Sample records for psychiatric mental health

  1. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  2. Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Clinical Courses

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    0 Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Clinical Courses Student Preceptor Guide Revised 1..............................................................................................................................................28 #12;2 TO: Psychiatric Mental Nurse Practitioner (PMH) Students, Preceptors, and Clinical Faculty Concentration Coordinator, Department of Advanced Practice & Doctoral Studies The University of Tennessee Health

  3. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing: Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Judith L.

    A guide to Nursing 5, a course on psychiatric-mental health nursing offered at East Los Angeles College is presented. The guide first details classroom and clinical course requirements and then identifies long-range and end-of-course objectives. A list of required texts and manuals is followed by an outline of the objectives for each of four…

  4. Psychiatric Mental Health Evidence-Based Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Rice

    2008-01-01

    This article is the first in a new column focusing on evidence-based practice (EBP) in psychiatric mental health nursing. The EBP movement was strongly influenced by a British epidemiologist, Dr. Cochrane, who advocated care based on randomized clinical controlled trials in the late 1900s. Although the majority of the EBP movement is directed toward developing clinical guidelines, the critical element

  5. Primary Mental Health Care: A Model for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith Haber; Carolyn V. Billings

    1995-01-01

    This article introduces and defines the concept of primary mental health care, a model for the delivery of community-based, comprehensive psychiatric-mental health nurs ing care. The primary mental health care model incorporates professional role re sponsibilities, role functions, and intervention activities for psychiatric-mental health nurses at the basic and advanced levels of practice. Use of this model will enable psychiatric

  6. Psychiatric mental health evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Rice, Michael J

    2008-05-01

    This article is the first in a new column focusing on evidence-based practice (EBP) in psychiatric mental health nursing. The EBP movement was strongly influenced by a British epidemiologist, Dr. Cochrane, who advocated care based on randomized clinical controlled trials in the late 1900s. Although the majority of the EBP movement is directed toward developing clinical guidelines, the critical element focuses on the therapeutic relationship and clinical judgment associated with providing care. This column will address a clinical problem, define PICO questions, report knowledge base searches, and present existing evidence. Recommendations will be offered for potential interventions and suggestions for evaluating clinical outcomes. Nurses can no longer view clinical studies as academic exercises discarded on graduation and not applied to the clinical setting. Conscientiously applying what is known about treatments and interventions of ethical, if not legal, value is consistent with the professional definition of care. J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc, 2008; 14(2), 107-111. DOI: 10.1177/1078390308315798. PMID:21665759

  7. Patient health outcomes in psychiatric mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, P; Rose, D; Carter, L

    2009-02-01

    This integrative literature review examined evidence concerning the relationship between psychiatric mental health nursing interventions and patient-focused outcomes. Empirical studies, published between 1997 and 2007, were identified and gathered by searching relevant databases and specific data sources. Although 156 articles were critically appraised, only 25 of them met the inclusion criteria. Findings from this review showed that the most frequently used outcome instruments assessed psychiatric symptom severity. Most of the instruments targeted two symptom categories: altered thoughts/perceptions and altered mood. Other outcome instruments were categorized in the following domains: self-care, functioning, quality of life and satisfaction. The most important finding of this review is the lack of consistently strong evidence to support decisions concerning which outcome instrument or combination of instruments to recommend for routine use in practice. Based on this review, additional research to conceptualize, measure and examine the feasibility of outcome instruments sensitive to psychiatric mental health nursing interventions is recommended. PMID:19192084

  8. Adolescents' Perceptions of Their Consent to Psychiatric Mental Health Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Anthony James; Kjervik, Diane K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a small-scale study in which the decision-making process of adolescents who consent to psychiatric mental health treatment was examined. Sixteen (16) adolescents were interviewed about their decisions related to initial and continued treatment, along with their understanding of minor consent laws. Interviews were audio-recorded, and transcripts were analyzed through concept analysis. Findings are presented in the context of the decision-making steps and research questions. Most adolescents did not recognize consequences related to psychiatric mental health treatment and did not assimilate and integrate information provided to them about treatment choices. Adolescents disagreed with current minor consent laws that allow minors to consent to certain healthcare treatments without the required consent of the parent. Further, adolescents reported that a collaborative approach in making decisions about the adolescent's psychiatric mental health treatment was most facilitative of achieving the goals of treatment. PMID:22474581

  9. [Being personal: the development of community psychiatric mental health nursing].

    PubMed

    Shiau, Shu-Jen; Lee, Shu-Hong

    2009-08-01

    Community psychiatric mental health nursing care emphasizes humanistic values and focuses on serving patient and family needs. In Taiwan, such care is delivered largely as part of patient discharge care plans and hospital / community based service models. Issues involved underscore the importance of operating an effective and integrated transfer system, the role and function of nurses and training in relevant competencies (Shiau, Huang & Lin, 2005). This article again emphasizes the importance of 'being personal' in the development of community psychiatric mental health nursing in Taiwan. Critical issues to consider include humanization, empowerment, nursing competencies, regulations, relating on a personal level, and facilitating empowerment and enlightenment on the healing process. PMID:19634094

  10. Psychiatric genetic research at the National Institute of Mental Health

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, K.; Mullican, C.; Maestri, N. [NIMH/NIH, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-15

    For some time it has been known through the results of family, twin, and adoption studies that hereditary appears to play a significant casual role in many mental disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other mood disorders, Alzheimer`s Disease, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism, dyslexia, and Tourette`s syndrome. The precise patterns of inheritance of these complex disorders have not been determined, nor have the relevant genes been localized or cloned. Because the genetics are complex and because there is also clearly an environmental contribution to behavior, we expect the analysis of the genetics of mental illness to be arduous and not quickly resolved. There are several compelling reasons to continue to focus our attention on uncovering the genetic factors for severe mental illness. Prominent among these are the implications for better treatment of mental disorders. The National Institute of Mental Health supports a wide range of studies on psychiatric genetic research. 16 refs.

  11. Knowledge & attitudes of mental health professionals regarding psychiatric research

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, N.N.; Bhatia, Triptish; Kumar, Nandini; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.; Parker, Lisa S.; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Mental health professionals have varied attitudes and views regarding informed consent and confidentiality protections in psychiatric research and clinical care. The present study was designed to understand the knowledge and views of mental health professionals (MHPs) regarding informed consent and confidentiality protection practices. Methods: Mental health professionals (n=121) who were members of the Delhi Psychiatric Society, were invited to participate in this questionnaire-based study of their knowledge and attitudes regarding informed consent and confidentiality. Half of them expressed willingness to discuss participation and gave initial oral consent (n=62); of these, 31 gave written informed consent to participate and completed the questionnaires. The questionnaires included both forced choice (yes / no / do not know) and open-ended questions. Questionnaires content reflected prominent guidelines on informed consent and confidentiality protection. Results: Attitudes of the majority of the participants towards informed consent and confidentiality were in line with ethical principles and guidelines. All expressed the opinion that confidentiality should generally be respected and that if confidentiality was breached, there could be mistrust of the professional by the patient/participant. The mean knowledge scores regarding informed consent and confidentiality were 8.55 ± 1.46 and 8.16 ± 1.29, respectively. Interpretation & conclusions: The participating mental health professionals appeared to have adequate knowledge of basic ethical guidelines concerning informed consent and confidentiality. Most respondents were aware of ethical issues in research. Given the small sample size and low response rate, the significance of the quantitative analysis must be regarded with modesty, and qualitative analysis of open-ended questions may be more valuable for development of future research. Increased efforts to involve mental health professionals in research on ethical concerns pertinent to their work must be made, and the actual practices of these professionals with regard to ethical guidelines need to be studied. PMID:24718399

  12. MSU College of Nursing Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Option

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    MSU College of Nursing Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Option 2 Year Program Semester 2 - Spring NRSG 525 Family Mental Health Nursing I 6 (3 lecture; 3 clin lab) NRSG 531 Rural Health 526 Family Mental Health Nursing II 6 (3 lecture; 3 clin lab) NRSG 529 Psychopharmacotherapeutics

  13. Development of Psychiatric–Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Competencies: Opportunities for the 21st Century

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen Wheeler; Judith Haber

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the development of the psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner(PMHNP) competencies. The historical context and controversy regarding the role of advanced practice psychiatric mental health nursing as well as the consensus process of a national panel charged with the development of these competencies are described. Also, implications for education, practice, research, and policy are

  14. Exploring Essential Competences and Credentialing Model of Community Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiin-Ru Rong; Wen-I Laiu; Fan-Fang Hung; Shu-Jen Shiau

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to outline nursing competences and to develop credentialing model of the essential community psychiatric mental health nursing. The action study research method was used in the study, with a core group of research subjects recruited from the field of psychiatric mental health nursing education and clinical practice. The construct of the developmental model comprises

  15. MSU College of Nursing Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Option

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    MSU College of Nursing Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Option 3 Year Program/Project * 3 or 2* Total Semester Credits 8 or 7 Semester 4 - Spring NRSG 525 Family Mental Health Nursing I 6 ­ Summer NRSG 526 Family Mental Health Nursing II 6 (3 lecture; 3 clin lab) NRSG 529

  16. Critical Behaviors in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Volume 2: Behavior of Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Angeline Marchese; And Others

    Part of a three-volume document, this volume is concerned with providing source data about the activities of mental health nursing personnel as these activities relate to patient care, and contains abstracts of more than 4,000 critical behaviors of psychiatric nurses in 50 psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals with psychiatric units, and…

  17. Critical Behaviors in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Volume 3: Behavior of Attendants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Angeline Marchese; And Others

    Part of a three-volume document, this volume is concerned with providing source data about the activities of mental health nursing personnel as the activities relate to patient care and contains abstracts of more than 4,000 critical behaviors of psychiatric attendants in 50 psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals with psychiatric units, and…

  18. Psychiatric Mental Health Leadership at the Tipping Point.

    PubMed

    R Delaney, Kathleen

    2015-05-01

    Currently the United States health care system is responding to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and the vision it contains for health care transformation. Along with sweeping changes in service delivery and payment structures, health care reform has championed concepts such as patient-centered care, integrated care, and wellness. Although these are not new ideas, their adaptation, in both ideology and service design has been accelerated in the context for reform. Indeed they are reaching a tipping point; the point where ideas gain wide acceptance and become influential trends. Although psychiatric mental health (PMH) nurses have been active in wellness, patient-centered care, and integrated care, at the current time they seem to be situated peripheral to these national trends. Increased presence of PMH nurses will facilitate their contribution to the development of these concepts within service structures and interventions. To increase knowledge and appreciation of PMH nurses' practice and unique perspective on these issues, leaders are needed who will connect and effectively communicate PMH nursing efforts to the broader health care arena. This article outlines the events that created a context for these three concepts (patient-centered care, wellness, and integrated care), and I suggest why they have reached a tipping point and discuss the need for greater PMH nursing presence in the American national dialog and the role of nursing leaders in facilitating these connections. PMID:26090854

  19. Outpatient mental health service use by older adults after acute psychiatric hospitalization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong Li; Enola Proctor; Nancy Morrow-Howell

    2005-01-01

    This study described outpatient mental health service used by elderly patients discharged from acute inpatient psychiatric treatment for depression, assessed services barriers, and identified factors related to the use of outpatient mental health services. The sample consisted of 199 elderly patients discharged home from a geropsychiatric unit of an urban midwestern hospital. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors

  20. The Construction of Essential Competence of Community Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Job Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fen-Fang Horng; Li-Na Chen; Hsiau-Pei Lu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish essential competence of psychiatric mental health nurses in job Management with psychiatric disorders, and hence to promote the quality of care for patients in community. The research was conducted using action method and case reports,. Subjects were both clinical participants and researchers including-three clinical nurses (include one nursing supervisor and two clinical

  1. Does primary care mental health resourcing affect the use and costs of secondary psychiatric services?

    PubMed

    Sadeniemi, Minna; Pirkola, Sami; Pankakoski, Maiju; Joffe, Grigori; Kontio, Raija; Malin, Maili; Ala-Nikkola, Taina; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2014-09-01

    Collaborative care models for treatment of depression and anxiety disorders in primary care have been shown to be effective. The aim of this study was to investigate at the municipal level to what extent investment in mental health personnel at primary care health centres in the study area is reflected in the costs and use of secondary psychiatric services. Furthermore, we analysed whether the service provision and use of secondary psychiatric care correlates with the socioeconomic indicators of need. We found significant variation in the amount of mental health personnel provided at the health centres, uncorrelated with the indicators of need nor with the costs of secondary psychiatric care. The amount of mental health nurses at the health centres correlated inversely with the number of secondary psychiatric outpatient visits, whereas its relation to inpatient days and admission was positive. The costs of secondary psychiatric care correlated with level of psychiatric morbidity and socioeconomic indicators of need. The results suggest that when aiming at equal access of care and cost-efficiency, the primary and secondary care should be organized and planned with integrative collaboration. PMID:25162710

  2. The Detrimental Impact of Maladaptive Personality on Public Mental Health: A Challenge for Psychiatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hengartner, Michael Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Experts in personality psychology and personality disorders have long emphasized the pervasive and persistent detrimental impact of maladaptive personality traits on mental health and functioning. However, in routine psychiatric practice, maladaptive personality is readily ignored and personality traits are seldom incorporated into clinical guidelines. The aim of this narrative review is to outline how pervasively personality influences public mental health and how personality thereby challenges common psychiatric practice. A comprehensive search and synthesis of the scientific literature demonstrates that maladaptive personality traits and personality disorders, in particular high neuroticism and negative affectivity, first, are risk factors for divorce, unemployment, and disability pensioning; second, relate to the prevalence, incidence, and co-occurrence of common mental disorders; third, impair functioning, symptom remission, and recovery in co-occurring common mental disorders; and fourth, predispose to treatment resistance, non-response and poor treatment outcome. In conclusion, maladaptive personality is not only involved in the development and course of mental disorders but also predisposes to chronicity and re-occurrence of psychopathology and reduces the efficacy of psychiatric treatments. The pernicious impact of maladaptive personality on mental health and functioning demands that careful assessment and thorough consideration of personality should be compulsory in psychiatric practice.

  3. Mental health and psychiatric care in Bolivia: what do we know?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently Bolivia has implemented a universal health system, but their mental health policy is still emerging. Objectives To investigate the current state of the mental health care system in Bolivia and discuss challenges for structuring a coordinated network of services that can effectively meet the needs of the Bolivian population. Methods This review was conducted by searching for scholarly articles through the databases Lilacs, Medline OPS, HISA and IBECS REPIDISCA via the search portal in the Virtual Health Library - NLM (http://www.bireme.br). Results Bolivia has a National Mental Health Plan that is intended to guide mental health promotion, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of mental illness, but the resources for this area of health are limited. There are 1.06 psychiatrists and 0.46 psychologists per 100, 000 inhabitants. Information on psychiatric morbidity in Bolivia and the impact of mental disorders on the global burden of disease is scarce. Admission statistics reported by psychiatric hospitals in the country show that the main cause of hospitalization is substance abuse (30%). Alcohol consumption is responsible for 90% of these admissions, in addition to being a major cause of deaths in traffic and one of the main risk factors for domestic violence. Almost one in two women in Bolivia (47%) experienced some form of violence from their partner in the last year. Nineteen percent of women living with a partner reported being physically abused, while 7% were sexually abused by their partners. Isolated studies report that suicide rates are disproportionately high in Bolivia. Conclusions Although there is a shortage of epidemiological data in Bolivia, it is clear the impact of alcohol addiction in psychiatric admissions, domestic violence and traffic accidents. Violence against women and suicides are important issues to be tackled. Among the proposed strategies to afford human resources for mental health in Bolivia, “task shifting”, the delegation of tasks to non-specialists should be extensively adopted in the country to improve mental health care. PMID:24843384

  4. Updated as of 8.14.2014 for AY 2014-2015 APPLYING TO THE PSYCHIATRIC MENTAL HEALTH NURSE

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Updated as of 8.14.2014 for AY 2014-2015 p. 1 APPLYING TO THE PSYCHIATRIC MENTAL HEALTH NURSE Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) program prepares graduates for advanced specialty practice with vulnerable populations and promote mental health across the lifespan. They work with children, adolescents

  5. Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Education in Graduate Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing: A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Denise; Svanum, Soren

    1983-01-01

    Surveyed 55 psychiatric/mental health nursing programs to assess training in substance abuse. Results indicated that, although virtually all programs offered some course work and clinical experience, the modal amount of course work was five percent of a three credit course. Specific clinical training was offered but rarely chosen. (JAC)

  6. The role of the nurse practitioner in psychiatric\\/mental health nursing: exploring consumer satisfaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. WORTANS; B. HAPPELL; H. JOHNSTONE

    2006-01-01

    There is a substantial body of literature pertaining to the role of the nurse practitioner. Research directed towards consumer satisfaction suggests that the care provided by nurse practitioners is perceived as at least equal to that provided by a medical practitioner. How- ever, there is a paucity of literature examining the nurse practitioner role in the psychiatric\\/ mental health field.

  7. Psychiatric Boarding in Washington State and the Inadequacy of Mental Health Resources.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Joseph D

    2015-06-01

    Psychiatric boarding is a term derived from emergency medicine that describes the holding of patients deemed in need of hospitalization in emergency departments for extended periods because psychiatric beds are not available. Such boarding has occurred for many years in the shadows of mental health care as both inpatient beds and community services have decreased. This article focuses on a 2014 Washington State Supreme Court decision that examined the interpretation of certain sections of the Washington state civil commitment statute that had been used to justify the extended boarding of detained psychiatric patients in general hospital emergency departments. The impact of this decision on the state of Washington should be significant and could spark a national debate about the negative impacts of psychiatric boarding on patients and on the nation's general hospital emergency services. PMID:26071512

  8. Ethics and human rights issues experienced by psychiatric-mental health and substance abuse registered nurses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela J. Grace; Sara T. Fry; Gary S. Schultz

    2003-01-01

    Background: The ethics and human rights issues experienced by psychiatric-mental health and substance-abuse registered nurses (P-MH and SA RNs) and how disturbed they are by the issues are not known. Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency of ethics and human rights issues experienced by P-MH and SA RNs and how disturbing the issues are to

  9. Barriers to evidence-based practice utilization in psychiatric/mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim Subhi

    2014-02-01

    Many psychiatric/mental health nursing (PMHN) practices have been affected by old traditions and haphazard trial and error instead of by established scientific evidence. The purpose of this article is to explore and analyze the barriers surrounding evidence-based practice (EBP) in PMHN. I identify some strategies to overcome these barriers in an attempt to incorporate EBP within the framework of PMHN services. Barriers explain the lack of EBP in today's PMHN environment. The barriers identified in this research are: the nature of the evidence, the contribution of the psychiatric nursing researchers to EBP, the personal characteristics of psychiatric nurses, and organizational factors. While the barriers to EBP for PMHN practice are clearly apparent, the challenge, now, is to build up creative strategies through which psychiatric nurses are better able to provide EBP care as part of their everyday performance. Adaptation of a more dynamic form of EBP, increasing the number of PMHN researchers, conducting clinical research projects, choosing suitable journals for publication, training the psychiatric nurses about computer skills, integrating the EBP principles into nursing curricula, developing journal clubs, and offering organizational facilitators are essential prerequisites for the achievement of EBP in the PMHN field. It is no longer justifiable for psychiatric nurses to be deficient in knowledge and skill since the advantages of EBP for patients are well-documented. PMID:24502472

  10. Parity of esteem begins at home: translating empirical psychiatric research into effective public mental health.

    PubMed

    Kirkbride, J B; Jones, P B

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing recognition that parity of esteem between mental and physical health disorders is essential to improve the course, outcome and quality of life of individuals within different populations. Achieving this parity now underpins the objectives of several nations. Here, we argue that parity of esteem between mental and physical health can only be realized when parity of esteem also exists across mental health disorders, particularly in terms of service commissioning and planning. Using first-episode psychosis and early intervention in psychosis services as a motivating example, we demonstrate how carefully conducted psychiatric epidemiology can be translated to develop precise forecasts of the anticipated incidence of first-episode psychosis in different populations, based on an understanding of underlying local needs and inequalities. Open-access prediction tools such as PsyMaptic will allow commissioners of mental health services to more effectively allocate resources across services, based on empirical evidence and local need, thus reducing inequalities in access to mental health care. PMID:23931735

  11. Disasters and mental health: new challenges for the psychiatric profession.

    PubMed

    López-Ibor, Juan J

    2006-01-01

    Articles published in the Viewpoint section of this Journal may not meet the strict editorial and scientific standards that are applied to major articles in The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry. In addition, the viewpoints expressed in these articles do not necessarily represent those of the Editors or the Editorial Board.A disaster is the consequence of an extraordinary event that destroys goods, kills people, produces physical or psychological harm but, above all, which overcomes the adaptive possibilities of the social group. Disasters have strong political background and consequences. They shake the life of a community and raise questions about safety, social organization and the meaning of life. Disasters confront psychiatrists with challenges far beyond regular clinical activities or research strategies. During early interventions after a disaster, psychiatrists often have to work out of their usual clinical premises, in contact with unfamiliar professionals (i.e. rescue personnel) and with individuals who should not be considered as 'cases', and therefore without keeping regular clinical records. In the latter stages they have to confront many factors which tend to cause the clinical consequences of those affected and who developed a psychiatric condition to be chronic. Reactions to stress occur in stages, each one characterised by a specific psychological mechanism. Symptoms include flashbacks, difficulties in remembering, avoidance of stimuli, blunting of responses, high arousal level and obsessive ruminations. The strong biological and psychosocial factors which are unchained after a disaster should be recognised and chanelled. The experience of psychiatry with the bio-psycho-social model can help to understand what disasters are, how some negative aspects of them could be prevented, and how their consequences, both clinical as well as social, can be reduced. PMID:16861143

  12. American Psychiatric Association: Position Statement on Firearm Access, Acts of Violence and the Relationship to Mental Illness and Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Pinals, Debra A; Appelbaum, Paul S; Bonnie, Richard; Fisher, Carl E; Gold, Liza H; Lee, Li-Wen

    2015-06-01

    The American Psychiatric Association, ("APA"), with more than 36,000 members at present, is the Nation's leading organization of physicians who specialize in psychiatry. APA provides for education and advocacy and develops policy through Position Statements. It promotes enhanced knowledge of particular topics relevant to psychiatric practice and patient care through Resource Documents. Since 1993, the APA has developed various positions and resource materials related to firearms and mental illness, incorporating evolving themes as new issues emerge. This paper reflects the APA's 2014 Position Statement on Firearm Access, Acts of Violence and the Relationship to Mental Illness and Mental Health Services. PMID:26095100

  13. Effects of eliminating psychiatric rehabilitation from the secure levels of a mental-health service system.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, Melissa; Sullivan, Mary; Ritchie, A Jocelyn; Spaulding, William D

    2013-11-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation (PR) is widely recognized as a treatment approach and an array of evidence-based practices effective for promoting the recovery of people with serious mental illness (SMI). However, its use in institutional settings is not widespread for unclear reasons. Policymakers may sometimes believe the superiority of PR in controlled research does not apply in the real world, for various reasons. This study exploits an unusual set of real-world circumstances surrounding the closure of a well-developed PR program in a state hospital. The program was closed after a period of mental-health services reform that significantly augmented the surrounding community-service system. The PR program was converted to conventional medical-institutional model-treatment units with no reduction in beds or funding within the state hospital. A database composed of public documents was used to analyze the consequences of the closing. Within the institution, the consequences included a persistent presence of long-term difficult-to-discharge patients, a slowed discharge rate, a net increase in the hospital's per capita treatment costs, and higher use of restraint/seclusion. Effects were also detectable in the surrounding mental-health service system, including degraded outcome of community-based step-down services and increased pressure on emergency/crisis services. The consequences of closing the program are consistent with expectations based on research, and demonstrate danger in assuming that real world exigencies obviate research findings. PMID:23148770

  14. A view of prescriptive practice collaboration: Perspectives of psychiatric-mental health clinical nurse specialists and psychiatrists

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Merrie J. Kaas; Denise Dehn; Deadra Dahl; Kristina Frank; Jill Markley; Patrice Hebert

    2000-01-01

    A majority of states require collaborative prescribing agreements between advanced practice nurses and physicians. Unfortunately, there is limited research describing the collaboration that occurs between the clinicians who have such prescribing agreements. This exploratory study identifies the characteristics, activities, and outcomes of collaboration between psychiatric-mental health clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) with prescribing agreements and their collaborating psychiatrists. Surveys were sent

  15. The art, science, and techniques of reframing in psychiatric mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Pesut, D J

    1991-01-01

    Reframing is a powerful psychotherapeutic intervention. Changing the "frame" in which a person perceives events can change the meaning the person associates with the events. This article describes several types of reframing strategies that have been developed within the context of a model of human behavior and communication known as neurolinguistic programming (NLP). Fundamental assumptions of the NLP model are discussed and several reframing techniques are described. A set of strategies that clinicians can use to redefine behaviors and expand a client's model of the world are illustrated. Development of theoretical and clinical applications of the NLP model and reframing techniques in psychiatric-mental health nursing is an important task for the 1990s. PMID:1988384

  16. Copenhagen Community Psychiatric Project (CCPP): characteristics and treatment of homeless patients in the psychiatric services after introduction of community mental health centres.

    PubMed

    Nordentoft, M; Knudsen, H C; Jessen-Petersen, B; Krasnik, A; Saelan, H; Brodersen, A M; Treufeldt, P; Lřppenthin, P; Sahl, I; Ostergĺrd, P

    1997-10-01

    The main purpose of the study was to describe the characteristics of homeless psychiatric patients, and to compare the treatment they are offered to that offered to domiciled patients by the psychiatric services. Another purpose was to analyse the prevalence of homelessness among psychiatric patients before and after the introduction of community mental health centres in Copenhagen. Cross-sectional studies were conducted in two intervention and two control districts before and after introduction of the new treatment modalities. In 1991, 80 of 1008 patients (8%) were homeless. Male sex, young age, living on general welfare, schizophrenia and alcohol or substance abuse were the factors that most markedly differentiated homeless from domiciled patients. Compared with the treatment of domiciled patients, the homeless were more likely to be offered no further treatment after consultation in a psychiatric emergency and, if admitted, they were more likely to be placed in locked wards, given compulsory medication, and medicated with depot neuroleptics. The homeless were also less likely to be offered psychotherapy and consultation with a social worker. Schizophrenia and alcohol or substance abuse characterised the majority of the patients discharged homeless. In the intervention districts, the number of homeless patients in contact with the psychiatric services was found to increase at the same rate as the number of all patients in contact with the psychiatric services. In the control districts, no changes in prevalence of homeless patients or other patients in contact with the psychiatric services occurred. It is concluded that homeless psychiatric patients comprise a difficult patient group, with problems of schizophrenia, substance abuse and lack of motivation for treatment. It is recommended that special efforts be made to create housing facilities that fit the needs of different types of homeless patients, and that the homeless mentally ill are assisted in obtaining and maintaining an acceptable housing situation. PMID:9383967

  17. Clinical outcomes and satisfaction of patients of clinical nurse specialists in psychiatric-mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Baradell, J G

    1995-10-01

    Survey research was conducted to examine clinical outcomes and satisfaction of patients of psychiatric mental health clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). Patients who had terminated from outpatient psychotherapy with 6 CNSs in 1993 were mailed a questionnaire (N = 223). Follow-ups by mail yielded a response rate of 45% (n = 100). The questionnaires included the Profile of Mood States-Short Form ([POMS-SF]; McNair, Lorr, & Droppleman, 1992). Quality of Life Function ([QOL]; Lehman, 1991), and Patient Satisfaction Scale (Baradell, 1994). Paired difference t-tests were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. Percentages were used to report satisfaction, and Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationship between clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The mean age for respondents was 37 years; 82% were female. Diagnoses included depression (46%), adjustment disorders (34%), anxiety (10%), and other (10%). Patients reported significant improvement in all clinical symptoms: anxiety, depression, anger, confusion, fatigue and vigor. Patients reported significant improvement in all domains of QOL: family, social, and job. Patients reported a very high level of satisfaction with the care provided. The more clinical improvement the patients reported, the more satisfied they were with the care provided. If nurses are to be included in a reformed health care delivery system in the future, additional research is essential. PMID:7487165

  18. The evolution of the advanced practice role in psychiatric mental health in New Jersey: 1960-2010.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Barbara A; Sclafani, Michael; Piren, Karen; Torre, Carolyn

    2012-04-01

    This historical perspective is focused on the contribution of Hildegard E. Peplau in laying the foundation for advanced practice nursing and the development of the roles of clinical nurse specialists and psychiatric nurse practitioners. An overview is provided of legal developments within the state that enabled Advanced Practice Nurses to provide mental health services. A description of a recent specialized state-funded initiative is outlined, focused on the development and contributions of psychiatric advanced practice nurses in community settings in New Jersey. Implications for the advanced practice nursing role in New Jersey are presented based on national and state initiatives. PMID:22468587

  19. Hope for Successful Implementation of Psychosocial/Psychiatric Rehabilitation in the Forensic Mental Health Setting.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephanie A; Lewis, Kent

    2014-08-18

    Objective: To explore staff perceptions of the successes and barriers to implementation of the psychosocial/psychiatric rehabilitation (PSR) model in the forensic mental health setting and identify staff supports needed for greater implementation. Method: A qualitative descriptive design was used and staff focus group data was analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results: All aspects of PSR are being implemented in the forensic setting. Barriers limiting comprehensive implementation include hospital processes and functions, legal components, client clinical presentation, staff attributes and interactions, and lack of resources. To foster greater implementation, employees require support to improve interprofessional interactions and acquire additional resources and education. Conclusions and Implications for Practice: Strengthening existing successes and addressing barriers identified will foster greater PSR implementation in the forensic setting. Adjusting the physical environment, streamlining documentation, shifting focus from security to rehabilitation goals, and adapting PSR principles to various levels of illness acuity and stages of treatment would enhance PSR implementation. A management focus on improving staff morale, self-care, peer support, team cohesion, and communication would limit burnout and increase successful implementation of PSR. Additional educational opportunities and ongoing training are suggested to support a unified understanding and sustained approach to PSR implementation in the forensic setting. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25133626

  20. Outsourcing mental health care services? The practice and potential of community-based farms in psychiatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Iancu, Sorana C; Zweekhorst, Marjolein B M; Veltman, Dick J; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Bunders, Joske F G

    2015-02-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation supports individuals with mental disorders to acquire the skills needed for independent lives in communities. This article assesses the potential of outsourcing psychiatric rehabilitation by analysing care farm services in the Netherlands. Service characteristics were analysed across 214 care farms retrieved from a national database. Qualitative insights were provided by five case descriptions, selected from 34 interviews. Institutional care farms were significantly larger and older than private care farms (comprising 88.8% of all care farms). Private, independent care farms provide real-life work conditions to users who are relatively less impaired. Private, contracted care farms tailor the work activities to their capacities and employ professional supervisors. Institutional care farms accommodate for the most vulnerable users. We conclude that collaborations with independent, contracted and institutional care farms would provide mental health care organizations with a diversity in services, enhanced community integration and a better match with users' rehabilitation needs. PMID:24965090

  1. Chronic Stress and Adolescents' Mental Health: Modifying Effects of Basal Cortisol and Parental Psychiatric History. The TRAILS Study.

    PubMed

    Zandstra, Anna Roos E; Hartman, Catharina A; Nederhof, Esther; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Dietrich, Andrea; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Ormel, Johan

    2015-08-01

    Large individual differences in adolescent mental health following chronic psychosocial stress suggest moderating factors. We examined two established moderators, basal cortisol and parental psychiatric history, simultaneously. We hypothesized that individuals with high basal cortisol, assumed to indicate high context sensitivity, would show relatively high problem levels following chronic stress, especially in the presence of parental psychiatric history. With Linear Mixed Models, we investigated the hypotheses in 1917 Dutch adolescents (53.2 % boys), assessed at ages 11, 13.5, and 16. Low basal cortisol combined with the absence of a parental psychiatric history increased the risk of externalizing but not internalizing problems following chronic stress. Conversely, low basal cortisol combined with a substantial parental psychiatric history increased the risk of internalizing but not externalizing problems following chronic stress. Thus, parental psychiatric history moderated stress- cortisol interactions in predicting psychopathology, but in a different direction than hypothesized. We conclude that the premise that basal cortisol indicates context sensitivity may be too crude. Context sensitivity may not be a general trait but may depend on the nature of the context (e.g., type or duration of stress exposure) and on the outcome of interest (e.g., internalizing vs. externalizing problems). Although consistent across informants, our findings need replication. PMID:25617009

  2. Prevalence of Cannabis Residues in Psychiatric Patients: A Case Study of Two Mental Health Referral Hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Awuzu, Epaenetus A.; Kaye, Emmanuel; Vudriko, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have reported that abuse of cannabis is a risk factor for psychosis. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of delta 9-tetrahydrocanabinol (?9-THC), a major metabolite of cannabis, in psychiatric patients in Uganda, and to assess the diagnostic capacity of two referral mental health hospitals to screen patients for exposure to cannabis in Uganda. Socio-demographic characteristics of the patients were collected through questionnaires and review of medical records. Urine samples were collected from 100 patients and analyzed using ?9-THC immunochromatographic kit (Standard Diagnostics®, South Korea). Seventeen percent of the patients tested positive for ?9-THC residues in their urine. There was strong association (P < 0.05) between history of previous abuse of cannabis and presence of ?9-THC residues in the urine. Alcohol, cocaine, heroin, pethidine, tobacco, khat and kuber were the other substances abused in various combinations. Both referral hospitals lacked laboratory diagnostic kits for detection of cannabis in psychiatric patients. In conclusion, previous abuse of cannabis is associated with occurrence of the residues in psychiatric patients, yet referral mental health facilities in Uganda do not have the appropriate diagnostic kits for detection of cannabis residues as a basis for evidence-based psychotherapy. PMID:24453492

  3. Psychiatric home health nursing: A new role in community mental health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fern Richie; Karen Lusky

    1987-01-01

    Psychiatric care provided in the home setting has been described in the literature for chronic schizophrenia (Pai & Nagarajaiah, 1982), crisis intervention with chronic clients presenting with dangerous behavior {Hatch & Sr 1980; West, Litwok, Oberlander & Martin, 1980; Soreff, 1985), intervention with the elderly (Hirschfeld, 1983; Wasson, Ripeckyj, Lazarus, Kupferer, Barry, & Force, 1984), and the provision of primary

  4. [Mental Health of elderly people: The prevalence and representations of psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Giordana, J Y; Roelandt, J L; Porteaux, C

    2010-01-01

    Upon the national data basis of the huge study "Mental Health in General Population", elaborated by the WHO Collaborating Centre, our research tries to identify the particularities of the advanced years population. The increasing number of the elderly in France and all over the world, as well as the demographic evolution prospects, truly justify our interest for them. A group of subjects older than 65 years old - representing 21,1% of the general population - was divided into two parts and the 65-74 years old (12.6%) - the 75 old years old and more (8.5%) - and was compared to the population between 18 and 74 years old (78.9%) who answered this investigation. The aim of our study was to detect the prevalence of the main psychic troubles of the elderly (depression, anxiety, addiction and psychiatric disorders), with a psychiatric tool, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). We also wanted to perceive how their perceptions and representations of the behaviours and clinical symptoms of the psychic troubles could be different from the ones of younger people. Thus, and according to the answers "normal/abnormal", "dangerous/not dangerous" linked to each item, we measured the possible difference between the answers and the representations of the general population towards the elderly. The elderly are generally confronted to multiple psychosocial stress factors (decrease of the cognitive performances, decline of the sensory abilities, drop of the social relationships, change of status, succession of loss and breach as well as the cessation of the professional activity and its network, which may favour the emergence of troubles. According to this, a higher rate of psychic troubles among the elderly than in the general investigated population, may be suspected. However, the study in general population points out that the prevalence of persons suffering from at least one trouble with the MINI declines among the subjects belonging to the highest brackets: 34.4% for the 18-64 years old, 23.2% for the 65-74 years, and 22.9% for the elderly, 75 years old and more. Anxiety decreases with the ageing (23.4% among the less than 65 years old, instead of 12.7% for the 75 years and more) as well as the addictive behaviours and the psychotic disorders (3.1% for the less than 65 years old, instead of 1.1% for the 75 years old and more). In the register of the social representations, a few differences appear also between the elderly - from 65 to 74 years old and 75 years old and more - and the majors under 65 years old: For the spectrum: T.P.S.A (sadness, tears, suicide, anxiety), the elderly consider these situations as pathological more often. The withdrawal behaviours are likely more perceived as "abnormal" by the elderly; The delusion, the hallucinations, the "odd" behaviours and talks are less often called "dangerous/non-dangerous", which leads to a rather different way of considering the elderly. Paramount the classical allowed image of the elderly - fearful, distrustful, intolerant towards any transgression and selfishly centred on their own the study reveals new conditions particularly in pointing out, among the elderly, less fear towards violent behaviours and more toleration towards the addicted subjects. PMID:20813225

  5. Use of Specialty Mental Health Services by Asian Americans with Psychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Meyer, Oanh; Zane, Nolan; Cho, Young Il; Takeuchi, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that Asian Americans underutilize mental health services but an understanding of the multiple factors involved in utilization has not been examined in a nationally representative sample. The current study analyzed data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) and examined 368 individuals with disorders to…

  6. The psychiatric hospital and its place in a mental health service

    PubMed Central

    Tooth, Geoffrey

    1958-01-01

    Modern methods of treatment of mental disease enable the average length of stay in hospital to be drastically reduced. The former overcrowding is therefore disappearing; in fact, it should be possible to contemplate a reduction in the size of the hospitals, particularly if new admissions are kept to a minimum by the provision of efficient out-patient clinics and of adequate geriatric and domiciliary nursing services. Taking recent trends in England and Wales as his starting point, the author outlines ways in which a modern mental health service might be built up around existing facilities under a variety of conditions. He advocates that, as far as possible, the treatment of mental disease should be integrated into general medicine, and emphasises the need for close co-operation between psychiatrists, family doctors, and the staff of general hospitals. PMID:13585081

  7. Good Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Home > Mental Health > Good mental health Mental Health This information in Spanish ( en espańol ) Good mental health Nutrition and mental health Exercise and mental health Sleep and mental health Stress ...

  8. Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

  9. What do Nurses do When they Taketo the Streets? An Analysis ofPsychiatric and Mental Health Nursing Interventions in theCommunity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thérčse Wallace; Shelley O’Connell; Sara R. Frisch

    2005-01-01

    Little research can be found on nursing practice for populations needing non-traditional mental health care. A descriptive study was done with the nurses on the Community Link Service (CLS), an intensive psychiatric community follow-up program, to identify nursing interventions and the types of situations encountered. These nurses use the guiding principles of two current treatment modalities, Assertive Community Treatment and

  10. A Historical Overview of Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing Education in the United Kingdom: Going around in Circles or on the Straight and Narrow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutcliffe, John

    2003-01-01

    Addresses historical issues in psychiatric/mental health nursing in the United Kingdom including attempts to integrate it with general nursing, the balance of theory/research and practice, and tensions over the recent shift to university-level nurse preparation. Discusses needs for the future. (Contains 42 references and commentary by Sheri…

  11. Hope and interpersonal psychiatric/mental health nursing: a systematic review of the literature--part one.

    PubMed

    Koehn, C V; Cutcliffe, J R

    2007-04-01

    Psychiatric/mental health (P/MH) nursing is inherently an interpersonal endeavour; one that includes a broad range of 'helping activities'. The interpersonal activities and skills are enshrined in our underpinning philosophy, explored and learned in our curricula (all around the world) and enacted in our everyday clinical practice. Within this interpersonal context and framework, it is heartening to see that understated, abstract and yet-lasting concepts such as hope are gaining more acknowledgement, recognition and subsequently attention. While it is recognized that hope in mental health care is increasingly becoming the focal point of disciplined inquiry, the authors believe it is perhaps necessary and timely to re-examine these two concepts, namely: interpersonal P/MH nursing and hope/inspiring hope in people with mental health problems. Accordingly, this two-part article reports on a systematic review of the literature that focuses on hope (inspiring hope) within interpersonal (counselling) focused P/MH nursing. Part one focuses on the method used and the results, indicating that a total of 57 articles were included in the review: 39 were categorized as empirical studies involving either a quantitative or qualitative methodological design, and 18 were considered theoretical/clinical/review articles. Though not a product of an empirical investigation per se, it was clear that many of the articles shared and covered common ground. Thus, these were arranged into six 'loose' thematic groupings. The first three of these areas, schizophrenia, suicidality and depression form the remainder of part one of this article, and the remaining areas are included in part two. PMID:17352775

  12. Psychiatric morbidity, service use, and need for care in the general population: results of The Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study.

    PubMed Central

    Bijl, R V; Ravelli, A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the use of primary health care, mental health care, and informal care services, as well as unmet care needs, by individuals with different psychiatric diagnoses. METHODS: Data were derived from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study and were based on a representative sample (n = 7147) of the general population (aged 18-64 years). RESULTS: In a 12-month period, 33.9% of those with a psychiatric disorder used some form of care; 27.2% used primary care, and 15.3% used mental health care. Patients with mood disorders were the most likely to enlist professional care; those with alcohol- and drug-related disorders were the least likely to do so. Higher educated persons who live alone, single parents, unemployed persons, and disabled persons were more likely to use mental health care. Unmet need for professional help was reported by 16.8% (men 9.9%, women 23.9%) of those with a disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Care use varies widely by diagnostic category. The role of general medical practitioners in treating persons with psychiatric disorders is more limited than was anticipated. Patients in categories associated with extensive use of professional care are more likely to have unmet care needs. PMID:10754976

  13. Mental Health Systems in Scandinavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, David J.

    The guidebook is introduced by general observations on the Scandinavian countries concerning history, social policy, medicine, mental health, and psychiatric diagnosis. Discussed individually for Norway, Sweden, and Denmark are the following areas: mental health programs and statistics; mental illness programs, regional, hospital, aftercare,…

  14. MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHIATRIC NURSING IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAWFORD, ANNIE L.

    THIRTY-ONE PROFESSIONAL NURSE EDUCATORS IN SCHOOLS OF PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE SOUTHEAST ATTENDED A TWO-WEEK CLINICAL WORKSHOP ON PSYCHIATRIC NURSING AT WESTERN STATE HOSPITAL, STAUNTON, VIRGINIA, IN AUGUST 1966. THEY RECONVENED FOR A THREE-DAY FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA, IN JANUARY 1967. THE PROJECT WAS UNDERTAKEN TO UPDATE THE…

  15. Running Head: Mental Health and Welfare Reform MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS AMONG SINGLE MOTHERS

    E-print Network

    Shyy, Wei

    Running Head: Mental Health and Welfare Reform MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS AMONG SINGLE MOTHERS Pennsylvania State University #12;Mental Health and Welfare Reform/2 MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS AMONG SINGLE that having a psychiatric disorder is associated with a 25 percent lower likelihood of working. Mental health

  16. USE OF NATIONWIDE OUTCOMES MONITORING DATA TO COMPARE CLINICAL OUTCOMES IN SPECIALIZED MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS AND GENERAL PSYCHIATRIC CLINICS IN THE VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg A. Greenberg; Robert A. Rosenheck

    2006-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the implementation of evidence-based specialized mental health programs. However, there has been little study of the effectiveness of these programs in comparison with standard mental health care in real world mental health systems. This study used a national sample of patients from the Veterans Health Administration to compare changes in mental health status

  17. What Is Mental Health?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Myths and Facts Recovery is Possible What Is Mental Health? Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social ... mental health problems and where to find help . Mental Health and Wellness Positive mental health allows people to: ...

  18. Mental Health Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Mental health conditions Mental health conditions Most teens have a lot to deal ... Taking care of your mental health What are mental health disorders? top Mental health disorders are a group ...

  19. Use of Inpatient Psychiatric Services by Children and Youth under Age 18, United States, 1980. Mental Health Statistical Note No. 175.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milazzo-Sayre, Laura J.; And Others

    The report examines data from three sample surveys of admissions during 1980 to the inpatient psychiatric services of state and mental hospitals and private psychiatric hospitals and the separate inpatient psychiatric services of non-federal general hospitals. Findings revealed that an estimated 81,532 persons under 18 years were admitted to…

  20. CCPP-Copenhagen Community Psychiatric Project. Implementation of community mental health centres in Copenhagen: effects of service utilization, social integration, quality of life and positive and negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nordentoft, M; Knudsen, H C; Jessen-Petersen, B; Krasnik, A; Saelan, H; Treufeldt, P; Wetcher, B

    1996-11-01

    Deinstitutionalization of psychiatry in Denmark has been extensive and the number of psychiatric beds per 1,000 inhabitants is among the lowest in Europe. The effect of supplementing hospital treatment with treatment in community mental health centres was evaluated in a quasi-experimental design. The patient group examined consisted of patients with long-term contact with psychiatric services. When development in intervention and control districts was compared, the only significant difference was that the total patient group in the intervention district had an increased number of day attendances per year. Comparison of patients from intervention districts who attended day-centres regularly with patients from control districts before and after implementation of community mental health centres indicated that patients from intervention districts had a reduction in the use of inpatient services, a significant increase in quality of life and a significant decrease in the presence of the negative symptom, alogia. We concluded that implementation of community mental health centres can increase the quality of life for the patients and decrease the frequency of the negative symptom, alogia. PMID:8952373

  1. Women and Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Health & Education > Mental Health Information Women and Mental Health Mental illnesses affect women and men differently — some ... mail.nih.gov Share Science News About Women’s Mental Health Soldiers at High Suicide Risk after Hospitalization NIMH ...

  2. Prestige and Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet Falk-Kessler; Peter Ruopp

    1993-01-01

    The prestige of occupational therapy in mental health was studied in relationship to the prestige held by other mental health professions. One hundred fifty four mental health professionals, representing members of a psychiatric treatment team, were surveyed. Although all professionals agreed that occupational therapists held a moderate amount of prestige when considered apart from other disciplines, occupational therapists received the

  3. Multidisciplinary mental health teams.

    PubMed

    Slade, M; Rosen, A; Shankar, R

    1995-01-01

    This study surveyed current practice amongst 91 Indian and Australian staff working within multidisciplinary mental health teams, looking at leadership skills, conflict resolution and therapeutic abilities. Length of training was associated with management skills, though these skill were more developed by psychiatric nurses and occupational therapists working in community settings. Hospital settings involved less consensual decision-making than community teams. Psychiatric nurses spent most time in clinical work, and occupational therapists were rated as less skilled in the therapeutic activities assessed than any other profession. Psychiatrists and clinical psychologists undertook most research. The activities assessed in this study could be undertaken by a team comprising psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses and social workers, with clinical psychologists employed where possible, especially for research or service evaluation. PMID:8847199

  4. WAR & Military Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Pols, Hans; Oak, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Involvement in warfare can have dramatic consequences for the mental health and well-being of military personnel. During the 20th century, US military psychiatrists tried to deal with these consequences while contributing to the military goal of preserving manpower and reducing the debilitating impact of psychiatric syndromes by implementing screening programs to detect factors that predispose individuals to mental disorders, providing early intervention strategies for acute war-related syndromes, and treating long-term psychiatric disability after deployment. The success of screening has proven disappointing, the effects of treatment near the front lines are unclear, and the results of treatment for chronic postwar syndromes are mixed. After the Persian Gulf War, a number of military physicians made innovative proposals for a population-based approach, anchored in primary care instead of specialty-based care. This approach appears to hold the most promise for the future. PMID:17971561

  5. Quality of Publicly-Funded Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Care for Common Childhood Psychiatric Disorders in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zima, Bonnie T.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Knapp, Penny; Ladd, Heather; Tang, Lingqi; Duan, Naihua; Wallace, Peggy; Rosenblatt, Abram; Landsverk, John; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To describe the documented adherence to quality indicators for the outpatient care of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, and major depression for children in public mental health clinics and to explore how adherence varies by child and clinic characteristics. Method: A statewide, longitudinal cohort study of 813…

  6. Elderly Mental Health: Needs*

    PubMed Central

    Parkar, Shubhangi R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the mental health needs of the elderly. It tackles the issues of their institutionalisation and community care. Rapid urbanisation in Indian society throws up special problems in elderly care. There is great evidence of a raise in morbidity, mortality, hospitalisation and loss of functional status related to common mental disorders in the elderly patients. Overlap of depression and anxiety is very common with up to almost half of the elderly patients reporting significant depressive and anxiety symptoms. Also, depression is the most common psychiatric disorder in late life. Growth in the elderly population means a direct increase in age related diseases such as dementia and poor mental health outcomes such as depression, anxiety, suicide and serious constraints on the quality of life among elderly individuals. The need to identify new and unmet problem areas and develop efficient therapeutic outcomes for this special population is stressed. PMID:25838727

  7. The Role of a Psychiatric Pharmacist in College Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Charles F.; Webber, Donna; Kurland, Michael; Holmes, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Published evidence indicates there is a growing prevalence of psychiatric illnesses on college campuses, and that approximately one quarter of students may be taking psychotropic medications. But attracting and retaining experienced mental health care professionals to college health settings is a challenging task. The psychiatric pharmacist is one…

  8. The Role of a Psychiatric Pharmacist in College Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles F. Caley; Donna Webber; Michael Kurland; Paula Holmes

    2010-01-01

    Published evidence indicates there is a growing prevalence of psychiatric illnesses on college campuses, and that approximately one quarter of students may be taking psychotropic medications. But attracting and retaining experienced mental health care professionals to college health settings is a challenging task. The psychiatric pharmacist is one professional resource that can serve as both a clinical and educational consultant

  9. Reinstitutionalization Following Psychiatric Discharge among VA Patients with Serious Mental Illness: A National Longitudinal Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheryl Irmiter; John F. McCarthy; Kristen L. Barry; Soheil Soliman; Frederic C. Blow

    2007-01-01

    Patterns of reinstitutionalization following psychiatric hospitalization for individuals with serious mental illnesses (SMI)\\u000a vary by medical and psychiatric health care settings. This report presents rates of reinstitutionalization across care settings\\u000a for 35,527 patients following psychiatric discharge in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health system, a national health\\u000a care system. Over a 7-year follow-up period, 30,417 patients (86%) were reinstitutionalized.

  10. Mental Health for Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Men's Health This information in Spanish ( en espańol ) Mental health for men More information on mental health for ... extremely effective. Return to top More information on Mental health for men Explore other publications and websites Attention ...

  11. Teen Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem. Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You ... things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

  12. [An existential health care approach in hospital psychiatric nursing].

    PubMed

    Furlan, Marcela Martins; Ribeiro, Cléa Regina de Oliveira

    2011-04-01

    The focus of Mental Health Care in Brazil has been on community psychiatric care services that replace the asylum model. However, individuals with mental disorders continue to shift between community services and psychiatric hospitals, besides becoming a target of the disciplinarization and violence that question the quality of the nursing care being delivered. The objective of this study is to understand the ontology of nursing care in psychiatric hospitalization. Participants were four individuals with mental disorders who attended a center for psychosocial care, who agreed to talk about their psychiatric hospitalization experience by means of a semi-directed interview. The subjects remembered about their psychiatric hospitalization and assigned meanings to it. Heidegger's Existential Analysis was used, and thus generated the Meaning Unit: Being-in-the-world cared with impersonality; which allowed to unveil the phenomenon through Dasein's structure, and thus made it possible to outline the ontological care in nursing in psychiatric hospitals. PMID:21655789

  13. [Mental health services in Australia].

    PubMed

    Kisely, Steve; Lesage, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Canada is 1.5 times the size of Australia. Australia's population of 20 million is located principally on the east coast. Like Canada, the Australia has a federal system of Government with 5 States and two territories. Each State and territory has its own legislation on mental health. The federal (Commonwealth) Government is responsible for health care planning. In addition, the federal Government subsidizes an insurance program (Medicare) that covers visits to specialists and family physicians, while provincial governments are involved in the provision of hospital care and community mental health services. The Commonwealth government also subsidises the cost of medication through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. These funds are supplemented by private health insurance. Mental health costs account for 6.5 per cent of all health care costs. Primary care treats the majority of common psychological disorders such as anxiety or depression, while specialist mental health services concentrate on those with severe mental illness. There have been 4 national mental health plans since 1992 with the long term aims of promoting mental health, increasing the quality and responsiveness of services, and creating a consistent approach to mental health service system reform among Australian states and territories. These systematic cycles of planning have first allowed a shift from psychiatric hospitals to community services, from reliance on psychiatric hospitals as pivotal to psychiatric care system. Community care budgets have increased, but overall have decreased with money not following patients; but recent deployment of federally funded through Medicare access to psychotherapy by psychologists for common mental disorders in primary care have increased overall budget. Concerns remain that shift to youth first onset psychosis clinics may come from older long-term psychotic patients, a form of discrimination whilst evidence amount of excess mortality by cardio-vascular diseases and cancers, and due to poverty, poor health prevention and primary health care for these patients. From a system perspective, Australia has been inspired by Canada and created in 2012 its own mental health commission with a similar leading role for patients and families, aboriginal people representatives, but also a surveillance of the system with its own yearly report, like the Quebec Health Commissioner 2012 mental health system performance report. PMID:25120122

  14. No personalization without participation: on the active contribution of psychiatric patients to the development of a mobile application for mental health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing pervasiveness of mobile computational technologies, knowledge about psychiatric patients’ preferences regarding the design and utility of mobile applications is very poor. This paper reports on a pilot-study that involved 120 psychiatric patients in the development of a mobile application (app) that is being used for data entry into the Signature Project data bank at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal (IUSMM), Canada. Participants were invited to comment on the ‘look and feel’ of the Signature App. Their input also extended the procedures for data collection. These suggestions may contribute to increased mental health literacy and empowerment of persons with mental illness receiving services at the IUSMM. Methods Participants were recruited to fill out a questionnaire on a tablet computer while waiting at the Emergency Room (ER, n = 40), Psychotic Disorders outpatient clinic (n = 40) or Anxiety and Mood Disorders outpatient clinic (n = 40) of IUSMM. Nine patients from each of these sub-groups participated in a focus group to review the results and to discuss how the design and use of the Signature App could be improved to better meet the needs of patients. Results This study (n = 120) indicated that psychiatric patients are clearly capable of using a tablet computer to fill out questionnaires for quantitative data entry, and that they enjoyed this experience. Results from the focus groups (n = 27) highlight that the app could also be used by patients to communicate some personal and contextual qualitative information. This would support a holistic and person-centered approach, especially at the ER where people acutely need to describe their recent history and receive emotional support. Conclusions This pilot-study has confirmed the necessity of involving patients not only in the testing of a new mobile application, but also as active contributors in the entire research and development process of a person-centered information and communication technology infrastructure. The input of participants was essential in designing the Signature Project computational procedure and making use of the app a positive and empowering experience. Participants also gave critical feedback remarks that went beyond the initial scope of the pilot-study, for example they suggested the addition of a client-clinician component. PMID:23890085

  15. Mental Health: Military

    MedlinePLUS

    Home > Mental Health > People > Military Let's Talk Facts Brochures Understanding Mental Disorders: Your Guide to DSM-5 Healthy Minds, Healthy ... Parity Healthy Minds TV What is a psychiatrist Mental Health Check-up Coping with Disasters Links for more ...

  16. Children's Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Children's Mental Health For parents, the key to handling mental disorders of children is to recognize the problem and seek ... and treatments, and a complete evaluation by a mental health provider can determine whether a child needs help. ...

  17. Mental Health and HIV

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enter ZIP code here Coping with HIV/AIDS: Mental Health for Veterans and the Public Mental Health and HIV: Entire Lesson Overview If you are ... deal with. Along with the physical illness are mental health conditions that may come up. Mental health refers ...

  18. Mental health literacy among university students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adrian Furnham; Richard Cook; Neil Martin; Mark Batey

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the mental health literacy of students. This study is part of the growing interest in mental health literacy among young people. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Over 400 university students indicated their knowledge of over 90 psychiatric illnesses labels derived from DSM:IV. They rated disorders on six questions concerning whether they had heard

  19. Correlates of Stress and Coping among Jordanian Nursing Students during Clinical Practice in Psychiatric/Mental Health Course.

    PubMed

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

    2014-10-13

    Training in psychiatric settings is stressful for nursing students. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations between the students' characteristics, their stress degrees, stressors and types of coping strategies they experience during training in psychiatric course. A descriptive, correlational, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five undergraduate nursing students were recruited randomly from five Jordanian universities. Self-report questionnaires were administered at the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. The findings showed that students who utilized avoidance or transference strategies reported high stress degrees. Moreover, the results showed that those students who were in the fourth year, with a low family income, who avoid extracurricular activities, with a low academic grade or who registered in other clinical course(s) reported high stress degrees. These findings present a worthy data for the clinical instructors that facilitate students training in psychiatric settings and promote their psychosocial well-being. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25308304

  20. [Mental health problems].

    PubMed

    Momotani, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Haruyoshi

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes current issues in occupational mental health, occupational mental health activities currently underway, and priorities to improve the situation in Japan. A new tool to support these activities is then discussed. The incidence of employee mental health problems is rising, despite efforts to promote occupational mental health activities. The adoption of such activities is lagging behind in medium and small-sized enterprises. Priorities to improve occupational mental health include motivating business operators to address mental health issues, focusing more on prevention, and promoting mental health initiatives in medium and small-sized enterprises. Mental-Rosai, a web-based mental health check system, is a useful tool for the prevention of mental health problems and can provide support for medium and small-sized enterprises. PMID:24605529

  1. STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH POLICY

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    1 STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH POLICY Revised January 2013 #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION 1. Context Widening with a notable increase in the numbers of students with significant mental health difficulties entering HE the continuum from promoting positive mental well-being to working with students with severe mental health

  2. Attitudes toward the Lower and Middle Class Psychiatric Patient as a Function of Authoritarianism Among Mental Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Nancy; And Others

    1970-01-01

    It was predicted that lower class case histories would be judged more negatively by those Ss who were more authoritarian as measured by the F Scale. This prediction was confirmed for a group of 24 psychiatric residents and bordered on significance for a group of 16 social work students. (Author)

  3. Children's Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Media Policy Makers  National Center Homepage Children's Mental Health Language: English Espańol (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... problems can continue into adulthood. Public health includes mental health A new report from the Centers for Disease ...

  4. Mental Health Screening Center

    MedlinePLUS

    Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not a substitute for consultation with a health professional. ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

  5. Women's Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Women’s Mental Health What it means to you. About this booklet “Women’s mental health is critical to their overall health and to ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Good mental health is important to everyone. And because it is ...

  6. Disaster planning for vulnerable populations: mental health.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Thomas B

    2010-12-01

    Psychological responses to a disaster are well established; however, little is known regarding how individuals with established psychiatric and mental health needs respond to a disaster. Further research is needed to provide a better understanding as well as to provide data and information that would assist in the provision of timely and adequate intervention and treatment. Addressing the psychological and psychiatric needs of this vulnerable population would assist in the provision of adequate and appropriate psychiatric mental health care in a timely and an effective manner. PMID:21095557

  7. A profile of mentally disordered offenders admitted to inpatient psychiatric services in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry J. Steadman; Marilyn J. Rosenstein; Robin L. MacAskill; Ronald W. Manderscheidt

    1988-01-01

    This research note presents data about mentally disordered offenders (MDOs) treated in inpatient psychiatric services. Data are derived from 1980 admission surveys by the Survey and Reports Branch, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). These data report for the first time inpatient services provided to MDOs by non-Federal general and private hospitals. A total of 31,773 MDOs were admitted, with

  8. Same-Sex Sexual Behavior and Psychiatric Disorders: Findings From the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theo G. M. Sandfort; Ron de Graaf; Rob V. Bijl; Paul Schnabel

    2001-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that homosexual- ity is associated with psychiatric morbidity. This study examined differences between heterosexually and ho- mosexually active subjects in 12-month and lifetime preva- lence of DSM-III-R mood, anxiety, and substance use dis- orders in a representative sample of the Dutch population (N=7076; aged 18-64 years). Methods: Data were collected in face-to-face inter- views, using

  9. Prevalence of psychiatric disorder in the general population: results of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. V. Bijl; A. Ravelli; G. van Zessen

    1998-01-01

    This article reports the initial results of a prospective study on the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in the Dutch population\\u000a aged 18–64. The objectives and the design of the study are described elsewhere in this issue. A total of 7076 people were\\u000a interviewed in person in 1996. The presence of the following disorders was determined by means of the CIDI:

  10. Sleep and Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Espańol Text Size Email Print Share Sleep and Mental Health Article Body Sleep has become a casualty of ... MPH, FAAP Last Updated 5/5/2015 Source Mental Health, Naturally: The Family Guide to Holistic Care for ...

  11. Seniors (Mental Health)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Alzheimer’s disease or vascular dementia. Conclusion Having good mental health throughout life does not ensure immunity from severe ... The Joint Commission Let's Talk Facts Brochures Alzheimers Mental Health in Seniors Depression Healthy Minds TV - Depression Suicide ...

  12. Teens and Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... community for teens and young adults struggling with mental health problems and encourage them to talk about what ... just the typical “growing pains” or a real mental health problem. While adolescence is a difficult time for ...

  13. Department. Mental Health

    E-print Network

    Li, Yi

    Student Services Department. Helping Students With Mental Health Difficulties. #12;#12;This document has been produced to assist staff in their dealings with students with mental health difficulties.1 It aims to: If a student is experiencing mental health difficulties there will often be warning

  14. Mental Health and African Americans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Mental Health Mental Health and African Americans Poverty level affects mental health ... compared to 120% of Non-Hispanic Whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  15. Indicators Predicting Use of Mental Health Services in Piedmont, Italy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giuseppe Tibaldi; Carmine Munizza; Sherri Pasian; Sonia Johnson; Luis Salvador-Carulla; Serena Zucchi; Simona Cesano; Cristina Testa; Elena Scala; Luca Pinciaroli

    2005-01-01

    Background: Since the 1978 Italian reform, an integrated network of community mental health services has been introduced. With few exceptions, research on determinants of mental health service use at the district level has focused on inpatient activities and social deprivation indicators. The European Psychiatric Care Assessment Team (EPCAT) standardized methodology allows for an evidence- based comparison of mental health systems

  16. Program Models for Mental Health Treatment of Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaranson, James M.; Bamford, Pauline

    This paper presents the approach used by the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) of the University of Minnesota's Refugee Assistance Program in Mental Health for identifying successful and culturally sensitive mental health service delivery models. It divides these into four categories: the psychiatric model; the community mental health model; the…

  17. Mental Health 3: Mental Health Through Literature

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Netlinks

    2002-07-27

    This lesson, from Science NetLinks, examines how mental illness has been portrayed in the arts while highlighting for students a more insightful way to further develop their ideas about human behavior. This lesson is the third of three lessons on mental health and human behavior.

  18. Mental Health 2: Bedlam

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Netlinks

    2002-07-28

    This is the second of three lessons from Science NetLinks on mental health and human behavior. This lesson gives students an up-close, personal look at Bedlam, the world's first mental health asylum, and the kind of life and treatment that mentally ill people received before the 20th century.

  19. HUMAN SERVICES Mental Health Services

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    procedures. Federal government, Departments of Health and Human Services Justice Veterans AdministrationPSYCHOLOGY HUMAN SERVICES Counseling Advocacy Mental Health Services STRATEGIESAREAS EMPLOYERS State government, Departments of Human Services Mental Health & Mental Retardation Community mental

  20. Mental Health Medications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... more about child and adolescent mental health research . Older adults Because older people often have more medical problems ... people who take medications for mental disorders. An older adult may forget his or her regular dose and ...

  1. Impact of Maternal Mental Health Status on Child Mental Health Treatment Outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carrie W. Rishel; Catherine G. Greeno; Steven C. Marcus; Esther Sales; M. Katherine. Shear; Holly A. Swartz; Carol Anderson

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of maternal depression and anxiety on child treatment outcome. Psychiatric assessments were conducted on 180 mother–child pairs when the child entered treatment in a community mental health center and six months later. Children whose mothers were depressed or anxious were significantly more impaired than children of mentally healthy mothers at both time points. Both groups

  2. Mental Health in Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Trina Menden Anglin

    The United States federal government has a vested interest in the mental health of children and adolescents. It considers\\u000a the current state of mental health care for children a public crisis (U.S. Public Health Service, 2000). Approximately 21%\\u000a of children and adolescents between the ages of 9 and 17 have a diagnosable mental or addictive disorder that causes at least

  3. Child and Adolescent Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health & Education > Mental Health Information Child and Adolescent Mental Health Publications Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents (Fact ... the Adolescent Brain? In recognition of National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day on May 8, 2014, parents gathered ...

  4. Mental Health Care Use in Parkinson’s Disease: A Record Linkage Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. G. Leentjens; G. Driessen; W. Weber; M. Drukker; J. van Os

    2008-01-01

    Background\\/Aim: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is often complicated by psychiatric comorbidity, which is likely to lead to a higher use of mental health care facilities. In addition, psychiatric symptomatology and associated mental health care use may be present even before motor symptoms and PD are diagnosed, as the pathophysiology of PD and its psychiatric consequences are likely to overlap to a

  5. Outcome of Occupational Therapy in a Psychiatric Day Care Unit for Long-Term Mentally Ill Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mona Eklund

    1999-01-01

    Twenty patients, receiving group based psychiatric outpatient occupational therapy, were assessed at admission and discharge regarding psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90-R), global mental health (HSRS), quality of life (SQoL), and occupational performance (AOF). The patients were in treatment from 4 to 30 months. There were statistically significant improvements from admission to discharge on all variables except quality of life. Thirteen of the

  6. Latino Adults’ Access to Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Zayas, Luis H.; Hansen, Marissa C.

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, epidemiological studies using state-of-the-art methodologies have documented the unmet mental health needs of Latinos adults in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This paper reviews 16 articles based on seven epidemiological studies, examines studies methodologies, and summarizes findings about how Latino adults access mental health services. Studies consistently report that, compared to non-Latino Whites, Latinos underutilize mental health services, are less likely to receive guideline congruent care, and rely more often on primary care for services. Structural, economic, psychiatric, and cultural factors influence Latinos’ service access. In spite of the valuable information these studies provide, methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs, scarcity of mixed Latino group samples) constrict knowledge about Latinos access to mental health services. Areas for future research and development needed to improve Latinos’ access and quality of mental health care are discussed. PMID:16598658

  7. Nutrition and Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to keep you feeling better physically and emotionally. Omega-3 fatty acids improve heart health by reducing “bad” cholesterol in your body and increasing “good” cholesterol. Omega-3 has also shown promise for improving mental health. ...

  8. Children's Mental Health Surveillance

    MedlinePLUS

    Children’s Mental Health Surveillance National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Division of Human Development and Disability What are ... gov CDC issues first comprehensive report on children’s mental health in the United States A new report from ...

  9. Mental health implications of migration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia Mirsky

    2009-01-01

    Introduction  Since late 1980s, 1,001,726 immigrants arrived in Israel from the former Soviet Union (FSU). A review of community studies\\u000a on the mental health of these immigrants is presented.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Israeli studies from the past two decades were reviewed. Presented are findings on the prevalence of psychological distress\\u000a and psychiatric disorders as well as on a number of risk factors among FSU

  10. Mental Health Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    Rural Mental Health There is a significant need for mental health services in rural America. According to Substance Abuse and ... action to prevent suicides? Where can I find mental health statistics for rural populations? The Substance Abuse and ...

  11. OT and Community Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Practice & Research Ethics Occupational Therapy Assistants Advocacy & Policy Mental Health Act AOTA's mental health legislation introduced in the ... Work Related For Professionals Ethics OT and Community Mental Health The overall goal of occupational therapy in community ...

  12. Mental Health and Asian Americans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Mental Health Mental Health and Asian Americans Suicide was the 10th leading ... Americans is half that of the White population. MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  13. African Americans’ Perception of Mental Health Professions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin A. Fall; Justin E. Levitov; Latoya Anderson; Harold Clay

    2005-01-01

    This study explored African-Americans perceptions of various mental health professions through the ranking of confidence levels across five case vignettes of varying psychiatric severity. Results indicated that African-Americans viewed psychologists and doctoral level licensed professional counselors with similar levels of confidence and ranked doctoral level licensed professional counselors above masters level counselors in every case example. Congruent with previous studies,

  14. COMPREHENSIVE MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES FOR THE DEAF.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALTSHULER, KENNETH Z.; RAINER, JOHN D.

    A THREE YEAR PILOT PROJECT DESIGNED TO DEMONSTRATE THE VALUE AND FEASIBILITY OF PROVIDING COMPREHENSIVE MENTAL HEALTH (PSYCHIATRIC) SERVICES FOR THE DEAF ESTABLISHED A CLINICAL UNIT FOR THE DEAF WITH INPATIENT, OUTPATIENT, AND AFTERCARE SERVICES. THE CLINIC SERVED 50 PATIENTS (MINIMUM AGE 16) IN THE WARDS AND 96 PATIENTS (ALL AGES) IN THE…

  15. Hispanic Mental Health Professionals. Monograph No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo, Esteban L., Ed.; Lopez, Steven, Ed.

    This volume is a collection of reports presented at a 1976 meeting held on the issue of Spanish American professional representation in the mental health field in the United States. Paper topics include: (1) Hispanics in psychiatry; (2) the current status of Hispanic social workers; (3) Hispanic psychiatric nursing personnel in the U.S.; (4) the…

  16. Mental Health and the TC. Chapter 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

    This document contains 19 papers from the ninth World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (TCs) that deal with the interface between the mental health establishments and the TC. Papers include: (1) "Psychiatry and the TC" (Jerome Jaffe); (2) "The Chemical Brain" (Sidney Cohen); (3) "Where Does the TC Fail?" (Ab Koster); (4) "Psychiatric Severity…

  17. The New Freedom Initiative—Transforming Mental Health Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rita P. Fleming Cottrell

    2007-01-01

    The United States mental health care system has a legacy of inadequate care that has consistently resulted in the lack of societal participation for persons with mental illnesses. Recent judicial decisions and executive actions offer the promise of community participation for persons with psychiatric disabilities. Most significant are the recommendations resulting from the New Freedom Initiative to transform the mental

  18. Perceived Mental Illness Stigma among Youth in Psychiatric Outpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkington, Katherine S.; Hackler, Dusty; McKinnon, Karen; Borges, Cristiane; Wright, Eric R.; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the experiences of mental illness stigma in 24 youth (58.3% male, 13-24 years, 75% Latino) in psychiatric outpatient treatment. Using Link and Phelan's (2001) model of stigmatization, we conducted thematic analysis of the interview texts, examining experiences of stigma at individual and structural levels, in addition to the…

  19. Mental Health Clinic Intake Assessment

    E-print Network

    Weiblen, George D

    Mental Health Clinic Intake Assessment Welcome to the Mental Health Clinic at Boynton Health or ADHD evaluation for review prior to scheduling your first medication appointment in the Mental Health). Contact the Medical Social Worker for resources­ 612-624-8182. · Long Term Therapy: The Mental Health

  20. Investigating the relationship between neighborhood experiences and psychiatric distress for individuals with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Kloos, Bret; Townley, Greg

    2011-03-01

    The present study examined the relationships between how research participants experienced their neighborhood, their neighborhood social climate, and psychological well-being. Participants (n = 525) were residents of supported housing programs who used mental health services at one of 17 community mental health centers in South Carolina. Hierarchical regression and mediation analyses were employed to answer research questions. Results suggest that neighbor relations, perceptions of neighborhood safety, and neighborhood satisfaction were significantly associated with perceptions of neighborhood social climate; and neighborhood social climate accounted for a significant amount of the variance in psychiatric distress. Of particular interest, perceptions of neighborhood social climate fully mediated the relationship between the specific reported neighborhood experiences and psychiatric distress. These findings have implications for interventions and policy aimed at promoting integration of individuals with serious mental illness into community settings. PMID:20680675

  1. MentalHealth.net

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site is an excellent resource for anyone seeking the latest issues surrounding mental health topics. It is designed and maintained by Clinical Psychologists and is "dedicated to educating the public about mental health, wellness, and family and relationship issues and concerns." In existence since 1995, the site provides featured topics, essays and articles, as well as latest news sections. In addition to these tools, weblogs, podcasts, and a questions and answers section are available. This site will be a valuable resource for any student, instructor or professional in the mental health field.

  2. Development of integrated mental health care: critical workforce competencies.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Kathleen R; Robinson, Karen M; Chafetz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    In integrated care, a person will have his or her medical and behavioral health needs addressed within one health care system. Support for integrated models has grown with the increasing awareness of how the medical comorbidities of individuals with serious mental illness contribute to their morbidity and mortality, the prevalence of mental health problems in the general population, and the mental health issues among those with chronic medical problems. The enactment of effective integrated care will demand developing clinicians who are trained to work with mental health needs at various levels of intensity, who are capable of addressing complex comorbidities, and who operate from a person-centered approach to care. In this light we argue that given their unique skill set and clinical training, Psychiatric-Mental Health Advanced Practice Nurses could play a critical role in integrated care and present policy recommendations which support the development of the Psychiatric-Mental Health Advanced Practice Nurses role in such models. PMID:23702474

  3. Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine personal and situational correlates of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Structured interview data were obtained from farmworkers (N=69) in six counties in eastern and western North Carolina. Results indicated that a substantial number of farmworkers have poor mental health, as indicated by elevated depressive symptoms (52.2%) and anxiety (16.4%). Results also indicated that each mental health outcome had different predictors. Addressing the mental health issues of farmworkers requires a comprehensive, multifaceted approach. PMID:22757952

  4. Mental Health and Mass Violence

    E-print Network

    Baker, Chris I.

    Mental Health and Mass Violence Evidence-Based Early Psychological Intervention for Victims Institute of Mental Health (2002). Mental Health and Mass Violence: Evidence-Based Early Psychological are available through: The National Institute of Mental Health Office of Communications and Public Liaison 6001

  5. The significance of services in a psychiatric hospital for family members of persons with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Shor, Ron; Shalev, Anat

    2015-03-01

    Hospitalization of persons with mental illness may cause their family members to experience multiple stressors that stem from the hospitalization as well as from the duties of helping him or her. However, providing support services in psychiatric hospitals for family members has received only limited attention. To change this situation, mental health professionals in a psychiatric hospital in Israel developed an innovative family-centered practice model, the Family Members' Support and Consultation (FMSC) service center. We examined the significance to family members of the services they received from the FMSC service center in a study that included 20 caregivers. Ten participated in 2 focus groups of 5 participants each; 10 were interviewed personally. We implemented a thematic analysis to analyze the data. According to the participants, the staff of the FMSC service center provided support services that helped them cope with the stressors and difficulties they experienced within the context of the psychiatric hospital. The participants emphasized the significance of the immediacy and accessibility of support provided, as well as the positive effects of systemic interventions aimed at changing the relationships between family members and systems in the psychiatric hospital. Our findings show the importance of integrating a service that focuses on the needs of family members of persons with mental illness within a psychiatric hospital. PMID:25485823

  6. Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine primary and context-specific stressors of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Methods: Structured interview data were obtained…

  7. Mental Health Matters

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mental Health Matters is a collection of various mental health articles which cover topics such as psychological disorders and treatments for mental illnesses. The site is easy to navigate and users can choose from disorders, symptoms, medications, and treatments. Once a visitor chooses a subfield from the homepage, they are provided with another set of choices which contain more specific information on the various main topics. The site is also designed so that users can search by disorder or category to find the appropriate information to answer their queries.

  8. Mental Illness and Psychiatric Treatment among Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gove, Walter R.; Johnson, Marilyn

    1980-01-01

    Gove suggests higher rates of mental illness among women can be linked to their societal role, particularly marital role. Johnson calls for examination of relationship between sex roles and emotional problems. Gove replies that Johnson's response is ideological, but they are in agreement on many issues. (HLM)

  9. The interface of child mental health and juvenile diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Sandra L; Overton, Mark W; Robbins, Douglas R

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common childhood illness, and its management is often complicated by mental health challenges. Psychiatric comorbidities are common, including anxiety, depression, and eating disorders. The illness can profoundly affect the developing brain and family functioning and have lifelong consequences. The child mental health provider can provide valuable assistance to support the child and family and assessment and treatment of comorbid mental health problems and to promote positive family functioning and normal developmental progress. PMID:25725569

  10. Florida Mental Health Institute

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The mission of the Louis de le Parte Florida Mental Health Institute is "to improve the lives of people with mental, addictive, and developmental disorders through research, training, and education." The Institute was created by the Florida legislature in 1967 and its work encompasses a range of mental health issues coupled with a rigorous outreach program. The materials here are divided into six thematic areas, including Publications/Reports, Research, and State & Local Partners. In the Publications/Reports area, visitors can learn about the Instituteâ??s scholarly activities through its quarterly newsletter and then browse through news briefs and Medicaid studies if so desired. Moving along, the Research area contains updates and reports on work in eight different areas, including autism, child welfare, and veteran's mental health affairs. Finally, the site also includes a section where visitors can contact the Institute to ask questions about its academic work and mission.

  11. Mental Health Stigma among Adolescents: Implications for School Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranke, Derrick; Floersch, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated adolescents with a mental health diagnosis and their experience of stigma in schools. Forty adolescents between the ages of twelve and seventeen who met DSM-IV criteria for a psychiatric illness and who were prescribed psychiatric medication were selected. The Teen Subjective Experience of Medication Interview was used to…

  12. Psychiatric components of a Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santy, Patricia A.

    1987-01-01

    The operational psychiatric requirements for a comprehensive Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on a permanently manned Space Station are examined. Consideration is given to the psychological health maintenance program designed for the diagnosis of mental distress in astronauts during flight and for prevention of mental breakdown. The types of mental disorders that can possibly affect the astronauts in flight are discussed, including various organic, psychotic, and affective mental disorders, as well as anxiety, adjustment, and somatoform/dissociative disorders. Special attention is given to therapeutic considerations for psychiatric operations on Space Station, such as restraints, psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial support.

  13. Health Care Reform and the Federal Transformation Initiatives: Capitalizing on the Potential of Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Delaney, Kathleen; Merwin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the US federal government proposed a transformation vision of mental health service delivery; patient-centered, evidence-based and recovery oriented treatment models. Health care reform brings additional expectations for innovation in mental/substance use service delivery, particularly the idea of creating systems where physical health, mental health and substance use treatment is fully integrated. Psychiatric nurses, as one of the four core US mental health professions, have the potential to play a significant role in the both the transformation initiative and health care reform vision. However, psychiatric nurses, particularly advanced practice psychiatric nurses, are an untapped resource due in part to significant state regulatory barriers that limit their scope of practice in many states. The purpose of this paper is to document what is currently known about advanced practice psychiatric nurses and discuss policy implications for tapping into the strengths of this workforce. Strategies for facilitating utilization of advanced practice psychiatric nurses discussed. PMID:21233135

  14. Mental Health, Are We at Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Tawar, Shabeena; Bhatia, Sanjana Seth; Ilankumaran, Mookkiah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mental health is an important component of the total positive health and is interwoven closely with the physical and physiological dynamics of the human body. Worldwide, about 500 million people are believed to be suffering from neurotic, stress related and psychological problems. In India, surveys on mental morbidity in various parts of the country suggest a prevalence rate of 18-20 per 1000. Materials and Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out amongst married women in the age group 18-45 years in an urban community of South Mumbai. Self-reporting questionnaire of 20 items (SRQ 20) developed by the WHO was administered. Statistical analysis was carried out to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disturbance. Result: The prevalence of psychiatric disturbance was found to be 27.27% for the total sample. The study results indicate that somatic symptoms were reported more commonly which could be a manifestation of underlying/burgeoning mental disorders. Conclusions: The results imply a high prevalence of 27.27% of psychiatric disturbance in our community. However, defining mental disorder from a clinical standpoint necessitates identification of the dividing line between despair and depression. It is recommended that women be encouraged to approach counsellors and thus enable further diagnosis and management of Common Mental Disorders in the community. PMID:24695680

  15. Role of the police in linking individuals experiencing mental health crises with mental health services

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The police are considered frontline professionals in managing individuals experiencing mental health crises. This study examines the extent to which these individuals are disconnected from mental health services, and whether the police response has an influence on re-establishing contact. Methods Police records were searched for calls regarding individuals with acute mental health needs and police handling of these calls. Mental healthcare contact data were retrieved from a Psychiatric Case Register. Results The police were called upon for mental health crisis situations 492 times within the study year, involving 336 individuals (i.e. 1.7 per 1000 inhabitants per year). Half of these individuals (N=162) were disengaged from mental health services, lacking regular care contact in the year prior to the crisis (apart from contact for crisis intervention). In the month following the crisis, 21% of those who were previously disengaged from services had regular care contact, and this was more frequent (49%) if the police had contacted the mental health services during the crisis. The influence of police referral to the services was still present the following year. However, for the majority (58%) of disengaged individuals police did not contact the mental health services at the time of crisis. Conclusions The police deal with a substantial number of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis, half of whom are out of contact with mental health services, and police play an important role in linking these individuals to services. Training police officers to recognise and handle mental health crises, and implementing practical models of cooperation between the police and mental health services in dealing with such crises may further improve police referral of individuals disengaged from mental health services. PMID:23072687

  16. Student Mental Health Final Report

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    1 Student Mental Health Committee Final Report University of California Office of the President: Report of the University of California Student Mental Health Committee On behalf of the Student Mental in December 2005, and was given a charge to assess 1) trends in student mental health, 2) how these trends

  17. Students & Mental Health Resource Pack

    E-print Network

    Stevenson, Mark

    Students & Mental Health Resource Pack Produced by - www.rethink.org/at-ease/ SHEFFIELD EARLY is severe mental illness? 1.4 Treatment and prognosis What is mental health awareness? 2.1 Introduction 2 for students with experience of mental health problems 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Pre-entry guidance for students 5

  18. Older Adults and Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Mental Health Information Older Adults and Mental Health Depression Depression is not a ... increased risk for suicide . Share Science News About Older Adults NIMH Hosts Twitter Chat on Depression and Older ...

  19. Understanding Your Mental Health Insurance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PDF version of this document . Insurance benefits for mental health services have changed a lot in recent years. ... health care. It is important to understand your mental health care coverage so that you can be an ...

  20. FastStats: Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Mental Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Health, United States trend tables with data on mental health Identifying Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Children Aged ...

  1. Identifying Need for Mental Health Services in Substance Abuse Clients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy A. Mericle; Cherie Martin; Deni Carise; Meghan Love

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Counselor detection of co-occurring disorders is critical to ensuring that clients with mental disorders entering substance abuse treatment receive appropriate care. This study sought to: (1) examine correspondence between client-reported psychiatric symptoms and client and counselor ratings of need for mental health treatment, and (2) explore client- and program-level characteristics associated with client and counselor underrating. Methods: Psychiatric symptoms

  2. Community-based mental health care in Africa: mental health workers’ views

    PubMed Central

    ALEM, ATALAY; JACOBSSON, LARS; HANLON, CHARLOTTE

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has for long proposed the development of community-based mental health services worldwide. However, the progress toward community mental health care in most African countries is still hampered by a lack of resources, with specialist psychiatric care essentially based in large, centrally located mental hospitals. It is again time to reconsider the direction of mental health care in Africa. Based on a small inquiry to a number of experienced mental health professionals in sub-Saharan Africa, we discuss what a community concept of mental health care might mean in Africa. There is a general agreement that mental health services should be integrated in primary health care. A critical issue for success of this model is perceived to be provision of appropriate supervision and continuing education for primary care workers. The importance of collaboration between modern medicine and traditional healers is stressed and the paper ends in a plea for WHO to take the initiative and develop mental health services according to the special needs and the socio-cultural conditions prevailing in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:18458779

  3. Integrated Educational and Mental Health Services within a Day Treatment Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Greta; Radka, Dale F.

    This paper discusses the integration of educational and mental health services for children and adolescents within a psychiatric day treatment setting at the Bradley School housed in a private psychiatric hospital affiliated with Brown University in Rhode Island. A full range of mental health services are used, and therapies are delivered in the…

  4. The 5/95 Gap on the dissemination of mental health research: The World Psychiatric Association (WPA) task force report on project with editors of low and middle income (LAMI) countries.

    PubMed

    de Jesus Mari, J; Patel, V; Kieling, C; Anders, M; Jakovljevi, M; Lam, L C; Lotaief, F; Mendlowicz, M V; Okulat, G; Sathyanarayana Rao, T S; Tamam, L; Tyrer, P; Herrman, H

    2009-02-01

    The World Psychiatric Association (WPA) Task Force and a small group previously convened by the WPA publications committee initiated three activities between 2006-2008 that aimed to respond to the need for greater support for psychiatry journals in LAMI countries. In a joint venture with participants from the Global Mental Health Movement the Task Force editors from LAMI countries in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America were contacted to identify potential journals to target for indexation (Medline and ISI). The committee analyzed the editors' applications on the following criteria: a) geographical representativeness; b) affiliation to a professional mental health society; c) regular publication of at least 4 issues per year over the past few years; d) comprehensive national and international editorial boards; e) publication of original articles, or at least abstracts, in English; f) some level of current indexation; g) evidence of a good balance between original and review articles in publications; and h) a friendly access website. The committee received 26 applications (11 from Latin America, 7 from Central Europe, 4 from Asia and 4 from Africa), and selected 8 journals, 2 from each geographical area, on the basis of the overall scores obtained for the items mentioned, to participate in an editors meeting held in Prague in September 2008. The aims of the committee are twofold: a) to concentrate support for those selected journals; and b) to assist all LAMI mental health editors in improving the quality of their journals and fulfilling the requirements for full indexation. This report summarizes the procedures conducted by the committee, the assessment of the current non-indexed journals, and offers suggestions for further action. PMID:19517045

  5. Community Mental Health Model for Campus Mental Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, James H.

    University and college mental health services have historically modeled themselves after a traditional clinic model. Few delivery systems have been influenced by the community mental health model. The major reason for this lack of influence appears to be the "in loco parentis" stance of colleges and universities. A campus mental health service…

  6. Addressing Tri?Morbidity (Hepatitis C, Psychiatric Disorders, and Substance Use): The Importance of Routine Mental Health Screening as a Component of a Comanagement Model of Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marian Fireman; Aaron Blackwell; Peter Hauser

    2005-01-01

    Background. Recent studies suggest that most patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection commonly present to medical clinics with active psychiatric and substance use disorders. However, routine screening for these disorders is generally not done. Objectives. The purpose of our study was to assess prospectively the frequency of psychiatric and substance use disorders in patients presenting for initial assessment of

  7. Modernizing mental health services: mission impossible?

    PubMed

    Berland, Alex

    2003-01-01

    Managing complex change initiatives can be a risky and controversial task. Hargrove and Glidew's (1990) model of "impossible jobs" defines typical obstacles: constituency conflict, perceptions of client legitimacy, respect for professional authority, and the strength of the agency myth. The author uses this model to describe his experiences while implementing major changes within British Columbia's community mental health system and provincial psychiatric hospital. Coping strategies include coalition building, public education, meaningful stakeholder participation, systemic feedback, mutual aid, and staff development. PMID:12854677

  8. Lifestyle and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized…

  9. Mental Health Occupational Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary Kielhofner; Roann Barris

    1984-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the history of ideas and practice in psychosocial occupational therapy. It then reports the results of two studies which examined present-day perspectives as reflected in occupational therapy literature and the actural practices of psychosocial therapists. The first study was based on a review of mental health-related articles in AJOT and OTMH; the second represented secondary analyses

  10. Lifestyle and Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Walsh

    2011-01-01

    Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized despite considerable evidence of their effectiveness in both clinical and normal populations. TLCs are sometimes as effective as

  11. Mental Health Treatment Program Locator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... County or Zip By Name Other Links State Mental Health Agencies Frequently Asked Questions Links Comments or Questions ... a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health treatment programs nearest you, find your State on ...

  12. Mental Health Care: Who's Who

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Living Listen Espańol Text Size Email Print Share Mental Health Care: Who's Who Article Body Psychiatrist: An M. ... degree in psychology, counseling or a related field. Mental Health Counselor: Master’s degree and several years of supervised ...

  13. Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Emotional & Mental Health Although dystonia is a movement disorder that impacts the physical body, it can also impact emotional and ... emotion as well as muscle movement. For years, mental health professionals have recognized that coping with a chronic ...

  14. The relationship between parental psychiatric disorder and child physical and sexual abuse: findings from the Ontario health supplement ? ? Christine Walsh is supported by a University of Toronto Open Scholarship; Dr. MacMillan is supported by a Faculty Scholar Award from the William T. Grant Foundation. This research was supported by the Wyeth-Ayerst Canada Inc. and Medical Research Council of Canada Clinical Research Chair in Women’s Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Walsh; Harriet MacMillan; Ellen Jamieson

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The study’s goal was to examine the relationship between a history of parental psychiatric disorder and a history of child abuse in a general population sample of Ontario residents.Method: A representative community sample of 8548 respondents who participated in the Ontario Mental Health Supplement (OHSUP) were interviewed about parental psychiatric history and completed a self-report measure of childhood physical

  15. From Mental Disorder to Iatrogenic Hypogonadism - Dilemmas in Conceptualizing Gender Identity Variants as Psychiatric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.

    2009-01-01

    The categorization of gender identity variants (GIVs) as “mental disorders” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) is highly controversial among professionals as well as among persons with GIV. After providing a brief history of GIV categorizations in the DSM, this paper presents some of the major issues of the ongoing debate: GIV as psychopathology versus natural variation; definition of “impairment” and “distress” for GID; associated psychopathology and its relation to stigma; the stigma impact of the mental-disorder label itself; the unusual character of “sex reassignment surgery” as a psychiatric treatment; and the consequences for health and mental-health services if the disorder label is removed. Finally, several categorization options are examined: Retaining the GID category, but possibly modifying its grouping with other syndromes; narrowing the definition to dysphoria and taking “disorder” out of the label; categorizing GID as a neurological or medical rather than a psychiatric disorder; removing GID from both the DSM and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD); and creating a special category for GIV in the DSM. I conclude that--as also evident in other DSM categories--the decision on the categorization of GIVs cannot be achieved on a purely scientific basis, and that a consensus for a pragmatic compromise needs to be arrived at that accommodates both scientific considerations and the service needs of persons with GIVs. PMID:19851856

  16. Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation in Florida Final Summary of Survey, with the Program Office of Substance Abuse and Mental Health in Florida's Department of Children and Families (DCF). Background Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ECMHC) is an effective prevention and early

  17. Improving Mental Health in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossen, Eric; Cowan, Katherine C.

    2015-01-01

    Students do not leave their mental health at the front door when they come to school. From wellness to serious illness, a student's mental health status is integral to how they think, feel, interact, behave, and learn. Decades of research and experience have laid a solid foundation and framework for effectively providing mental health

  18. MENTAL HEALTH and INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

    E-print Network

    MENTAL HEALTH and INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS: What Educators Need to Know Ingle International cares about you and your students www.studyinsured.com #12;www.studyinsured.comMental Health and International Students: What Educators Need to Know Mental Health and International Students: What Educators Need to Know

  19. Predicting type of psychiatric disorder from Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) scores in child mental health clinics in London and Dhaka

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Goodman; D. Renfrew; M. Mullick

    2000-01-01

    A computerised algorithm was developed to predict child psychiatric diagnoses on the basis of the symptom and impact scores derived from Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires (SDQs) completed by parents, teachers and young people. The predictive algorithm generates \\

  20. Mental health in-reach teams in English prisons: Aims, processes and impacts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom Ricketts; Charlie Brooker; Kim Dent-Brown

    2007-01-01

    Prisoners are at greater risk of developing mental health problems compared with people of a similar age and gender in the community. They are less likely to have their mental health needs recognised, are less likely to receive psychiatric help or treatment, and are at an increased risk of suicide. Prison mental health in-reach services have been developed in the

  1. Disparities in the Geography of Mental Health: Implications for Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews recent theory and research on geographic disparities in mental health and their implications for social work. It focuses on work emerging from the fields of mental health geography, psychiatric epidemiology, and social work, arguing that a wide range of spatial disparities in mental health are important to understand but that…

  2. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  3. [Cytogenetic study of 257 mentally deficient patients in psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, M; Bénézech, M; Tournier-Zerbid, N; Constant-Boy, M; Benazet-Rissou, J

    1975-11-01

    Cytogenetic survey of 257 mentally retarded individuals. A cytogenetic inquiry was undertaken among 257 patients with mental retardation of two psychiatric hospitals. 25 patients show chromosomes anomalies (10%). We found: --18 trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome); --3 sexual chromosome anomalies: 47, XYY syndrome; 47, XYY/46, XY mosaďcism; 47, XXY, or Klinefelter syndrom; --1 partial delection of long arm of chromosome number 18 (46, XX, 18 q--); --3 translocations; 45, XX, t (1, 13) (p 36, q 11); 46, XX, t (5 p--, 18 p+) (p 12, p 11); 46, XY, t (9, 19) (q 21, p 18). We also found 9 large Y chromosomes (46, XY q+), 8 cases of variant chromosomes, 1 case with chromosomes associations..., we report a case of masculine Turner phenotype or Noonan syndrom. PMID:135524

  4. Mental Health and Stress

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Falconer

    2007-03-18

    This project collects resources for studying mental health and stress issues with middle schoolers. Teens and stress Science NetLinks: The Laughing Brain 2: A Good Laugh Dealing with anger Stress-o-meter Look at each of the above sites. Choose one and read the content. Write a one-paragraph summary. Play interactive games and take quizzes. Keep a log of what you do. Tell which site you liked best and why. ...

  5. What Is Infant Mental Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Thomas, Kandace

    2012-01-01

    Unfortunately, the term "infant mental health" can be confusing for some people because it may be understood as translating into "mental illness." Others may not appreciate that babies and toddlers have the capacity to experience complex emotions. The Guest Editors of this issue of the Journal explore the meaning of infant mental health.

  6. Mental health access to care in Missouri.

    PubMed

    Shoyinka, Sosunmolu; Lauriello, John

    2012-01-01

    Mental illnesses are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, affecting, in some estimates, up to one in four adults or 57.7 million people. Severe psychiatric disorders, like schizophrenia, bipolar and major depression occur in one in seventeen Americans. Moreover, serious mental illnesses affect children at rates approaching 10%. Addictive disorders co-occurring with other mental illnesses affect over five million adults. The direct cost of these illnesses is high, totaling 16 billion dollars per year; dwarfed by the indirect costs of loss productivity which is four times as much. Individuals diagnosed with mental disorders have significantly higher rates of school dropout, homelessness, incarceration, and suicide. Embedded in these statistics is a concerning fact; access to care for those with psychiatric disorders is poor, with only one-third of adults and half the children diagnosed receiving care in any given year. These numbers are worse if the person is a racial or ethnic minority. This paper hopes to highlight the state of mental health treatment first in the United States and then in our state of Missouri. The news is sobering but there are pockets of good news as well. PMID:23362651

  7. Global Mental Health: concepts, conflicts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Rob

    2015-08-01

    This paper introduces, describes and analyses the emerging concept of Global Mental Health (GMH). The birth of GMH can be traced to London, 2007, with the publication of a series of high-profile papers in The Lancet. Since then, GMH has developed into a movement with proponents, adherents, opponents, an ideology and core activities. The stated aims of the Movement for GMH are 'to improve services for people living with mental health problems and psychosocial disabilities worldwide, especially in low- and middle-income countries where effective services are often scarce'. GMH could be considered an attempt to right a historic wrong. During the colonial and post-colonial eras, the mental health of subject populations was accorded a very low priority. This was fuelled by scientific racism, which alleged that mental illness was uncommon in places such as Africa. As developing nations have made the epidemiological transition, the burden of mental illness has proportionately increased, with research suggesting a massive 'treatment gap' between those in need and those actually receiving formal mental health care. As such, much GMH research and action has been devoted to: (i) the identification and scale-up of cost-effective evidence-supported interventions that could be made more widely available; (ii) task-shifting of such intervention delivery to mental-health trained non-specialist Lay Health Workers. GMH has come under sustained critique. Critics suggest that GMH is colonial medicine come full circle, involving the top-down imposition of Western psychiatric models and solutions by Western-educated elites. These critiques suggest that GMH ignores the various indigenous modalities of healing present in non-Western cultures, which may be psychologically adaptive and curative. Relatedly, critics argue that GMH could be an unwitting Trojan horse for the mass medicalisation of people in developing countries, paving the way for exploitation by Big Pharma, while ignoring social determinants of health. PMID:26027857

  8. Prevalence of Psychiatric Symptoms in Adults with Mental Retardation and Challenging Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Borge; Gitlesen, Jens Petter

    2003-01-01

    A sample of 165 adults with mental retardation was surveyed for the presence of psychiatric symptoms, mental retardation level, and challenging behavior. Challenging behavior was associated with increased prevalence of psychiatric symptoms, especially anxiety and psychosis, and not with depression. No association was found between anxiety and…

  9. The ecology of mental health care in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chou, Li-Fang

    2006-07-01

    This paper applied the ecology model of general medical care by White et al. to analysis of mental health services utilization within the National Health Insurance in Taiwan. The ambulatory and inpatient claims of a 200,000-person cohort in 2001 were analyzed. The yearly and monthly prevalence estimates included psychotropic drug prescription, diagnosis of mental disorders, psychiatric ambulatory visit and admission, community psychiatric rehabilitation, and certificate of chronic psychosis. The results revealed one-fourth of people had received psychotropic drugs during the year, mostly from non-psychiatrists. Besides, the elderly might be excessively exposed to psychotropic drugs, and community rehabilitation programs were underutilized. PMID:16625305

  10. Mental Health & the Career Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Marty

    This supplement to ninth grade mental health units relates mental health to the following occupational clusters: agribusiness and natural resources, environment, health, marine science, communications and media, business and office, marketing and distribution, public service, transportation, personnel services, consumer and homemaking education,…

  11. Perspectives: A Mental Health Magazine

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Perspectives, provided by Mental Health Net, is a quarterly online magazine devoted to mental health. It features short (usually less than 2,000 word) articles about all aspects of its topic. The Vol. 1, No. 4 issue contains articles on Prozac, loneliness, and managed care, among others. It also includes a regular column on "Being Human." Archives are available at the site, as are submission guidelines. Mental Health Net is a well known "comprehensive guide to mental health online," with pointers to resources in the field, arranged by topic and resource type.

  12. Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster.

    PubMed

    Bromet, Evelyn J

    2012-03-01

    The psychosocial consequences of disasters have been studied for more than 100 years. The most common mental health consequences are depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, medically unexplained somatic symptoms, and stigma. The excess morbidity rate of psychiatric disorders in the first year after a disaster is in the order of 20%. Disasters involving radiation are particularly pernicious because the exposure is invisible and universally dreaded, and can pose a long-term threat to health. After the Chernobyl disaster, studies of clean-up workers (liquidators) and adults from contaminated areas found a two-fold increase in post-traumatic stress and other mood and anxiety disorders and significantly poorer subjective ratings of health. Among liquidators, the most important risk factor was severity of exposure. In general population samples, the major risk factor was perceived exposure to harmful levels of radiation. These findings are consistent with results from A-bomb survivors and populations studied after the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. With regard to children, apart from findings from ecological studies that lack direct data on radiation or other teratologic exposures and local studies in Kiev, the epidemiologic evidence suggests that neither radiation exposure nor the stress of growing up in the shadow of the accident was associated with emotional disorders, cognitive dysfunction, or impaired academic performance. Thus, based on the studies of adults, the Chernobyl Forum concluded that mental health was the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident. Since mental health is a leading cause of disability, physical morbidity, and mortality, health monitoring after radiation accidents like Fukushima should include standard measures of well-being. Moreover, given the comorbidity of mental and physical health, the findings support the value of training non-psychiatrist physicians in recognizing and treating common mental health problems like depression in Fukushima patients. PMID:22394694

  13. Mental health in schools and public health

    E-print Network

    Adelman, Howard S; Taylor, Linda

    2006-01-01

    and some on physical health, education, and social services.public health professionals share goals related to educationEducation Act, the recommendations of the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, and

  14. Mental Disorders among Children and Adolescents Admitted to a French Psychiatric Emergency Service

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Laurent; Henry, Jean-Marc; Samuelian, Jean-Claude; Belzeaux, Raoul; Auquier, Pascal; Lancon, Christophe; Da Fonseca, David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of children and adolescents admitted to the psychiatric emergency department (ED) of a French public teaching hospital over a six-year study period (2001–2006). Data for all episodes of care in the psychiatric ED from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2006, delivered to adolescents aged less than 18 years were retrospectively analyzed. During the six-year study period, 335 episodes of care in the psychiatric ED were experienced by 264 different adolescents. They accounted for 2.0% of the 16,754 care episodes of the ED; 164 patients (62.1) were female and the average age was 16.5 (SD = 1.6). The neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders were the most frequent (25.4%) and concerned mainly anxiety disorders (15.2%). The frequency of the absence of psychiatric diagnosis (22.7%) was high. A total of 48 children and adolescents (18.2%) benefited from more than one episode of care. Several factors were associated to a higher number of visits to the ED: substance use, schizophrenia, disorders of adult personality and behaviour, disorders occurring in childhood and adolescence, and dual diagnosis. In conclusion, mental health disorders in children and adolescents are a serious problem associated with several potentially modifiable factors. PMID:23431454

  15. Single mothers in Ontario: sociodemographic, physical and mental health characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Lipman, E L; Offord, D R; Boyle, M H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the sociodemographic, physical and mental health characteristics of single mothers in Ontario. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Ontario residents aged 15 years or older who participated in the Ontario Health Supplement survey conducted between December 1990 and April 1991; of 9953 eligible participants, 1540 were mothers with at least 1 dependent child (less than 16 years of age). OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence rates of sociodemographic, physical and mental health characteristics. RESULTS: Single mothers were significantly more likely than the mothers in 2-parent families to be poor, to be 25 years of age or less, to have mental health problems (dissatisfaction with multiple aspects of life, affective disorder ever and 1 or more psychiatric disorders in the past year or ever) and to use mental health services. When compared by income level, poor single mothers had a higher prevalence of all mental health outcomes measured; the difference was significant for anxiety disorder in the past year or ever and for 1 or more psychiatric disorders in the past year or ever. In a logistic regression analysis, single-mother status was found to have the strongest independent effect on predicting mental health morbidity and utilization of mental health services; the next strongest was low income. CONCLUSIONS: Single mothers are more likely to be poor, to have an affective disorder and to use mental health services than mothers in 2-parent families. The risk of mental health problems is especially pronounced among poor single mothers. Further studies are needed to determine which aspects of single motherhood, apart from economic status, affect mental health outcomes. PMID:9068569

  16. The challenge of gun control for mental health advocates.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Anand

    2013-09-01

    Mass shootings, such as the 2012 Newtown massacre, have repeatedly led to political discourse about limiting access to guns for individuals with serious mental illness. Although the political climate after such tragic events poses a considerable challenge to mental health advocates who wish to minimize unsympathetic portrayals of those with mental illness, such media attention may be a rare opportunity to focus attention on risks of victimization of those with serious mental illness and barriers to obtaining psychiatric care. Current federal gun control laws may discourage individuals from seeking psychiatric treatment and describe individuals with mental illness using anachronistic, imprecise, and gratuitously stigmatizing language. This article lays out potential talking points that may be useful after future gun violence. PMID:24042247

  17. COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTER PROGRAMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ARTHUR H. BRAYFIELD

    1967-01-01

    A STATEMENT SUPPORTING THE GOALS OF THE COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTERS LEGISLATION GIVEN AT HEARINGS BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE, 90TH CONGRESS, 1ST SESSION, 1967.

  18. Why Is It Important? What Is Infant Mental Health?2 What Is Infant Mental Health?

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    What Is Why Is It Important? ? #12;What Is Infant Mental Health?2 What Is Infant Mental Health? What is infant mental health? Does the term "infant mental health" make you think of a baby on a couch telling his problems to a psychiatrist? So what is infant mental health? Infant mental health reflects

  19. Mental Health, United States, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderscheid, Ronald W., Ed.; Henderson, Marilyn J., Ed.

    In recent years, the mental health community has made great strides in understanding more about the delivery of mental health services, improving efficiency and quality in services, and also about how to build strengths and resilience in the face of lifes stresses. This volume adds to the knowledge base so that the important task of system change…

  20. Sensory Integration in Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara W. Posthuma

    1983-01-01

    Lorna Jean King is interviewed concerning the present status of sensory integration as a treatment modality in the area of mental health. Topics covered are: use of sensory integration techniques with adults and adolescents in both chronic and acute mental health settings; goals and expected outcomes of using sensory integration techniques; cost-effectiveness of these techniques; differences between occupational therapy and

  1. Clinical Placement in Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jillian Gilbert; Jenny Strong

    2000-01-01

    The recruitment of students in health professions into the area of mental health has been shown to be influenced by their attitudes towards the area, with such attitudes possibly shaped in the same way as many of the attitudes towards mental illness are by the general community. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of occupational therapy

  2. Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Cusick; Tracey Demattia; Sharon Doyle

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies have identified a low preference for mental health careers among students and practitioners in occupational therapy. Factors implicated include the social stigma of mental health in the community, fieldwork experience, academic preparation, and work setting factors such as role ambiguity and chronicity of clients. Of these factors, fieldwork may be the most important influence. A survey was administered

  3. Seminar in Health and Mental Health Economics Spring 2012

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Seminar in Health and Mental Health Economics Spring 2012 Profs. John topics in health and mental health economics. The main objectives and mental health measurement; (3) prescription drugs and medical devices; (4

  4. Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Teens > Mind > Mental Health > Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care Print A A A Text Size What's in ... if you're concerned about paying for mental health care. Lots of people need help and worry that ...

  5. Local suffering and the global discourse of mental health and human rights: An ethnographic study of responses to mental illness in rural Ghana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ursula M Read; Edward Adiibokah; Solomon Nyame

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Global Movement for Mental Health has brought renewed attention to the neglect of people with mental illness within health policy worldwide. The maltreatment of the mentally ill in many low-income countries is widely reported within psychiatric hospitals, informal healing centres, and family homes. International agencies have called for the development of legislation and policy to address these abuses.

  6. Suicide Ideation in Older Adults: Relationship to Mental Health Problems and Service Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corna, Laurie M.; Cairney, John; Streiner, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence of suicide ideation among community-dwelling older adults and the relationship between suicide ideation, major psychiatric disorder, and mental health service use. Design and Methods: We use data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 1.2: Mental Health and Well-being (CCHS 1.2). We estimate the prevalence of…

  7. Mental Health Problems in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinton, Chris; Elison, Sarah; Howlin, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Although many researchers have investigated emotional and behavioral difficulties in individuals with Williams syndrome, few have used standardized diagnostic assessments. We examined mental health problems in 92 adults with Williams syndrome using the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disabilities--PAS-ADD (Moss,…

  8. A Predictive Model of Older Widow's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Ruth A.

    The loss of one's spouse is a disorganizing life event. This study explores the mental health of older women who have lost a spouse. The specific aims of this study were: (1) to identify the incidence of depression or other psychiatric morbidity among widows during the first two years of bereavement; and (2) to evaluate a model which incorporates:…

  9. Southeast Asian Mental Health: Treatment, Prevention, Services, Training and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owan, Tom Choken, Ed.

    This sourcebook contains 19 papers which discuss the mental health service needs of Southeast Asian refugees in the United States. The volume is divided into five sections: Treatment; Prevention; Services; Training; and Research. The papers (and their authors) are: (1) "Psychiatric Care for Southeast Asians: How Different Is Different?" (Tran Minh…

  10. Mental Health Issues on Campus: A Resource Kit for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Jana; McLean, Patricia

    This resource kit provides information intended to assist Australian college students with psychiatric disabilities in understanding the effects of mental health issues on learning in the context of post-secondary education. The guide suggests a range of compensatory strategies that aim to optimize learning outcomes for students and considers how…

  11. Responsive Changes in Mental Health Practice in Wisconsin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda Samuel

    1998-01-01

    Delivery of mental health care is changing dramatically at the state and county levels in Wisconsin. These new trends are affecting psychiatric institutions and rehabilitation personnel in reference to staffing patterns, the roles of occupational therapists, certified occupational therapy assistants, patient population and level of acute care and the type and site of intervention. Therapists are moving to more community-based

  12. The Performance of Paraprofessionals in the Mental Health Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Alan; Riessman, Frank

    A major concern of this article is to document the role of paraprofessionals in providing services for clients in the mental health and psychiatric fields. There are basically three types of paraprofessionals. The first type is the "old" hospital worker; he does not have a college degree, is not indigenous to the community in which he is working,…

  13. Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health: United States-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlot, Lauren; Beasley, Joan B.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, research directed specifically at improving our understanding of the psychiatric assessment and treatment of individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) has grown, yet lags far behind efforts for typically developing children and adults. In the United States, a lack of a national approach to the mental health problems of…

  14. Support System for Mental Health Professionals*

    PubMed Central

    Dandekar, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    This paper talks of support systems for mental health professionals wherein the Bombay Psychiatric Society (BPS) should devote some meetings exclusively to problems pertaining to the profession, e.g., long and odd working hours leading to potentially hazardous practice schedules, unhealthy competitive attitudes and culture. A crash course in self-defence against potentially psychotic patients and drug addicts is advocated as also awareness of the potential hazards in dealing with the litigious paranoid patients, erotomaniacs and some of the difficult hysterical patients. Potential medicolegal problems arise in treating an uncooperative patient without his knowledge and consent on an outpatient department basis, admitting such an uncooperative patient to a nursing home or a hospital, administering electroconvulsive therapies, maintaining detailed clinical records of patients, and legal issues involving smaller psychiatric private nursing homes. This paper stresses on the use of Yoga as a recognised psycho-physiological therapy. Furthermore, it suggests on the need for BPS, as a professional body, to have a cell to guide and help aspiring young professionals in setting up private practice. It points out the need to evolve some concrete programmes that in the long run should help alleviate stresses and strains and promote positive comprehensive health amongst mental health professionals. PMID:25838730

  15. Child rights and mental health.

    PubMed

    Carlson, M

    2001-10-01

    This article introduces the principles and articles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and discusses the implications of this new conceptualization of childhood for child mental health. Consistent with the articles of the CRC, Canadian and US health administrations call for including the perspectives and participation of children in promotion of their own mental health and in the planning of mental health services. Examples of the incorporation of the CRC into programs and services for children and youth are described. PMID:11588806

  16. Interface between intellectual disability and mental health: hermeneutic review.

    PubMed

    Surjus, Luciana Togni de Lima e Silva; Campos, Rosana Teresa Onocko

    2014-06-01

    A literature review was conducted aiming to understand the interface between the Intellectual Disability and Mental Health fields and to contribute to mitigating the path of institutionalizing individuals with intellectual deficiencies. The so-called dual diagnosis phenomenon remains underestimated in Brazil but is the object of research and specific public policy internationally. This phenomenon alerts us to the prevalence of mental health problems in those with intellectual disabilities, limiting their social inclusion. The findings reinforce the importance of this theme and indicate possible diagnostic invisibility of the development of mental illness in those with intellectual disabilities in Brazil, which may contribute to sustaining psychiatric institutionalization of this population.  PMID:25119948

  17. A STATE OF MIND: DOMINATION, COERCION AND ABUSE IN THE SOUTH AFRICAN MENTAL HEALTH CARE ACT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sam Davis; Cape Town

    This paper examines the South African Mental Health Care Act, focussing on its ideological and theoretical underpinnings. It argues that the Act is flawed not only through clear textual inconsistencies, but further, as a consequence of its view of mental illness resting on contestable psychiatric dogma. Specifically, the disease model of mental illness reproduced in the policy allows the desires,

  18. The mental health care bill 2013: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Choudhary Laxmi; Shekhar, Shivendra

    2015-01-01

    The Mental Health Care Bill - 2013 has been introduced in Rajya Sabha and is now waiting for enactment. The Bill entails unprecedented measures to be undertaken by the Government ensuring everyone right to access mental health care and treatment from services run or funded by the Government. The Government is to meet the man-power requirement of mental health professionals according to international standard within a period of ten years. Various rights of persons with mental illness have been ensured. All the places where psychiatric patients are admitted and treated including the general hospital psychiatry units (GHPU) are to be registered as mental health establishments. Unmodified ECT has been banned and ECT to minors can be given only after approval from the Mental Health Review Board. This article advocates for exemption of GHPU from the purview of the Bill, taking into consideration impediment created in the treatment of vast majority of psychiatric patients who retain their insight into the illness and seldom require involuntary admissions. It is also advocated to reconsider ban on unmodified ECT and restriction placed on ECT to minor which are very effective treatment methods based on scientific evidence. In our country, family is an important asset in management of mental illness. But requirement of seeking approval from the Board in many of the mental health care decision may discourage the families to be proactive in taking care of their wards. The Board and Mental Health Authorities at the central and the state levels are authorized to take many crucial decisions, but these panels have very few experts in the field of mental health. PMID:25969610

  19. The Mental Health Care Bill 2013: A Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Choudhary Laxmi; Shekhar, Shivendra

    2015-01-01

    The Mental Health Care Bill – 2013 has been introduced in Rajya Sabha and is now waiting for enactment. The Bill entails unprecedented measures to be undertaken by the Government ensuring everyone right to access mental health care and treatment from services run or funded by the Government. The Government is to meet the man-power requirement of mental health professionals according to international standard within a period of ten years. Various rights of persons with mental illness have been ensured. All the places where psychiatric patients are admitted and treated including the general hospital psychiatry units (GHPU) are to be registered as mental health establishments. Unmodified ECT has been banned and ECT to minors can be given only after approval from the Mental Health Review Board. This article advocates for exemption of GHPU from the purview of the Bill, taking into consideration impediment created in the treatment of vast majority of psychiatric patients who retain their insight into the illness and seldom require involuntary admissions. It is also advocated to reconsider ban on unmodified ECT and restriction placed on ECT to minor which are very effective treatment methods based on scientific evidence. In our country, family is an important asset in management of mental illness. But requirement of seeking approval from the Board in many of the mental health care decision may discourage the families to be proactive in taking care of their wards. The Board and Mental Health Authorities at the central and the state levels are authorized to take many crucial decisions, but these panels have very few experts in the field of mental health. PMID:25969610

  20. Students or Patients? Provision of Education in the Mental Health Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Peter; Godding, Bernard

    1992-01-01

    British government proposals for community care of psychiatric patients require a response from adult educators about the need for learning opportunities both inside and outside institutions for people with mental health problems. (SK)

  1. Exploring Perceptions of the Ability of Student Nurses to Achieve Learning Outcomes in Community-Based Psychiatric Mental Health Clinical Settings

    E-print Network

    Stricklin, Suzanne Martin

    2012-08-31

    health (PMH) clinical settings. Studies have shown that 25% of American adults experience a diagnosable PMH problem each year, and that acute care medical-surgical nurses carry an average patient load of five to six persons. Traditionally, PMH clinical...

  2. Addressing Risks to Advance Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Iltis, Ana S.; Misra, Sahana; Dunn, Laura B.; Brown, Gregory K.; Campbell, Amy; Earll, Sarah A.; Glowinski, Anne; Hadley, Whitney B.; Pies, Ronald; DuBois, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Risk communication and management are essential to the ethical conduct of research, yet addressing risks may be time consuming for investigators and institutional review boards (IRBs) may reject study designs that appear too risky. This can discourage needed research, particularly in higher risk protocols or those enrolling potentially vulnerable individuals, such as those with some level of suicidality. Improved mechanisms for addressing research risks may facilitate much needed psychiatric research. This article provides mental health researchers with practical approaches to: 1) identify and define various intrinsic research risks; 2) communicate these risks to others (e.g., potential participants, regulatory bodies, society); 3) manage these risks during the course of a study; and 4) justify the risks. Methods As part of a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded scientific meeting series, a public conference and a closed-session expert panel meeting were held on managing and disclosing risks in mental health clinical trials. The expert panel reviewed the literature with a focus on empirical studies and developed recommendations for best practices and further research on managing and disclosing risks in mental health clinical trials. IRB review was not required because there were no human subjects. The NIMH played no role in developing or reviewing the manuscript. Results Challenges, current data, practical strategies, and topics for future research are addressed for each of four key areas pertaining to management and disclosure of risks in clinical trials: identifying and defining risks, communicating risks, managing risks during studies, and justifying research risks. Conclusions Empirical data on risk communication, managing risks, and the benefits of research can support the ethical conduct of mental health research and may help investigators better conceptualize and confront risks and to gain IRB approval. PMID:24173618

  3. School Mental Health: A Federal Perspective

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    School Mental Health: A Federal Perspective David Esquith Director for the Office of Safe Ingrid Donato Branch Chief, Mental Health Promotion, Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) #12;Health Resources and Services Administration Maternal

  4. Migration and mental health in Europe (the state of the mental health in Europe working group: appendix 1)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background This paper is a part of the work of the group that carried out the report "The state of the mental health in Europe" (European Commission, DG Health and Consumer Protection, 2004) and deals with the mental health issues related to the migration in Europe. Methods The paper tries to describe the social, demographical and political context of the emigration in Europe and tries to indicate the needs and (mental) health problems of immigrants. A review of the literature concerning mental health risk in immigrant is also carried out. The work also faces the problem of the health policy toward immigrants and the access to health care services in Europe. Results Migration during the 1990s has been high and characterised by new migrations. Some countries in Europe, that have been traditionally exporters of migrants have shifted to become importers. Migration has been a key force in the demographic changes of the European population. The policy of closed borders do not stop migration, but rather seems to set up a new underclass of so-called "illegals" who are suppressed and highly exploited. In 2000 there were also 392.200 asylum applications. The reviewed literature among mental health risk in some immigrant groups in Europe concerns: 1) highest rate of schizophrenia; suicide; alcohol and drug abuse; access of psychiatric facilities; risk of anxiety and depression; mental health of EU immigrants once they returned to their country; early EU immigrants in today disadvantaged countries; refugees and mental health Due to the different condition of migration concerning variables as: motivation to migrations (e.g. settler, refugees, gastarbeiters); distance for the host culture; ability to develop mediating structures; legal residential status it is impossible to consider "migrants" as a homogeneous group concerning the risk for mental illness. In this sense, psychosocial studies should be undertaken to identify those factors which may under given conditions, imply an increased risk of psychiatric disorders and influence seeking for psychiatric care. Comments and Remarks Despite in the migrants some vulnerable groups were identified with respect to health problems, in many European countries there are migrants who fall outside the existing health and social services, something which is particularly true for asylum seekers and undocumented immigrants. In order to address these deficiencies, it is necessary to provide with an adequate financing and a continuity of the grants for research into the multicultural health demand. Finally, there is to highlight the importance of adopting an integrated approach to mental health care that moves away from psychiatric care only. PMID:16135246

  5. WHO: Global Health Observatory: Mental Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    While more than 800,000 people die from suicide globally each year, the median amount of the health budget allocated to mental health in 2011 was 2.8%. In Afghanistan, six out of every 100,000 men committed suicide. In the United States, that number was 19. These and other data can be gleaned from the age-standardized suicide rates interactive graph on the World Health Organizationâ??s Global Health Observatory website dedicated to issues of Mental Health. Additionally, the page provides links to reports on Policy and financing of mental health, Human resources (in terms of the number of psychiatrists available per 100,000 people in a given country), and Mental health care delivery.

  6. The National Mental Health Association

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2006-01-01

    As it approaches its 100th anniversary in 2009, the National Mental Health Association (NMHA) remains the countryâ??s oldest and largest nonprofit organization that deals with all aspects of mental health and mental illness. First-time users of their site will find that their homepage contains copious amounts of material related to their advocacy efforts, along with materials that deal with helping a loved one who may be suffering the effects of mental illness. The â??Need Info?â?ť area is a good place to start for these types of materials, as it provides access to information on treatment resources, support groups, and fact sheets. Visitors can also elect to sign up for one (or several) of their helpful email updates, which include work on related legislation, and mental health news coverage.

  7. The treatment gap in mental health care.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Robert; Saxena, Shekhar; Levav, Itzhak; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2004-01-01

    Mental disorders are highly prevalent and cause considerable suffering and disease burden. To compound this public health problem, many individuals with psychiatric disorders remain untreated although effective treatments exist. We examine the extent of this treatment gap. We reviewed community-based psychiatric epidemiology studies that used standardized diagnostic instruments and included data on the percentage of individuals receiving care for schizophrenia and other non-affective psychotic disorders, major depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and alcohol abuse or dependence. The median rates of untreated cases of these disorders were calculated across the studies. Examples of the estimation of the treatment gap for WHO regions are also presented. Thirty-seven studies had information on service utilization. The median treatment gap for schizophrenia, including other non-affective psychosis, was 32.2%. For other disorders the gap was: depression, 56.3%; dysthymia, 56.0%; bipolar disorder, 50.2%; panic disorder, 55.9%; GAD, 57.5%; and OCD, 57.3%. Alcohol abuse and dependence had the widest treatment gap at 78.1%. The treatment gap for mental disorders is universally large, though it varies across regions. It is likely that the gap reported here is an underestimate due to the unavailability of community-based data from developing countries where services are scarcer. To address this major public health challenge, WHO has adopted in 2002 a global action programme that has been endorsed by the Member States. PMID:15640922

  8. Competency of Psychiatric Residents in the Treatment of People with Severe Mental Illness before and after a Community Psychiatry Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Melinda; Romero-Gonzalez, Mauricio; Gonzalez, Gerardo; Klee, Anne; Kirwin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric rehabilitation is an evidence-based service with the goal of recovery for people with severe mental illness. Psychiatric residents should understand the services and learn the principles of psychiatric rehabilitation. This study assessed whether a 3-month rotation in a psychiatric rehabilitation center changes the competency…

  9. Mental Health in the Hispanic / Latino Community

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A Guide for Latinos and their families. Latino Mental Health Video - English View the Video in Spanish Cultural ... Latinos with mental illness often go without professional mental health treatment. At-Risk Groups Studies have shown that ...

  10. Religion, Guilt, and Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faiver, Christopher M.; O'Brien, Eugene M.; Ingersoll, R. Elliott

    2000-01-01

    Article reviews the constructs of religion, guilt, and mental health, and explores relationships between these constructs as they pertain to the counseling profession. General therapeutic approaches are identified and summarized for counseling practice. (Author/JDM)

  11. Rural Schools' Mental Health Needs

    E-print Network

    Lee, Steven W.; Lohmeier, Jill H.; Niileksela, Christopher Robert; Oeth, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    Rural schools often can not provide the same access to mental health service as schools in larger population areas can.. Understanding the implications of these sometimes limited services is important in overcoming barriers to adequate services...

  12. Rurality and Mental Health Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily J. Hauenstein; Stephen Petterson; Virginia Rovnyak; Elizabeth Merwin; Barbara Heise; Douglas Wagner

    2007-01-01

    Diversity within rural areas renders rural–urban comparisons difficult. The association of mental health treatment rates with\\u000a levels of rurality is investigated here using Rural–Urban Continuum Codes. Data from the 1996–1999 panels of the Medical Expenditure\\u000a Panel Survey are aggregated to provide annual treatment rates for respondents reporting mental health problems. Data show\\u000a that residents of the most rural areas receive

  13. Stress in mental health nursing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J Kipping

    2000-01-01

    Although there have been growing concerns about stress in nursing over recent years, research has primarily focused on general nurses. This paper reports on stress in mental health nursing. The data were obtained, via questionnaires, from mental health nurses at the end of their training. Four-hundred and forty-seven questionnaires were returned, an 80% response rate. Open-ended questions were asked about

  14. Mental health in Tamil cinema.

    PubMed

    Mangala, R; Thara, R

    2009-06-01

    Tamil cinema is a vibrant part of the lives of many in south India. A chequered history and a phenomenal growth have made this medium highly influential not only in Tamil Nadu politics, but also in the social lives of the viewers. This paper provides an overview of the growth of Tamil cinema, and discusses in detail the way mental health has been handled by Tamil films. Cinema can be used very effectively to improve awareness about mental health issues. PMID:19459098

  15. The Relationship between Academic Achievement and School-Based Mental Health Services for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lisa O.

    2012-01-01

    Mental health issues among American adolescents and children can negatively impact their potential for school success. As many as 10% of students among the general education population suffer from psychiatric disorders, yet only between 1% and 5% of those students are being served. The effects of mental health difficulties are problematic for…

  16. Mental Health Practitioners' Reflections on Psychological Work in Uganda: Exploring Perspectives from Different Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jennifer; d'Ardenne, Patricia; Nsereko, James; Kasujja, Rosco; Baillie, Dave; Mpango, Richard; Birabwa, Harriet; Hunter, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    The Butabika-East London Link collaborated with Ugandan mental health services to train mental health professionals (psychiatric clinical officers, "PCOs", and clinical psychologists and psychiatrists, "Core Group") in psychological therapies. The aims of this research were to investigate how professionals were applying and…

  17. Web Sites Related to Mental Health Web Sites Related to Mental Health

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Web Sites Related to Mental Health Web Sites Related to Mental Health American Academy of Child://www.psychologicalscience.org/ Canadian Mental Health Association http://www.cmha.ca/ Center for Mental Health Services Research http://gwbweb.wustl.edu/Users/cmhsr/ Depression and Related Affective Disorders Association http://www.drada.org/ Disaster Mental Health http

  18. Social determinants of mental health.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jessica; Balfour, Reuben; Bell, Ruth; Marmot, Michael

    2014-08-01

    A person's mental health and many common mental disorders are shaped by various social, economic, and physical environments operating at different stages of life. Risk factors for many common mental disorders are heavily associated with social inequalities, whereby the greater the inequality the higher the inequality in risk. The poor and disadvantaged suffer disproportionately, but those in the middle of the social gradient are also affected. It is of major importance that action is taken to improve the conditions of everyday life, beginning before birth and progressing into early childhood, older childhood and adolescence, during family building and working ages, and through to older age. Action throughout these life stages would provide opportunities for both improving population mental health, and for reducing risk of those mental disorders that are associated with social inequalities. As mental disorders are fundamentally linked to a number of other physical health conditions, these actions would also reduce inequalities in physical health and improve health overall. Action needs to be universal: across the whole of society and proportionate to need. Policy-making at all levels of governance and across sectors can make a positive difference. PMID:25137105

  19. Mental Health Effects of Don't Ask Don't Tell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary E. Barber

    2012-01-01

    The mental health implications of the military's Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy, and the history of the relationship between psychiatry and the military on the issue of gay servicemembers is reviewed. Before 1973 when homosexuality was removed from psychiatry's diagnostic manual, the psychiatric profession cooperated with screening gays out of military service. In 1990, the American Psychiatric Association officially supported

  20. The mental health of Korean immigrants in Săo Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sam; Razzouk, Denise; Mari, Jair Jesus de; Shirakawa, Itiro

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated the frequency of lifetime mental disorders among Korean immigrants in the city of Săo Paulo, Brazil. Snowball sampling with multiple focuses was used to recruit Korean immigrants older than 18 years and living in Săo Paulo. A total of 324 Korean immigrants were selected and their mental status was evaluated using a structured interview, namely the Portuguese or the Korean version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1. The diagnoses of mental disorders were made according to the ICD-10. The frequency of any lifetime psychiatric disorder was 41.9%. The frequencies of main disorders were: anxiety disorder, 13% (post-traumatic stress disorder, 9.6%); mood disorder, 8.6%; somatoform disorders, 7.4%; dissociative disorder, 4.9%; psychotic disorder, 4.3%; eating disorder, 0.6%; any substance (tobacco, alcohol, drugs) use disorder, 23.1%. The frequency of any psychiatric disorder except alcohol and tobacco use disorders was 26.2%. Korean immigrants have more psychiatric disorders than the Korean population in Korea, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder, and almost the same rate as the Brazilian population. Mental health authorities should promote a healthier integration and the development of culturally sensitive mental health programs for Korean immigrants. PMID:19347208

  1. Mental health in Asia: social improvements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tseng, W S; Ebata, K; Kim, K I; Krahl, W; Kua, E H; Lu, Q; Shen, Y; Tan, E S; Yang, M J

    2001-01-01

    Remarkable improvements in economic conditions and a considerable upgrade in the quality of life have been observed in many parts of Asia during the past several decades. At the same time, many mental health challenges face the people of Asia. Various social mental health indexes are reviewed here, with available data from China, Japan, Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, and other Asian societies. The data are compared with data from the United States, Australia in the Pacific Rim, and some other Western countries to examine patterns of similarity or difference between East and West in the process of modernization. Common trends in mental health issues associated with rapid sociocultural change observed in different Asian societies are discussed, as well as the relative shortage of mental health personnel available in many Asian societies. It is emphasized that, in addition to expanding psychiatric services, there is an even more urgent need to promote mental health knowledge and concern through education in the general population. Mental health needs to be cultivated and maintained by social forces and cultural strengths. It is stressed that there is a challenge for Asian people to advance mental health beyond economic development in the 21st century. PMID:11322408

  2. Counseling and Mental Health Services OUR MISSION

    E-print Network

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Counseling and Mental Health Services Page 1 OUR MISSION The mission of Counseling and Mental Disclosure and Confidentiality The privacy of your mental health information, including all written of all disciplines involved in your treatment. Uses and Disclosures of Your Mental Health Information

  3. Technology and rural mental health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah P. Farrell; Caroline R. McKinnon

    2003-01-01

    In addition to the specific and pervasive rural issues of isolation and suitability of services, the rural mental health system faces many of the same problems as the health system in general: access and increasing costs. The introduction of technology adds the unknown dimensions of acceptability and feasibility. Technology has the potential to decrease the gap in services and improve

  4. Community Mental Health Services in Latin America for People with Severe Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Minoletti, Alberto; Galea, Sandro; Susser, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are highly prevalent in Latin American countries and exact a serious emotional toll, yet investment in public mental health remains insufficient. Most countries of the region have developed national and local initiatives to improve delivery of mental health services over the last 22 years, following the technical leadership of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO). It is especially notable that PAHO/WHO facilitated the development of national policies and plans, as well as local programs, to deliver specialized community care for persons with severe mental disorders. Nevertheless, at present, the majority of Latin American countries maintain a model of services for severe mental disorders based primarily on psychiatric hospitals that consume most of the national mental health budget. To accelerate the pace of change, this article emphasizes the need to develop cross-country regional initiatives that promote mental health service development, focusing on severe mental disorders. As one specific example, the authors describe work with RedeAmericas, which has brought together an interdisciplinary group of international investigators to research regional approaches and train a new generation of leaders in public mental health. More generally, four regional strategies are proposed to complement the work of PAHO/ WHO in Latin America: 1) to develop multi-country studies on community services, 2) to study new strategies and interventions in countries with more advanced mental health services, 3) to strengthen advocacy groups by cross-country interchange, and 4) to develop a network of well-trained leaders to catalyze progress across the region. PMID:25339792

  5. African American Community Mental Health Fact Sheet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the African American population • Culture biases against mental health professionals and health care professionals in general prevent ... disadvantage in terms of accessing both medical and mental health care: in 2006, one-third of working adult ...

  6. Video Surveillance in Mental Health Facilities: Is it Ethical?

    PubMed

    Stolovy, Tali; Melamed, Yuval; Afek, Arnon

    2015-05-01

    Video surveillance is a tool for managing safety and security within public spaces. In mental health facilities, the major benefit of video surveillance is that it enables 24 hour monitoring of patients, which has the potential to reduce violent and aggressive behavior. The major disadvantage is that such observation is by nature intrusive. It diminishes privacy, a factor of huge importance for psychiatric inpatients. Thus, an ongoing debate has developed following the increasing use of cameras in this setting. This article presents the experience of a medium-large academic state hospital that uses video surveillance, and explores the various ethical and administrative aspects of video surveillance in mental health facilities. PMID:26137651

  7. Indian Psychiatric Society multicentric study on assessment of health-care needs of patients with severe mental illnesses as perceived by their family caregivers and health-care providers

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Avasthi, Ajit; Shah, Sandip; Lakdawala, Bhavesh; Chakraborty, Kaustav; Nebhinani, Naresh; Kallivayalil, Roy A; Dalal, Pranob K.; Sinha, Vishal; Khairkar, Praveen; Mukerjee, Divya G.; Thara, R.; Behere, Prakash; Chauhan, Nidhi; Thirunavukarasu, M.; Malhotra, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the health-care needs of the patients with severe mental disorders as perceived by their family caregivers and the treating psychiatrists. Materials and Methods: Caregivers of patients with severe mental disorders and their treating psychiatrists were assessed using Camberwell Assessment of Need-Research Version (CAN-R) scale and indigenously designed Supplementary Assessment of Needs Scale (SNAS). Results: The study included 1494 patients recruited from 15 centers. The mean needs as per the CAN-R, perceived by the caregivers were 7.8 and treating psychiatrists were 8.1. About one-third of needs were unmet. On SNAS, both caregivers and treating psychiatrists reported a mean of 7.9 needs, of which more than half were unmet as per the caregivers. As per the treating psychiatrists, 45.5% of the needs as assessed on SNAS were unmet. There was a high level of correlation between needs perceived by the patients, caregivers and the treating psychiatrists. On CAN-R, main domains of needs as reported by the caregivers were those of money, relief of psychological distress, information about the illness and treatment, welfare benefits, transport, company and food. As per the treating psychiatrists, the most common total needs identified were those of relief of psychological distress, welfare benefits, information about the illness and treatment, money, transport, company self-care and physical health. The most common domains of needs as assessed on SNAS as per the caregivers were those of free treatment, medical reimbursement, psychoeducation, financial help, social support, insurance, more time from the clinicians and travel concession. The treating psychiatrists identified dealing with caregiver's stress as the most common need. Conclusions: According to the family caregivers and treating psychiatrists, about one-third of the needs of the patients as assessed using CAN-R and about half of the needs as assessed using SNAS are unmet.

  8. Predictors of Criminal Justice Outcomes Among Mental Health Courts Participants: The Role of Perceived Coercion and Subjective Mental Health Recovery.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Christina; Yanos, Philip T; Kopelovich, Sarah L; Koerner, Joshua; Alexander, Mary Jane

    2013-04-01

    Internationally, one effort to reduce the number of people with serious mental illness (SMI) in jails and prisons is the development of Mental Health Courts (MHC). Research on MHCs to date has been disproportionately focused on the study of recidivism and re-incarceration over the potential of these problem-solving courts to facilitate mental health recovery and affect the slope or gradient of opportunity for recovery. Despite the strong conceptual links between the MHC approach and the recovery-orientation in mental health, the capacity for MHCs to facilitate recovery has not been explored. This user-informed mental health and criminal justice (MH/CJ) community based participatory (CBPR) study assesses the extent to which MHC practices align with recovery-oriented principles and may subsequently affect criminal justice outcomes. We report on the experiences and perceptions of 51 MHC participants across four metropolitan Mental Health Courts. Specifically, the current study assesses: 1) how defendants' perceptions of court practices, particularly with regard to procedural justice and coercion, relate to perceptions of mental health recovery and psychiatric symptoms, and, 2) how perceptions of procedural justice and mental health recovery relate to subsequent criminal justice outcomes. The authors hypothesized that perceived coercion and mental health recovery would be inversely related, that perceived coercion would be associated with worse criminal justice outcomes, and perceptions of mental health recovery would be associated with better criminal justice outcomes. Results suggest that perceived coercion in the MHC experience was negatively associated with perceptions of recovery among MHC participants. Perceptions of "negative pressures," a component of coercion, were important predictors of criminal justice involvement in the 12 month period following MHC admission, even when controlling for other factors that were related to criminal justice outcomes, and that an increase in procedural justice was associated with a decrease in symptoms but curiously not to an increase in attitudes toward recovery. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:24039547

  9. Psychiatric residency directors' perceptions of firearm access by the mentally ill in the United States.

    PubMed

    Price, James H; Thompson, Amy J; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Wiblishauser, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Firearms injuries place a unique burden on America in terms of lives lost (31,000/year), disability (70,000 nonfatal injuries/year), and economic costs ($174 billion in 2010). The purpose of this study was to examine psychiatric residency directors' perceptions of firearm access issues of the mentally ill. In late Fall 2012 and early Spring of 2013, a three-wave mailing was used to survey the membership of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (N = 129). Due to the homogenous small sample size descriptive statistics were calculated to describe the responses. A total of 72 (56 %) directors responded. Almost 1 in 4 (23.6 %) thought that access to firearms by the seriously mentally ill should not be prohibited. The majority (91.7 %) supported closing the background check loophole. The majority (54.2 %) also believed that singling out the mentally ill as a group of "banned purchasers" adds to the stigma of the mentally ill (54.2 %) but a plurality (44.4 %) did not believe reporting the mentally ill to authorities would result in the mentally ill avoiding treatment. The current method of reducing access by the mentally ill to firearms is perceived by psychiatric residency directors as ineffective and burdensome to the mentally ill. PMID:23996614

  10. Mental Health Issues in Rural Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, Karen S., Comp.

    Five papers cover recent developments in rural mental health nursing. "Rural Mental Health Care: A Survey of the Research" (Karen Babich) chronicles recent interest in understanding the rural population's character and the nature of mental health services needed by and provided to rural America. Lauren Aaronson ("Using Health Beliefs in a Nursing…

  11. Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Decia Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

  12. What do African American youth with a mental illness think about help-seeking and psychiatric medication?: Origins of stigmatizing attitudes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derrick Kranke; Joseph Guada; Bridget Kranke; Jerry Floersch

    2011-01-01

    Stigma greatly impacts African Americans' underutilization of mental health treatment. Stigmatizing attitudes are attributed to racial mistrust, familial, religious and cultural beliefs. However, most research on influences of these attitudes has been conducted with adults. Origins among adolescents may be unique because they have different competing influences relative to development. Identifying these influences is crucial to promoting utilization of psychiatric

  13. Ageism in Mental Health and Health Care: A Critical Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claire Robb; Hongbin Chen; William E. Haley

    2002-01-01

    Discussions of aging and mental health widely assume that ageism among mental health providers is an important factor limiting access to mental health services for older adults. Given the widespread citation of ageism as a problem, we critically review the history of the ageism construct, and evidence for its existence in both mental health and medical professionals. There is surprisingly

  14. Children and the Sphere standard on mental and social aspects of health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jodi Morris; Mark van Ommeren; Myron Belfer; Shekhar Saxena; Benedetto Saraceno

    2007-01-01

    Most of the world's children live in resource­poor countries where people are at a relatively high risk of exposure to catastrophic situations arising from conflict and natural disasters. 2 Given the potential social, psychological and psychiatric consequences of exposure to disaster, mental health and psychosocial support programmes are increasingly part of humanitarian aid. A minimum standard on mental and social

  15. From “Double Trouble” to “Dual Recovery”: Integrating Models of Recovery in Addiction and Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larry Davidson; Raquel Andres-Hyman; Luis Bedregal; Janis Tondora; Jennifer Frey; Thomas A. Kirk Jr

    2008-01-01

    Conceptualizations and approaches to the treatment of co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders are currently in transition. With the dawning of the contemporary “recovery movement,” both the mental health and addictions fields are increasingly moving toward acknowledging that people with mental illnesses and addictions are first and foremost people rather than their diagnoses or disorders, subsequently replacing such phrases as

  16. Determinants of mental illness stigma for adolescents discharged from psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Moses, Tally

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the factors that increase the risk for enacted mental illness stigma (i.e. rejection, devaluation and exclusion) as perceived by the stigmatized person. This is particularly true for the population of adolescents diagnosed with a mental illness. The aim of this study was to address this question and examine select social and clinical factors that predict enacted stigma (self-reported) with research that follows eighty American adolescents for 6 months following a first psychiatric hospitalization. Drawing on social identity theory, and research on stigma-threatening environments, social group identification and social support, this study tested four hypotheses: affiliation or identification with higher status and lower status peers predicts more and less stigma respectively (H1); a greater and more supportive social network, and more perceived family support predict less stigma (H2); greater severity of internalizing and externalizing symptoms predicts more stigma (H3); and poorer school functioning predicts more stigma (H4). Results indicated that about 70% of adolescents reported experiencing enacted stigma (at 6 months); disrespect or devaluation was more common than outright social rejection. Using OLS regression analyses, the results provided partial support for H1, H3 and H4, while H2 was not supported. The baseline factors found to be most predictive of enacted stigma ratings at 6-months were: affiliating with more friends with mental health problems, identifying with the 'populars' peer group, higher internalizing symptom ratings, and self-reported disciplinary problems at school. These four factors remained significant when controlling for initial enacted stigma ratings, pointing to their importance in determining changes in social stigma experiences in the follow-up period. They also remained significant when controlling for perceived public stigma ratings at follow-up, indicating that the findings were not due to generalized perceptions of stigma of youth with mental illness. PMID:24695363

  17. Complete mental health recovery: bridging mental illness with positive mental health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helene L. Provencher; Corey L. M. Keyes

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose that the study, and the promotion, of recovery can be augmented by adopting the model of mental health as a complete state. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A literature review of the last two decades was undertaken and pathways to complete mental health in recovery are proposed. Findings – More work is needed

  18. Volunteers in Community Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet gives detailed accounts of mental health programs in operation around the nation. A total of nine different types of activities is included. "Helping Children" describes a program whereby students from nearby colleges give troubled children, at home, an experience in friendship by serving as big brothers or sisters. "Helping the…

  19. Guilt Feelings and Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Harold A.

    After initially defining both mental health and guilt feelings, the author examined their relationship, primarily from the perspective of the crippling effects of unwarranted feelings of guilt. Admitting the varied pressures of modern society, he nevertheless believes it is the individual's fault when he fails to glean as much from lif e as he…

  20. Toward Explaining Mental Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aneshensel, Carol S.

    2009-01-01

    Mental health disparities refer to the disproportionate amount of psychopathology found among persons of disadvantageous social standing, such as persons of low socioeconomic status (SES). Although social and self selection cannot entirely be ruled out as explanations for these differences, the accumulation of evidence supports a social causation…

  1. Mental Health 1: Human Behavior

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Netlinks

    2002-07-29

    This lesson, from Science NetLinks, provides students with a sound introduction and historical overview of the important figures and discoveries that have greatly advanced the study of human behavior since the early 1900s. This lesson is the first of three lessons on mental health and human behavior.

  2. Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Regulations and Guidance Stakeholder Engagement Training Resources The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act Contents Introduction Summary ... Regulation Introduction The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) ...

  3. Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Families © helpful and would like to make good mental health a reality, consider donating to the Campaign for ... Facts for Families, as well as other vital mental health information, free of charge. Medication-Related Weight Gain, “ ...

  4. Medicare and Your Mental Health Benefits

    MedlinePLUS

    CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Medicare & Your Mental Health Benefits This official government booklet has information about mental health benefits for people with Original Medicare, including: Who’s eligible Outpatient & inpatient benefits Prescription ...

  5. Mental Health Issues of Muslim Americans

    PubMed Central

    Basit, Abdul; Hamid, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The underpinning of all research leading to various schools of thought in the field of psychiatry and psychology is without doubt a product of Western professionals who represent the religio-cultural traditions, historical symbols, and narratives of Western society. Also, the major schools of psychotherapy emerged during an era of individualism and logical positivism reflecting the religious, ethical, and cultural heritage that has shaped the modern Western society. Consequently, the methods and techniques developed in the West may not be always suitable and effective for Muslim Americans. To respond to the growing needs of psychiatric problems encountered by Muslim Americans, many community social service centers have been established in the United States during the past two decades. We now have a growing body of research data suggesting how to tailor our field to the specific needs of this population. We will discuss what kind of emotional and psychiatric problems are most prevalent in Muslim Americans and explain the therapeutic approaches mental health professionals have used and the treatment strategies which have been found effective in the psychosocial rehabilitation of Muslim Americans. PMID:23864761

  6. Mental Health: African Americans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... education, employment, and health care. However, strong social, religious, and family connections have helped many African Americans ... church and community to cope. The level of religious commitment among African Americans is high. In one ...

  7. The Role of Bilingual Workers without Professional Mental Health Training in Mental Health Services for Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egli, Eric

    This paper discusses the use of bilingual workers who do not have formal mental health training as mediators and providers of mental health care for refugees. The introduction provides a background discussion of the need for refugee mental health services, the characteristics of bilingual mental health workers, and the work places and expectations…

  8. Mental Health Screenings in Juvenile Detention Centers: Predictors of Mental Health Service Utilization and Recidivism

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Mental Health Screenings in Juvenile Detention Centers: Predictors of Mental Health Service provide mental health services for juveniles in need. As a result, juvenile adolescents have low rates months post-detention. Methods: 2089 adolescents held in a detention center completed a mental health

  9. Mental health systems research is urgently needed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benedetto Saraceno

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments, including experience related to the development of WHO's World Health Report 2001, the WHO Atlas and the DCP Project related to Mental, Neurological, Developmental and Substance Abuse Disorders, indicate why advancing the interests of mental health is now so compelling. In order to deliver a high standard of mental health treatment and care WHO emphasizes the adoption of

  10. Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

  11. Engaging families in child mental health services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary M. McKay; William M. Bannon Jr

    2004-01-01

    The last decade has brought important advances in the area of children's mental health, including a concerted focus on building a scientific base for un- derstanding the mental health difficulties that our most vulnerable members of society experience and examining the impact of services that potentially reduce child mental health needs (1,2). Serious concern remains, however, as to whether the

  12. Thirty Years in Infant Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    In the late 1960s and early 1970s, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts, and developmental psychologists pioneered the study of infant mental health. The author, a clinician who helped to develop the field of infant mental health, uses an anecdote-enriched account of his 30-year career to describe the origins and evolution of the infant mental health

  13. Young People's Experiences of Mental Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Anjalee; Medlow, Sharon; Kelk, Norm; Hickie, Ian; Whitwell, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore young people's experiences of mental health care in Australia with the aim of informing the headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation. The interviews revealed that significant numbers of respondents had been aware of their mental health problems for several years before seeking help and…

  14. Ethnic Issues in Adolescent Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiffman, Arlene Rubin, Ed.; Davis, Larry E., Ed.

    The essays collected in this book examine the effects of ethnicity on the mental health of adolescents. A dual set of issues emerges throughout the volume: the importance of adolescent mental health in contributing to adult well-being, and the necessity of understanding ethnicity in studying and treating mental health problems. The book is divided…

  15. Leveraging Mental Health Dollars into Your District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilkenny, Robert; Katz, Nechama; Baron, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    By addressing common reasons that schools and mental health partners often cannot sustain sufficient school-based mental health services, Connecting With Care (CWC)--a mental health collaboration that places full-time clinicians in schools in Boston's most under-served urban neighborhood--is demonstrating how schools and districts can leverage…

  16. April, 2014 Addiction & Mental Health Learning Events

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    Cognition April, 2014 Addiction & Mental Health Learning Events Information & Evaluation Services, Addiction and Mental Health, Edmonton Zone http://insite.albertahealthservices.ca/9250.asp Contact Daniel://edmonton.cmha.ca/programs_services/asist-tuneup/ Provided by CMHA #12;Cognition April, 2014 Addiction & Mental Health Learning Events Information

  17. Handbook of Infant Mental Health. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H., Jr., Ed.

    This revised edition offers an interdisciplinary analysis of the developmental, clinical, and social aspects of mental health from birth to age 3. Chapters are organized into five areas, covering the context of mental health, risk and protective factors, assessment, psychopathology, intervention, and applications of infant mental health. The…

  18. A PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH

    E-print Network

    Hayes, Jane E.

    A PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH DIAGNOSES, 2000-2010 #12; #12; i A Profile of Kentucky Medicaid Mental Health Diagnoses, 20002010 BY Michael T. Childress have received a mental or behavioral health diagnosis from 2000 to 2010. A Profile of Kentucky

  19. Mental Health Consultation in Child Care and

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Mental Health Consultation in Child Care and Early Childhood Settings Opportunities to Expand Department of Children & Families Children's Mental Health Program June 30, 2006 Florida State University-922-1300 · www.cpeip.fsu.edu #12;Mental Health Consultation in Child Care and Early Childhood Settings

  20. STAFF GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH

    E-print Network

    Guo, Zaoyang

    STAFF GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH DIFFICULTIES MARCH 2007 #12;1 1. INTRODUCTION This document seeks to give basic advice to staff who may encounter students with mental health difficulties and guidance mechanisms in respect of mental health. These guidelines do not give detailed medical advice

  1. Johnson & Johnson Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Johnson & Johnson ­ Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program Program Description Mission The mission of the Johnson & Johnson - Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program is to increase access-based guidelines, initially in a small number of sites (typically 3-4 community mental health centers

  2. Postdoctoral Fellowships National Institute of Mental Health

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Postdoctoral Fellowships National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program Bethesda, Maryland, USA The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Section on Neuroadaptation and Protein; National Institute of Mental Health; 10 Center Drive, Room 2D54; Bethesda, MD 20892-1298, USA or via e

  3. Barriers to Mental Health Care Utilization in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Roseanne D.; Rubino, Jade Tiu; Friedman, Jill; Allen, Lesley A.; Gara, Michael A.; Menza, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is frequently complicated by co-occurring psychiatric problems, such as depression and anxiety, that negatively affect the course and management of the illness. Yet, in the majority of cases, these psychiatric comorbidities are neither recognized nor treated to remission. The primary purpose of this study was to identify and describe barriers to mental health care utilization for people with PD. Secondary objectives included the assessment of attitudes and preferences regarding the need for mental health services in the PD community and the acceptability of tele-health interventions as a method for improving access and quality of care. Methods Seven hundred sixty-nine people with PD completed an anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire assessing barriers to mental health care utilization in this medical population. Respondents were drawn from a national sample. Results Commonly endorsed barriers to mental health care utilization in PD reflect the patients’ incomplete understanding of mental health problems, access issues, and illness-specific concerns, as well as the inadequate screening and detection of psychiatric complications by medical providers, and the need for more effective treatments in this medical population. Several demographic, medical, and psychiatric variables also influenced the likelihood of accessing mental health care. Interest in tele-health approaches to mental health treatment was high and, in several instances, correlated with perceived barriers to mental health care utilization. Conclusions People with PD may encounter a multitude of barriers that impede their pursuit of mental health care. Clinical implications are discussed and further research is needed to replicate and extend these findings. PMID:23589410

  4. Malayalam cinema and mental health.

    PubMed

    Menon, Koravangattu Valsraj; Ranjith, Gopinath

    2009-06-01

    There is a tradition of using films to teach various aspects of psychiatry and we feel that Malayalam cinema can also be used suitably to teach effectively. These films can be an invaluable resource in cultural competency training as they depict the effects of culture on psychopathology and cultural and regional influences on attitudes to mental illness and stigma. We also note that the portrayal is often far from reality but this is not a barrier for using the films as an effective alternative to traditional and didactic teaching methods. This method of teaching can stimulate interest and discussion and demystify the myths of novice students and others about mental health. PMID:19459097

  5. Psychiatry and the death penalty: dilemma for mental health professionals.

    PubMed

    Kermani, E J; Drob, S L

    1988-01-01

    The arguments for and against mental health professionals' participation in death penalty proceedings are presented against the background of U.S. Supreme Court decisions which have had a bearing on this issue. It is concluded that the possibility of presenting mitigating psychologic testimony in such proceedings necessitates the possibility of exacerbating psychiatric testimony and that hence, mental health professionals who testify for the prosecution in such cases do not, on a wider view, violate their hippocratic oaths or other ethical codes. A number of safeguards, however, should be instituted with respect to such testimony. Psychiatrists, psychologists or other qualified mental health professionals should (1) testify with medical "possibility" or "probability," (2) not be permitted to address ultimate legal issues and (3) be permitted, in fact encouraged, to present alternative interpretations of forensic psychiatric findings. It is further argued that in addition to being justified in testifying for the prosecution on death penalty cases, mental health professionals may have a moral rationale for treating death row prisoners and restoring them to competency. PMID:3070607

  6. Community mental health nursing in Alberta, Canada: an oral history.

    PubMed

    Boschma, Geertje

    2012-01-01

    Community mental health nurses had a central role in the construction of new rehabilitative practices and community mental health services in the 1960s and 1970s. The purpose of this article is, first, to explore how nurses understood and created their new role and identity in the turbulent context of deinstitutionalization. The development of after care services for patients discharged from Alberta Hospital in Ponoka (AH-Ponoka), a large mental institution in Calgary, in the Canadian province of Alberta, will be used as a case study. I specifically focus on the establishment of outpatient services in a new psychiatric department at Foothills General Hospital in Calgary. Second, I examine how deinstitutionalization itself shaped community mental health nurses' work. Oral history interviews with nurses and other mental health professionals, who had a central role in this transformation process, provide a unique lens through which to explore this social change. The article concludes that new rehabilitative, community-based mental health services can better be understood as a transformation of former institutional practices rather than as a definite break with them. PMID:22360000

  7. Mental health problems in youths committed to juvenile institutions: prevalences and treatment needs

    PubMed Central

    Anckarsäter, Henrik; Nilsson, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Many international studies show that adolescents in coercive institutional care display high prevalences of mental disorders, especially in the form of disruptive behavior disorders [including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder], anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. High degrees of overlap across mental disorders have also been reported. In addition, institutionalized adolescents are often traumatized. Despite this well-documented psychiatric morbidity, the mental health care needs of detained adolescents are often overlooked. The main objective of this study is to assess prevalences of psychiatric disorders, results of intelligence tests, and previous contacts with child and adolescent psychiatric services among adolescents in institutional care. DSM-IV diagnoses, mental health contacts, substance abuse, neurocognitive abilities, and school performance were registered in 100 adolescents (92 boys, 8 girls) aged 12–19 years (mean age 16.0; SD ± 1.5) consecutively committed to Swedish juvenile institutions between 2004 and 2007. At least one psychiatric disorder was diagnosed in 73% of the subjects: 48% met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for AD/HD, 17% for an autism spectrum disorder, and 10% for a mental retardation. The collapsed prevalence for psychiatric disorders requiring specialist attention was 63%. Our data indicate that systematic diagnostic procedures are crucial in the treatment planning for institutionalized adolescents. Adequate treatment strategies need to be designed and implemented to meet the extensive mental health care needs of this vulnerable population. PMID:20949366

  8. Evaluation of Mental Health Emergency Preparedness Among Health Professionals

    E-print Network

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Hawley, Suzanne; Konda, Kurt M.; Wolfe, Deborah; Cook, David J.

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify if health professionals report an increase in mental health preparedness abilities with having only two mental health components as part of a 2-day preparedness training conference. At each of three...

  9. Mental health of hospital consultants: the effects of stress and satisfaction at work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J Ramirez; J Graham; M. A Richards; W. M Gregory; A Cull

    1996-01-01

    SummaryBackground Burnout and psychiatric morbidity among gastroenterologists, surgeons, radiologists, and oncologists in the UK have been estimated by means of a questionnaire-based survey. The relationship between consultants' mental health and their job stress and satisfaction, as well as their job and demographic characteristics, were also examined.Methods Psychiatric morbidity was estimated using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. The three components of

  10. Relationship between loneliness, psychiatric disorders and physical health ? A review on the psychological aspects of loneliness.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Raheel; Shoib, Sheikh; Shah, Tabindah; Mushtaq, Sahil

    2014-09-01

    Human beings are social species which require safe and secure social surroundings to survive. Satisfying social relationships are essential for mental and physical well beings. Impaired social relationship can lead to loneliness. Since the time of dawn, loneliness is perceived as a global human phenomenon. Loneliness can lead to various psychiatric disorders like depression, alcohol abuse, child abuse, sleep problems, personality disorders and Alzheimer's disease. It also leads to various physical disorders like diabetes, autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and cardiovascular diseases like coronary heart disease, hypertension (HTN), obesity, physiological aging, cancer, poor hearing and poor health. Left untended, loneliness can have serious consequences for mental and physical health of people. Therefore it is important to intervene at the right time to prevent loneliness, so that physical and mental health of patients is maintained. PMID:25386507

  11. Integrating mental health into public health: The community mental health development project in India

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chee; Chauhan, Ajay P.; Chavan, Bir Singh; Ramasubramanian, Chellamuthu; Singh, Amool R.; Sagar, Rajesh; Fraser, Julia; Ryan, Brigid; Prasad, Jagdish; Singh, Sujeet; Das, Jayanta; Isaac, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and its public health institutes are collaborating with Asia Australia Mental Health on an innovative community mental health development project designed to enhance initiatives under the District Mental Health Program and increase accessibility of essential community mental health services. The project is an exciting opportunity to create positive change in meeting the challenges of community mental health care in India. It recognizes that no one single model of care can be applied to all the community in the country and that locally appropriate models working in close partnership with local communities is required. Targeted and skill-based training programs are useful to build local leadership capacity in implementing quality and culturally appropriate community mental health services. PMID:25316931

  12. Mental health in the mainstream of health care.

    PubMed

    Frank, Richard G; Glied, Sherry A

    2007-01-01

    Mental health policy making has moved steadily into the mainstream of health policy. The phenomenon has expanded the resources available to people with mental disorders. It has also led to decisions that are based on inadequate understanding of mental illnesses and their treatment. Continued progress in the well-being of people with mental disorders requires expanded engagement of the mental health community with mainstream health policymakers. PMID:17978368

  13. The mental health nurse: contributing to improved outcomes for patients in the emergency department

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Wand; B. Happell

    2001-01-01

    Fundamental changes to health-care policy in Australia have led to an increase in the extent to which emergency department staff come into contact with patients experiencing mental health problems. This has been problematic for nurses, many of whom perceive themselves as lacking the skills and expertise to provide appropriate care and treatment to this client group. Psychiatric\\/mental health consultation-liaison nursing

  14. Leadership and training in mental health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Lubotsky Levin; Ardis Hanson; Sara A. Kuppin

    2003-01-01

    The leadership function within mental health organizations continues to demand that professionals must understand and deal with current multidimensional problems in the managed behavioral health care industry. Furthermore, the responsibility for preparing these professionals rests within universities to better educate these leaders in public health issues and in basic health and mental health administration. In addition, the responsibility also rests

  15. Policy perspectives and attitudes towards mental health treatment in rural Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental health is often given low priority in health policy planning, particularly in developing countries. Several international health bodies, including the World Health Organization, recommend integrating mental health into primary care settings to reduce mortality and morbidity associated with mental illness, particularly in low-resource settings. Objective This study explores health care workers' and policy stakeholders’ knowledge and attitudes regarding mental illness, interactions with patients in the community, and perceived training needs at a health clinic in rural southeastern Senegal. Interviews were conducted with eight key informant medical staff members and community health workers. Methods Interview data were analyzed and interpreted using a qualitative content analysis based on the grounded theory approach. Results The findings indicate that staff members encounter many patients with emotional/psychological problems or mental illnesses, and they employ various strategies in treating these patients. Respondents also highlighted the need for more training to address and diagnose mental health problems, especially severe psychiatric illnesses. Conclusions Findings are used to discuss recommendations for developing a comprehensive mental health primary care treatment approach that includes screening patients for mental health problems screening, incorporating rural villagers' attitudes and beliefs about mental illness into treatment, and utilizing community health workers—who are often a first health contact for many—to work with the medical staff to identify mental health problems. PMID:24646335

  16. Religion, Senescence, and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Van Ness, Peter H.; Larson, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The authors review epidemiological and survey research relevant to the relationships between religiousness/spirituality and mental health in people at the end of life, with the end of helping psychiatrists, psychologists, and other mental health professionals dealing with older Americans. They give special attention to well-being, religious coping, cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and suicide, and consider the extent to which hope is a mediator of the purported salutary effects of religiousness. Studies were selected from the comprehensive and systematic review of 20th-century scientific literature concerning religion and health. Authors also review current studies relevant to religion and end-of-life issues. Religious persons reported generally higher levels of well-being. The review also found fairly consistent inverse associations of religiousness with rates of depression and suicide. There was some negative association between religious participation and cognitive dysfunction, but the association with anxiety was inconsistent, with some studies showing a correlation between higher levels of religion and anxiety. Religion’s effects on mental health are generally protective in direction but modest in strength. PMID:12095898

  17. Access to Mental Health Services and Health Sector Social Capital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael S. Hendryx; Melissa M. Ahern

    2001-01-01

    Mental health services are underused relative to mental illness rates. We hypothesized a positive correlation between use of mental health services and community-level health care social capital. Community Tracking Study data from 43 cities (N=43,278), merged with the National Profile of Local Health Departments and other sources, show that use of mental health services was greater when public health districts

  18. Farming and Mental Health Problems and Mental Illness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Fraser; K. B. Smith; F. Judd; J. S. Humphreys; L. J. Fragar; A. Henderson

    2005-01-01

    Background: Farmers experience one of the highest rates of suicide of any industry and there is growing evidence that those involved in farming are at higher risk of developing mental health problems. This article provides an overview of the literature examining mental health issues experienced by farming populations in the United Kingdom, Europe, Australia, Canada and the United States and

  19. Patient health questionnaire for screening psychiatric disorders in secondary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Ankur; Jacob, George P.; Mahmood, Syed Safvi

    2013-01-01

    Background: The adult population often suffers from a number of physical and mental problems. This study was conducted to determine the proportion of mental illnesses in adult population visiting the outpatient departments at Dr. TMA Pai Rotary Hospital, Karkala and to study the socio-demographic correlates of psychiatric disorders. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during March 2004 among 193 adult individuals of 18 years and above at Dr. TMA Pai Rotary Hospital, Karkala, Karnataka. Data was analyzed by the statistical package for social sciences version 10.0 for windows and results were expressed in terms of proportions and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Chi-square test, multiple logistic regression with adjusted odds ratio and its 95% CI. Results: The proportion of psychiatric disorders in adult population was determined to be 39.9%. Proportion of psychiatric morbidity among males and females were 36.2 and 42.2%, respectively. Conclusion: This study revealed that socio-demographic correlates like age group of 50 years and above, unemployed or housewives, living alone, and a history of psychiatric illness in the family were independently associated with psychiatric disorders in adult population. PMID:23825844

  20. Smartphone Ownership and Interest in Mobile Applications to Monitor Symptoms of Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Rohn; Keshavan, Matcheri

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient retrospective recollection is a mainstay of assessing symptoms in mental health and psychiatry. However, evidence suggests that these retrospective recollections may not be as accurate as data collection though the experience sampling method (ESM), which captures patient data in “real time” and “real life.” However, the difficulties in practical implementation of ESM data collection have limited its impact in psychiatry and mental health. Smartphones with the capability to run mobile applications may offer a novel method of collecting ESM data that may represent a practical and feasible tool for mental health and psychiatry. Objective This paper aims to provide data on psychiatric patients’ prevalence of smartphone ownership, patterns of use, and interest in utilizing mobile applications to monitor their mental health conditions. Methods One hundred psychiatric outpatients at a large urban teaching hospital completed a paper-and-pencil survey regarding smartphone ownership, use, and interest in utilizing mobile applications to monitor their mental health condition. Results Ninety-seven percent of patients reported owning a phone and 72% reported that their phone was a smartphone. Patients in all age groups indicated greater than 50% interest in using a mobile application on a daily basis to monitor their mental health condition. Conclusions Smartphone and mobile applications represent a practical opportunity to explore new modalities of monitoring, treatment, and research of psychiatric and mental health conditions. PMID:25098314

  1. Child physical abuse and adult mental health: a national study.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Luisa; Hasin, Deborah S; Olfson, Mark; Lin, Keng-Han; Grant, Bridget F; Blanco, Carlos

    2012-08-01

    This study characterizes adults who report being physically abused during childhood, and examines associations of reported type and frequency of abuse with adult mental health. Data were derived from the 2000-2001 and 2004-2005 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a large cross-sectional survey of a representative sample (N = 43,093) of the U.S. population. Weighted means, frequencies, and odds ratios of sociodemographic correlates and prevalence of psychiatric disorders were computed. Logistic regression models were used to examine the strength of associations between child physical abuse and adult psychiatric disorders adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, other childhood adversities, and comorbid psychiatric disorders. Child physical abuse was reported by 8% of the sample and was frequently accompanied by other childhood adversities. Child physical abuse was associated with significantly increased adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of a broad range of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders (AOR = 1.16-2.28), especially attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and bipolar disorder. A dose-response relationship was observed between frequency of abuse and several adult psychiatric disorder groups; higher frequencies of assault were significantly associated with increasing adjusted odds. The long-lasting deleterious effects of child physical abuse underscore the urgency of developing public health policies aimed at early recognition and prevention. PMID:22806701

  2. Defendants with Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health Diagnoses: Faring in a Mental Health Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, M. M.; Griggs, M.; Dykens, E. M.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Begun in the late 1990s, mental health courts are specialty criminal courts developed to address the needs of persons with mental illness. Methods: As many persons with intellectual disabilities (IDs) may overlap in the mental health court system, we used mental health court records to examine the phenomenology and outcomes of 224…

  3. Social ties and mental health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ichiro Kawachi; Lisa F. Berkman

    2001-01-01

    It is generally agreed that social ties play a beneficial role in the maintenance of psychological well-being. In this targeted\\u000a review, we highlight four sets of insights that emerge from the literature on social ties and mental health outcomes (defined\\u000a as stress reactions, psychological well-being, and psychological distress, including depressive symptoms and anxiety). First,\\u000a the pathways by which social networks

  4. Mental Health Net: Professional Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Part of a much larger meta-resource, this site contains annotated, rated resources in over 25 subject categories, as well as associations, academic departments, employment, mailing lists, and newsgroups, among other resources. MHN has a rating system (one to four stars), based on content, presentation, ease of use, and overall experience. Interestingly, users are also allowed to interactively vote thumbs up or down on annotated resources. Mental Health Net and CMHC Systems maintain this site.

  5. Associations Between Psychiatric Inpatient Bed Supply and the Prevalence of Serious Mental Illness in Veterans Affairs Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, Benjamin J.; McCarthy, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed whether reductions in inpatient psychiatric beds resulted in transinstitutionalization to nursing home care of patients with serious mental illness (SMI) within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Methods. We assessed trends in national and site-level inpatient psychiatric beds and nursing home patient demographics, service use, and functioning from the VHA National Patient Care Database, VHA Service Support Center Bed Control, and VHA Minimum Data Set. We estimated nursing home admission appropriateness using propensity score analyses based on Michigan Medicaid Nursing Facility Level of Care Determinations ratings. Results. From 1999 to 2007, the number of VHA inpatient psychiatric beds declined (43?894–40?928), the average inpatient length of stay decreased (33.1–19.0 days), and the prevalence of SMI in nursing homes rose (29.4%–43.8%). At site level, psychiatric inpatient bed availability was unrelated to SMI prevalence in nursing home admissions. However, nursing home residents with SMI were more likely to be inappropriately admitted than were residents without SMI (4.0% vs 3.2%). Conclusions. These results suggest the need for increased attention to the long-term care needs of individuals with SMI. Additional steps need to be taken to ensure that patients with SMI are offered appropriate alternatives to nursing home care and receive adequate screening before admission to nursing home treatment. PMID:23078462

  6. Mental Health Counseling: A Stakeholder's Manifesto.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Edward S.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the original dreams of the founders of the American Mental Health Counselors Association; looks at history and comments on the state of mental health counseling as it has struggled to evolve as a profession. Urges those in the counseling profession to consider an acquisitions and mergers corporate mentality to ensure and enhance the…

  7. The Mental Health First Aid Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony Jorm; Betty Kitchener

    Summary • Mental Health First Aid is a training program for members of the public in how to support someone in a mental health crisis situation or who is developing a mental disorder. • The program has solid evidence for its effectiveness from randomized controlled trials and qualitative studies. It increases knowledge, reduces stigma and, most importantly, increases supportive actions.

  8. Synergy, 2003. Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network, Parramatta.

    Each issue in the 2002 edition of the Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network (ATMHN) newsletter represents a theme critical to mental health practitioners. The Winter 2002 issue features articles on the psychological consequences of interpreters in relation to working with torture and trauma clients, addressing language issues on mental

  9. Religion and mental health among blacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1981-01-01

    The positive role of religion in the mental health of black Americans is a much neglected theme in the literature. This paper considers “religion” as one of the important retained black cultural traits, which continues to play a vital role in the mental health and survival strategies of black Americans. The paper examines Grier and Cobbs's appraisal of the religion-mental

  10. Patient Advocacy: A Mental Health Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodside, Marianne R.; Legg, Bobbie H.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the Protection and Advocacy for Mentally Ill Individuals Act of 1986. Describes recent mental health reform history. Defines patient advocates' role and responsibilities. Presents illustrations of types of cases encountered by patient advocate. Explores implications of this role for the mental health counselor. (Author/CM)

  11. The Relationship between Parental Psychiatric Disorder and Child Physical and Sexual Abuse: Findings from the Ontario Health Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Christine; MacMillan, Harriet; Jamieson, Ellen

    2002-01-01

    A study interviewed 8,548 participants in the Ontario Mental Health Supplement about parental psychiatric history and childhood physical and sexual abuse. Respondents reporting a parental history of depression, mania, or schizophrenia had a two to threefold increase in the rates of physical, sexual, or any abuse. (Contains references.) (CR)

  12. What is good mental health nursing? A survey of Irish nurses.

    PubMed

    Lakeman, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The practice, theory, and preparation associated with nursing people with mental health issues has changed in profound ways in recent decades. This has in part been reflected by a shift in nurses identifying as being mental health rather than psychiatric nurses. Context, theory, and values shape what it means to be a mental health nurse. Thirty experienced mental health nurses in Ireland completed a survey on what good mental health nursing is and a definition induced from their responses. Mental health nursing is a professional, client-centered, goal-directed activity based on sound evidence, focused on the growth, development, and recovery of people with complex mental health needs. It involves caring, empathic, insightful, and respectful nurses using interpersonal skills to draw upon and develop the personal resources of individuals and to facilitate change in partnership with the individual and in collaboration with friends, family, and the health care team. This appears to encapsulate the best of what it meant to be a psychiatric nurse, but challenges remain regarding how to reconcile or whether to discard coercive practices incompatible with mental health nursing. PMID:22633584

  13. Mental Health Resources on UAA Campus Student Health and

    E-print Network

    Duddleston, Khrys

    Mental Health Resources on UAA Campus Student Health and Counseling Center Psychological Services Health Education YES YES YES Mental Health Screening Events YES NO YES Situational Crisis Management YES Counseling YES YES YES Children and Adolescent Counseling NO YES NO Medication Management YES NO NO Mental

  14. Contemporary perspectives on spirituality and mental health.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pulkit; Charak, Ruby; Sharma, Vibha

    2009-01-01

    The paper strives to elucidate the complex yet intimate relation between spirituality and mental health from contemporary perspectives. The diverse and constantly evolving views that spiritualists and mental health professionals have held toward each other over last century are discussed with special accent on the transpersonal spiritual framework within psychology. The role of spirituality in promoting mental health and alleviating mental illness is highlighted. The paper is concluded with an increasing need to integrate spirituality within the mental health field albeit there are several impediments in achieving the same, which need to be worked through circumspectly. PMID:21938086

  15. Genetic Counseling for Mental Health Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth L. Pestka

    2005-01-01

    The sequenced map of the DNA base pairs in the human genome is making it easier to understand the biological pathways involved in mental illnesses and to develop better methods of diagnosis, treatment, and ultimately prevention. This article describes the genetic counseling process for psychiatric disorders, including the use of a family pedigree and predicting genetic inheritance risks based on

  16. Community Mental Health Care: Clients' Perceptions of Services and an Evaluation of a Voluntary Agency Support Scheme

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liz Handyside; Bob Heyman

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire assessment of mental health and of perceptions of formal care was conducted with a sample of clients before they received a voluntary agency mental health intervention in addition to normal community psychiatric and social services. The assessment was repeated three months later. A matched control group who received only the normal services were also assessed twice over a

  17. Reflections on psychiatry and international mental health.

    PubMed

    Herrman, Helen

    2013-01-01

    This paper reflects on the needs for close interaction between psychiatry and all partners in international mental health for the improvement of mental health and advancement of the profession, with a particular view to the relationships between mental health, development and human rights. The World Health Organisation identifies strong links between mental health status and development for individuals, communities and countries. In order to improve population mental health, countries need effective and accessible treatment, prevention, and promotion programmes. Achieving adequate support for mental health in any country requires a unified approach. Strong links between psychiatrists, community leaders and patients and families that are based on negotiation and respect, are vital for progress. When strong partnerships exist, they can contribute to community understanding and advancement of psychiatry. This is the first step towards scaling up good quality care for those living with mental illnesses, preventing illnesses in those at risk, and promoting mental health through work with other community sectors. Partnerships are needed to support education and research in psychiatry, and improvements in quality of care wherever psychiatry is practiced, including primary health and community mental health services, hospitals and private practice. There are important roles for psychiatry in building the strength of organisations that champion the advocacy and support roles of service users and family carers, and encouraging partnerships for mental health promotion in the community. PMID:23678238

  18. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

    MedlinePLUS

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Home Newsroom Site Map Contact Us SAMHSA Search Search All SAMHSA Data ... SAMHSA's mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities. “Talk. They ...

  19. Trucking organization and mental health disorders of truck drivers.

    PubMed

    Shattell, Mona; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Collins, Chad; Sönmez, Sevil; Fehrenbacher, Caitlin

    2012-07-01

    There are over 3 million truck drivers employed in the commercial transportation and material moving occupations, one of the largest occupational groups in the United States. Workers in this large and growing occupational segment are at risk for a range of occupational health-induced conditions, including mental health and psychiatric disorders due to high occupational stress, low access and use of health care, and limited social support. The purpose of this study was to explore male truck drivers' mental health risks and associated comorbidities, using a cross-sectional and quantitative design. Data were collected from a random sample of 316 male truckers between the ages of 23 and 76 at a large truck stop located within a 100-mile radius of Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, using a self-administered 82-item questionnaire. Surveyed truckers were found to have significant issues affecting their mental health, such as loneliness (27.9%), depression (26.9%), chronic sleep disturbances (20.6%), anxiety (14.5%), and other emotional problems (13%). Findings have potential to help researchers develop interventions to improve the emotional and occupational health of truck drivers, a highly underserved population. Mental health promotion, assessment, and treatment must become a priority to improve the overall trucking environment for truckers, the transportation industry, and safety on US highways. PMID:22757596

  20. Limitations of the Patient Health Questionnaire in Identifying Anxiety and Depression in Community Mental Health: Many Cases Are Undetected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concordance between the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in diagnosing anxiety and depressive disorders. Method: Fifty women seeking psychiatric services for their children at two mental health centers in western Pennsylvania were assessed for anxiety and…

  1. Recruitment and Retention of Mental Health Workers in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Helen; Canavan, Maureen; Ofori-Atta, Angela; Taylor, Lauren; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The lack of trained mental health workers is a primary contributor to the mental health treatment gap worldwide. Despite the great need to recruit and retain mental health workers in low-income countries, little is known about how these workers perceive their jobs and what drives them to work in mental health care. Using qualitative interviews, we aimed to explore factors motivating mental health workers in order to inform interventions to increase recruitment and retention. Methods We conducted 28 in-depth, open-ended interviews with staff in Ghana’s three public psychiatric hospitals. We used the snowballing method to recruit participants and the constant comparative method for qualitative data analysis, with multiple members of the research team participating in data coding to enhance the validity and reliability of the analysis. The use of qualitative methods allowed us to understand the range and depth of motivating and demotivating factors. Results Respondents described many factors that influenced their choice to enter and remain in mental health care. Motivating factors included 1) desire to help patients who are vulnerable and in need, 2) positive day-to-day interactions with patients, 3) intellectual or academic interest in psychiatry or behavior, and 4) good relationships with colleagues. Demotivating factors included 1) lack of resources at the hospital, 2) a rigid supervisory hierarchy, 3) lack of positive or negative feedback on work performance, and 4) few opportunities for career advancement within mental health. Conclusions Because many of the factors are related to relationships, these findings suggest that strengthening the interpersonal and team dynamics may be a critical and relatively low cost way to increase worker motivation. The data also allowed us to highlight key areas for resource allocation to improve both recruitment and retention, including risk pay, adequate tools for patient care, improved hospital work environment, and stigma reduction efforts. PMID:23469111

  2. Health in women on long-term sick leave because of pain or mental illness.

    PubMed

    Lytsy, Per; Larsson, Kjerstin; Anderzén, Ingrid

    2015-03-01

    Mental illness and pain are common causes of long-term sick absence and major difficulties in vocational rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to investigate health in a group of women with pain or mental illness who had exhausted their days of sickness benefit. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from 355 women on long-term sick leave participating in controlled intervention studies aiming at returning to work. The study population filled in a written questionnaire with questions of self-rated health and sleep quality and validated indexes of mental health, satisfaction with life and general self-efficacy. Clinical psychiatric screening was performed on 230 individuals. The study population had a mean age of 48.8 years (SD 8.4), with an average time on sick leave of 7.8 years (SD 3.2). Self-rated health and sleep quality was poor compared with other populations. In all, 80.1% had at least one psychiatric diagnosis according to the psychiatric screening, and the average numbers of psychiatric diagnoses were 2.2 (SD 1.9). Foreign-born women showed significantly higher levels of mental illness, poorer self-rated health and sleep quality and lower self-efficacy and life satisfaction than native Swedish women. Women with long sick leave because of mental illness and/or pain have poor self-rated health and sleep quality, high prevalence of mental illness and low self-efficacy and life satisfaction. Psychiatric screening suggests more extensive mental illness than what was stated on the sick leave certificates. The health of foreign-born women seems to be worse than that of native Swedish women. PMID:25203749

  3. Using Decision Support to Address Racial Disparities in Mental Health Service Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawal, Purva H.; Anderson, Tanya R.; Romansky, Jill R.; Lyons, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Unfortunately, racial disparities are well documented in the delivery of behavioral health services. This study examines the effects of implementing a decision support process, integrating clinical information into the administration of mental health services, on racial disparities in psychiatric hospital admissions for children in state custody.…

  4. The Impact of Managed Behavioral Health Care on Rehabilitation Services to Persons with Serious Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutman, Irvin D.; Baron, Richard C.; Hadley, Trevor R.

    This monograph examines issues in the field of psychosocial/psychiatric rehabilitation (PSR) services for people with serious mental illness, placed in the context of a debate within the field about trends toward managed behavioral health care companies. Four main issues are addressed: (1) the degree to which managed behavioral health care…

  5. Capacity-Building for African American Mental Health Training and Research: Lessons from the Howard-Dartmouth Collaborative Summer School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipolito, Maria M. S.; Malik, Mansoor; Carpenter-Song, Elizabeth; Whitley, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many psychiatric residents have traditionally received little-or-no training in cross cultural approaches to psychiatric training and research. Method: The Dartmouth-Howard Collaboration summer school training program had a 5-year grant to explore approaches to enhancing understanding of cultural factors in mental health treatment and…

  6. Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

  7. Where Have All the Children Gone? Movement from Child to Adult Mental Health Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Terence McCormick; Mary E. Evans; Steven Banks; Randall Fasnacht; Michael Bigley

    1997-01-01

    The mental health histories of the 448 children 15 and 16 years of age who were admitted to state-operated children's psychiatric inpatient services in New York during 1982 were reviewed for the 11 year period through April 1993, Thirty-three percent were served as adults (after age 18) in the state-operated adult civil mental health system; 42% of these individuals were

  8. 42 CFR 431.620 - Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. 431.620 Section 431.620...Agencies § 431.620 Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. (a)...

  9. 42 CFR 431.620 - Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. 431.620 Section 431.620...Agencies § 431.620 Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. (a)...

  10. 42 CFR 431.620 - Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. 431.620 Section 431.620...Agencies § 431.620 Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. (a)...

  11. 42 CFR 431.620 - Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. 431.620 Section 431.620...Agencies § 431.620 Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. (a)...

  12. 42 CFR 431.620 - Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. 431.620 Section 431.620...Agencies § 431.620 Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. (a)...

  13. The Mental Health Librarian: A Member of the Team

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LEONA MACKLER

    THIS PAPER WILL REVIEW current practices and emerging trends in mental health librarianship as they have developed with the growth of the mental health field. Mental health librarians are defined here as professionals who provide library service in both public and private mental health and\\/or health sciences institutions, agencies and organi- zations. The mental health field is here considered as

  14. Oregon's Gun Relief Program for Adjudicated Mentally Ill Persons: The Psychiatric Security Review Board.

    PubMed

    Britton, Juliet; Bloom, Joseph D

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the State of Oregon's implementation of two programs designed to comply with federal gun laws regarding reporting individuals who have received mental health adjudications in criminal and civil courts. One mandate requires that states submit names of adjudicated individuals to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) while the second requires that the state establish a qualifying gun restoration program for those disqualified from gun ownership. In 2009, Oregon's Legislature developed an administrative approach to gun restoration and assigned the responsibility for conducting these hearing to the Oregon Psychiatric Security Review Board (PSRB). The PSRB is a state administrative board that has existed since 1977 and has been primarily focused on the supervision and treatment of adult and juvenile insanity acquittees. The gun restoration program began in 2010, but to date has only received three completed petitions requesting restoration of firearm rights. The article concludes with a discussion that surmises why very few of the Oregonians who are listed in NICS have submitted petitions for relief. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25728522

  15. Mental Health Promotion Education in Multicultural Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanlou, Nazilla

    2003-01-01

    A mental health promotion perspective provides a system-based understanding of relationships between culture and health. Educating nurses for multicultural practice should adopt an interdisciplinary approach that fosters critical awareness of diverse influences on mental health and their intersections. (Contains 38 references.) (SK)

  16. Social disorder and diagnostic order: the US Mental Hygiene Movement, the Midtown Manhattan study and the development of psychiatric epidemiology in the 20th century.

    PubMed

    March, Dana; Oppenheimer, Gerald M

    2014-08-01

    Recent scholarship regarding psychiatric epidemiology has focused on shifting notions of mental disorders. In psychiatric epidemiology in the last decades of the 20th century and the first decade of the 21st century, mental disorders have been perceived and treated largely as discrete categories denoting an individual's mental functioning as either pathological or normal. In the USA, this grew partly out of evolving modern epidemiological work responding to the State's commitment to measure the national social and economic burdens of psychiatric disorders and subsequently to determine the need for mental health services and to survey these needs over time. Notably absent in these decades have been environmentally oriented approaches to cultivating normal, healthy mental states, approaches initially present after World War II. We focus here on a set of community studies conducted in the 1950s, particularly the Midtown Manhattan study, which grew out of a holistic conception of mental health that depended on social context and had a strong historical affiliation with: the Mental Hygiene Movement and the philosophy of its founder, Adolf Meyer; the epidemiological formation of field studies and population surveys beginning early in the 20th century, often with a health policy agenda; the recognition of increasing chronic disease in the USA; and the radical change in orientation within psychiatry around World War II. We place the Midtown Manhattan study in historical context--a complex narrative of social institutions, professional formation and scientific norms in psychiatry and epidemiology, and social welfare theory that begins during the Progressive era (1890-1920) in the USA. PMID:25031047

  17. 45 CFR 1304.24 - Child mental health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Child mental health. 1304.24 Section 1304.24 Public Welfare...Development and Health Services § 1304.24 Child mental health. (a) Mental health services. (1) Grantee and delegate...

  18. 45 CFR 1304.24 - Child mental health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Child mental health. 1304.24 Section 1304.24 Public Welfare...Development and Health Services § 1304.24 Child mental health. (a) Mental health services. (1) Grantee and delegate...

  19. 45 CFR 1304.24 - Child mental health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Child mental health. 1304.24 Section 1304.24 Public Welfare...Development and Health Services § 1304.24 Child mental health. (a) Mental health services. (1) Grantee and delegate...

  20. 45 CFR 1304.24 - Child mental health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Child mental health. 1304.24 Section 1304.24 Public Welfare...Development and Health Services § 1304.24 Child mental health. (a) Mental health services. (1) Grantee and delegate...

  1. 45 CFR 1304.24 - Child mental health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Child mental health. 1304.24 Section 1304.24 Public Welfare...Development and Health Services § 1304.24 Child mental health. (a) Mental health services. (1) Grantee and delegate...

  2. A Participant's to Mental Health Clinical Research

    E-print Network

    Baker, Chris I.

    A Participant's Guide to Mental Health Clinical Research #12;Contents Purpose of this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What is clinical research What are the different types of clinical research? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

  3. Mental Health Services in Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Andy

    2008-01-01

    This dialog suggests that mental health services in Head Start should be more broadly defined than they currently are in many programs. Specifically, these services should emphasize the important role prevention (e.g., prereferral/identification) plays in promoting mental wellness. Additionally, this dialog briefly addresses the role of the mental

  4. Mental Health: An Interdisciplinary and International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klineberg, Otto

    The World Federation for Mental Health was founded as an international apolitical organization concerned with quality of life rather than merely the absence or prevention of mental illness. An examination of the manner and extent to which mental problems arise in different cultural settings can provide data needed to understand the relationship…

  5. Towards Horizon 2020: challenges and advances for clinical mental health research – outcome of an expert survey

    PubMed Central

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; van Os, Jim; Knappe, Susanne; Schumann, Gunter; Vieta, Eduard; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lewis, Shôn W; Elfeddali, Iman; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Linszen, Donald; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Haro, Josep Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The size and increasing burden of disease due to mental disorders in Europe poses substantial challenges to its population and to the health policy of the European Union. This warrants a specific research agenda concerning clinical mental health research as one of the cornerstones of sustainable mental health research and health policy in Europe. The aim of this research was to identify the top priorities needed to address the main challenges in clinical research for mental disorders. Methods The research was conducted as an expert survey and expert panel discussion during a scientific workshop. Results Eighty-nine experts in clinical research and representing most European countries participated in this survey. Identified top priorities were the need for new intervention studies, understanding the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of mechanisms of disease, and research in the field of somatic-psychiatric comorbidity. The “subjectivity gap” between basic neuroscience research and clinical reality for patients with mental disorders is considered the main challenge in psychiatric research, suggesting that a shift in research paradigms is required. Conclusion Innovations in clinical mental health research should bridge the gap between mechanisms underlying novel therapeutic interventions and the patient experience of mental disorder and, if present, somatic comorbidity. Clinical mental health research is relatively underfunded and should receive specific attention in Horizon 2020 funding programs. PMID:25061300

  6. Priorities for mental health research in Europe: A survey among national stakeholders' associations within the ROAMER project

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Andrea; Luciano, Mario; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Sampogna, Gaia; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Maj, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Within the ROAMER project, funded by the European Commission, a survey was conducted with national associations/organizations of psychiatrists, other mental health professionals, users and/or carers, and psychiatric trainees in the 27 countries of the European Union, aiming to explore their views about priorities for mental health research in Europe. One hundred and eight associations/organizations returned the questionnaire. The five most frequently selected research priorities were early detection and management of mental disorders, quality of mental health services, prevention of mental disorders, rehabilitation and social inclusion, and new medications for mental disorders. All these areas, except the last one, were among the top ten research priorities according to all categories of stakeholders, along with stigma and discrimination. These results seem to support the recent argument that some rebalancing in favor of psychosocial and health service studies may be needed in psychiatric research. PMID:23737426

  7. Psychiatric disorders and leukocyte telomere length: Underlying mechanisms linking mental illness with cellular aging.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Daniel; Epel, Elissa S; Mellon, Synthia H; Penninx, Brenda W; Révész, Dóra; Verhoeven, Josine E; Reus, Victor I; Lin, Jue; Mahan, Laura; Hough, Christina M; Rosser, Rebecca; Bersani, F Saverio; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Wolkowitz, Owen M

    2015-08-01

    Many psychiatric illnesses are associated with early mortality and with an increased risk of developing physical diseases that are more typically seen in the elderly. Moreover, certain psychiatric illnesses may be associated with accelerated cellular aging, evidenced by shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which could underlie this association. Shortened LTL reflects a cell's mitotic history and cumulative exposure to inflammation and oxidation as well as the availability of telomerase, a telomere-lengthening enzyme. Critically short telomeres can cause cells to undergo senescence, apoptosis or genomic instability, and shorter LTL correlates with poorer health and predicts mortality. Emerging data suggest that LTL may be reduced in certain psychiatric illnesses, perhaps in proportion to exposure to the psychiatric illnesses, although conflicting data exist. Telomerase has been less well characterized in psychiatric illnesses, but a role in depression and in antidepressant and neurotrophic effects has been suggested by preclinical and clinical studies. In this article, studies on LTL and telomerase activity in psychiatric illnesses are critically reviewed, potential mediators are discussed, and future directions are suggested. A deeper understanding of cellular aging in psychiatric illnesses could lead to re-conceptualizing them as systemic illnesses with manifestations inside and outside the brain and could identify new treatment targets. PMID:25999120

  8. Autism and mental health: your guide to today's mental health issues.

    PubMed

    Gould, Judith

    Autism is not a mental health disorder, but it sometimes is misdiagnosed as one--and can bring its own mental health issues. Dr Judith Gould explains how a mental health problem may mask an undiagnosed autistic spectrum disorder. PMID:20073108

  9. Understanding Integrated Mental Health Services in Head Start: Staff Perspectives on Mental Health Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Beth L.; Simpson, Jennifer; Everhart, Maria C.; Vale, Elizabeth; Gettman, Maria Garcia

    2004-01-01

    Despite mandates for Head Start programs to provide mental health services to families and children, considerable variability remains in the level and type of services provided by mental health consultants. A qualitative study was conducted to explore staff perceptions about the role of mental health consult- ants and, in particular; the ways in…

  10. Disclosure of domestic violence in mental health settings: A qualitative meta-synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Trevillion, Kylee; Hughes, Bryony; Feder, Gene; Borschmann, Rohan; Oram, Siân

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how psychiatric services respond to service users’ experiences of domestic violence. This qualitative meta-synthesis examined the healthcare experiences and expectations of mental health service users experiencing domestic violence. Twenty-two biomedical, social science, grey literature databases and websites were searched, supplemented by citation tracking and expert recommendations. Qualitative studies which included mental health service users (aged ? 16 years) with experiences of domestic violence were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently extracted data from included papers and assessed quality. Findings from primary studies were combined using meta-synthesis techniques. Twelve studies provided data on 140 female and four male mental health service users. Themes were generally consistent across studies. Overarching theoretical constructs included the role of professionals in identifying domestic violence and facilitating disclosures, implementing personalized care and referring appropriately. Mental health services often failed to identify and facilitate disclosures of domestic violence, and to develop responses that prioritized service users’ safety. Mental health services were reported to give little consideration to the role of domestic violence in precipitating or exacerbating mental illness and the dominance of the biomedical model and stigma of mental illness were found to inhibit effective responses. Mental health services often fail to adequately address the violence experienced by mental health service users. This meta-synthesis highlights the need for mental health services to establish appropriate strategies and responses to domestic violence to ensure optimal care of this vulnerable population. PMID:25137109

  11. Podiatric problems are associated with worse health status in persons with severe mental illness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia K Crews; Kieu O Vu; Arthur J Davidson; Lori A Crane; Philip S Mehler; John F Steiner

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of self-reported podiatric impairments and their effect on health status in persons with severe mental illness. A sample of psychiatric outpatients (N=309) underwent interviews assessing medical conditions and health status with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36). Podiatric health was assessed using nine items from the National Health Interview

  12. Forensic mental health assessment in France: recommendations for quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Combalbert, Nicolas; Andronikof, Anne; Armand, Marine; Robin, Cécile; Bazex, Hélčne

    2014-01-01

    The quality of forensic mental health assessment has been a growing concern in various countries on both sides of the Atlantic, but the legal systems are not always comparable and some aspects of forensic assessment are specific to a given country. This paper describes the legal context of forensic psychological assessment in France (i.e. pre-trial investigation phase entrusted to a judge, with mental health assessment performed by preselected professionals called "experts" in French), its advantages and its pitfalls. Forensic psychiatric or psychological assessment is often an essential and decisive element in criminal cases, but since a judiciary scandal which was made public in 2005 (the Outreau case) there has been increasing criticism from the public and the legal profession regarding the reliability of clinical conclusions. Several academic studies and a parliamentary report have highlighted various faulty aspects in both the judiciary process and the mental health assessments. The heterogeneity of expert practices in France appears to be mainly related to a lack of consensus on several core notions such as mental health diagnosis or assessment methods, poor working conditions, lack of specialized training, and insufficient familiarity with the Code of Ethics. In this article we describe and analyze the French practice of forensic psychologists and psychiatrists in criminal cases and propose steps that could be taken to improve its quality, such as setting up specialized training courses, enforcing the Code of Ethics for psychologists, and calling for consensus on diagnostic and assessment methods. PMID:24631526

  13. Indian Psychiatric Society-World Psychiatric Association - World Health Organization survey on usefulness of International Classification of Diseases-10

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajit; Grover, Sandeep; Maj, Mario; Reed, Geoffrey; Thirunavukarasu, M.; Garg, Uttam Chand

    2014-01-01

    Background: World Health Organization (WHO) is in the process of revising the International Classification of Diseases 10 (ICD-10). For increasing the acceptability of the ICD-11, WHO along with World Psychiatric Association (WPA), conducted a survey of psychiatrists around the world, in which 386 psychiatrists from India participated. Aim: To present the findings of “WPA-WHO Global Survey of Psychiatrists’ Attitudes toward Mental Disorders Classification” for Indian psychiatrists who participated in the survey as members of Indian Psychiatric Society. Methodology: The online survey was sent to qualified psychiatrists who are members of Indian Psychiatric Society and are residing in India. Results: Of the 1702 members who were urged to participate in the survey, 386 (22.7%) participated. Most(79%) of the psychiatrists opined that they use formal classificatory systems in their day-to-day clinical practice. ICD-10 was the most commonly (71%) followed classificatory system. Nearly half (48%) felt the need for only 10–30 categories for use in clinical settings and another 44% opined that 31-100 categories are required for use. Most of the participants (85%) suggested that a modified/simpler classificatory system should be designed for primary care practitioners. Similarly, the same number of participants (89%) argued that for maximum utility of a nosological system diagnostic criteria should provide flexible guidance that allows cultural variation and clinical judgement. About 75% opined that the diagnostic system they were using was difficult to apply across cultures. Conclusion: Findings of the survey suggest that classificatory systems are routinely used in day-to-day practice by most of the participating psychiatrists in India and most expect that future classificatory system should provide flexible guidance that allows cultural variation and clinical judgement. PMID:25568475

  14. Can a general health surveillance between birth and 10 months identify children with mental disorder at 1˝ year?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Mette Skovgaard; Tine Houmann; Eva Christiansen; Else Marie Olsen; Susanne Lassen Landorph; Anne Lichtenberg; Torben Jřrgensen

    2008-01-01

    Mental health surveillance in infancy was studied in an existing child health surveillance programme with child psychiatric\\u000a disorder at 1˝ year as the outcome. Methods Children considered of concern by community health nurses were cases in a case control study nested in the Copenhagen Child\\u000a Cohort (CCC 2000). Outcome was mental health status at 1˝ year assessed by clinical and

  15. Key stakeholder perceptions regarding acute care psychiatry in distressed publicly funded mental health care markets.

    PubMed

    Frueh, B Christopher; Grubaugh, Anouk L; Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Jones, Walter J; Oldham, John M; Lindrooth, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    The role of acute care inpatient psychiatry, public and private, has changed dramatically since the 1960s, especially as recent market forces affecting the private sector have had ripple effects on publicly funded mental health care. Key stakeholders' experiences, perceptions, and opinions regarding the role of acute care psychiatry in distressed markets of publicly funded mental health care were examined. A qualitative research study was conducted using semi-structured thematic interviews with 52 senior mental health system administrators, clinical directors and managers, and nonclinical policy specialists. Participants were selected from markets in six regions of the United States that experienced recent significant closures of acute care psychiatric beds. Qualitative data analyses yielded findings that clustered around three sets of higher order themes: structure of care, service delivery barriers, and outcomes. Structure of care suggests that acute care psychiatry is seen as part of a continuum of services; service delivery barriers inhibit effective delivery of services and are perceived to include economic, regulatory, and political factors; outcomes include fragmentation of mental health care services across the continuum, the shift of mental health care to the criminal justice system, and market-specific issues affecting mental health care. Findings delineate key stakeholders' perceptions regarding the role acute care psychiatry plays in the continuum of care for publicly funded mental health and suggest that public mental health care is inefficacious. Results carry implications for policy makers regarding strategies/policies to improve optimal utilization of scarce resources for mental health care, including greater focus on psychotherapy. PMID:22409204

  16. Consumer Satisfaction with Children's Mental Health Services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jocelyn S. Martin; Christopher G. Petr; Stephen A. Kapp

    2003-01-01

    Consumer satisfaction with children's mental health services was assessed via a statewide survey. All families of children receiving case management services from community mental health centers in Kansas were eligible to participate. Youth ages 12 and older who were receiving case management were also surveyed. The sample consisted of 963 parents and 331 youth. Results are presented in the form

  17. Transforming the Workforce in Children's Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larke Huang; Gary Macbeth; Joan Dodge; Diane Jacobstein

    2004-01-01

    Building on the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, this article highlights the twofold crisis in children's mental health: a critical shortage of practitioners in child-serving disciplines, and a mismatch between training and preparation and actual practice and service delivery. The authors discuss the challenges of transforming the workforce in the context of changing population demographics, the prevalence of

  18. Evaluation of Expanded School Mental Health Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Weist; Laura A. Nabors; C. Patrick Myers; Paula Armbruster

    2000-01-01

    Expanded school mental health programs provide a full range of mental health services (assessment, treatment, case management, prevention) to youth in regular and special education, and typically involve close collaboration between schools and community agencies. A major challenge for these programs is documenting that provided services are of high quality and leading to enhanced outcomes for the youth and schools

  19. College Mental Health at the Cutting Edge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    As someone who has been involved in college mental health in three different roles, the author would say those who work in this field inhabit a strange space. College mental health centers are generally seen as somewhat peripheral to the core mission of universities by upper administration. Counseling centers do not reside within academic…

  20. Children's Mental Health and School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSocio, Janiece; Hootman, Janis

    2004-01-01

    An integrative review of literature was undertaken to examine the impact of children's mental health on their school success. The literature confirmed a confluence of problems associated with school performance and child and adolescent mental health. Poor academic functioning and inconsistent school attendance were identified as early signs of…

  1. Whatever Happened to "Community Mental Health?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musto, David F.

    1975-01-01

    A chronicle of the developmental thrust of psychiatry into the community mental health movement; its rise and fall in popularity, and the subsequent doubts raised about the power of social environment and mental health experts as manipulators of that environment to serve as unique forces for the betterment of society as a whole. (EH)

  2. Student Mental Health: Reframing the "Problem"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author contends that to understand the concern over student mental health, one must first consider what students are reporting about themselves. Students with mental health issues are intellectually capable; rising numbers of accepted students with diagnosed psychological conditions confirm this. However, many conditions…

  3. Migrant Farmworker Stress: Mental Health Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiott, Ann E.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Davis, Stephen W.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The number of Latinos in rural regions of the United States is increasing. Little is known about factors that undermine the mental health of this segment of the rural population. Purpose: The goal of this study is to determine which stressors inherent in farmwork and the farmworker lifestyle contribute to poor mental health. Methods: An…

  4. Mental Health Consumers' Experience of Stigma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Otto F. Wahl

    1999-01-01

    The extent to which mental health consumers encounter stigma in their daily lives is a matter of sub- stantial importance for their recovery and quality of life. This article summarizes the results of a nation- wide survey of 1,301 mental health consumers con- cerning their experience of stigma and discrimination. Survey results and followup interviews with 100 respondents revealed experience

  5. Qualitative Research Methods in Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Peters

    2010-01-01

    As the evidence base for the study of mental health problems develops, there is a need for increasingly rigorous and systematic research methodologies. Complex questions require complex methodological approaches. Recognising this, the MRC guidelines for developing and testing complex interventions place qualitative methods as integral to each stage of intervention development and implementation. However, mental health research has lagged behind

  6. Starting mental health services in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daya J. Somasundaram; Willem A. C. M. van de Put; Maurice Eisenbruch

    1999-01-01

    Cambodia has undergone massive psychosocial trauma in the last few decades, but has had virtually no western-style mental health services. For the first time in Cambodia a number of mental health clinics in rural areas have been started. This experience is used to discuss the risks and opportunities in introducing these services in the present war-torn situation. Basic statistics from

  7. Mental Health Professionals and the Bereaved.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterweis, Marian; Townsend, Jessica

    This booklet provides mental health professionals with an analytic framework for understanding psychosocial reactions to bereavement of adults and children and for selecting appropriate intervention strategies. It also identifies those people most likely to need the intervention of a mental health professional to help prevent or mitigate…

  8. The Crisis in Mental Health Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bertram S.

    Presented is a speech by Bertram Brown, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, on the effects of decreased federal funding of mental health research. Brown notes that there has been a 56% slash in the purchasing power of the research grant program when inflation is accounted for. It is suggested that causes of the dwindling support…

  9. Mental Health of Students. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that mental health is as critical to academic success as physical well-being. School nurses play a vital role in the school community by promoting positive mental health development in students through school/community-based programs and curricula. As members of…

  10. The Competent Early Childhood Mental Health Specialist

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon Korfmacher; Aimee Hilado

    2008-01-01

    Summary Over the last decade mental health and early childhood professionals in several states have begun to develop competency systems to guide the field in determining what constitutes a knowledgeable and skilled early childhood mental health (ECMH) provider. Competency systems generally define domains of knowledge, skills, and abilities that ECMH providers should have, and establish areas of service and treatment.

  11. Minority Status, Aging, and Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markides, Kyriakos S.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews findings on mental health and life satisfaction among aged blacks, Mexican Americans, and Native Americans. Mental health and life satisfaction of these groups was no lower than might be anticipated based on their relative socioeconomic standing. Little is known about how ethnicity and minority group status influence psychopathology and…

  12. Funding Early Childhood Mental Health Services & Supports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishmann, Amy; Kates, Donald; Kaufmann, Roxane

    This paper is the first of a two-part series on financing early childhood mental health services. It discusses the need for a systemic approach to financing early childhood mental health services and supports and presents a matrix to assist states and communities in the design of comprehensive financing systems. The vertical axis of the matrix…

  13. Commonalities in Values among Mental Health Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consoli, Andres J.; Williams, Laurie M.

    1999-01-01

    Mental-health counselors (N=161) from Buenos Aires, Argentina, who ascribed to distinct theoretical orientations were surveyed with regard to their personal and mental-health values. This study provides further empirical input on what the values commonalities are even among counselors who profess distinct theoretical orientations and have a…

  14. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  15. Mental Health and Work: Issues and Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Lou, Ed.; Verins, Irene, Ed.; Willis, Eileen, Ed.

    In Australia, there is increasing attention being paid to the promotion of mental health and the prevention of serious mental disorder by policymakers, funders, academics and service providers. This has required a shift in thinking to focus on health and well being, not just on illness and treatment. The National Action Plan for Promotion,…

  16. Management of Frontotemporal Dementia in Mental Health and Multidisciplinary Settings

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Mary Anne; Shnall, Adriana; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Huey, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in the mental health setting and issues pertaining to longitudinal care of this population in a specialty clinic are reviewed. FTD is often misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder, most commonly as a mood disorder. FTD has features that overlap with those of major depression, mania, obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. We describe these features and how to differentiate FTD from these psychiatric disorders. This paper also describes practical issues in the management of FTD, specifically the issues that clinicians, patients and their families face in managing this disease. Areas of clinical care along the continuum are explored; FTD care involves collaborative management of symptoms and disability, and assisting patients and families in adapting to the disease. PMID:23611352

  17. Perspectives on disaster mental health intervention from the USNS Comfort.

    PubMed

    Reeves, James J

    2002-09-01

    Immediately after September 11, 2001, the USNS Comfort was deployed to provide relief to the rescue workers involved with the World Trade Center collapse. The members of the behavioral healthcare team had little field experience in disaster psychiatry and had to organize a response quickly. Due to the unique nature of the assignment, the behavioral care team had to take nontraditional approaches to care. Through preparation of the team to implementation of care, the team learned a great deal about disaster mental health interventions. These perspectives are compared with those in the psychiatric literature to better understand the lessons of September 11th. PMID:12363155

  18. M-Psychiatry: Sensor Networks for Psychiatric Health Monitoring

    E-print Network

    Magill, Evan H.

    M-Psychiatry: Sensor Networks for Psychiatric Health Monitoring Jesse Blum, Prof. Evan Magill, PAM can be seen as an M-Psychiatry2 project. An M-Psychiatry solution could provide patients and clini issues in- volved in an M-Psychiatry solution to this type of data collection and transmission problem

  19. Analysis of Assembly Bill 1600: Mental Health Services

    E-print Network

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2010-01-01

    perspective. Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 2007;28:1320-International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. Zuvekas SH,Mental Health Services except substance related disorders, life transition problems, skilled nursing

  20. Analysis of Assembly Bill 154: Mental Health Services

    E-print Network

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01

    perspective. Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 2007;28:1320-Journal of Mental Health Nursing. Zarkin, Bray, Aldridge,Mental Health Services except substance related disorders, life transition problems, skilled nursing

  1. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

  2. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mental health services. 17.98 Section...Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following...furnished to persons who were receiving mental health services in...

  3. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

  4. Mental Health and Teens: Watch for Danger Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stages Listen Espańol Text Size Email Print Share Mental Health and Teens: Watch for Danger Signs Article Body ... be strong indicators of serious mental health issues. Mental Health “Red Flags” Parents Should Be Alert For: Excessive ...

  5. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mental health services. 17.98 Section...Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following...furnished to persons who were receiving mental health services in...

  6. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

  7. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mental health services. 17.98 Section...Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following...furnished to persons who were receiving mental health services in...

  8. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

  9. 76 FR 80741 - TRICARE: Certified Mental Health Counselors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ...0720-AB55] TRICARE: Certified Mental Health Counselors AGENCY: Office of...would allow licensed or certified mental health counselors to be able to independently...current TRICARE requirements, mental health counselors (MHCs) are...

  10. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mental health services. 17.98 Section...Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following...furnished to persons who were receiving mental health services in...

  11. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mental health services. 17.98 Section...Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following...furnished to persons who were receiving mental health services in...

  12. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

  13. REPORT OF THE PROVOSTIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH

    E-print Network

    Prodić, Aleksandar

    REPORT OF THE PROVOSTIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH October 2014 The University of Toronto Student Mental Health Strategy and Framework #12;Report of the Provostial Advisory Committee on Student Mental Health 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary

  14. Racial/ethnic disparities in children's emergency mental health after economic downturns.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Tim; Kim, Yonsu; Snowden, Lonnie

    2014-05-01

    African American children-more than other race/ethnicities-rely on emergency psychiatric care. One hypothesized cause of this overrepresentation involves heightened sensitivity to economic downturns. We test whether the African American/white difference in psychiatric emergency visits increases in months when the regional economy contracts. We applied time-series methods to California Medicaid claims (1999-2008; N = 7.1 million visits). One month following mass layoffs, African American youths use more emergency mental health services than do non-Hispanic whites. Economic downturns may provoke or uncover mental disorder especially among African American youth who by and large do not participate in the labor force. PMID:23397232

  15. Women's mental health in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Niaz, Unaiza

    2004-01-01

    In Pakistan, societal attitudes and norms, as well as cultural practices (Karo Kari, exchange marriages, dowry, etc.), play a vital role in women's mental health. The religious and ethnic conflicts, along with the dehumanizing attitudes towards women, the extended family system, role of in-laws in daily lives of women, represent major issues and stressors. Such practices in Pakistan have created the extreme marginalisation of women in numerous spheres of life, which has had an adverse psychological impact. Violence against women has become one of the acceptable means whereby men exercise their culturally constructed right to control women. Still, compared to other South Asian countries, Pakistani women are relatively better off than their counterparts. PMID:16633458

  16. Managed Mental Health Care: Intentional Misdiagnosis of Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Sharon A.; Cox, Jane A.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an overview of the effectiveness of managed health care systems and their impact on mental health counselors. They review ethical and legal dilemmas involving informed consent, confidentiality, client autonomy, competence, treatment plans, and termination that had not existed prior to the introduction of…

  17. Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

  18. The mental health of informal caregivers in Ontario: an epidemiological survey.

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, J J; Goering, P N; Rogers, J M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study describes the mental health status, disability, physical health, and mental health service utilization of informal care-givers under the age of 65 in the province of Ontario. METHODS: The study analyzed data collected in the 1991 province-wide, population-based mental health supplement to the Ontario Health Survey. Diagnoses from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition, revised, were generated on the basis of a structured diagnostic interview. Caregivers and noncaregivers are compared here on past-year prevalence of psychiatric disorder, physical illness, disability, and utilization of mental health services. The possible confounding effects of age, sex, employment status, and economic disadvantage are explored. RESULTS: Informal caregivers (n = 1219) constituted 15.0% of the sample. Caregivers had higher rates of affective (6.3% vs 4.2%) and anxiety (17.5% vs 10.9%) disorders than noncaregivers and used health services for mental health problems at nearly twice the rate. CONCLUSIONS: Documentation of the prevalence of caregiving and the increased prevalence of psychiatric disorders, disability, and service utilization among caregivers is of critical importance as governments continue to move toward community-based care. To accomplish this goal, the needs of caregivers must be acknowledged and met by the establishment of appropriate and readily accessible support services. PMID:9431291

  19. Does Integrated Behavioral Health Care Reduce Mental Health Disparities for Latinos? Initial Findings

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Ana J.; Andrews, Arthur R.; Villalobos, Bianca T.; Pastrana, Freddie A.; Cavell, Timothy A.; Gomez, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Integrated behavioral health care (IBHC) is a model of mental health care service delivery that seeks to reduce stigma and service utilization barriers by embedding mental health professionals into the primary care team. This study explored whether IBHC service referrals, utilization, and outcomes were comparable for Latinos and non-Latino White primary care patients. Data for the current study were collected from 793 consecutive patients (63.8% Latino; M age = 29.02 years [SD = 17.96]; 35.1% under 18 years; 65.3% women; 54.3% uninsured) seen for behavioral health services in 2 primary care clinics during a 10.5 month period. The most common presenting concerns were depression (21.6%), anxiety (18.5%), adjustment disorder (13.0%), and externalizing behavior problems (9.8%). Results revealed that while Latino patients had significantly lower self-reported psychiatric distress, significantly higher clinician-assigned global assessment of functioning scores, and fewer received a psychiatric diagnosis at their initial visit compared to non-Latino White patients, both groups had comparable utilization rates, comparable and clinically significant improvements in symptoms (Cohen’s d values > .50), and expressed high satisfaction with integrated behavioral services. These data provide preliminary evidence suggesting integration of behavioral health services into primary care clinics may help reduce mental health disparities for Latinos. PMID:25309845

  20. [Sexuality, psychiatric institution and normalization of the mentally ill.].

    PubMed

    Dupras, A

    1977-01-01

    The author sets three objectives: to determine the status of sexuality in pedagogical institutions; to examine the means used to control sexuality; and to trace a global interpretation of the links between sexuality and the institution. The development of the asylum saw the appearance of moral treatment which sought to promote certain social values and to repress those behaviours such as sexual activity which opposed the fundamental bourgeois social virtues. These notions were presented in the guise of an ethical standard and a normative scientific current (eg. sexuality is a symptom to be eliminated; it is a cause of insanity.) Now, while no longer attacked in the institution, sexuality is nonetheless perceived as lacking any inherent value and is worthwhile only in terms of its therapeutic utility* The same phenomenon is observable in the school. To illustrate the second point the author analyses the phenomenon of masturbation. The 18th century saw masturbation cited as the cause of insanity and numerous physical disorders. Viewed as a diversion of the child's natural forms, and as bringing into question the substitutive educational system, masturbation was excluded from the school of the period. At present, masturbation is permitted but there is no recognition of the child's free enjoyment. Instead a system of exercises has been developped which permit the child greater body control. This masturbation has become a therapeutic technique to obtain a normative level of pleasure.Touching on the third point, the author states that society regulates sexual life with a complex normative system in order to incorporate it within an identification with sexual institutions and no longer with judicial sanctions. Applying this analysis to the situation of the mentally ill, the author argues that the latter's sexuality is socially normalized by the definition and utilisation of illegal areas where it's actualization is permitted. PMID:17093652

  1. [Toward further reform of mental health care and welfare].

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Teruhiko

    2011-01-01

    The Committee for Investigating the Future of Mental Health Care and Welfare, launched in 2008 by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, issued its final report in September 2009. The 2009 report was an expert-driven interim review of implementation of the 10-year plan proposed in the 2004 "Vision for Reforming Mental Health Care and Welfare," which marked its midpoint in 2009, and was conducted in order to identify priority issues in the final five years of the plan. The report recognizes that "mental illness significantly impairs quality of life and causes great socioeconomic loss"; that "health care and welfare assistance systems that support the ability of people with mental disorders to live in the community are inadequate"; and that "large numbers of patients with schizophrenia remain institutionalized over the long term. The report notes that this is due to previous policies that promoted institutionalized care, with regard to which concerned parties, including government entities, have expressed regret." The new approach described in the report can be summarized as (1) promoting the basic principle of moving from institutionalized care toward community-based care, based on the vision for reform noted above; (2) creating a society where patients who have mental disorders can receive high-quality health care, and depending on the patients' symptoms and wishes where they can receive appropriate health care and welfare services while continuing to live independently and securely in the community; and (3) speeding up the process of reform in mental health care and welfare. The core focus of reform is expressed in four fundamental principles: (1) restructuring mental health care (restructuring and improving the healthcare system by upgrading community-centered healthcare, shifting the focus of hospital care to the acute stage, and similar efforts) ; (2) improving the quality of mental health care (improving the quality of health care provided to each individual patient, whether it involves pharmacological or psychosocial therapy, and also improving the quality of health care by promoting staff development) ; (3) strengthening community living support systems (developing welfare services that support the ability of persons with disabilities to live in the community, improving care management, improving emergency and community health services, securing places of residence, etc.) ; and (4) prioritizing increased awareness and understanding of psychiatric illness (promoting an accurate understanding of mental disorders so that patients can obtain help at an early stage, and so that people with mental disorders can live as fully-participating members of the community). The committee also reviewed the targets stated in the vision for reform, and established a new maximum limit of 150,000 patients institutionalized with schizophrenia (the number was 196,000 in 2005). By 2011, the committee will also set a concrete target for the number of patients institutionalized with dementia. Preserving the 2004 goals expressed under the vision for reform, the mean target ratio of patients remaining hospitalized in psychiatric wards less than one year, for all prefectures, was set at 24% or less, while the target discharge rate for patients hospitalized for one year or longer, for each prefecture, was fixed at a minimum of 29%. PMID:21706855

  2. A Survey of Mental Health Service Provision in New York State Residential Treatment Centers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy J. L. Baker; Darren Fulmore; Julie Collins

    2008-01-01

    Thirty-seven of 43 (86%) agencies operating child welfare residential treatment centers in New York State responded to a survey about the provision of mental health services. Questions were asked about provision of services, satisfaction with services, and suggestions for improvement in five domains: therapeutic milieu, individual therapy, group therapy, family therapy, and psychiatric services. Results revealed that due to funding

  3. Mental health effects of the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor restart

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Dew; E. J. Bromet; H. C. Schulberg; L. O. Dunn; D. K. Parkinson

    1987-01-01

    Controversy over potential mental health effects of the Three Mile Island Unit-1 restart led the authors to examine prospectively the pattern of psychiatric symptoms in a sample of Three Mile Island area mothers of young children. Symptom levels after restart were elevated over previous levels; a sizable subcohort of the sample reported relatively serious degrees of postrestart distress. History of

  4. Mental Health Services for African Americans: A Cultural\\/Racial Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard H. Dana

    2002-01-01

    African Americans have made consistent progress toward first-class citizenship since 1965. Nonetheless, mental health services for this population have been biased, incomplete, and deficient because similarities to European Americans have been emphasized whereas differences were largely ignored. This article addresses some differences, including cultural\\/racial identity and the cultural self, that affect assessment, psychiatric diagnoses, and psychotherapy or other interventions. An

  5. The Prevalence and Incidence of Mental Ill-Health in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantry, D.; Cooper, S. -A.; Smiley, E.; Morrison, J.; Allan, L.; Williamson, A.; Finlayson, J.; Jackson, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: While there is considerable literature on adults with Down syndrome who have dementia, there is little published on the epidemiology of other types of mental ill-health in this population. Method: Longitudinal cohort study of adults with Down syndrome who received detailed psychiatric assessment (n = 186 at the first time point; n =…

  6. Use of the Child Behavior Checklist as a Diagnostic Screening Tool in Community Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rishel, Carrie W.; Greeno, Catherine; Marcus, Steven C.; Shear, M. Katherine; Anderson, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study examines whether the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) can be used as an accurate psychiatric screening tool for children in community mental health settings. Method: Associations, logistic regression models, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were used to test the predictive relationship between the CBCL and…

  7. Morale and job perception of community mental health professionals in Berlin and London

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Priebe; Walid K. H. Fakhoury; Karin Hoffmann; Richard A. Powell

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Morale and job perception of staff in community mental health care may influence feasibility and quality of care, and some research has suggested particularly high burnout of staff in the community. The aims of this study were to: a) assess morale, i. e. team identity, job satisfaction and burnout, in psychiatrists, community psychiatric nurses and social workers in community

  8. Intellectual Disability and Mental Ill Health: A View of Australian Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torr, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This general review situates Australian research within a framework that quantifies and describes mental health needs of the population with intellectual disabilities across the life span, surveys service provision, and develops the evidence base to inform clinicians regarding assessment and management of psychopathology and psychiatric disorder…

  9. Why the professional-client ethic is inadequate in mental health care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wai-Ching Leung

    2002-01-01

    Patients who are subject to compulsory care constitute a substantial proportion of the work-load of mental health professionals, particularly psychiatric nurses. This article examines the traditional 'beneficence-autonomy' approach to ethics in compulsory psy- chiatric care and evaluates it against the reality of daily practice. Risk to the public has always been an important but often unacknowledged consideration. Inequalities exist among

  10. Development and Validation of a Brief Mental Health Screening Instrument for Newly Incarcerated Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Julian D.; Trestman, Robert L.; Wiesbrock, Valerie; Zhang, Wanli

    2007-01-01

    The authors report the development and initial psychometric evaluation of gender-specific brief screening instruments to identify undetected psychiatric impairment on incarceration. Women and men completed the Correctional Mental Health Screen (CMHS), a 56-item screen derived from validated measures. Representative subsamples completed structured…

  11. Challenges for psychiatry: delivering the Mental Health Declaration for Europe

    PubMed Central

    MUIJEN, MATT

    2006-01-01

    Mental health care is in the process of transformation across the European Region, due to a combination of recognition of disease burden, poor treatment conditions and demand from clinicians and the public. This transformation affects the scope of mental health, increasingly including promotion and prevention, and the structure and process of care, shifting to community based delivery. Many psychiatrists are in leadership positions, able to influence policies and strategies. But their work is also seriously affected by the consequences of these policies. New roles and responsibilities of all members of a multi-disciplinary team need to be planned, and education and training have to be designed to prepare professionals to deal with expectations and demands. Psychiatrists face major challenges, since their complex roles are affected in multiple ways by the psychiatric and general health system. Some of these challenges can be addressed by the psychiatric profession and their partners, including patient and family organizations; others require wide ranging changes in attitude and system design. PMID:16946954

  12. Measuring Disparities across the Distribution of Mental Health Care Expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Benjamin Lę; Manning, Willard; Alegría, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous mental health care disparities studies predominantly compare mean mental health care use across racial/ethnic groups, leaving policymakers with little information on disparities among those with a higher level of expenditures. Aims of the Study To identify racial/ethnic disparities among individuals at varying quantiles of mental health care expenditures. To assess whether disparities in the upper quantiles of expenditure differ by insurance status, income and education. Methods Data were analyzed from a nationally representative sample of white, black and Latino adults 18 years and older (n=83,878). Our dependent variable was total mental health care expenditure. We measured disparities in any mental health care expenditures, disparities in mental health care expenditure at the 95th, 97.5th, and 99th expenditure quantiles of the full population using quantile regression, and at the 50th, 75th, and 95th quantiles for positive users. In the full population, we tested interaction coefficients between race/ethnicity and income, insurance, and education levels to determine whether racial/ethnic disparities in the upper quantiles differed by income, insurance and education. Results Significant Black-white and Latino-white disparities were identified in any mental health care expenditures. In the full population, moving up the quantiles of mental health care expenditures, Black-White and Latino-White disparities were reduced but remained statistically significant. No statistically significant disparities were found in analyses of positive users only. The magnitude of black-white disparities was smaller among those enrolled in public insurance programs compared to the privately insured and uninsured in the 97.5th and 99th quantiles. Disparities persist in the upper quantiles among those in higher income categories and after excluding psychiatric inpatient and emergency department (ED) visits. Discussion Disparities exist in any mental health care and among those that use the most mental health care resources, but much of disparities seem to be driven by lack of access. The data do not allow us to disentangle whether disparities were related to white respondent’s overuse or underuse as compared to minority groups. The cross-sectional data allow us to make only associational claims about the role of insurance, income, and education in disparities. With these limitations in mind, we identified a persistence of disparities in overall expenditures even among those in the highest income categories, after controlling for mental health status and observable sociodemographic characteristics. Implications for Health Care Provision and Use Interventions are needed to equalize resource allocation to racial/ethnic minority patients regardless of their income, with emphasis on outreach interventions to address the disparities in access that are responsible for the no/low expenditures for even Latinos at higher levels of illness severity. Implications for Health Policies Increased policy efforts are needed to reduce the gap in health insurance for Latinos and improve outreach programs to enroll those in need into mental health care services. Implications for Further Research Future studies that conclusively disentangle overuse and appropriate use in these populations are warranted. PMID:23676411

  13. The Centre for International Mental Health approach to mental health system development.

    PubMed

    Minas, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Although mental disorders are a major public health problem, the development of mental health services has been a low priority everywhere, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Recent years have seen a growing understanding of the importance of population mental health and increased attention to the need to develop mental health systems for responding to population mental health service needs. In countries and regions where mental health services are all but nonexistent, and in postconflict and postdisaster settings, there are many impediments to establishing or scaling up mental health services. It is frequently necessary to act simultaneously on multiple fronts: generating local evidence that will inform decision makers; developing a policy framework; securing investment; determining the most appropriate service model for the context; training and supporting mental health workers; establishing or expanding existing services; putting in place systems for monitoring and evaluation; and strengthening leadership and governance capabilities. This article presents the approach of the Centre for International Mental Health in the Melbourne School of Population Health to mental health system development, and illustrates the way in which the elements of the program are integrated by giving a brief case example from Sri Lanka. PMID:22335181

  14. Learning from the world of mental health care: nursing students' narratives.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, L; Mikkonen, I; Jokinen, P

    2011-09-01

    This narrative study describes the substance of nursing students' learning in the area of mental health and their responses to the challenges of working in the psychiatric field. The data consisted of 39 critical incidents written by 20 Finnish second-year nursing students during their 5-week mental health placement. The narrative analysis method was used in the data analysis and the configuration of three consistent learning storylines: self-awareness and self-esteem, the nurse-patient relationship and mental health care methods. The three storylines characterized the essence of the students' learning and their responses to the challenges of the psychiatric field during the placement. The students were actively exposed to complicated care situations and patient encounters in which they had to face their own emotions and test coping skills. It seems that the critical incident technique stimulated students' narrative skills and possibly sensitized them for listening at the stories of their future patients. PMID:21848597

  15. Profession differences in family focused practice in the adult mental health system.

    PubMed

    Maybery, Darryl; Goodyear, Melinda; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Cuff, Rose; Reupert, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    There is a large gulf between what psychiatric services should (or could) provide and what they do in practice. This article sought to determine practice differences between the differing professions working in adult mental health services in terms of their family focused work. Three hundred and seven adult mental health professionals completed a cross-sectional survey of family focused practices in adult mental health services. Findings highlight that social workers engaged in more family focused practice compared to psychiatric nurses, who performed consistently the lowest on direct family care, compared to both social workers and psychologists. Clear skill, knowledge, and confidence differences are indicated between the professions. The article concludes by offering direction for future profession education and training in family focused practices. PMID:24945363

  16. [Suicide rates and mental health services in Greece].

    PubMed

    Giotakos, O; Tsouvelas, G; Kontaxakis, V

    2012-01-01

    Some studies have shown that access to mental health services can have an impact on mental health outcomes, including the suicide rates. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between regional and prefecture suicide rates (suicides per 100.000 residents) and both the number of primary and mental health-care service providers and the number of mental health infrastructures in Greece. Data were taken mainly from the Hellenic Statistical Authority (EL.STAT.) and the Ministry of Health for the period 2002-2009. Spearman correlations were used to examine the relationship between primary health-care, mental health providers and suicide rates per 100,000 residents at the prefecture, administrative region and geographical region levels. Men showed significantly higher suicide rates than women (U=-7.20, p<0.001). For the period 2002-2009, the highest suicide rate at the prefecture level were in Rethymno (6.99), Rodopi (5.62) and Zakynthos (5.28). For the same period, the highest suicide rates at the geographical level were in Peloponnisos (4.01), Ionian Islands (4.03) and Grete (3.65). Increase in suicide rates (2009 vs 2002-2009) was observed in the following geographical regions of Greece: Crete (4.76 vs 3.65), Thrace (4.45 vs 2.02) Central Greece (3.61 vs 1.39) Aegean Islands (3.03 vs 1.28). The highest correlations between suiciderutes and health services at the geographic regional level were found to be during the period 2007-2009, where suicide rates showed a significant negative correlation with privately practicing psychiatrists (rho=-0.71, p<0.05), privately practicing psychologists (rho=-0.56, p<0.05), pathologists (rho=-0.73, p<0.01), and the number of the official mental health services (psychiatric clinics, day centers, mobile mental health units etc.) (rho=-0.73, p<0.01). In conclusion it was found that at all regional levels, suicide rates were reversely related to the number of primary health-care and mental health service providers, as well as the number of mental health infrastructures in Greece. It should be noted that the running financial crisis in Greece seems to have many effects on quality of life, since the most common effects of an economic crisis are unemployment, spending power cuts,general insecurity and public spending retrenchment, including health related budget cuts. Having in mind the above situation, further analyses are needed to determine the relationship between mental health-care services, suicide rates and other psychosocial indices, in order to provide a strategic plan for a better design of mental health-care policy in Greece. PMID:22549038

  17. Mental Health Considerations in Secondary HIV Prevention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia I. Grossman; Christopher M. Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Despite substantial attention in the past decade to the co-morbidity of mental health problems among people living with HIV\\/AIDS\\u000a (PLWHA), these problems remain a significant barrier to maintaining health and secondary prevention. To address these issues,\\u000a program staff from the Center for Mental Health Research on AIDS at the NIMH convened a meeting on 19th and 20th July 2007\\u000a to

  18. Patient-centered medical homes: presenting a role for the advanced practice mental health nurse.

    PubMed

    Jordow, Rechele L

    2014-03-01

    As the burden of mental illness grows in the United States, recent data show that many in need of behavioral health services are not currently receiving them. Recent passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has presented an opportunity to change the delivery of behavioral health care to a consumer-driven, evidence-based model geared toward the coordination of care within the primary care setting. Psychiatric-mental health clinical nurse specialist/nurse practitioners are in an ideal position to deliver cost-effective behavioral health care in collaboration with primary care providers under the new patient-centered medical home model of care. PMID:24200915

  19. Promoting and Protecting Mental Health as Flourishing: A Complementary Strategy for Improving National Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Corey L. M. Keyes

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes the conception and diagnosis of the mental health continuum, the findings supporting the two continua model of mental health and illness, and the benefits of flourishing to individuals and society. Completely mentally healthy adults—individuals free of a 12-month mental disorder and flourishing—reported the fewest missed days of work, the fewest half-day or greater work cutbacks, the healthiest

  20. Mental Health Service Delivery Following Health System Reform in Colombia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mauricio Romero-Gonzalez; Gerardo Gonzalez; Robert A. Rosenheck

    2003-01-01

    Background: In 1993, Colombia underwent an ambitious and comprehensive process of health system reform based on managed competition and structured pluralism, but did not include coverage for mental health services. Aims of the Study: In this study, we sought to evaluate the impact of the reform on access to mental health services and whether there were changes in the pattern

  1. Coercion and compulsion in community mental health care.

    PubMed

    Molodynski, Andrew; Rugkĺsa, Jorun; Burns, Tom

    2010-01-01

    There is ongoing debate in the UK as to the place of coercion and compulsion in community mental health care. Recent changes in service provision and amendments to the Mental Health Act in England and Wales have increased the scope for compulsion in the community. This has intensified the debate revealing fault lines in the psychiatric and legal professions. Despite powerful arguments from all sides there is little empirical evidence to inform this debate at a clinical or a theoretical level. This review utilizes evidence from articles in peer reviewed journals. Papers were identified from electronic databases, the authors' databases of relevant literature and personal correspondence with experts in the field. The evidence base is relatively small but is expanding. It has been demonstrated that informal coercion is common in USA mental health services and can be experienced negatively by patients. There is evidence that powers of compulsion in community mental health care are used frequently when available and their availability is generally seen as positive by clinicians when practice becomes embedded. The evidence for the effectiveness of compulsion in community mental health care is patchy and conflicting, with randomized or other trials failing to show significant benefits overall even if secondary analyses may suggest positive outcomes in some subgroups. There are widespread regional and international differences in the use of community compulsion. Research examining treatment pressures (or 'leverage') and the subjective patient experience of them appears to be expanding and is increasing our awareness and understanding of these complex issues. There is an urgent need for evidence regarding the usefulness and acceptability of compulsion in the community now that powers have been made available. Trials of the effectiveness of compulsion are needed as is qualitative work examining the experiences of those involved in the use of such orders. These are needed to help clinicians utilize the powers available to them in an informed and judicious fashion and to ensure adequate training. PMID:20501486

  2. Under the golden psi: the franchising of mental health.

    PubMed

    Gessner, T L; Morisseau, D S

    1980-11-01

    M. Brewster-Smith (1968) divided the history of psychiatry into three revolutionary periods. The first was the unshackling of the lunatics and the conception of mental illness. The second revolution was the spread of the dynamic theory of Freud with its emphasis on the one-to-one therapeutic relationship. The third revolution was the community mental health movement with its emphasis on bringing treatment into the community. We are now on the verge of yet another revolution. The new revolution is quiet and its leaders come from within the psychiatric profession. The major feature of this revolution is the binding together of medical authority and social treatment models within a corporate structure. The new movement takes the individually oriented private practitioners and shows them that in union there is profit. PMID:7422741

  3. I. Comparing Use of Public and Private Mental Health Services: The Enduring Barriers of Race and Age

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marvin S. Swartz; H. Ryan Wagner; Jeffrey W. Swanson; Barbara J. Burns; Linda K. George; Deborah K. Padgett

    1998-01-01

    Data from the NIMH-Epidemiologic Catchment AreaProject were used to predict differential use of privateversus public outpatient mental health services, asalient concern in integrating public and private services in market-based health care reformefforts. Having a recent psychiatric disorder, being age25-44, female, white, of higher educational level, andunmarried increase the odds of any mental health service use. However, odds of treatment in

  4. A bioecological systems approach for navigating the college mental health crisis.

    PubMed

    Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie; Bell, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    McLean Hospital's College Mental Health Program was established four years ago as an institutional response to escalating, national college mental health concerns. The critical factors underlying the college mental health crisis in this country have been debated, examined, and addressed almost exclusively within college and university settings. McLean Hospital is the first psychiatric hospital to develop a comprehensive college student program that bridges the gap between a psychiatric hospital and multiple campus settings as an attempt to address the specific needs of college student-patients across levels of psychiatric care and diagnostic areas/programs. Using a bioecological systems framework, this review examines (1) the strategic clinical, education/outreach, and research efforts that collectively represent a paradigm shift to extend responsibility for addressing serious college mental health challenges beyond college and university campuses, (2) the challenges and benefits of creating stronger multi-campus/hospital collaborations in order to improve our understanding of college students with serious mental illness, and (3) the progress in addressing these needs more effectively and in establishing documented best practices and policies through effective and innovative partnerships. PMID:22894727

  5. [psychenet - The Hamburg Network for Mental Health].

    PubMed

    Härter, Martin; Brandes, Andreas; Hillebrandt, Bernd; Lambert, Martin

    2015-07-01

    With the research and development project psychenet: the Hamburg Network for Mental Health (2011?-?2015), the Federal Ministry of Education and Research contributes to strengthening healthcare regions in Germany by establishing new transsectoral cooperations and implementing evaluated innovations. More than 300 partners from research, health care, health industry and government in the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg are promoting innovative measures to improve the detection, diagnosis, and treatment for mental disorders. The main objective is to implement integrated healthcare networks based on evidence for effective treatment methods, deriving from high-quality research throughout five indications such as psychosis, depression, somatoform and functional syndromes, anorexia and bulimia and addiction illnesses in adolescence. Those networks are accompanied by additional measures, for example, for improving awareness, information and education for mental health, addressing occupational health or strengthening the participation of patients and their families suffering from mental illness. PMID:26135279

  6. MORTALITY IN PERSONS WITH MENTAL DISORDERS IS SUBSTANTIALLY OVERESTIMATED USING INPATIENT PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSES

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, John P. A.; Sundquist, Kristina; Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Sundquist, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are associated with premature mortality, and the magnitudes of risk have commonly been estimated using hospital data. However, psychiatric patients who are hospitalized have more severe illness and do not adequately represent mental disorders in the general population. We conducted a national cohort study using outpatient and inpatient diagnoses for the entire Swedish adult population (N=7,253,516) to examine the extent to which mortality risks are overestimated using inpatient diagnoses only. Outcomes were all-cause and suicide mortality during 8 years of follow-up (2001–2008). There were 377,339 (5.2%) persons with any inpatient psychiatric diagnosis, vs. 680,596 (9.4%) with any inpatient or outpatient diagnosis, hence 44.6% of diagnoses were missed using inpatient data only. When including and accounting for prevalent psychiatric cases, all-cause mortality risk among persons with any mental disorder was overestimated by 15.3% using only inpatient diagnoses (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 5.89; 95% CI, 5.85–5.92) vs. both inpatient and outpatient diagnoses (aHR, 5.11; 95% CI, 5.08–5.14). Suicide risk was overestimated by 18.5% (aHRs, 23.91 vs. 20.18), but this varied widely by specific disorders, from 4.4% for substance use to 49.1% for anxiety disorders. The sole use of inpatient diagnoses resulted in even greater overestimation of all-cause or suicide mortality risks when prevalent cases were unidentified (~20–30%) or excluded (~25–40%). However, different methods for handling prevalent cases resulted in only modest variation in risk estimates when using both inpatient and outpatient diagnoses. These findings have important implications for the interpretation of hospital-based studies and the design of future studies. PMID:23806577

  7. The Centre for International Mental Health Approach to Mental Health System Development

    PubMed Central

    Minas, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Although mental disorders are a major public health problem, the development of mental health services has been a low priority everywhere, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Recent years have seen a growing understanding of the importance of population mental health and increased attention to the need to developmental health systems for responding to population mental health service needs. In countries and regions where mental health services are all but nonexistent, and in postconflict and postdisaster settings, there are many impediments to establishing or scaling up mental health services. It is frequently necessary to act simultaneously on multiple fronts: generating local evidence that will inform decision makers; developing a policy framework; securing investment; determining the most appropriate service model for the context; training and supporting mental health workers; establishing or expanding existing services; putting in place systems for monitoring and evaluation; and strengthening leadership and governance capabilities. This article presents the approach of the Centre for International Mental Health in the Melbourne School of Population Health to mental health system development, and illustrates the way in which the elements of the program are integrated by giving a brief case example from Sri Lanka. (harv rev psychiatry 2012;20:37–46.) PMID:22335181

  8. The Physical and Mental Health of Children in Foster Care

    PubMed Central

    FERRARA, Pietro; ROMANI, Lorenza; BOTTARO, Giorgia; IANNIELLO, Francesca; FABRIZIO, Giovanna Carmela; CHIARETTI, Antonio; ALVARO, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate physical and mental health in children in foster care and comparison with general population. Methods: The study is carried out between September 2011 and April 2012 into nine group homes in Rome. It involved 112 children ranging in age 2–17 years, living in temporary care facilities or institutes. All data came out of clinical history and physical exams, validated by a pediatrician. Such data were being then compared with samples of general population. Results: Significant themes were high percentage of children with psychiatric disorders in foster care (22.3%); high percentage of psychiatric disorders diagnosed immediately while arriving at the foster care (56%); no significant differences in weight, height and BMI between children in foster care and general population; significant differences (P<0.05) for allergy, gastrointestinal diseases and caries between children in foster care and general population. Conclusion: The results suggest that the physical health of children in group homes is no worse than that of children living care in their own homes and that the foster care provides necessary conditions to support the growth of the children and their physical, mental and social needs. PMID:23785675

  9. Enhancing home visiting with mental health consultation.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Barbara Dillon; Mackrain, Mary; Perry, Deborah F; O'Brien, Kevin; Gwaltney, Margaret K

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting programs have been successful in engaging and enrolling families who are at high risk for stress, depression, and substance abuse. However, many of these mothers may not be receiving mental health services because home visitors lack the knowledge and skills to identify mental health or determine how to appropriately address these problems. In response, a growing number of home visiting programs are expanding their capacity by integrating a mental health provider into their ongoing operations. This approach, referred to as early childhood mental health consultation, involves a partnership between a professional consultant with early childhood mental health expertise and home visiting or family support programs, staff, and families. This integrated model holds the promise of promoting parent and child behavioral health by enhancing the capacity of home visitors to identify and appropriately address the unmet mental health needs of children and families. The article highlights efforts under way in several federally funded Linking Actions for Unmet Needs in Children's Health Project sites where local programs are testing the effectiveness of this model. PMID:24187122

  10. Migration and common mental disorder: an improvement in mental health over time?

    PubMed

    Butler, Margaret; Warfa, Nasir; Khatib, Yasmin; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2015-02-01

    Global migration is reaching record high levels and UK migrant groups comprise an increasing proportion of the total population. The migratory process causes stress that can affect mental health. There is limited consistent empirical evidence of a longitudinal nature to explain the association between migration and mental health. This review aims to examine the evidence of a relationship between migration and common mental disorder (CMD) amongst migrants over time. A comprehensive search of medical and psychiatric databases for global quantitative empirical studies investigating incidence of CMD amongst adult migrants from 1975 to July 2012 was conducted. Declines in rates of CMD amongst migrants over time were reported by two thirds of the 18 studies reviewed, less than one third of which were statistically significant. On the contrary, three studies showed an increased rate of CMD, one statistically significant. Individual psychological resources, social support, the acculturation process, cultural variations and time since relocation are identified as statistically significant protective factors against the development of CMD amongst migrants. New enlightening points include the significant impact of varying patterns of psychological distress, of which negative is the most adverse for CMD. Migration is an extremely complex process. Further clarification is needed to gain deeper understanding of the relationship between migration and CMD to address contradictions in the literature and health inequalities amongst migrants. PMID:25738865

  11. How Stigma Interferes With Mental Health Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Corrigan

    2004-01-01

    Many people who would benefit from mental health services opt not to pursue them or fail to fully participate once they have begun. One of the reasons for this disconnect is stigma; namely, to avoid the label of mental illness and the harm it brings, people decide not to seek or fully participate in care. Stigma yields 2 kinds of

  12. Culturally Sensitive Refugee Mental Health Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Refugees Assistance Program - Mental Health Technical Assistance Center.

    This report, based on a survey conducted during the summer and fall of 1986, identifies culturally sensitive training programs for professionals, paraprofessionals, and others who provide mental health services to refugees. An introductory section discusses the language, cultural, racial, experiential, and socioeconomic factors of refugee mental

  13. Environmental Quality Index and Childhood Mental Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    Childhood mental disorders affect between 13%-20% of children in the United States (US) annually and impact the child, family, and community. Literature suggests associations exist between environmental and children’s mental health such as air pollution with autism and ADHD...

  14. Help-seeking for mental health problems of children: preferences and attitudes in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Valsamma; Ghubash, Rafia

    2004-04-01

    Parental attitudes, religious beliefs, and other sociocultural factors have all been recognized to influence help-seeking patterns in relation to child psychiatric morbidity. But few systematic studies have addressed this issue in the Arab region. In this study, we investigated the help-seeking preferences for mental health problems in a community sample. 325 parents contacted as part of a community-based study of child psychiatric disorders were surveyed using a semistructured interview schedule. Only 38% of those surveyed indicated they would seek help from mental health specialists in the event of psychiatric problems developing in a family member, including their children. Main reasons given for nonconsultation were reluctance to acknowledge that a member of their family has a mental illness, stigma attached to attending mental health services, and the skepticism about the usefulness of mental health services. Willingness to utilize psychiatric services was associated with better parental education, occupation, and socioeconomic status. Our results suggest that sociocultural factors and parental perceptions may have a major effect on whether children with psychiatric disturbance receive professional help. PMID:15154199

  15. Mental Health in American Indians and Alaska Natives

    MedlinePLUS

    Home > Mental Health > People > American Indians Let's Talk Facts Brochures Understanding Mental Disorders: Your Guide to DSM-5 Healthy Minds, ... Parity Healthy Minds TV What is a psychiatrist Mental Health Check-up Coping with Disasters Links for more ...

  16. Attitudes of Mental Health Professionals Toward People With Schizophrenia and Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Nordt, Carlos; Rössler, Wulf; Lauber, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Several studies reveal poor knowledge about mental illness in the general population and stigmatizing attitudes toward people with mental illness. However, it is unknown whether mental health professionals hold fewer stigmatizing attitudes than the general population. A survey was conducted of the attitudes of mental health professionals (n = 1073) and members of the public (n = 1737) toward mental illness and their specific reaction toward a person with and without psychiatric symptoms (“non-case” as a reference category). Psychiatrists had more negative stereotypes than the general population. Mental health professionals accepted restrictions toward people with mental illness 3 times less often than the public. Most professionals were able to recognize cases of schizophrenia and depression, but 1 in 4 psychiatrists and psychologists also considered the non-case as mentally ill. The social distance toward both major depression and the non-case was lower than toward schizophrenia. However, in this regard, there was no difference between professionals and the public. The study concludes that the better knowledge of mental health professionals and their support of individual rights neither entail fewer stereotypes nor enhance the willingness to closely interact with mentally ill people. PMID:16510695

  17. The mental health needs of military service members and veterans.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Susan G

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence in active duty military service members of 30-day DSM-IV psychiatric disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorders and major depressive disorder, is greater than among sociodemographically-matched civilians. Only 23-40% of returning military who met strict criteria for any mental health problem in 2004 had received professional help in the past year. One-fourth of Regular Army soldiers meet criteria for a 30-day DSM-IV mental disorder, two-thirds of whom report a pre-enlistment age of onset. Both pre- and post-enlistment age of onset are predictors of severe role impairment which was reported by 12.8% of respondents. In addition, three-fifths of those with severe role impairment had at least one psychiatric diagnosis. The number of deployments, especially three or more, is positively correlated with all disorders, especially major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and intermittent explosive disorder. Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder frequently have comorbidity with other psychiatric diagnoses and an increased death rate from homicide, injury, and cardiovascular disease, and are at increased risk of medical illness, smoking and substance abuse, decreased employment and work productivity, marital and family dysfunction and homelessness. Active duty suicides have increased from a rate lower than among civilians to one exceeding that in civilians in 2008. Suicides among veterans climbed to 22 per day in 2010 with male veterans having twice the risk of dying from suicide as their civilian counterparts. Associated extremely high costs of psychiatric illness in decreased productivity and increased morbidity and mortality can be ameliorated with appropriate treatment which is not yet fully available to veterans in need. In addition, Veterans Administration/Department of Defense treatment guidelines to date do not recognize the need for intensive and extended psychotherapies for chronic complex psychiatric conditions including personality disorders and chronic anxiety and depressive disorders. It has been suggested that treatment should be available for all military service member mental illness regardless of whether or not it predates military service, a goal which remains distant. PMID:25211433

  18. Existentially Oriented Training for Mental Health Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Carl

    1976-01-01

    The author presents an overview of the role of existentialism in the training of counselors and mental health practitioners. Exercises and skill development techniques are also presented for existentially oriented training of psychotherapists, using a workshop format. (HLM)

  19. Mental health interventions in schools 1

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Mina; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Stephan, Sharon; Ford, Tamsin

    2015-01-01

    Mental health services embedded within school systems can create a continuum of integrative care that improves both mental health and educational attainment for children. To strengthen this continuum, and for optimum child development, a reconfiguration of education and mental health systems to aid implementation of evidence-based practice might be needed. Integrative strategies that combine classroom-level and student-level interventions have much potential. A robust research agenda is needed that focuses on system-level implementation and maintenance of interventions over time. Both ethical and scientific justifications exist for integration of mental health and education: integration democratises access to services and, if coupled with use of evidence-based practices, can promote the healthy development of children.

  20. Visualizations for mental health topic models

    E-print Network

    Chen, Ge (Ge Jackie)

    2014-01-01

    Crisis Text Line supports people with mental health issues through texting. Unfortunately, support is limited by the number of counselors and the time each counselor has for clients, as well as the cognitive load on ...

  1. Toward culturally centered integrative care for addressing mental health disparities among ethnic minorities.

    PubMed

    Holden, Kisha; McGregor, Brian; Thandi, Poonam; Fresh, Edith; Sheats, Kameron; Belton, Allyson; Mattox, Gail; Satcher, David

    2014-11-01

    Despite decades of research, recognition and treatment of mental illness and its comorbidities still remain a significant public health problem in the United States. Ethnic minorities are identified as a population that is vulnerable to mental health disparities and face unique challenges pertaining to mental health care. Psychiatric illness is associated with great physical, emotional, functional, and societal burden. The primary health care setting may be a promising venue for screening, assessment, and treatment of mental illnesses for ethnic minority populations. We propose a comprehensive, innovative, culturally centered integrated care model to address the complexities within the health care system, from the individual level, which includes provider and patient factors, to the system level, which includes practice culture and system functionality issues. Our multidisciplinary investigative team acknowledges the importance of providing culturally tailored integrative health care to holistically concentrate on physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral problems among ethnic minorities in a primary care setting. It is our intention that the proposed model will be useful for health practitioners, contribute to the reduction of mental health disparities, and promote better mental health and well-being for ethnic minority individuals, families, and communities. PMID:25383991

  2. Mental health conference first of its kind

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth Fenech

    2011-01-01

    Nursing students in their final semester of study have participated in “Stepping Out”, a student-led mental health conference that’s the first of its kind at The University of Notre Dame Australia’s Sydney School of Nursing.\\u000aAssociate Professor Bill Goodin and Associate Professor Bethne Hart decided to incorporate the conference into the assessment schedule for nursing students undertaking the Mental Health

  3. South African Mental Health Process Indicators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Crick Lund; Alan J. Flisher

    Background: In post-apartheid South Africa the organisation and delivery of mental health care is undergoing significant change. With the heritage of an under-resourced, fragmented, racially inequitable service, heavily reliant on chronic custodial treatment in large centralised institutions, this change is long overdue. New policy has set out a vision for a community-based, comprehensive, integrated mental health service. In order to

  4. What about the mental health of adults?

    PubMed

    Maeda, Masaharu; Yabe, Hirooki; Yasumura, Seiji; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Mental health problems such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression have surfaced and are affecting many residents in Fukushima prefecture as a result of the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami and the subsequent nuclear disaster. It has also been reported that such mental health problems appeared and persisted after large-scale nuclear accidents in the past, such as the Chernobyl and Three Mile Island accidents, widely affecting the disaster victims. PMID:25747615

  5. Sahaja: an Indian ideal of mental health.

    PubMed

    Neki, J S

    1975-02-01

    Sahaja is an Indian ideal of mental and spiritual health that has received special emphasis in the Sikh scriptures--especially, the Adi Granth. Since the concept of sahaja has long been associated with mystical thought and practice, its description has become shrouded in peculiar esoteric terminologies. It is the purpose of this communication to divest sahaja of its esoteric, mystic connotations and to redefine it as a mental health ideal in the context of contemporary conditions. PMID:1114187

  6. Patterns of mental health service utilization in a general hospital and outpatient mental health facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enrique Baca-Garcia; Maria M. Perez-Rodriguez; Ignacio Basurte-Villamor; F. Javier Quintero-Gutierrez; Juncal Sevilla-Vicente; Maria Martinez-Vigo; Antonio Artes-Rodriguez; Antonio L. Fernandez del Moral; Miguel A. Jimenez-Arriero; Jose L. Gonzalez de Rivera

    2008-01-01

    Purpose  Mental health is one of the priorities of the European Commission. Studies of the use and cost of mental health facilities\\u000a are needed in order to improve the planning and efficiey of mental health resources. We analyze the patterns of mental health\\u000a service use in multiple clinical settings to identify factors associated with high cost.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Subjects and methods  22,859 patients received

  7. The Latino Mental Health Project: A Local Mental Health Needs Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sara T.; Calista, Joanne L.; Connell, Joy; Encarnación, José; Esparza, Nancy K.; Frohock, Jeanne; Hicks, Ellen; Kim, Saeromi; Kokernak, Gerald; McGrenra, Michael; Mestre, Ray; Pérez, Maria; Pinedo, Tatiana M.; Quagan, Rosemary; Rivera, Christina; Taucer, Patsy; Wang, Ed

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we present the results of a local needs assessment of the mental health experiences, service needs, and barriers to treatment-seeking of the Latino population in Worcester, Massachusetts. Overall, participants reported relatively high rates of experiences with symptoms of mental health problems, they indicated using a range of both formal and alternative mental health services, and they noted a variety of instrumental, attitudinal, and culturally-specific barriers to seeking mental health services. Findings are discussed with regards to the role that community-driven research can play in advancing efforts to provide relevant services to underserved populations. PMID:17279338

  8. Mental Health Concerns Impacting Students: Guidelines for Faculty and Staff

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    emotional distress and/or mental health issues. As key members of UW-Milwaukee's caring community, faculty and staff are encouraged to be supportive of students experiencing emotional distress and/or mental health with appropriate resources and services. Definitions: Mental Health: Mental health is a state of well

  9. Children's mental health service use across service sectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara J. Burns; E. Jane Costello; Adrian Angold; Dan Tweed; Dalene Stangl; Elizabeth M. Z. Farmer; Al Erkanli

    1995-01-01

    This DataWatch explores the roles of human service sectors (mental health, education, health, child welfare, and juvenile justice) in providing mental health services for children. The data are from the first wave of the Great Smoky Mountains Study of Youth, a population-based study of psychopathology and mental health service use among children. The results show somewhat higher rates of mental

  10. A systematic review of the international published literature relating to quality of institutional care for people with longer term mental health problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatiana L Taylor; Helen Killaspy; Christine Wright; Penny Turton; Sarah White; Thomas W Kallert; Mirjam Schuster; Jorge A Cervilla; Paulette Brangier; Jiri Raboch; Lucie Kališová; Georgi Onchev; Hristo Dimitrov; Roberto Mezzina; Kinou Wolf; Durk Wiersma; Ellen Visser; Andrzej Kiejna; Patryk Piotrowski; Dimitri Ploumpidis; Fragiskos Gonidakis; José Caldas-de-Almeida; Graça Cardoso; Michael B King

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A proportion of people with mental health problems require longer term care in a psychiatric or social care institution. However, there are no internationally agreed quality standards for institutional care and no method to assess common care standards across countries. We aimed to identify the key components of institutional care for people with longer term mental health problems and

  11. Epidemiology of psychiatric and alcohol disorders in Ukraine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evelyn J. Bromet; Semyon F. Gluzman; Volodymyr I. Paniotto; Charles P. M. Webb; Nathan L. Tintle; Victoria Zakhozha; Johan M. Havenaar; Zinoviy Gutkovich; Stanislav Kostyuchenko; Joseph E. Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    Background This study presents the life- time, 12-month, and 1-month prevalence estimates of nine psychiatric and alcohol disorders in Ukraine assessed as part of the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health (WMH) research pro- gram. The Ukraine WMH survey is the first psychiatric epidemiologic study in a former Soviet Union country to administer a structured psychiatric interview to a

  12. Natural history of male psychological health. III. Empirical dimensions of mental health.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, G E

    1975-04-01

    In a nonpatient polulation, the concept of mental health was operationally defined both in terms of behavior and of abstract psychological functioning. Ninety-five college sophomores, selected for psychological health, were prospectively followed up for 30 years. They were assessed by independent raters on a scale reflecting objectively defined healthy adult adjustment; on a scale of clinically defined psychiatric illness; and on a scale of maturity of ego defenses. These three scales were highly correlated. It seemed likely that relatively objective items like length of vacation, divorce, heavy use of mood-altering drugs, career dissatisfaction, and visits to medical physicians can--as a cluster--statistically identify the abstract concept of mental health. PMID:1119895

  13. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR).

    PubMed

    Aziz, A A; Salina, A A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Badiah, Y; Cheah, Y C; Nor Hayati, A; Ruzanna, Z Z; Sharifah Suziah, S M; Chee, K Y

    2008-09-01

    The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) collects information about patients with mental disorder in Malaysia. This information allows us to estimate the incidence of selected mental disorders, and to evaluate risk factors and treatment in the country. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) presented its first report in 2004, a year after its establishment. The report focused on schizophrenia as a pioneer project for the National Mental Health Registry. The development of the registry has progressed with data collected from government-based facilities, the academia and the private sector. The 2003-2005 report was recently published and distributed. Since then the registry has progressed to include suicides and other mental illnesses such as depression. The NMHR Report 2003-2005 provides detailed information about the profile of persons with Schizophrenia who presented for the first time to various psychiatry and mental health providers throughout Malaysia. More detailed description regarding pharmacotherapy is reported and few cross tabulations done in an effort to provide better understanding and more clinically meaningful reports. PMID:19227671

  14. Pediatric Mental Health Emergencies and Special Health Care Needs

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Thomas H.; Katz, Emily R.; Duffy, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Children with mental health problems are increasingly being evaluated and treated by both pediatric primary care and pediatric emergency physicians. This article focuses on the epidemiology, evaluation, and management of the two most common pediatric mental health emergencies, suicidal and homicidal/aggressive patients, as well as the equally challenging population of children with autism or other developmental disabilities. PMID:24093903

  15. Declaration on mental health in Africa: moving to implementation.

    PubMed

    Daar, Abdallah S; Jacobs, Marian; Wall, Stig; Groenewald, Johann; Eaton, Julian; Patel, Vikram; dos Santos, Palmira; Kagee, Ashraf; Gevers, Anik; Sunkel, Charlene; Andrews, Gail; Daniels, Ingrid; Ndetei, David

    2014-01-01

    Urgent action is needed to address mental health issues globally. In Africa, where mental health disorders account for a huge burden of disease and disability, and where in general less than 1% of the already small health budgets are spent on these disorders, the need for action is acute and urgent. Members of the World Health Organization, including African countries, have adopted a Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan. Africa now has an historic opportunity to improve the mental health and wellbeing of its citizens, beginning with provision of basic mental health services and development of national mental health strategic plans (roadmaps). There is need to integrate mental health into primary health care and address stigma and violations of human rights. We advocate for inclusion of mental health into the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, and for the convening of a special UN General Assembly High Level Meeting on Mental Health within three years. PMID:24931476

  16. Benefiting from online mental status examination system and mental health diagnostic system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hajar Mat Jani; Jalan Kajang-Puchong; Selangor Darul Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    In this really hectic world, quite a number of people are exposed to situations where mental stress Is unavoidable. This leads to people having all kinds of mental health problems that eventually may turn to chronic mental disorders. People with mental health problems normally have the tendency of not admitting their health problems because of the stigma attached to these

  17. Treatment Research in Mental Illness: Improving the Nation's Public Mental Health Care

    E-print Network

    Baker, Chris I.

    Treatment Research in Mental Illness: Improving the Nation's Public Mental Health Care through NIMH Funded Interventions Research Report of the National Advisory Mental Health Council's Workgroup on Clinical Trials EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The mission of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH

  18. Evaluting the WHO Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems by comparing mental health policies in four countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamada Hamid; Karen Abanilla; Besa Bauta; Keng-Yen Huang

    2008-01-01

    Mental health is a low priority in most countries around the world. Minimal research and resources have been invested in mental health at the national level. As a result, WHO has developed the Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems (WHO- AIMS) to encourage countries to gather data and to re-evaluate their national mental health policy. This paper demonstrates the utility

  19. Expanding the Toolkit or Changing the Paradigm: Are We Ready for a Public Health Approach to Mental Health?

    PubMed

    Atkins, Marc S; Frazier, Stacy L

    2011-09-01

    Kazdin and Blase aptly describe the enormous mental health burden facing our nation and suggest several ways to reform the workforce, setting, and content of services to address this long-standing unmet need. We propose that current health care reform legislation and associated advances in service delivery provide a unique and timely opportunity for a paradigm shift in mental health research, practice, and training to support services that are comprehensive, readily accessible, and relevant to a broad range of mental health needs and capacities. Using the recent public health initiative to contain the H1N1 virus for comparison, and informed by a long-standing and extensive literature documenting the need for a public health model for mental health, we describe the rationale for a three-tiered public mental health model, illustrated with examples from ongoing research, to minimize universal risk for mental health difficulties via capacity building in natural settings; reduce onset and severity of symptoms by prioritizing high-risk groups via screening and services for targeted populations; and reduce psychiatric impairment among individuals with more intensive needs via individual, family, and group interventions. New priorities for clinical science to support a public health approach are proposed. PMID:26168200

  20. Measuring the prevalence of current, severe symptoms of mental health problems in a canadian correctional population: implications for delivery of mental health services for inmates.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gregory P; Hirdes, John P; Fries, Brant E

    2015-01-01

    This study measured the prevalence of current, severe symptoms of a mental health problem in an adult population of inmates in Ontario, Canada. The Resident Assessment Instrument-Mental Health was used to measure the prevalence of symptoms among a sample of 522 inmates. Propensity score weighting was used to adjust for nonrandom selection into the sample. Prevalence estimates were derived for the total inmate population, remand and sentenced, males and females, and Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal inmates. It is estimated that 41.1% of Ontario inmates will have at least one current, severe symptom of a mental health problem; of this group, 13.0%, will evidence two or more symptoms. The number of symptoms is strongly associated with presence of a psychiatric diagnosis and level of mental health care needs. Female (35.1%) and Aboriginal (18.7%) inmates are more likely to demonstrate two or more current, severe symptoms. Greater efforts must be made to bridge the gap between correctional and mental health care systems to ensure inmates in correctional facilities can access and receive appropriate mental health care services. PMID:24146355

  1. Evidence-based hope for recovery from “schizophrenia”: A common objective for all stakeholders in the mental health field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Tibaldi; L. Govers

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the research about, and presents a personal account of, recovery from “schizophrenia”.In a potentially optimistic mental health scenario, like that in Italy, where psychiatric hospitals were closed and community-oriented care is nearly ubiquitous, the majority of mental health professionals maintain a pessimistic outlook concerning the long-term outcomes of schizophrenia. This gap between a clinician’s daily practice and

  2. Evidence-based hope for recovery from “schizophrenia”: A common objective for all stakeholders in the mental health field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Tibaldi; L. Govers

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the research about, and presents a personal account of, recovery from “schizophrenia”.In a potentially optimistic mental health scenario, like that in Italy, where psychiatric hospitals were closed and community-oriented care is nearly ubiquitous, the majority of mental health professionals maintain a pessimistic outlook concerning the long-term outcomes of schizophrenia. This gap between a clinician’s daily practice and

  3. Contextual barriers to the successful implementation of family-centered practice in mental health care: a Hong Kong study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Oi Ling

    2014-06-01

    This article presents findings from an exploratory study to identify nurses' perspectives on factors that hinder the implementation of family-centered practice in mental health settings in Hong Kong. Thirty-four nurses participated in the study by completing the pre- and post-questionnaires. Ten nurses were invited to participate in focus group and case interviews. The analysis identified knowledge-practice gap, role of psychiatric nurses, professional identity of psychiatric nurses, and management support as negatively affecting the nurses in implementing a family-centered approach to mental health care. Suggestions about facilitating the implementation of the family-centered approach into clinical practice are offered. PMID:24856276

  4. Mental health literacy and attitudes in a Swedish community sample – Investigating the role of personal experience of mental health care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karin M Dahlberg; Margda Waern; Bo Runeson

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mental ill health is a common condition in the general population, yet only about half of those with a mental disorder have treatment contact. Personal experience may affect attitudes, which in turn influence the help-seeking process. This study investigated differences in mental health literacy and attitudes among mentally healthy persons and in persons with symptoms of mental illness with

  5. Setting priorities for global mental health research

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Igor; Saxena, Shekhar; Swartz, Leslie; Tsai, Alexander C; Patel, Vikram

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective To set investment priorities in global mental health research and to propose a more rational use of funds in this under-resourced and under-investigated area. Methods Members of the Lancet Mental Health Group systematically listed and scored research investment options on four broad classes of disorders: schizophrenia and other major psychotic disorders, major depressive disorder and other common mental disorders, alcohol abuse and other substance abuse disorders, and the broad class of child and adolescent mental disorders. Using the priority-setting approach of the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative, the group listed various research questions and evaluated them using the criteria of answerability, effectiveness, deliverability, equity and potential impact on persisting burden of mental health disorders. Scores were then weighted according to the system of values expressed by a larger group of stakeholders. Findings The research questions that scored highest were related to health policy and systems research, where and how to deliver existing cost-effective interventions in a low-resource context, and epidemiological research on the broad categories of child and adolescent mental disorders or those pertaining to alcohol and drug abuse questions. The questions that scored lowest related to the development of new interventions and new drugs or pharmacological agents, vaccines or other technologies. Conclusion In the context of global mental health and with a time frame of the next 10 years, it would be best to fill critical knowledge gaps by investing in research into health policy and systems, epidemiology and improved delivery of cost-effective interventions. PMID:19565122

  6. Violent Victimization, Mental Health, and Service Utilization Outcomes in a Cohort of Homeless and Unstably Housed Women Living With or at Risk of Becoming Infected With HIV.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alexander C; Weiser, Sheri D; Dilworth, Samantha E; Shumway, Martha; Riley, Elise D

    2015-05-15

    Most studies about the association between exposure to violence and higher psychological vulnerability have been cross-sectional in nature. Using longitudinal data from the Shelter, Health, and Drug Outcomes Among Women Study on 300 homeless or unstably housed women infected with or at risk of becoming infected with human immunodeficiency virus who were living in San Francisco, California, in 2008-2012, we examined the relationship between recent violent victimization and mental health status, mental health-related emergency department visits, and psychiatric hospitalization. We used generalized estimating equations to account for potentially confounding time-invariant and time-varying variables, including comorbid psychiatric conditions and lifetime history of child abuse. A total of 207 (69%) women experienced childhood abuse. The median number of psychiatric diagnoses per woman at baseline was 8 (interquartile range, 5-11). Recent exposure to violence was associated with lower mental health status (b = -1.85, 95% confidence interval: -3.02, -0.68) and higher risks of mental health-related emergency department visits (adjusted risk ratio = 2.96, 95% confidence interval: 1.51, 5.78) and psychiatric hospitalizations (adjusted risk ratio = 2.32, 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 4.91). We did not find strong evidence of a reciprocal relationship. Among homeless or unstably housed women with severe preexisting comorbid psychiatric conditions, recent violence has adverse mental health consequences. Reducing ongoing violence may improve mental health in this population. PMID:25834138

  7. Mental health concepts of evangelical Protestants.

    PubMed

    McLatchie, L R; Draguns, J G

    1984-11-01

    There has been an upsurge of interest in the problems encountered when attempting counseling and psychotherapy across cultural and ethnic barriers. Differences between therapist and client in nationality, race, and socioeconomic background have been widely discussed. Protestant evangelicals have not received much attention in this literature, yet this group has a world view not likely to be shared by the majority of mental health professionals. To fill this gap, 152 members of liberal and traditional (evangelical, fundamentalist) Protestant churches were investigated. Measures of religious orthodoxy and of modernity served as independent variables. Dependent variables were attitudes toward seeking mental health services, opinions about mental illness, and tendencies to view mental health problems as spiritual. The results indicate that evangelicals are prepared to use professional help, although they are concerned about the beliefs and values of the mental health practitioner and express fears that secular therapists might try to alter their beliefs and values: They prefer to go to religious advisers. They also appear to have certain characteristic ideas about mental illness that need to be addressed in any attempt to counsel such clients. PMID:6530680

  8. Caregiver Mental Health, Neighborhood, and Social Network Influences on Mental Health Needs among African American Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Michael A.; Browne, Dorothy C.; Thompson, Richard; Hawley, Kristin M.; Graham, Christopher J.; Weisbart, Cindy; Harrington, Donna; Kotch, Jonathan B.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the combined effects of caregiver mental health, alcohol use, and social network support/satisfaction on child mental health needs among African American caregiver-child dyads at risk of maltreatment. The sample included 514 eight-year-old African American children and their caregivers who participated in the…

  9. Advancing Mental Health Research: Washington University's Center for Mental Health Services Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.; McMillen, Curtis; Haywood, Sally; Dore, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Research centers have become a key component of the research infrastructure in schools of social work, including the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University. In 1993, that school's Center for Mental Health Services Research (CMHSR) received funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) as a Social Work…

  10. Psychosocial Functioning of Youth Receiving Mental Health Services in the Schools Versus Community Mental Health Centers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Weist; C. Patrick Myers; Eileen Hastings; Hari Ghuman; Yu Ling Han

    1999-01-01

    Evaluated psychosocial differences between youthreceiving mental health services in Community MentalHealth Centers (CMHCs; n = 79) as compared to youthreceiving services from a program operating in 10 Baltimore schools (n = 186). Racial and genderdifferences were shown, with more African American youthand females in the School than CMHC sample. Multivariateanalyses that controlled for these racial and gender differences failed to

  11. Do State Mental Health Plans Address the New Freedom Commission's Goals for Children's Mental Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Sara R.; Roberts, Michael C.; Beals, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    The latest initiative to address mental health needs of the nation, including those of children and youth, is the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (NFC). The NFC formulated a benchmark of six goals and related recommendations toward which the U.S. should strive, including the recommendation that each state develop a…

  12. Ethics and care: an ethnographic study of psychiatric community health nursing practice 1 1 Research completed as part of dissertation at Teachers College, Columbia University

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bonnie A Sturm

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this ethnographic study was to explore, describe, and document the practice of a group of psychiatric community health nurses (CHNs), and to provide a forum through which their voices could be heard. Discovery of the nature of issues CHNs experience in an effort to meet the needs of patients with mental illness was the focus. The paper

  13. Morbidity of "DSM-IV" Axis I Disorders in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain: Psychiatric Morbidity Linked with Increased Pain and Health Care Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kamila S.; Raffa, Susan D.; Jakle, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.; Covino, Nicholas A.; Ullman, Edward; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined current and lifetime psychiatric morbidity, chest pain, and health care utilization in 229 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), angina-like pain in the absence of cardiac etiology. Diagnostic interview findings based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV"; American…

  14. Mental Health Awareness Month & Speak Up for Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Katherine C.

    2012-01-01

    May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. This is a great time to highlight the importance of mental wellness and school-based mental health services to children's positive learning and development. There is heightened urgency to the imperative to advance school-based mental health and school psychologists' expertise as essential to the…

  15. Socioeconomic gradients and mental health: implications for public health.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Samaraweera, Preshila Chandimali; Taggart, Frances; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Stranges, Saverio

    2015-06-01

    Background Research on mental well-being is relatively new and studies of its determinants are rare. Aims To investigate whether the socioeconomic correlates of mental well-being mirror those for mental illness. Method Using logistic regression analyses, the independent odds ratios of high and low mental well-being, compared with middle-range mental well-being, were estimated for a number of sociodemographic variables known to be associated with mental illness from 13 983 participants in the 2010 and 2011 Health Surveys for England. Results Independent odds ratios for low mental well-being were as expected from studies of mental illness with increased odds for the unemployed (OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.01-2.10) and those aged 35-54 years (OR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.35-1.84) and reduced odds for the married (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.62-0.97). A linear trend was observed with education and equivalised income. Odds ratios for high mental well-being differed from those for low mental well-being with regard to age (55+ years: OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.23-1.79); employment status where there was an association only with retirement (OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.09-1.69); education where there was no association; and equivalised income for which the association was non-linear. Conclusions Odds ratios for low mental well-being mirrored those for mental illness, but not those for high mental well-being, suggesting that the socioeconomic factors associated with positive mental health are different from those associated with mental illness. PMID:25792696

  16. Tobacco Use and Its Treatment Among Young People in Mental Health Settings: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Youth with psychiatric disorders are at increased risk of tobacco use. Outpatient mental health settings have received little investigation for delivering tobacco treatment. This study obtained formative data to guide development of a tobacco cessation program for transitional age youth with co-occurring psychiatric disorders with a focus on outpatient mental health settings. Methods: Applying qualitative methods, we analyzed transcripts from interviews with 14 mental health clients (aged 16–23) and 8 mental health providers. Results: The youth identified internal (nicotine addiction and mood), social, parental, and media influences to their use of tobacco. Providers’ viewed youth tobacco use as a normative developmental process, closely tied to management of psychiatric symptoms, supported by parents, and of lower priority relative to youth alcohol and illicit drug use. Youth and providers believed that clinicians can do more to address tobacco use in practice and emphasized nonjudgmental support and nondirective approaches. Top recommended quitting strategies, however, differed notably for the youth (cold turkey, support from friends, physical activity, hobbies) and providers (cessation pharmacotherapy, cessation groups, treatment referrals). Conclusions: Mental health providers’ greater prioritization of other substances and view of youth smoking as developmentally normative and a coping strategy for psychopathology are likely contributing to the general lack of attention to tobacco use currently. Integrating care within mental health settings would serve to reach youth in an arena where clinical rapport is already established, and study findings suggest receptivity for system improvements. Of consideration, however, is the apparent disconnect between provider and youth recommended strategies for supporting cessation. PMID:23322765

  17. Career Guidance and Public Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Career guidance may have the potential to promote public health by contributing positively to both the prevention of mental health conditions and to population level well-being. The policy implications of this possibility have received little attention. Career guidance agencies are well placed to reach key target groups. Producing persuasive…

  18. Mental Health Patients' Experiences of Being Misunderstood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura M. Gaillard; Mona M. Shattell; Sandra P. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mental health patients describe “being understood” as an experience that evokes feelings of importance, worthiness, and empowerment. However, the experience of “being misunderstood” is more prevalent in patients' relationships with health care providers. Negative consequences such as vulnerability, dehumanization, and frustration reveal that being misunderstood has the potential to damage or destroy therapeutic relationships.OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this secondary

  19. Religion, mental health, and clinical issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary Lea

    1982-01-01

    This article reviews a number of studies investigating the relationship between religion and the variables of mental health and social behavior. Characteristics of religious health and pathology are examined, and a framework for clinical assessment and treatment of religious pathology is described. Tentative conclusions concerning the subject matter are drawn and limitations of the number and type of studies are

  20. One Hundred Years of College Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Although the first student health service is credited to Amherst College in 1861, almost 50 years passed before Princeton University established the first mental health service in 1910. At that time, a psychiatrist was hired to help with student personality development. Although other schools subsequently established such services, the first 50…

  1. Mental Health Practice Guidelines for Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The guidelines and supporting rationale presented in this paper were developed from the October 2007 "Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference" sponsored by Casey Family Programs, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the REACH Institute (REsource for Advancing Children's Health). The purpose of the conference was to…

  2. [The female role as assessment of mental health of women within the general population of Cantabria].

    PubMed

    de Santiago Díaz, A; Vázquez Barquero, J L; Díez Manrique, J F

    1994-01-01

    This paper tries to analyse the relationship between traditional feminine role (marriage, motherhood and housing) and mental health in spanish women. The General Health Questionnaire 60-items (GHQ-60) was used to define "cases" in a random sample of the general population of Cantabria consisting of 630 women aged 17 and over. The rate of probable prevalence of psychiatric disorders was 26.4%. In contrast to previous studies, motherhood and traditional feminine role correlated with the lowest GHQ-60 mean scores. Occupational status was not related to mental health. Women living with husband, children, parents and/or parents-in-law scored lower on GHQ-60 than those living with husband and children. These results are discussed in the light of previous findings in the literature. At least, they reconfirm the importance of socio-cultural factors in community psychiatric disorder. PMID:7817849

  3. Clinical psychologist in the vanguard: Current attitudes toward mental illness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James K. Morrison; Gregory D. Hanson

    1978-01-01

    To determine the current degree of acceptance of an antimedical approach to mental illness, a survey was conducted of attitudes toward mental illness among various mental health professionals (20 psychiatrists, 23 psychiatric nurses, 16 psychologists, and 25 social workers) and mental patients (41 outpatients with a history of psychiatric hospitalization and 20 outpatients with no similar history) in a community

  4. Psychiatric symptoms moderate the effects of mental illness self-management in a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Steigman, Pamela J; Pickett, Susan A; Diehl, Sita M; Fox, Anthony; Grey, Dennis D; Shipley, Patricia; Cook, Judith A

    2014-03-01

    Depression has been shown to moderate the effects of physical illness self-management (ISM) programs. We attempted to replicate these findings for a mental ISM intervention. Outpatients with serious mental illness (N = 428) from eight Tennessee communities were randomly assigned to receive a peer-led self-management intervention called Building Recovery of Individual Dreams and Goals Through Education and Support or services as usual. Psychiatric symptoms were assessed with the Brief Symptom Inventory; the outcome of personal empowerment was measured by the Empowerment Scale. Intent-to-treat analysis using mixed-effects random regression found significant interaction effects between study condition and three moderating symptom profiles. Empowerment was greater for the intervention participants with high levels of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and general symptom distress than for the experimental participants with low symptom levels and the control subjects with high or low levels of symptoms. These results shed light on how mental ISM programs operate and ways these can be improved. PMID:24566504

  5. Mental Health Promotion and Illness Prevention: A Challenge for Psychiatrists

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, Chang-Uk

    2013-01-01

    Mental health is essential for individual and public health. To improve mental health, promotion, prevention, and the treatment of disease are required. These three kinds of interventions are interrelated but independent from one another. Although separate efforts for mental health promotion and prevention are needed as well as the public need of mental health promotion and well-being, psychiatrists usually are not accustomed to mental health promotion and prevention. This review introduces an overview of the concept, subjects according to target populations, and various intervention strategies for mental health promotion and prevention of mental illnesses. Based on literatures to date, understanding of developmental psychology, lifestyle medicine, and biopsychosocial contributors of mental health with a macroscopic perspective might help to practice mental health promotion and illness prevention. PMID:24474978

  6. UPDATES IN HIV: Mental health

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    Illness in southern Africa In Botswana, depression is highly prevalent among people living with HIV . Evidence suggests that mental illness is a significant problem in similar settings across southern Africa transmissions. However, alcohol abuse is significant risk factor for HIV acquisition in southern Africa21

  7. [Mental health support for disaster relief personnel].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Sho

    2014-01-01

    The Tohoku-Pacific Ocean Earthquake, which occurred on March 11, 2011, caused serious damage and resulted in numerous fatalities and almost 20,000 missing persons. Furthermore, a major accident accompanied by exudation of radioactive material occurred in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A statement regarding the victims' mental health was issued by the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology on May 21, 2011, which established the Department of Disaster Psychiatry for the provision and assurance of long-term mental care support for the victims. The Department of Disaster Psychiatry was consequently reformed in April 2012, focusing on the following objectives: to verify the validity of current mental support methods; to ensure disaster psychiatry and medical care in Japan; and to promote human resource development that can respond to future large-scale disasters. Mental health support for disaster victims is of highest priority. However, the mental health of relief personnel, who act as front liners during disasters (i. e., police officers, fire fighters, Self-Defense Forces, and health care workers), has often been neglected. Therefore, countermeasures for the problems faced by relief personnel are indispensable for a more effective reconstruction. Volunteers are also important members of the disaster relief team and they have witnessed the actual tragedy, and some have experienced burnout. Thus, they require sufficient mental health support, as do relief personnel. We thought that the mental health of disaster relief personnel is an important issue; thus, we report their mental health needs, the systematic correspondence to disaster stress, and our works for relief assistance. As first responders, relief personnel even without prior disaster education proceed to the area of disaster and may get injured. We therefore suggest that prior to the occurrence of any disaster, networking, education, and disaster awareness should be advocated among relief personnel and volunteers to safeguard their mental health. However, programs on these subjects remain insufficient. We extend our utmost respect and appreciation to the disaster relief workforce for doing their best to save lives. We hope that this aids in the reconstruction process of such affected areas. PMID:24783446

  8. Special Considerations When Providing Mental Health Services for Persons with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Jill F.

    Unique challenges surface when providing services in community mental health centers for persons with mental retardation and mental illness. Before any type of mental health treatment for a client with this dual diagnosis can begin, proper assessment is critical. Clinicians working with this population have to adapt their treatment strategies and…

  9. Mental health in the Third World.

    PubMed

    Lin, T Y

    1983-02-01

    In spite of great national and international efforts and relative success in achieving technological and economic progress, the underlying situation in the Third World offers little cause for optimism. Some notable exceptions notwithstanding, in most countries poverty is increasing at an alarming rate, with its accompanying misery, poor health, and social unrest. Unequal distribution of material wealth, political instability, and the crumbling of traditional and cultural values are also increasingly prevalent. Critical assessment of the philosophy, goals, and methodology of development is an urgent requirement in many nations. Mental health endeavors in the Third World need similar reformulation of both immediate and long range objectives and methods, if ever-increasing mental health demands fostered by such rapid and sweeping changes are to be met. Four major models--the hospital-based model, the medical school-based model, the community-based model, and the voluntary organization model--have so far been the basis for mental health development in Third World nations and, to a certain extent, have produced the needed personnel and services. A fifth model--the primary health care model--seems to hold more promise for the future. By virtue of its integration with general health and other administrative social networks, it can more easily reach out to the community, providing both curative and preventive mental health. Whichever model or combination of models any one nation or region adopts, future mental health endeavors in the Third World should be an integral part of overall social policy and health planning. Taking children, family, and school as major foci, such efforts are indispensible and should constitute a positive force in shaping the continuing process of social evolution. PMID:6822821

  10. WPA guidance on mental health and mental health care in migrants

    PubMed Central

    BHUGRA, DINESH; GUPTA, SUSHAM; BHUI, KAMALDEEP; CRAIG, TOM; DOGRA, NISHA; INGLEBY, J. DAVID; KIRKBRIDE, JAMES; MOUSSAOUI, DRISS; NAZROO, JAMES; QURESHI, ADIL; STOMPE, THOMAS; TRIBE, RACHEL

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this guidance is to review currently available evidence on mental health problems in migrants and to present advice to clinicians and policy makers on how to provide migrants with appropriate and accessible mental health services. The three phases of the process of migration and the relevant implications for mental health are outlined, as well as the specific problems of groups such as women, children and adolescents, the elderly, refugees and asylum seekers, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. The concepts of cultural bereavement, cultural identity and cultural congruity are discussed. The epidemiology of mental disorders in migrants is described. A series of recommendations to policy makers, service providers and clinicians aimed to improve mental health care in migrants are provided, covering the special needs of migrants concerning pharmacotherapies and psychotherapies. PMID:21379345

  11. WPA guidance on mental health and mental health care in migrants.

    PubMed

    Bhugra, Dinesh; Gupta, Susham; Bhui, Kamaldeep; Craig, Tom; Dogra, Nisha; Ingleby, J David; Kirkbride, James; Moussaoui, Driss; Nazroo, James; Qureshi, Adil; Stompe, Thomas; Tribe, Rachel

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this guidance is to review currently available evidence on mental health problems in migrants and to present advice to clinicians and policy makers on how to provide migrants with appropriate and accessible mental health services. The three phases of the process of migration and the relevant implications for mental health are outlined, as well as the specific problems of groups such as women, children and adolescents, the elderly, refugees and asylum seekers, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. The concepts of cultural bereavement, cultural identity and cultural congruity are discussed. The epidemiology of mental disorders in migrants is described. A series of recommendations to policy makers, service providers and clinicians aimed to improve mental health care in migrants are provided, covering the special needs of migrants concerning pharmacotherapies and psychotherapies. PMID:21379345

  12. Mental Health Policy and Psychotropic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Richard G; Conti, Rena M; Goldman, Howard H

    2005-01-01

    The pace of innovation in psychotropic drugs has been rapid over the past 15 years. There also have been unprecedented increases in spending on prescription drugs generally and psychotropic medications specifically. Psychotropic medications are playing a more central role in treatment. They also are receiving close scrutiny from health insurers, state budget makers, and ordinary citizens. Public policy actions regarding prescription drugs have the potential to significantly affect clinical care for mental disorders, the costs of this care to individuals and society at large, and the prospects for future scientific advances. This article outlines the policy issues related to psychotropic drugs with respect to their role in determining access to mental health treatment and the cost and quality of mental health care. PMID:15960772

  13. Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

  14. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Zambia: a care provider's perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lonia Mwape; Alice Sikwese; Augustus Kapungwe; Jason Mwanza; Alan Flisher; Crick Lund; Sara Cooper

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the 1991 reforms of the health system in Zambia, mental health is still given low priority. This is evident from the fragmented manner in which mental health services are provided in the country and the limited budget allocations, with mental health services receiving 0.4% of the total health budget. Most of the mental health services provided are curative

  15. Mental health assessment of rape offenders

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Jaydip

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need for development of methods of assessment and management of sex offenders (rapists, child sex offenders, other sexual offenders, and murderers) to mount a society-wide battle against the scourge of sexual offences in India. This paper provides an overview of theories, models, and assessment methods of rapists. It draws upon literature from psychiatry, psychology, criminology, probation, and ethics to provide a framework for understanding reasons behind rape, how mental health issues are implicated, what mental health professionals can do to contribute to crime management, and why this is ethically right and proper. PMID:24082243

  16. Personality, Negative Interactions, and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Karen D.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that an individual’s personality traits may mediate the relationship between social support and mental health. This study uses two national data sets to test a conceptual model that integrates personality, social support, negative interactions, and psychological distress. Results suggest that, beyond the influence of personality, social support is negatively associated with psychological distress, and negative interactions are positively associated with such distress. The findings also suggest that personality has direct and indirect effects, through social support and negative interactions, on psychological distress. Findings specify how positive and negative facets of relationships and personality influence mental health outcomes. PMID:21151733

  17. Mental Health Information Systems: Some National Trends

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, James L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a national survey indicate that approximately 90 percent of all state departments of mental health utilize computer support for at least some administrative and clinical functions. Nearly all indicated planning for considerably increased use; very few reported neither current use of computers nor active plans for future use. Both this survey and a similar one concerning community mental health centers indicate extensive development and strong acceptance of computer applications in administrative and documentation areas, in program evaluation, utilization review and research, but rather weak endorsement and proliferation concerning more clinically-oriented computer applications that involve the monitoring of individual patient care, clinical decision making and clinical predictions.

  18. National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    Located at the National Institutes of Health, NIMH is focused on mental health: Depression, Anxiety Disorders, Alzheimer's Disease, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Schizophrenia, etc. The site contains items of interest to the researcher (news & events, grants, contracts, & committees, and research activities) as well as the lay person (the public information section provides specifics on "mental disorders, diagnosis and treatment," as well as links to other NIMH programs such as D/ART, the Depression Awareness Recognition Treatment Program). Additionally, NIMH organizational and directory information is available. The site can be searched, through either a simple or an advanced search interface.

  19. U.S. mental health policy. Doomed to fail.

    PubMed

    Kiesler, C A

    1992-09-01

    Changes in the de facto system of mental health care in the last decade reflect organizational and entrepreneurial responsiveness to changes in health policy, not mental health policy. Various other actions described here reduced statutory or institutional leadership roles in mental health and increased the pace at which mental health policy was becoming dependent on health policy. In turn, U.S. health policy in the 20th century has been inherently flawed. The short-term general hospital--the "doctors' workshop"--emphasizing acute care and surgery, has been the cornerstone of U.S. health policy throughout the 20th century. The mimicry of health services by mental health leads to demonstrably more expensive and less effective mental health care and dooms mental health policy to failure. PMID:1416383

  20. Social Workers' Role in the Canadian Mental Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towns, Ashley M.; Schwartz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using Canadian survey data this research provides social workers in Canada with a better understanding of their role in the Canadian mental health care system. Methods: By analyzing data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2 Mental Health and Well-being, the role of social workers in the Canadian mental health system was…

  1. Use of mental health services among disaster survivors: predisposing factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dirk-Jan den Ouden; Peter G van der Velden; Linda Grievink; Mattijn Morren; Anja JE Dirkzwager; C Joris Yzermans

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given the high prevalence of mental health problems after disasters it is important to study health services utilization. This study examines predictors for mental health services (MHS) utilization among survivors of a man-made disaster in the Netherlands (May 2000). METHODS: Electronic records of survivors (n = 339; over 18 years and older) registered in a mental health service (MHS)

  2. Asian American Mental Health: A Call to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sue, Stanley; Cheng, Janice Ka Yan; Saad, Carmel S.; Chu, Joyce P.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Surgeon General's report "Mental Health: Culture, Race, and Ethnicity--A Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General" (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2001) was arguably the best single scholarly contribution on the mental health of ethnic minority groups in the United States. Over 10 years have now elapsed…

  3. Interprofessional Collaboration in the Mental Health Services in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Andvig, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and interpret interprofessional collaboration between healthcare professionals (HCPs) working at the district psychiatric centre (DPC) and employed in community mental health care (CMHC) using a dialogue-oriented co-operative approach. Data were collected by means of multistage focus groups and qualitative content analysis was performed. The main theme “development of interprofessional collaboration by means of organisational strategies and interactional styles” encompassed the following categories: “improved communication skills,” “developing structures for coordination and responsibility” and “ increased professional insight into the values and conditions necessary for decision-making.” In conclusion, more attention should be paid to leadership in terms of coordination and feedback. The HCPs must be acknowledged, understood and strengthened in their work to improve the quality of CMHC. Finally, we recommend that a range of organisational and administrative models of care be used in order to support improvement work. PMID:24724020

  4. Relational Agents for mHealth & Mental Health

    E-print Network

    Relational Agents for mHealth & Mental Health Interventions Timothy Bickmore, PhD College instructions from? #12;Motivation: Therapeutic Alliance #12;Motivation: Health Literacy #12;Platforms #12 study, VA Boston, N=24 veterans · NM-ASSIST administered by research assistant and agent. · Overall

  5. Perceptions of mental health nurses and patients about health promotion in mental health care: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Verhaeghe, N; De Maeseneer, J; Maes, L; Van Heeringen, C; Annemans, L

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the perceptions of patients with mental disorders and mental health nurses of health promotion targeting physical activity and eating habits in mental health care. An electronic search strategy was conducted. Furthermore, references were searched by hand-searching the reference lists of the retrieved articles from the electronic databases. The literature on perceptions of health promotion and lifestyle interventions in mental health care principally consist of qualitative studies using interviews and focus groups. Positive perceptions of both mental health nurses and patients towards health promotion targeting physical activity and eating habits in mental health care were identified. Contrary, several barriers for integrating healthy lifestyles into the daily life of patients were described. Patients usually want to learn more about healthy lifestyles, but see the ability to change their physical health as beyond their control. In this sense, support from mental health nurses is considered as important. Despite the awareness of the importance of health promotion in mental health care, it appears that visions and attitudes towards the potential of health promotion are in need of change. PMID:21749554

  6. Inpatient mental health professionals' perceptions of the discharge planning process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria Dawn Biro

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated perceptions of the discharge planning process by mental health professionals in a regional inpatient mental health service. The burden of mental illness in Australia is growing, with a corresponding increase in demand for services. Continuity of care and effective discharge planning for people with serious and enduring mental illness is considered a complex and multifaceted process. The

  7. Mental health effects of climate change.

    PubMed

    Padhy, Susanta Kumar; Sarkar, Sidharth; Panigrahi, Mahima; Paul, Surender

    2015-01-01

    We all know that 2014 has been declared as the hottest year globally by the Meteorological department of United States of America. Climate change is a global challenge which is likely to affect the mankind in substantial ways. Not only climate change is expected to affect physical health, it is also likely to affect mental health. Increasing ambient temperatures is likely to increase rates of aggression and violent suicides, while prolonged droughts due to climate change can lead to more number of farmer suicides. Droughts otherwise can lead to impaired mental health and stress. Increased frequency of disasters with climate change can lead to posttraumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorder, and depression. Changes in climate and global warming may require population to migrate, which can lead to acculturation stress. It can also lead to increased rates of physical illnesses, which secondarily would be associated with psychological distress. The possible effects of mitigation measures on mental health are also discussed. The paper concludes with a discussion of what can and should be done to tackle the expected mental health issues consequent to climate change. PMID:26023264

  8. Mental health effects of climate change

    PubMed Central

    Padhy, Susanta Kumar; Sarkar, Sidharth; Panigrahi, Mahima; Paul, Surender

    2015-01-01

    We all know that 2014 has been declared as the hottest year globally by the Meteorological department of United States of America. Climate change is a global challenge which is likely to affect the mankind in substantial ways. Not only climate change is expected to affect physical health, it is also likely to affect mental health. Increasing ambient temperatures is likely to increase rates of aggression and violent suicides, while prolonged droughts due to climate change can lead to more number of farmer suicides. Droughts otherwise can lead to impaired mental health and stress. Increased frequency of disasters with climate change can lead to posttraumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorder, and depression. Changes in climate and global warming may require population to migrate, which can lead to acculturation stress. It can also lead to increased rates of physical illnesses, which secondarily would be associated with psychological distress. The possible effects of mitigation measures on mental health are also discussed. The paper concludes with a discussion of what can and should be done to tackle the expected mental health issues consequent to climate change. PMID:26023264

  9. A Study of Mental Health Literacy Among North Korean Refugees in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jin-Won; Kwon, Young Dae; Yu, Sieun; Park, Hyunchun; Woo, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate North Korean refugees’ knowledge of mental illnesses and treatments and analyze the factors affecting this knowledge. Methods: Subjects were selected via a snowball sampling method, and the survey outcomes of 152 North Korean refugee participants were analyzed. The factors affecting knowledge of mental illnesses were analyzed via a regression analysis by constructing a multivariate model with mental illness knowledge score as the dependent variable. Results: The North Korean refugees’ mental illness scores ranged from 3 to 24 points, with an average score of 13.0. Regarding the factors that influence mental illness knowledge, the subjects with South Korean spouses and those who had spent more time in South Korea had higher knowledge scores. Furthermore, the subjects who considered the mental health of North Korean refugees to be a serious issue revealed lower knowledge scores than those who did not believe it was a serious issue. The subjects who visit psychiatric clinics showed higher knowledge scores than those who do not. The South Korean subjects who had at least a college education exhibited higher scores than did those without advanced education. The subjects who are satisfied with life in South Korea manifested a higher mental illness knowledge score than those who are not. Conclusions: This study is significant as being the first study to ever measure and evaluate the level of North Korean refugees’ knowledge of mental illnesses. In addition, the evaluations of North Korean refugees’ mental illness knowledge and influencing factors while residing in South Korea created basic data that formed the foundation of an effort to enhance mental health literacy and provide proper mental health services. The results of this study can be utilized to solve mental health problems that might frequently occur during the unification process of North and South Korea in the future. PMID:25652712

  10. Mindful Parenting in Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, Annukka; Restifo, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Mindfulness is a form of meditation based on the Buddhist tradition, which has been used over the last two decades to successfully treat a multitude of mental health problems. Bringing mindfulness into parenting (“mindful parenting”) is one of the applications of mindfulness. Mindful parenting interventions are increasingly being used to help prevent and treat mental disorders in children, parenting problems, and prevent intergenerational transmission of mental disorders from parents to children. However, to date, few studies have examined the hypothesized mechanisms of change brought about by mindful parenting. We discuss six possible mechanisms through which mindful parenting may bring about change in parent–child interactions in the context of child and parent mental health problems. These mechanisms are hypothesized to be mediated by the effects of mindfulness on parental attention by: (1) reducing parental stress and resulting parental reactivity; (2) reducing parental preoccupation resulting from parental and/or child psychopathology; (3) improving parental executive functioning in impulsive parents; (4) breaking the cycle of intergenerational transmission of dysfunctional parenting schemas and habits; (5) increasing self-nourishing attention; and (6) improving marital functioning and co-parenting. We review research that has applied mindful parenting in mental health settings, with a focus on evidence for these six mechanisms. Finally, we discuss directions for future research into mindful parenting and the crucial questions that this research should strive to answer. PMID:21125026

  11. [Culture and mental health in Haiti : a literature review].

    PubMed

    Pierre, Andrena; Minn, Pierre; Sterlin, Carlo; Annoual, Pascale C; Jaimes, Annie; Raphaël, Frantz; Raikhel, Eugene; Whitley, Rob; Rousseau, Cécile; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews and summarizes the available literature on Haitian mental health and mental health services. This review was conducted in light of the Haitian earthquake in January 2010. We searched Medline, Google Scholar and other available databases to gather scholarly literature relevant to mental health in Haiti. This was supplemented by consultation of key books and grey literature relevant to Haiti. The first part of the review describes historical, economic, sociological and anthropological factors essential to a basic understanding of Haiti and its people. This includes discussion of demography, family structure, Haitian economics and religion. The second part of the review focuses on mental health and mental health services. This includes a review of factors such as basic epidemiology of mental illness, common beliefs about mental illness, explanatory models, idioms of distress, help-seeking behavior, configuration of mental health services and the relationship between religion and mental health. PMID:21076788

  12. Psychiatric health care costs of multiple personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ross, C A; Dua, V

    1993-01-01

    The lifetime psychiatric health care costs of 15 women with multiple personality disorder (MPD) who were admitted to the senior author's inpatient service over a four-year period were tabulated. A calculation of the projected costs of treatment based on costs incurred since diagnosis was made, and this was compared to prediagnosis baseline costs projected forwards for ten years. The result of the calculation was a saving of $84,899.44 per patient over ten years due to the diagnosis and psychotherapeutic treatment of MPD. If the length of time in the health care system prior to diagnosis was reduced from the average of 98.77 months experienced by these 15 women to 12 months, the savings would be over $250,000.00 per case. Because the potential savings from the diagnosis and treatment of MPD appear to be so large, replication of the study with a longer followup is required. PMID:8434690

  13. The mental health of foreign students.

    PubMed

    Furnham, A; Trezise, L

    1983-01-01

    Because of the psychological stress associated with university life and the physical and mental stress associated with migration, researchers have become interested in psychological problems of foreign students. In this study four groups of foreign students from different parts of the world were compared with two British groups on a self-report measure of mental health. No sex differences were found yet the overseas students, as a whole, showed significantly more disturbance than either British control or first-year subjects. However, despite many differences between their countries of origin there were no significant differences between any of the overseas groups on the total scale score or any sub-scores. Further, with the exception of Malaysian students, the British subjects were significantly more satisfied with their social lives than the other groups. These findings are discussed in terms of the literature on life events and illness, culture shock and migration and mental health. PMID:6857295

  14. Review of mobile health technology for military mental health.

    PubMed

    Shore, Jay H; Aldag, Matt; McVeigh, Francis L; Hoover, Ronald L; Ciulla, Robert; Fisher, Ashley

    2014-08-01

    Mental health problems pose challenges for military veterans, returning service members, and military family members including spouses and children. Challenges to meeting mental health needs include improving access to care and improving quality of care. Mobile Health, or "mHealth," can help meet these needs in the garrison and civilian environments. mHealth brings unique capabilities to health care provision through the use of mobile device technologies. This report identifies high-priority mHealth technology development considerations in two categories. First, priority considerations specific to mental health care provision include safety, privacy, evidence-based practice, efficacy studies, and temperament. Second, priority considerations broadly applicable to mHealth include security, outcomes, ease of use, carrier compliance, hardware, provider perspectives, data volume, population, regulation, command policy, and reimbursement. Strategic planning for the advancement of these priority considerations should be coordinated with stated Department of Defense capability needs to maximize likelihood of adoption. This report also summarizes three leading, military programs focused on mHealth projects in mental health, The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, The Military Operational Medicine Research Program, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and The National Center for Telehealth and Technology. PMID:25102529

  15. Mental Health Literacy: Empowering the Community to Take Action for Better Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorm, Anthony F.

    2012-01-01

    For major physical diseases, it is widely accepted that members of the public will benefit by knowing what actions they can take for prevention, early intervention, and treatment. However, this type of public knowledge about mental disorders ("mental health literacy") has received much less attention. There is evidence from surveys in several…

  16. Recommendations of mental health professionals and the general population on how to treat mental disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christoph Lauber; Carlos Nordt; Wulf Rössler

    2005-01-01

    Objective The objectives of the study are (1) to assess the mental health literacy of mental health professionals, (2) to determine whether there is agree- ment between different professional groups with re- spect to different psychopathological conditions and (3) to compare the professionals' knowledge with that of the general population. Methods Two repre- sentative samples of mental health professionals and

  17. Mental Health, Mental Illness, and Psychological Distress: Same Continuum or Distinct Phenomena??

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew R. Payton

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I argue that the relationships among mental health, disorder, and distress are a key source of conflict in the sociology of mental health and that the features of the conflict have the potential to call into question much of the accumulated scientific knowledge on mental health. To address this issue, I attempt to empirically assess three competing

  18. The association of child mental health conditions and parent mental health status among U.S. Children, 2007.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Amanda C; Brewer, Katherine C; Rankin, Kristin M

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association of child mental health conditions and parent mental health status. This study used data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health on 80,982 children ages 2-17. The presence of a child mental health condition was defined as a parent-reported diagnosis of at least one of seven child mental health conditions. Parent mental health was assessed via a 5-point scale. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of child mental health conditions and parent mental health status, while examining socioeconomic, parent, family, and community factors as potential effect modifiers and confounders of the association. 11.1% of children had a mental health condition (95% CI = 10.5-11.6). The prevalence of child mental health conditions increased as parent mental health status worsened. Race/ethnicity was the only significant effect modifier of the child-parent mental health association. After adjustment for confounders, the stratum-specific adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of child mental health conditions related to a one-level decline in parent mental health were: 1.44 (1.35-1.55) for non-Hispanic whites, 1.24 (1.06-1.46) for non-Hispanic blacks, 1.04 (0.81-1.32) for Hispanics from non-immigrant families, 1.21 (0.96-1.93) for Hispanics from immigrant families, and 1.43 (1.21-1.70) for non-Hispanic other race children. The effect of parent mental health status on child mental health conditions was significant only among non-Hispanic children. Parent-focused interventions to prevent or improve child mental health conditions may be best targeted to the sub-populations for whom parent and child mental health are most strongly associated. PMID:21948199

  19. Selecting Measures for Use in Child Mental Health Services: A Scorecard Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erin M. Warnick; V. Robin Weersing; Lawrence Scahill; Joseph L. Woolston

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of evidence-based treatments in mental health services requires reliable and valid measurements to guide\\u000a treatment. This study evaluated the efficiency of three caretaker-report measures of child psychiatric disorders. Data from\\u000a 211 caregivers were used to assess the CBCL, the OHIO, and the SDQ. A scorecard methodology was implemented to determine the\\u000a efficiency of each scale as compared to

  20. Adverse childhood experiences and mental health in young adults: a longitudinal survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth A Schilling; Robert H Aseltine Jr; Susan Gore

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been consistently linked to psychiatric difficulties in children and adults. However, the long-term effects of ACEs on mental health during the early adult years have been understudied. In addition, many studies are methodologically limited by use of non-representative samples, and few studies have investigated gender and racial differences. The current study relates self-reported lifetime