok, Hian Koh; Xu, Changqing; Chuan Su, Alex Hsin; Sengupta, Somnath; Jacob, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We examined health care utilization, clinical profiles (such as sociodemographic features, clinical severity), and outcomes (inpatient admission, revisit within 24 hours of discharge) of patients who were admitted to a 23-hour observation unit within the emergency service of a tertiary psychiatric hospital and hypothesized that a specific clinical profile (greater clinical severity, lower psychosocial functioning) predicted subsequent inpatient hospitalization. Method: The medical records of all patients admitted to the observation unit from February 5, 2007, to February 4, 2012 (N = 2,158) were assessed for relevant data. Clinical severity and level of psychosocial functioning were assessed using Clinical Global ImpressionsSeverity (CGI-S) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scales, respectively. Results: Overall, the patients seen were predominantly Chinese males > 36 years old who had diagnoses including stress-related, anxiety, affective spectrum, and psychotic disorders. The clinical severity score (CGI-S) improved significantly following discharge from the observation unit (t1,1848 = 23.316; P < .001). Logistic regression analyses revealed that self-referred (P = .001), older patients (P = .007) with past psychiatric history (P = .019), lower GAF scores (P = .025), and less improvement of CGI-S scores (P = .001) were associated with inpatient admission after a 23-hour stay in the observation unit. Conclusions: Our study findings affirmed our hypothesis and supported the utility of the observation unit in monitoring the overall clinical status of patients, which was linked with subsequent inpatient admissions. Better management of these patients at the outpatient level can potentially decrease unnecessary hospitalization and reduce health care cost as well as illness burden on patients and caregivers. PMID:26693048

  3. Predicting U.S. Army suicides after hospitalizations with psychiatric diagnoses in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Warner, LTC Christopher H.; Ivany, LTC Christopher; Petukhova, Maria V.; Rose, Sherri; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Brown, LTC Millard; Cai, Tianxi; Colpe, Lisa J.; Cox, Kenneth L.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Li, Junlong; Millikan-Bell, Amy M.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.; Wessely, Simon; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The U.S. Army experienced a sharp rise in suicides beginning in 2004. Administrative data show that among those at highest risk are soldiers in the 12 months after inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder. OBJECTIVE To develop an actuarial risk algorithm predicting suicide in the 12 months after US Army soldier inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder to target expanded post-hospital care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS There were 53,769 hospitalizations of active duty soldiers in 2004–2009 with ICD-9-CM psychiatric admission diagnoses. Administrative data available prior to hospital discharge abstracted from a wide range of data systems (socio81 demographic, Army career, criminal justice, medical/pharmacy) were used to predict suicides in the subsequent 12 months using machine learning methods (regression trees, penalized regressions) designed to evaluate cross-validated linear, nonlinear, and interactive predictive associations. MAIN OUTCOME Suicides of soldiers hospitalized with psychiatric disorders in the 12 months after hospital discharge. RESULTS 68 soldiers died by suicide within 12 months of hospital discharge (12.0% of all Army suicides), equivalent to 263.9 suicides/100,000 person-years compared to 18.5 suicides/100,000 person-years in the total Army. Strongest predictors included socio-demographics (male, late age of enlistment), criminal offenses (verbal violence, weapons possession), prior suicidality, aspects of prior psychiatric inpatient and outpatient treatment, and disorders diagnosed during the focal hospitalizations. 52.9% of post-hospital suicides occurred after the 5% of hospitalizations with highest predicted suicide risk (3,824.1 suicides/100,000 person years). These highest-risk hospitalizations also accounted for significantly elevated proportions of several other adverse post-hospital outcomes (unintentional injury deaths, suicide attempts, re-hospitalizations). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The high concentration of risk of suicides and other adverse outcomes might justify targeting expanded post-hospital interventions to soldiers classified as having highest post-hospital suicide risk, although final determination requires careful consideration of intervention costs, comparative effectiveness, and possible adverse effects. PMID:25390793

  4. Acute Psychiatric Hospital Admissions of Adults and Elderly Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Examination of the records of 240 inpatients with mental retardation and 7 with autism discharged from a university hospital indicated that elderly adults had more medical problems than did adults, more elderly adults were transferred to a state hospital, and the most common diagnosis in both adults and elderly adults was chronic schizophrenia,

  5. Hospital's comic book promotes benefits of good eating habits. Grocery chain joins campaign with "Cancer Day" promotion. Parkview Hospital, Fort Wayne, IN.

    PubMed

    Herreria, J

    1998-01-01

    For the past seven years, Parkview Hospital has provided the educational component of Cancer Day. The hospital has distributed pamphlets that educate about different forms of cancer. Last year, the marketing department undertook the subject of colon cancer. PMID:10177638

  6. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. PMID:22962847

  7. Psychiatric case notes: symptoms of mental illness and their attribution at the Maudsley Hospital, 1924-35.

    PubMed

    Jones, Edgar; Rahman, Shahina; Everitt, Brian

    2012-06-01

    Case notes of patients treated at the Maudsley Hospital during the interwar period provided data about diagnosis, symptoms and beliefs about mental illness. In the absence of effective treatments, patients were investigated in detail in the hope that connections between disease processes might be revealed. We analysed a randomly-selected sample of 700 patients taken equally from 1924, 1928, 1931 and 1935. Eight groups (three representing psychosis and five indicating psychological disorders) were identified on the basis of symptom clusters. Formal diagnosis did not correlate with clusters. Although there was a measure of agreement between patients and doctors about the cause of mental illness, stigma may have inhibited discussion of some themes. Psychiatric diagnosis was informed by symptoms but not determined by them. In an era before classification systems were tested for reliability, diagnosis was fluid, reflecting changing hypotheses about causation, pathology and treatment. Attributions were associated with diagnosis rather than symptoms. PMID:23057225

  8. Patient safety culture in two Finnish state-run forensic psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Anssi; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Eronen, Markku; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture refers to the way patient safety is regarded and implemented within an organization and the structures and procedures in place to support this. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient safety culture, identify areas for improvement, and establish a baseline for improving state hospitals in Finland. Cross-sectional design data were collected from two state-run forensic hospitals in Finland using an anonymous, Web-based survey targeted to hospital staff based on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire. The response rate was 43% (n = 283). The overall patient safety level was rated as excellent or very good by 58% of respondents. The highest positive grade was for "teamwork within units" (72%). The lowest rating was for "nonpunitive response to errors" (26% positive). Good opportunities for supplementary education had a statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) effect on 9 of 12 Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture dimensions. Statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences in patient safety culture were also found in the staff's educational background, manager status, and between the two hospitals. These findings suggest there are a number of patient safety problems related to cultural dimensions. Supplementary education was shown to be a highly significant factor in transforming patient safety culture and should therefore be taken into account alongside sufficient resources. PMID:24256983

  9. Half of 30-Day Hospital Readmissions Among HIV-Infected Patients Are Potentially Preventable

    PubMed Central

    Kitchell, Ellen; Etherton, Sarah Shelby; Duarte, Piper; Halm, Ethan A.; Jain, Mamta K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thirty-day readmission rates, a widely utilized quality metric, are high among HIV-infected individuals. However, it is unknown how many 30-day readmissions are preventable, especially in HIV patients, who have been excluded from prior potentially preventable readmission analyses. We used electronic medical records to identify all readmissions within 30 days of discharge among HIV patients hospitalized at a large urban safety net hospital in 2011. Two independent reviewers assessed whether readmissions were potentially preventable using both published criteria and detailed chart review, how readmissions might have been prevented, and the phase of care deemed suboptimal (inpatient care, discharge planning, post-discharge). Of 1137 index admissions, 213 (19%) resulted in 30-day readmissions. These admissions occurred among 930 unique HIV patients, with 130 individuals (14%) experiencing 30-day readmissions. Of these 130, about half were determined to be potentially preventable using published criteria (53%) or implicit chart review (48%). Not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) greatly increased the odds of a preventable readmission (OR 5.9, CI:2.4–14.8). Most of the preventable causes of readmission were attributed to suboptimal care during the index hospitalization. Half of 30-day readmission in HIV patients are potentially preventable. Increased focus on early ART initiation, adherence counseling, management of chronic conditions, and appropriate timing of discharge may help reduce readmissions in this vulnerable population. PMID:26154066

  10. Organization of Hospital Nursing and 30-day Readmissions in Medicare Patients Undergoing Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chenjuan; McHugh, Matthew D; Aiken, Linda H

    2014-01-01

    Background Growing scrutiny of readmissions has placed hospitals at the center of readmission prevention. Little is known, however, about hospital nursing - a critical organizational component of hospital service system - in relation to readmissions. Objectives To determine the relationships between hospital nursing factors - nurse work environment, nurse staffing, and nurse education - and 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients undergoing general, orthopedic, and vascular surgery. Method and Design We linked Medicare patient discharge data, multi-state nurse survey data, and American Hospital Association Annual Survey data. Our sample included 220,914 Medicare surgical patients and 25,082 nurses from 528 hospitals in four states (CA, FL, NJ, & PA). Risk-adjusted robust logistic regressions were used for analyses. Results The average 30-day readmission rate was 10% in our sample (general surgery: 11%; orthopedic surgery: 8%; vascular surgery: 12%). Readmission rates varied widely across surgical procedures and could be as high as 26% (upper limb and toe amputation for circulatory system disorders). Each additional patient per nurse increased the odds of readmission by 3% (OR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.00-1.05). Patients cared in hospitals with better nurse work environments had lower odds of readmission (OR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.95-0.99). Administrative support to nursing practice (OR=0.96, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99) and nurse-physician relations (OR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.95-0.99) were two main attributes of the work environment that were associated with readmissions. Conclusions Better nurse staffing and work environment were significantly associated with 30-day readmission, and can be considered as system-level interventions to reduce readmissions and associated financial penalties. PMID:25373404

  11. [The role of the nurse and child health nurse in a haematology day hospital].

    PubMed

    Perray, Stéphanie; Costes, Élodie; Héritier, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The paediatric haemato-oncology nurse and the child health nurse in a day hospital have specific technical skills and in-depth knowledge in order to be able to provide global care for children with leukaemia. Close collaboration between the different professionals working in this care unit is essential. PMID:26183096

  12. Reducing alternate level of care days at Winchester District Memorial Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ricottone, Madeline

    2015-09-01

    Winchester District Memorial Hospital has maintained near-zero alternative level of care census days for three consecutive years by focusing on partnerships, staff/physician engagement, and maintaining a circle of care with patients and families. The strategies and challenges faced revisiting internal discharge processes and linking directly to their local community through change management techniques are discussed. PMID:26152906

  13. Antenatal day care units versus hospital admission for women with complicated pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dowswell, Therese; Middleton, Philippa; Weeks, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Antenatal day care units have been widely used as an alternative to inpatient care for women with pregnancy complications including mild and moderate hypertension, and preterm prelabour rupture of the membranes. Objectives The objective of this review is to compare day care units with routine care or hospital admission for women with pregnancy complications in terms of maternal and perinatal outcomes, length of hospital stay, acceptability, and costs to women and health services providers. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Groups Trials Register (February 2009). Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing day care with inpatient or routine care for women with complicated pregnancy. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently carried out data extraction and assessed studies for risk of bias. Main results Three trials with a total of 504 women were included. For most outcomes it was not possible to pool results from trials in meta-analyses as outcomes were measured in different ways. Compared with women in the ward/routine care group, women attending day care units were less likely to be admitted to hospital overnight (risk ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 0.62). The average length of antenatal admission was shorter for women attending for day care, although outpatient attendances were increased for this group. There was evidence from one study that women attending for day care were significantly less likely to undergo induction of labour, but mode of birth was similar for women in both groups. For other outcomes there were no significant differences between groups. The evidence regarding the costs of different types of care was mixed; while the length of antenatal hospital stays were reduced, this did not necessarily translate into reduced health service costs. While most women tended to be satisfied with whatever care they received, women preferred day care compared with hospital admission. Authors conclusions Small studies suggest that there are no major differences in clinical outcomes for mothers or babies between antenatal day units or hospital admission, but women may prefer day care. PMID:19821282

  14. The effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.

  15. An Administrative Claims Model for Profiling Hospital 30-Day Mortality Rates for Pneumonia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bratzler, Dale W.; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Wang, Yun; O'Donnell, Walter J.; Metersky, Mark; Han, Lein F.; Rapp, Michael T.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Outcome measures for patients hospitalized with pneumonia may complement process measures in characterizing quality of care. We sought to develop and validate a hierarchical regression model using Medicare claims data that produces hospital-level, risk-standardized 30-day mortality rates useful for public reporting for patients hospitalized with pneumonia. Methodology/Principal Findings Retrospective study of fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries age 66 years and older with a principal discharge diagnosis of pneumonia. Candidate risk-adjustment variables included patient demographics, administrative diagnosis codes from the index hospitalization, and all inpatient and outpatient encounters from the year before admission. The model derivation cohort included 224,608 pneumonia cases admitted to 4,664 hospitals in 2000, and validation cohorts included cases from each of years 19982003. We compared model-derived state-level standardized mortality estimates with medical record-derived state-level standardized mortality estimates using data from the Medicare National Pneumonia Project on 50,858 patients hospitalized from 19982001. The final model included 31 variables and had an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.72. In each administrative claims validation cohort, model fit was similar to the derivation cohort. The distribution of standardized mortality rates among hospitals ranged from 13.0% to 23.7%, with 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of 16.5%, 17.4%, and 18.3%, respectively. Comparing model-derived risk-standardized state mortality rates with medical record-derived estimates, the correlation coefficient was 0.86 (Standard Error?=?0.032). Conclusions/Significance An administrative claims-based model for profiling hospitals for pneumonia mortality performs consistently over several years and produces hospital estimates close to those using a medical record model. PMID:21532758

  16. The psychiatric hospital and its place in a mental health service

    PubMed Central

    Tooth, Geoffrey

    1958-01-01

    Modern methods of treatment of mental disease enable the average length of stay in hospital to be drastically reduced. The former overcrowding is therefore disappearing; in fact, it should be possible to contemplate a reduction in the size of the hospitals, particularly if new admissions are kept to a minimum by the provision of efficient out-patient clinics and of adequate geriatric and domiciliary nursing services. Taking recent trends in England and Wales as his starting point, the author outlines ways in which a modern mental health service might be built up around existing facilities under a variety of conditions. He advocates that, as far as possible, the treatment of mental disease should be integrated into general medicine, and emphasises the need for close co-operation between psychiatrists, family doctors, and the staff of general hospitals. PMID:13585081

  17. Effects of a Dedicated Regional Psychiatric Emergency Service on Boarding of Psychiatric Patients in Area Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Scott; Calma, Nicole; Stone, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mental health patients boarding for long hours, even days, in United States emergency departments (EDs) awaiting transfer for psychiatric services has become a considerable and widespread problem. Past studies have shown average boarding times ranging from 6.8 hours to 34 hours. Most proposed solutions to this issue have focused solely on increasing available inpatient psychiatric hospital beds, rather than considering alternative emergency care designs that could provide prompt access to treatment and might reduce the need for many hospitalizations. One suggested option has been the regional dedicated emergency psychiatric facility, which serves to evaluate and treat all mental health patients for a given area, and can accept direct transfers from other EDs. This study sought to assess the effects of a regional dedicated emergency psychiatric facility design known at the Alameda Model on boarding times and hospitalization rates for psychiatric patients in area EDs. Methods Over a 30-day period beginning in January 2013, 5 community hospitals in Alameda County, California, tracked all ED patients on involuntary mental health holds to determine boarding time, defined as the difference between when they were deemed stable for psychiatric disposition and the time they were discharged from the ED for transfer to the regional psychiatric emergency service. Patients were also followed to determine the percentage admitted to inpatient psychiatric units after evaluation and treatment in the psychiatric emergency service. Results In a total sample of 144 patients, the average boarding time was approximately 1 hour and 48 minutes. Only 24.8% were admitted for inpatient psychiatric hospitalization from the psychiatric emergency service. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the Alameda Model of transferring patients from general hospital EDs to a regional psychiatric emergency service reduced the length of boarding times for patients awaiting psychiatric care by over 80% versus comparable state ED averages. Additionally, the psychiatric emergency service can provide assessment and treatment that may stabilize over 75% of the crisis mental health population at this level of care, thus dramatically alleviating the demand for inpatient psychiatric beds. The improved, timely access to care, along with the savings from reduced boarding times and hospitalization costs, may well justify the costs of a regional psychiatric emergency service in appropriate systems. PMID:24578760

  18. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Certification of need for hospitalization when a SNF bed is not available. (1) The physician may certify or... treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for the... physician is expected to continue efforts to place the patient in a participating SNF as soon as a...

  19. Evaluating Psychiatric Hospital Admission Decisions for Children in Foster Care: An Optimal Classification Tree Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Jessica A.; Leon, Scott C.; Bryant, Fred B.; Lyons, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored clinical and nonclinical predictors of inpatient hospital admission decisions across a sample of children in foster care over 4 years (N = 13,245). Forty-eight percent of participants were female and the mean age was 13.4 (SD = 3.5 years). Optimal data analysis (Yarnold & Soltysik, 2005) was used to construct a nonlinear…

  20. Evaluating Psychiatric Hospital Admission Decisions for Children in Foster Care: An Optimal Classification Tree Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Jessica A.; Leon, Scott C.; Bryant, Fred B.; Lyons, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored clinical and nonclinical predictors of inpatient hospital admission decisions across a sample of children in foster care over 4 years (N = 13,245). Forty-eight percent of participants were female and the mean age was 13.4 (SD = 3.5 years). Optimal data analysis (Yarnold & Soltysik, 2005) was used to construct a nonlinear

  1. Persistence of Impaired Functioning and Psychological Distress After Medical Hospitalization for Men with Co-Occurring Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Brenda M; Blow, Frederic C; Loveland Cook, Cynthia A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To measure the persistence of impaired health-related quality of life (HRQL) and psychological distress associated with co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders in a longitudinal sample of medically hospitalized male veterans. DESIGN A random sample followed observationally for 1 year after study enrollment. SETTING Inpatient medical and surgical wards at three university-affiliated Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS A random sample of 1,007 admissions to medical and surgical inpatient services, excluding women and admissions for psychiatric reasons. A subset of participants (n = 736) was designated for longitudinal follow-up assessments at 3 and 12 months after study enrollment. This subset was selected to include all possible participants with study-administered psychiatric diagnoses (52%) frequency-matched by date of study enrollment to approximately equivalent numbers of participants without psychiatric diagnoses (48%). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS All participants were administered a computerized structured psychiatric diagnostic interview for 13 psychiatric (include substance use) disorders and received longitudinal assessments at 3 and 12 months on a multidimensional measure of HRQL, the SF-36, and a measure of psychological distress, the Symptom Checklist, 90-item version. On average, HRQL declined and psychological distress increased over time (P < .05). Psychiatric disorders were associated with significantly greater impairments in functioning and increased distress on all measures (P < .001) except physical functioning (P < .05). These results were replicated in the patients (n = 130) who received inpatient or outpatient mental health or substance abuse services. CONCLUSIONS General medical physicians need to evaluate the mental health status of their hospitalized and seriously ill patients. Effective mental health interventions can be initiated posthospitalization, either immediately in primary care or through referral to appropriate specialty care, and should improve health functioning over time. PMID:11251751

  2. Psychosocial functioning of individuals with schizophrenia in community housing facilities and the psychiatric hospital in Zurich.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Matthias; Briner, David; Kawohl, Wolfram; Seifritz, Erich; Baumgartner-Nietlisbach, Gabriela

    2015-12-15

    Individuals with severe mental illness frequently have difficulties in obtaining and maintaining adequate accommodation. If they are not willing or able to adapt to requirements of traditional supported housing institutions they may live in sheltered and emergency accommodation. Adequate mental health services are rarely available in these facilities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mental health, functional and social status of individuals living in community sheltered housing facilities. A cross-sectional survey of n=338 individuals in sheltered housing compared to a sample of patients at intake in acute inpatient psychiatry (n=619) concerning clinical and social variables was carried out in the catchment area of Zurich. Matched subsamples of individuals with schizophrenia (n=168) were compared concerning functioning and impairments on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Individuals with schizophrenia in sheltered housing (25% of the residents) have significantly more problems concerning substance use, physical illness, psychopathological symptoms other than psychosis and depression, and relationships, daily activities and occupation than patients with schizophrenia at intake on an acute psychiatric ward. Community sheltered accommodation although conceptualized to prevent homelessness in the general population de facto serve as housing facilities for individuals with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness. PMID:26416587

  3. A retrospective cohort study of tinea pedis and tinea unguium in inpatients in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Masaaki; Suzuki, Toshihito; Hiruma, Masataro; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective cohort study on clinical and mycological features of tinea pedis and tinea unguium in psychiatric inpatients in Japan. Of the 317 inpatients (152 with schizophrenia and 165 with depression), 46.1% had tinea pedis and 23.7% had tinea unguium. Of those with tinea pedis, 48.6% also had tinea unguium. The most common clinical type of tinea pedis was the combination of interdigital type and hyperkeratotic type. The mean clinical score of tinea pedis was 5.9, and that of tinea unguium based on the Scoring Clinical Index for Onychomycosis (SCIO) was 15.8. The main causative species of tinea pedis were Trichophyton rubrum (68.4%) and T. mentagrophytes (26.3%). No statistically significant differences were observed in incidence rates of tinea pedis or tinea unguium between men and women or between patients with schizophrenia and those with depression. As for incidence rates by age, patients with depression showed a single peak for tinea pedis and / or tinea unguium in their 50's, while patients with schizophrenia exhibited twin peaks for tinea pedis and / or tinea unguium in their 50's and 70's. Both tinea pedis and tinea unguium tended to become more severe in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Our study suggests that schizophrenia and depression, like diabetes mellitus and HIV infections, should be regarded as risk factors for tinea pedis and tinea unguium. PMID:24943206

  4. Thirty Day Hospital Readmission for Medicaid Enrollees with Schizophrenia: The Role of Local Health Care Systems

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Alisa B.; Epstein, Arnold M.; McGuire, Thomas G.; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Frank, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Examining health care system characteristics possibly associated with 30-day readmission may reveal opportunities to improve healthcare quality as well as reduce costs. Aims of the Study Examine the relationship between 30-day mental health readmission for persons with schizophrenia and county-level community treatment characteristics. Methods Observational study of 18 state Medicaid programs (N=274 counties, representing 103,967 enrollees with schizophrenia--28,083 of whom received ≥1 mental health hospitalization) using Medicaid administrative and United States Area Health Resource File data from 2005. Medicaid is a federal-state program and major health insurance provider for low income and disabled individuals, and the predominant provider of insurance for individuals with schizophrenia. The Area Health Resource File provides county-level estimates of providers. We first fit a regression model examining the relationship between 30-day mental health readmission and enrollee characteristics (e.g., demographics, substance use disorder [SUD], and general medical comorbidity) from which we created a county-level demographic and comorbidity case-mix adjuster. The case-mix adjuster was included in a second regression model examining the relationship between 30-day readmission and county-level factors: 1) quality (antipsychotic/visit continuity, post-hospital follow-up); 2) mental health hospitalization (length of stay, admission rates); and 3) treatment capacity (e.g., population-based estimates of outpatient providers/clinics). We calculated predicted probabilities of readmission for significant patient and county-level variables. Results Higher county rates of mental health visits within 7-days post-hospitalization were associated with lower readmission probabilities (e.g., county rates of 7-day follow up of 55% versus 85%, readmission predicted probability(PP)[95%CI]=16.1%[15.8%-16.4%] versus 13.3%[12.9%-13.6%]). In contrast, higher county rates of mental health hospitalization were associated with higher readmission probabilities (e.g., country admission rates 10% versus 30%, readmission predicted probability=11.3%[11.0%-11.6%] versus 16.7%[16.4%-17.0%]). Although not our primary focus, enrollee comorbidity was associated with higher predicted probability of 30-day mental health readmission: PP[95%CI] for enrollees with SUD=23.9%[21.5%-26.3%] versus 14.7%[13.9%-15.4%] for those without; PP[95%CI] for those with ≥three chronic medical conditions = 25.1%[22.1%-28.2%] versus none=17.7%[16.3%-19.1]. Discussion County rates of hospitalization and 7-day follow-up post hospital discharge were associated with readmission, along with patient SUD and general medical comorbidity. This observational design limits causal inference and utilization patterns may have changed since 2005. However, overall funding for U.S. Medicaid programs remained constant since 2005, reducing the likelihood significant changes. Last, our inability to identify community capacity variables associated with readmission may reflect imprecision of some variables as measured in the Area Health Resource File. Implications for Health Care Provision and Use & for Health Policies Healthcare policy and programming to reduce 30-day mental health readmissions should focus on county-level factors that contribute to hospitalization in general and improving transitions to community care, as well as patient comorbidity. Implications for Further Research Given the likely importance of local care systems, to reduce readmission future research is needed to refine community-level capacity variables that are associated with reduced readmissions; and to evaluate models of care coordination in this population. PMID:26474051

  5. Co-morbidities and 90-day outcomes in hospitalized COPD exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christopher M; Stone, Robert A; Lowe, Derek; Pursey, Nancy A; Buckingham, Rhona J

    2011-10-01

    COPD exacerbations resulting in hospitalization are accompanied by high mortality and morbidity. The contribution of specific co-morbidities to acute outcomes is not known in detail: existing studies have used either administrative data or small clinical cohorts and have provided conflicting results. Identification of co-existent diseases that affect outcomes provides opportunities to address these conditions proactively and improve overall COPD care. Cases were identified prospectively on admission then underwent retrospective case note audit to collect data including co-morbidities on up to 60 unselected consecutive acute COPD admissions between March and May in each hospital participating in the 2008 UK National COPD audit. Outcomes recorded were death in hospital, length of stay, and death and readmission at 90 days after index admission. 232 hospitals collected data on 9716 patients, mean age 73, 50% male, mean FEV1 42% predicted. Prevalence of co-morbidities were associated with increased age but better FEV1 and ex-smoker status and with worse outcomes for all four measures. Hospital mortality risk was increased with cor pulmonale, left ventricular failure, neurological conditions and non-respiratory malignancies whilst 90 day death was also increased by lung cancer and arrhythmias. Ischaemic and other heart diseases were important factors in readmission. This study demonstrates that co-morbidities adversely affect a range of short-term patient outcomes related to acute admission to hospital with exacerbations of COPD. Recognition of relevant accompanying diseases at admission provides an opportunity for specific interventions that may improve short-term prognosis. PMID:21864116

  6. The Day-Hospital of the University Hospital, Bobo Dioulasso: An Example of Optimized HIV Management in Southern Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Chas, Julie; Hema, Arsène; Slama, Laurence; Kabore, Nongondo Firmin; Lescure, François-Xavier; Fontaine, Camille; Pialoux, Gilles; Sawadogo, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the epidemiological evolution of patients with HIV (PtHIV), between 2002 and 2012, in a day-hospital that became an HIV reference centre for south-west Burkina Faso. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of PtHIV followed in the Bobo Dioulasso university hospital since 2002. The study was based on clinical data recorded using ESOPE software and analysed using Excel and SAS. Results A total of 7320 patients have been treated at the centre since 2002; the active file of patients increased from 147 in 2002 to 3684 patients in 2012. Mean age was stable at 38.4 years and the majority were female (71%). The delay to initiation of antiretroviral (ARV) treatment after HIV diagnosis decreased from 12.9 months in 2002 to 7.2 months in 2012. The percentage of PtHIV lost to follow-up, untreated for HIV and deaths all decreased after 2005. Voluntary anonymous screening and/or an evocative clinical picture were the main reasons for HIV diagnosis, usually at a late stage (41.1% at WHO stage 3). Virological success increased due to a decrease in time to initiation of ARV treatment and an increase in percentage of patients treated (90.5% in 2012, mainly with 1st line drugs). However, there was also a slight increase in the rate of therapeutic failures and the percentage of patients who progressed to 2nd or 3rd line-ARVs. Conclusion Our day-hospital is a good example of the implementation of a specialist centre for the management of PtHIV in a resource-limited country (Burkina Faso). PMID:25970181

  7. Gender Differences in the Relationship Between Physical Activity and Smoking Among Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Erika Litvin; Abrantes, Ana M; Fokas, Kathryn F; Ramsey, Susan E; Brown, Richard A

    2012-12-01

    Physical activity has been identified as a protective factor with regard to tobacco use, such that physically active adolescents are less likely to initiate smoking, and smokers are less physically active than non-smokers. These findings, along with the well-documented benefits of exercise on mood and well-being in adults, have stimulated interest in exercise-based smoking cessation interventions. However, little research has explored the relationship between physical activity and smoking characteristics within adolescent smokers. Also, gender differences in adolescents' motives for smoking and exercise may have implications for intervention development, especially in clinical populations. The current study explored the relationship between physical activity and smoking in a sample of adolescent smokers (N = 191) and non-smokers (N = 48) receiving inpatient psychiatric treatment (61% female, mean age 15.3 years). Results indicated that smokers were less likely to be physically active than non-smokers. Additionally, there was a consistent pattern of gender differences in the relationship between smoking and physical activity within smokers. Specifically, physically active male smokers were less nicotine dependent and less prone to withdrawal, and had a trend toward greater motivation to quit, than their non-active counterparts. In contrast, physically active female smokers did not differ in dependence or withdrawal and were less motivated to quit than non-active female smokers. Taken together, these results suggest that within clinical populations of adolescent females, smoking and exercise may be used jointly as weight control strategies. Exercise-based interventions for smoking cessation for adolescent females, especially clinical populations, should address weight and body image concerns. PMID:23459125

  8. Suicidality and hospitalization as cause and outcome of pediatric psychiatric emergency room visits.

    PubMed

    Grudnikoff, Eugene; Soto, Erin Callahan; Frederickson, Anne; Birnbaum, Michael L; Saito, Ema; Dicker, Robert; Kane, John M; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of suicidality in youth presenting to a pediatric psychiatric emergency room service (PPERS). To this end, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of youth aged <18 years consecutively assessed by a PPERS 01.01.2002-12.31.2002, using a 12-page semi-structured institutional evaluation form and the Columbia Classification Algorithm for Suicide Assessment. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to identify correlates of suicidal thoughts and attempts/preparation and their relationship to outpatient/inpatient disposition. Of 1,062 youth, 265 (25.0%) presented with suicidal ideation (16.2%) or attempt/preparation (8.8%). Suicidal ideation was associated with female sex, depression, adjustment disorder, absent referral by family/friend/self, school referral, precipitant of peer conflict, and no antipsychotic treatment (p < 0.0001). Suicidal attempt/preparation was associated with female sex, depression, lower GAF score, past suicide attempt, precipitant of peer conflict, and no stimulant treatment (p < 0.0001). Compared to suicidal attempt/preparation, suicidal ideation was associated with school referral, and higher GAF score (p < 0.0001). Of the 265 patients with suicidality, 58.5% were discharged home (ideation = 72.1% vs. attempt/preparation = 33.7%, p < 0.0001). In patients with suicidal ideation, outpatient disposition was associated with higher GAF score, school referral, and adjustment disorder (p < 0.0001). In patients with suicidal attempt/preparation, outpatient disposition was associated with higher GAF score, lower acuity rating, and school referral (p < 0.0001). Suicidality is common among PPERS evaluations. Higher GAF score and school referral distinguished suicidal ideation from suicidal attempt/preparation and was associated with outpatient disposition in both presentations. Increased education of referral sources and establishment of different non-PPERS evaluation systems may improve identification of non-emergent suicidal presentations and encourage more appropriate outpatient referrals. PMID:25331538

  9. [Alteration of profile of treatment of the public psychiatric hospitals of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in the context of mental health care reform].

    PubMed

    Coelho, Vívian Andrade Araújo; Volpe, Fernando Madalena; Diniz, Sabrina Stephanie Lana; Silva, Eliane Mussel da; Cunha, Cristiane de Freitas

    2014-08-01

    This article seeks to describe the profile of treatment and internment in public psychiatric hospitals in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, from 2002 to 2011. The changes in the characteristics of treatment and the profiles of the patients treated are analyzed in the context of health care reform. It is a study of temporal series with trend analysis by means of linear regression. There was a reduction in the total of patients treated in the period under scrutiny. Inversely, there was an increase in internments with a reduction in length of stay, though no change in readmission rates. Patients from Belo Horizonte prevailed, however a relative increase in demand from the surrounding area was observed. There was a reversal in the prevalence of morbidity switching from psychotic disorders to disorders resulting from the use of alcohol and/or other drugs. The alteration observed in the profile of treatment in public psychiatric hospitals in Belo Horizonte was concomitant with the progressive implementation of community mental health services, which have probably met the demand that was formerly directed to these hospitals. Currently the psychiatric hospital is not the first, much less the only venue for treatment in the mental health network in Minas Gerais. PMID:25119099

  10. Schizophrenia and tobacco smoking: a replication study in another US psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jose; Tracy, Joseph; McCann, Eileen; McGrory, Amy; Diaz, Francisco J

    2002-07-01

    A prior study in a US state hospital suggested that schizophrenia is more closely associated with tobacco smoking when compared with other severe mental illnesses. This second study, in a neighborhood hospital, tries to (1) replicate that schizophrenia is associated with smoking and heavy smoking, and (2) rule out that this relationship is explained by substance use. The methodology was very similar to the first study. The sample included 588 inpatients. Logistic regression was used to develop models of variables associated with smoking or heavy smoking. The frequency of current smoking for the total, schizophrenic and non-schizophrenic samples were respectively 71, 75, and 55%. The sequence of frequencies from the highest to lowest was the same as in the first study: male schizophrenic patients, male non-schizophrenic patients, female schizophrenic patients and female non-schizophrenic patients. This second study consistently replicated the relationship between schizophrenia and smoking (after correcting for other variables) including history of alcohol and drug abuse or dependence. Only one of two definitions of heavy smoking showed a significant association with schizophrenia. In summary, these two studies suggest that schizophrenia is strongly associated with smoking. Neither substance use, antipsychotics, nor institutionalism can explain this relationship. PMID:12084420

  11. [Physical activities, psychiatric care and mental health].

    PubMed

    Davanture, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    At Ville-Evrard psychiatric hospital, sports activities are used as one of several therapeutic tools. The day-long multi-sport sessions, led notably by a nurse, form part of the care programme. Sport not only enables the patients to exert themselves, it is above all a form of therapeutic mediation which encourages verbal and non-verbal communication. PMID:24654330

  12. Thought and language disorder among sexually abused children in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Conway, Francine; McCarthy, James; Talreja, Priyam; Conway, Fiona

    2013-04-01

    The empirical literature offers evidence that childhood sexual abuse is a predictor of psychopathology in adults. However, the literature examining the relations between thought disorder and psychotic symptoms in children is sparse. Children with a history of childhood sexual abuse are expected to demonstrate more disturbances in thought relative to their peers with no childhood sexual abuse. Using the Thought and Language Index, Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) narratives for four commonly used TAT cards obtained from 39 closed charts of hospitalized children were analyzed. Narratives were assessed on seven dimensions including weakening of goals, perseveration, looseness, peculiar word usage, peculiar sentence construction, non-logical reasoning, and distractibility. Good inter-rater reliability was obtained. Sexually abused childrenhad higher aberrant scores on card number four compared to non-abused children. Sexual abuse history was a predictive factor for non-logical reasoning, with small effect size. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:23833866

  13. Diagnosis and Treatment Procedures for Patients With Anxiety Disorders by the Psychiatric Consultation Liaison Service in a General Hospital in Germany: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christina; Tauch, Deborah; Quante, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the population of patients with anxiety disorders in a general hospital in Germany who required treatment by a consultation psychiatrist. Method: A retrospective investigation of psychiatric consultations concerning 119 patients with anxiety disorders (DSM-IV criteria) from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2012, was conducted in a general hospital of the Charité Berlin, Berlin, Germany. The frequency of different anxiety disorders, the distribution of anxiety disorders among the departments of the general hospital, and the recommended treatment procedure were investigated. Results: The largest group of patients with anxiety symptoms presented panic attacks. Many of these patients sought treatment in the emergency department of the hospital primarily due to their anxiety symptoms. Within the group of somatically ill patients, panic attacks were prominent, especially in patients with cardiac or respiratory diseases. Treatment procedures comprised pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions. Benzodiazepines and psychoeducation were common acute treatments; antidepressants, pregabalin, and psychotherapy were recommended for long-term treatment. Conclusions: Many patients who primarily suffer from symptoms of anxiety seek treatment in a general hospital, especially in the emergency department. It is therefore very important for the individual patient as well as the health care system that the correct treatment is initiated. The consultation-liaison psychiatric service within a general hospital is important to ensure the best possible diagnostic procedures as well as treatment for patients with anxiety disorders. PMID:26835174

  14. The impact of the Great East Japan earthquake on mandatory psychiatric emergency hospitalizations in Tokyo: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Aoki, A; Aoki, Y; Harima, H

    2012-01-01

    On 11 March 2011, the eastern part of Japan was struck by a magnitude 9.0 quake. About 20?000 people were killed or were missing, and a nuclear crisis followed. In Tokyo, people were indirectly exposed to the earthquake and nuclear crisis by TV broadcast. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential effect of the series of catastrophes on psychiatric emergency hospitalizations in Tokyo. Clinical records of patients who were mandatorily admitted to Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital by law because of urgent risk to self or others were reviewed. Records regarding the 2 years of investigation, which include the 6 months after the earthquake, were reviewed. The six months after the earthquake were compared with the eighteen months before the earthquake in clinical and demographic data using independent t-tests or ?(2) tests. During the 6 months before and after the earthquake, 97 and 127 people were mandatorily admitted. ?(2) Tests demonstrated a significant increase in the number of patients after the earthquake (P = 0.045), attributable to the significant increase in the number of patients with schizophrenia after the earthquake (P = 0.011, 32 vs 56), whereas there were no significant differences in the number of patients with other diagnoses between those two periods. Independent t-tests revealed that patients admitted after the earthquake had marginally significantly shorter periods of education compared with those admitted before the earthquake (13.78 vs 12.82 years, P = 0.084). This work suggests that patients with schizophrenia were more sensitive to indirect exposure to the earthquake and that a shorter period of education was a potential risk factor. PMID:23032944

  15. The impact of the Great East Japan earthquake on mandatory psychiatric emergency hospitalizations in Tokyo: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, A; Aoki, Y; Harima, H

    2012-01-01

    On 11 March 2011, the eastern part of Japan was struck by a magnitude 9.0 quake. About 20?000 people were killed or weremissing, and a nuclear crisis followed. In Tokyo, people were indirectly exposed to the earthquake and nuclear crisis by TV broadcast. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential effect of the series of catastrophes on psychiatric emergency hospitalizations in Tokyo. Clinical records of patients who were mandatorily admitted to Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital by law because of urgent risk to self or others were reviewed. Records regarding the 2 years of investigation, which include the 6 months after the earthquake, were reviewed. The six months after the earthquake were compared with the eighteen months before the earthquake in clinical and demographic data using independent t-tests or ?2 tests. During the 6 months before and after the earthquake, 97 and 127 people were mandatorily admitted. ?2 Tests demonstrated a significant increase in the number of patients after the earthquake (P=0.045), attributable to the significant increase in the number of patients with schizophrenia after the earthquake (P=0.011, 32 vs 56), whereas there were no significant differences in the number of patients with other diagnoses between those two periods. Independent t-tests revealed that patients admitted after the earthquake had marginally significantly shorter periods of education compared with those admitted before the earthquake (13.78 vs 12.82 years, P=0.084). This work suggests that patients with schizophrenia were more sensitive to indirect exposure to the earthquake and that a shorter period of education was a potential risk factor. PMID:23032944

  16. Exploring the Needs for Support of Pediatric Nurses Caring for Children with a Mental Health Disorder Hospitalized in Non-Psychiatric Units.

    PubMed

    Vallières-Noël, Marie-Michelle; Garçon, Schnell; Rosmus, Christina; Goulnik, Francoise; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie

    2016-04-01

    This qualitative study explored the experience and the needs for support of pediatric nurses caring for children with a mental health disorder hospitalized in non-psychiatric units in a health organization in Canada. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 nurses. Content analysis revealed two main themes: (a) nurses are challenged by the lack of knowledge, the gap between access to mental health resources and the basic role of only ensuring safety. Amidst these barriers, nurses revealed their feelings of helplessness, frustration and injustice. (b) All participants voiced their willingness to break this powerlessness loop. They identified several strategies to support them: more training in mental health, better collaboration with the mental health team, etc. Further research is needed to evaluate the efficiency of these strategies to improve the delivery of care for children with a mental health disorder hospitalized in non-psychiatric units. PMID:26992867

  17. Short Hospitalization system: a new way of interpreting day surgery care.

    PubMed

    Rago, Rocco; Franceschini, Francesca; Tomassini, Carlo R

    2016-01-01

    Today's poorer income on the one hand and the more and more unbearable costs on the other, call for solutions to maintain public health through proper and collective care. We need to think of a new dimension of health, to found a modern and innovative approach, which can combine the respect of healthcare rights with the optimization of resources. Worldwide, franchises serving millions of people every year succeed in limiting operating costs and still offer a service and a quality equal to single businesses. Let's imagine every single Day Surgery Unit (DSU), within its own hospital, as a single trade: starting a process of centralized management and subsequent affiliation with other DSUs, they would increase their healthcare offer by means of solid organization, efficiency and foresight that with a strong focus on innovation and continuous updating, thus increasing its range of consumers and containing management costs. The Short Hospitalization System (SHS) is the proposed project, which is not only a type of hospitalization which is different from the ordinary, but also an innovative clinical-organizational model, with an important economic impact, where the management and maximization of the different hospital flows (care, professional, logistical, information), as well as the ability to implement strategies to anticipate them are crucial. The expected benefits are both clinically and socially relevant. Among them: 1) best practice build up; 2) lower impact on daily habits and increased patient satisfaction; 3) reduction of social and health expenditure. PMID:25532492

  18. SIADH-related hyponatremia in hospital day care units: clinical experience and management with tolvaptan.

    PubMed

    De Las Peñas, Ramón; Ponce, Santiago; Henao, Fernando; Camps Herrero, Carlos; Carcereny, Enric; Escobar Álvarez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, César A; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; López López, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia (Na ˂135 mmol/l) is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in clinical practice, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is the commonest cause of hyponatremia in cancer patients. Correcting hyponatremia in these patients can reduce morbidity and mortality, increase the response to anti-cancer agents, and help reduce hospital length of stay and costs. Tolvaptan is an oral medication used to treat SIADH-related hyponatremia patients that needs to be initiated at hospital so patients can have their serum sodium monitored. If tolvaptan could be initiated in hospital day care units (DCUs), performing the same tests, hospitalization could be avoided, quality of life improved, and costs reduced. This is the first publication where a panel of oncologists are sharing their experience and making some recommendations with the use of tolvaptan to treat SIADH-related hyponatremia in DCU after collecting and examining 35 clinical cases with these type of patients. The conclusion from this retrospective observational analysis is that the use of tolvaptan in DCU is safe and effective in the therapeutic management of SIADH-related hyponatremia. PMID:26431960

  19. Eating disorders in individuals with type 1 diabetes: case series and day hospital treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Colton, Patricia Anne; Olmsted, Marion Patricia; Wong, Harmonie; Rodin, Gary Michael

    2015-07-01

    Women with type 1 diabetes are at high risk for eating disorders (ED), a combination that can increase medical complications and mortality. As little is known about treatment response in this population, clinical presentation and treatment outcome in an extended case series were assessed. A chart review at the Eating Disorders Day Hospital Program at Toronto General Hospital identified a total of 100 individuals with type 1 diabetes assessed 1990-2012. Of 37 who attended day hospital, most experienced improvement in ED symptoms, but only 18.8% had a good immediate treatment outcome, while 43.8% had an intermediate outcome and 37.5% had a poor outcome (meeting diagnostic criteria at discharge). This is poorer than program outcomes in individuals without diabetes (χ(2)  = 12.2, df = 2; p = 0.002). Factors influencing treatment engagement and outcome must be further studied and used to improve treatment results in this high-risk group. PMID:25988537

  20. Seasonality of Admissions for Mania: Results From a General Hospital Psychiatric Unit in Pondicherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bipolar disorder is affected by variables that modulate circadian rhythm, including seasonal variations. There is evidence of a seasonal pattern of admissions of mania in various geographical settings, though its timing varies by region and climate. Variables such as age and gender have been shown to affect seasonality in some studies. Methodology: Data on monthly admission patterns for mania at a general hospital psychiatry unit in Pondicherry, India, were collected for 4 years (20102013) and analyzed for seasonality and seasonal peaks. The effects of age and gender were analyzed separately. Results: There was overall evidence of a seasonal pattern of admissions for mania (P < .01, Friedman test for seasonality), with a peak beginning during the rainy season and ending before summer (P < .0.1, Ratchet circular scan test). Male sex (P < .005, Ratchet circular scan test) and age > 25 years (P < .005, Ratchet circular scan test) were specifically associated with this seasonal peak. Discussion: The effect of seasons on mania is complex and is modulated by a variety of variables. Our study is consistent with earlier research findings: a greater degree of seasonality for mania in men. It is possible that climatic and individual variables interact to determine seasonal patterns in bipolar disorder in a given setting. PMID:26644962

  1. Duration of bed occupancy as calculated at a random chosen day in an acute care ward. Implications for the use of scarce resources in psychiatric care

    PubMed Central

    Berg, John E; Restan, Asbjrn

    2005-01-01

    Background Psychiatric acute wards are obliged to admit patients without delay according to the Act on Compulsive Psychiatric Care. Residential long term treatment facilities and rehabilitation facilities may use a waiting list. Patients, who may not be discharged from the acute ward or should not wait there, then occupy acute ward beds. Materials and methods Bed occupancy in one acute ward at a random day in 2002 was registered (n = 23). Successively, the length of stay of all patients was registered, together with information on waiting time after a decision was made on further treatment needs. Eleven patients waited for further resident treatment. The running cost of stay was calculated for the acute ward and in the different resident follow-up facilities. Twenty-three patients consumed a total of 776 resident days. 425 (54.8%) of these were waiting days. Patients waited up to 86 days. Results Total cost of treatment was 0.69 million Euro (0.90 mill. $), waiting costs were 54.8% of this, 0.38 million Euro (0.50 million $). The difference between acute care costs and the costs in the relevant secondary resident facility was defined as the imputed loss. Net loss by waiting was 0.20 million Euro (0.26 million $) or 28.8% of total cost. Discussion This point estimate study indicates that treating patients too sick to be released to anything less than some other intramural facility locks a sizable amount of the resources of a psychiatric acute ward. The method used minimized the chance of financially biased treatment decisions. Costs of frustration to staff and family members, and delayed effect of treatment was set to zero. Direct extrapolation to costs per year is not warranted, but it is suggested that our findings would be comparable to other acute wards as well. The study shows how participant observation and cost effectiveness analysis may be combined. PMID:15921516

  2. Impact of Frontloading of Skilled Nursing Visits on the Incidence of 30-day Hospital Readmission

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Melissa; Hanlon, Alexandra; Bowles, Kathryn H.

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalization among older adults receiving skilled home health services continues to be prevalent. Frontloading of skilled nursing visits, defined as providing 60% of the planned skilled nursing visits within the first two weeks of home health episode, is one way home health agencies have attempted to reduce the need for readmission among this chronically ill population. This was a retrospective observational study using data from five Medicare-owned, national assessment and claim databases from 2009. An independent randomized sample of 4,500 Medicare-reimbursed home health beneficiaries was included in the analyses. Propensity score analysis was used to reduce known confounding among covariates prior to the application of logistic analysis. Although whether skilled nursing visits were frontloaded or not was not a significant predictor of 30-day hospital readmission (p=0.977), additional research is needed to refine frontloading and determine the type of patients who are most likely to benefit from it. PMID:24702719

  3. Prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity among patients attending dental OPD and the role of consultation-liaison psychiatry in dental practice in a tertiary care general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Pradip K; Ray (Bhattacharya), Sampa; Makhal, Manabendra; Majumder, Uttam; De, Shantanu; Ghosh, Subhankar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric co-morbidities are frequent among patients attending dental OPD, some of which go unrecognized and hence untreated. Aims: The present study has been carried out to detect the psychiatric co-morbidities among dental patients and determine the scope of consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry in a rural teaching hospital regarding comprehensive management of the patients. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional, descriptive type study was conducted in a multi-speciality tertiary care teaching hospital in the northern part of West Bengal, India. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients attending the dental OPD were randomly included in the study and every patient was consecutively referred to psychiatry department for assessment, during the period from 1st November 2013 to 30th April 2014. All referred patients were clinically examined and psychiatric co-morbidity was assessed by the help of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-28 and Mental Status Examination. Statistical analysis used: The data were subjected to statistical package for social sciences (SPSS), version 16, and statistically analyzed using Cross tab and Chi test. P <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The commonest dental illness was dental caries (22%). More than two-third of the patients had psychiatric co-morbidity according to GHQ-28 total score. Sixty-eight patients were diagnosed to have mental disorder on mental status examination. Somatoform disorder (25%) was the commonest type of mental disorder, followed by mixed anxiety and depression (14%). Conclusions: This study has pointed the need for psychological examination of patients visiting dental specialty with unexplained physical symptoms. Such patients can be identified and treated, provided a psychiatric consultation service exists. PMID:25767358

  4. Transient ischemic attack evaluation models: hospitalization, same-day clinics, or rapid evaluation units.

    PubMed

    Warrior, Lakshmi; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2011-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) has been well established as a risk factor for future stroke. Therefore, the diagnosis of TIA may serve as a golden opportunity for providing early time sensitive therapies to this high-risk group. Currently, there is no standardized algorithm for triaging suspected TIA, leading to errors in diagnosis, significant delays in evaluation and treatment, and greater morbidity and mortality. There are several proposed methods for triaging patients: hospitalization, same-day clinics, and rapid evaluation units. We review the benefits and limitations for each model, focusing on stroke risk reduction, costs, and feasibility. PMID:20634680

  5. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We discuss the interpretation of these results and the issues they raise in terms of the potential and limitations of international comparison. PMID:16243678

  6. [Prospective assessment of children with pervasive developmental disorder after 2 years of day-hospital treatment].

    PubMed

    Poinso, F; Dubois, B; Chatel, C; Viellard, M; Bastard-Rosset, D; Girardot, A-M; Grandgeorge, P; De Martino, S; Sokolowsky, M; Salle-Collemiche, X; Da Fonseca, D

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) has not been systematically assessed in French day-care units. In this prospective study, 11children with a diagnosis of PDD were followed up for 2years in a day-care unit in the Marseille university hospital. The treatment they received is based on an initial assessment by the "Centre Ressources Autisme" (CRA PACA) and further included a continued observation of the child and an assessment of the child's abilities and needs. This treatment used various therapeutic approaches 10h weekly and also included parental counseling and coordinated work with schools. Treatment in our day-care unit can be categorized as eclectic, non-intensive therapy. It is based on methods such as TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication handicapped Children), Floor Time Play, speech and language therapy, developmental therapy, and psychotherapy. International studies on intensive behavioral therapies suggest that this treatment is superior to non-behavioral and/or non-intensive treatment. They suggest its efficiency is due both to the nature of the treatment (behavioral) and to its intensity (more than 25h a week). In this study, the CRA diagnosed children using the ADI and ADOS. The 11 children (mean age, 3years 5months) were tested twice, with the Vineland and CARS scales. The first assessment was on admission to the day hospital and the second was 2years later. The results showed developmental progress with a mean increase of 13.5 months at the Vineland Scale, and a decrease of the autism severity score on the CARS. The treatment presented here proves to be efficient; if compared to similar results in international studies, we obtained better results than their eclectic intensive or non-intensive treatment comparison group. PMID:23219270

  7. Decade-Long Trends in the Frequency of 90-Day Rehospitalizations After Hospital Discharge for Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Yang; Tisminetzky, Mayra; Yarzebski, Jorge; Gore, Joel M; Goldberg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    There are limited data available describing relatively contemporary trends in 90-day rehospitalizations in patients who survive hospitalization after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a community setting. We examined decade-long (2001 to 2011) trends in, and factors associated with, 90-day rehospitalizations in patients discharged from 3 central Massachusetts (MA) hospitals after AMI. Residents of the Worcester, MA, metropolitan area discharged after AMI from 3 central MA hospitals on a biennial basis from 2001 to 2011 comprised the study population (n= 4,810). The average age of this population was 69years, 42% were women, and 92% were white. From 2001 to 2011, 30.0% of patients were rehospitalized within 90days after hospital discharge, and 38% of 90-day rehospitalizations occurred after the first month after hospital discharge. Crude 90-day rehospitalization rates decreased from 31.5% in 2001/2003 to 27.3% in 2009/2011. After adjusting for several sociodemographic characteristics, co-morbidities, and in-hospital factors, there was a reduced risk of being rehospitalized within 90days after hospital discharge in 2009/2011 compared with 2001/2003 (risk ratio= 0.87, 95% CI= 0.77 to 0.98); this trend was slightly attenuated (risk ratio= 0.90, 95% CI= 0.79 to 1.02) after further adjustment for hospital treatment practices. Female sex, having several previously diagnosed co-morbidities, an increased hospital stay, and the in-hospital development of atrial fibrillation, cardiogenic shock, and heart failure were significantly associated with an increased risk of being rehospitalized. In conclusion, the likelihood of subsequent 90-day rehospitalizations remained frequent, and wedid not observe a significant decrease in these rates during the years under study. PMID:26742475

  8. Preventing 30-day hospital readmissions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Leppin, Aaron L.; Gionfriddo, Michael R.; Kessler, Maya; Brito, Juan Pablo; Mair, Frances S.; Gallacher, Katie; Wang, Zhen; Erwin, Patricia J.; Sylvester, Tanya; Boehmer, Kasey; Ting, Henry H.; Murad, M. Hassan; Shippee, Nathan D.; Montori, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Reducing early (<30 days) hospital readmissions is a policy priority aimed at improving healthcare quality. The Cumulative Complexity Model conceptualizes patient context. It predicts that highly supportive discharge interventions will enhance patient capacity to enact burdensome self-care and avoid readmissions. Objectives To synthesize the evidence of the efficacy of interventions to reduce early hospital readmissions and identify intervention featuresincluding their impact on treatment burden and on patients capacity to enact post-discharge self-carethat might explain their varying effects. Data Sources We searched electronic databases (1990 until April 1st, 2013), contacted experts, and reviewed bibliographies. Study Selection Randomized trials that assessed the effect of interventions on all-cause or unplanned readmissions within 30 days of discharge in adult patients admitted to the hospital for a medical or surgical cause for > 24 hours and discharged to home. Data extraction and Synthesis Reviewer pairs extracted trial characteristics and used an activity-based coding strategy to characterize the interventions; fidelity was confirmed with authors. Blinded to trial outcomes, reviewers noted the extent to which interventions placed additional work on patients after discharge or supported their capacity for self-care in accordance with the Cumulative Complexity Model. Main Outcome Relative risk of all-cause or unplanned readmission with or without out of hospital deaths at 30 days post-discharge. Results In 42 trials, the tested interventions prevented early readmissions [pooled random effects relative risk (RR) 0.82, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.91; p=.03; I2= 32%], a finding that was consistent across patient subgroups. Trials published before 2002 reported interventions that were 1.6 times more effective than those tested later (pinteraction = .01). In exploratory subgroup analyses, interventions with many components (pinteraction <.01), involving more individuals in care delivery (pinteraction = .05), and supporting patient capacity for self-care (pinteraction = .04) were 1.4, 1.3, and 1.3 times more effective than other interventions. A post-hoc regression model showed incremental value in providing comprehensive, post-discharge support to patients and caregivers. Conclusions Tested interventions are effective at reducing readmissions, but more effective interventions are complex and support patient capacity for self-care. Interventions tested more recently are less effective. Registration Number PROSPERO, CRD42013004773 PMID:24820131

  9. Health literacy and 30-day hospital readmission after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Fang, Gang; Annis, Izabela E; O'Conor, Rachel; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the validity of a predictive model of health literacy, and to examine the relationship between derived health literacy estimates and 30-day hospital readmissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants A National Institute of Aging (NIA) study cohort of 696 adult, English-speaking primary care patients, aged 55–74 years, was used to assess the validity of derived health literacy estimates. Claims from 7733 Medicare beneficiaries hospitalised for AMI in 2008 in North Carolina and Illinois were used to investigate the association between health literacy estimates and 30-day hospital readmissions. Measures The NIA cohort was administered 3 common health literacy assessments (Newest Vital Sign, Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, and Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine). Health literacy estimates at the census block group level were derived via a predictive model. 30-day readmissions were measured from Medicare claims data using a validated algorithm. Results Fair agreement was found between derived estimates and in-person literacy assessments (Pearson Correlation coefficients: 0.38–0.51; κ scores: 0.38–0.40). Medicare enrollees with above basic literacy according to derived health literacy estimates had an 18% lower risk of a 30-day readmission (RR=0.82, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.92) and 21% lower incidence rate of 30-day readmission (IRR=0.79, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.87) than patients with basic or below basic literacy. After adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, the risk of 30-day readmission was 12% lower (p=0.03), and the incidence rate 16% lower (p<0.01) for patients with above basic literacy. Conclusions Health literacy, as measured by a predictive model, was found to be a significant, independent predictor of 30-day readmissions. As a modifiable risk factor with evidence-based solutions, health literacy should be considered in readmission reduction efforts. PMID:26068508

  10. Efficacy of treatment for hyperglycemic crisis in elderly diabetic patients in a day hospital

    PubMed Central

    Benaiges, D; Chillarn, JJ; Carrera, MJ; Cots, F; Puig de Dou, J; Corominas, E; Pedro-Botet, J; Flores-Le Roux, JA; Claret, C; Goday, A; Cano, JF

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to compare the costs of day hospital (DH) care for hyperglycemic crisis in elderly diabetic patients with those of conventional hospitalization (CH). Secondary objectives were to compare these two clinical scenarios in terms of glycemic control, number of emergency and outpatient visits, readmissions, hypoglycemic episodes, and nosocomial morbidity. Methods The study population comprised diabetic patients aged >74 years consecutively admitted to a tertiary teaching hospital in Spain for hyperglycemic crisis (sustained hyperglycemia [>300 mg/dL] for at least 3 days with or without ketosis). The patients were assigned to DH or CH care according to time of admission and were followed for 6 months after discharge. Exclusion criteria were ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar crisis, hemodynamic instability, severe intercurrent illness, social deprivation, or Katz index >D. Results Sixty-four diabetic patients on DH care and 36 on CH care were included, with no differences in baseline characteristics. The average cost per patient was 1,345.1793.6 in the DH group and 2,212.4982.5 in the CH group (P<0.001). There were no differences in number of subjects with mild hypoglycemia during follow-up (45.3% DH versus 33.3% CH, P=0.24), nor in the percentage of patients achieving a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) <8% (67.2% DH versus 58.3% CH, P=0.375). Readmissions for hyperglycemic crisis and pressure ulcer rates were significantly higher in the CH group. Conclusion DH care for hyperglycemic crises is more cost-effective than CH care, with a net saving of 1,418.4 per case, lower number of readmissions and pressure ulcer rates, and similar short-term glycemic control and hypoglycemia rates. PMID:24868152

  11. [Notes on the abandoned construction project for the provincial psychiatric hospital in Istria in the second half of the nineteenth century].

    PubMed

    Cergna, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Records about the need for a psychiatric hospital in Istria date back to the early 19th century). This article presents the views on the issue expressed by advisors of the National Council of Istria more than half a century later. It starts with the session held on 15 March 1864 and follows the development of views the National Council held, from the motion to build a new mental hospital in at the feet of Monte Ghiro to the actual construction of the "Santorio Santorio" Provincial Hospital (still existing) at the hill of St Mihovil in Pula. The paper also investigates the reasons why the Council advisors abandoned the project of building the psychiatric hospital in Istria in favour of a home for the mentally ill in Trieste, where many Istrian patients were provided accommodation from as early as the end of the eighteenth century until the end of World War II. During the rule of the Habsburg Monarchy, many other cities of the Empire hospitalised mental patients from Istria, whose pitiful condition was reported by Matteo Campitelli at the session of the Istrian Provincial Parliament in 1886. PMID:24304106

  12. Neopositivism and the DSM psychiatric classification. An epistemological history. Part 2: Historical pathways, epistemological developments and present-day needs.

    PubMed

    Aragona, Massimiliano

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the concrete historical sources for the use of neopositivist operational criteria by the DSM-III. This paper suggests that distinct sources operated implicitly. The current usefulness of the operational approach is questioned. It is shown that: (a) in epistemology, neopositivism has been replaced by more adequate accounts; (b) psychologists rejected operational definitions because these were unable to define the majority of mental phenomena; (c) mental symptoms cannot be directly described as such, because they already make part of the psychiatric diagnosis to which they belong. In conclusion, diagnosing is based on the hermeneutical co-construction of mental symptoms. The failure of the neopositivist programme suggests that it is time to reconcile scientific formalization and semiotic activity. PMID:24573752

  13. [Madhouse, asylum, retreat, specialist hospital - on the genesis and history of names for psychiatric institutions in Germany until the beginning of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Carius, Dirk; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Steinberg, Holger

    2003-11-01

    This paper analyses the history of names for psychiatric institutions in the German language. When scientific, medical psychiatry came into being in the late 18 (th) century, names with negative connotations such as "Narrenhaus" or "Tollhaus" (approximating to the English word "madhouse") were substituted by the then neutral "Irrenhaus" and later in the 19 (th) century by "Irrenanstalt". Soon, however, this new term became associated with negative connotations, making it unsuitable as a reflection of the many improvements made both in the treatment and the public image of psychiatric service users. Changes in word form such as "Heilanstalt", "Pflegeanstalt" and "Heil- und Pflegeanstalt" better reflect the character of the institutions. Objections to the word "Anstalt" (institution) were not acknowledged until the 20 (th) century when the term "Fachkrankenhaus" ("specialist hospital") was introduced. Before then the German word "Klinik" was reserved for university hospitals, the first of which was founded in 1878. The history of names for psychiatric institutions reflects both changes in the treatment of the mentally ill and the attempts made above all by psychiatrists to face and overcome stigmatisation of their clients. PMID:14658093

  14. Daily time series for cardiovascular hospital admissions and previous day's air pollution in London, UK.

    PubMed Central

    Poloniecki, J D; Atkinson, R W; de Leon, A P; Anderson, H R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test for a significant association between air pollution and emergency hospital admissions for circulatory diseases (international classification of diseases-9 390-459) in London, England, that would be consistent with a causal effect of pollution on the previous day. METHODS: Long term concurrent trends, temperature, humidity, day of the week, influenza epidemic of 1989, and cyclical covariations with periodicity > 20 days in daily measures of pollution and admissions for 1987-94 were allowed for. RESULTS: There were 373556 admissions. No association was found between O3 and circulatory diseases. Four other pollutants were associated with acute myocardial infarction and circulatory diseases combined. P values and attributable cases (95% confidence intervals) for acute myocardial infarction were: black smoke P = 0.003, 2.5% (0.8% to 4.3%); NO2 P = 0.002, 2.7% (0.8% to 4.6%); CO P = 0.001, 2.1% (0.7% to 3.5%); and SO2 P = 0.0006, 1.7% (0.7% to 2.6%). There were also associations between black smoke and angina (P = 0.02), NO2 and arrhythmia (P = 0.04), and CO and other circulatory diseases (P = 0.004), but none with heart failure. Acute myocardial infarction was the only diagnosis for which there were significant associations with and without adjustment for cyclical terms. The associations with acute myocardial infarction were significant only in the cool season. CONCLUSION: Population data were consistent with 1 in 50 heart attacks currently presenting at London hospitals being triggered by outdoor air pollution. Further research is now needed to investigate whether background concentrations of black smoke, NO2, CO, and SO2 are a preventable cause of myocardial infarction. These results, if applied to all myocardial infarctions in the United Kingdom, indicate a potential saving of 6000 heart attacks a year. PMID:9326156

  15. Medicare Program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system changes and FY2011 rates; provider agreements and supplier approvals; and hospital conditions of participation for rehabilitation and respiratory care services; Medicaid program: accreditation for providers of inpatient psychiatric services. Final rules and interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2010-08-16

    : We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs. We also are setting forth the update to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. We are updating the payment policy and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and setting forth the changes to the payment rates, factors, and other payment rate policies under the LTCH PPS. In addition, we are finalizing the provisions of the August 27, 2009 interim final rule that implemented statutory provisions relating to payments to LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities and increases in beds in existing LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities under the LTCH PPS. We are making changes affecting the: Medicare conditions of participation for hospitals relating to the types of practitioners who may provide rehabilitation services and respiratory care services; and determination of the effective date of provider agreements and supplier approvals under Medicare. We are also setting forth provisions that offer psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs increased flexibility in obtaining accreditation to participate in the Medicaid program. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs will have the choice of undergoing a State survey or of obtaining accreditation from a national accrediting organization whose hospital accreditation program has been approved by CMS. We are also issuing an interim final rule with comment period to implement a provision of the Preservation of Access to Care for Medicare Beneficiaries and Pension Relief Act of 2010 relating to Medicare payments for outpatient services provided prior to a Medicare beneficiary's inpatient admission. PMID:20712087

  16. Making strides in womens mental health care delivery in rural Ethiopia: demographics of a female outpatient psychiatric cohort at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (20062008)

    PubMed Central

    Chemali, Zeina N; Borba, Christina PC; Henderson, Tanya E; Tesfaye, Markos

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the delivery of mental health care to a sample of women living in Jimma, rural Ethiopia, and their access to mental health services. A total of 226 psychiatric charts were reviewed for women seen at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The mental health charts included documentation ranging from one paragraph to a full note. No psychiatric chart recorded medication status, detailed substance abuse history, or a history of violence. Rendering appropriate mental health care for women requires concerted efforts by multiple stake holders. Using our results, we advance concrete and practical suggestions for improving womens mental health in rural Ethiopia. We point out that the health care system needs to be responsive, allowing for change starting with gender rights, so that rural women have access to basic mental health services. PMID:23901297

  17. Making strides in women's mental health care delivery in rural Ethiopia: demographics of a female outpatient psychiatric cohort at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (2006-2008).

    PubMed

    Chemali, Zeina N; Borba, Christina Pc; Henderson, Tanya E; Tesfaye, Markos

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the delivery of mental health care to a sample of women living in Jimma, rural Ethiopia, and their access to mental health services. A total of 226 psychiatric charts were reviewed for women seen at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The mental health charts included documentation ranging from one paragraph to a full note. No psychiatric chart recorded medication status, detailed substance abuse history, or a history of violence. Rendering appropriate mental health care for women requires concerted efforts by multiple stake holders. Using our results, we advance concrete and practical suggestions for improving women's mental health in rural Ethiopia. We point out that the health care system needs to be responsive, allowing for change starting with gender rights, so that rural women have access to basic mental health services. PMID:23901297

  18. [Adverse perinatal and infant outcomes among children born to mothers with major mental disorders in a psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscila Krauss; Vieira, Cludia Lima; Santos, Jacqueline Fernandes de Cintra; Lima, Lcia Abelha; Legay, Letcia Fortes; Lovisi, Giovanni Marcos

    2014-08-01

    Adverse perinatal and infant outcomes are the leading causes of infant morbidity and mortality in developing countries like Brazil. Among the risk factors are maternal mental disorders. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted based on passive follow-up using probabilistic record linkage to estimate the prevalence of adverse perinatal and infant outcomes in children of women admitted to a public psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and who gave birth from 1999 to 2009. Prevalence rates were: low birth weight (27.6%), prematurity (17.4%), malformations (2.5%), stillbirths (4.8%), and neonatal deaths (3.7%). Associated factors were deficient prenatal care, schizophrenia, and low income. The results corroborate the high prevalence of adverse perinatal and infant outcomes in mothers with major mental disorders, and that screening of psychiatric symptoms and specialized care by mental health professionals are essential throughout prenatal and postpartum care. PMID:25210906

  19. Analysis of Time-of-Day Energy Demand and Supply in University and Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Yoichi

    The aim of this study was to estimate the time-of-day energy demand in University of Yamanashi. Our University consisted of Kofu campus (Faculty of Education & Human Sciences and Faculty of Engineering) and Faculty of Medicine campus (Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital). The energy data of 4 facilities were classified into hot water, heating, cooling and electric power demands based on electric power consumptions, city gas and heavy oil from 1996 to 2005. For 10 years, primary energy increased 1.2 times in the whole of the university. The amount of electric power consumption was 63% in the fuel classification. The amount of electric power consumption of faculty reacted to the change in temperature greatly. In 2005, it was found that thermoelectric-ratios for 4 facilities, i.e. Education, Engineering, Medicine and Hospital were 2.3, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.7 respectively. These data are very useful for the energy saving and energy management of university.

  20. [Patients' experiences and picture processes during the art therapy in a psychosomatic day hospital].

    PubMed

    Oster, Jörg; Poetsch, Stephanie; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was the examination of the experiences of patients participating in an art therapy during a psychosomatic day hospital. The data basis were 15 transliterated interviews from the end of the treatment, conducted with a presentation of the pictures painted in the art therapy sessions, as well as the digitised pictures. The evaluation was done with a qualitative analysis of the interviews and an analysis of the pictures, using a specially-developed category system. In the art therapy, most part of the pa-tients dealt with own conflicts. Nearly all pa-tients benefitted from the art therapy and indicated an improvement of their feeling. The picture processes are different; at the beginning, wishes and familiar techniques dominated. Pictures of turning points differed in their dimensions. The art therapy was seen as a part of the complete treatment in which several therapies assembled. The final interviews were experienced as helpful for further reflections. PMID:24101037

  1. Stability of etoposide solutions in disposable infusion devices for day hospital cancer practices.

    PubMed

    Klasen, Alison; Kessari, Romain; Mercier, Lionel; Valade, Cyril; Grill, Jacques; Desmaris, Romain; Paci, Angelo

    2014-03-01

    In a context of day hospital care of cancer patients, a protocol combining etoposide and carboplatin is used in paediatrics. Disposable infusion devices can be used to improve patient quality of life and to optimize nursing time. Stability data are available for carboplatin in these devices but not for etoposide. The aim of this study was to determine the stability of etoposide solutions in these devices by monitoring the changing etoposide concentration. To study the changing etoposide concentration, we investigated three different concentrations, each in two different solvents: sodium chloride (NaCl) 0.9 % and dextrose 5 %, in Intermate(®) disposable infusion devices. Quantitative analyses were performed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet (UV) detection on samples collected over a 24-h study period. The results showed that 100 mg/L etoposide solutions were stable for 24 h in NaCl 0.9 % and for 12 h in dextrose 5 %, whatever the temperature. The 400-mg/L solutions were stable for 24 h in both diluents, whatever the temperature, whereas the 600-mg/L solutions when diluted in NaCl 0.9 % and dextrose 5 % in water were stable for 8 and 6 h, respectively. We found that precipitation was the main phenomenon responsible for decreased etoposide concentrations. This study allowed us to conclude that etoposide solutions prepared in Intermate(®) infusion devices are stable for day hospital administration in paediatrics. It will also allow us to conduct a future clinical study that will focus on the medico-economic feasibility of this protocol and on the evaluation of patient and nurse satisfaction. PMID:24627337

  2. Associations of volume and other hospital characteristics on mortality within 30?days of acute myocardial infarction in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Sun Jung; Kim, Woorim; Jang, Sung-In; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Lee, Seo Yoon; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objective The mortality for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has declined worldwide. However, improvements in care for AMI in South Korea have lagged slightly behind those in other countries. Therefore, it is important to investigate how factors such as hospital volume, structural characteristics of hospital and hospital staffing level affect 30-day mortality due to AMI in South Korea. Setting We used health insurance claim data from 114 hospitals to analyse 30-day mortality for AMI. Participants These data consisted of 19?638 hospitalisations during 20102013. Interventions No interventions were made. Outcome measure Multilevel models were analysed to examine the association between the 30-day mortality and inpatient and hospital level variables. Results In the 30?days after hospitalisation, 10.5% of patients with AMI died. Hospitalisation cases at hospitals with a higher AMI volume had generally inverse associations with 30-day mortality (1st quartile=ref; 2nd quartile=OR 0.811, 95% CI 0.658 to 0.998, 3rd quartile=OR 0.648, 95% CI 0.500 to 0.840, 4th quartile=OR 0.807, 95% CI 0.573 to 1.138). In addition, hospitals with a greater proportion of specialists were associated with better outcomes (above median=OR 0.789, 95% CI 0.663 to 0.940). Conclusions Health policymakers need to include volume and staffing when defining the framework for treatment of AMI in South Korean hospitals. Otherwise, they must consider increasing the proportion of specialists or regulating the hiring of emergency medicine specialists. In conclusion, they must make an effort to reduce 30-day mortality following AMI based on such considerations. PMID:26546143

  3. Assessing the Representativeness of Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Inpatient Utilization Data for Individuals With Psychiatric and Nonpsychiatric Conditions.

    PubMed

    Slade, Eric P; Goldman, Howard H; Dixon, Lisa B; Gibbons, Brent; Stuart, Elizabeth A

    2015-12-01

    Sampling and reporting biases in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) survey could render data on inpatient utilization that are not representative for individuals with severe psychiatric conditions. The authors assessed the representativeness of MEPS data on psychiatric inpatient utilization, by comparing MEPS estimates of total annual psychiatric and nonpsychiatric inpatient admissions and bed days, and mean length of stay, for nonelderly U.S. adults in calendar years 2005 to 2010 (N = 9,288) to estimates from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), a nationally representative inpatient care database derived from hospitals' administrative records (N = 21,934,378). Compared with the NIS, the MEPS indicated 34% as many psychiatric admissions and 86% as many nonpsychiatric admissions, while mean psychiatric length of stay was greater in MEPS than in NIS. In MEPS data, underrepresentation of psychiatric inpatient utilization at community hospitals may result in measurement distortions for commonly used statistics on psychiatric inpatient utilization and costs. PMID:26149973

  4. Hypotension During Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure Is Independently Associated With 30-Day Mortality: Findings from ASCEND-HF

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyesh A.; Heizer, Gretchen; OConnor, Christopher M.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Hasselblad, Vic; Mills, Roger M.; McMurray, John J.; Starling, Randall C.; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Outcomes associated with episodes of hypotension while hospitalized are not well understood. Methods and Results Using data from ASCEND-HF, we assessed factors associated with inhospital hypotension and subsequent 30-day outcomes. Patients were classified as having symptomatic or asymptomatic hypotension. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with in-hospital hypotension, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between hypotension and 30-day outcomes. We also tested for treatment interaction with nesiritide on 30-day outcomes and the association between inhospital hypotension and renal function at hospital discharge. Overall, 1555/7141 (21.8%) patients had an episode of hypotension, of which 73.1% were asymptomatic and 26.9% were symptomatic. Factors strongly associated with in-hospital hypotension included randomization to nesiritide (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.762.23; p<0.001), chronic metolazone therapy (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.172.60; p<0.001), and baseline orthopnea (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.131.52; p=0.001) or S3 gallop (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.061.40; p=0.006). In-hospital hypotension was associated with increased hazards of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.03, 95% CI 1.572.61; p<0.001), 30-day heart failure (HF) hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.341.86; p<0.001), and 30-day all-cause hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.221.61; p<0.001). Nesiritide had no interaction on the relationship between hypotension and 30-day outcomes (interaction p=0.874 for death, p=0.908 for death/HF hospitalization, p=0.238 death/all-cause hospitalization). Conclusions Hypotension while hospitalized for acute decompensated HF is an independent risk factor for adverse 30-day outcomes, and its occurrence highlights the need for modified treatment strategies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00475852. PMID:25281655

  5. Psychiatric In-Patients Away from Home: Accounts by People with Intellectual Disabilities in Specialist Hospitals outside Their Home Localities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Deborah; Hall, Ian; Ali, Afia; Hassell, Holly; Patkas, Iannis

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study reflects a growing concern with the placement of people with intellectual disabilities and complex mental health problems in out of area placements at a distance from their families and communities. Materials and methods: We interviewed service users (n = 17) living in out of area in-patient psychiatric units using a…

  6. Use of the Suicide Status Form-II to investigate correlates of suicide risk factors in psychiatrically hospitalized children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Romanowicz, Magdalena; OConnor, Stephen S.; Schak, Kathryn M.; Swintak, Cosima C.; Lineberry, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Suicide is the third leading cause of death in the United States for youth 1217 years or age. Acute psychiatric hospitalization represents a clear worst point clinically and acute suicide risk is the most common reason for psychiatric admission. We sought to determine factors associated with differences in individual suicide risk assessment for children and adolescents during acute psychiatric admission. Methods Study participants were 1,153 youth consecutively admitted to an inpatient psychiatry unit who completed a self-administered Suicide Status Form (SSF) within 24 hours of admission. Additional information on suicide risk factors was obtained through medical chart abstraction. Results Females reported significantly greater psychological pain, stress, hopelessness, and self-hate on the SSF and were significantly more likely to have made a suicide attempt just prior to the index hospital admission (OR = 1.59, SE = .29; CI = 1.122.26), report a family history of suicide (OR = 2.02, SE = .33; CI = 1.472.78), and had experienced a greater number of inpatient psychiatry admissions related to suicidal ideation (RR = 1.33, SE = .13; CI = 1.101.61). High school aged youth and those with a primary diagnosis of depression displayed consistently elevated SSF scores and risk factors for suicide compared to comparison groups. Limitations Diagnosis was determined through chart abstraction. Responses to access to firearm question had missing data for 46% of the total sample. Conclusions Systematic administration of a suicide-specific measure at admission may help clinicians improve identification of suicide risk factors in youth in inpatient psychiatry settings. PMID:23856283

  7. Day Hospital Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa: A 12-Month Follow-up Study.

    PubMed

    Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Marzola, Enrica; De-Bacco, Carlotta; Buzzichelli, Sara; Brustolin, Annalisa; Campisi, Stefania; Amianto, Federico; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Fassino, Secondo

    2015-09-01

    Day hospitals (DHs) represent a treatment option for anorexia nervosa (AN), a mental disorder that is difficult to treat and has no evidence-based treatments available. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of a DH treatment that was specifically focused on the emotions of severe AN patients. Body mass index and eating psychopathology were the primary outcome measures. Fifty-six adult patients with AN were assessed upon admission, at the end of treatment (EOT) and at a 12-month follow-up evaluation (T18) using Eating Disorders Inventory-2, Beck Depression Inventory, Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety and Brief Social Phobia Scale. All participants received a multidisciplinary treatment programme that focused on psychodynamic psychotherapy. Seventy-eight per cent of participants reported positive outcomes at EOT and 68% at T18. Moreover, 82.1% and 65.4% of long-standing patients showed positive outcomes at EOT and T18, respectively. All measures of psychopathology were significantly improved at EOT and were maintained at follow-up. Our DH was effective at treating severe AN patients; however, further investigations of the processes of change are warranted. PMID:25974364

  8. Predicting In-Hospital Treatment Failure (≤7 days) in Patients with COPD Exacerbation Using Antibiotics and Systemic Steroids.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Ernesto; Torres, Antoni; Huerta, Arturo; Guerrero, Mónica; Gabarrús, Albert; Gimeno, Alexandra; Martinez, Raquel; Soler, Néstor; Fernández, Laia; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Menéndez, Rosario

    2016-02-01

    Although pharmacological treatment of COPD exacerbation (COPDE) includes antibiotics and systemic steroids, a proportion of patients show worsening of symptoms during hospitalization that characterize treatment failure. The aim of our study was to determine in-hospital predictors of treatment failure (≤ 7 days). Prospective data on 110 hospitalized COPDE patients, all treated with antibiotics and systemic steroids, were collected; on the seventh day of hospitalization, patients were divided into treatment failure (n = 16) or success (n = 94). Measures of inflammatory serum biomarkers were recorded at admission and at day 3; data on clinical, laboratory, microbiological, and severity, as well data on mortality and readmission, were also recorded. Patients with treatment failure had a worse lung function, with higher serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 8, and IL-10 at admission, and CRP and IL-8 at day 3. Longer length of hospital stay and duration of antibiotic therapy, higher total doses of steroids and prevalence of deaths and readmitted were found in the treatment failure group. In the multivariate analysis, +1 mg/dL of CRP at admission (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.13) and use of penicillins or cephalosporins (OR, 5.63; 95% CI, 1.26 to 25.07) were independent variables increasing risk of treatment failure, whereas cough at admission (OR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.75) reduces risk of failure. In hospitalized COPDE patients CRP at admission and use of specific class of antibiotics predict in-hospital treatment failure, while presence of cough has a protective role. PMID:26451913

  9. Stability of psychiatric patients' perceptions of their admission experience.

    PubMed

    Cascardi, M; Poythress, N G; Ritterband, L

    1997-12-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the stability (i.e., consistency of patients' responses over time) of newly developed scales to measure the admission experience of psychiatric hospitalization. Eighty-four psychiatric patients involuntarily committed to a crisis stabilization unit participated. All participants were admitted under an emergency petition or ex parte order for a psychiatric evaluation. Patients were interviewed soon after admission (M = 3.33 days, SD = 1.86 days). The test-retest interval was 24-48 hours with most (83.3%) re-evaluated at 24 hours. Overall, the measures showed acceptable levels of stability (r's range from .62 to .72). Factors associated with reliable responses were lower overall psychiatric symptom severity, less severe psychotic symptoms, and mentioning the same person as an influence of perceptions about the admission experience at each assessment point. PMID:9403385

  10. Duration of Hospitalization and Post Discharge Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Ting-Pong

    2006-01-01

    A retrospective cohort of discharged patients from all public psychiatric hospitals in Hong Kong (1997-1999) was linked to suicide data from Coroner's court. Patients hospitalized shorter than 15 days had significantly lower suicide rates than longer stay patients. The results were fairly consistent across immediate/late post discharge periods,…

  11. The Validity of Goal Achievement as an Outcome Measure in Physical Rehabilitation Day Hospitals for Older People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneebone, Ian I.; Hurn, Jane S.; Raisbeck, Elizabeth; Cropley, Mark; Khoshnaw, Hiro; Milton, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation day hospitals are widely used community-based services designed to meet the medical and rehabilitation needs of older people. While there is evidence for the effectiveness of these services, concerns about the shortcomings of how this is measured have led to the recommendation that the achievement of individually tailored

  12. Understanding psychiatric institutionalization: a conceptual review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since Goffman’s seminal work on psychiatric institutions, deinstitutionalization has become a leading term in the psychiatric debate. It described the process of closure or downsizing of large psychiatric hospitals and the establishment of alternative services in the community. Yet, there is a lack of clarity on what exactly the concept of institutionalization means in present-day psychiatry. This review aims to identify the meaning of psychiatric institutionalization since the early 1960s to present-day. Method A conceptual review of institutionalization in psychiatry was conducted. Thematic analysis was used to synthesize the findings. Results Four main themes were identified in conceptualizing institutionalization: bricks and mortar of care institutions; policy and legal frameworks regulating care; clinical responsibility and paternalism in clinician-patient relationships; and patients’ adaptive behavior to institutionalized care. Conclusions The concept of institutionalization in psychiatry reflects four distinct themes. All themes have some relevance for the contemporary debate on how psychiatric care should develop and on the role of institutional care in psychiatry. PMID:23773398

  13. [Psychiatric nursing at the Hospital Saint-Jean-de-Dieu School of Nursing: striking a balance between the spiritual and the technical sides].

    PubMed

    Thifault, Marie-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The art of taking care of the insane developed and solidified at the Hospital Saint-Jean-de-Dieu after a School of Nurses was created there in 1912. Founded by the Sisters of Providence, this new school participated in the transformation of the asylum into a regular hospital. The archives of the Sisters of Providence and the monthly magazine La garde-malade canadienne-française allow us to analyze the discourse of nursing leaders, which was based on the importance of professional training. Scientific discoveries and new technologies were at the heart of the care process at Saint-Jean-de-Dieu, where students were introduced to a technical, as well as a spiritual, education. This article first considers the marginal status of psychiatric nursing training within the larger nurses' professionalization movement. In a second step, it describes the socio-religious context between 1912 and 1962 within which the School of Nurses of the Hospital Saint-Jean-de-Dieu evolved. PMID:21560368

  14. The ward atmosphere of single-sex wards in a maximum-security forensic psychiatric hospital in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Brunt, David

    2008-03-01

    This exploratory study investigated the ward atmosphere of single-sex wards in a forensic psychiatric context in the light of Moos' conceptualization of the treatment setting. The wards for female patients bore similarities to Relationship-Oriented and Insight-Oriented programmes and had a generally positive ward atmosphere. On the other hand the wards for male patients did not resemble any treatment programme and had a more mixed diagnosis profile than those for female patients. Comparisons of the two types of wards are made and implications of the findings in terms of the overriding principle of normalization are discussed. PMID:18340610

  15. Family influence and psychiatric care: Physical treatments in Devon mental hospitals, c. 1920 to the 1970s☆

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    ‘What is it that appears to make the mentally ill so vulnerable to therapeutic experimentation?’1 One commentator wrote in the 1990s, regarding mental hospitals as repressive, coercive and custodial institutions where medical staff subjected patients to orgies of experimentation. A careful study of surviving documents of the Devon County Lunatic Asylum (DCLA), however, paints a different picture. Rather than medical staff, patients’ relatives and the wider community exercised a considerable influence over a patient's hospital admission and discharge, rendering the therapeutic regime in the middle of the 20th century the result of intense negotiations between the hospital and third parties. PMID:23876990

  16. From the agricultural colony to the hospital-colony: configurations for psychiatric care in Brazil in the first half of the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Venancio, Ana Teresa A

    2011-12-01

    The meanings given to the institutional model of the colonies in psychiatric care in Brazil are assessed, duly considering their different configurations in the context of public health policies in the first half of the twentieth century. The central thread of this analysis is the case of the Colônia Juliano Moreira, an institution founded in 1924 in Rio de Janeiro. It seeks to show the meaning attributed to the concept of agricultural colony and its importance in shaping the Colônia Juliano Moreira, in order to understand how the ideological precept of agricultural colony was translated into the concept of hospital-colony from the 1940s onwards, when this institution experienced a steady process of marked expansion of its physical structure and its therapeutic resources. PMID:22240946

  17. [Application of the BOP (an evaluation scale for older patients) in a psychiatric hospital. A clinical study].

    PubMed

    Baas, M M; Cornelissen, E A; Frohn-de Winter, M L; Bleeker, J A

    1984-10-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between BOP rating scores and psychiatric diagnoses at discharge of 74 psychogeriatric patients admitted to the AZUA psychiatric clinic. The BOP is the Dutch rating scale modelled after the Stockton Geriatric Rating Scale. The BOP was administered two weeks after admittance, and a second time four weeks later. These results were compared with results from an earlier study. The usefulness of the BOP as viewed by the treatment and nursing staff was evaluated. Treatment team evaluation of the BOP revealed some shortcomings. Members found the information too global und redundant. Reflecting their training and own point of view, the nursing staff too gave critical assessments of the BOP. Analysis of the first BOP rating scores showed a positive correlation between three BOP subscale scores and the discharge diagnosis of dementia. Closer inspection revealed that this relation was limited to male patients suggesting that both the patient sex and the nature of the dementia may be factors influencing BOP rating scores. PMID:6506145

  18. Psychiatric team's experience of working in psychiatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Fard, Victoria Omrani; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Fanian, Nasrin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatric team plays an important role in treating and taking care of psychiatric patients. Using this team's experience seems necessary for enhancing care services. The aim of this study was to assess psychiatric team's experience of working in different psychiatric groups. METHODS: This is a qualitative study with phenomenological approach. Samples were chosen using purposive sampling method. Samples included 10 personnel from psychiatric wards of 4 hospitals in Isfahan city in 2007. Data was gathered using deep interviews which were recorded on tapes. Data was analyzed using Colaizzi's seven steps method. RESULTS: Results from participants experiences were summarized in 3 main concepts: communication, ability and conflict; and 5 sub concepts: cooperation, self acknowledgement, hope, qualification and multiple roles. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study could be used in future programming to enhance care services for psychiatric patients in hospitals. PMID:22039375

  19. What are the Costs and Benefits of Providing Comprehensive Seven-day Services for Emergency Hospital Admissions?

    PubMed

    Meacock, Rachel; Doran, Tim; Sutton, Matt

    2015-08-01

    The English National Health Service is moving towards providing comprehensive 7-day hospital services in response to higher death rates for emergency weekend admissions. Using Hospital Episode Statistics between 1st April 2010 and 31st March 2011 linked to all-cause mortality within 30 days of admission, we estimate the number of excess deaths and the loss in quality-adjusted life years associated with emergency weekend admissions. The crude 30-day mortality rate was 3.70% for weekday admissions and 4.05% for weekend admissions. The excess weekend death rate equates to 4355 (risk adjusted 5353) additional deaths each year. The health gain of avoiding these deaths would be 29 727-36 539 quality-adjusted life years per year. The estimated cost of implementing 7-day services is £1.07-£1.43 bn, which exceeds by £339-£831 m the maximum spend based on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence threshold of £595 m-£731 m. There is as yet no clear evidence that 7-day services will reduce weekend deaths or can be achieved without increasing weekday deaths. The planned cost of implementing 7-day services greatly exceeds the maximum amount that the National Health Service should spend on eradicating the weekend effect based on current evidence. Policy makers and service providers should focus on identifying specific service extensions for which cost-effectiveness can be demonstrated. PMID:26010243

  20. [Closure of large psychiatric hospitals in England: evaluation by the TAPS project--a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Becker, T

    1995-03-01

    The TAPS study evaluates the closure of two Greater London mental hospitals. Beginning in 1985, one-year and five-year follow-up compared successive cohorts of long-stay patients discharged to the community (leavers) with groups of matched long-stay patients who stayed in hospital. Some psychopathological symptoms improved in discharged patients, some did not. Mortality, patient vagrancy and delinquent behaviour did not increase in leavers. Patient autonomy, social networks and patient satisfaction favoured out-patient provision of care as compared to continuing in-patient care. PMID:7761538

  1. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago. PMID:26668224

  2. Vitamin D Deficiency and Depressive Symptomatology in Psychiatric Patients Hospitalized with a Current Depressive Episode: A Factor Analytic Study

    PubMed Central

    von Känel, Roland; Fardad, Nasser; Steurer, Nadine; Horak, Nicole; Hindermann, Esther; Fischer, Franz; Gessler, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Background Low vitamin D levels have been associated with depressive symptoms in population-based studies and non-clinical samples as well as with clinical depression. This study aimed to examine the association of vitamin D levels with the severity and dimensions of depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression taking into account confounding variables. Methods We investigated 380 patients (mean age 47±12 years, 70% women) who were consecutively hospitalized with a main diagnosis of an ICD-10 depressive episode. All patients self-rated depressive symptom severity with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and the Brief Symptom Inventory. A principal component analysis was performed with all 34 items of these questionnaires and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH D) were measured. Results Vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/l), insufficiency (50–75 nmol/l), and sufficiency (>75 nmol/l) were present in 55.5%, 31.8% and 12.6%, respectively, of patients. Patients with vitamin D deficiency scored higher on the HADS-D scale and on an anhedonia symptom factor than those with insufficient (p-values ≤0.023) or sufficient (p-values ≤0.008) vitamin D. Vitamin D deficient patients also scored higher on the BDI-II scale than those with sufficient vitamin D (p = 0.007); BDI-II cognitive/affective symptoms, but not somatic/affective symptoms, were higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.005) and insufficiency (p = 0.041) relative to those with sufficient vitamin D. Effect sizes suggested clinically relevant findings. Conclusions Low vitamin D levels are frequent in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression. Especially 25-OH D levels <50 nmol/l were associated with cognitive/affective depressive symptoms, and anhedonia symptoms in particular. PMID:26397113

  3. Hospital Nursing and 30-Day Readmissions among Medicare Patients with Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Ma, Chenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Provisions of the Affordable Care Act that increase hospitals’ financial accountability for preventable readmissions have heightened interest in identifying system-level interventions to reduce readmissions. Objectives To determine the relationship between hospital nursing; i.e. nurse work environment, nurse staffing levels, and nurse education, and 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Method and Design Analysis of linked data from California, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania that included information on the organization of hospital nursing (i.e., work environment, patient-to-nurse ratios, and proportion of nurses holding a BSN degree) from a survey of nurses, as well as patient discharge data, and American Hospital Association Annual Survey data. Robust logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between nursing factors and 30-day readmission. Results Nearly one-quarter of heart failure index admissions (23.3% [n=39,954]); 19.1% (n=12,131) of myocardial infarction admissions; and 17.8% (n=25,169) of pneumonia admissions were readmitted within 30-days. Each additional patient per nurse in the average nurse’s workload was associated with a 7% higher odds of readmission for heart failure (OR=1.07, [1.05–1.09]), 6% for pneumonia patients (OR=1.06, [1.03–1.09]), and 9% for myocardial infarction patients (OR=1.09, [1.05–1.13]). Care in a hospital with a good versus poor work environment was associated with odds of readmission that were 7% lower for heart failure (OR = 0.93, [0.89–0.97]); 6% lower for myocardial infarction (OR = 0.94, [0.88–0.98]); and 10% lower for pneumonia (OR = 0.90, [0.85–0.96]) patients. Conclusions Improving nurses’ work environments and staffing may be effective interventions for preventing readmissions. PMID:23151591

  4. The health of irregular and illegal immigrants: analysis of day-hospital admissions in a department of migration medicine.

    PubMed

    Affronti, Mario; Affronti, Andrea; Pagano, Salvatore; Soresi, Maurizio; Giannitrapani, Lydia; Valenti, Miriam; La Spada, Emanuele; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    It is difficult to trace full details of the path which irregular or illegal immigrants follow when seeking assistance in the network of the various hospital departments and health structures. The aim of this work was to analyze the health needs of immigrant people by reviewing the types of treatment given to them in the day-hospital of our Department of Migration Medicine. Our study analyzed day-hospital admissions between 2003 and 2009. The patient charts used for managing day-hospital activity were adopted in 2002 in conformity with the "OSI project". From these it is possible to draw up a scale picture of the distribution of each pathology in the immigrant population. The sample population consisted of 1,758 subjects, representing 7.4% of potential users. More than half came from Africa, followed by Asia, and then Europe. Gastroenterological diseases ranked first, with dyspeptic syndromes most frequently diagnosed. Infections and parasitic diseases ranked second, and the most frequent diagnoses were sexually transmitted diseases. Third were diseases of the genitourinary system. Metabolic disorders ranked fourth, among them, more than half of the cases were of diabetes mellitus, in patients from south-east Asia. Diseases of the circulatory system were sixth, with hypertension the most frequent pathology. Our data confirm a marked persistence of the phenomenon known as the "healthy immigrant effect" in these types of patients, as well as the prominent role played by "social determinants" in conditioning the health of immigrants, particularly in the case of some infectious diseases. PMID:21647689

  5. Reasons for 30-day postoperative readmissions for Medicare patients at a community-based teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Jennifer L; Kothari, Shanu N; Ausloos, Janelle M; Gundrum, Jacob D; Kallies, Kara J

    2015-04-01

    Healthcare reform initiatives have proposed reducing reimbursement for certain 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients. Our objective was to evaluate the incidence and reasons for 30-day postoperative readmissions at our institution. The medical records of Medicare patients who underwent surgery from January 1, 2010, through May 16, 2011, were reviewed. Statistical analysis included ?(2), Wilcoxon rank sum, and t tests. Two thousand eight hundred sixty-five patients were included; 199 (7%) had a 30-day readmission. The readmission group included a higher proportion of men (53.8 vs 43.6%, P = 0.005), and patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class 3 or greater (84 vs 66%, P < 0.001) versus the nonreadmission group. Mean index length of stay and operative time were longer in the readmitted versus nonreadmitted group (4.8 vs 2.8 days, P < 0.001; 122.8 vs 98.2 minutes, P < 0.001). Readmission reasons were surgically related (53%), surgically unrelated (35%), planned (7%), and patient-related (5%). Higher 30-day postoperative readmission rates were associated with male sex, higher ASA class, and longer index length of stay and operative time. Reasons for readmission included surgical- and patient-related factors. Decreased reimbursement should be discouraged for readmissions directly related to patient noncompliance. PMID:25831185

  6. ["Should the staff's attitude towards the patients remain unchanged, I will not guarantee anything." Protest masculinity and coping of "rebellious patients" at the Heidelberg University Psychiatric Hospital on the eve of deinstitutionalization].

    PubMed

    Schwamm, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the illness experiences of male patients from the Heidelberg University Psychiatric Hospital during the protests against Psychiatry in the year 1973. Protest is one of the most important expressions of masculinity in socially disadvantaged men, such as men with mental disorders. The analysis of 100 medical records shows that some patients tried to construct themselves as men in a way that was explicitly motivated by antipsychiatric ideas: They questioned psychiatric authority, behaved "sexually inappropriate", or used drugs. On the eve of psychiatric reform in West Germany those patients were well aware that the alternative--complying with the treatment--would put them at considerable risk. In addition to the usual inference of hegemonic or normative masculinities as risk-factors, the behavior of those ,,rebellious patients" has to be interpreted as individual coping strategies. PMID:26219192

  7. Are structural characteristics of programs and hospitals associated with 100-day readmission of hematopoietic SCTs in Taiwan?

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S-I; Johantgen, M; Hsu, L-L; Kuo, M-C; Lu, T-H

    2011-09-01

    Hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) is one treatment modality for hematological malignancies. It is increasingly common but remains centralized in certain hospitals wherein procedures and protocols can vary. This study examined 100-day readmission for patients with hematological malignancies undergoing HSCT in Taiwan from the years 2001 to 2006. Of particular interest was an examination of how HSCT program characteristics might influence outcomes. This population-based retrospective cohort study with longitudinal follow-up used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A generalized linear model with a logistic-dependent variable representing being admitted or not admitted was used to model 100-day readmission, adjusting for the nested design. There were 718 HSCT recipients for hematological malignancies in the 5-year study period from 10 HSCT programs. In spite of the average length of stay of 43.71 days (s.d.=25.75) days, 52% of recipients were readmitted within 100 days of discharge. Ownership status, the number of HSCT hematologists, and the ratio of HSCT procedures to HSCT hematologists independently predicted 100-day readmission after adjusting for clustered data and controlling for recipient characteristics. PMID:21113192

  8. Waiving the Three-Day Rule: Admissions and Length-of-Stay at Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities did not Increase

    PubMed Central

    Grebla, Regina C.; Keohane, Laura; Lee, Yoojin; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Rahman, Momotazur; Trivedl, Amal N.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional Medicare program requires an enrollee to have a hospital stay of at least three consecutive calendar days to qualify for coverage of subsequent postacute care in a skilled nursing facility. This long-standing policy, implemented to discourage premature discharges from hospitals, might now be inappropriately lengthening hospital stays for patients who could be transferred sooner. To assess the implications of eliminating the three-day qualifying stay requirement, we compared hospital and postacute skilled nursing facility utilization among Medicare Advantage enrollees in matched plans that did or did not eliminate that requirement in 2006–10. Among hospitalized enrollees with a skilled nursing facility admission, the mean hospital length-of-stay declined from 6.9 days to 6.7 days for those no longer subject to the qualifying stay but increased from 6.1 to 6.6 days among those still subject to it, for a net decline of 0.7 day when the three-day stay requirement was eliminated. The elimination was not associated with more hospital or skilled nursing facility admissions or with longer lengths-of-stay in a skilled nursing facility. These findings suggest that eliminating the three-day stay requirement conferred savings on Medicare Advantage plans and that study of the requirement in traditional Medicare plans is warranted. PMID:26240246

  9. Three hospital admissions in 9 days to diagnose azathioprine hypersensitivity in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Mookherjee, Somnath; Narayanan, Maya; Uchiyama, Tomoharu; Wentworth, Kelly L

    2015-01-01

    Azathioprine (AZA) is commonly used as a steroid-sparing immunosuppressive medication for the treatment of immune-mediated disorders including Crohn's disease. There is ample awareness of the more common adverse effects of this drug, including myelosuppression and risk of malignancy. We present a case of a 57-year-old man with fistulizing Crohn's disease who underwent 3 hospital admissions for recurrent fever with an extensive work-up for infection before the diagnosis of AZA hypersensitivity was made. Clinicians should be vigilant for AZA hypersensitivity as a cause of otherwise unexplained fever. Furthermore, in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the signs and symptoms of AZA hypersensitivity may overlap with typical findings of inflammatory bowel disease flare. PMID:23782763

  10. Multisystemic therapy versus hospitalization for crisis stabilization of youth: placement outcomes 4 months postreferral.

    PubMed

    Schoenwald, S K; Ward, D M; Henggeler, S W; Rowland, M D

    2000-03-01

    Hospitalization and out-of-home placement data for 113 youth participating in a randomized trial comparing home-based multisystemic therapy (MST; n = 57) with hospitalization (n = 56) for psychiatric crisis stabilization were analyzed following the completion of MST treatment--approximately 4 months post approval for emergency psychiatric hospitalization. Analyses showed that MST prevented any hospitalization for 57% of the participants in the MST condition and reduced the overall number of days hospitalized by 72%. Importantly, the reduction in use and length of hospitalization was not offset by increased use of other placement options, as MST reduced days in other out-of-home placements by 49%. The cost implications for the viability of MST as an alternative to hospitalization for youth presenting psychiatric emergencies are discussed. PMID:11254068

  11. [University professors in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the German Democratic Republic up to 1961: Academic alternation of generations at university psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Kumbier, E; Haack, K

    2015-05-01

    After WWII a politically guided staffing policy foresaw an exchange program for professors from the Soviet Occupation Zone and the German Democratic Republic (GDR). In the field of medicine this initiative was not successful. With respect to university psychiatric/neurological hospitals this experiment failed as a result of a shortage of personnel due to the consequences of war, denazification and people migrating into western occupation zones. Criteria for politically selecting promising young talent which had been propagated by the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands, SED) were thus not relevant in academic medicine until 1961; however, the communist rulers had great interest in bringing professional and academic resources up to date. Politically implicated representatives in the field were also included in this process. At the forefront was the interest in functioning medical care and education in order to be able to train much needed health professionals. At the end of the 1950s a new generation of professors was established at the university hospitals. This generation rotation demonstrated the politically intended replacement of the "old" professor generation and the transition to a new GDR generation that had been trained after 1945. This second generation of professors inherited vacant professorships and defined and shaped research and academia until the end of the GDR much more than the previous generation had and also more than the one that followed. The generation of professors continued to feel a strong affiliation with their academic teachers and consequently continued their tradition in the sense of a school, for the most part independent of political circumstances. PMID:25604837

  12. Telavancin for Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia: Clinical Response and 28-Day Survival

    PubMed Central

    Corey, G. Ralph; Kollef, Marin H.; Shorr, Andrew F.; Rubinstein, Ethan; Stryjewski, Martin E.; Hopkins, Alan

    2014-01-01

    U.S. Food and Drug Administration draft guidance for future antibiotic clinical trials of bacterial nosocomial pneumonia recommends the use of diagnostic criteria according to American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America (ATS/IDSA) guidelines and the use of a primary endpoint of 28-day all-cause mortality. The effect of applying these guidelines on outcomes of phase III nosocomial pneumonia studies of telavancin was evaluated in a post hoc analysis. ATS/IDSA criteria were applied in a blind fashion to the original all-treated (AT) group. Clinical cure rates at final follow-up were determined in the refined AT and clinically evaluable (CE) groups (ATS/IDSA-AT and ATS/IDSA-CE, respectively). The exploratory endpoint of 28-day survival was evaluated for the ATS/IDSA-AT group. Noninferiority of telavancin versus vancomycin was demonstrated, with similar cure rates in the ATS/IDSA-AT (59% versus 59%) and ATS/IDSA-CE (83% versus 80%) groups. Cure rates favored telavancin in ATS/IDSA-CE patients where Staphylococcus aureus was the sole pathogen (86% versus 75%). Overall, 28-day survival rates were similar in the telavancin (76%) and vancomycin (77%) groups but lower in telavancin-treated patients with preexisting moderate-to-severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance [CLCR] of <50 ml/min). Telavancin should be administered to patients with moderate-to-severe renal impairment only if treatment benefit outweighs the risk or if no suitable alternatives are available. PMID:24419353

  13. Factors Affecting Non-Adherence among Patients Diagnosed with Unipolar Depression in a Psychiatric Department of a Tertiary Hospital in Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sohini

    2013-01-01

    Non-adherence to depression treatment is a common clinical problem globally. However, limited research is available from India. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess non-adherence to prescribed treatment among patients with unipolar depression at a psychiatric out-patient department (OPD) of a tertiary hospital in Kolkata, India. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) was used and a questionnaire designed by the Principal Investigator (PI) was administered. A total of 239 patients with unipolar depression were interviewed of whom 66.9% (160) were non-adherent and 33.1% (79) were adherent to treatment. The difference was significant (Fisher's Exact <0.000). Women were nearly three times at a higher risk of being non-adherent compared to men (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.0–7.1). The non-adherent group compared to the adherent group was significantly more likely to consume extra medicines than the recommended amount (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.1–7.3) and had lower internal locus of control (LOC) (OR 4.5; 95% CI 2.4–8.3). Adherence to prescribed treatment in an out-patient clinical setting was a problem among patients with unipolar depression. Suitable interventions on individuals with the above mentioned attributes are required in India and in similar settings where non-adherence to depression therapy is an important public health problem. PMID:24381752

  14. Association of meteorological and day-of-the-week factors with emergency hospital admissions in Fukuoka, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makie, Toshio; Harada, Muneaki; Kinukawa, Naoko; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Masako; Nose, Yoshiaki

    2002-02-01

    We carried out a statistical study of the influence of meteorological and day-of-the-week factors on the intrinsic emergency patients transported to hospitals by ambulance. Multiple piecewise linear regression analysis was performed on data from 6,081 emergency admissions for 1 year between April 1997 and March 1998 in Fukuoka, Japan. The response variable was the daily number of emergency patients admitted with three types of disease: cerebrovascular, respiratory and digestive diseases. The results showed that the number of emergency patients admitted daily with cerebrovascular disease was significantly associated with temperature on the day of admission and whether the day was Sunday. As it became colder than 12 C, emergency admissions of patients with cerebrovascular disease increased drastically, reaching a plateau at 4 C. On the 3rd and 7th days after the temperature fell below 10 C, the daily admission of patients with respiratory disease significantly increased. We also observed a weak association between emergency admissions of patients suffering from digestive disease and rising barometric pressure on the day of admission.

  15. Psychiatric diagnosis, psychiatric power and psychiatric abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, T

    1994-01-01

    Psychiatric abuse, such as we usually associate with practices in the former Soviet Union, is related not to the misuse of psychiatric diagnoses, but to the political power intrinsic to the social role of the psychiatrist in totalitarian and democratic societies alike. Some reflections are offered on the modern, therapeutic state's proclivity to treat adults as patients rather than citizens, disjoin rights from responsibilities, and thus corrupt the language of political-philosophical discourse. PMID:7996558

  16. Risk of venous thromboembolism and benefits of prophylaxis use in hospitalized medically ill US patients up to 180 days post-hospital discharge

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To assess the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and bleeding events with or without thromboprophylaxis and the associated costs in a cohort of medically ill patients in both in-hospital and outpatient settings. Methods A large hospital drug database and linked outpatient files were used to identify patients eligible for this analysis, based on demographic and clinical characteristics. Results Among 11,135 patients identified, 1592 (14.30%) were admitted with chronic heart failure, 1684 (15.12%) with thromboembolic stroke, 3834 (34.43%) with severe lung disease, 1658 (14.89%) with acute infection, and 2367 (21.26%) with cancer. Of the 11,135 patients, 5932 received anticoagulant therapy at some point during their hospitalization and until 30 days after discharge. VTE events occurred in 1.30% of patients who received anticoagulant prophylaxis versus 2.99% of patients who did not. Risk-adjusted total healthcare costs for patients with a VTE or major or minor bleeding event were significantly higher than for those without events (VTE: $52,157 24,389 vs $24,164 11,418; major bleeding: $33,656 18,196 vs $24,765 11,974; minor bleeding: $33,690 14,398 vs $23,610 11,873). In a multivariate analysis, appropriate anticoagulant prophylaxis use was significantly associated with a reduced risk of clinical VTE, compared with no anticoagulant use (hazard ratio: 0.37). Patients admitted with thromboembolic stroke were less likely to have a VTE than patients admitted with cancer (hazard ratio: 0.42). Conclusions In this analysis, VTE and major bleeding event rates were lower for patients who received prophylaxis compared with those who did not. Prophylaxis use was associated with lower healthcare costs. PMID:21995820

  17. Antimicrobial use over a four-year period using days of therapy measurement at a Canadian pediatric acute care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Bruce R; MacTavish, Sandra J; Bresee, Lauren C; Rajapakse, Nipunie; Vanderkooi, Otto; Vayalumkal, Joseph; Conly, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance is a concern that is challenging the ability to treat common infections. Surveillance of antimicrobial use in pediatric acute care institutions is complicated because the common metric unit, the defined daily dose, is problematic for this population. OBJECTIVE: During a four-year period in which no specific antimicrobial stewardship initiatives were conducted, pediatric antimicrobial use was quantified using days of therapy (DOT) per 100 patient days (PD) (DOT/100 PD) at the Alberta Childrens Hospital (Calgary, Alberta) for benchmarking purposes. METHODS: Drug use data for systemic antimicrobials administered on wards at the Alberta Childrens Hospital were collected from electronic medication administration records. DOT were calculated and rates were determined using 100 PD as the denominator. Changes over the surveillance period and subgroup proportions were represented graphically and assessed using linear regression. RESULTS: Total antimicrobial use decreased from 93.6 DOT/100 PD to 75.7 DOT/100 PD (19.1%) over the 2010/2011 through to the 2013/2014 fiscal years. During this period, a 20.0% increase in PD and an essentially stable absolute count of DOT (2.9% decrease) were observed. Overall, antimicrobial use was highest in the pediatric intensive care and oncology units. DISCUSSION: The exact changes in prescribing patterns that led to the observed reduction in DOT/100 PD with associated increased PD are unclear, but may be a topic for future investigations. CONCLUSION: Antimicrobial use data from a Canadian acute care pediatric hospital reported in DOT/100 PD were compiled for a four-year time period. These data may be useful for benchmarking purposes. PMID:26600813

  18. DAY-CARE REHABILITATION CENTER FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED ADOLESCENTS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAWFORD, HUGH A.; VAN DUYNE, WILLIAM V.

    IN THIS FIVE YEAR DEMONSTRATION PROJECT, EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED ADULTS AND ADOLESCENTS RECEIVED TREATMENT AT A DAY CARE REHABILITATION CENTER SPONSORED BY THE RHODE ISLAND DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION (DVR) LOCATED IN A PRIVATE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL (BUTLER HOSPITAL). THE MAJOR TREATMENT GOALS WERE PRESERVATION AND RESTORATION OF

  19. Survival curves to support quality improvement in hospitals with excess 30-day mortality after acute myocardial infarction, cerebral stroke and hip fracture: a beforeafter study

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Helgeland, Jon; Waage, Halfrid Persdatter; Thalamus, Jacob; Clemens, Dirk; Lindman, Anja Schou; Rygh, Liv Helen; Tjomsland, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate survival curves (Kaplan-Meier) as a means of identifying areas in the clinical pathway amenable to quality improvement. Design Observational beforeafter study. Setting In Norway, annual public reporting of nationwide 30-day in-and-out-of-hospital mortality (30D) for three medical conditions started in 2011: first time acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke and hip fracture; reported for 2009. 12 of 61 hospitals had statistically significant lower/higher mortality compared with the hospital mean. Participants Three hospitals with significantly higher mortality requested detailed analyses for quality improvement purposes: Telemark Hospital Trust Skien (AMI and stroke), stfold Hospital Trust Fredrikstad (stroke), Innlandet Hospital Trust Gjvik (hip fracture). Outcome measures Survival curves, crude and risk-adjusted 30D before (20082009) and after (20122013). Interventions Unadjusted survival curves for the outlier hospitals were compared to curves based on pooled data from the other hospitals for the 30-day period 20082009. For patients admitted with AMI (Skien), stroke (Fredrikstad) and hip fracture (Gjvik), the curves suggested increased mortality from the initial part of the clinical pathway. For stroke (Skien), increased mortality appeared after about 8?days. The curve profiles were thought to reflect suboptimal care in various phases in the clinical pathway. This informed improvement efforts. Results For 20082009, hospital-specific curves differed from other hospitals: borderline significant for AMI (p=0.064), highly significant (p?0.005) for the remainder. After intervention, no difference was found (p>0.188). Beforeafter comparison of the curves within each hospital revealed a significant change for Fredrikstad (p=0.006). For the three hospitals, crude 30D declined and they were non-outliers for risk-adjusted 30D for 2013. Conclusions Survival curves as a supplement to 30D may be useful for identifying suboptimal care in the clinical pathway, and thus informing design of quality improvement projects. PMID:25808167

  20. Risk factors associated with psychiatric readmission.

    PubMed

    Lorine, Kim; Goenjian, Haig; Kim, Soeun; Steinberg, Alan M; Schmidt, Kendall; Goenjian, Armen K

    2015-06-01

    The present study focused on identifying risk factors for early readmission of patients discharged from an urban community hospital. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted on 207 consecutive inpatient psychiatric admissions that included patients who were readmitted within 15 days, within 3 to 6 months, and not admitted for at least 12 months post-discharge. Findings indicated that a diagnosis of schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (OR = 18; 95% CI 2.70-117.7; p < 0.05), history of alcohol abuse (OR = 9; 95% CI 1.80-40.60; p < 0.05), number of previous psychiatric hospitalizations (OR = 2; 95% CI 1.28-3.73; p < 0.05), and type of residence at initial admission (e.g., homeless, OR = 29; 95% CI 3.99-217; p < 0.05) were significant risk factors for early readmission, where OR compares readmission group 1 versus group 3 in the multinomial logistic regression. Initial positive urine drug screen, history of drug abuse or incarceration, and legal status at initial admission did not predict early readmission. Reducing the risk factors associated with psychiatric readmissions has the potential to lead to the identification and development of preventative intervention strategies that can significantly improve patient safety, quality of care, well-being, and contain health care expenditures. PMID:25974053

  1. College Student Utilization of a Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Kader, Mahrin; Haggerty, Melinda Z.; Bakhai, Yogesh D.; Warren, Calvert G.

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to identify college students at risk for experiencing a mental health crisis that warranted a psychiatric evaluation at a hospital and/or a psychiatric hospitalization. A retrospective chart review of college students evaluated at a comprehensive psychiatric emergency program during a 1-year period was conducted. Demographic…

  2. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review 456.170 Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  3. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review 456.170 Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  4. College Student Utilization of a Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Kader, Mahrin; Haggerty, Melinda Z.; Bakhai, Yogesh D.; Warren, Calvert G.

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to identify college students at risk for experiencing a mental health crisis that warranted a psychiatric evaluation at a hospital and/or a psychiatric hospitalization. A retrospective chart review of college students evaluated at a comprehensive psychiatric emergency program during a 1-year period was conducted. Demographic

  5. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review 456.170 Medical, psychiatric... beneficiary's need for care in the hospital; and appropriate professional personnel must make a...

  6. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review 456.170 Medical, psychiatric... beneficiary's need for care in the hospital; and appropriate professional personnel must make a...

  7. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review 456.170 Medical, psychiatric... beneficiary's need for care in the hospital; and appropriate professional personnel must make a...

  8. Thirty-Day Hospital Readmission following Discharge from Post-acute Rehabilitation in Fee-for-Service Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Karmarkar, Amol; Graham, James E.; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Deutsch, Anne; Reistetter, Timothy; Snih, Soham Al; Granger, Carl V.

    2014-01-01

    Importance The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently identified 30-day readmission after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation facilities as a national quality indicator. Research is needed to determine the rates and factors related to readmission in this patient population. Objective Determine 30-day readmission rates and factors related to readmission for patients receiving post-acute inpatient rehabilitation. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 1,365 post-acute inpatient rehabilitation facilities providing services to Medicare fee-for service beneficiaries. Participants Records for 736,536 post-acute patients discharged from inpatient rehabilitation facilities to the community in 2006 through 2011. Mean age 78.0 (SD = 7.3) years. Sixty-three percent of patients were female and 85.1% were non-Hispanic white. Main Outcome and Measures 30-day readmission rates for the six largest diagnostic impairment categories receiving inpatient rehabilitation. These included stroke, lower extremity fracture, lower extremity joint replacement, debility, neurological disorders and brain dysfunction. Results Mean rehabilitation length of stay was 12.4 (SD = 5.3) days. The overall 30-day readmission rate was 11.8% (95%CI, 11.7%, 11.8%). Rates ranged from 5.8% (95%CI, 5.8%, 5.9%) for patients with lower extremity joint replacement to 18.8% (95%CI, 18.8%, 18.9%). for patients with debility. Rates were highest in men (13.0%; 95%CI, 12.8%, 13.1%), non-Hispanic blacks, (13.8%; 95%CI, 13.5%, 14.1%), dual eligible beneficiaries (15.1%; 95%CI, 14.9%, 15.4%), and in patients with tier 1 comorbidities (25.6%; 95%CI, 24.9%, 26.3%). Higher motor and cognitive functional status were associated with lower hospital readmission rates across the six impairment categories. Variability in adjusted readmission rates by state ranged from 9.2% to 13.6%. Approximately 50% of patients who were rehospitalized within the 30-day period were readmitted within 11 days of discharge. MS-DRG codes for heart failure, urinary tract infection, pneumonia, septicemia, nutritional and metabolic disorders, esophagitis, gastroenteritis and digestive disorders were common reasons for readmission. Conclusion and Relevance Among post-acute rehabilitation facilities providing services to Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, 30-day readmission rates ranged from 5.8% to 18.8% for selected impairment groups. Further research is needed to understand the reasons for readmission. PMID:24519300

  9. Geriatric day hospital: opportunity or threat? A qualitative exploratory study of the referral behaviour of Belgian general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In order to address the challenges of an ageing population the Belgian government decided to allocate resources to the creation of geriatric day hospitals (GDHs). Although GDHs are meant to be a strategy to support general practitioners (GPs) caring for the frail elderly, few Belgian GPs seem to refer to a GDH. This study aims to explore the barriers and facilitating factors of GPs' referral to GDHs. Methods A qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGDs) was conducted. Fifteen FGDs were organized in the different Belgian regions (Flanders, Wallonia, Brussels). Results Contextual factors such as the unsatisfactory cooperation between hospital and GPs and organizational barriers such as the lack of communication on referral procedures between hospital and primary health care (PHC) were identified. Lack of basic knowledge about the concept or the local organization of GDH seemed to be a problem. Unclear task descriptions, responsibilities and activities of a GDH formed prominent points of discussion in all FGDs. Nevertheless a lot of possible advantages and disadvantages of GDHs for the patient and for the GP were mentioned. Conclusions In the case of poor referral to GDHs, focusing on improving overall collaboration between primary and secondary health care is essential. This can be achieved by actively delivering adequate information, permanent communication and more involvement of PHC in the organization and functioning of GDHs. The absence of a transparent health care system with delineated role definitions, seems to hinder the integration of new initiatives like GDHs in the care process. Strategies to enhance referral to GDHs should use a comprehensive approach. PMID:20619001

  10. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who…

  11. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who

  12. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Requirements for certification and recertification: General considerations... other hospitals because the care furnished in inpatient psychiatric facilities is often purely...

  13. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Requirements for certification and recertification: General considerations... other hospitals because the care furnished in inpatient psychiatric facilities is often purely...

  14. Low serum albumin and total lymphocyte count as predictors of 30 day hospital readmission in patients 65 years of age or older

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge is a target for health care cost savings through the medicare Value Based Purchasing initiative. Because of this focus, hospitals and health systems are investing considerable resources into the identification of patients at risk of hospital readmission and designing interventions to reduce the rate of hospital readmission. Malnutrition is a known risk factor for hospital readmission. Materials and Methods. All medical patients 65 years of age or older discharged from Memorial Medical Center from January 1, 2012 to March 31, 2012 who had a determination of serum albumin level and total lymphocyte count on hospital admission were studied retrospectively. Admission serum albumin levels and total lymphocyte counts were used to classify the nutritional status of all patients in the study. Patients with a serum albumin less than 3.5 grams/dL and/or a TLC less than 1,500 cells per mm3 were classified as having protein energy malnutrition. The primary outcome investigated in this study was hospital readmission for any reason within 30 days of discharge. Results. The study population included 1,683 hospital discharges with an average age of 79 years. The majority of the patients were female (55.9%) and had a DRG weight of 1.22 (0.68). 219 patients (13%) were readmitted within 30 days of hospital discharge. Protein energy malnutrition was common in this population. Low albumin was found in 973 (58%) patients and a low TLC was found in 1,152 (68%) patients. Low albumin and low TLC was found in 709 (42%) of patients. KaplanMeier analysis shows any laboratory evidence of PEM is a significant (p < 0.001) predictor of hospital readmission. Low serum albumin (p < 0.001) and TLC (p = 0.018) show similar trends. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis showed low serum albumin (Hazard Ratio 3.27, 95% CI [2.304.63]) and higher DRG weight (Hazard Ratio 1.19, 95% CI [1.031.38]) to be significant independent predictors of hospital readmission within 30 days. Discussion. This study investigated the relationship of PEM to the rate of hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge in patients 65 years of age or older. These results indicate that laboratory markers of PEM can identify patients at risk of hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge. This risk determination is simple and identifies a potentially modifiable risk factor for readmission: protein energy malnutrition. PMID:26339558

  15. Broader Indications for Psychiatric Consultation

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A liaison approach to psychiatric consultation increases the patient population who can benefit from psychiatric assessment during hospitalization for medical or surgical conditions. It also broadens the scope of the psychiatric investigation of the individual patient. The meaning of the illness to the patient, and the patient's present methods of adapting to his or her illness are important considerations. Unconscious concerns, which interfere with the patient's compliance to medical treatment, may be sufficiently clarified and resolved so that medical progress is expedited. Psychiatric consultation can be used to prevent an untoward psychological reaction to illness, if this is foreseen. This preventive consultation, which is often possible only because of the family physician's awareness of the psychological vulnerability of some of her or his patients, can result in reduced medical and psychiatric morbidity. PMID:21263836

  16. Motivational Interviewing to Reduce Substance Use in Adolescents with Psychiatric Comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard A; Abrantes, Ana M; Minami, Haruka; Prince, Mark A; Bloom, Erika Litvin; Apodaca, Timothy R; Strong, David R; Picotte, Dawn M; Monti, Peter M; MacPherson, Laura; Matsko, Stephen V; Hunt, Jeffrey I

    2015-12-01

    Substance use among adolescents with one or more psychiatric disorders is a significant public health concern. In this study, 151 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents, ages 13-17 with comorbid psychiatric and substance use disorders, were randomized to a two-session Motivational Interviewing intervention to reduce substance use plus treatment as usual (MI) vs. treatment as usual only (TAU). Results indicated that the MI group had a longer latency to first use of any substance following hospital discharge relative to TAU (36days versus 11days). Adolescents who received MI also reported less total use of substances and less use of marijuana during the first 6months post-discharge, although this effect was not significant across 12months. Finally, MI was associated with a significant reduction in rule-breaking behaviors at 6-month follow-up. Future directions are discussed, including means of extending effects beyond 6months and dissemination of the intervention to community-based settings. PMID:26362000

  17. [Psychiatric emergencies in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Berthaut, Elise; Marcelli, Daniel

    2003-06-01

    Psychiatric emergencies in adolescents, apart from difficulties also found in adults, present specific difficulties linked to psychological characteristics of this period of life and to importance of familial interactions. "Real" emergencies or situations felt to be emergencies, they all need that we take time for serious assessment. Drugs and hospitalization are possible responses but must be challenged with much care. After some general aspects of these emergencies, we detail the most frequent clinical situations. PMID:15185643

  18. Lunar phase and psychiatric illness in goa.

    PubMed

    Parmeshwaran, R; Patel, V; Fernandes, J M

    1999-01-01

    There has been considerable research on the influence of the lunar cycle on mental illness with conflicting findings. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between full moon (FM), new moon (NM), and other moon (OM) days and the frequency of specific psychiatric disorders in patients seen at a tertiary psychiatric hospital in Goa and to examine relationships with eclipses. Analysis of all new patients in two calendar years (1997 & 1993) was carried out. Diagnoses of interest were : Non affective psychoses; depression; and mania. The numbers of new patients seen at the OPD of the Institute of Psychiatry & Human Behaviour, Goa, with these diagnoses were compared between FM, NM and OM days. Numbers of patients with these diagnoses on eclipse days (lunar/solar) were also examined. A significant trend was observed for greater numbers of patients with non-affective psychoses on FM days, but no pattern was observed for mania or depression. The excess of non-affective psychoses was more marked on days of a visible lunar eclipse. A relationship between FM and non-affective psychoses has been demonstrated. Its implications for further research and the potential mechanism to explain these findings are discussed. PMID:21455355

  19. North vs south differences in acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage in Croatia: hospitalization incidence trends, clinical features, and 30-day case fatality

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Pavić, Tajana; Budimir, Ivan; Puljiz, Željko; Bišćanin, Alen; Bratanić, Andre; Nikolić, Marko; Hrabar, Davor; Troskot, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the seven-year trends of hospitalization incidence due to acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage (APUH) and associated risk factors, and examine the differences in these trends between two regions in Croatia. Methods The study collected sociodemographic, clinical, and endoscopic data on 2204 patients with endoscopically confirmed APUH who were admitted to the Clinical Hospital Center “Sestre Milosrdnice,” Zagreb and Clinical Hospital Center Split between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. We determined hospitalization incidence rates, 30-day case fatality rate, clinical outcomes, and incidence-associated factors. Results No differences were observed in APUH hospitalization incidence rates between the regions. Age-standardized one-year cumulative APUH hospitalization incidence rate calculated using the European Standard Population was significantly higher in Zagreb than in Split region (43.2/100 000 vs 29.2/100,000). A significantly higher APUH hospitalization incidence rates were observed in the above 65 years age group. Overall 30-day case fatality rate was 4.9%. Conclusion The hospitalization incidence of APUH in two populations did not change over the observational period and it was significantly higher in the Zagreb region. The incidence of acute duodenal ulcer hemorrhage also remained unchanged, whereas the incidence of acute gastric ulcer hemorrhage increased. The results of this study allow us to monitor epidemiological indicators of APUH and compare data with other countries. PMID:25559836

  20. A Clinical Predictor Score for 30-Day Mortality among HIV-Infected Adults Hospitalized with Pneumonia in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Koss, Catherine A.; Jarlsberg, Leah G.; den Boon, Saskia; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Davis, J. Lucian; Worodria, William; Ayakaka, Irene; Sanyu, Ingvar; Huang, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major cause of mortality among HIV-infected patients. Pneumonia severity scores are promising tools to assist clinicians in predicting patients 30-day mortality, but existing scores were developed in populations infected with neither HIV nor tuberculosis (TB) and include laboratory data that may not be available in resource-limited settings. The objective of this study was to develop a score to predict mortality in HIV-infected adults with pneumonia in TB-endemic, resource-limited settings. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a prospective study enrolling HIV-infected adults with cough ?2 weeks and <6 months and clinically suspected pneumonia admitted to Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda from September 2008 to March 2011. Patients provided two sputum specimens for mycobacteria, and those with Ziehl-Neelsen sputum smears that were negative for mycobacteria underwent bronchoscopy with inspection for Kaposi sarcoma and testing for mycobacteria and fungi, including Pneumocystis jirovecii. A multivariable best subsets regression model was developed, and one point was assigned to each variable in the model to develop a clinical predictor score for 30-day mortality. Results Overall, 835 patients were studied (mean age 34 years, 53.4% female, 30-day mortality 18.2%). A four-point clinical predictor score was identified and included heart rate >120 beats/minute, respiratory rate >30 breaths/minute, oxygen saturation <90%, and CD4 cell count <50 cells/mm3. Patients 30-day mortality, stratified by score, was: score 0 or 1, 12.6%, score 2 or 3, 23.4%, score 4, 53.9%. For each 1 point change in clinical predictor score, the odds of 30-day mortality increased by 65% (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.39-1.96, p <0.001). Conclusions A simple, four-point scoring system can stratify patients by levels of risk for mortality. Rapid identification of higher risk patients combined with provision of timely and appropriate treatment may improve clinical outcomes. This predictor score should be validated in other resource-limited settings. PMID:25962069

  1. Hospital-level associations with 30-day patient mortality after cardiac surgery: a tutorial on the application and interpretation of marginal and multilevel logistic regression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Marginal and multilevel logistic regression methods can estimate associations between hospital-level factors and patient-level 30-day mortality outcomes after cardiac surgery. However, it is not widely understood how the interpretation of hospital-level effects differs between these methods. Methods The Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ASCTS) registry provided data on 32,354 patients undergoing cardiac surgery in 18 hospitals from 2001 to 2009. The logistic regression methods related 30-day mortality after surgery to hospital characteristics with concurrent adjustment for patient characteristics. Results Hospital-level mortality rates varied from 1.0% to 4.1% of patients. Ordinary, marginal and multilevel regression methods differed with regard to point estimates and conclusions on statistical significance for hospital-level risk factors; ordinary logistic regression giving inappropriately narrow confidence intervals. The median odds ratio, MOR, from the multilevel model was 1.2 whereas ORs for most patient-level characteristics were of greater magnitude suggesting that unexplained between-hospital variation was not as relevant as patient-level characteristics for understanding mortality rates. For hospital-level characteristics in the multilevel model, 80% interval ORs, IOR-80%, supplemented the usual ORs from the logistic regression. The IOR-80% was (0.8 to 1.8) for academic affiliation and (0.6 to 1.3) for the median annual number of cardiac surgery procedures. The width of these intervals reflected the unexplained variation between hospitals in mortality rates; the inclusion of one in each interval suggested an inability to add meaningfully to explaining variation in mortality rates. Conclusions Marginal and multilevel models take different approaches to account for correlation between patients within hospitals and they lead to different interpretations for hospital-level odds ratios. PMID:22409732

  2. Authoritarianism, democracy and psychiatric reform in Argentina, 1943-83.

    PubMed

    Ablard, Jonathan D

    2003-09-01

    From 1955 through the early 1970s a group pf Argentine psychiatrists, influenced by psychoanalysis and the mental health movement, and supported by military and civilian governments alike, began attempts to transform psychiatric care by replacing large asylums with day hospitals, general hospital clinics and therapeutic communities. Their goals included integrating psychiatry into the mainstream of medicine, improving medical and social services to patients, improving the relationship between doctors and patients, and eliminating patients' social isolation. The military coup of march 1976 ushered in a period of unchecked repression and led to the evaporation of what had often been a tenuous alliance between progressive psychiatry and the state. PMID:14621692

  3. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  4. Three Cases of West Nile Encephalitis over an Eight-Day Period at a Downtown Los Angeles Community Hospital.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, Adam; Liu, Antonio K; Williams, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction in New York City in 1999, the virus has spread throughout the entire North American continent and continues to spread into Central and Latin America. Our report discusses the signs and symptoms, diagnostics, and treatment of West Nile disease. It is important to recognize the disease quickly and initiate appropriate treatment. We present three cases of West Nile encephalitis at White Memorial Medical Center in East Los Angeles that occurred over the span of eight days. All three patients live within four to six miles from the hospital and do not live or work in an environment favorable to mosquitoes including shallow bodies of standing water, abandoned tires, or mud ruts. All the patients were Hispanic. Physicians and other health care providers should consider West Nile infection in the differential diagnosis of causes of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis, obtain appropriate laboratory studies, and promptly report cases to public health authorities. State governments should establish abatement programs that will eliminate sources that allow for mosquito reproduction and harboring. The public needs to be given resources that educate them on what entails the disease caused by the West Nile virus, what the symptoms are, and, most importantly, what they can do to prevent themselves from becoming infected. PMID:26106493

  5. Reasons for non-attendance at a day hospital for people with enduring mental illness: the clients' perspective.

    PubMed

    McGonagle, I M; Gentle, J

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a research project which aimed to discover the reasons clients give for failing to attend a mental health day hospital. There was concern that this service provision, for people with enduring mental illness, had a high level of non-attendance and therefore might not be meeting the needs of the people for whom it is targeted. Over a period of 6 months 36 people failed to attend, despite assessment and apparent agreement to attend. Of the 36, 14 agreed to talk about their reasons for not attending. An open interview format was used which enabled the clients to talk in depth about their experiences, which they felt led to the decision to stop attending. Content analysis of the interview data resulted in the identification of common themes. Main findings suggest a lack of partnership in decisions on choice of therapy, particularly the emphasis on groupwork, which 86% found unhelpful. Other main factors for non-attendance were a lack of an individual approach to care, not being listened to, and a lack of warmth from the staff. Recommendations for future practice are given, with particular attention to the need to develop a partnership with clients aimed at meeting individual needs. PMID:8696799

  6. Development, Validation and Deployment of a Real Time 30 Day Hospital Readmission Risk Assessment Tool in the Maine Healthcare Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shiying; Wang, Yue; Jin, Bo; Shin, Andrew Young; Zhu, Chunqing; Huang, Min; Zheng, Le; Luo, Jin; Hu, Zhongkai; Fu, Changlin; Dai, Dorothy; Wang, Yicheng; Culver, Devore S.; Alfreds, Shaun T.; Rogow, Todd; Stearns, Frank; Sylvester, Karl G.; Widen, Eric; Ling, Xuefeng B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Identifying patients at risk of a 30-day readmission can help providers design interventions, and provide targeted care to improve clinical effectiveness. This study developed a risk model to predict a 30-day inpatient hospital readmission for patients in Maine, across all payers, all diseases and all demographic groups. Methods Our objective was to develop a model to determine the risk for inpatient hospital readmission within 30 days post discharge. All patients within the Maine Health Information Exchange (HIE) system were included. The model was retrospectively developed on inpatient encounters between January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 from 24 randomly chosen hospitals, and then prospectively validated on inpatient encounters from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013 using all HIE patients. Results A risk assessment tool partitioned the entire HIE population into subgroups that corresponded to probability of hospital readmission as determined by a corresponding positive predictive value (PPV). An overall model c-statistic of 0.72 was achieved. The total 30-day readmission rates in low (score of 030), intermediate (score of 3070) and high (score of 70100) risk groupings were 8.67%, 24.10% and 74.10%, respectively. A time to event analysis revealed the higher risk groups readmitted to a hospital earlier than the lower risk groups. Six high-risk patient subgroup patterns were revealed through unsupervised clustering. Our model was successfully integrated into the statewide HIE to identify patient readmission risk upon admission and daily during hospitalization or for 30 days subsequently, providing daily risk score updates. Conclusions The risk model was validated as an effective tool for predicting 30-day readmissions for patients across all payer, disease and demographic groups within the Maine HIE. Exposing the key clinical, demographic and utilization profiles driving each patients risk of readmission score may be useful to providers in developing individualized post discharge care plans. PMID:26448562

  7. Substance abuse in an inpatient psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    Brady, K; Casto, S; Lydiard, R B; Malcolm, R; Arana, G

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between psychoactive drug abuse and psychopathology is complex. There have been few systematic explorations of substance abuse in psychiatric populations since the recent epidemic of cocaine abuse. To update and further explore the relationship between psychiatric illness and substance abuse, 100 consecutively admitted patients to an inpatient psychiatry unit were administered a drug and alcohol use/abuse questionnaire. Sixty-four percent endorsed current or past problems with substance abuse and 29% met DSM-III-R criteria for substance abuse in the 30 days prior to admission. For the major diagnostic categories, there were no significant differences between groups in percentages of patients with substance abuse disorders. There was a trend (p less than or equal to .2) toward an increased number of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations in the substance-abusing group. Alcohol was the most common drug of choice followed by stimulants, cannabis, and sedative hypnotics. Differences in drug choices between diagnostic categories are discussed. Forty-three percent of urine drug screens obtained were positive, and of those with positive urine drug screens, 42% denied drug use upon admission. Only 40% of patients with current or past substance abuse problems had received treatment for their chemical dependency. In our sample, while substance abuse was very prevalent, it was underreported and undertreated. PMID:1746501

  8. Teaching Creative Writing in a Psychiatric Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Simone N.

    This paper reports the results of creative writing workshops in various psychiatric hospitals that have demonstrated that individuals in psychiatric settings have particular needs, affinities, and receptivities to the means of self-expression and communication available through creative writing. The purgative effect of Emily Dickinson's poetry and…

  9. Psychiatric diagnoses, trauma, and suicidiality

    PubMed Central

    Floen, Silje K; Elklit, Ask

    2007-01-01

    Background This study aimed to examine the associations between psychiatric diagnoses, trauma and suicidiality in psychiatric patients at intake. Methods During two months, all consecutive patients (n = 139) in a psychiatric hospital in Western Norway were interviewed (response rate 72%). Results Ninety-one percent had been exposed to at least one trauma; 69 percent had been repeatedly exposed to trauma for longer periods of time. Only 7% acquired a PTSD diagnosis. The comorbidity of PTSD and other psychiatric diagnoses were 78%. A number of diagnoses were associated with specific traumas. Sixty-seven percent of the patients reported suicidal thoughts in the month prior to intake; thirty-one percent had attempted suicide in the preceding week. Suicidal ideation, self-harming behaviour, and suicide attempts were associated with specific traumas. Conclusion Traumatised patients appear to be under- or misdiagnosed which could have an impact on the efficiency of treatment. PMID:17448229

  10. [Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk patients under antiretrovirals in a day hospital at Bobo-Dioulasso (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Sawadogo, A; Sanou, S; Hema, A; Kamboule, B E; Kabore, N F; Sore, I; Konate, A; Poda, G E A; Zoungrana, J; Sawadogo, A B

    2014-08-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has reduced morbidity and mortality of HIV but has led to an increasing metabolic cardiovascular risk. A cross-sectional study was conducted from May to September 2011 in Day Care Hospital for HIV-Patients of Bobo-Dioulasso. We included in this study 400 patients infected by HIVon antiretroviral therapy ? 6 months selected by a random draw. Metabolic syndrome was assessed according to the definitions of the IDF and ATP-III. The high risk of cardiovascular disease in 10 years was defined by a Framingham score ? 20%. The average age of our patients was 41.4 years [20-76]. 17% received an IP. The average duration of PI exposure was 35.5 months and 50.1 months for NNRTI. The prevalence of diabetes was 1.3% (95% CI: 0.5-3) and that of hypertension of 12.0 % (95% CI: 9.3-16). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to IDF was 10% (95% CI: 7.3-13.5) and the metabolic syndrome according to ATP-III 12.3% (95% CI: 9.3-16). The body mass index was higher (BMI 25.2 vs. 22.5 kg/m(2), p <10(-3) with ATPIII and BMI 26.6 vs. 22.4 kg/m(2), p <10(-3) with IDF), and duration exposure to ARVs longer in patients with metabolic syndrome regardless of the definition used (58.6 months vs 27.9 months). High cardiovascular risk was present in 1.8% (95% CI: 0.8 to 3.7) of our patients, all male more than half (n=4/7) of them were smoking. The choice of antiretroviral therapy must take into account its potential long-term toxicity. It should also strengthen supervision. PMID:24953144

  11. How can we improve targeting of frail elderly patients to a geriatric day-hospital rehabilitation program?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The optimal patient selection of frail elderly persons undergoing rehabilitation in Geriatric Day Hospital (GDH) programs remains uncertain. This study was done to identify potential predictors of rehabilitation outcomes for these patients. Methods This study is a retrospective cohort analysis of patients admitted to the rehabilitation program of our GDH, in Montreal, Canada, over a five year period. The measures considered were: Barthel Index, Older Americans Resources and Services, Folstein Mini Mental Status Exam, Timed Up & Go (TUG), 6-minute walk test (6 MWT), Gait speed, Berg Balance, grip strength and the European Quality of life - 5 Dimensions. Successful improvement with rehabilitation was defined as improvement in three or more tests of physical function. Logistic regression analysis using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) was employed to select the optimal model for making predictions of rehabilitation success. Results A total of 335 patients were studied, but only 233 patients had a complete data set suitable for the predictive model. Average age was 81 years and patients attended the GDH an average of 24 visits. Significant changes were found in several measures of physical performance for many patients ranging from improved gait speed in 21.3% to improved TUG in 62.7% of the cohort. Fifty-eight percent of patients attained successful improvement with rehabilitation by our criteria. This group was characterized by lower test scores on admission. Using BIC, the best predictor model was the 6 MWT [OR: 0.994 per meter walked (95% CI: 0.990-0.997)]. Conclusions The GDH rehabilitation program is effective in improving patients' physical performance. Although no single measure was found to be sufficiently predictive to help target candidates appropriately, the 6 MWT showed a trend to significance. Further research will be done to elucidate the utility of a composite 'rehab appropriateness index' and the role of International Classification of Function concepts for targeting frail elderly to GDH rehabilitation services. PMID:21047403

  12. Observational follow-up study following two cohorts of children with severe pneumonia after discharge from day care clinic/hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nur H; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gyr, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the features of relapse, morbidity, mortality and re-hospitalisation following successful discharge after severe pneumonia in children between a day care group and a hospital group and to explore the predictors of failures during 3?months of follow-up. Design An observational study following two cohorts of children with severe pneumonia for 3?months after discharge from hospital/clinic. Setting Day care was provided at the Radda Clinic and hospital care at a hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Participants Children aged 259?months with severe pneumonia attending the clinic/hospital who survived to discharge. Intervention No intervention was done except providing some medications for minor illnesses, if indicated. Primary outcome measures The primary outcome measures were the proportion of successes and failures of day care at follow-up visits as determined by estimating the OR with 95% CI in comparison to hospital care. Results The authors enrolled 360 children with a mean (SD) age of 8 (7)?months, 81% were infants and 61% were men. The follow-up compliance dropped from 95% at first to 85% at sixth visit. The common morbidities during the follow-up period included cough (28%), fever (17%), diarrhoea (9%) and rapid breathing (7%). During the follow-up period, significantly more day care children (n=22 (OR 12.2 (95% CI 8.217.8))) required re-hospitalisation after completion of initial day care compared with initial hospital care group (n=11 (OR 6.1 (95% CI 3.410.6))). The predictors for failure were associated with tachycardia, tachypnoea and hypoxaemia on admission and prolonged duration of stay. Conclusions There are considerable morbidities in children discharged following treatment of severe pneumonia like cough, fever, rapid breathing and diarrhoea during 3-month period. The findings indicate the importance of follow-up for early detection of medical problems and their management to reduce the risk of death. Establishment of an effective community follow-up would be ideal to address the problem of non-compliance with follow-up. Trial registration The original randomised control trial comparing day care with hospital care was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (identifier NCT00455468). PMID:22842561

  13. Psychiatric morbidity among victims of bomb blast.

    PubMed

    Gautam, S; Gupta, I D; Batra, L; Sharma, H; Khandelwal, R; Pant, A

    1998-01-01

    Thirty one victims of bomb blast in a bus caused by terrorist activity in Dausa district, Rajasthan on 22.5.96, were evaluated for psychological reactions 3 days & 2 weeks after the incident. All hospitalized & non hospitalised bomb blast victims were assessed within 3 days of injury by objective predictors (percent of burnt area, facial disfigurement, limb amputations, fractures etc.) and subjective predictors (emotional distress and perceived social support). Detailed history, physical and mental state examination of all patients was carried out and for those having scores more then 17 on GHQ-60 (Hindi version), IPIS was administered. Diagnosis was made by 3 senior consultant psychiatrists of Psychiatric Centre, Jaipur, on the basis oflCD-10. At day 3 of 31 patients studied 11 (35.45%) had psychiatric morbidity. Out of which 6 (19.35%) had acute stress reaction, 3 (9.68%) had depression and 2 (6.45%) dissociative amnesia. Most commonly reported symptoms on IPIS were depersonalisation, derealisation, sleep disturbances specially generalised sleep loss, loss of appetite, nightmares, situational anxiety, depression, mental irritability, dulness of feelings, self blame, guilt, loss of interest, suicidal ideas, and worry about money, spouse, work and children. Most common physical injury was burns, followed by hearing disturbances, wounds received due to glass <& metal pieces and non specific pains and aches. Findings of follow up have been discussed and battery of tests for evaluation of victims of acute trauma has been suggested. PMID:21494441

  14. Cohesion to the Group and Its Association with Attendance and Early Treatment Response in an Adult Day-Hospital Program for Eating Disorders: A Preliminary Clinical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crino, Natalie; Djokvucic, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Treatment outcome studies demonstrate that day-hospital programs are effective in the treatment of eating disorders. Few descriptions are available on the specifics of treatment, particularly the process of therapy. The group therapy modality is thought to provide important therapeutic benefits. The present study aimed to examine the association

  15. Cohesion to the Group and Its Association with Attendance and Early Treatment Response in an Adult Day-Hospital Program for Eating Disorders: A Preliminary Clinical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crino, Natalie; Djokvucic, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Treatment outcome studies demonstrate that day-hospital programs are effective in the treatment of eating disorders. Few descriptions are available on the specifics of treatment, particularly the process of therapy. The group therapy modality is thought to provide important therapeutic benefits. The present study aimed to examine the association…

  16. Factors Influencing Same-day Hospital Discharge and Risk Factors for Readmission After Robotic Surgery in the Gynecologic Oncology Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Colleen; Casserly, Kelly; Anderson, Mary; Isaksson Vogel, Rachel; Teoh, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective To determine the factors that allow for a safe outpatient robotic-assisted minimally invasive gynecologic oncology surgery procedure. Design Retrospective chart review (Canadian Task Force classification II-1). Setting University hospital. Patients All patients (140) undergoing robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery with the gynecologic oncology service from January 1, 2013, to December 31, 2013. Interventions Risk factors for unsuccessful discharge within 23 hours of surgery and same-day discharge were assessed using logistic regression models. Measurements and Main Results All patients were initially scheduled for same-day discharge. The outpatient surgery group was defined by discharge within 23 hours of the surgery end time, and a same-day surgery subgroup was defined by discharge before midnight on the day of surgery. One hundred fifteen (82.1%) were successfully discharged within 23 hours of surgery, and 90 (64.3%) were discharged the same day. The median hospital stay was 5.3 hours (range, 148 hours). Unsuccessful discharge within 23 hours was associated with a preoperative diagnosis of lung disease and intraoperative complications; unsuccessful same-day discharge was associated with older age and later surgery end time. Only 2 patients (1.4%) were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of surgery. Conclusions Outpatient robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery is safe and feasible for most gynecologic oncology patients and appears to have a low readmission rate. Older age, preoperative lung disease, and later surgical end time were risk factors for prolonged hospital stay. These patients may benefit from preoperative measures to facilitate earlier discharge. PMID:25304856

  17. Correlation between psychometric and biological parameters in anorexic and bulimic patients during and after an intensive day hospital treatment.

    PubMed

    Manara, F; Manara, A; Todisco, P

    2005-12-01

    This study describes: 1. The therapeutic effects on anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) patients of a psycho-nutritional intensive day-hospital program; 2. The possible correlation between the changes observed in the psychometric tests and the variations of a number of biological parameters. Forty-six female patients (24 AN and 22 BN) were assessed through a semi-structured clinical interview based on DSM-IV criteria for Eating Disorders (ED) and a number of psychometric tests (SCL-90R, BDI, EDI-2, EAT-40, BITE, BAT) at the beginning and at the end of treatment, and after a 6-month follow-up. At these three times, we also assessed the plasma level of leptin, cortisol, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and 17beta-estradiol together with body mass index (BMI) and menstrual cycle. From beginning to discharge, the scores on all psychometric tests improved in the whole sample, except for the Perfectionism subscale of EDI-2 in both groups (AN and BN), the Anger-Hostility, Phobic Anxiety and Paranoid Ideation subscales of SCL-90 and the Interpersonal Distrust subscale of EDI-2 in the BN group. At follow-up, there was a worsening of the BITE scores and of a number of EDI-2 subscales, especially in the AN subgroup - with these changes correlating with the trend of BMI. In AN patients, plasma leptin levels changed from the beginning to the end of treatment and at follow-up according to BMI changes. The mean plasma leptin level in the BN subgroup was higher than in the AN one. We found a statistically significant correlation with the scores of BDI, SCL-90R Depression and Ineffectiveness subscales, EAT-40, BITE-Symptom subscale and the trend of menses dividing these patients into two subgroups (according to the plasma leptin concentration, higher or lower than the top leptin level in the anorexics). These data seem to confirm that leptin secretion doesn't correlate univocally to BMI. PMID:16755167

  18. Metabolic interaction between amitriptyline and perphenazine in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Cooper, S F; Dugal, R; Elie, R; Albert, J M

    1979-01-01

    1. Steady-state plasma level samples of sixty-five schizophrenic patients from two psychiatric hospitals assigned to three treatment groups (amitriptyline 150 mg/day, perphenazine 20 mg/day and a combination of amitriptyline and perphenazine at 150 mg and 20 mg/day) were assayed for amitriptyline (AT), endogenous nortriptyline (NT) and perphenazine (PPZ) using gas-liquid chromatography. 2. Results reveal that AT and NT levels are independent of sex and hospital environment. 3. PPZ significantly increased the steady-state NT plasma levels, probably through inhibition of the hydroxylation biotransformation pathway, but had no effect on AT levels, thus indicating that PPZ has no influence on the desmethylation pathway, or alternatively, the hydroxylation of AT. PMID:400992

  19. Cost prediction of antipsychotic medication of psychiatric disorder using artificial neural network model

    PubMed Central

    Mirabzadeh, Arash; Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Khodae, Mohamad Reza; Kooshesh, Mohamad Reza; Mahabadi, Bibi Riahi; Mirabzadeh, Hossein; Biglarian, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotic monotherapy or polypharmacy (concurrent use of two or more antipsychotics) are used for treating patients with psychiatric disorders (PDs). Usually, antipsychotic monotherapy has a lower cost than polypharmacy. This study aimed to predict the cost of antipsychotic medications (AM) of psychiatric patients in Iran. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, 790 patients with PDs who were discharged between June and September 2010 were selected from Razi Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, Iran. For cost prediction of AM of PD, neural network (NN) and multiple linear regression (MLR) models were used. Analysis of data was performed with R 2.15.1 software. Results: Mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the duration of hospitalization (days) in patients who were on monotherapy and polypharmacy was 31.19 ± 15.55 and 36.69 ± 15.93, respectively (P < 0.001). Mean and median costs of medication for monotherapy (n = 507) were $8.25 and $6.23 and for polypharmacy (n =192) were $13.30 and $9.48, respectively (P = 0.001). The important variables for cost prediction of AM were duration of hospitalization, type of treatment, and type of psychiatric ward in the MLR model, and duration of hospitalization, type of diagnosed disorder, type of treatment, age, Chlorpromazine dosage, and duration of disorder in the NN model. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the artificial NN (ANN) model can be used as a flexible model for cost prediction of AM. PMID:24381622

  20. Psychiatric manifestations in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Fraidakis, M J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare and severe, but treatable, inborn disorder of bile acid biosynthesis and sterol storage with autosomal recessive inheritance and variable clinical presentation. CTX treatment consists of chenodeoxycholic acid and must be started as early as possible to prevent permanent disability. Psychiatric manifestations are rare and non-specific, and often lead to significant diagnostic and treatment delay. Therefore, better recognition of the gamut of psychiatric manifestations in CTX can diminish the risk of misdiagnosis and irreversible neurological deterioration. We hereby describe the psychiatric features in CTX. A complete review of all published cases of CTX in the medical literature was undertaken and the case reports with psychiatric presentation were collected and analyzed. We also describe the psychiatric features in relation to the neurological semeiology in six patients with CTX diagnosed at the La Salpêtrière Hospital. We conclude that psychiatric manifestations in CTX follow a bimodal/bitemporal pattern, appearing early in the disease course in the form of a behavioral/personality disorder associated with learning difficulties or mental retardation, or manifesting in advanced disease in the setting of dementia as rich neuropsychiatric syndromes, such as frontal, orbitofrontal or frontotemporal syndromes of cortico-subcortical dementia encompassing behavioral/personality disturbance, affective/mood disorders or psychotic disorders. Behavioral/personality disturbance in childhood or adolescence, especially when accompanied by learning difficulties, should therefore lead to further investigation to exclude CTX, as early diagnosis and treatment is critical for prognosis. PMID:24002088

  1. Psychiatric manifestations in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

    PubMed

    Fraidakis, M J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare and severe, but treatable, inborn disorder of bile acid biosynthesis and sterol storage with autosomal recessive inheritance and variable clinical presentation. CTX treatment consists of chenodeoxycholic acid and must be started as early as possible to prevent permanent disability. Psychiatric manifestations are rare and non-specific, and often lead to significant diagnostic and treatment delay. Therefore, better recognition of the gamut of psychiatric manifestations in CTX can diminish the risk of misdiagnosis and irreversible neurological deterioration. We hereby describe the psychiatric features in CTX. A complete review of all published cases of CTX in the medical literature was undertaken and the case reports with psychiatric presentation were collected and analyzed. We also describe the psychiatric features in relation to the neurological semeiology in six patients with CTX diagnosed at the La Salptrire Hospital. We conclude that psychiatric manifestations in CTX follow a bimodal/bitemporal pattern, appearing early in the disease course in the form of a behavioral/personality disorder associated with learning difficulties or mental retardation, or manifesting in advanced disease in the setting of dementia as rich neuropsychiatric syndromes, such as frontal, orbitofrontal or frontotemporal syndromes of cortico-subcortical dementia encompassing behavioral/personality disturbance, affective/mood disorders or psychotic disorders. Behavioral/personality disturbance in childhood or adolescence, especially when accompanied by learning difficulties, should therefore lead to further investigation to exclude CTX, as early diagnosis and treatment is critical for prognosis. PMID:24002088

  2. [Fragments of history in psychiatric care Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Francisco Arnoldo Nunes; Santos, Raionara Cristina de Araújo; de Azevedo, Dulcian Medeiros; Fernandes, Rafaella Leite; Costa, Tarciana Sampaio

    2010-09-01

    This article aims to rescue aspects of the performing therapeutic of the Day Hospital (HD) Dr Elger Nunes, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, during its term, and analyze the results regarding to the number of patients assisted from 1996 to 2004. This is an empirical, descriptive and exploratory study, ex post facto with a quantitative approach, carried out through the analysis of the records of 910 people attended in the hospital. The data was submitted to the informational resource software Microsoft Excel and converted into diagrams. The results show a greater accessibility to this treatment modality, decreasing in hospitalization-time length and improving hospital discharge conditions for users, with reduction in number of patients who interrupted treatment. It focus on the importance of the Day Hospital in the process of psychiatric reform, with care grounded on the use of the humanized therapeutic practices, and still not losing the bond with family and society. PMID:21574332

  3. Substance abuse and psychiatric illness: treatment experience.

    PubMed

    Sloan, K L; Rowe, G

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an outpatient dual-diagnosis treatment program and 1-year clinical outcome and hospital utilization data. Subjects were 118 consecutive admissions to the Seattle Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center's Dual Disorders program over the period from June 1, 1992, to August 31, 1994. Program eligibility requirements included having a current substance use disorder and an active non-substance-related major Axis I disorder (typically major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], bipolar disorder, or schizoaffective disorder). The treatment frame involved group-based programming (including support, medications management, and psychoeducation), routine urine drug screening, and crisis interventions. Results showed that subjects averaged 1.5 non-substance-related Axis I psychiatric disorders (54% involving psychotic symptoms) and 1.8 active substance use disorders. Patients stayed engaged in treatment for a median of 217 days, with 60% of patients having no positive drug screens, and the overall sample having a 40% reduction in the number of inpatient bed days in the year after intake. Conclusions were that, for a number of patients with comorbid disorders, psychiatric stabilization and cessation of substance use can be accomplished within an outpatient treatment frame that averages two completed clinical contacts per week. PMID:9849770

  4. The evolving private psychiatric inpatient market.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Erica C; Frank, Richard G; Glied, Sherry A

    2011-01-01

    The private psychiatric hospital market has exhibited great volatility over time. From 1976 to 1992, the number of hospitals more than doubled, while in the decade following, the number of facilities dropped by half. Recently, however, the industry has begun to grow again. The evolution of this market reflects the response of a private industry with access to capital markets to changes in both the supply of substitutes and the demand for services. Most recently, the limited supply of facilities and expanded demand for psychiatric services have spurred renewed growth. The two leading firms today, Universal Health Services, Inc., which rode the market crest and downturn since the 1980s, and Psychiatric Solutions, Inc., a newer entrant, have employed different strategies to take advantage of these opportunities. The rapid responsiveness of the private psychiatric hospital market, as exemplified by these two firms, presents significant potential for shaping future mental health policy. PMID:19941086

  5. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals... Definitions 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. Inpatient psychiatric... physician; (b) Are provided by (1) A psychiatric hospital that undergoes a State survey to...

  6. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals... Definitions 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. Inpatient psychiatric... physician; (b) Are provided by (1) A psychiatric hospital that undergoes a State survey to...

  7. 28 CFR 549.43 - Transfer for psychiatric or psychological examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transfer for psychiatric or psychological... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment 549.43 Transfer for psychiatric... psychiatric or psychological examination to determine whether hospitalization in a suitable facility...

  8. 28 CFR 549.43 - Transfer for psychiatric or psychological examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transfer for psychiatric or psychological... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment 549.43 Transfer for psychiatric... psychiatric or psychological examination to determine whether hospitalization in a suitable facility...

  9. 28 CFR 549.43 - Transfer for psychiatric or psychological examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transfer for psychiatric or psychological... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment 549.43 Transfer for psychiatric... psychiatric or psychological examination to determine whether hospitalization in a suitable facility...

  10. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals... Definitions 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. Inpatient psychiatric... physician; (b) Are provided by (1) A psychiatric hospital that undergoes a State survey to...

  11. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals... Definitions 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. Inpatient psychiatric... physician; (b) Are provided by (1) A psychiatric hospital that undergoes a State survey to...

  12. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals... Definitions 440.160 Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. Inpatient psychiatric... physician; (b) Are provided by (1) A psychiatric hospital that undergoes a State survey to...

  13. Residential mobility among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Tulloch, Alex D; Fearon, Paul; David, Anthony S

    2011-07-01

    Residential mobility among those with mental disorders is consistently associated with hospital admission. We studied 4485 psychiatric admissions in South London, aiming to describe the prevalence, timing and associations of residential moves occurring in association with admission. Moves tended to cluster around discharge; 15% of inpatients moved during admission or up to 28 days after discharge. The strongest associations were with younger age (especially 16-25 years) and homelessness. Unadjusted effects of gender, marital status and previous service use were mediated by homelessness. Possible mechanisms for the associations with homelessness and younger age are discussed. PMID:21612971

  14. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered psychotropic drugs were recorded. The frequency of ECT was calculated by identifying the total number of the hospitalized patients during the study period from the hospital records. Results A total number of 1,432 female and 1,141 male patients hospitalized in a period of 7 years, with a total number of 111 patients treated with ECT. The ratio of ECT was 4%, maintenance/acute ECT 11%. For acute ECT, affective disorders (65.3%) and psychotic disorders (21.6%) were among the leading diagnoses. Maintenance ECT, the diagnosis was; 6 affective disorders, 4 psychotic disorders and 1 obsessive compulsive disorder. There was a significant difference between the patients receiving acute and maintenance ECT in terms of age, duration of illness, and number of previous hospitalizations and ECTs. Conclusion The percentage of patients treated with acute ECT is lower in our institution than that in many other institutions from our country. Acute and maintenance ECT should be considered as an important treatment option particularly for patients with long disease duration, a high number of hospitalizations and a history of benefiting from previous ECTs. PMID:26792041

  15. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  16. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  17. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  18. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  19. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Certification and Plan Requirements 424.14 Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric... requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  20. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... psychiatric facilities. (a) Content of certification and recertification: General considerations. The content requirements differ from those for other hospitals because the care furnished in psychiatric hospitals is...

  1. Is Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests Worse During Days of National Academic Meetings in Japan? A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Izawa, Junichi; Nishiyama, Chika; Iwami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Background Outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) might be worse during academic meetings because many medical professionals attend them. Methods This nationwide population-based observation of all consecutively enrolled Japanese adult OHCA patients with resuscitation attempts from 2005 to 2012. The primary outcome was 1-month survival with a neurologically favorable outcome. Calendar days at three national meetings (Japanese Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Japanese Association for Acute Medicine, and Japanese Circulation Society) were obtained for each year during the study period, because medical professionals who belong to these academic societies play an important role in treating OHCA patients after hospital admission, and we identified two groups: the exposure group included OHCAs that occurred on meeting days, and the control group included OHCAs that occurred on the same days of the week 1 week before and after meetings. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for confounding variables. Results A total of 20 143 OHCAs that occurred during meeting days and 38 860 OHCAs that occurred during non-meeting days were eligible for our analyses. The proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes after whole arrests did not differ during meeting and non-meeting days (1.6% [324/20 143] vs 1.5% [596/38 855]; adjusted odds ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.88–1.19). Regarding bystander-witnessed ventricular fibrillation arrests of cardiac origin, the proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes also did not differ between the groups. Conclusions In this population, there were no significant differences in outcomes after OHCAs that occurred during national meetings of professional organizations related to OHCA care and those that occurred during non-meeting days. PMID:26639754

  2. Comparison of assessment and management of suicidal risk for acute psychiatric assessment between two state sponsored hospitals in England and Italy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranbir; Verdolini, Norma; Agius, Mark; Moretti, Patrizia; Quartesan, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The risk of suicide is one of the most important risk factors looked into for acute psychiatric assessments that influences the management plan. The prevalence of suicide is on a rise across European countries; as a consequence, the different countries have created specific guidelines and policies in order to prevent suicides in the acute settings. These guidelines are based on both different cultural aspects as well as the different organization of the mental health system in the different countries. This paper wants to present the comparison between the guidelines of two European countries, England and Italy, in order to evaluate the systems, understand differences and common contact points. The different European countries could learn one from the other and a European shared point of view may be a way forward to create better understanding and preventing the risk of suicide across the population. PMID:26417782

  3. Present-Day Hospital Readmissions after Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: A Large Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ruben E.; Singh, Steve K.; Hoang, Dale T.; Ali, Syed W.; Elayda, MacArthur A.; Mallidi, Hari R.; Frazier, O.H.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy improves survival, hemodynamic status, and end-organ perfusion in patients with refractory advanced heart failure. Hospital readmission is an important measure of the intensity of LVAD support care. We analyzed readmissions of 148 patients (mean age, 53.6 ± 12.7 yr; 83% male) who received a HeartMate II LVAD from April 2008 through June 2012. The patients had severe heart failure; 60.1% were in Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support class 1 or 2. All patients were observed for at least 12 months, and readmissions were classified as planned or unplanned. Descriptive and multivariate regression analyses were used to identify predictors of unplanned readmission. Twenty-seven patients (18.2%) had no readmissions or 69 planned readmissions, and 121 patients (81.8%) had 460 unplanned readmissions. The LVAD-related readmissions were for bleeding, thrombosis, and anticoagulation (n=103; 49.1%), pump-related infections (n=60; 28.6%), and neurologic events (n=28; 13.3%). The readmission rate was 2.1 per patient-year. Unplanned readmissions were for comorbidities and underlying cardiac disease (54.3%) or LVAD-related causes (45.7%). In the unplanned-readmission rate, there was no significant difference between bridge-to-transplantation and destination-therapy patients. Unplanned readmissions were associated with diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR]=3.3; P=0.04) and with shorter mileage from residence to hospital (OR=0.998; P=0.046). Unplanned admissions for LVAD-related sequelae and ongoing comorbidities were common. Diabetes mellitus and shorter distance from residence to hospital were significant predictors of readmission. We project that improved management of comorbidities and of anticoagulation therapy will reduce unplanned readmissions of LVAD patients in the future. PMID:26504434

  4. Analysis of Early Out-of Hospital Mortality after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation among Patients with Aortic Stenosis Successfully Discharged from the Hospital and Alive at 30 days (From the PARTNER Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Beohar, Nirat; Zajarias, Alan; Thourani, Vinod H.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Mack, Michael; Kapadia, Samir; Green, Philip; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Cohen, David J.; Gnreux, Philippe; Xu, Ke; Leon, Martin B.; Kirtane, Ajay J.

    2015-01-01

    In high risk/inoperable patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a proven alternative to standard (i.e., medical) therapy (ST) or surgical AVR. Concerns have been raised, however, about patients who survive the procedure but have a short subsequent survival. We therefore sought to identify correlates of early out-of-hospital mortality (EOHM) among patients undergoing successful TAVI, rendering TAVI potentially futile. Patients who were discharged from the hospital and survived >30 days but <12 months after TAVI were identified (EOHM group). Independent predictors of EOHM were explored, including patient-level factors and procedural non-fatal major complications (NFMC). A sensitivity analysis was also performed excluding patients with NFMC. Among 485 patients who were discharged from the hospital and survived 30 days following TAVI, 101 (21%) were dead within one year. Independent predictors of EOHM included serum creatinine, liver disease, coagulopathy, mental status, body mass index, male gender, and STS score. Although NFMC were strongly associated with EOHM, patient-level risk factors for EOHM were similar among patients who did and did not experience NFMC. Compared to ST, TAVI patients with EOHM had similar 6-month 6-minute walk distance & functional class, with higher rates of repeat hospitalization. In conclusion, among high risk/inoperable patients undergoing TAVI who were discharged and alive at 30 days, EOHM was not infrequent, and was largely determined by presenting characteristics and the occurrence of peri-procedural NFMC. Careful screening and minimization of NFMC may maximize the benefit of TAVI. PMID:25277334

  5. The prevalence of early postpartum psychiatric morbidity in Dubai: a transcultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Abou-Saleh, M T; Ghubash, R

    1997-05-01

    There have been numerous studies of the prevalence of postpartum psychiatric illness and its putative risk factors in Western Europe and North America, but very few studies have been undertaken in developing countries, including the Arab world. A total of 95 women admitted to the New Dubai Hospital in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, for childbirth were studied. All subjects were assessed in the postpartum period using clinical and socio-cultural instruments, namely the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ) on day 2 and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) on day 7 after delivery. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was 24% according to the SRQ and 18% according to the EPDS. A number of psychosocial factors emerged as putative risk factors for postpartum psychiatric disturbance, including depressive illness. It is concluded that the prevalence of postpartum psychiatric morbidity and its risk factors in this Arab culture are similar to the results obtained in numerous previous studies conducted in industrialized countries. These findings have implications for the early detection and care of women at risk for postpartum psychiatric illness. PMID:9197909

  6. Epidemiological African day for evaluation of patients at risk of venous thrombosis in acute hospital care settings

    PubMed Central

    Kingue, Samuel; Bakilo, Limbole; Mvuala, Richard; Ze Minkande, Jacqueline; Fifen, Inoussa; Gureja, Yash Pal; Razafimahandry, Henri Jean Claude; Okubadejo, Njideka; Oke, DA; Manga, Alexandre; Rajaonera, Tovohery; Cajetan, Nwadinigwe; Pay Pay, Emmanuel; Rabearivony, Nirina

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction This study aimed to identify patients at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) among all patients hospitalised, and to determine the proportion of at-risk hospital patients who received effective types of VTE prophylaxis in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods A multinational, observational, cross-sectional survey was carried out on 1 583 at-risk patients throughout five SSA countries. Results The prevalence of VTE risk was 50.4% overall, 62.3% in medical and 43.8% in surgical patients. The proportion of at-risk patients receiving prophylaxis was 51.5% overall, 36.2% in medical and 64% in surgical patients. Low-molecular weight heparin was the most frequently used prophylactic method in 40.2% overall, 23.1% in medical and 49.9% in surgical patients. Discussion This study showed a high prevalence of VTE risk among hospitalised patients and that less than half of all at-risk patients received an American College of Clinical Pharmacy-recommended method of prophylaxis. Conclusion Recommended VTE prophylaxis is underused in SSA. PMID:25192298

  7. Too Few Psychiatric Patients Screened for Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 155667.html Too Few Psychiatric Patients Screened for Diabetes: Study Commonly prescribed antipsychotic medications tied to greater ... WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite guidelines, diabetes screening rates are low among adults with severe ...

  8. Psychiatric thoughts in ancient India.

    PubMed

    Abhyankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry. PMID:25838724

  9. Psychiatric Thoughts in Ancient India*

    PubMed Central

    Abhyankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry. PMID:25838724

  10. Exploring identity dynamics in mental help-seeking trajectories: an ethnographic study among inpatient service users of two Belgian psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sercu, Charlotte; Pattyn, Elise; Bracke, Piet

    2015-04-01

    Using an ethnographic approach, in combining interviews with forty-two inpatient service users and participant observations, this research explored service users' experiences of their help seeking trajectories in an effort to uncover identity dynamics by which these are informed. They described both identity dynamics that made them postpone their search for help, like their belief in the essential difference between themselves and mental health service users; and dynamics that catalyzed their hospitalization, like the loss of social roles. Their accounts illustrate how experiences of barriers and facilitators for help seeking are closely intertwined with identity and therefore context related dynamics. PMID:25858204

  11. Differences in Epidemiological and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in Children from a University Hospital and Day Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rodrguez, Erika A.; Correa, Margarita M.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Atehorta, Santiago L.; Jimnez, J. Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus colonization has been demonstrated in hospital settings; however, studies in the community have shown contrasting results regarding the relevance of colonization in infection by community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In Colombia there are few studies on S. aureus colonization. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of nasal colonization by S. aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in children from a university hospital and day care centers (DCCs) of Medellin, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 400 children (200 in each setting), aged 0 months to 5 years, during 2011. Samples were collected from each nostril and epidemiological information was obtained from the parents. Genotypic analysis included spa typing, PFGE, MLST, SCCmec typing, detection of genes for virulence factors and agr groups. Results Frequency of S. aureus colonization was 39.8% (n?=?159) (hospital 44.5% and DCCs 35.0%) and by MRSA, 5.3% (n?=?21) (hospital 7.0% and DCCs 3.5%). Most S. aureus colonized children were older than two years (p?=?0.005), the majority of them boys (59.1%), shared a bedroom with a large number of people (p?=?0.028), with history of ?-Lactamase inhibitors usage (p?=?0.020). MSSA strains presented the greatest genotypic diversity with 15 clonal complexes (CC). MRSA isolates presented 6 CC, most of them (47.6%) belonged to CC8-SCCmec IVc and were genetically related to previously reported infectious MRSA strains. Conclusion Differences in epidemiological and molecular characteristics between populations may be useful for the understanding of S. aureus nasal colonization dynamics and for the design of strategies to prevent S. aureus infection and dissemination. The finding of colonizing MRSA with similar molecular characteristics of those causing infection demonstrates the dissemination capacity of S. aureus and the risk of infection among the child population. PMID:24987854

  12. The relationship of illness management and recovery to state hospital readmission.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, Tom; Zechner, Michelle

    2014-09-01

    The current study examined the association between number of hours attended of the Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) program and psychiatric readmission rates after discharge from a state psychiatric hospital. The study used archival data, N = 1186, from a large northeastern state psychiatric hospital in the United States. A Cox's regression survival analyses was conducted, adjusting for extreme outliers and controlling for sociodemographic covariates, to examine the association between different amounts of IMR and the risk for returning to the hospital. After controlling for the client characteristics of age, sex, marital status, psychiatric diagnosis, and Global Assessment of Functioning score at discharge, as well as controlling for mean daily dose of generic hospital programming and the number of days of hospitalization, it was found that, for each hour of IMR, there was an associated 1.1% reduction in the risk for returning to the hospital. This suggests that participation in IMR while in inpatient settings may assist individuals in reducing their risk for returning to the hospital. PMID:25099301

  13. Impact of risperidone long acting injection on resource utilization in psychiatric secondary care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Currie, A; Lloyd, K; Price, M; Peperell, Kate

    2008-03-01

    Risperidone long acting injection (RLAI) is the only long acting atypical antipsychotic available in the UK. Its impact on NHS resource use has not been widely studied. This review of medical records was conducted to quantify the impact of RLAI on NHS psychiatric secondary care resource use, primarily in terms of episodes of inpatient hospital care 12 months before and 12 months after RLAI initiation. Data on number of hospitalizations and hospital bed days were collected retrospectively, from patient notes and hospital databases in four acute psychiatric units in the UK for all individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were prescribed RLAI more than 12 months previously. Data were collected on 100 individuals (58 male) with a mean age 40.8 years (range 19-70). The median duration of illness before RLAI initiation was 12 years (range six months to 43 years). There were 62 admissions in the 12 months pre-RLAI, falling to 22 admissions in the 12 months post-RLAI. Number of admissions, we argue, offer a more reliable indicator of the impact of treatment than total hospital bed days in this type of study. In this study there were 40 fewer admissions in the 12 months after RLAI was initiated compared with the previous 12 months. This is important as readmission is a good proxy measure of relapse, and adherence to medication is known to be a key factor in relapse prevention. PMID:18308820

  14. Velocity during Strength and Power Training of the Ankle Plantar and Dorsiflexor Muscles in Older Patients Attending Day Hospital Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Power training has been proposed as a more effective type of resistance training for older adults for functional performance. It is not yet known whether older adults respond appropriately to instructions for power versus strength training. The purpose of this study was to determine the velocity during strength and power training, with elastic resistance bands, in older adults attending a geriatric rehabilitation day program. It was hypothesized that power training would be faster than strength training, but that there would be large interindividual differences. Nine older patients (70 to 86 years) performed power and strength training of the ankle dorsiflexor and plantar flexor muscles using elastic resistance bands. Training sessions were filmed to assess the velocity of training. Power training occurred at faster velocities as compared to strength training (P < 0.01) for both muscle groups. However, a wide variation was observed between participants in the training velocities. Older adults attending geriatric rehabilitation do have the potential to develop faster contractions during power training as compared to strength training. Nevertheless, the actual velocities achieved differed between individuals. This could explain some of the mixed findings of studies on power training. Hence, researchers should monitor velocity when comparing different types of resistance training. PMID:25802760

  15. [Psychiatric and psychosomatic consulation-liaison. An overview].

    PubMed

    Wolf, M; Arolt, V; Burian, R; Diefenbacher, A

    2013-05-01

    A high rate of psychiatric comorbidity is found in patients with somatic diseases in general hospitals. Reasons for psychiatric disorders in somatically ill patients are variable and can lead to or be a result of the physical illness or just occur coincidentally. Consultation-liaison services (C/L) assist the physician and the treatment team on internal surgical wards in general hospitals in paying attention to and caring for somatic psychiatric comorbidities with diagnostic, therapeutic and, if appropriate, secondary preventative methods. In this article an overview of the development of C/L psychiatry is given. Furthermore, the importance of particular psychiatric disorders seen by psychiatric C/L services and their treatment is described. Finally, specific aspects of service delivery with regard to collaborative care between general hospital physicians and private practitioners are discussed. PMID:23595917

  16. Attitudes of Psychiatric Nurses about the Request for Euthanasia on the Basis of Unbearable Mental Suffering(UMS)

    PubMed Central

    Wampers, Martien; De Lepeleire, Jan; Correll, Christophe U.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction When psychiatric patients express a wish for euthanasia, this should first and foremost be interpreted as a cry for help. Due to their close day-to-day relationship, psychiatric nurses may play an important and central role in responding to such requests. However, little is known about nurses’ attitudes towards euthanasia motivated by unbearable mental suffering. Objectives The aim of this study was to provide insight into the attitudes and actions taken by psychiatric nurses when confronted with a patient’s euthanasia request based on unbearable mental suffering (UMS). Method A questionnaire was sent to 11 psychiatric hospitals in the Flemish part of Belgium. Results The overall response rate was 70% (N = 627). Psychiatric nurses were frequently confronted with a request for euthanasia, either directly (N = 329, 53%) or through a colleague (N = 427, 69%). A majority (N = 536, 84%) did not object to euthanasia in a psychiatrically ill population with UMS. Confounding factors were the psychiatric diagnosis and the type of ward where the nurses were working. Most participants acknowledged a lack of knowledge and skills to adequately address the euthanasia request (N = 434, 71%). Nearly unanimously (N = 618, 99%), study participants indicated that dealing with euthanasia requests and other end-of-life issues should be part of the formal training of nurses. Conclusion The results highlight the need for ethically sound and comprehensive provision of care. Psychiatric nurses play an important role in dealing with the complex issue of requests for euthanasia. There is also a need for education, training and clear guidelines on the level of health care organizations. PMID:26700007

  17. No effect of lunar cycle on psychiatric admissions or emergency evaluations.

    PubMed

    McLay, Robert N; Daylo, Amado A; Hammer, Paul S

    2006-12-01

    It is a popularly held belief that psychiatric behavior worsens during a full moon. Research in this area has yielded mixed results. Records from Naval Medical Center San Diego for 1993-2001 were examined to see whether there were higher rates of psychiatric admission associated with particular phases of the moon. Records from 8,473 admissions revealed that there were no more admission on days with a full moon, a new moon, any quarter of the moon, a waxing moon, or a waning moon. This held true for psychiatric patients as a whole, as well as for individuals with particular diagnoses, such as those with a mood disorder or psychotic disorder. Records from 1,909 emergency psychiatric evaluations that occurred between 2002 and 2003 were also examined to see whether a higher percentage of patients might present, but not require hospitalization, during a particular phase of the moon. Once again, no significant effect was found. In summary, lunar phase was not associated in any significant way with psychiatric admissions or emergency presentation. PMID:17256692

  18. Psychiatric Adjustment in the Year after Meningococcal Disease in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shears, Daniel; Nadel, Simon; Gledhill, Julia; Gordon, Fabiana; Garralda, M. Elena

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess psychiatric status after meningococcal disease. Method: Cohort study of 66 children (34 boys, 32 girls) ages 4 to 17 years admitted to pediatric hospitals with meningococcal disease. The main outcome measure was psychiatric disorder (1-year period and point prevalence on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia

  19. Psychiatric Adjustment in the Year after Meningococcal Disease in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shears, Daniel; Nadel, Simon; Gledhill, Julia; Gordon, Fabiana; Garralda, M. Elena

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess psychiatric status after meningococcal disease. Method: Cohort study of 66 children (34 boys, 32 girls) ages 4 to 17 years admitted to pediatric hospitals with meningococcal disease. The main outcome measure was psychiatric disorder (1-year period and point prevalence on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia…

  20. [The psychiatric liaison nurse in somatic care departments].

    PubMed

    Bossis, Marie-Laure; Lemoine, Nathalie Cornet; Guitteny, Marie; Vanelle, Jean-Marie; Sauvaget, Anne; Giffaud, Sandrine

    2012-09-01

    The role of the psychiatric liaison nurse is continuing to develop within somatic wards. Its foundations are based on the recognition of the value accorded to interactions between physical and psychical dimension. This account of a psychiatric liaison nurse's practice at the university hospital of Nantes shows the positive impact a successful collaboration on inpatients. PMID:23115919

  1. Reduced medical costs and hospital days when using oral arsenic plus ATRA as the first-line treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Liang, Gong-Wen; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Jiang, Qian; Han, Sheng; Shi, Lu-Wen; Zhu, Hong-Hu

    2015-12-01

    We have demonstrated that oral arsenic (Realgar-Indigo naturalis formula, RIF) plus all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is not inferior to intravenous arsenic trioxide (ATO) plus ATRA as the first-line treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). To compare the cost-effectiveness of oral and intravenous arsenic, we analyzed the results of 30 patients in each group involved in a randomized controlled trial at our center. The median total medical costs were $13,183.49 in the RIF group compared with $24136.98 in the ATO group (p<0.0001). This difference primarily resulted from the different costs of induction therapy (p=0.016) and maintenance treatment (p<0.0001). The length of hospitalization for the RIF group was significantly lower than that for the ATO group (24 vs. 31 days, p<0.0001) during induction therapy. During maintenance treatment, the estimated medical costs were $2047.14 for each patient in the RIF group treated at home compared with $11273.81 for each patient in the ATO group treated in an outpatient setting (p<0.0001). We conclude that oral RIF plus ATRA significantly reduced the medical costs and length of hospital stay during induction and remission therapy compared with ATO plus ATRA in APL patients. PMID:26403986

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Amoebiasis among institutionalized psychiatric patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H. S.; Wang, L. C.

    1999-01-01

    Although information on amoebiasis among institutionalized psychiatric patients is available, reports on the relationship between behaviour and this infection are not abundant. From July 1995 to June 1996, stool and blood samples were collected from 565 patients in three psychiatric hospitals of North Taiwan. Stool samples were examined using the direct smear and formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation techniques as well as ProSpecT Entamoeba histolytica Microplate Assay kit. Blood samples were examined by the Amebiasis Serology Microwell ELISA kit. Among these patients, 14 (2.5%) harboured one or two species of intestinal parasites. There were 6 (1.1%) E. histolytica/E. dispar cyst passers: 5 positive in stool ELISA test and 2 with antibodies against E. histolytica. Among demographic factors, type of psychiatric disorder and disability, only a significant sexual difference in seropositivity of E. histolytica was observed. These findings indicate that the infected patients acquired the infections before they entered the hospitals. PMID:10355798

  4. Negative Rumor: Contagion of a Psychiatric Department

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Stephanie; Bota, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, a sizable body of literature on the effects of rumors and gossip has emerged. Addressing rumors in the workplace is an important subject, as rumors have a direct impact on the quality of the work environment and also on the productivity and creativity of the employees. To date, little has been written on the effect of rumors and gossip in psychiatric hospitals. This article presents case vignettes of rumors spread in psychiatric hospitals and the impact on team cohesion and morale among the staff implicated in these, too often, neglected occurrences. Dynamic aspects with particular focus on rumors in psychiatric units and suggestions for remedy and treatment are presented. PMID:25133051

  5. Sustained Uptake of a Hospital-Based Handwashing with Soap and Water Treatment Intervention (Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 Days [CHoBI7]): A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    George, Christine Marie; Jung, Danielle S; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K M; Monira, Shirajum; Sack, David A; Rashid, Mahamud-Ur; Mahmud, Toslim; Mustafiz, Munshi; Rahman, Zillur; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Winch, Peter J; Leontsini, Elli; Perin, Jamie; Begum, Farzana; Zohura, Fatema; Biswas, Shwapon; Parvin, Tahmina; Sack, R Bradley; Alam, Munirul

    2016-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children under 5 years of age globally. The time patients and caregivers spend at a health facility for severe diarrhea presents the opportunity to deliver water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions. We recently developed Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 days (CHoBI7), a 1-week hospital-based handwashing with soap and water treatment intervention, for household members of cholera patients. To investigate if this intervention could lead to sustained WASH practices, we conducted a follow-up evaluation of 196 intervention household members and 205 control household members enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of the CHoBI7 intervention 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Compared with the control arm, the intervention arm had four times higher odds of household members' handwashing with soap at a key time during 5-hour structured observation (odds ratio [OR]: 4.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.61, 8.49) (18% versus 50%) and a 41% reduction in households in the World Health Organization very high-risk category for stored drinking water (OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.96) (58% versus 34%) 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Furthemore, 71% of observed handwashing with soap events in the intervention arm involved the preparation and use of soapy water, which was promoted during the intervention, compared to 9% of control households. These findings demonstrate that the hospital-based CHoBI7 intervention can lead to significant increases in handwashing with soap practices and improved stored drinking water quality 6 to 12 months post-intervention. PMID:26728766

  6. The psychiatric abortion consultation.

    PubMed

    Pariser, S F; Dixon, K N; Thatcher, K M

    1978-09-01

    The role of the psychiatric consultant has changed with the recent liberal "on demand" abortion legislation. This paper emphasizes factors relevant to the psychiatric consultant in the evaluation of the adolescent patient, the retarded patient and the patient with psychiatric illness. In addition, a survey of the literature is made to identify the patient who is at high risk of developing postabortion psychiatric complications. The authors conclude that postabortion complications are infrequent and that there are no absolute psychiatric contraindications to elective abortion. PMID:722700

  7. Remote Psychiatric and Psychological Services via the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covvey, H. Dominic; And Others

    To provide remote psychiatric services to a population in Moose Factory, Ontario, via satellite, digital data links will be used to provide 24-hour access to the psychiatric medical file system and the psychiatric patient register at University Hospital, London, Ontario, and to permit scoring and interpretation of standard psychological tests. The…

  8. Incidence and risk factors of workplace violence on psychiatric staff

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, Marilyn; Lanza, Marilyn; Hendricks, Scott; Hartley, Dan; Rierdan, Jill; Zeiss, Robert; Amandus, Harlan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND A study by Hesketh et al. found that 20% of psychiatric nurses were physically assaulted, 43% were threatened with physical assault, and 55% were verbally assaulted at least once during the equivalent of a single work week. From 2005 through 2009, the U.S. Department of Justice reported that mental health occupations had the second highest average annual rate of workplace violence, 21 violent crimes per 1,000 employed persons aged 16 or older. OBJECTIVE An evaluation of risk factors associated with patient aggression towards nursing staff at eight locked psychiatric units. PARTICIPANTS Two-hundred eighty-four nurses in eight acute locked psychiatric units of the Veterans Health Administration throughout the United States between September 2007 and September 2010. METHODS Rates were calculated by dividing the number of incidents by the total number of hours worked by all nurses, then multiplying by 40 (units of incidents per nurse per 40-hour work week). Risk factors associated with these rates were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with a Poisson model. RESULTS Combining the data across all hospitals and weeks, the overall rate was 0.60 for verbal aggression incidents and 0.19 for physical aggression, per nurse per week. For physical incidents, the evening shift (3 pm – 11 pm) demonstrated a significantly higher rate of aggression than the day shift (7 am – 3 pm). Weeks that had a case-mix with a higher percentage of patients with personality disorders were significantly associated with a higher risk of verbal and physical aggression. CONCLUSION Healthcare workers in psychiatric settings are at high risk for aggression from patients. PMID:24894691

  9. Establishing a Coalition of Hospital-Affiliated and Community-Based Child Care Services through a Family Home Day Care Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Kathy A.

    The director of the child care and services program of a New England hospital designed and implemented this practicum for the purpose of expanding child care services for children of hospital employees and residents of communities around the hospital. The primary goal was to increase the number of quality child care slots in the area. A second aim

  10. Cost-effectiveness of a day hospital falls prevention programme for screened community-dwelling older people at high risk of falls

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Lisa; Conroy, Simon P.; Sach, Tracey; Gladman, John R. F.; Harwood, Rowan H.; Kendrick, Denise; Coupland, Carol; Drummond, Avril; Barton, Garry; Masud, Tahir

    2010-01-01

    Background: multifactorial falls prevention programmes for older people have been proved to reduce falls. However, evidence of their cost-effectiveness is mixed. Design: economic evaluation alongside pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Intervention: randomised trial of 364 people aged ?70, living in the community, recruited via GP and identified as high risk of falling. Both arms received a falls prevention information leaflet. The intervention arm were also offered a (day hospital) multidisciplinary falls prevention programme, including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nurse, medical review and referral to other specialists. Measurements: self-reported falls, as collected in 12 monthly diaries. Levels of health resource use associated with the falls prevention programme, screening (both attributed to intervention arm only) and other health-care contacts were monitored. Mean NHS costs and falls per person per year were estimated for both arms, along with the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and cost effectiveness acceptability curve. Results: in the base-case analysis, the mean falls programme cost was 349 per person. This, coupled with higher screening and other health-care costs, resulted in a mean incremental cost of 578 for the intervention arm. The mean falls rate was lower in the intervention arm (2.07 per person/year), compared with the control arm (2.24). The estimated ICER was 3,320 per fall averted. Conclusions: the estimated ICER was 3,320 per fall averted. Future research should focus on adherence to the intervention and an assessment of impact on quality of life. PMID:20833862

  11. Do the psychiatric patients reject themselves?

    PubMed

    Malhotra, H K; Inam, A S; Chopra, H D

    1981-01-01

    Five statements measuring social distance from and prejudice against the ex-mentally ill were read to 137 psychiatric patients and relatives from urban background. Their agreement and disagreement with the five statements was analysed and compared with controls from an orthopaedic clinic.Maximum social distance was found on statements about establishing marital relationship with an ex-mental patient. The social distance was found less frequently in working in a mental hospital; sharing same house, falling in love and working with an ex-mental patient respectively. The psychiatric patients and their relatives are more rejecting than the controls. PMID:22058514

  12. Multisystemic Therapy Effects on Attempted Suicide by Youths Presenting Psychiatric Emergencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Stanley J.; Henggeler, Scott W.; Rowland, Melisa D.; Halliday-Boykins, Colleen A.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Pickrel, Susan G.; Edwards, James

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of multisystemic therapy (MST) in reducing attempted suicide among predominantly African American youths referred for emergency psychiatric hospitalization. Method: Youths presenting psychiatric emergencies were randomly assigned to MST or hospitalization. Indices of attempted suicide, suicidal ideation,

  13. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health care...

  14. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health care...

  15. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health care...

  16. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health care...

  17. Suicide Prevention in the Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matakas, Frank; Rohrbach, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    It is currently impossible to distinguish between patients with depression who will make a suicide attempt and those who will not. Prevention, therefore, must be based on the assumption that any patient with more than mild symptoms of depression is at risk of suicide, and can only be effective if it is applicable to all patients with moderate to

  18. Substance Abusers in an Acute Psychiatric Facility: A Diagnostic and Logistic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Berg, John E.; Restan, Asbjørn

    2013-01-01

    Acute resident psychiatric facilities in Norway usually get their patients after referral from a medical doctor. Acute psychiatric wards are the only places accepting persons in need of emergency hospitalisation when emergency units in somatic hospitals do not accept the patient. Resident patients at one random chosen day were scrutinized in an acute psychiatric facility with 36 beds serving a catchment area of 165 000. Twenty-five patients were resident in the facility at that particular day. Eight of 25 resident patients (32.0%) in the acute wards were referred for a substance-induced psychosis (SIP). Another patient may also have had a SIP, but the differential diagnostic work was not finished. A main primary diagnosis of substance use was given in the medical reports in only 12.9% of patients during the last year. Given that the chosen day was representative of the year, a majority of patients with substance abuse problems were given other diagnoses. There seems to be a reluctance to declare the primary reason for an acute stay in a third of resident stays. Lack of specialized emergency detoxification facilities may have contributed to the results. PMID:23738222

  19. Teaching Scholarly Activity in Psychiatric Training: Years 6 and 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Boland, Robert; Cowley, Deborah; Cyr, Rebecca L.; Pato, Michele T.; Thrall, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To address nationally recognized needs for increased numbers of psychiatric clinician-scholars and physician-scientists, the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) has provided a series of full-day conferences of psychiatry residency training directors designed to increase their competence in

  20. Psychiatric illness in physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Shortt, S E

    1979-01-01

    Psychiatric illness and behavioural problems among physicians are reviewed in this paper. Some studies suggest that the medical profession has a high rate of alcoholism, drug abuse and marital discord. As well, physicians appear to commit suicide and to seek admission to psychiatric institutions more frequently than comparable populations. Considered as etiologic factors in psychiatric illness among physicians are the role strain inherent in the profession and the personality development of individual practitioners prior to their entering medical school. The review concludes with suggestions for an improved approach to treatment and prevention. PMID:380794

  1. Traumatic brain injury in children and adolescents: psychiatric disorders in the second three months.

    PubMed

    Max, J E; Lindgren, S D; Robin, D A; Smith, W L; Sato, Y; Mattheis, P J; Castillo, C S; Stierwalt, J A

    1997-06-01

    Psychiatric disorders may be common after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children, yet there is a death of prospective studies examining this problem. Fifty children aged 6 to 14, hospitalized after TBI, were assessed soon after TBI regarding preinjury psychiatric, behavioral, adaptive, and family functioning, family psychiatric history status and injury severity. The outcome measure was the presence of a "novel" psychiatric disorder (not present before the injury) during the second 3 months after the injury. Forty-two subjects were reassessed at 6 months. Severity of injury, family psychiatric history, and family function predicted a novel psychiatric disorder. Among children suffering a mild/moderate injury, those with preinjury lifetime psychiatric disorders were no longer (as they had been in the first 3 months) at higher risk than those without such a lifetime history. Thus, there appeared to be children, identifiable through clinical assessment, at increased risk for novel psychiatric disorders after TBI. PMID:9205426

  2. One-day point prevalence of emerging bacterial pathogens in a nationwide sample of 62 German hospitals in 2012 and comparison with the results of the one-day point prevalence of 2010

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, Christian; Hbner, Nils-Olaf; Gleich, Sabine; Thalmaier, Ulrike; Krger, Colin M.; Kramer, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens is an emerging problem worldwide. To combat multidrug resistant organisms (MRDOs) networks of care providers have been established in all states in Germany. The HICARE-network, a project to combat MRDOs, founded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, has published data from 2010 of a voluntary, German-wide, multicenter point-prevalence survey in 2011 conducted in collaboration with the German Society of Hospital Hygiene. The aim of the present survey was the re-evaluation of the situation in 2012. Method: The survey was conducted as a voluntary, anonymous, point-prevalence in May 2012 using routine data of microbiological diagnostics of the hospitals. As in the former survey of 2010 it was differentiated between primary, secondary and tertiary care hospitals and only data from intensive care units, surgical and medical wards were collected. Based on the survey form used in 2010, an updated version was used including more pathogens and corrected issues observed in the former survey. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (total as well as separated in hospital-acquired (HA), community-acquired (CA) and lifestock-associated (LA) MRSA), vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA/GRSA), vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis resp. Enterococcus faecium (VR-E. faecalis resp. VR-E. faecium), extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-building (ESBL) E. coli (ESBL-EC) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP), multiresistant Acinetobacter spp. (MAB), multiresistant Pseudomonas spp. (MRP), carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) as well as Clostridium difficile (CD) infections and severe infections requiring ICU-treatment were included in the survey along with additional data on screening strategy, the equipment with infection control staff and possible confounders. Results: Out of 1,550 hospitals asked to participate, 62 returned data (4%). Data from 56 hospitals including primary (26), secondary (20) and tertiary (10) care hospitals were analyzable (3.6%). The most frequently reported organisms were MRSA 1.53% [CI95: 1.321.75], followed by CDAD 1.30% [CI95: 1.111.50], ESBL-EC 0.97% [CI95: 0.801.14], and ESBL-KP 0.27% [CI95: 0.180.36], regardless of the level of care. Prevalence of MRDOs depended on the level of care and on the type of ward, as expected. Overall prevalence was highest on intensive care wards, and prevalences were remarkably high on medical wards compared to surgical wards. All tertiary care providers employed their own infection control nurse, while only ~70% of the secondary and primary care hospitals did. Surprisingly, in two of the ten participating tertiary care providers neither an internal nor an external infection control doctor was available. Discussion: With more than 13,000 patients in 56 hospitals distributed all over Germany, the survey included more than three times as many patients as the first survey and therefore not only adds valuable information about the epidemiology of emerging nosocomial pathogens, but also helps to raise awareness of the problem of antibacterial resistance in Germany. The prevalences reported seem to be comparable to the results of the former survey and of other surveys published. Some hospitals reported to have no infection control personnel available at all. This statement is in line with another survey published in this issue. PMID:23967398

  3. Religious Affiliation as a Predictor of Involuntary Psychiatric Admission: A Brazilian 1-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Caio Borba; Loch, Alexandre Andradade

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze factors associated with the legal status at psychiatric admission of individuals with psychosis or bipolar disorder in a Latin-American cultural setting. Methods: Prospective observational study was conducted in So Paulo, Brazil. We analyzed 169 individuals with bipolar or psychotic disorder in need of hospitalization. Sociodemographic data, data on the psychiatric disorder, information about the hospital stay, and data at time of discharge were collected. Their families were also contacted by telephone and interviews were conducted at 1, 2, 6, and 12?months post-discharge as a follow-up. Results: Eighty-eight patients (52%) had a voluntary admission and 81 (48%) had an involuntary admission (IA). The average length of admission was similar in both groups (17.4 vs. 17.3?days, p?=?0.22). It was significantly more common for IA patients to be admitted because of other-directed aggressiveness (47.7 vs. 65.4%, p?=?0.02). The percentage of individuals that needed physical restraint during hospital stay among IA patients was also significantly higher (11.4 vs. 25.9%, p?=?0.01). Having any religious affiliations was significantly related to an IA status as well (OR?=?46.48). Conclusion: Our results suggest that cultural factors related to religious affiliations might play an important role in determining psychiatric hospitalization legal status. Religion might possibly influence someones judgment and insight about his/her psychiatric disorder. This study restates the importance of dealing with the subject of religion with patients. PMID:25157344

  4. Day Hospital Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT-DH) versus treatment as usual in the treatment of severe borderline personality disorder: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe borderline personality disorder is associated with a very high psychosocial and economic burden. Current treatment guidelines suggest that several manualized treatments, including day hospital Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT-DH), are effective in these patients. However, only two randomized controlled trials have compared manualized MBT-DH with treatment as usual. Given the relative paucity of data supporting the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of MBT-DH, the possible influence of researcher allegiance in one of the trials, and potential problems with the generalization of findings to mental health systems in other countries, this multi-site randomized trial aims to investigate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of manualized MBT-DH compared to manualized specialist treatment as usual in The Netherlands. Methods/design The trial is being conducted at two sites in The Netherlands. Patients with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of borderline personality disorder and a score of ≥ 20 on the Borderline Personality Disorder Severity Index were randomly allocated to MBT-DH or treatment as usual. The MBT-DH program consists of a maximum of 18 months’ intensive treatment, followed by a maximum of 18 months of maintenance therapy. Specialist treatment as usual is provided by the City Crisis Service in Amsterdam, a service that specializes in treating patients with personality disorders, offering manualized, non-MBT interventions including family interventions, Linehan training, social skills training, and pharmacotherapy, without a maximum time limit. Patients are assessed at baseline and subsequently every 6 months up to 36 months after the start of treatment. The primary outcome measure is the frequency and severity of manifestations of borderline personality disorder as assessed by the Borderline Personality Disorder Severity Index. Secondary outcome measures include parasuicidal behaviour, symptomatic distress, social and interpersonal functioning, personality functioning, attachment, capacity for mentalizing and quality of life. Cost-effectiveness is assessed in terms of the cost per quality-adjusted life year. Outcomes will be analyzed using multilevel analyses based on intention-to-treat principles. Discussion Severe borderline personality disorder is a serious psychological disorder that is associated with high burden. This multi-site randomized trial will provide further data concerning the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of MBT-DH for these patients. Trial registration NTR2175 PMID:24886402

  5. How a Stressed Local Public System Copes With People in Psychiatric Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Rebecca; La, Elizabeth Holdsworth; Morrissey, Joseph; Hall, Marissa; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Blouin, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    In order to bolster the public mental health safety net, we must first understand how these systems function on a day-to-day basis. This study explored how individual attributes and organizational interdependencies within one predominantly urban US county affected responses to individuals needs during psychiatric crises. We interviewed clinicians and managers within the crisis response network about people at immediate risk of psychiatric hospitalization, what had happened to them during their crises, and factors affecting services provided (N = 94 individuals and 9 agencies). Social network diagrams depicted patterns of referrals between agencies. Iterative coding of interview transcripts was used to contextualize the social network findings. Often, agencies saw crises through to resolution. However, providers also limited the types of people they served, leaving many people in crisis in limbo. This study illustrates how attributes of individuals with mental illness, service providers and their interactions, and state and federal policies intersect to shape the trajectories of individuals during psychiatric crises. Understanding both the structures of current local systems and their contexts may support continued evolution toward a more humane and robust safety net for some of our societys most vulnerable members. PMID:23065371

  6. The Patient- And Nutrition-Derived Outcome Risk Assessment Score (PANDORA): Development of a Simple Predictive Risk Score for 30-Day In-Hospital Mortality Based on Demographics, Clinical Observation, and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Frantal, Sophie; Schindler, Karin; Themessl-Huber, Michael; Mouhieddine, Mohamed; Schuh, Christian; Pernicka, Elisabeth; Schneider, Stphane; Singer, Pierre; Ljunqvist, Olle; Pichard, Claude; Laviano, Alessandro; Kosak, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a simple scoring system to predict 30 day in-hospital mortality of in-patients excluding those from intensive care units based on easily obtainable demographic, disease and nutrition related patient data. Methods Score development with general estimation equation methodology and model selection by P-value thresholding based on a cross-sectional sample of 52 risk indicators with 123 item classes collected with questionnaires and stored in an multilingual online database. Setting Worldwide prospective cross-sectional cohort with 30 day in-hospital mortality from the nutritionDay 2006-2009 and an external validation sample from 2012. Results We included 43894 patients from 2480 units in 32 countries. 1631(3.72%) patients died within 30 days in hospital. The Patient- And Nutrition-Derived Outcome Risk Assessment (PANDORA) score predicts 30-day hospital mortality based on 7 indicators with 31 item classes on a scale from 0 to 75 points. The indicators are age (0 to 17 points), nutrient intake on nutritionDay (0 to 12 points), mobility (0 to 11 points), fluid status (0 to 10 points), BMI (0 to 9 points), cancer (9 points) and main patient group (0 to 7 points). An appropriate model fit has been achieved. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for mortality prediction was 0.82 in the development sample and 0.79 in the external validation sample. Conclusions The PANDORA score is a simple, robust scoring system for a general population of hospitalised patients to be used for risk stratification and benchmarking. PMID:26000634

  7. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Families Guide Skip breadcrumb navigation Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Quick Links Facts For Families Guide Facts For ... Families Guide - Search No. 52; Updated November 2012 Evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist is appropriate ...

  8. Neuroinflammation and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in psychiatric illness. While systemic autoimmune diseases are well-documented causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, synaptic autoimmune encephalitides with psychotic symptoms often go under-recognized. Parallel to the link between psychiatric symptoms and autoimmunity in autoimmune diseases, neuroimmunological abnormalities occur in classical psychiatric disorders (for example, major depressive, bipolar, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorders). Investigations into the pathophysiology of these conditions traditionally stressed dysregulation of the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, but the mechanisms causing these neurotransmitter abnormalities remained elusive. We review the link between autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disorders, and the human and experimental evidence supporting the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in selected classical psychiatric disorders. Understanding how psychosocial, genetic, immunological and neurotransmitter systems interact can reveal pathogenic clues and help target new preventive and symptomatic therapies. PMID:23547920

  9. Psychiatric issues in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, E S

    2001-04-01

    In recent years there has been considerable research interest at the interface between epilepsy and psychiatry. Topics of interest include the epidemiology of psychiatric co-morbidity in epilepsy; clinical syndromes at this interface and their classification; the relationship between cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric co-morbidity; biological mechanisms that mediate such co-morbidity, especially with developments in imaging and genetic research; the association between temporal lobe surgery, vagus nerve stimulation, and other non-pharmacological treatments, and the development of such co-morbidity; the contribution of anticonvulsant drugs towards the development of psychiatric co-morbidity; quality of life and other psychosocial issues; and non-epileptic attack disorder. In this review, papers on these psychiatric issues in epilepsy, with a focus on those published in the past year (October 1999 to October 2000) are critically evaluated, and some important current issues at this interface are considered in detail. PMID:11262739

  10. Women in U.S. Psychiatric Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Shaili; Ballamudi, Bhawani

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The number of women in psychiatric training is predicted to increase over time. This article aims to review and evaluate the existing literature on the topic and identify present areas of concern and recommend future areas for research. Method: A Medline search from 1964 to the present day was conducted. Literature on female physicians

  11. Psychiatric morbidity among prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Ayirolimeethal, Anithakumari; Ragesh, G.; Ramanujam, Jayanthi M.; George, Biju

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a considerable lack of scientific estimate of psychiatric morbidity among Indian prisoners. Objective: The objective of the following study is to study the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among prisoners. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study at District Jail, Kozhikode, Kerala. Materials and Methods: A total of 255 prisoners who were inmates during the period from mid-April to mid-July 2011 participated in the study. The study subjects included both male and female remand or convict prisoners. Socio-demographic data, clinical history and criminological history were collected from each individual. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using MINI-Plus. Statistical Analysis: Done by using SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). Results: A total of 175 subjects (68.6%) had a current mental illness. Substance use disorder was the most common diagnosis (47.1%). Antisocial personality disorder was diagnosed in 19.2%, adjustment disorder in 13.7%, mood disorder in 4.3% and psychosis in another 6.3% of prisoners. A high rate of a current psychiatric disorder was seen in male (69.7%) prisoners. A significant association was noticed for the different nature of crimes with psychiatric diagnoses and previous imprisonment. Nearly 4% of prisoners reported a moderate to high suicide risk. Conclusion: Mental health problems among prisoners were quite high. Mentally ill prisoners are at high risk for repeated incarceration. The increased rate of psychiatric disorders should be a concern for mental health professionals and the policy makers. PMID:24891702

  12. Temporal patterns of veterans' psychiatric service utilization, disability payments, and cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Grossman, L S; Willer, J K; Miller, N S; Stovall, J G; McRae, S G; Maxwell, S

    1997-01-01

    This study examined temporal patterns of service utilization, disability benefits, and substance use. Specifically, it investigated whether the first day of the first week of each month (when disability payments are disbursed) was associated with increased emergency room (ER) use and more frequent cocaine use among psychiatric patients. All 1993 psychiatric ER presentations (n=1,448) at a Veterans Administration hospital were reviewed in order by the week of each month in which they occurred. A random subsample of only those admitted to an inpatient psychiatric service (n=143) was further assessed for amount of disability payments received and recent cocaine use. This study found that for the total population of patients utilizing the ER, most ER visits occurred during the first week, followed by weeks two, three, and four respectively. The highest percentage (49%) of patients who used cocaine were those admitted during the first week of the month, followed by week two (39%), week four (28%) and week three (25%). For the subsample of patients admitted to inpatient services, patients hospitalized during the fourth week of the month were those receiving the highest disability payments. This study found that cocaine users have the most ER visits during the first week of the month following receipt of benefits. Current data, if confirmed, would suggest public policy changes, such as payment of entitlement money to cocaine users through a third-party payee and stipulated treatment for psychiatric patients with substance use disorders as a condition of payment. Ethical and political issues, including confidentiality and patient autonomy, would need to be considered in any such policy changes. PMID:9339861

  13. Psychiatric disorders and treatment among newly homeless young adults with histories of foster care

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Ronald G.; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective While foster care placement is often preceded by stressful events such as childhood abuse, foster care itself often exposes children to additional severe stressors. A history of foster care, as well as the childhood abuse that often precedes it, is common among homeless young adults. However, whether a history of foster care elevates the likelihood of psychiatric disorders and treatment among homeless young adults, after adjustment for childhood abuse, is unknown. This study examined whether a history of foster care was associated with psychiatric disorders, prior psychiatric counseling, prescription of psychiatric medications, and prior psychiatric hospitalization among newly homeless young adults, controlling for childhood abuse and other covariates. Methods Among a consecutive sample of 424 newly homeless young adults (18 to 21 years) in a crisis shelter, logistic regression analyses determined the associations between foster care and any psychiatric disorder (affective, anxiety, personality, psychotic) and psychiatric treatment, adjusted for demographics, childhood abuse, substance abuse, prior arrest, unemployment, lack of high school diploma, and histories of psychiatric disorders and drug abuse among biological relatives. Results Homeless young adults with histories of foster care were 70% more likely to report any psychiatric disorder (AOR=1.70) and twice as likely to have received mental health counseling for a psychiatric disorder (AOR=2.17), been prescribed psychiatric medication (AOR=2.26), and been hospitalized for psychiatric problems (AOR=2.15) than those without such histories. Conclusions Histories of foster care should trigger screening for psychiatric disorders among homeless young adults to aid in the provision of treatment (counseling, medication, hospitalization) tailored to their psychiatric needs. PMID:22706986

  14. The Geriatric Population and Psychiatric Medication

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sannidhya; Sareen, Himanshu; Trivedi, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    With improvement in medical services in the last few years, there has been a constant rise in the geriatric population throughout the world, more so in the developing countries. The elderly are highly prone to develop psychiatric disorders, probably because of age related changes in the brain, concomitant physical disorders, as well as increased stress in later life. Psychiatric disorders in this population may have a different presentation than in other groups and some of psychopathologies might be mistaken for normal age related changes by an unwary clinician. Therefore the need of the day is to train psychiatrists and physicians to better recognize and manage mental disorders in this age group. PMID:21327169

  15. Utilization of day surgery services at Upper hill Medical Centre and the Karen hospital in Nairobi: the influence of medical providers, cost and patient awareness

    PubMed Central

    Odhiambo, Mildred Adhiambo; Njuguna, Susan; Waireri-Onyango, Rachel; Mulimba, Josephat; Ngugi, Peter Mungai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Health systems face challenges of improving access to health services due to rising health care costs. Innovative services such as day surgery would improve service delivery. Day surgery is a concept where patients are admitted for surgical procedures and discharged the same day. Though used widely in developed countries due to its advantages, utilization in developing countries has been low. This study sought to establish how utilization of day surgery services was influenced by medical providers, patient awareness and cost among other factors. Methods The study design was cross sectional with self administered questionnaires used to collect data. Data analysis was done by using statistical package for social science (SPSS) and presented as frequencies, percentages and Spearman's correlation to establish relationship among variables. Results Medical providers included doctors, their employees and medical insurance providers. Most doctors were aware of day surgery services but their frequency of utilization was low. Furthermore, medical insurance providers approved only half of the requests for day surgery. Doctors’ employees were aware of the services and most of them would recommend it to patients. Although, most patients were not aware of day surgery services those who were aware would prefer day surgery to in patient. Moreover, doctors and medical insurance providers considered day surgery to be cheaper than in patient. Conclusion The study showed that medical providers and patient awareness had influence over day surgery utilization, though, cost alone did not influence day surgery utilization but as a combination with other factors. PMID:26664529

  16. Narcissism and relational representations among psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kealy, David; Ogrodniczuk, John S; Joyce, Anthony S; Steinberg, Paul I; Piper, William E

    2015-06-01

    Pathological narcissism is associated with maladaptive interpersonal behavior, although less is known regarding the internal relational representations of narcissistic patients. The authors examined the relationship between pathological narcissism and two constructs that reflect internal representations of relational patterns: quality of object relations and attachment style. Patients attending a psychiatric day treatment program (N = 218) completed measures of narcissism, general psychiatric distress, and attachment style in terms of attachment avoidance and anxiety. A semistructured interview was used to assess quality of object relations. Multiple regression analysis was conducted, controlling for general psychiatric distress. Pathological narcissism was associated with anxious attachment, but not with avoidant attachment. Narcissism was also associated with lower levels of quality of object relations. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of internal representations of self-other relations. PMID:23398104

  17. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 10 Warning Signs Adult Day Care Assistive Technology Elder Abuse Face the Facts Government Assisted Housing Home ... Hospital Discharges Pension Counseling A Talk with An Elder Driver Brochures Federal Websites Helpful Links Search by ...

  18. Abortion and psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Stotland, Nada L

    2003-03-01

    The subject of abortion is fraught with politics, emotions, and misinformation. A widespread practice reaching far back in history, abortion is again in the news. Psychiatry sits at the intersection of the religious, ethical, psychological, sociological, medical, and legal facets of the abortion issue. Although the religions that forbid abortion are more prominent in the media, many religions have more liberal approaches. While the basic right to abortion has been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court, several limitations have been permitted, including parental notification or consent (with the possibility of judicial bypass) for minors, waiting periods, and mandatory provision of certain, sometimes biased, information. Before the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion in 1973, many women were maimed or killed by illegal abortions, and psychiatrists were sometimes asked to certify that abortions were justified on psychiatric grounds. Currently, there are active attempts to convince the public and women considering abortion that abortion frequently has negative psychiatric consequences. This assertion is not borne out by the literature: the vast majority of women tolerate abortion without psychiatric sequelae. The psychiatric outcome of abortion is best when patients are able to make autonomous, supported decisions. Psychiatrists need to know the medical and psychiatric facts about abortion. Psychiatrists can then help patients prevent unwanted pregnancies, make informed decisions consonant with their own values and circumstances when they become pregnant, and find appropriate social and medical resources whatever their decisions may be. PMID:15985924

  19. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and

  20. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and…

  1. Day to day with COPD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... but there are things you can do every day to keep COPD from getting worse, to protect ... COPD - day to day; Chronic obstructive airways disease - day to day; Chronic obstructive lung disease - day to day ; Chronic ...

  2. Psychiatric consultation to the postpartum mother.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Eleanor A; Kim, Deborah R

    2015-04-01

    The immediate postpartum period is a time of acute vulnerability to mental illness, which presents unique challenges for the psychiatric consultant. Because the postpartum hospital stay is typically brief, the consultant must have a working knowledge of postpartum physiology and the myriad forms of mental illness that may emerge in this vulnerable time, in order to quickly make a diagnosis and formulate a treatment plan. This review aims to characterize the most common reasons for postpartum consultation, review postpartum physiology and psychiatric conditions, and propose an evidence-based, practical approach to treatment. A literature search using the terms "postpartum," "obstetric," "consultation," and "psychiatry" yielded six studies that identified reasons for psychiatric consultation to the obstetrics and gynecology services. These studies informed the structure of the article such that we review the most common reasons for consultation and how to approach each issue. The most common reason for consultation is past psychiatric history, often in the absence of current symptoms. For each clinical situation, including depression, adverse birth events, and psychosis, we present a differential diagnosis, as well as risk factors, clinical signs, and recommended treatment. PMID:25764006

  3. Cigarette smoking among psychiatric patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barros, Fabiana Cristina Ribeiro de; Melo, Ana Paula Souto; Cournos, Francine; Cherchiglia, Maringela Leal; Peixoto, Eliane Rezende de Morais; Guimares, Mark Drew Crosland

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate tobacco smoking prevalence among psychiatric patients attended in care facilities in Brazil and assess associated factors. A cross-sectional multicenter study was conducted of psychiatric patients (N = 2,475) selected from 26 care facilities. Current and ex-smokers were compared to those who had never smoked. Odds ratios were estimated using logistic regression. The current and past smoking prevalence rates were 52.7% and 18.9%, respectively. Being male, aged 40 years or over, drug and alcohol use, unprotected sex and a history of physical violence were factors associated with both current and past smoking, while a low education level (? 8 years of schooling), history of homelessness, not practicing a religion, current or previous psychiatric hospitalization, and main psychiatric diagnosis substance use disorders, were factors only associated with current smoking. Tobacco smoking prevalence among this population was high and was higher than the rate in the general population. Appropriate interventions and smoking prevention policies should be incorporated into mental health services. PMID:25099043

  4. The Spectrum of Psychiatric Pathology in a Patient with Genetically Verified Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alkabie, Samir; Singh, Daljinder; Hernandez, Amy; Dumenigo, Rhaisa

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral disturbances are common in Huntington's disease (HD) and contribute significantly to its morbidity and mortality. We herein present the case of a 43-year-old woman with genetically verified HD, whose deteriorating psychiatric condition necessitated multiple inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations and featured a clinical spectrum of neuropsychiatric disturbances classically associated with HD. This paper reviews the literature concerning Huntington's psychopathology and provides an illustrative case example of its clinical nature. PMID:26451266

  5. The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

  6. Multidimensional Prognostic Index in Association with Future Mortality and Number of Hospital Days in a Population-Based Sample of Older Adults: Results of the EU Funded MPI_AGE Project

    PubMed Central

    Angleman, Sara B.; Santoni, Giola; Pilotto, Alberto; Fratiglioni, Laura; Welmer, Anna-Karin

    2015-01-01

    Background The Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) has been found to predict mortality in patients with a variety of clinical conditions. We aimed to assess the association of the MPI with future mortality and number of in-hospital days for the first time in a population-based cohort. Methods The study population consisted of 2472 persons, aged 66–99 years, from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen, Sweden, who underwent the baseline visit 2001–4, and were followed up >10 years for in-hospital days and >12 years for mortality. The MPI was a modified version of the original and aggregated seven domains (personal and instrumental activities of daily living, cognitive function, illness severity and comorbidity, number of medications, co-habitation status, and nutritional status). The MPI score was divided into risk groups: low, medium and high. Number of in-hospital days (within 1, 3 and 10 years) and mortality data were derived from official registries. All analyses were age-stratified (sexagenarians, septuagenarians, octogenarians, nonagenarians). Results During the follow-up 1331 persons (53.8%) died. Laplace regression models, suggested that median survival in medium risk groups varied by age from 2.2–3.6 years earlier than for those in the corresponding low risk groups (p = 0.002-p<0.001), and median survival in high risk groups varied by age from 3.8–9.0 years earlier than for corresponding low risk groups (p<0.001). For nonagenarians, the median age at death was 3.8 years earlier in the high risk group than for the low risk group (p<0.001). The mean number of in-hospital days increased significantly with higher MPI risk score within 1 and 3 years for people of each age group. Conclusion For the first time, the effectiveness of MPI has been verified in a population-based cohort. Higher MPI risk scores associated with more days in hospital and with fewer years of survival, across a broad and stratified age range. PMID:26222546

  7. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  8. Use of psychiatric medications in schizophrenia and other psychoses in a general population sample.

    PubMed

    Nyknen, Salla; Puska, Virpi; Tolonen, Jussi-Pekka; Salo, Henri; Isohanni, Matti; Koponen, Hannu; Pirkola, Sami; Penttil, Matti; Haapea, Marianne; Moilanen, Jani; Miettunen, Jouko; Jskelinen, Erika

    2016-01-30

    The information on the use of psychiatric medications in general population-based samples is limited. Our aim was to analyse the use of psychiatric medications and factors associated with antipsychotic use in psychoses in a general population sample. Fifty-five persons with schizophrenia, 21 with bipolar psychosis or psychotic depression and 20 with other psychoses from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 were examined at about 43 years of age. The frequency of use and dosage of psychiatric medication and the factors associated with the use of antipsychotics were analysed. Antipsychotics were used by 85% of schizophrenia, 65% of bipolar psychosis or psychotic depression and 62% of other psychoses cases; antidepressants were used by 22%, 60% and 33%; and benzodiazepines by 42%, 35% and 10%, respectively. In all the diagnostic groups, higher symptom scores and a higher number of hospital days were associated with the use of antipsychotics. In schizophrenia and other psychoses, poorer social and occupational functioning, and in other psychoses, female gender and lower education were also associated with the use of antipsychotics. Our results may partly indicate that, especially in schizophrenia, the effectiveness of antipsychotics is not as good as expected. PMID:26652841

  9. Symptom, Family, and Service Predictors of Childrens Psychiatric Rehospitalization Within One Year of Discharge

    PubMed Central

    BLADER, JOSEPH C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate predictors of readmission to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children aged 5 to 12 discharged from acute-care hospitalization. Method One hundred nine children were followed for 1 year after discharge from inpatient care. Time to rehospitalization was the outcome of interest. Predictors of readmission, examined via the Cox proportional hazards model, were symptom and family factors assessed at admission, aspects of psychiatric treatment, and demographic variables. Results The Kaplan-Meier rehospitalization risk within 1 year of discharge, taking into account known readmissions and censored observations, was 0.37. Most readmissions (81%) occurred within 90 days of discharge. Four variables contributed simultaneously to predicting readmission risk. More severe conduct problems, harsh parental discipline, and disengaged parentchild relations conferred a higher risk for rehospitalization; these risks were attenuated when parents disclosed higher stress in their parenting roles. Conclusions Findings showed that psychiatric rehospitalization of children is common, most likely in the trimester after discharge, and highly related to both child symptoms and family factors measurable at admission. Results suggest that efforts to improve postdischarge outcomes of children should target the initial period following inpatient care, address vigorously the complex treatment needs of those with severe conduct problems, and aim to improve parentchild relations. PMID:15187804

  10. Adolescent Dress, Part I: Dress and Body Markings of Psychiatric Outpatients and Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelman, John D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated dress and body markings of 100 hospitalized and never-hospitalized adolescent psychiatric patients using in-depth interviews. Found that hospitalized patients had higher incidence of self-scarring, but other individual expressions of appearance did not differentiate two groups. Suggests that dress and appearance observations,

  11. Gender and Disorder Specific Criminal Career Profiles in Former Adolescent Psychiatric In-Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjelsberg, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    A Norwegian nation-wide sample of 1087 former adolescent psychiatric in-patients, 584 males and 503 females, were followed up 15-33 years after first hospitalization. On the basis of detailed hospital records from index hospitalization all were rediagnosed according to DSM-IV. The patient list was linked to the national criminal register and the…

  12. Traditional Healing Practices Sought by Muslim Psychiatric Patients in Lahore, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farooqi, Yasmin Nilofer

    2006-01-01

    This research explored the type of traditional healing practices sought by Muslim psychiatric patients treated at public hospitals of Lahore city, Pakistan. The sample comprised 87 adult psychiatric patients (38% male and 62% female). The patients self-reported on the Case History Interview Schedule that they had sought diverse traditional healing

  13. Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Admission Rates and Subsequent One-Year Mortality in England: 1998-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Anthony; Clacey, Joe; Seagroatt, Valerie; Goldacre, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a time of very rapid change not only in physical but also psychological development. During the teenage years there is a reported rise in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate age- and sex-specific National Health Service (NHS) hospital inpatient admission rates for psychiatric

  14. Traditional Healing Practices Sought by Muslim Psychiatric Patients in Lahore, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farooqi, Yasmin Nilofer

    2006-01-01

    This research explored the type of traditional healing practices sought by Muslim psychiatric patients treated at public hospitals of Lahore city, Pakistan. The sample comprised 87 adult psychiatric patients (38% male and 62% female). The patients self-reported on the Case History Interview Schedule that they had sought diverse traditional healing…

  15. Workplace Literacy for Psychiatric Health Care Workers. Final Performance Report [and] External Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perin, Dolores; And Others

    This report documents the Workplace Literacy for Psychiatric Health Care Workers project, a partnership between a labor union and the City University of New York through which workplace literacy instruction was provided to mental hygiene therapy aides (MHTAs) employed in five state-operated psychiatric hospitals in New York City. Among the…

  16. Heterogeneity in Youth Symptom Trajectories Following Psychiatric Crisis: Predictors and Placement Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday-Boykins, Colleen A.; Henggeler, Scott W.; Rowland, Melisa D.; DeLucia, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined heterogeneity in symptom trajectories among youths following psychiatric crises as well as the psychosocial correlates and placement outcomes associated with identified trajectories. Using semiparametric mixture modeling with 156 youths approved for psychiatric hospitalization, the authors identified 5 trajectories based on

  17. Characterizing Aggressive and Noncompliant Behaviors in a Children's Psychiatric Inpatient Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Cardona, Laurie; Martin, Andres

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate aggression and noncompliance among child psychiatric inpatients in relation to demographic, clinical, and hospitalization characteristics, including the use of restraints and seclusion. Eighty six children (10.8 plus or minus 2.4 years old, 67% male) consecutively admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit were

  18. Pathological Gambling: Psychiatric Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Three psychiatric conceptual models: addictive, obsessive-compulsive spectrum and mood spectrum disorder have been proposed for pathological gambling. The objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate the evidence base from the most recent reviews of each model, (2) update the evidence through 2007 and (3) summarize the status of the evidence for

  19. Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, a number of components related to psychiatric diagnosis have come under criticism for their inaccuracies and inadequacies. Neurobiologists and anthropologists have particularly criticized the rigidity of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis –composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress—as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. PMID:23816860

  20. Shrinking inpatient psychiatric capacity: cause for celebration or concern?

    PubMed

    Salinsky, Eileen; Loftis, Christopher

    2007-08-01

    This issue brief examines reported capacity constraints in inpatient psychiatric services and describes how these services fit within the continuum of care for mental health treatment. The paper summarizes the type and range of acute care services used to intervene in mental health crises, including both traditional hospital-based services and alternative crisis interventions, such as mobile response teams. It reviews historical trends in the supply of inpatient psychiatric beds and explores the anticipated influence of prospective payment for inpatient psychiatric services under Medicare. The paper also considers other forces that may affect the need for and supply of acute mental health services, including key factors that could improve the quality and efficiency of inpatient psychiatric care. PMID:17679175

  1. Predictors of psychiatric rehospitalization among elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chun Yin Terry

    2015-01-01

    The population of Hong Kong and the proportion of elderly people have been increasing rapidly. The aim of this retrospective cohort study is to determine predictive factors for psychiatric rehospitalization within 2 years among elderly patients who were discharged from psychiatric wards, in attempt to reduce their rehospitalization rate and to reintegrate them into the community. Patients aged 65 and over, who were discharged from psychiatric wards of Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital from 1 March 2010 to 29 February 2012, were identified. Rehospitalization within 2 years after discharge was the primary outcome measure, and the time to rehospitalization was measured as the secondary outcome. Patients were subgrouped into readmitted and non-readmitted groups. Logistic regression and Cox regression analyses were applied to the potential predictive factors with odds ratios and hazard ratios obtained, respectively, for the significant findings. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted for graphical representation of the study results in survival analysis. 368 individuals satisfying the study criteria were identified. The same four factors were shown to be significantly associated with rehospitalization in both multiple logistic regression and Cox regression survival analysis. Referral to other psychiatric disciplines upon discharge (p< 0.001, OR=0.325, HR=0.405) was associated with a lower rehospitalization risk and correlated to a longer time to rehospitalization. History of suicidal behaviors (p< 0.001, OR=4.906, HR=3.161), history of violent behaviors (p< 0.001, OR=5.443, HR=3.935) and greater number of previous psychiatric admissions (p< 0.001, OR=1.250, HR=1.121) were associated with a higher rehospitalization risk and predicted earlier rehospitalization. The rehospitalization rate of elderly patients was 5.2% at 1 month, 9.5% at 3 months, 15.0% at 6 months, 17.1% at 1 year, 18.8% at 1.5 year and 20.9% at 2 years. PMID:26870319

  2. Doctor's oath to secrecy and psychiatric patient.

    PubMed

    Juki?, V; Bamburac, J; Dodig, G; Jakovljevi?, M

    1997-06-01

    Doctor's oath to secrecy is in the basics of patient's trust to doctor, which is a prerequisite of successful medical treatment. The authors tried to find the answers to following questions: a) what is the attitude of psychiatric patients, people who ask for psychiatric help, towards revealing facts about their psychical problems, b) how well are they informed about doctor's oath to secrecy and to what extent does their willingness reach in asking compensation on the court in case their secret was revealed, c) what is the frequency of the so called "institutionalized" revealing of secrets. The research was performed on the sample of 100 male psychiatric patients hospitalized at the University Clinic for Psychiatry and additional 100 persons who asked for help using phone service of Center for crisis conditions at the same clinic. The obtained data showed that 41% of hospitalized psychiatric patients wanted to hide their psychical problems, and considerably higher percentage (74%) of patients expect the doctor's discretion about the problem, although the most of them are not convinced that there will actually be one. Not a single patient has expressed willingness to ask for compensation on the court in case of doctor's breaking the oath to secrecy. About the half of the patients are informed about doctor's oath to secrecy (42%), but almost all of them (39% of cases in our total sample) consider it normal that the information about their illness is given to some institution outside their family. Persons that ask for help by phone want to remain anonymous in 43% of cases, and in almost same percentage (41%) they believe that their secrecy is guaranteed. In the concluding paragraphs, the need for constant consideration and actualization of problem of doctor's oath to secrecy in the complex situation of global social and medical progress is stressed. PMID:9225520

  3. Mapping Common Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Carlos; Krueger, Robert F.; Hasin, Deborah S.; Liu, Shang-Min; Wang, Shuai; Kerridge, Bradley T.; Saha, Tulshi; Olfson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Context Clinical experience and factor analytic studies suggest that some psychiatric disorders may be more closely related to one another, as indicated by the frequency of their co-occurrence, which may have etiologic and treatment implications. Objective To construct a virtual space of common psychiatric disorders, spanned by factors reflecting major psychopathologic dimensions, and locate psychiatric disorders in that space, as well as to examine whether the location of disorders at baseline predicts the prevalence and incidence of disorders at 3-year follow-up. Design, Setting, and Patients A total of 34 653 individuals participated in waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Main Outcome Measures The distance between disorders at wave 1, calculated using the loadings of the factors spanning the space of disorders as coordinates. This distance was correlated with the adjusted odds ratios for age, sex, and race/ethnicity of the prevalence and incidence of Axis I disorders in wave 2, with the aim of determining whether smaller distances between disorders at wave 1 predicts higher disorder prevalence and incidence at wave 2. Results A model with 3 correlated factors provided an excellent fit (Comparative Fit Index = 0.99, Tucker-Lewis Index=0.98, root mean square error of approximation=0.008) for the structure of common psychiatric disorders and was used to span the space of disorders. Distances ranged from 0.070 (between drug abuse and dysthymia) to 1.032 (between drug abuse and avoidant personality disorder). The correlation of distance between disorders in wave 1 with adjusted odds ratios of prevalence in wave 2 was ?0.56. The correlation of distance in wave 1 with adjusted odds ratios of incidence in wave 2 was ?0.57. Conclusions Mapping psychiatric disorders can be used to quantify the distances among disorders. Proximity in turn can be used to predict prospectively the incidence and prevalence of Axis I disorders. PMID:23266570

  4. 78 FR 46733 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ...This notice updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the fiscal year (FY) beginning October 1, 2013 through September 30,...

  5. Possible criteria for inpatient psychiatric admissions: which patients are transferred from emergency services to inpatient psychiatric treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Ziegenbein, Marc; Anreis, Christoph; Brggen, Bernhard; Ohlmeier, Martin; Kropp, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Background Patients with psychiatric problems often seek help and assistance in hospital emergency departments. An important task of emergency room staff is to decide whether such patients need to be admitted or whether they can be treated on an outpatient basis. Methods Psychiatric treatments given in the Central Interdisciplinary Emergency Department (CED) at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) in 2002 were analysed. Results Of a total of 2632 patients seeking psychiatric help, 51.4% were admitted for inpatient treatment. Patients with dementia syndromes were admitted more frequently than patients with other psychiatric diseases. Suicidality was often the reason for admission. Accompanied patients were less likely to be hospitalised, unless a care-order was in force. Restraining measures and acute medication also had an impact on the rate of admissions. Conclusion The results may help psychiatrists in the emergency department to make a more effective decision regarding inpatient admission in the interest of the individual patient. PMID:17121672

  6. [The role of the psychiatric nurse--oppressed and oppressor].

    PubMed

    Filizola, C L

    1997-08-01

    This work aims at analysing the role of the psychiatric nurse in assisting the hospitalized mentally ill, viewing that practice not in itself, but as a social and historical one. An empirical research was done in two psychiatric hospitals in two stages: field observations and interviews with nurses. It was checked that the emphasis the role of the psychiatric nurse is not in therapeutic relationship but in administratives activities and that the relationship the members of the nursing team have with the patient is authoritarian and reproduce the authoritarism of the institutions. Thus the precepts of school that says the chief role of the nurse is the therapeutic relationship seem to have an ideological character. That makes us suggest that the teaching-learning relationships must be established on a praxis basis. PMID:9369753

  7. Is readmission a valid indicator of the quality of inpatient psychiatric care?

    PubMed

    Durbin, Janet; Lin, Elizabeth; Layne, Crystal; Teed, Moira

    2007-04-01

    Early return to hospital is a frequently measured outcome in mental health system performance monitoring yet its validity for evaluating quality of inpatient care is unclear. This study reviewed research conducted in the last decade on predictors of early readmission (within 30 to 90 days of discharge) to assess the association between this indicator and quality of inpatient psychiatric care. Only 13 studies met inclusion criteria. Results indicated that risk is greatest in the 30-day period immediately after discharge. There was modest support that attending to stability of clinical condition and preparing patients for discharge can protect against early readmission. A history of repeated admission increases risk, suggesting that special efforts are required to break the revolving door cycle. The authors identified a need for more standardization in measurement of client status at discharge and related care processes, more intervention studies on discharge practices, and studies of the effect of community care on early readmission. PMID:17437186

  8. Strategies for operational efficiency in a general hospital public inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Santos, A B; McLeod-Bryant, S

    1991-01-01

    Operational strategies for maximizing efficient utilization of beds were carried out in a 12-bed psychiatric inpatient unit for public patients in a general hospital. Developed through a public-academic collaboration, the unit is part of a community-based system of care. The average length of stay is ten days. Medical staff are university faculty and residents. Treatment focuses on resolution of the symptoms or behavior that led to the patient's hospitalization and includes rapid stabilization using crisis management and somatic therapies and rapid mobilization of aftercare resources. Other strategies for promoting efficient provision of services include clearly defined staff roles and a structured format for discussing clinical information. PMID:2049129

  9. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  10. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various

  11. Brief Report: Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Pregnant Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitsuhiro, Sandro Sendin; Chalem, Elisa; Barros, Marina Carvalho Moraes; Guinsburg, Ruth; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of ICD-10 psychiatric disorders in a population of pregnant teenage women from a Brazilian public hospital. Method: 1000 pregnant teenage women were evaluated using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, a structured interview which establishes diagnoses according to the International Classification…

  12. Histories of Child Maltreatment and Psychiatric Disorder in Pregnant Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Elisa; Zoccolillo, Mark; Paquette, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The study investigated histories of child maltreatment and psychiatric disorder in a high-risk sample of pregnant adolescents. Method: Cross-sectional data were obtained for 252 pregnant adolescents from high school, hospital, and group home settings in Montreal (Canada). Adolescents completed a child maltreatment questionnaire and a

  13. Brief Report: Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Pregnant Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitsuhiro, Sandro Sendin; Chalem, Elisa; Barros, Marina Carvalho Moraes; Guinsburg, Ruth; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of ICD-10 psychiatric disorders in a population of pregnant teenage women from a Brazilian public hospital. Method: 1000 pregnant teenage women were evaluated using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, a structured interview which establishes diagnoses according to the International Classification

  14. The Effects of Data Sources, Cohort Selection, and Outcome Definition on a Predictive Model of Risk of Thirty-Day Hospital Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Colin; Hripcsak, George

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission risk prediction remains a motivated area of investigation and operations in light of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program through CMS. Multiple models of risk have been reported with variable discriminatory performances, and it remains unclear how design factors affect performance. Objectives To study the effects of varying three factors of model development in the prediction of risk based on health record data: 1) Reason for readmission (primary readmission diagnosis); 2) Available data and data types (e.g. visit history, laboratory results, etc); 3) Cohort selection. Methods Regularized regression (LASSO) to generate predictions of readmissions risk using prevalence sampling. Support Vector Machine (SVM) used for comparison in cohort selection testing. Calibration by model refitting to outcome prevalence. Results Predicting readmission risk across multiple reasons for readmission resulted in ROC areas ranging from 0.92 for readmission for congestive heart failure to 0.71 for syncope and 0.68 for all-cause readmission. Visit history and laboratory tests contributed the most predictive value; contributions varied by readmission diagnosis. Cohort definition affected performance for both parametric and nonparametric algorithms. Compared to all patients, limiting the cohort to patients whose index admission and readmission diagnoses matched resulted in a decrease in average ROC from 0.78 to 0.55 (difference in ROC 0.23, p value 0.01). Calibration plots demonstrate good calibration with low mean squared error. Conclusion Targeting reason for readmission in risk prediction impacted discriminatory performance. In general, laboratory data and visit history data contributed the most to prediction; data source contributions varied by reason for readmission. Cohort selection had a large impact on model performance, and these results demonstrate the difficulty of comparing results across different studies of predictive risk modeling. PMID:25182868

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with higher 90-day Hospital Readmission Rates Compared to Osteoarthritis after Hip or Knee arthroplasty: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Inacio, Maria C.S.; Namba, Robert S.; Paxton, Elizabeth W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine if an underlying diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis (OA) impacts the 90-day readmission rates after total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA). Methods Prospectively collected data from an integrated healthcare system Total Joint Replacement Registry of adults with RA or OA undergoing unilateral primary THA or TKA during 2009-2011 were analyzed. Adjusted logistic regression models for 90-day readmission were fit. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Study year was an effect modifier for the outcome, therefore separate analyses were conducted for each of the three study years. Results Of the 34,311 patients, 496 had RA and 33,815 had OA. Comparing RA and OA, there were: 73% and 61% women; 45% and 70% Caucasians; and the mean age was lower, 61 vs. 67 years (p<0.001). Respective crude 90-day readmission rates were 8.5% and 6.7%. The adjusted odds of 90-day readmission increased from year to year for RA compared to OA patients, from 0.89 (95% CI, 0.46-1.71) in 2009 to 1.34 (95% CI, 0.69-2.61) in 2010 to 1.74 (95% CI, 1.16-2.60) in 2011. The two most common readmission reasons were: joint prosthesis infection (10.2%) and septicemia (10.2%) in RA; joint prosthesis infection (5.7%) and other postoperative infection (5.1%) in OA. Conclusions RA is a risk factor for 90-day readmission after primary TKA or THA. An increasing risk of readmissions noted in RA in 2011 is concerning and indicates further studies should examine the reasons for this increasing trend. PMID:25302697

  16. Effectiveness of three types of geriatric medical services: lessons for geriatric psychiatric services.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of geriatric medical services, to identify the types of patients who would benefit from such services, to determine the service components related to positive outcomes and to apply pertinent findings to geriatric psychiatric services. DATA SOURCES: Two databases, MEDLINE and Health Planning and Administration, were searched for relevant articles published from January 1975 to February 1990. The bibliographies of identified articles were searched for additional references. STUDY SELECTION: Seventeen reports were located that met the following three inclusion criteria: original research, published in English or French and controlled trial (nonrandomized or randomized) of a geriatric medical service. Fifteen met the validity criteria for intervention studies established by McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. DATA EXTRACTION: Information about study design, patient selection, interventions, outcome measures and results was systematically abstracted from each report. DATA SYNTHESIS: Abstracted data were compared and contrasted. Most of the external services and some of the hospital units were effective in reducing the number of hospital days an deaths. Consultation services were ineffective. Continuing care appeared to be related to positive outcomes. CONCLUSION: In applying these findings to geriatric psychiatric services priority should be given to the development of external services and the organization of continuing care. PMID:2025818

  17. Voting of hospitalized and ambulatory patients with mental disorders in parliamentary elections.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Yuval; Donsky, Liora; Oyffe, Igor; Noam, Sigalit; Levy, Galit; Gelkopf, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the voting rate among psychiatric inpatients and the voting rate of outpatients, in relation to the severity of their illness. On election day the number of inpatients that voted was recorded in one psychiatric hospital in Israel. For two weeks following the elections outpatients were asked if they voted: 100/271 (36.9%) inpatients and 131/181(72.4%) ambulatory patients voted; 53.8% of the inpatients and 4.7% of the ambulatory patients could not vote because they had no identity cards. Ambulatory patients with no prior hospitalizations had the highest voting rates. The most common reason for not voting among inpatients in Israel is lack of identity cards. PMID:24029106

  18. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  19. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  20. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities 412.404 Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. (a) General requirements. (1)...