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1

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

Reighley, Joan

2

Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Clinical Courses  

E-print Network

0 Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Clinical Courses Student Preceptor Guide Revised 1..............................................................................................................................................28 #12;2 TO: Psychiatric Mental Nurse Practitioner (PMH) Students, Preceptors, and Clinical Faculty Concentration Coordinator, Department of Advanced Practice & Doctoral Studies The University of Tennessee Health

Cui, Yan

3

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing: Course Outline.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A guide to Nursing 5, a course on psychiatric-mental health nursing offered at East Los Angeles College is presented. The guide first details classroom and clinical course requirements and then identifies long-range and end-of-course objectives. A list of required texts and manuals is followed by an outline of the objectives for each of four…

Cardinal, Judith L.

4

Psychiatric Mental Health Evidence-Based Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is the first in a new column focusing on evidence-based practice (EBP) in psychiatric mental health nursing. The EBP movement was strongly influenced by a British epidemiologist, Dr. Cochrane, who advocated care based on randomized clinical controlled trials in the late 1900s. Although the majority of the EBP movement is directed toward developing clinical guidelines, the critical element

Michael J. Rice

2008-01-01

5

Teaching mental health administration to psychiatric residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods for teaching mental health administration within the framework of the regular psychiatric residency are described. The basic principles of social systems analysis and social systems management are the framework for both the field experience and the didactic curriculum. Emphasis is placed on student participation in the teaching process. The student engages in multiple exercises within the actual working processes

E. Mansell Pattison

1976-01-01

6

Communication and Mental Health: Psychiatric Forerunners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The connections between human communication and mental health were first noted 50 to 60 years ago by such early psychiatrists as Alfred Adler, Harry Stack Sullivan, and Karen Horney. They were concerned with understanding those communication processes and skills that make for effective, fully functioning human beings. Adler emphasized faulty…

Brooks, Deems M.

7

Adolescents' Perceptions of Their Consent to Psychiatric Mental Health Treatment  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a small-scale study in which the decision-making process of adolescents who consent to psychiatric mental health treatment was examined. Sixteen (16) adolescents were interviewed about their decisions related to initial and continued treatment, along with their understanding of minor consent laws. Interviews were audio-recorded, and transcripts were analyzed through concept analysis. Findings are presented in the context of the decision-making steps and research questions. Most adolescents did not recognize consequences related to psychiatric mental health treatment and did not assimilate and integrate information provided to them about treatment choices. Adolescents disagreed with current minor consent laws that allow minors to consent to certain healthcare treatments without the required consent of the parent. Further, adolescents reported that a collaborative approach in making decisions about the adolescent's psychiatric mental health treatment was most facilitative of achieving the goals of treatment. PMID:22474581

Roberson, Anthony James; Kjervik, Diane K.

2012-01-01

8

Caffeine, mental health, and psychiatric disorders.  

PubMed

Caffeine intake is so common that its pharmacological effects on the mind are undervalued. Since it is so readily available, individuals can adjust their own dose, time of administration and dose intervals of caffeine, according to the perceived benefits and side effects of each dose. This review focuses on human studies of caffeine in subjects with and without psychiatric disorders. Besides the possibility of mild drug dependence, caffeine may bring benefits that contribute to its widespread use. These benefits seem to be related to adaptation of mental energy to the context by increasing alertness, attention, and cognitive function (more evident in longer or more difficult tasks or situations of low arousal) and by elevating mood. Accordingly, moderate caffeine intake (< 6 cups/day) has been associated with less depressive symptoms, fewer cognitive failures, and lower risk of suicide. However, its putative therapeutic effects on depression and ADHD have been insufficiently studied. Conversely, in rare cases high doses of caffeine can induce psychotic and manic symptoms, and more commonly, anxiety. Patients with panic disorder and performance social anxiety disorder seem to be particularly sensitive to the anxiogenic effects of caffeine, whereas preliminary data suggests that it may be effective for some patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). The threshold for the anxiogenic effect of caffeine is influenced by a polymorphism of the A2A receptor. In summary, caffeine can be regarded as a pharmacological tool to increase energy and effortful behavior in daily activities. More populational (cross-sectional and prospective) and experimental studies are necessary to establish the role of caffeine intake in psychiatric disorders, especially its putative efficacy on depressive mood and cognitive/attentional disorders. PMID:20164571

Lara, Diogo R

2010-01-01

9

Juvenile Mental Health Courts for Adjudicated Youth: Role Implications for Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses  

PubMed Central

TOPIC Juvenile mental health courts for adjudicated youth. PURPOSE To describe the role of psychiatric nurses in reducing mental health disparities for adjudicated youth via juvenile mental health courts. SOURCES ISI Web of Knowledge; Sage Journals Online; HighWire; PubMed; Google Scholar and Wiley Online Library and websites for psychiatric nursing organizations. Years included: 2000–2010. CONCLUSIONS Juvenile mental health courts may provide a positive and effective alternative to incarceration for youth with mental health problems with psychiatric nurses playing a key role in program implementation. PMID:21501288

Burriss, F. Antoinette; Breland-Noble, Alfiee M.; Webster, Joe L.; Soto, Jose A.

2013-01-01

10

Racial Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes after Psychiatric Hospital Discharge among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Racial disparities in mental health outcomes have been widely documented in noninstitutionalized community psychiatric samples, but few studies have specifically examined the effects of race among individuals with the most severe mental illnesses. A sample of 925 individuals hospitalized for severe mental illness was followed for a year after…

Eack, Shaun M.; Newhill, Christina E.

2012-01-01

11

Understanding and integrating mindfulness into psychiatric mental health nursing practice.  

PubMed

The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into Western clinical practice within the context of psychotherapy and stress management. Although it is based in ancient Buddhist philosophy, there remains confusion about the definition, antecedents, processes, and outcomes of mindfulness practice. This article reviews the literature on mindfulness, with a focus upon a clearer definition and understanding of the processes and integration into psychiatric mental health nursing practice. PMID:19766927

Tusaie, Kathleen; Edds, Kelly

2009-10-01

12

Knowledge & attitudes of mental health professionals regarding psychiatric research  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: Mental health professionals have varied attitudes and views regarding informed consent and confidentiality protections in psychiatric research and clinical care. The present study was designed to understand the knowledge and views of mental health professionals (MHPs) regarding informed consent and confidentiality protection practices. Methods: Mental health professionals (n=121) who were members of the Delhi Psychiatric Society, were invited to participate in this questionnaire-based study of their knowledge and attitudes regarding informed consent and confidentiality. Half of them expressed willingness to discuss participation and gave initial oral consent (n=62); of these, 31 gave written informed consent to participate and completed the questionnaires. The questionnaires included both forced choice (yes / no / do not know) and open-ended questions. Questionnaires content reflected prominent guidelines on informed consent and confidentiality protection. Results: Attitudes of the majority of the participants towards informed consent and confidentiality were in line with ethical principles and guidelines. All expressed the opinion that confidentiality should generally be respected and that if confidentiality was breached, there could be mistrust of the professional by the patient/participant. The mean knowledge scores regarding informed consent and confidentiality were 8.55 ± 1.46 and 8.16 ± 1.29, respectively. Interpretation & conclusions: The participating mental health professionals appeared to have adequate knowledge of basic ethical guidelines concerning informed consent and confidentiality. Most respondents were aware of ethical issues in research. Given the small sample size and low response rate, the significance of the quantitative analysis must be regarded with modesty, and qualitative analysis of open-ended questions may be more valuable for development of future research. Increased efforts to involve mental health professionals in research on ethical concerns pertinent to their work must be made, and the actual practices of these professionals with regard to ethical guidelines need to be studied. PMID:24718399

Mishra, N.N.; Bhatia, Triptish; Kumar, Nandini; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.; Parker, Lisa S.; Deshpande, Smita N.

2014-01-01

13

MSU College of Nursing Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Option  

E-print Network

MSU College of Nursing Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Option 2 Year Program Semester 2 - Spring NRSG 525 Family Mental Health Nursing I 6 (3 lecture; 3 clin lab) NRSG 531 Rural Health 526 Family Mental Health Nursing II 6 (3 lecture; 3 clin lab) NRSG 529 Psychopharmacotherapeutics

Dyer, Bill

14

Critical Behaviors in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Volume 1: A Survey of Mental Health Nursing Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes the methodology followed in obtaining abstracts (see volumes 2 and 3) of more than 8,000 critical behaviors of nurses and attendants in delivering care in 50 psychiatric and mental health facilities throughout the country. The abstracts were derived from reports of actual observations by 1,785 mental health practitioners in…

Jacobs, Angeline Marchese; And Others

15

Exploring Essential Competences and Credentialing Model of Community Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purposes of this study were to outline nursing competences and to develop credentialing model of the essential community psychiatric mental health nursing. The action study research method was used in the study, with a core group of research subjects recruited from the field of psychiatric mental health nursing education and clinical practice. The construct of the developmental model comprises

Jiin-Ru Rong; Wen-I Laiu; Fan-Fang Hung; Shu-Jen Shiau

2008-01-01

16

Critical Behaviors in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Volume 3: Behavior of Attendants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of a three-volume document, this volume is concerned with providing source data about the activities of mental health nursing personnel as the activities relate to patient care and contains abstracts of more than 4,000 critical behaviors of psychiatric attendants in 50 psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals with psychiatric units, and…

Jacobs, Angeline Marchese; And Others

17

Critical Behaviors in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Volume 2: Behavior of Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of a three-volume document, this volume is concerned with providing source data about the activities of mental health nursing personnel as these activities relate to patient care, and contains abstracts of more than 4,000 critical behaviors of psychiatric nurses in 50 psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals with psychiatric units, and…

Jacobs, Angeline Marchese; And Others

18

Psychiatric Disorders and Sexual Risk among Adolescents in Mental Health Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine the relationship between psychiatric disorders and sexual behaviors among adolescents receiving mental health treatment. Adolescents in mental health treatment have been found to have higher rates of HIV risk behavior than their peers, but data concerning the relationship between psychopathology and risk are inconsistent and…

Brown, Larry K.; Hadley, Wendy; Stewart, Angela; Lescano, Celia; Whiteley, Laura; Donenberg, Geri; DiClemente, Ralph

2010-01-01

19

Mental health care policy environment in Rivers State: experiences of mental health nurses providing mental health care services in neuro-psychiatric hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Mental health services for Rivers State and surrounding States in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria are provided only at the neuropsychiatric Rumuigbo Hospital in Port Harcourt City, Rivers State, Nigeria. The study explored mental health nurses’ experiences of providing mental health services at the hospital in an attempt to understand policy implications, identify difficulties and challenges of delivering mental health care services. Methods A qualitative study using in-depth interview was conducted among 20 mental health nurses working at the neuropsychiatric Rumuigbo Hospital. This was reviewed within the Townsend mental health policy template of context and resources domains. Results A lack of political support and senior position in the Ministry of Health hinders service delivery, the prevalence of institutionalized stigma, a lack of training, and system failure to provide services at all levels of care is hampering service delivery. The inadequate allocation of resources for hospital renovations and equipment is preventing appropriate client care, as does the lack of funding for drugs, the cost of which makes them unaffordable, affecting clients staying on treatment. Conclusion Education and training of mental health care professionals should be given priority to remedy human resource shortage, provide incentives to motivate health professionals for psychiatric practice, and move toward decentralization of care into general health care services. Information should be provided at all levels to overcome the myths surrounding the causes of mental illnesses, to reduce stigma and discrimination of the affected and their families. PMID:23414640

2013-01-01

20

MSU College of Nursing Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Option  

E-print Network

MSU College of Nursing Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Option 3 Year Program Advanced Health Assessment 3 (2 lec; 1 college lab) Total Semester Credits 8 Semester 2 - Spring NRSG 531 Rural Health Nursing 3 (2 lecture; 1 college lab) NRSG 555 Concepts of Family Care 2 (2 lecture) Total

Dyer, Bill

21

Does Primary Care Mental Health Resourcing Affect the Use and Costs of Secondary Psychiatric Services?  

PubMed Central

Collaborative care models for treatment of depression and anxiety disorders in primary care have been shown to be effective. The aim of this study was to investigate at the municipal level to what extent investment in mental health personnel at primary care health centres in the study area is reflected in the costs and use of secondary psychiatric services. Furthermore, we analysed whether the service provision and use of secondary psychiatric care correlates with the socioeconomic indicators of need. We found significant variation in the amount of mental health personnel provided at the health centres, uncorrelated with the indicators of need nor with the costs of secondary psychiatric care. The amount of mental health nurses at the health centres correlated inversely with the number of secondary psychiatric outpatient visits, whereas its relation to inpatient days and admission was positive. The costs of secondary psychiatric care correlated with level of psychiatric morbidity and socioeconomic indicators of need. The results suggest that when aiming at equal access of care and cost-efficiency, the primary and secondary care should be organized and planned with integrative collaboration. PMID:25162710

Sadeniemi, Minna; Pirkola, Sami; Pankakoski, Maiju; Joffe, Grigori; Kontio, Raija; Malin, Maili; Ala-Nikkola, Taina; Wahlbeck, Kristian

2014-01-01

22

Embracing an emerging structure: The employment of psychiatric survivors in Ontario community mental health organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation discusses a mixed methods research project exploring the patterns of participation in Ontario community mental health services of those who have utilized the mental health system and exploring the characteristics of two Ontario organizations that have high levels of psychiatric survivor participation, particularly in employment. Framed by structuration theory (Giddens, 1984, 1993) and Foucault's (1969\\/2002, 1980a, 1980b, 1994d)

Jillian Gail Grant

2006-01-01

23

Mental Health of Rural Young Adults: Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders, Comorbidity, and Service Utilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies estimate rural psychiatric disorder rates. No study has reported either DSM-III-R or DSM IV disorder prevalence\\u000a and mental health service use among US rural young adults. This paper reports psychiatric disorder prevalence, comorbidity,\\u000a service utilization, and disorder correlates in a community sample of 536 young adults, aged 19 to 23 years, living in the\\u000a rural Midwestern US. More than

Martha A. Rueter; Kristen E. Holm; Rebecca Burzette; Kee Jeong Kim; Rand D. Conger

2007-01-01

24

Explanatory models and mental health treatment: is vodou an obstacle to psychiatric treatment in rural Haiti?  

PubMed

Vodou as an explanatory framework for illness has been considered an impediment to biomedical psychiatric treatment in rural Haiti by some scholars and Haitian professionals. According to this perspective, attribution of mental illness to supernatural possession drives individuals to seek care from houngan-s (Vodou priests) and other folk practitioners, rather than physicians, psychologists, or psychiatrists. This study investigates whether explanatory models of mental illness invoking supernatural causation result in care-seeking from folk practitioners and resistance to biomedical treatment. The study comprised 31 semi-structured interviews with community leaders, traditional healers, religious leaders, and biomedical providers, 10 focus group discussions with community members, community health workers, health promoters, community leaders, and church members; and four in-depth case studies of individuals exhibiting mental illness symptoms conducted in Haiti's Central Plateau. Respondents invoked multiple explanatory models for mental illness and expressed willingness to receive treatment from both traditional and biomedical practitioners. Folk practitioners expressed a desire to collaborate with biomedical providers and often referred patients to hospitals. At the same time, respondents perceived the biomedical system as largely ineffective for treating mental health problems. Explanatory models rooted in Vodou ethnopsychology were not primary barriers to pursuing psychiatric treatment. Rather, structural factors including scarcity of treatment resources and lack of psychiatric training among health practitioners created the greatest impediments to biomedical care for mental health concerns in rural Haiti. PMID:22544545

Khoury, Nayla M; Kaiser, Bonnie N; Keys, Hunter M; Brewster, Aimee-Rika T; Kohrt, Brandon A

2012-09-01

25

Mental health and psychiatric care in Bolivia: what do we know?  

PubMed Central

Background Recently Bolivia has implemented a universal health system, but their mental health policy is still emerging. Objectives To investigate the current state of the mental health care system in Bolivia and discuss challenges for structuring a coordinated network of services that can effectively meet the needs of the Bolivian population. Methods This review was conducted by searching for scholarly articles through the databases Lilacs, Medline OPS, HISA and IBECS REPIDISCA via the search portal in the Virtual Health Library - NLM (http://www.bireme.br). Results Bolivia has a National Mental Health Plan that is intended to guide mental health promotion, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of mental illness, but the resources for this area of health are limited. There are 1.06 psychiatrists and 0.46 psychologists per 100, 000 inhabitants. Information on psychiatric morbidity in Bolivia and the impact of mental disorders on the global burden of disease is scarce. Admission statistics reported by psychiatric hospitals in the country show that the main cause of hospitalization is substance abuse (30%). Alcohol consumption is responsible for 90% of these admissions, in addition to being a major cause of deaths in traffic and one of the main risk factors for domestic violence. Almost one in two women in Bolivia (47%) experienced some form of violence from their partner in the last year. Nineteen percent of women living with a partner reported being physically abused, while 7% were sexually abused by their partners. Isolated studies report that suicide rates are disproportionately high in Bolivia. Conclusions Although there is a shortage of epidemiological data in Bolivia, it is clear the impact of alcohol addiction in psychiatric admissions, domestic violence and traffic accidents. Violence against women and suicides are important issues to be tackled. Among the proposed strategies to afford human resources for mental health in Bolivia, “task shifting”, the delegation of tasks to non-specialists should be extensively adopted in the country to improve mental health care. PMID:24843384

2014-01-01

26

Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Education in Graduate Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing: A Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed 55 psychiatric/mental health nursing programs to assess training in substance abuse. Results indicated that, although virtually all programs offered some course work and clinical experience, the modal amount of course work was five percent of a three credit course. Specific clinical training was offered but rarely chosen. (JAC)

Busch, Denise; Svanum, Soren

1983-01-01

27

The Fairweather Mental Health Housing Model—A Peer Supportive Environment: Implications for Psychiatric Rehabilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent emphasis on consumer empowerment and recovery in psychiatric rehabilitation is uniquely suited to peer-supported service delivery models. The Fairweather mental health housing model's basic tenets of peer support, empowerment, community, and productive work align well with recovery models. This article outlines the major principles of the model, recent research, fidelity standards, and outcomes supporting the model. A case site

KRISTINE L. HAERTL

2007-01-01

28

Mental health service use types among asian americans with a psychiatric disorder: considerations of culture and need.  

PubMed

Despite levels of need that are comparable with other groups, relatively few Asian Americans receive mental health care. While studies have described the tendency for Asian Americans to delay care until mental health symptoms are severe, relatively little research has examined how the severity of symptoms impact mental health service use. This study uses publicly available data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) and focuses solely on Asian American respondents with a psychiatric disorder (n?=?230). Unexpectedly, few Asian Americans with a psychiatric disorder received care in a medical setting. The perception of mental health needs increased the likelihood of using mental health specialist care. Social and systemic barriers together hinder mental health service use. Implications for addressing Asian American mental health service use within a changing health care environment are discussed. PMID:24402440

Nguyen, Duy; Bornheimer, Lindsay A

2014-10-01

29

Immersion experience in undergraduate psychiatric mental health nursing.  

PubMed

Immersion practica have been used in a variety of nursing settings to help prepare culturally competent nursing students. The psychiatric setting represents a diverse culture that traditionally has not appealed to nursing students when considering career options. This article describes the experiences of baccalaureate nursing students and hospital nursing staff following a brief immersion practicum at a psychiatric facility. Seven students were assigned to one practicum for six consecutive weekdays (45 hours), without the distraction of other classes. Both the students and staff rated the experience as positive. The students believed that their ability to form therapeutic relationships, develop clinical skills, and integrate theory into clinical practice was enhanced. While nursing faculty struggle to produce more graduates, with declining clinical sites and increased competition for these sites, the brief clinical immersion may be a reasonable alternative to a traditional rotation. PMID:21627052

Tratnack, Sheri A; O'Neill, Claudia M; Graham, Pat

2011-09-01

30

Self-Rated Mental Health Among Asian American Adults: Association With Psychiatric Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the association between self-rated mental health (SRMH) and diagnoses of psychiatric disorders among Asian American adults. Data were drawn from the National Latino and Asian American Survey (NLAAS, 2002–2003). Bivariate correlations and logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare the association in three subgroups of Asian Americans (i.e., Chinese, Filipinos, and Vietnamese). Results from logistic regression

Giyeon Kim; David A. Chiriboga; Ami Bryant; Chao-Hui Huang; Martha Crowther; Grace X. Ma

2012-01-01

31

Differences in mental health, substance use, and other problems among dual diagnosis patients attending psychiatric or substance misuse treatment services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: The study investigates differences in dual diagnosis disorders among patients in psychiatric and in substance use treatment services.Method: The sample (n = 159) comprised patients from four treatment settings: community mental health service, inpatient psychiatric ward, drug treatment service, alcohol treatment service. Patients who screened positive for dual diagnosis received a detailed multi-axial assessment of substance use and mental health problems.Results:

Victoria Manning; Geraldine Strathdee; David Best; Francis Keaney; Kamuldeep Bhui; Michael Gossop

2008-01-01

32

Hearing distressing voices clinical simulation: "life changing" experiences of psychiatric-mental health nursing students.  

PubMed

The purpose of the current qualitative study was to investigate the experience of baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students with the clinical simulation of hearing distressing voices and derive themes from the written reflective data of students' evaluative statements. A purposive convenience sample of BSN students (N = 74) was recruited from two nursing cohorts at a private, religiously affiliated university BSN program in the northeastern United States. Student reflections on three evaluation questions of the simulation experience were analyzed using constant comparison as per naturalistic inquiry methodology. Themes emerged from each of the three questions related to students' experiences of hearing the simulated voices. Findings support the value of this simulation as a means to promote both active and affective learning in BSN students as they enter psychiatric-mental health clinical rotations. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(10), 42-51.]. PMID:25291728

Wieland, Diane; Levine, Ciara; Smith, Janet

2014-10-01

33

Constructivism applied to psychiatric-mental health nursing: an alternative to supplement traditional clinical education.  

PubMed

With the popularity of accelerated pre-licensure nursing programmes and the growth in nursing student enrolments, traditional clinical education continues to be a challenge to deliver. Nursing faculty members are required to develop and implement educational innovations that achieve effective learning outcomes, while using fewer resources. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the effectiveness of a constructivism-based learning project to achieve specific learning outcomes and to supplement approximately 30 clinical hours in a psychiatric-mental health nursing course. Students participated in a 10-week, multistage project that examined life histories, treatment resources, and evidence-based practice, as applied to a single individual with a mental illness. Students reported increased understanding of mental health and illness, developed personal relevance associated with the knowledge gained, and learned to problem solve with regard to nursing care of individuals diagnosed with mental illness. For many students, there also appeared to be a reduction in stigmatized attitudes towards mental illness. Constructivism-based learning is a promising alternative to supplement clinical hours, while effectively achieving learning outcomes. Future research is needed to further validate the use of this method for the learning of course content, as well as the reduction of stigma. PMID:21676137

DeCoux Hampton, Michelle

2012-02-01

34

Screening for mental health: validity of the MHI-5 using DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric disorders as gold standard  

Microsoft Academic Search

Short screening questionnaires for mental health are useful tools for research and clinical practice, e.g. they could play a major role in detecting patients with psychiatric disorders in primary care. The present study tests the validity of the five-item Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5) screening test using DSM-IV Axis I diagnoses as a gold standard and analyzes its performance in different

Hans-Jürgen Rumpf; Christian Meyer; Ulfert Hapke; Ulrich John

2001-01-01

35

Perceived Impact by Administrators of Psychiatric Emergency Services after Changes in a State’s Mental Health System  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a safety net, psychiatric emergency services are sensitive to system changes. To determine the impact of a state’s changes in its mental health system, administrators of publicly funded psychiatric emergency services were surveyed. They reported few (M=0.8) negative changes in coordination of care but 77% endorsed change in administrative burden (54% saying it negatively affected quality of services). Reporting

Cynthia L. Arfken; Lori Lackman Zeman; Alison Koch

2006-01-01

36

Limited English proficiency as a barrier to mental health service use: A study of Latino and Asian immigrants with psychiatric disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Language barriers pose problems in mental health care for foreign-born individuals in the United States. Immigrants with psychiatric disorders may be at particular risk but are currently understudied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of limited English proficiency (LEP) on mental health service use among immigrant adults with psychiatric disorders. Drawn from the National Latino and

Giyeon Kim; Claudia X. Aguado Loi; David A. Chiriboga; Yuri Jang; Patricia Parmelee; Rebecca S. Allen

2011-01-01

37

The art, science, and techniques of reframing in psychiatric mental health nursing.  

PubMed

Reframing is a powerful psychotherapeutic intervention. Changing the "frame" in which a person perceives events can change the meaning the person associates with the events. This article describes several types of reframing strategies that have been developed within the context of a model of human behavior and communication known as neurolinguistic programming (NLP). Fundamental assumptions of the NLP model are discussed and several reframing techniques are described. A set of strategies that clinicians can use to redefine behaviors and expand a client's model of the world are illustrated. Development of theoretical and clinical applications of the NLP model and reframing techniques in psychiatric-mental health nursing is an important task for the 1990s. PMID:1988384

Pesut, D J

1991-01-01

38

Psychiatric and Sociodemographic Predictors of Attrition in a Longitudinal Study The Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the effects of sociodemographics and the presence of psychiatric disorders diagnosed in the 12 months before the first interview by using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-III-R, third edition, revised, on three types of attrition (failure to locate, refusal to participate, morbidity\\/mortality) in the second wave (1997-1998) of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and

Ron de Graaf; Rob V. Bijl; Filip Smit; Anneloes Ravelli; Wilma A. M. Vollebergh

39

Mental health care and the politics of inclusion: a social systems account of psychiatric deinstitutionalization.  

PubMed

This paper provides an interpretation, based on the social systems theory of German sociologist Niklas Luhmann, of the recent paradigmatic shift of mental health care from an asylum-based model to a community-oriented network of services. The observed shift is described as the development of psychiatry as a function system of modern society and whose operative goal has moved from the medical and social management of a lower and marginalized group to the specialized medical and psychological care of the whole population. From this theoretical viewpoint, the wider deployment of the modern social order as a functionally differentiated system may be considered to be a consistent driving force for this process; it has made asylum psychiatry overly incompatible with prevailing social values (particularly with the normative and regulative principle of inclusion of all individuals in the different functional spheres of society and with the common patterns of participation in modern function systems) and has, in turn, required the availability of psychiatric care for a growing number of individuals. After presenting this account, some major challenges for the future of mental health care provision, such as the overburdening of services or the overt exclusion of a significant group of potential users, are identified and briefly discussed. PMID:20711755

Novella, Enric J

2010-12-01

40

Using electronic patient records in mental health care to capture housing and homelessness information of psychiatric consumers.  

PubMed

Homelessness among people with psychiatric illness is at an all time high. Many explanations for this phenomenon exist, including the incidence of discharge from inpatient hospital directly into the streets or shelter system. With little known about this unseen social issue afflicting many mental health consumers, this manuscript provides recommendations for using electronic patient records (EPR) as a conduit to capture housing and homelessness related information. With the increased use of EPRs in the Canadian health care system, the research and clinical benefits of this technology have only recently begun to be realized in mental health care. PMID:17050339

Booth, Richard G

2006-12-01

41

The “Psychiatric Masquerade”: The Mental Health Exception in New Zealand Abortion Law  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although nearly 99% of abortions in New Zealand are permitted in order to prevent danger or injury to a woman’s mental health\\u000a (the ‘mental health exception’), the reasons why mental health considerations should effectively control access to abortion\\u000a are not altogether clear. This article analyses abortion case law, statutes and debates from New Zealand, the United Kingdom\\u000a and the United

Charlotte Leslie

2010-01-01

42

Mental health problems in a population without a previous modern psychiatric care system.  

PubMed

Despite the recognized role of traditional healers in helping patients with mental health problems, there is a need for modern mental healthcare facilities in Africa. When made available, these are used by the local population, but less by those at remote locations. Data from the SOSAME centre indicate the high prevalence of mental diseases, especially in urban population and during the active decades of life. To decrease the burden imposed on mental health institutions by patients consulting for non-mental problems, it is desirable to integrate these institutions with the other components of the healthcare system. PMID:11676053

Chabwine, J N; Mubagwa, K

2001-10-01

43

National Survey of Psychiatric Mental Health Advanced Practice Nursing: The Adequacy of Educational Preparation: Voices of Our Graduates  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the fit between practice and graduate education from the perspective of psychiatric mental health advanced practice registered nurses (PMH APRNs).OBJECTIVE: With the purpose of addressing this gap in our knowledge, an e-mail survey that was sent to certified PMH APRNs included a query “Did your program prepare you for your role?” and an open-ended follow-up

Kathleen R. Delaney; Edna Hamera; Barbara L. Drew

2009-01-01

44

Making strides in women's mental health care delivery in rural Ethiopia: demographics of a female outpatient psychiatric cohort at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (2006-2008).  

PubMed

This paper presents the delivery of mental health care to a sample of women living in Jimma, rural Ethiopia, and their access to mental health services. A total of 226 psychiatric charts were reviewed for women seen at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The mental health charts included documentation ranging from one paragraph to a full note. No psychiatric chart recorded medication status, detailed substance abuse history, or a history of violence. Rendering appropriate mental health care for women requires concerted efforts by multiple stake holders. Using our results, we advance concrete and practical suggestions for improving women's mental health in rural Ethiopia. We point out that the health care system needs to be responsive, allowing for change starting with gender rights, so that rural women have access to basic mental health services. PMID:23901297

Chemali, Zeina N; Borba, Christina Pc; Henderson, Tanya E; Tesfaye, Markos

2013-01-01

45

One day survey by the Mental Health Act Commission of acute adult psychiatric inpatient wards in England and Wales  

PubMed Central

Objectives To provide (via the Mental Health Act Commission’s “national visit”) empirical evidence on ward occupancy levels, use of the Mental Health Act 1983, nurse staffing, and care of female patients on acute adult psychiatric wards. Design One day survey of a stratified random sample. Settings 119/250 (47%) acute adult psychiatric inpatient units in England and Wales. Subjects End sample of 263 acute psychiatric inpatient wards. Main outcome measures Ward occupancy rates; number of patients detained under the Mental Health Act and proportion “absent without leave”; nurse staffing levels, skill mix, and vacancies; proportion of women with self contained, women-only facilities. Results Mean ward occupancy was 99% (95% confidence interval 97% to 102%). A ward mean of 30% (28% to 32%) of patients were detained under the Mental Health Act; of all detained patients, 1% (1% to 2%) were absent without leave. A ward mean of 0.3 (0.29 to 0.31) nurses were on duty per patient at the time of the visit. An estimated ward mean of 31% (30% to 32%) of nurse staffing may have been through casual contracts—higher in inner (48% (43% to 53%)) and outer London (45% (41% to 48%)). On 26% (21% to 32%) of wards, there were no nurses interacting with patients. A ward mean of 36% (30% to 41%) of female patients had self contained, women-only facilities. Conclusions Attention should focus on improving the quality of acute inpatient psychiatric care as well as of community care. Key messagesLeave arrangements on adult psychiatric wards cause considerable difficulties in bed managementAn estimated third of nursing staff on duty are employed on a casual basisNurses spend much of their time engaged in intensive observation of a few patients, but a quarter of wards had no nurse interacting with patients at the time of the national visitOnly a third of female patients had the use of self contained, women-only areasPolicymaking, management, and training must be refocused to improve the quality of acute inpatient psychiatric care PMID:9804713

Ford, Richard; Durcan, Graham; Warner, Lesley; Hardy, Pollyanna; Muijen, Matt

1998-01-01

46

Supporting children whose parent has a mental health problem: an assessment of the education, knowledge, confidence and practices of registered psychiatric nurses in Ireland.  

PubMed

Health professionals, including nurses, stand accused of ignorance or oversight of children whose parent experience a mental health problem. Psychiatric nurses are in an ideal position to respond to children's needs and support their parents in a proactive and sensitive manner. The aim of this study was to explore psychiatric nurses' education, knowledge, confidence and practice with regard to the support needs of children whose parent has a mental health problem. This study employed a self-completion anonymous survey design with a sample of registered psychiatric nurses from one integrated mental health service in Ireland. The sample reported relatively low levels of education, knowledge, confidence and supportive clinical practice when it came to children whose parent has a mental health problem. There is an urgent need for education on family-focused care, and the development of guidelines and child focused services if the needs of parents and children are to be met. PMID:22632714

Houlihan, D; Sharek, D; Higgins, A

2013-04-01

47

Chapter 6. Psychosocial Stressors, Psychiatric Diagnoses and Utilization of Mental Health Services Among Undocumented Immigrant Latinos  

Microsoft Academic Search

The combined effects of minority status, specific ethnic group experiences (political, economic, trauma and immigration history), poverty, and illegal status pose a set of unique psychiatric risks for undocumented Latinos in the United States. Restrictive legislation and policy measures have limited access to health care, and other basic human services to undocumented immigrants and their children throughout the nation. However,

M. Carmela Pérez; Lisa Fortuna

2005-01-01

48

[Working in mental health services in the context of Brazilian psychiatric reform: a technical, political and ethical challenge].  

PubMed

This paper deals with mental health taken within the context of Brazilian Psychiatric Reform and profiling the transformations in the organization of work processes. This has occurred as a result of the advances with respect to the implementation of the services that replaced the classic psychiatric model and the reconfiguration of the scope of intervention and practices. From this standpoint, the paper seeks to pinpoint the contradictions and problems related to this process and its impact on the organization of work processes on the management of services and on worker health. Lastly, strategies are prepared for the purpose of tackling the problem, chief among which are the following: the redefinition of spaces, practices, and the relationships among the different actors, namely managers, workers, and users; the adoption of co-management mechanisms; and clinical-institutional supervision. PMID:22124909

Sampaio, José Jackson Coelho; Guimarães, José Maria Ximenes; Carneiro, Cleide; Garcia Filho, Carlos

2011-12-01

49

Randomised controlled trial of a psychiatric consultation model for treatment of common mental disorder in the occupational health setting  

PubMed Central

Background Common mental disorders are the most prevalent of all mental disorders, with the highest burden in terms of work absenteeism and utilization of health care services. Evidence-based treatments are available, but recognition and treatment could be improved, especially in the occupational health setting. The situation in this setting has recently changed in the Netherlands because of new legislation, which has resulted in reduced sickness absence. Severe mental disorder has now become one of the main causes of work absenteeism. Occupational physicians (OPs) are expected to take an active role in diagnosis and treatment, and seem to be in need of support for a new approach to handle cases of more complex mental disorders. Psychiatric consultation can be a collaborative care model to achieve this. Methods/design This is a two-armed cluster-randomized clinical trial, with randomization among OPs. Forty OPs in two big companies providing medical care for multiple companies will be randomized to either the intervention group, i.e. psychiatric consultation embedded in a training programme, or the control group, i.e. only training aimed at recognition and providing Care As Usual. 60 patients will be included who have been absent from work for 6–52 weeks and who, after screening and a MINI interview, are diagnosed with depressive disorder, anxiety disorder or somatoform disorder based on DSM-IV criteria. Baseline measurements and follow up measurements (at 3 months and 6 months) will be assessed with questionnaires and an interview. The primary outcome measure is level of general functioning according to the SF-20. Secondary measures are severity of the mental disorder according to the PHQ and the SCL-90, quality of life (EQ-D5), measures of Return To Work and cost-effectiveness of the treatment assessed with the TiC-P. Process measures will be adherence to the treatment plan and assessment of the treatment provided by the Psychiatric Consultant (PC) in both groups. Discussion In the current study, a psychiatric consultation model that has already proved to be effective in the primary care setting, and aimed to enhance evidence-based care for patients with work absenteeism and common mental disorder will be evaluated for its efficacy and cost-effectiveness in the occupational health setting. PMID:17326830

van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Meeuwissen, Jolanda AC; de Jong, Fransina J; Hoedeman, Rob; Elfeddali, Iman

2007-01-01

50

Effectiveness of psychiatric mental health nurses: can we save the core of the profession in an economically constrained world?  

PubMed

Mental and behavioral disorders are common, affecting more than 25% of all people at some time during their lives. Mental disorders and their burden on society have increased dramatically. This scenario can be an opportunity for psychiatric/mental health (P/MH) nurses. Some literature shows gratifying experiences of care delivered by P/MH nurses, but that can also be a threat if, in a world with an economic dominance such as ours, we are not able to clarify our identity and effectiveness. One implication of this is that we need to identify the contribution of nursing to patient outcomes through nurses' independent, dependent, and interdependent roles. The authors stressed the importance of improving our accountability and fighting against invisibility to policy makers to prioritize the nurse-client relationship and identify our effectiveness. Based on some literature, the authors argue that clinical nurse specialists are in a better position than nurse practitioners to produce nursing-sensitive outcomes. PMID:21978801

Santos, José Carlos; Amaral, António Fernando Salgueiro

2011-10-01

51

Prevalence of Cannabis Residues in Psychiatric Patients: A Case Study of Two Mental Health Referral Hospitals in Uganda  

PubMed Central

Various studies have reported that abuse of cannabis is a risk factor for psychosis. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of delta 9-tetrahydrocanabinol (?9-THC), a major metabolite of cannabis, in psychiatric patients in Uganda, and to assess the diagnostic capacity of two referral mental health hospitals to screen patients for exposure to cannabis in Uganda. Socio-demographic characteristics of the patients were collected through questionnaires and review of medical records. Urine samples were collected from 100 patients and analyzed using ?9-THC immunochromatographic kit (Standard Diagnostics®, South Korea). Seventeen percent of the patients tested positive for ?9-THC residues in their urine. There was strong association (P < 0.05) between history of previous abuse of cannabis and presence of ?9-THC residues in the urine. Alcohol, cocaine, heroin, pethidine, tobacco, khat and kuber were the other substances abused in various combinations. Both referral hospitals lacked laboratory diagnostic kits for detection of cannabis in psychiatric patients. In conclusion, previous abuse of cannabis is associated with occurrence of the residues in psychiatric patients, yet referral mental health facilities in Uganda do not have the appropriate diagnostic kits for detection of cannabis residues as a basis for evidence-based psychotherapy. PMID:24453492

Awuzu, Epaenetus A.; Kaye, Emmanuel; Vudriko, Patrick

2014-01-01

52

Discharged from a mental health admission ward: is it safe to go home? A review on the negative outcomes of psychiatric hospitalization  

PubMed Central

Before psychiatry emerged as a medical discipline, hospitalizing individuals with mental disorders was more of a social stigmatizing act than a therapeutic act. After the birth of the mental health disciplines, psychiatric hospitalization was legitimized and has proven to be indispensable, preventing suicides and helping individuals in need. However, despite more than a century passing since this legitimization occurred, psychiatric hospitalization remains a controversial issue. There is the question of possible negative outcomes after a psychiatric admission ceases to take its protective effect, and even of whether the psychiatric admission itself is related to a negative setback after discharge. This review aims to summarize some of the most important negative outcomes after discharge from a psychiatric institution. These experiences were organized into two groups: those after a brief psychiatric hospitalization, and those after a long-stay admission. The author further suggests possible ways to minimize these adversities, emphasizing the need of awareness related to this important issue. PMID:24812527

Loch, Alexandre Andrade

2014-01-01

53

Psychiatric Disorders in Outpatients With Borderline Intellectual Functioning: Comparison With Both Outpatients From Regular Mental Health Care and Outpatients With Mild Intellectual Disabilities  

PubMed Central

Objective: In the Netherlands, patients with borderline intellectual functioning are eligible for specialized mental health care. This offers the unique possibility to examine the mix of psychiatric disorders in patients who, in other countries, are treated in regular outpatient mental health care clinics. Our study sought to examine the rates of all main Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in outpatients with borderline intellectual functioning of 2 specialized regional psychiatric outpatient departments and to compare these with rates of the same disorders in outpatients from regular mental health care (RMHC) and outpatients with mild intellectual disabilities (IDs). Method: Our study was a cross-sectional, anonymized medical chart review. All participants were patients from the Dutch regional mental health care provider Rivierduinen. Diagnoses of patients with borderline intellectual functioning (borderline intellectual functioning group; n = 235) were compared with diagnoses of patients from RMHC (RMHC group; n = 1026) and patients with mild ID (mild ID group; n = 152). Results: Compared with the RMHC group, psychotic and major depressive disorders were less common in the borderline intellectual functioning group, while posttraumatic stress disorder and V codes were more common. Compared with the mild ID group, psychotic disorders were significantly less common. Conclusion: Mental health problems in people with borderline intellectual functioning may not be well addressed in general psychiatry, or by standard psychiatry for patients with ID. Specific attention to this group in clinical practice and research may be warranted lest they fall between 2 stools. PMID:25007114

Wieland, Jannelien; Haan, Sara Kapitein-de; Zitman, Frans G

2014-01-01

54

Cultural sensitivity training in mental health: treatment of Orthodox Jewish psychiatric inpatients.  

PubMed

We describe some of the cultural/religious issues which arose in the treatment of major psychiatric disorders among Orthodox Jewish inpatients at SUNY Health Science Center's University Hospital (SUH) in Brooklyn, New York. The distinct ways in which cultural and religious factors impacted on presentation, therapeutic interventions, and transference-countertransference reactions are noted. Specific reference is made to the use of religion by patients and families as a means of defense, rationalization or power-brokering. Via case vignettes, we explore ways of distinguishing between culturally appropriate vs. maladaptive behaviors in the Orthodox population. Practical solutions are suggested for sensitive ways to surmount culture-based barriers to effective inpatient therapy in this group. PMID:10950360

Sublette, E; Trappler, B

2000-01-01

55

Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

56

Psychiatric wills of mental health professionals: a survey of opinions regarding advance directives in psychiatry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pscychiatric wills are advance directives for an eventual involuntary treatment in psychiatry. We attempted to determine\\u000a psychiatric professionals' knowledge and opinion about this legal option and obtain their formulations of advance directives\\u000a for themselves. A total of 101 psychiatric nurses and psychiatrists at the Department of Psychiatry of the University of Vienna\\u000a responded to a questionnaire about psychiatric wills and

M. Amering; E. Denk; H. Griengl; I. Sibitz; P. Stastny

1999-01-01

57

A Historical Overview of Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing Education in the United Kingdom: Going around in Circles or on the Straight and Narrow?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses historical issues in psychiatric/mental health nursing in the United Kingdom including attempts to integrate it with general nursing, the balance of theory/research and practice, and tensions over the recent shift to university-level nurse preparation. Discusses needs for the future. (Contains 42 references and commentary by Sheri…

Cutcliffe, John

2003-01-01

58

Prognosis after Adolescent Suicide Attempt: Mental Health, Psychiatric Treatment, and Suicide Attempts in a Nine-Year Follow-Up Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The prevalence of mental health and suicidal behavior was examined 8 to 10 years after an adolescent suicide attempt. Of 71 persons, 79% had at least one psychiatric disorder (mean 1.7) at follow-up, most commonly depression (46%), personality disorder (46%), and anxiety disorder (42%). The stability of diagnoses was moderate. The suicide…

Groholt, Berit; Ekeberg, Oivind

2009-01-01

59

The integration of treatment and rehabilitation in psychiatric practice and services: a case study of a community mental health center.  

PubMed

After briefly reviewing the relationship of psychosocial rehabilitation to psychiatric practice, the authors recommend a renewed commitment of psychiatrists to bridge and integrate psychiatric treatment with psychosocial rehabilitation in practice and in the organization of services. They use the case example of an urban, community mental health center to illustrate a strategy for achieving greater integration of these two, relatively independent fields of professional practice. The Center's strategy for integration includes (1) center-wide planning, (2) structuring the medical staff office to support the task of integration, (3) establishing a model of practice and principles of care that supports both domains of intervention, (4) educating medical staff about psychosocial rehabilitation, (5) inter-disciplinary team building, including a definition and discussion of professional roles, (6) expanding services research on psychosocial rehabilitation, and (7) advocating in alliance with rehabilitation colleagues for expanded psychosocial rehabilitation services and their integration with treatment. By taking initiative to forward the integration of treatment and rehabilitation, psychiatrists better serve seriously ill patients and more effectively define their own work and roles. PMID:11892858

Jacobs, Selby; Davidson, Larry; Steiner, Jeanne; Hoge, Michael

2002-02-01

60

Migration background and juvenile mental health: a descriptive retrospective analysis of diagnostic rates of psychiatric disorders in young people  

PubMed Central

Introduction This article presents diagnostic rates for specific mental disorders in a German pediatric inpatient population over a period of 20 years with respect to migration background and socioeconomic status (SES). Methods Diagnostic data were obtained over a period of 20 years from 8,904 patients who visited a child and adolescent psychiatry mental health service in Germany. Data from 5,985 diagnosed patients (ICD-9 and ICD-10 criteria) were included with respect to gender, migration background, and SES. Results Migration- and gender-specific effects were found for both periods of assessment. The group of boys with a migration background showed significantly higher rates of reactions to severe stress, adjustment disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder compared to their male, non-migrant counterparts. Conversely, boys without a migration background showed a significantly higher percentage rate of hyperkinetic disorders than male migrants. Similar results were found for female migrants in the latter assessment period (ICD-10). In addition, female migrants showed lower rates of emotional disorders whose onset occurs in childhood compared to their non-migrant counterparts. Conclusions Data from this investigation provide preliminary evidence that the prevalence of various psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents is influenced by migration background and SES. PMID:23787053

Gaber, Tilman Jakob; Bouyrakhen, Samira; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Hagenah, Ulrich; Holtmann, Martin; Freitag, Christine Margarete; Wockel, Lars; Poustka, Fritz; Zepf, Florian Daniel

2013-01-01

61

Psychological trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder among women in community mental health aftercare following psychiatric intensive care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychological trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are prevalent among adults with severe mental illness, but their impact on the psychosocial and physical health-related impairment of women with major mental illnesses is not known. A sample of 35 low-income urban women receiving community mental health services for severe and chronic mental illness was assessed with psychometrically validated structured interview instruments

Julian D Ford; Debra Fournier

2007-01-01

62

MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHIATRIC NURSING IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. FINAL REPORT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIRTY-ONE PROFESSIONAL NURSE EDUCATORS IN SCHOOLS OF PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE SOUTHEAST ATTENDED A TWO-WEEK CLINICAL WORKSHOP ON PSYCHIATRIC NURSING AT WESTERN STATE HOSPITAL, STAUNTON, VIRGINIA, IN AUGUST 1966. THEY RECONVENED FOR A THREE-DAY FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA, IN JANUARY 1967. THE PROJECT WAS UNDERTAKEN TO UPDATE THE…

CRAWFORD, ANNIE L.

63

Perceived stress and coping strategies among Jordanian nursing students during clinical practice in psychiatric/mental health courses.  

PubMed

Clinical practice in the psychiatric/mental health nursing (PMHN) field is considered a highly-stressful experience for nursing students. The purpose of the present study was to identify the degrees of stress, the types of stressors, and coping strategies perceived by undergraduate nursing students during their clinical practice in PMHN courses. A descriptive, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five students registered in PMHN clinical courses were recruited from five Jordanian universities using a systematic random-sampling method. Data collection was conducted in the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year at two points of time: pre-PMHN clinical training and post-PMHN training. The Basic Information Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, and Coping Behavior Inventory were administered. Students' ages ranged from 20 to 25 years. The findings illustrate that the highest reported types of stressors at both data-collection times were taking care of patients, stress related to teachers and nursing staff, and from assignments and workloads. The most utilized coping strategy at both data-collection times was problem solving. The findings of the present study are useful for clinical educators in identifying nursing students' stressors, easing their learning in the clinical setting, and establishing an efficient PMHN course programme. PMID:24372812

Al-Zayyat, Abdulkarim Subhi; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

2014-08-01

64

Transsexual patients' psychiatric comorbidity and positive effect of cross-sex hormonal treatment on mental health: results from a longitudinal study.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of psychiatric diseases/symptoms in transsexual patients and to compare psychiatric distress related to the hormonal intervention in a one year follow-up assessment. We investigated 118 patients before starting the hormonal therapy and after about 12 months. We used the SCID-I to determine major mental disorders and functional impairment. We used the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) for evaluating self-reported anxiety and depression. We used the Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90-R) for assessing self-reported global psychological symptoms. Seventeen patients (14%) had a DSM-IV-TR axis I psychiatric comorbidity. At enrollment the mean SAS score was above the normal range. The mean SDS and SCL-90-R scores were on the normal range except for SCL-90-R anxiety subscale. When treated, patients reported lower SAS, SDS and SCL-90-R scores, with statistically significant differences. Psychiatric distress and functional impairment were present in a significantly higher percentage of patients before starting the hormonal treatment than after 12 months (50% vs. 17% for anxiety; 42% vs. 23% for depression; 24% vs. 11% for psychological symptoms; 23% vs. 10% for functional impairment). The results revealed that the majority of transsexual patients have no psychiatric comorbidity, suggesting that transsexualism is not necessarily associated with severe comorbid psychiatric findings. The condition, however, seemed to be associated with subthreshold anxiety/depression, psychological symptoms and functional impairment. Moreover, treated patients reported less psychiatric distress. Therefore, hormonal treatment seemed to have a positive effect on transsexual patients' mental health. PMID:24275005

Colizzi, Marco; Costa, Rosalia; Todarello, Orlando

2014-01-01

65

Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Video Games Video Sharing Sites Webcasts/ Webinars Widgets Wikis Follow Us on New Media News & Events Awareness ... mental health should be part of your complete medical evaluation before starting antiretroviral medications. And you should ...

66

Health care reform and rural mental health: Severe mental illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Service needs of rural severely mentally ill and strengths of rural communities are addressed. Health care reform policy development at present appears to neglect the seriously mentally ill in general and rural services specifically. Examples of strategies to meet the needs for health care, psychiatric treatment, psychosocial rehabilitation and appropriate housing are described. The advantages and drawbacks of such efforts

Catherine F. Kane; Jacqueline M. Ennis

1996-01-01

67

SOCIAL ROLE VALORIZATION IN COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH HOUSING: DOES IT CONTRIBUTE TO THE COMMUNITY INTEGRATION AND LIFE SATISFACTION OF PEOPLE WITH PSYCHIATRIC DISABILITIES?  

PubMed Central

Despite its importance as a theory in the development of programs for populations with disabilities, social role valorization (SRV) has received relatively little attention in community mental health research. We present findings of a study that examined the relationship of housing-related SRV to community integration and global life satisfaction of persons with psychiatric disabilities. The housing environments and associated supports of a group of 73 persons with psychiatric disabilities living in a mid-sized city were assessed using the PASSING rating system on the extent that their housing environments facilitated SRV. In addition, in-person interviews were conducted to determine the levels of physical integration, psychological integration, social integration, and life satisfaction of study participants. Results showed SRV contributing directly to all three types of community integration. Psychological integration was found to mediate the relationship between SRV and life satisfaction. Implications of the findings are discussed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23658470

Aubry, Tim; Flynn, Robert J; Virley, Barb; Neri, Jaclynne

2013-01-01

68

Florida Mental Health Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Florida Mental Health Institute, dedicated to research, training and program development for improving psychological wellbeing, has four main divisions: Aging and Mental Health, Child and Family Studies, Community Mental Health, and Mental Health Law and Policy.

2007-03-16

69

Women and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... About Us Home > Health & Education > Mental Health Information Women and Mental Health Mental illnesses affect women and ... olearyk@mail.nih.gov Share Science News About Women's Mental Health Bundling HIV Prevention with Prenatal Care ...

70

WAR & Military Mental Health  

PubMed Central

Involvement in warfare can have dramatic consequences for the mental health and well-being of military personnel. During the 20th century, US military psychiatrists tried to deal with these consequences while contributing to the military goal of preserving manpower and reducing the debilitating impact of psychiatric syndromes by implementing screening programs to detect factors that predispose individuals to mental disorders, providing early intervention strategies for acute war-related syndromes, and treating long-term psychiatric disability after deployment. The success of screening has proven disappointing, the effects of treatment near the front lines are unclear, and the results of treatment for chronic postwar syndromes are mixed. After the Persian Gulf War, a number of military physicians made innovative proposals for a population-based approach, anchored in primary care instead of specialty-based care. This approach appears to hold the most promise for the future. PMID:17971561

Pols, Hans; Oak, Stephanie

2007-01-01

71

Quality of Publicly-Funded Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Care for Common Childhood Psychiatric Disorders in California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To describe the documented adherence to quality indicators for the outpatient care of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, and major depression for children in public mental health clinics and to explore how adherence varies by child and clinic characteristics. Method: A statewide, longitudinal cohort study of 813…

Zima, Bonnie T.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Knapp, Penny; Ladd, Heather; Tang, Lingqi; Duan, Naihua; Wallace, Peggy; Rosenblatt, Abram; Landsverk, John; Wells, Kenneth B.

2005-01-01

72

Atheism and mental health.  

PubMed

The exploration of the impact of religiosity on mental health is an enduring, if somewhat quiet, tradition. There has been virtually no exploration, however, of the influence of atheism on mental health. Though not a "religion," atheism can be an orienting worldview that is often consciously chosen by its adherents, who firmly believe in the "truth" of atheism-a phenomenon known as "positive atheism." Atheism, especially positive atheism, is currently enjoying something of a renaissance in the Western liberal democracies-a trend often referred to as the "new atheism." I argue that atheism, especially positive atheism, should be treated as a meaningful sociocultural variable in the study of mental health. I argue that atheism (just like theism) is an appropriate domain of study for social and cultural psychiatrists (and allied social scientists) interested in exploring socio-environmental stressors and buffers relating to mental health. Specifically, I argue that (1) atheism needs to be accurately measured as an individual-level exposure variable, with the aim of relating that variable to psychiatric outcomes, (2) there needs to be greater systematic investigation into the influence of atheism on psychiatry as an institution, and (3) the relation of atheism to mental health needs to be explored by examining atheistic theory and its practical application, especially as it relates to the human condition, suffering, and concepts of personhood. PMID:20415634

Whitley, Rob

2010-01-01

73

Exploring Perceptions of the Ability of Student Nurses to Achieve Learning Outcomes in Community-Based Psychiatric Mental Health Clinical Settings  

E-print Network

The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to investigate how traditional undergraduate baccalaureate (BSN) student nurses and their faculty perceive students' ability to achieve learning outcomes in community-based psychiatric mental...

Stricklin, Suzanne Martin

2012-08-31

74

Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans' health care needs and their underuse of health care resources: implications for psychiatric-mental health nurses.  

PubMed

U.S. Veterans who have served in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars have combat-related medical and mental health issues, notably posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, but underuse health care resources. To better understand their health care needs, resource use, and facilitators and barriers to seeking health care, a literature review was conducted. The results suggest high prevalence of mental and medical health issues and disproportionate use of quantitative research design that lacked approaches to understanding the psychosocial, cultural, and contextual factors that affect help-seeking by Veterans. Strategies to increase the likelihood that Veterans will seek needed health care, gaps in the literature, and the need for further research are discussed. PMID:24530219

Nworah, Uchenna; Symes, Lene; Young, Anne; Langford, Rae

2014-06-01

75

Attitudes Toward Mental Illness Among Mental Health Volunteers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many research efforts have demonstrated relationships between the experience of mental health volunteers and their attitudes toward mental illness. Questionnaire surveys were completed by adult volunteers in psychiatric and nonpsychiatric programs in order to assess general attitudes toward mental patients and to control for the potential effects…

Wahl, Otto F.; And Others

76

Mental health in Egypt.  

PubMed

The concepts and management of mental health in Egypt are presented from the Pharaonic era through the Islamic Renaissance until today. Papyri from the Pharaonic period show that Soma and Psyche were not differentiated and mental disorders were described as symptoms of the heart and uterus. Although theories of causation were of a mystical nature, mental disorders were treated on a somatic basis. In the Islamic era, mental patients were neither maltreated nor tortured as a consequence of the belief that they may be possessed by a good Moslem genie. In the 14th century mental disorders was one of the four departments in Cairo's Kalawoon Hospital, a precursor of the place of psychiatry in general hospitals that was accepted in Europe six centuries later. The mental health services in Egypt today are described, and transcultural studies carried out in Egypt of the prevalence and phenomenology of anxiety, schizophrenia, depression, suicide, conversion and obsessive compulsive disorders are reviewed. The psychiatric services for children are in their infancy. Since 1983 the common and semi-accepted use of hashish has been joined by abuse by heroin and other substances. PMID:16342608

Okasha, Ahmed

2005-01-01

77

Reported comorbidity of mental disorders with substance abuse among psychiatric inpatients in israel  

Microsoft Academic Search

In preparation for shifting of care from psychiatric hospital to the community, the prevalence of substance abuse comorbidity\\u000a among discharged psychiatric patients was studied. Such patients are not usually treated by substance abuse programs or mental\\u000a health clinics. Data from the Israeli National Psychiatric Case Registry were analyzed on reported substance abuse among all\\u000a 53,379 psychiatric discharges during 1989–92. The

Jonathan Rabinowitz; Mordechai Mark; Miriam Popper; Michael Slyuzberg

1996-01-01

78

The Role of a Psychiatric Pharmacist in College Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Published evidence indicates there is a growing prevalence of psychiatric illnesses on college campuses, and that approximately one quarter of students may be taking psychotropic medications. But attracting and retaining experienced mental health care professionals to college health settings is a challenging task. The psychiatric pharmacist is one…

Caley, Charles F.; Webber, Donna; Kurland, Michael; Holmes, Paula

2010-01-01

79

Child Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... mental illnesses in children early on. Once mental illness develops, it becomes a regular part of your ... often Repeated thoughts of death To diagnose mental health problems, the doctor or mental health specialist looks ...

80

Contacts with public services, with special reference to mental health care, preceding a serious crime: a retrospective study of 268 subjects of forensic psychiatric investigations.  

PubMed

Between July 1995 and June 1996, 533 subjects underwent forensic psychiatric investigation I Sweden. Odd case numbers (n = 268) were included in the study. Of these 268 people, 50% had been in contact with psychiatric services during the six-month period preceding the crime leading to forensic psychiatric assessment. Contacts with psychiatric services during the six-month period preceding the crime were significantly more common in three categories of individuals than others. These were: women, individuals who were diagnosed as having a psychotic disorder during the forensic psychiatric investigation, and individuals found to suffer from a serious mental disorder as defined in the legislation. Subjects who were found not to suffer from a serious mental disorder and were thus not eligible for special sanctions on medicolegal grounds had significantly less psychiatric contacts before the crime, as did subjects under 20 years of age. However, these two groups still had considerably more psychiatric contacts than the general population. The present results suggest that the patient category studied requires special monitoring and case management in general psychiatry in Sweden. To this end, we call for closer studies of high-risk individuals, particularly of previously violent offenders and potentially violent offenders, and closer studies of their psychiatric contacts. This will provide a basis for the development of adequate programs and guidelines for effective care and treatment within the psychiatric sector. PMID:16503354

Holmberg, Gunnar; Kristiansson, Marianne

2006-01-01

81

Reinstitutionalization Following Psychiatric Discharge among VA Patients with Serious Mental Illness: A National Longitudinal Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patterns of reinstitutionalization following psychiatric hospitalization for individuals with serious mental illnesses (SMI)\\u000a vary by medical and psychiatric health care settings. This report presents rates of reinstitutionalization across care settings\\u000a for 35,527 patients following psychiatric discharge in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health system, a national health\\u000a care system. Over a 7-year follow-up period, 30,417 patients (86%) were reinstitutionalized.

Cheryl Irmiter; John F. McCarthy; Kristen L. Barry; Soheil Soliman; Frederic C. Blow

2007-01-01

82

Adolescent Mental Health Facts  

MedlinePLUS

... Care Positive Mental Health: Resilience In the States Adolescent Health Topics Reproductive Health Mental Health Physical Health and ... Insurance Marketplace Scroll Left Scroll Right Office of Adolescent Health 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700 Rockville, MD 20852 ...

83

Organization and financing of mental health care in Poland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organization of care: Health care is provided to patients with mental disorders by the state health care facilities as well as by social help agencies. Mental health care services are provided mostly by mental health facilities and partly by primary care units. Outpatient clinics, separate for psychiatric patients and substance abusers, are the most numerous mental health care units, amounting

Wanda Langiewicz; Elzbieta Slupczynska-Kossobudzka

2000-01-01

84

Teen Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem. Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You ... things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

85

[An existential health care approach in hospital psychiatric nursing].  

PubMed

The focus of Mental Health Care in Brazil has been on community psychiatric care services that replace the asylum model. However, individuals with mental disorders continue to shift between community services and psychiatric hospitals, besides becoming a target of the disciplinarization and violence that question the quality of the nursing care being delivered. The objective of this study is to understand the ontology of nursing care in psychiatric hospitalization. Participants were four individuals with mental disorders who attended a center for psychosocial care, who agreed to talk about their psychiatric hospitalization experience by means of a semi-directed interview. The subjects remembered about their psychiatric hospitalization and assigned meanings to it. Heidegger's Existential Analysis was used, and thus generated the Meaning Unit: Being-in-the-world cared with impersonality; which allowed to unveil the phenomenon through Dasein's structure, and thus made it possible to outline the ontological care in nursing in psychiatric hospitals. PMID:21655789

Furlan, Marcela Martins; Ribeiro, Cléa Regina de Oliveira

2011-04-01

86

Mental Health Clinic Intake Assessment  

E-print Network

-624-8182. · Eating Disorders: We provide an Eating Disorder Therapy program in coordination with medical and nutrition services. We do not offer intensive Eating Disorder Treatment (including treatment for anorexia-624-8182. Psychiatric Hospitalizations/Past Treatment: Mental Health Professional/Clinic: Situation/condition treated

Weiblen, George D

87

No personalization without participation: on the active contribution of psychiatric patients to the development of a mobile application for mental health  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the increasing pervasiveness of mobile computational technologies, knowledge about psychiatric patients’ preferences regarding the design and utility of mobile applications is very poor. This paper reports on a pilot-study that involved 120 psychiatric patients in the development of a mobile application (app) that is being used for data entry into the Signature Project data bank at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal (IUSMM), Canada. Participants were invited to comment on the ‘look and feel’ of the Signature App. Their input also extended the procedures for data collection. These suggestions may contribute to increased mental health literacy and empowerment of persons with mental illness receiving services at the IUSMM. Methods Participants were recruited to fill out a questionnaire on a tablet computer while waiting at the Emergency Room (ER, n = 40), Psychotic Disorders outpatient clinic (n = 40) or Anxiety and Mood Disorders outpatient clinic (n = 40) of IUSMM. Nine patients from each of these sub-groups participated in a focus group to review the results and to discuss how the design and use of the Signature App could be improved to better meet the needs of patients. Results This study (n = 120) indicated that psychiatric patients are clearly capable of using a tablet computer to fill out questionnaires for quantitative data entry, and that they enjoyed this experience. Results from the focus groups (n = 27) highlight that the app could also be used by patients to communicate some personal and contextual qualitative information. This would support a holistic and person-centered approach, especially at the ER where people acutely need to describe their recent history and receive emotional support. Conclusions This pilot-study has confirmed the necessity of involving patients not only in the testing of a new mobile application, but also as active contributors in the entire research and development process of a person-centered information and communication technology infrastructure. The input of participants was essential in designing the Signature Project computational procedure and making use of the app a positive and empowering experience. Participants also gave critical feedback remarks that went beyond the initial scope of the pilot-study, for example they suggested the addition of a client-clinician component. PMID:23890085

2013-01-01

88

Telepsychiatry and school mental health.  

PubMed

The provision of mental health services in schools has been one effective strategy for reaching out to a greater number of youth to identify and provide treatment for mental health issues. With the increasing challenges related to shortages in child and adolescent psychiatrists, it is critical to develop models of care that can maximize a full range of mental health services for all children and adolescents who need them. Telehealth offers an innovative distance technology strategy to effectively and efficiently provide access to psychiatric services in schools. Telepsychiatry has the potential to better link and enhance the provision of health services, and can be particularly beneficial in addressing geographic distance and/or capacity issues. This article describes the clinical, educational, and administrative uses of telemental health in the school environment with mental health professionals and staff. PMID:21092914

Grady, Brian J; Lever, Nancy; Cunningham, Dana; Stephan, Sharon

2011-01-01

89

Ethical issues in forensic psychiatric research on mentally disordered offenders.  

PubMed

This paper analyses ethical issues in forensic psychiatric research on mentally disordered offenders, especially those detained in the psychiatric treatment system. The idea of a 'dual role' dilemma afflicting forensic psychiatry is more complicated than acknowledged. Our suggestion acknowledges the good of criminal law and crime prevention as a part that should be balanced against familiar research ethical considerations. Research aiming at improvements of criminal justice and treatment is a societal priority, and the total benefit of studies has to be balanced against the risks for research subjects inferred by almost all systematic studies. Direct substantial risks must be balanced by health benefits, and normal informed consent requirements apply. When direct risks are slight, as in register-based epidemiology, lack of consent may be counter-balanced by special measures to protect integrity and the general benefit of better understanding of susceptibility, treatment and prevention. Special requirements on consent procedures in the forensic psychiatric context are suggested, and the issue of the relation between decision competence and legal accountability is found to be in need of further study. The major ethical hazard in forensic psychiatric research connects to the role of researchers as assessors and consultants in a society entertaining strong prejudices against mentally disordered offenders. PMID:20017746

Munthe, Christian; Radovic, Susanna; Anckarsäter, Henrik

2010-01-01

90

Why mental health matters to global health.  

PubMed

Global health has been defined as an area of study, research, and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. This article provides an overview of some central issues in global mental health in three parts. The first part demonstrates why mental health is relevant to global health by examining three key principles of global health: priority setting based on the burden of health problems, health inequalities and its global scope in particular in relation to the determinants and solutions for health problems. The second part considers and addresses the key critiques of global mental health: (a) that the "diagnoses" of mental disorders are not valid because there are no biological markers for these conditions; (b) that the strong association of social determinants undermines the use of biomedical interventions; (c) that the field is a proxy for the expansion of the pharmaceutical industry; and (d) that the actions of global mental health are equivalent to "medical imperialism" and it is a "psychiatric export." The final part discusses the opportunities for the field, piggybacking on the surge of interest in global health more broadly and on the growing acknowledgment of mental disorders as a key target for global health action. PMID:24595266

Patel, Vikram

2014-12-01

91

The Influence of Immigration on the Mental Health of Those Seeking Psychiatric Care in Southern Israel: A Comparison of New Immigrants to Veteran Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

. Abstract: Objective: The wave of immigration from the countries of the former Soviet Union from 1990 to 2006 brought to Israel over 1,000,000 people. Many of them suffer from different diseases including mental disorders. Al- though the majority of older persons are free of serious psychopathology, 15-20% of the elderly people may be in need of psychiatric services. The

Vladimir Lerner; Michael Kanevsky; Eliezer Witztum

2008-01-01

92

[Mental health problems].  

PubMed

This paper describes current issues in occupational mental health, occupational mental health activities currently underway, and priorities to improve the situation in Japan. A new tool to support these activities is then discussed. The incidence of employee mental health problems is rising, despite efforts to promote occupational mental health activities. The adoption of such activities is lagging behind in medium and small-sized enterprises. Priorities to improve occupational mental health include motivating business operators to address mental health issues, focusing more on prevention, and promoting mental health initiatives in medium and small-sized enterprises. Mental-Rosai, a web-based mental health check system, is a useful tool for the prevention of mental health problems and can provide support for medium and small-sized enterprises. PMID:24605529

Momotani, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Haruyoshi

2014-02-01

93

Same-Sex Sexual Behavior and Psychiatric Disorders: Findings From the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: It has been suggested that homosexual- ity is associated with psychiatric morbidity. This study examined differences between heterosexually and ho- mosexually active subjects in 12-month and lifetime preva- lence of DSM-III-R mood, anxiety, and substance use dis- orders in a representative sample of the Dutch population (N=7076; aged 18-64 years). Methods: Data were collected in face-to-face inter- views, using

Theo G. M. Sandfort; Ron de Graaf; Rob V. Bijl; Paul Schnabel

2001-01-01

94

Prevalence of psychiatric disorder in the general population: results of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports the initial results of a prospective study on the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in the Dutch population\\u000a aged 18–64. The objectives and the design of the study are described elsewhere in this issue. A total of 7076 people were\\u000a interviewed in person in 1996. The presence of the following disorders was determined by means of the CIDI:

R. V. Bijl; A. Ravelli; G. van Zessen

1998-01-01

95

Disaster planning for vulnerable populations: mental health.  

PubMed

Psychological responses to a disaster are well established; however, little is known regarding how individuals with established psychiatric and mental health needs respond to a disaster. Further research is needed to provide a better understanding as well as to provide data and information that would assist in the provision of timely and adequate intervention and treatment. Addressing the psychological and psychiatric needs of this vulnerable population would assist in the provision of adequate and appropriate psychiatric mental health care in a timely and an effective manner. PMID:21095557

Mendez, Thomas B

2010-12-01

96

New Research into General Psychiatric Services for Adults with Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: There are a variety of models for the mental health care of adults with comorbid intellectual disability (ID) and mental illness. There has been a long-running debate as to whether this should be provided by general psychiatric or specialised ID services. A previous review concluded that there was no clear evidence to support either…

Chaplin, R.

2009-01-01

97

Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... coming back, you should talk to a counselor in the health services/center. They see lots of students who are anxious, stressed or depressed at college. What if it's more serious than feeling down— ...

98

Psychiatric Issues in Palliative Care: Assessing Mental Capacity  

PubMed Central

Issues surrounding capacity to consent to or refuse treatment are increasingly receiving clinical and legal attention. Through the use of 3 case vignettes that involve different aspects of mental health care in palliative care settings, mental capacity issues are discussed. The vignettes tackle capacity in a patient with newly developed mental illness consequent to physical illness, capacity in a patient with mental illness but without delirium and capacity in a patient with known impairment of the mind. These discussions give credence to best practice position where physicians act in the best interests of their patients at all times. It is important to emphasize that capacity decisions have to be made on a case by case basis, within the remit of legal protection. This is a fundamental requirement of the Mental Capacity Act 2005, England & Wales (MCA). The later is used as the legal basis for these discussions. The psychiatric liaison service is a useful resource to provide consultation, advice and or joint assessment to clinicians encountering complex dilemmas involving decision-making capacity. PMID:25278761

Udo, Itoro; Mohammed, Zeid; Gash, Amanda

2013-01-01

99

Factors Underlying Beliefs of Traditional Chinese Medicine Efficacy for Psychiatric and Physical Disorders among Chinese Americans: Implications for Mental Health Service Utilization  

PubMed Central

We examined how community attitudes towards traditional Chinese conceptions of health and Western dichotomization of illness might affect perceptions of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) efficacy to examine factors underlying psychiatric service underutilization among Chinese-Americans. We administered an experimental vignette to assess perceived illness severity and beliefs of TCM efficacy for physical and psychiatric disorders among 90 Chinese-Americans ascertained through a national telephone survey. Perceived illness severity was unrelated to assessment of TCM effectiveness. However, psychiatric conditions tended to be viewed as distinct from physical disorders, and TCM use was endorsed as less effective for psychiatric illnesses when compared with physical illnesses. Furthermore, differences in perceived TCM efficacy appeared to be magnified among U.S.-born respondents, with U.S.-born respondents endorsing lower efficacy for psychiatric disorders than foreign-born respondents. These findings suggest that TCM use for psychiatric disorders may decrease with Westernization, but might yet delay access to psychiatric services among first-generation immigrants. PMID:19282690

Yang, Lawrence H.; Corsini-Munt, Serena; Phelan, Jo C.; Link, Bruce G.

2014-01-01

100

Measurement of risk for mental disorders and competence in a psychiatric epidemiologic community survey: the National Institute of Mental Health Methods for the Epidemiology of Child and Adolescent Mental Disorders (MECA) study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the implementation of the National Institute of Mental Health Methods for the Epidemiology of Child\\u000a and Adolescent Mental Disorders (MECA) study's goals of measuring risk factors and competence. The emphasis is on the development\\u000a and testing of the measures. Relevant constructs for measurement of risk and competence in relation to psychopathology were\\u000a selected and pilot tested prior

S. H. Goodman; C. W. Hoven; W. E. Narrow; P. Cohen; B. Fielding; M. Alegria; P. J. Leaf; D. Kandel; S. McCue Horwitz; M. Bravo; R. Moore; M. K. Dulcan

1998-01-01

101

India mental health country profile.  

PubMed

India, the second most populated country of the world with a population of 1.027 billion, is a country of contrasts. It is characterized as one of the world's largest industrial nations, yet most of the negative characteristics of poor and developing countries define India too. The population is predominantly rural, and 36% of people still live below poverty line. There is a continuous migration of rural people into urban slums creating major health and economic problems. India is one of the pioneer countries in health services planning with a focus on primary health care. Improvement in the health status of the population has been one of the major thrust areas for social development programmes in the country. However, only a small percentage of the total annual budget is spent on health. Mental health is part of the general health services, and carries no separate budget. The National Mental Health Programme serves practically as the mental health policy. Recently, there was an eight-fold increase in budget allocation for the National Mental Health Programme for the Tenth Five-Year Plan (2002-2007). India is a multicultural traditional society where people visit religious and traditional healers for general and mental health related problems. However, wherever modern health services are available, people do come forward. India has a number of public policy and judicial enactments, which may impact on mental health. These have tried to address the issues of stigma attached to the mental illnesses and the rights of mentally ill people in society. A large number of epidemiological surveys done in India on mental disorders have demonstrated the prevalence of mental morbidity in rural and urban areas of the country; these rates are comparable to global rates. Although India is well placed as far as trained manpower in general health services is concerned, the mental health trained personnel are quite limited, and these are mostly based in urban areas. Considering this, development of mental health services has been linked with general health services and primary health care. Training opportunities for various kinds of mental health personnel are gradually increasing in various academic institutions in the country and recently, there has been a major initiative in the growth of private psychiatric services to fill a vacuum that the public mental health services have been slow to address. A number of non-governmental organizations have also initiated activities related to rehabilitation programmes, human rights of mentally ill people, and school mental health programmes. Despite all these efforts and progress, a lot has still to be done towards all aspects of mental health care in India in respect of training, research, and provision of clinical services to promote mental health in all sections of society. PMID:15276945

Khandelwal, Sudhir K; Jhingan, Harsh P; Ramesh, S; Gupta, Rajesh K; Srivastava, Vinay K

2004-01-01

102

Mental Health 3: Mental Health Through Literature  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson, from Science NetLinks, examines how mental illness has been portrayed in the arts while highlighting for students a more insightful way to further develop their ideas about human behavior. This lesson is the third of three lessons on mental health and human behavior.

Science Netlinks;

2002-07-27

103

Running Head: Mental Health and Welfare Reform MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS AMONG SINGLE MOTHERS  

E-print Network

. However, we find that their psychological status is quite distinct. Findings indicate that 17 percent, had experienced a psychiatric disorder within the past year. Logistic regression results reveal that having a psychiatric disorder is associated with a 25 percent lower likelihood of working. Mental health

Shyy, Wei

104

What differentiates children visiting outpatient mental health services with bipolar spectrum disorder from children with other psychiatric diagnoses?  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine the contribution of parent-reported manic symptoms, family history, stressful life events, and family environment in predicting diagnosis of bipolar spectrum disorders (BPSD) in youth presenting to an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Methods A total of 707 6- to 12-year-old children [621 with elevated symptoms of mania (ESM+) based on screening via the Parent General Behavior Inventory 10-item Mania Scale (PGBI-10M) and 86 without ESM (ESM?)] received a comprehensive assessment. Results Of the 629 with complete data, 24% (n = 148) had BPSD. Compared to those without BPSD (n = 481), children with BPSD: were older (Cohen’s d = 0.44) and more likely to be female (Cohen’s d = 0.26); had higher parent-endorsed manic symptom scores at screening (Cohen’s d = 0.36) and baseline (Cohen’s d = 0.76), more biological parents with a history of manic symptoms (Cohen’s d = 0.48), and greater parenting stress (Cohen’s d = 0.19). Discriminating variables, in order, were: baseline PGBI-10M scores, biological parent history of mania, parenting stress, and screening PGBI-10M scores. Absence of all these factors reduced risk of BPSD from 24% to 2%. Conclusions History of parental manic symptoms remains a robust predictor of BPSD in youth seeking outpatient care, even after accounting for parent report of manic symptoms in the child at screening. However, the risk factors identified as associated with BPSD, together had limited value in accurately identifying individual participants with BPSD, highlighting the need for careful clinical assessment. PMID:22788253

Fristad, Mary A; Frazier, Thomas W; Youngstrom, Eric A; Mount, Katherine; Fields, Benjamin W; Demeter, Christine; Birmaher, Boris; Kowatch, Robert A; Arnold, L Eugene; Axelson, David; Gill, Mary Kay; Horwitz, Sarah McCue; Findling, Robert L

2012-01-01

105

Program Models for Mental Health Treatment of Refugees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the approach used by the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) of the University of Minnesota's Refugee Assistance Program in Mental Health for identifying successful and culturally sensitive mental health service delivery models. It divides these into four categories: the psychiatric model; the community mental health model; the…

Jaranson, James M.; Bamford, Pauline

106

The Effect of Cognitive Impairment on Mental Healthcare Costs for Individuals With Severe Psychiatric Illness  

PubMed Central

Objective This study was conducted to determine the effect of cognitive impairment (CI) on mental healthcare costs for older low-income adults with severe psychiatric illness. Methods Data were collected from 62 ethnically diverse low-income older adults with severe psychiatric illness who were participating in day programming at a large community mental health center. CI was diagnosed by a neuropsychologist utilizing the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale-Second Edition and structured ratings of functional impairment (Clinical Dementia Rating Scale). Mental healthcare costs for 6, 12, and 24-month intervals before cognitive assessments were obtained for each participant. Substance abuse history was evaluated utilizing a structured questionnaire, depression symptom severity was assessed utilizing the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and psychiatric diagnoses were obtained through medical chart abstraction. Results CI was exhibited by 61% of participants and was associated with significantly increased mental healthcare costs during 6, 12, and 24-month intervals. Results of a regression analysis indicated that ethnicity and CI were both significant predictors of log transformed mental healthcare costs over 24 months with CI accounting for 13% of the variance in cost data. Conclusions CI is a significant factor associated with increased mental healthcare costs in patients with severe psychiatric illness. Identifying targeted interventions to accommodate CI may lead to improving treatment outcomes and reducing the burden of mental healthcare costs for individuals with severe psychiatric illness. PMID:20808129

Mackin, R. Scott; Delucchi, Kevin L.; Bennett, Robert W.; Arean, Patricia A.

2011-01-01

107

Mental Health 2: Bedlam  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the second of three lessons from Science NetLinks on mental health and human behavior. This lesson gives students an up-close, personal look at Bedlam, the world's first mental health asylum, and the kind of life and treatment that mentally ill people received before the 20th century.

Science Netlinks;

2002-07-28

108

Reinstitutionalization following psychiatric discharge among VA patients with serious mental illness: a national longitudinal study.  

PubMed

Patterns of reinstitutionalization following psychiatric hospitalization for individuals with serious mental illnesses (SMI) vary by medical and psychiatric health care settings. This report presents rates of reinstitutionalization across care settings for 35,527 patients following psychiatric discharge in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health system, a national health care system. Over a 7-year follow-up period, 30,417 patients (86%) were reinstitutionalized. Among these patients, 73% were initially reinstitutionalized to inpatient psychiatric settings. Homelessness, medical morbidity, and substance use were associated with increased risks for reinstitutionalization. Despite the VA's increased emphasis on outpatient services delivery, the vast majority of patients experienced reinstitutionalization in the follow-up period. Study findings may inform efforts to refine psychiatric and medical assessment for service delivery for this vulnerable population. PMID:17763982

Irmiter, Cheryl; McCarthy, John F; Barry, Kristen L; Soliman, Soheil; Blow, Frederic C

2007-12-01

109

HUMAN SERVICES Mental Health Services  

E-print Network

procedures. Federal government, Departments of Health and Human Services Justice Veterans AdministrationPSYCHOLOGY HUMAN SERVICES Counseling Advocacy Mental Health Services STRATEGIESAREAS EMPLOYERS State government, Departments of Human Services Mental Health & Mental Retardation Community mental

Escher, Christine

110

Brazil's mental health adventure.  

PubMed

This is an account of my trips to Brazil in 2001 where I worked on a series of mental health projects with Brazilian colleagues. I first got interested in Brazil after I graduated from college when I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Northeast Brazil (Bahia state). After I got out of the Peace Corps I moved to Rio de Janeiro and went to work for United Press International (UPI) in their Rio bureau. I was UPI foreign news correspondent for a year and a half. Those years in Brazil were probably the happiest years of my life. Later on, after I became ill in the U.S., my Brazilian connection played an important role in my recovery. Raised in a Victorian family in a small town in the Midwest, and schooled in a traditional boarding school for boys and then at an all men's college, Brazil's lively Latino culture served as a healthy antidote for my tendency to be reserved and often depressed. My contact with Brazilians and Brazilian culture always beckoned me on. I maintained contact with my friends in Brazil and they stuck by me through my illness years. What seemed like my emotional and intellectual "excess" to me, was easily accepted by my Brazilian friends. I felt much more myself interacting with Brazilians and connected to a larger sense of self I developed in Brazil. I traveled to Brazil at every opportunity and made friends with Brazilians I met in the States. I initiated Portuguese classes at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio in the early 1990s and then was invited to teach Brazilian culture to undergraduates. These appointments and my own resilience moved me past one depression and a dysthymia condition and into the wider community. I regained my confidence as a teacher, a role I had before and during the years of my illness. From this position, I organized a club for Brazilian students studying in the Cleveland area. After this teaching stint, I felt ready to pursue full time employment and began a job search that would eventually land me in New Haven at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. Since 1997, I've spent my vacations traveling and working in Brazil as an Outside Consultant on mental health projects with colleagues in Rio and Sao Paulo. In my travels I've been befriended and supported by adherents of a social movement, not unlike the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, that has struggled for many years to close Brazil's long-term psychiatric hospitals, create community-based services and expand the rights of mental patients. Now I see my Brazilian connection as part of my ongoing recovery. I see myself as having the opportunity to be a link between the mental health worlds of the U.S. and Brazil. I believe the two countries have much to offer each other when it comes to mental health. PMID:12653451

Weingarten, Richard

2003-01-01

111

Malaysia mental health country profile.  

PubMed

Malaysia is a tropical country in the heart of south east Asia with a population of 24 million people of diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds living in harmony in 330,000 km(2) of land on the Asian mainland and Borneo. Malaysia, which lies on the crossroads of trade between east and west Asia, has an ancient history as a centre of trading attracting commerce between Europe, west Asia, India and China. It has had influences from major powers that dominated the region throughout its history. Today the country, after independence in 1957, has embarked on an ambitious development project to make it a developed country by 2020. In this effort the economy has changed from one producing raw material to one manufacturing consumer goods and services and the colonial health system has been overhauled and social systems strengthened to provide better services for its people. The per capita income, which was under 1,000 US dollars at independence, has now passed 4,000 US dollars and continues to grow, with the economy largely based on strong exports that amount to over 100 billion US dollars. The mental health system that was based on institutional care in four mental hospitals at independence from British colonial rule in 1957 with no Malaysian psychiatrists is today largely based on over 30 general hospital psychiatric units spread throughout the country. With three local postgraduate training programmes in psychiatry and 12 undergraduate departments of psychiatry in the country--all started after independence--there is now a healthy development of mental health services. This is being supplemented by a newly established primary care mental health service that covers community mental health by integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental health care at the level of psychiatrists rests with about 140 psychiatrists most of whom had undertaken a four-year masters course in postgraduate psychiatry in Malaysia since 1973. However, there continues to be severe shortages of other professionals such as clinical psychologists and social workers in mental health services. There are a few specialists, and specialized services in child, adolescent, forensic, rehabilitative, liaison or research fields of mental health. In the area of services for women and children, as well as the disabled in the community, there are strong efforts to improve the care and provide services that are in keeping with a caring society. New legislation on these are being passed every year and the setting up of a Ministry for Women's Affairs is one such move in recent years. Mental health in Malaysia has been slow in developing but has in the past decade seen important strides to bring it on par with other branches of medicine. PMID:15276949

Parameshvara Deva, M

2004-01-01

112

Mental Health and Minorities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter includes 12 brief articles or news items concerning mental health among minority groups. These address: (1) cultural considerations in treating Asians (reasons why Asians tend not to use mental health services); (2) coping with racial stress (responses to a questionnaire on dealing with racial stress); (3) minority health

Meadows, Michelle, Ed.

1997-01-01

113

What Is Mental Health?  

MedlinePLUS

... positive Getting physically active Helping others Getting enough sleep Developing coping skills Learn More About Mental Health The importance of prevention and wellness What communities can do ...

114

Women Veterans and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Health > Women veterans and mental health Mental Health Women veterans and mental health Post-traumatic stress disorder ( ... hurt you. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and women veterans PTSD can occur after you have been ...

115

Latino Adults’ Access to Mental Health Care  

PubMed Central

Since the early 1980s, epidemiological studies using state-of-the-art methodologies have documented the unmet mental health needs of Latinos adults in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This paper reviews 16 articles based on seven epidemiological studies, examines studies methodologies, and summarizes findings about how Latino adults access mental health services. Studies consistently report that, compared to non-Latino Whites, Latinos underutilize mental health services, are less likely to receive guideline congruent care, and rely more often on primary care for services. Structural, economic, psychiatric, and cultural factors influence Latinos’ service access. In spite of the valuable information these studies provide, methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs, scarcity of mixed Latino group samples) constrict knowledge about Latinos access to mental health services. Areas for future research and development needed to improve Latinos’ access and quality of mental health care are discussed. PMID:16598658

Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Zayas, Luis H.; Hansen, Marissa C.

2008-01-01

116

Mental health implications of migration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Since late 1980s, 1,001,726 immigrants arrived in Israel from the former Soviet Union (FSU). A review of community studies\\u000a on the mental health of these immigrants is presented.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Israeli studies from the past two decades were reviewed. Presented are findings on the prevalence of psychological distress\\u000a and psychiatric disorders as well as on a number of risk factors among FSU

Julia Mirsky

2009-01-01

117

Feminism, eating, and mental health.  

PubMed

Eating disorders are prevalent health problems for women today. The traditional biomedical or psychiatric approaches offer a narrow perspective of the problem, its courses, and its treatment. Analyzing disordered eating from a feminist perspective, this article discusses cultural, political, and social phenomena that have had a significant impact on the development of these disorders. Parallels of eating disorders and other women's mental illnesses and the medicalization of their symptoms is explored. A "new view" of disordered eating in women is proposed that can be advanced only through feminist research. PMID:1707250

White, J H

1991-03-01

118

EFFECTIVELY IMPLEMENTING PSYCHIATRIC ADVANCE DIRECTIVES TO PROMOTE SELF-DETERMINATION OF TREATMENT AMONG PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Statutes on psychiatric advance directives (PADs) allow competent individuals to document instructions for future mental health treatment in the event of an incapacitating crisis. PADs are aimed at promoting a stronger sense of patient self-determination, considered a central tenet of psychosocial rehabilitation and recovery; however, it is unknown what factors (if any) lead psychiatric patients with PADs to experience this

Eric B. Elbogen; Jeffrey W. Swanson; Marvin S. Swartz; Richard Van Dorn; Joelle Ferron; H. Ryan Wagner; Christine Wilder

2007-01-01

119

Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality and the changing boundaries of medicine, psychiatry and psychiatric and mental health nursing practice: a slave revolt?  

PubMed

The main constructions in Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality (1994) are employed in order to explore the changes in mental health care that have been recently taking place. Characterized by boundaries that define the objectivity of scientific method, the biological stratum or the area of concern (disease and the disembodied being) and the professional distance that is maintained in the healthcare encounter, the noble morality of contemporary allopathic (Western) mental health care practice appears to be being challenged, in an act of ressentiment, by the slave morality of society, inverting values and beliefs that have previously been held. Mental health care paternalism may be in the process of giving way to consumer sovereignty, patient participation in decision making and the re-discovery of the embodied being at the centre of the healthcare encounter. Nietzsche warns that the dominance of slave morality and the inversion of moral values (what was a quality that was held by the nobles and regarded as good) - that is, objectivity and mental health care paternalism - becomes bad; and what was a quality held by the slaves and regarded as bad - subjectivity - becomes good, may ultimately be detrimental to the advancement of society. PMID:21050336

Biley, F C

2010-10-01

120

Mental Health and the TC. Chapter 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains 19 papers from the ninth World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (TCs) that deal with the interface between the mental health establishments and the TC. Papers include: (1) "Psychiatry and the TC" (Jerome Jaffe); (2) "The Chemical Brain" (Sidney Cohen); (3) "Where Does the TC Fail?" (Ab Koster); (4) "Psychiatric Severity…

Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

121

Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster  

Microsoft Academic Search

The psychosocial consequences of disasters have been studied for more than 100 years. The most common mental health consequences are depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, medically unexplained somatic symptoms, and stigma. The excess morbidity rate of psychiatric disorders in the first year after a disaster is in the order of 20%. Disasters involving radiation are particularly pernicious because the exposure

Evelyn J Bromet

2012-01-01

122

Mental Health Needs of Arab Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers indicate that the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in the Arab region is similar to that found in other parts of the world. Women, in particular, are more likely to suffer various disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, somatization, and eating disorders. In this article, the author highlights some of the research on the mental health needs of Arab women. Consideration

Aisha Hamdan

2009-01-01

123

Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Previous studies about unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) showed that they are a highly vulnerable group who have greater psychiatric morbidity than the general population. This review focuses on mental health issues among URMs. Articles in databases PsycINFO, Medline and PubMed from 1998 to 2008 addressing this topic were reviewed. The literature had a considerable emphasis on the assessment of

Julia Huemer; Niranjan S Karnik; Sabine Voelkl-Kernstock; Elisabeth Granditsch; Kanita Dervic; Max H Friedrich; Hans Steiner

2009-01-01

124

Defining mental health and mental illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Key featuresDiscussion of the terminological confusion that exists in relation to issues associated with mental health.  The scale of individual suffering from mental health problems and illness among young people.  The worldwide phenomenon of the stigmatization of mental illness, originating during childhood.

Sharon Leighton; Nisha Dogra

125

The thin blue line of mental health in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the shift from psychiatric custodial treatment and accommodation of mentally ill individuals to community living and community care may have been devised with good intentions, poorly implemented reforms have promulgated numerous deficiencies in Australia’s mental health system. Among these has been the troubling proportion of mentally ill individuals who have ‘fallen through the cracks’ into crisis as a consequence

Katrina Clifford

2010-01-01

126

MentalHealth.net  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is an excellent resource for anyone seeking the latest issues surrounding mental health topics. It is designed and maintained by Clinical Psychologists and is "dedicated to educating the public about mental health, wellness, and family and relationship issues and concerns." In existence since 1995, the site provides featured topics, essays and articles, as well as latest news sections. In addition to these tools, weblogs, podcasts, and a questions and answers section are available. This site will be a valuable resource for any student, instructor or professional in the mental health field.

2007-08-23

127

Vulnerability and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vulnerability of children has long been recognized in terms of their development needs and the importance of protecting their physical health. The extent, severity and impact of their mental health problems, including the particular vulnerabilities associated with such problems in both childhood and through to adult life, have been less of a public health priority. Vulnerabilities come in many

Beverley Raphael; Garry Stevens; Keirsten Pedersen

2006-01-01

128

Mental Health Matters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mental Health Matters is a collection of various mental health articles which cover topics such as psychological disorders and treatments for mental illnesses. The site is easy to navigate and users can choose from disorders, symptoms, medications, and treatments. Once a visitor chooses a subfield from the homepage, they are provided with another set of choices which contain more specific information on the various main topics. The site is also designed so that users can search by disorder or category to find the appropriate information to answer their queries.

2007-08-13

129

Health policy and mental health.  

PubMed

Health policy can be described as policy directed at the determinants of health, i.e. biological and environmental factors, lifestyle and the health care system. This type of policy now has become a policy objective in an increasing number of countries. In this article mental health is placed in the broad context of this policy. The central question is: can the mental health field grasp the opportunity of a growing interest in prevention and health promotion in general, as major objectives of health policy? Or will it stay more or less isolated from the mainstream of current developments? Answering this question means looking at the conditions of health policy. For health policy it is required that a definition be given of health problems and "causing" conditions. There should further be available intervention possibilities of a preventive and intersectoral character and also preventive strategies. It is stated that there is enough standardized information on mental health problems and experience with community-based research to let mental health participate in drawing up a community diagnosis. It also appears possible to construct an ecological health status model for mental health. Research on the factors in this model shows a shift in focus from risk populations to risk situations, e.g. unemployment, industrial disability, divorce and isolation. Further it is recognized that the search for causal factors is substituted by that for precipitating factors. Social-demographic factors, taken alone, are not precipitating factors. What matters is the combination of an underdeveloped coping mechanism, little social support, and prolonged stressful conditions or sudden stressful events.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10287174

Dekker, E

1987-01-01

130

Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina  

PubMed Central

Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine personal and situational correlates of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Structured interview data were obtained from farmworkers (N=69) in six counties in eastern and western North Carolina. Results indicated that a substantial number of farmworkers have poor mental health, as indicated by elevated depressive symptoms (52.2%) and anxiety (16.4%). Results also indicated that each mental health outcome had different predictors. Addressing the mental health issues of farmworkers requires a comprehensive, multifaceted approach. PMID:22757952

Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

2013-01-01

131

Mental Health and Mass Violence  

E-print Network

Mental Health and Mass Violence Evidence-Based Early Psychological Intervention for Victims Institute of Mental Health (2002). Mental Health and Mass Violence: Evidence-Based Early Psychological are available through: The National Institute of Mental Health Office of Communications and Public Liaison 6001

Baker, Chris I.

132

Cannabis Use and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates whether cannabis use leads to worse mental health. To do so, we account for common unobserved factors aecting mental health and cannabis consumption by modeling mental health jointly with the dy- namics of cannabis use. Our main finding is that using cannabis increases the likelihood of mental health problems, with current use having a larger eect than

Carol Propper; Tue Gørgens; Chikako Yamauchi

133

Benchmarking Adult Mental Health Organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This paper describes the adult mental health forums that were conducted as part of the National Mental Health Benchmarking Project (NMHBP).Method: Eight adult mental health forums were attended by staff from eight adult mental health services from around the country. The forums provided an avenue for these participants to document their organizations’ performances against previously agreed key performance indicators

Tim Coombs; Tania Geyer; Jane Pirkis

2011-01-01

134

Inequality, privacy, and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The state's mental health power is standardly understood in terms of the state's power to intervene with persons or populations to address mental health problems. This article advances a more expansive view of the state's mental health power, one which seeks to capture those exercises of state power that do not directly concern mental health but that nevertheless can have

Andrew W. Siegel

2008-01-01

135

Is the Mental Health Review Tribunal Inherently Unfair to Patients?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mental Health Act 1983 (UK), which governs the compulsory detention of psychiatric patients in England and Wales, includes a number of statutory safeguards to ensure that the patient's continued detention is not unlawful. One of these safeguards is the Mental Health Review Tribunal (MHRT). The primary role of MHRTs is to review the legality of a patient's detention in

Amar Shah

2010-01-01

136

Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine primary and context-specific stressors of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Methods: Structured interview data were obtained…

Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

2012-01-01

137

Mental health services in the Arab world.  

PubMed

This paper summarizes the current situation of mental health services in the Arab world. Out of 20 countries for which information is available, six do not have a mental health legislation and two do not have a mental health policy. Three countries (Lebanon, Kuwait and Bahrain) had in 2007 more than 30 psychiatric beds per 100,000 population, while two (Sudan and Somalia) had less than 5 per 100,000. The highest number of psychiatrists is found in Qatar, Bahrain and Kuwait, while seven countries (Iraq, Libya, Morocco, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) have less than 0.5 psychiatrists for 100,000 population. The budget allowed for mental health as a percentage from the total health budget, in the few countries where information is available, is far below the range to promote mental health services. Some improvement has occurred in the last decade, but the mental health human resources and the attention devoted to mental health issues are still insufficient. PMID:22295010

Okasha, Ahmed; Karam, Elie; Okasha, Tarek

2012-02-01

138

Poverty and Mental Health in the Breadline Britain Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the difficulties in the research has long been the issue of 'drift'. This theory suggests that the greater proportion of psychiatric admissions from poorer areas and higher levels of observed psychiatric symptoms is the result of inward migration which is prompted by poor mental health, either due to decreasing income or to 'disintegration' which means that people with

Sarah Payne

139

Mental Health Stigma among Adolescents: Implications for School Social Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated adolescents with a mental health diagnosis and their experience of stigma in schools. Forty adolescents between the ages of twelve and seventeen who met DSM-IV criteria for a psychiatric illness and who were prescribed psychiatric medication were selected. The Teen Subjective Experience of Medication Interview was used to…

Kranke, Derrick; Floersch, Jerry

2009-01-01

140

Effects of the community mental health centers program on the growth of mental health facilities in nonmetropolitan areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a quasi-experimental design, changes in the numbers of mental health facilities between 1964 and 1974 were examined for a sample of 50 nonmetropolitan catchment areas that established a Community Mental Health Center (CMHC) before January 1973 and a sample that did not. Compared to non-CMHC areas, CMHC areas had a slightly greater number of general hospital psychiatric units in

Jeffrey A. Buck

1984-01-01

141

Psychiatric components of a Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The operational psychiatric requirements for a comprehensive Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on a permanently manned Space Station are examined. Consideration is given to the psychological health maintenance program designed for the diagnosis of mental distress in astronauts during flight and for prevention of mental breakdown. The types of mental disorders that can possibly affect the astronauts in flight are discussed, including various organic, psychotic, and affective mental disorders, as well as anxiety, adjustment, and somatoform/dissociative disorders. Special attention is given to therapeutic considerations for psychiatric operations on Space Station, such as restraints, psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial support.

Santy, Patricia A.

1987-01-01

142

Mental Health, Are We at Risk?  

PubMed Central

Background: Mental health is an important component of the total positive health and is interwoven closely with the physical and physiological dynamics of the human body. Worldwide, about 500 million people are believed to be suffering from neurotic, stress related and psychological problems. In India, surveys on mental morbidity in various parts of the country suggest a prevalence rate of 18-20 per 1000. Materials and Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out amongst married women in the age group 18-45 years in an urban community of South Mumbai. Self-reporting questionnaire of 20 items (SRQ 20) developed by the WHO was administered. Statistical analysis was carried out to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disturbance. Result: The prevalence of psychiatric disturbance was found to be 27.27% for the total sample. The study results indicate that somatic symptoms were reported more commonly which could be a manifestation of underlying/burgeoning mental disorders. Conclusions: The results imply a high prevalence of 27.27% of psychiatric disturbance in our community. However, defining mental disorder from a clinical standpoint necessitates identification of the dividing line between despair and depression. It is recommended that women be encouraged to approach counsellors and thus enable further diagnosis and management of Common Mental Disorders in the community. PMID:24695680

Tawar, Shabeena; Bhatia, Sanjana Seth; Ilankumaran, Mookkiah

2014-01-01

143

Mental Health Economics and Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

As evidenced by the European Commission's recent Mental Health Pact, mental health has moved up the policy agenda in many countries. There is much more attention now on promoting general mental wellbeing in the population, and addressing the needs of people with mental health problems. Particular concerns are: human rights abuses; rebalancing community and institutional care; coordinating action across multiple

Martin Knapp; David McDaid; Jennifer Beecham; Derek King; Roshni Mangalore; A-La Park; Andres Roman; Monique Smith; Cicely Thomas; Fayaz Aziz

2009-01-01

144

Student Mental Health Final Report  

E-print Network

1 Student Mental Health Committee Final Report University of California Office of the President: Report of the University of California Student Mental Health Committee On behalf of the Student Mental in December 2005, and was given a charge to assess 1) trends in student mental health, 2) how these trends

O'Toole, Alice J.

145

Mental Health, Racism, and Sexism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume, successor to the 1973 volume "Racism and Mental Health," presents a range of perspectives on mental health, prejudice, and discrimination. Contributors are of multiracial, multiethnic, and gender-diverse backgrounds. They use their existential experiences to analyze pressing mental health and mental illness issues. Contributions…

Willie, Charles V., Ed.; And Others

146

Australian Indigenous mental health.  

PubMed

Understanding the complexity of another culture's health concerns is fraught with difficulty, yet 'ways forward' abound. Many researchers, including Indigenous people, have recorded cultural understandings of health, and made recommendations that have influenced the planning of Indigenous peoples' mental health care. Indeed, there is anticipation with vision for the future. Australian Indigenous people have suffered many losses, which have resulted in much social unrest, and mental and spiritual sorrow. The difficulty of belonging and adjusting to two different cultural contexts has led to particular physical health and mental health concerns for some. Health for Indigenous people is viewed within a holistic and community lifestyle framework, which is related to both past and present issues, and it is not necessarily individualized or compartmentalized. A closer liaison between the health traditions of both cultures, working together with education, good will and understanding of each other's health business, and working together within mainstream health services may assist with healing, reconciliation and improved Aboriginal holistic health. PMID:11421971

Brown, R

2001-03-01

147

where transformation happens health + mental health  

E-print Network

where transformation happens health + mental health BOSTON COLLEGE G R A D U A T E S C H O O L O F SOCIAL WOR K #12;program overview The Health & Mental Health Concentration prepares students for clinical or macro practice in health or mental health settings by providing specialized knowl- edge in assessment

Huang, Jianyu

148

Assessments of mental capacity in psychiatric inpatients: a retrospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) was introduced in 2007 to protect vulnerable individuals who lack capacity to make decisions for themselves and to provide a legal framework for professionals to assess incapacity. The impact of the MCA on clinical practice is not known. This study aims to evaluate how frequently mental capacity is assessed in psychiatric inpatients, whether the criteria for determining capacity set out in the MCA are used in practice, and whether this has increased with the introduction of the MCA. Method A retrospective cohort study was carried out using a case register of South East London mental health service users. The Case Register Interactive Search (CRIS) system enabled searching and retrieval of anonymised information on patients admitted to the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust since 2006. The presence and outcomes of documented mental capacity assessments in psychiatric admissions between May 2006 and February 2010 were identified and demographic information on all admissions was retrieved. Results Capacity assessments were documented in 1,732/17,744 admissions (9.8%). There was a significant increase in the frequency of capacity assessments carried out over the study period of 0.3 percentage points per month (95% CI 0.26-0.36, p?mental capacity assessments carried out on psychiatric inpatients. Although mental health services are considering the issue of capacity more frequently, mental capacity assessments are inconsistently applied and do not make adequate use of MCA criteria. PMID:23586975

2013-01-01

149

Community-based mental health care in Africa: mental health workers' views  

PubMed Central

The World Health Organization (WHO) has for long proposed the development of community-based mental health services worldwide. However, the progress toward community mental health care in most African countries is still hampered by a lack of resources, with specialist psychiatric care essentially based in large, centrally located mental hospitals. It is again time to reconsider the direction of mental health care in Africa. Based on a small inquiry to a number of experienced mental health professionals in sub-Saharan Africa, we discuss what a community concept of mental health care might mean in Africa. There is a general agreement that mental health services should be integrated in primary health care. A critical issue for success of this model is perceived to be provision of appropriate supervision and continuing education for primary care workers. The importance of collaboration between modern medicine and traditional healers is stressed and the paper ends in a plea for WHO to take the initiative and develop mental health services according to the special needs and the socio-cultural conditions prevailing in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:18458779

ALEM, ATALAY; JACOBSSON, LARS; HANLON, CHARLOTTE

2008-01-01

150

Addressing Tri?Morbidity (Hepatitis C, Psychiatric Disorders, and Substance Use): The Importance of Routine Mental Health Screening as a Component of a Comanagement Model of Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Recent studies suggest that most patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection commonly present to medical clinics with active psychiatric and substance use disorders. However, routine screening for these disorders is generally not done. Objectives. The purpose of our study was to assess prospectively the frequency of psychiatric and substance use disorders in patients presenting for initial assessment of

Marian Fireman; Aaron Blackwell; Peter Hauser

2005-01-01

151

Mental Health: Keeping Your Emotional Health  

MedlinePLUS

... emotional health can sometimes have emotional problems or mental illness. Mental illness often has a physical cause, such as a ... with family, work or school can sometimes trigger mental illness or make it worse. However, people who are ...

152

Community Mental Health Model for Campus Mental Health Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

University and college mental health services have historically modeled themselves after a traditional clinic model. Few delivery systems have been influenced by the community mental health model. The major reason for this lack of influence appears to be the "in loco parentis" stance of colleges and universities. A campus mental health service…

Banning, James H.

153

Pennsylvania Women's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women have undergone a revolution in their self-perception and their traditional relationships to work, money, marriage, and family. These social changes have implications for every aspect of women's lives, including their mental health. Because of the special problems and conflicts confronting women today, data need to be analyzed on policies,…

Towns, Kathryn; And Others

154

Lifestyle and Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized…

Walsh, Roger

2011-01-01

155

Lifestyle and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized despite considerable evidence of their effectiveness in both clinical and normal populations. TLCs are sometimes as effective as

Roger Walsh

2011-01-01

156

Seniors (Mental Health)  

MedlinePLUS

... also is possible that depression is an early symptom of Alzheimer’s disease or vascular dementia. Conclusion Having good mental health ... life does not ensure immunity from severe depression, Alzheimer’s disease, ... could be symptoms of conditions for which help is available. Seniors ...

157

[Mental health and utilization of mental health services among victims of crime in Japan].  

PubMed

Since the Crime Victims Act became enforced in 2005, the mental health recovery of crime victims has become an important issue among national government and local authorities. A high prevalence of psychiatric disorders, such as PTSD, among crime victims has been reported in domestic and foreign studies. However, little is known about the percentage of victims of crime who actually attend mental health services. The prevalence of mental health service usage varied from one study to another and is thought to be higher among victims of severe crimes, such as sexual assault. Several factors associated with seeking mental health care, including the presence of psychopathology, appear to be common among the studies. To offer suitable mental health services for crime victims, various organizations or agencies must cooperate with each other, including the police and prosecution, private victim support groups, and medical departments like emergency medical care centers and gynecology clinics. This report summarizes mental health problems and the use of mental health services among crime victims, and discusses how crime victims who require medical treatment may actually receive adequate mental health care. PMID:17447467

Nakajima, Satomi; Shirai, Akemi

2007-02-01

158

Mental Health Treatment Program Locator  

MedlinePLUS

... County or Zip By Name Other Links State Mental Health Agencies Frequently Asked Questions Links Comments or Questions ... a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health treatment programs nearest you, find your State on ...

159

Disasters and Mental Health Research  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... 1 Item) Populations Children and Adolescents (18 Items) Military Service Members (2 Items) Women’s Mental Health (1 ... 1 Item) Populations Children and Adolescents (18 Items) Military Service Members (2 Items) Women’s Mental Health (1 ...

160

Mental health and housing.  

PubMed

With the present trend away from the designing of individual buildings and towards the systematic planning of whole residential communities, it should be possible to take mental health requirements into account at the planning stage. At present, sociologists are all too seldom consulted on matters of residential planning. When discussing the relationship between housing and mental health one cannot restrict oneself only to the external aspects of the house, but rather one must also consider the opportunities available for the members of the family to satisfy their own needs, both within the home and in its immediate surroundings. Factors which may affect residential requirements include geographical location, type and standard of dwelling and time and continuity of occupation. A move between two districts or groups representing different housing norms and values may lead to withdrawal symptoms in the individual. This may arise equally well from the remoteness of the country districts as from the conflicting pressures brought on by the abundance of contacts available in the large towns. Town life tends to heighten susceptibility to neuroses and personality conflicts. The character of a residential area may affect the mental health of its occupants. Faris & Dunham (4), in studying the incidence of various types of mental illness with an urban population, observed that schizophrenia was most common among people who were in some way isolated from social involvement. The striving for spaciousness in residential areas and the creation of a "summer city" or "garden city" image or a "family-centred way of life" may lead to unexpected problems and have a variety of social consequences. Mental health difficulties have been noted, for example, among housewives in "dormitory" towns or suburbs (11). The institutions required by a community may be grouped into four categories, representing the basic needs of its members. These are (1) economic institutions, (2) social and political organizations, (3) leisure-time clubs and (4) societies and institutions for promoting social integration, including educational, advisory and assistance bodies. The study of satiation processes offers an interesting approach to the relationship between housing and mental health. Man requires new stimuli to motivate him. Boredom and satiation serve to induce passivity and may provoke destructive behaviour and escapism. Finland has the highest percentage of dwellings constructed in the immediate post-war period of any country in Europe, and in respect of the functions of housing many aspects are still apparent which are detrimental to mental health. PMID:1273551

Kari-Koskinen, O; Karvonen, P

1976-01-01

161

Mental Health and the Media.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces special issue on the topic of mental health and the media. States that there is no single answer about the impact of the media. Suggests that articles attempt to encourage counselors to think critically about the role of the media in influencing individual mental health and in shaping public perceptions of mental health issues.…

Wilson, Nona L.

1999-01-01

162

Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation  

E-print Network

Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation in Florida Final Summary of Survey, with the Program Office of Substance Abuse and Mental Health in Florida's Department of Children and Families (DCF). Background Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ECMHC) is an effective prevention and early

McQuade, D. Tyler

163

The HIV mental health spectrum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growing mental health needs that are related to HIV are immense and diverse. The HIV mental health spectrum is a model that identifies and characterizes populations in need of HIV-related services which can be offered by Community Mental Health Centers. The spectrum describes the specialized service requirements for each of these populations, the challenges in providing these services, and

Michael D. Knox; Maryann Davis; Martha A. Friedrich

1994-01-01

164

Mental capacity in patients involuntarily or voluntarily receiving psychiatric treatment for an acute mental disorder.  

PubMed

Despite the growing amount of data, much information is needed on patients' mental capacity to consent to psychiatric treatment for acute mental disorders. The present study was undertaken to compare differences in capacity to consent to psychiatric treatment in patients treated voluntarily and involuntarily and to investigate the role of psychiatric symptoms, competency, and cognitive functioning in determining voluntariness of hospital admission. Involuntary patients were interviewed with the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment (MacCAT-T), the 24-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices, and their data were compared with those for age- and sex-matched voluntary patients. Involuntary patients performed worse in all MacCAT-T subscales. Capacity to consent to treatment varied widely within each group. Overall, involuntary patients have worse consent-related mental capacity than those treated voluntarily, despite capacity to consent to treatment showing a significant variability in both groups. PMID:24502678

Mandarelli, Gabriele; Tarsitani, Lorenzo; Parmigiani, Giovanna; Polselli, Gian M; Frati, Paola; Biondi, Massimo; Ferracuti, Stefano

2014-07-01

165

Predicting type of psychiatric disorder from Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) scores in child mental health clinics in London and Dhaka  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computerised algorithm was developed to predict child psychiatric diagnoses on the basis of the symptom and impact scores derived from Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires (SDQs) completed by parents, teachers and young people. The predictive algorithm generates \\

R. Goodman; D. Renfrew; M. Mullick

2000-01-01

166

Mental health in the tropics.  

PubMed

Although problems in mental health constitute 14% of the global burden of disease, mental health has been largely missing from the international health agenda. The burden from mental illness is largely attributable to the chronically disabling nature of depression and other common mental disorders, alcohol-use and substance-use disorders, and psychoses. The last decade has seen some progress in addressing this gap. In 2001, the World Health Report, Mental Health: New Understanding, New Hope, drew attention to the situation, with an appeal from the World Health Organization's Director General that 'mental health - neglected for far too long - is crucial to the overall well-being of individuals, societies and countries and must be universally regarded in a new light.' In September 2007, the journal Lancet launched the global mental health series, which highlighted the public-health dimension of mental health, identified barriers to receiving treatment, and gave a call for action to the nations of the world, to make a major commitment to upgrade the quality of mental-health services, to develop evidence-based treatment and preventive measures, to provide support for research in mental health, and to develop indicators to monitor progress. In October 2008, the World Health Organization launched the Mental Health Gap Action Programme, with the aim of scaling up the services for mental, neurological and substance-use disorders in all countries but especially those with low and middle incomes. The programme aims to develop evidence-based packages of care, psycho-social interventions and pharmacotherapy for tens of millions who could be treated for depression, schizophrenia and epilepsy, prevented from suicide, and begin to lead normal lives - even in very poor countries. While there is cause for optimism, much remains to be done. Most of all, there needs to be awareness amongst health providers and planners that mental health is an integral part of general health concerns, and that there can be no health without mental health. PMID:19208294

Rahman, A; Prince, M

2009-03-01

167

Childhood environment of adult psychiatric outpatients in Norway having been bullied in school ? ? This study was supported by a research grant from the Norwegian Council for Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The goal of this study was to contrast the childhood environment of adult psychiatric outpatients reporting to have been bullied at school with those who were not.Method: One-hundred-sixty consecutive adult outpatients from a psychiatric clinic in Norway completed self-administered questionnaires about their psychosocial environment during childhood and adolescence. The frequency of being bullied was measured with an inventory used

Gunilla Klensmeden Fosse; Are Holen

2002-01-01

168

Barriers to Mental Health Care Utilization in Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is frequently complicated by co-occurring psychiatric problems, such as depression and anxiety, that negatively affect the course and management of the illness. Yet, in the majority of cases, these psychiatric comorbidities are neither recognized nor treated to remission. The primary purpose of this study was to identify and describe barriers to mental health care utilization for people with PD. Secondary objectives included the assessment of attitudes and preferences regarding the need for mental health services in the PD community and the acceptability of tele-health interventions as a method for improving access and quality of care. Methods Seven hundred sixty-nine people with PD completed an anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire assessing barriers to mental health care utilization in this medical population. Respondents were drawn from a national sample. Results Commonly endorsed barriers to mental health care utilization in PD reflect the patients’ incomplete understanding of mental health problems, access issues, and illness-specific concerns, as well as the inadequate screening and detection of psychiatric complications by medical providers, and the need for more effective treatments in this medical population. Several demographic, medical, and psychiatric variables also influenced the likelihood of accessing mental health care. Interest in tele-health approaches to mental health treatment was high and, in several instances, correlated with perceived barriers to mental health care utilization. Conclusions People with PD may encounter a multitude of barriers that impede their pursuit of mental health care. Clinical implications are discussed and further research is needed to replicate and extend these findings. PMID:23589410

Dobkin, Roseanne D.; Rubino, Jade Tiu; Friedman, Jill; Allen, Lesley A.; Gara, Michael A.; Menza, Matthew

2013-01-01

169

School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

2013-01-01

170

Contemporary mental health rehabilitation.  

PubMed

In the United Kingdom, contemporary mental health rehabilitation services evolved during the period of deinstitutionalisation. They focus on people with complex psychosis, a "low volume, high needs" group which is at risk of social exclusion. Without these specialist services, this group is at risk of becoming stuck in a hospital or in other facilities that do not enable them to achieve their optimal level of autonomy. When a "whole system" of rehabilitative care is provided, including specialist inpatient facilities and supported accommodation, the majority are able to progress in their recovery and live successfully in the community. Rehabilitation is a complex intervention; current and further research is needed to identify the specific aspects of treatment and support it delivers that are most effective in enabling recovery and social inclusion for those with the most complex and long-term mental health needs. PMID:25316799

Killaspy, H

2014-09-01

171

Mental health promotion system.  

PubMed

Mental activity promotion system is presented that analyzes, quantifies, trains and prescribes based on analysis of logical, memorizing, concentrative, decisive, in conditions where time and space is involved, possibility of dementia, and on evaluation of lifestyle of subjects. Special consideration has been made to make the system motivational, persuasive, attractive and fun to use. The system has been successfully deployed in Bitgeoul Senior health town, Gwangju, South Korea. PMID:22255530

Farooq, Umar; Jang, Dae-Geun; Jang, Jae-Keun; Park, Seung-Hun

2011-01-01

172

Mental Health and Stress  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This project collects resources for studying mental health and stress issues with middle schoolers. Teens and stress Science NetLinks: The Laughing Brain 2: A Good Laugh Dealing with anger Stress-o-meter Look at each of the above sites. Choose one and read the content. Write a one-paragraph summary. Play interactive games and take quizzes. Keep a log of what you do. Tell which site you liked best and why. ...

Falconer, Mrs.

2007-03-18

173

[Cytogenetic study of 257 mentally deficient patients in psychiatric hospitals].  

PubMed

Cytogenetic survey of 257 mentally retarded individuals. A cytogenetic inquiry was undertaken among 257 patients with mental retardation of two psychiatric hospitals. 25 patients show chromosomes anomalies (10%). We found: --18 trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome); --3 sexual chromosome anomalies: 47, XYY syndrome; 47, XYY/46, XY mosaïcism; 47, XXY, or Klinefelter syndrom; --1 partial delection of long arm of chromosome number 18 (46, XX, 18 q--); --3 translocations; 45, XX, t (1, 13) (p 36, q 11); 46, XX, t (5 p--, 18 p+) (p 12, p 11); 46, XY, t (9, 19) (q 21, p 18). We also found 9 large Y chromosomes (46, XY q+), 8 cases of variant chromosomes, 1 case with chromosomes associations..., we report a case of masculine Turner phenotype or Noonan syndrom. PMID:135524

Bourgeois, M; Bénézech, M; Tournier-Zerbid, N; Constant-Boy, M; Benazet-Rissou, J

1975-11-01

174

Combining creativity and community partnership in mental health clinical experiences.  

PubMed

Lack of parity for mental health treatment, coupled with the trend toward more community-based care, has challenged nurse faculty to identify quality, creative psychiatric clinical sites. The purpose of this article is to educate nurse faculty on practical, creative ways to identify nontraditional community psychiatric clinical experiences. Service learning, community partnerships, and group interaction are emphasized. Literature regarding recent health care initiatives and widely accepted criteria for quality nursing education are discussed as foundations for creating alternative mental health clinical experiences. The authors' experiences implementing these concepts are discussed. Community partnerships and alternative clinical sites/experiences benefit students, faculty, institutions, and the community. PMID:18459625

Pharez, Marye C; Walls, Noretta D; Roussel, Linda A; Broome, Barbara A

2008-01-01

175

The Cuban immigration of 1980: a special mental health challenge.  

PubMed Central

The 124,769 Cubans who entered the United States from Cuba in a boatlift in 1980 included a small minority of people who needed mental health care. Some had been taken involuntarily from psychiatric hospitals, mental retardation facilities, jails, and prisons. The National Institute of Mental Health, Public Health Service (PHS), was responsible for mental health screening, evaluation, and treatment of the Cuban Entrants. Bilingual psychiatrists and psychologists found that many Entrants given preliminary evaluations showed evidence of transient situational stress reactions, not psychiatric illnesses. Entrants who had not yet been sponsored were consolidated into one facility in October 1980, and about 100 of those with severe problems were transferred to an Immigration and Naturalization Service-PHS evaluation facility in Washington, DC. Between March 1, 1981, and March 1, 1982, a total of 3,035 Entrants were evaluated at both facilities. Among the 1,307 persons who presented symptoms, there was a primary diagnosis of personality disorders for 26 percent, schizophrenic disorders for 15 percent, adjustment disorders for 14.5 percent, mental retardation for 8.6 percent, chronic alcohol abuse for 8.6 percent, and major depression for 7.2 percent. Only 459 Cubans with symptoms were found to be in need of further psychiatric care. As of October 1984, many Entrants with psychiatric illnesses remained under inpatient or community-based halfway house psychiatric care as a direct Federal responsibility. A PHS program for further placement in community-based facilities is underway. PMID:3918322

Silver, L B; Silver, B J; Silverman, M M; Prescott, W; del Pollard, L

1985-01-01

176

What Is Infant Mental Health?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unfortunately, the term "infant mental health" can be confusing for some people because it may be understood as translating into "mental illness." Others may not appreciate that babies and toddlers have the capacity to experience complex emotions. The Guest Editors of this issue of the Journal explore the meaning of infant mental health.

Osofsky, Joy D.; Thomas, Kandace

2012-01-01

177

Chicano Aging and Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focusing on the direction future research on the Chicano elderly should take, the 10 papers address theory development, methodological approach, social policy and problems, mental health service delivery, and issues of mental illness. The first seven papers discuss: the theoretical perspectives of research pertaining to mental health and the…

Miranda, Manuel, Ed.; Ruiz, Rene A., Ed.

178

Psychedelics and Mental Health: A Population Study  

PubMed Central

Background The classical serotonergic psychedelics LSD, psilocybin, mescaline are not known to cause brain damage and are regarded as non-addictive. Clinical studies do not suggest that psychedelics cause long-term mental health problems. Psychedelics have been used in the Americas for thousands of years. Over 30 million people currently living in the US have used LSD, psilocybin, or mescaline. Objective To evaluate the association between the lifetime use of psychedelics and current mental health in the adult population. Method Data drawn from years 2001 to 2004 of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health consisted of 130,152 respondents, randomly selected to be representative of the adult population in the United States. Standardized screening measures for past year mental health included serious psychological distress (K6 scale), mental health treatment (inpatient, outpatient, medication, needed but did not receive), symptoms of eight psychiatric disorders (panic disorder, major depressive episode, mania, social phobia, general anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and non-affective psychosis), and seven specific symptoms of non-affective psychosis. We calculated weighted odds ratios by multivariate logistic regression controlling for a range of sociodemographic variables, use of illicit drugs, risk taking behavior, and exposure to traumatic events. Results 21,967 respondents (13.4% weighted) reported lifetime psychedelic use. There were no significant associations between lifetime use of any psychedelics, lifetime use of specific psychedelics (LSD, psilocybin, mescaline, peyote), or past year use of LSD and increased rate of any of the mental health outcomes. Rather, in several cases psychedelic use was associated with lower rate of mental health problems. Conclusion We did not find use of psychedelics to be an independent risk factor for mental health problems. PMID:23976938

Krebs, Teri S.; Johansen, Pal-?rjan

2013-01-01

179

Dual Diagnosis in an Aging Population: Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders, Comorbid Substance Abuse, and Mental Health Service Utilization in the Department of Veterans Affairs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: In the context of an aging baby boom cohort with higher rates of substance use disorders than previous cohorts, the abuse of substances and dual diagnosis represent growing areas of concern among older adults. The aims of this study were to determine the current treated prevalence of major psychiatric illnesses, substance use disorders, and dual diagnosis across multiple age

Karin E. Kerfoot; Ismene L. Petrakis; Robert A. Rosenheck

2011-01-01

180

Reactions of Mental Health Professionals to Hypothetical Clients: A Comparison Based on Clients' Adoptive Status.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental health professionals have often reported differences in the psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses of adopted and nonadopted children and adolescents. Since psychiatric diagnoses are influenced by the judgments of the professionals who assign them, it is possible that the differences observed between adopted and nonadopted psychiatric patients…

Weiss, Andrea

181

Knowledge and attitudes about personalized mental health genomics: narratives from individuals coping with serious mental illness.  

PubMed

The present qualitative study examined the personal accounts, elicited via semi-structured interview, of nine United States military veterans with serious mental illness to describe their knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about psychiatric genetics, genetic testing and counseling for mental illness. The aim of the research was to elucidate issues from the perspective of adults with mental illness that may inform the education and training of mental health providers on basic genetic counseling. Findings suggest that participants had some basic knowledge about genetics, were interested in psychiatric genetic testing, and had an awareness of both positive and negative aspects of genetic test results. Participants tended to have overly optimistic ideas about current advances in psychiatric genetics and were motivated to undergo genetic testing for the good of their families and to benefit society. Implications of findings for research and practice are discussed. PMID:21394471

Potokar, Danielle N; Stein, Catherine H; Darrah, Olivia A; Taylor, Brent C; Sponheim, Scott R

2012-10-01

182

Economic recession and mental health: an overview.  

PubMed

Effects of the current global economic downturn on population mental health will emerge in the years ahead. Judging from earlier experience of financial crises in various parts of the world, stresses associated with rising unemployment, poverty and social insecurity will lead to upward trends in many national suicide rates, as well as to less readily charted increase in the prevalence of psychiatric illness, alcohol-related disorders and illicit drug use. At the same time, mental health services are being cut back as part of government austerity programs. Budget cuts will thus affect psychiatric services adversely just when economic stressors are raising the levels of need and demand in affected populations. Proactive fiscal and social policies could, however, help to mitigate the health consequences of recession. Evidence- based preventive measures include active labor market and family support programs, regulation of alcohol prices and availability, community care for known high-risk groups, and debt relief projects. Economic mental health care could best be achieved, not by decimating services but by planning and deploying these to meet the needs of defined area populations. PMID:21968374

Cooper, Brian

2011-01-01

183

Marital transitions and mental health.  

PubMed

Most research identifies marital disruption as a precursor for poor mental health but is generally unable to discount the potential selection effect of poor mental health leading to marital disruption. We use data from nine annual waves of the British Household Panel Survey to examine social selection and social causation as competing explanations. Mental health is measured using the general health questionnaire. We examine mental health at multiple time points prior to and after a marital transition through separation or divorce and compare this process to those who experience widowhood. All groups transitioning out of marriage have a higher prevalence of poor mental health afterwards but for those separated or divorced, poor mental health also precedes marital disruption, lending support to both social-causation and social-selection processes. The processes both preceding and after the transition to widowhood differ, with increased prevalence of disorder centering around the time surrounding the death itself PMID:15305757

Wade, Terrance J; Pevalin, David J

2004-06-01

184

A Comparative Study of the Psychiatric Nurses' Attitudes Towards Mental Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

THE aim of the present study is to analyse the effect of professional training on the psychiatric nurse's tolerance of mental disorders. We have used as samples two clearly-differentiated population groups : university students (N=328) and psychiatric nurses (N=50). The testing instruments were a semantic differential test and questionnaires on the subjects of aetiological factors, prognosis of mental disorders and

J. L. Ayuso Gutierrez; J. Saiz Ruiz

1978-01-01

185

Mental health and disorders. Editorial.  

PubMed

Mental health and mental disorders pose a tremendous challenge to the societal, health, and research policies in Europe, and sound advice is needed on a potential strategy for mental health research investment. Toward this goal, the ROAMER initiative ("Roadmap for Mental Health Research in Europe") was launched to map the current state of the art, to identify gaps and to delineate advances needed in various areas and domains of mental health research in Europe. To further stimulate discussions among the scientific community and stakeholders on how to improve mental health research and to promote an improved research agenda for the next decade, this IJMPR topic issue presents the overall ROAMER methodology as well as a series of selected papers highlighting critical issues of psychological approaches and interventions as outcomes of the ROAMER work package 5 "Psychological research and treatments". PMID:24375538

Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

2014-01-01

186

Youth with substance abuse and comorbid mental health disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with co-occurring disorders (CODs) have a substance use disorder (SUD) and at least one other mental health diagnosis.\\u000a Many patients with a non-SUD mental health diagnosis also have an SUD, whereas most patients with SUDs have other co-occurring\\u000a psychiatric disorders. Recognition is growing regarding the importance of identifying and treating CODs. This article reviews\\u000a the magnitude of CODs, theories

Christopher A. Lamps; Aradhana B. Sood; Rishi Sood

2008-01-01

187

The ecology of mental health care in Taiwan.  

PubMed

This paper applied the ecology model of general medical care by White et al. to analysis of mental health services utilization within the National Health Insurance in Taiwan. The ambulatory and inpatient claims of a 200,000-person cohort in 2001 were analyzed. The yearly and monthly prevalence estimates included psychotropic drug prescription, diagnosis of mental disorders, psychiatric ambulatory visit and admission, community psychiatric rehabilitation, and certificate of chronic psychosis. The results revealed one-fourth of people had received psychotropic drugs during the year, mostly from non-psychiatrists. Besides, the elderly might be excessively exposed to psychotropic drugs, and community rehabilitation programs were underutilized. PMID:16625305

Chou, Li-Fang

2006-07-01

188

[Impact of disasters on the mental health].  

PubMed

The study on the impact of disasters on the mental health is a relatively recent research field. Despite this, there are a significant number of studies showing the epidemiological data of the psychiatric pathology present in survivors and those affected by disasters This review attempts to summarize current knowledge and give an integrated vision of the effects of the disasters on the mental health, either natural or manmade disasters, as well as identify the effects prevalence and differences in each type of disaster. Post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety disorders, suicidal ideation or suicide attempts are some of the pathologies observed in people affected by disasters and with an ineffective adaptation, jointly with an increase in the consumption of toxic substances, generating an additional public health problem within another problem. The consequences will be different depending on the type of population and its cultural pattern, sex and gender of the affected people and type of disasters. PMID:24547635

Cernuda Martínez, José Antonio; Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael

2013-12-01

189

Choosing a career in psychiatric-mental nursing: do more clinical placements in this area for undergraduate student nurses make a difference? (Part One).  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to address the broader issue of how to increase the interest among undergraduate student nurses in choosing a career in the psychiatric-mental nursing field upon graduation. A description is given of the new clinical placement option that was offered in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing in April-May 1989 for the 100 hours of clinical experience (Nursing 439-Intersession) for undergraduate nursing students completing their third year of their Bachelor of Nursing degree at the Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary. One of these settings was an acute care psychiatric unit (McNab Mental Health Centre) and the other a provincial psychiatric hospital (Alberta Hospital Ponoka). This article is divided into three parts: 1) An overview of the present psychiatric-mental nursing content of the undergraduate program of U. of C.'s Faculty of Nursing; 2a) The perceptions of the four students who chose to do their Intersession-1989 clinical experience in a long-term care psychiatric setting; 2b) the perceptions of the preceptors who worked with the students in that long-term care setting; 3) and concluding comments about this relatively new venture, including some of the implications for future planning and research in terms of the issues pertaining to clinical placements, and recruitment of baccalaureate-prepared nurses for the psychiatric-mental health field. PMID:2588964

LeNavenec, C L

1989-11-01

190

Mental Health of Indian Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children constitute nearly 40% of India's population, a significant portion of whom suffer mental ailments. Ways to sensitize those who work with children to various aspects associated with child mental health are explored in this book. The focus is not on mental handicap but on the internal or external distress which warps the psychosocial…

Kapur, Malavika

191

Implementation of Social Services for the Chronically Mentally ill in a Polish Mental Health District: Consequences for Service Use and Costs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In accordance with the mental health reform in Poland, from 1970 to 1980 the following mental health facilities were established within the general health system in the Warsaw District of Targowek: general hospital psychiatric ward, day hospital, outpatient clinic (OC), and community mobile team (CMT) with some procedures of assertive community treatment (ACT). In 1998 (according to the Mental

Maria Zaluska; Dorota Suchecka; Zofia Traczewska; Jolanta Paszko

192

Interface of women’s mental and reproductive health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interface of women’s reproductive and mental health is an evolving area of psychiatric practice, necessitating familiarity\\u000a with psychobiological factors unique to women. The role of estrogen in particular has profound implications for the etiology\\u000a and treatment of women’s psychiatric illness, and has been reviewed along with the role of other hormones. Additionally, the\\u000a stress of specific life events such

Sermsak Lolak; Navid Rashid; Thomas N. Wise

2005-01-01

193

Oral Health of Psychiatric In-Patients in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Poor oral health has been reported among various psychiatric populations. Little is known regarding the oral health among psychiatric patients in Asia.Aims: To examine the oral health status of a group of Chinese psychiatric inpatients in a long-term rehabilitation facility.Methods: A dental survey using the WHO standardised dental evaluation form was conducted in adult psychiatric patients in a rehabilitation

Wai Kwong Tang; Frank C. S. Sun; Gabor S. Ungvari; David O’Donnell

2004-01-01

194

Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster.  

PubMed

The psychosocial consequences of disasters have been studied for more than 100 years. The most common mental health consequences are depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, medically unexplained somatic symptoms, and stigma. The excess morbidity rate of psychiatric disorders in the first year after a disaster is in the order of 20%. Disasters involving radiation are particularly pernicious because the exposure is invisible and universally dreaded, and can pose a long-term threat to health. After the Chernobyl disaster, studies of clean-up workers (liquidators) and adults from contaminated areas found a two-fold increase in post-traumatic stress and other mood and anxiety disorders and significantly poorer subjective ratings of health. Among liquidators, the most important risk factor was severity of exposure. In general population samples, the major risk factor was perceived exposure to harmful levels of radiation. These findings are consistent with results from A-bomb survivors and populations studied after the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. With regard to children, apart from findings from ecological studies that lack direct data on radiation or other teratologic exposures and local studies in Kiev, the epidemiologic evidence suggests that neither radiation exposure nor the stress of growing up in the shadow of the accident was associated with emotional disorders, cognitive dysfunction, or impaired academic performance. Thus, based on the studies of adults, the Chernobyl Forum concluded that mental health was the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident. Since mental health is a leading cause of disability, physical morbidity, and mortality, health monitoring after radiation accidents like Fukushima should include standard measures of well-being. Moreover, given the comorbidity of mental and physical health, the findings support the value of training non-psychiatrist physicians in recognizing and treating common mental health problems like depression in Fukushima patients. PMID:22394694

Bromet, Evelyn J

2012-03-01

195

Preliminary Outcomes From an Integrated Mental Health Primary Care Team  

E-print Network

The effects of establishing a multidisciplinary mental health primary care team in a Veterans Affairs internal medicine primary care clinic were evaluated. The multidisciplinary team worked in collaboration with primary care providers to evaluate and treat their patients, who had a wide variety of psychiatric disorders, in the primary care clinic. In the first year of operation preliminary outcomes indicated that the rate of referrals to specialty mental health care dropped from 38 percent to 14 percent. The mean number of appointments with the team for evaluation and stabilization was 2.5. These outcomes suggest that a multidisciplinary mental health primary care team can rapidly evaluate and stabilize pa-

Bradford L. Felker; Robert F. Barnes; Diane M. Greenberg, Ph.D.; Edmund F. Chaney, Ph.D.; Molly M. Shores; M. Katherine Buike

196

Palestinian mothers' perceptions of child mental health problems and services  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to explore Palestinian mothers' perceptions of child mental health problems and their understanding of their causes; to determine Palestinian mothers' awareness of existing services and sources of help and support; to identify professionals in the community whom Palestinian mothers would consult if their child had mental health problems; and to establish their views on ways of increasing awareness of child mental health issues and services. Checklists exploring the above issues were completed by 249 Palestinian mothers living in refugee camps in the Gaza Strip. Palestinian mothers equally perceived emotional, behavioural and psychotic symptoms as suggestive of mental ill health in childhood. Mothers perceived multiple causes of child mental health problems, including family problems, parental psychiatric illness and social adversity. A substantial proportion (42.6%) had knowledge of local child mental health care services. Overall, mothers preferred Western over traditional types of treatment, and were keen to increase mental health awareness within their society. Despite a different cultural tradition, Palestinian mothers appear open to a range of services and interventions for child mental health problems. As in other non-Western societies, child mental health service provision should be integrated with existing primary health care, schools, and community structures. PMID:16946953

THABET, ABDEL AZIZ; EL GAMMAL, HOSSAM; VOSTANIS, PANOS

2006-01-01

197

Italian quality assurance in mental health.  

PubMed

Since the radical changes in Italian mental health law in the 1970s, quality assurance models have gained consensus as the most suitable service assessment tool. In the 1990s, the whole Italian National Health System changed into a corporate model, and an accreditation system was implemented.The Italian Association for Quality and Accreditation in Mental Health (Associazione Italiana per la Qualità e l'Accreditamento in Salute Mentale [QUASM]) was founded in 1984, and since then, it offers consultation and support for Mental Health Departments and Regional Governments to help them to develop psychiatric programs, self-evaluation, educational programs, and professional peer-model accreditation. The QUASM accreditation manual has now gone through several revisions, the last in 2008. Until 2008, QUASM was successful in promoting quality and facilitating both institutional and professional accreditation. However, radical changes triggered by financial crisis have jeopardized quality assurance implementation. Nowadays, the challenge for QUASM is to maintain quality and accreditation geared to excellence against prevailing leveling trends. PMID:24840086

Rossi, Giovanni; Agnetti, Germana; Bosio, Roberto; De Luca, Pasquale; Erlicher, Arcadio; Morganti, Carla; Neri, Giovanni; Re, Edoardo; Semisa, Domenico; Fioritti, Angelo

2014-06-01

198

Low serum vitamin B12 levels among psychiatric patients admitted in Butabika mental hospital in Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background Psychiatric manifestations have been noted in patients with low serum vitamin B12 levels even in the absence of other neurologic and/or haematologic abnormalities. There is no literature on low serum B12 prevalence among Ugandans with psychiatric illnesses. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical manifestations of low serum vitamin B12 among psychiatric patients admitted in a Mental Health Hospital in Uganda. Method Using a cross sectional descriptive study design, 280 in-patients selected by systematic sampling were studied using a standardized protocol. Low serum vitamin B12 was defined as a level?psychiatric diagnosis of schizophrenia (AOR 1.74 (95% C.I. 1.00, 3.02); p-value?=?0.049), duration of psychiatric illness?>?or?=?3 years (AOR 2.27 (95% C.I. 1.29, 3.98); p-value?=?0.004), and hospitalization?psychiatric patients with the majority having no haematological findings. Associated risk factors included having a psychiatric diagnosis of schizophrenia, a shorter duration of hospitalization and longer duration of psychiatric illness. Female participants were less likely to have low serum vitamin B12 levels. Routine screening for serum vitamin B12 levels should be adopted by all hospitals for admitted psychiatric patients. PMID:24533701

2014-01-01

199

Mental Health, United States, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, the mental health community has made great strides in understanding more about the delivery of mental health services, improving efficiency and quality in services, and also about how to build strengths and resilience in the face of lifes stresses. This volume adds to the knowledge base so that the important task of system change…

Manderscheid, Ronald W., Ed.; Henderson, Marilyn J., Ed.

200

Tips for Mental Health Interpretation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper offers tips for working with interpreters in mental health settings. These tips include: (1) Using trained interpreters, not bilingual staff or community members; (2) Explaining "interpreting procedures" to the providers and clients; (3) Addressing the stigma associated with mental health that may influence interpreters; (4) Defining…

Whitsett, Margaret

2008-01-01

201

Zambia mental health country profile  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This country profile for Zambia was compiled between 1998 and 2002. The objectives of the exercise were to first of all avail policymakers, other key decision makers and leaders in Zambia, information about mental health in Zambia in order to assist policy and services development. Secondly, to facilitate comparative analyses of mental health services between countries. The work involved

John Mayeya; Roy Chazulwa; Petronella Ntambo Mayeya; Edward Mbewe; Lonia Mwape Magolo; Friday Kasisi; Annel Chishimba Bowa

2004-01-01

202

competency Course Objective 1 2b, 2c Demonstrate and conduct a complete psychiatric history with emphasis on the mental status examination.  

E-print Network

the problem of stigmatization of the mentally ill. 11 1f Explain the relationship between psychosocial factors and behaviors leading to ill health and disability. 12 3e, 3h Explain a complete psychiatric history with emphasis on the mental status examination. 2 2e

Myers, Lawrence C.

203

Mental health consultation in a nursing home.  

PubMed

As the world's population ages, increasing numbers of people can anticipate spending their latter years in long-term care settings. Many of these nursing home residents will also present psychiatric illnesses as primary or secondary diagnoses. The resulting behavioral problems may present challenges to nursing staff that they are ill-prepared to meet. This article illustrates the application of the Blake and Mouton consultation model to a Veterans Administration (VA) nursing home situation by a team of psychiatric mental health nurse specialists. The consultation is described and interpreted in terms of the Blake and Mouton model. The focal conflicts addressed in the consultation included issues of morale/cohesion, power/authority, and norms/standards. Interventions used were acceptant, prescriptive, confrontation, and theories/principles. The model provided a useful structure for conceptualizing and organizing assessment and intervention in the consultation situation. PMID:11855442

Kennedy, B; Covington, K; Evans, T; Williams, C A

2000-11-01

204

Characteristics of mentally ill offenders from 100 psychiatric court reports  

PubMed Central

Background There is an increasing probability that the psychiatrist will, willingly or not, come into contact with mentally ill offenders in the course of their practice. There are increasing rates of violence, substance abuse and other psychiatric disorders that are of legal importance. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the rates of different mental disorders in 100 court reports and to investigate the characteristics of mentally ill offenders. Methods All cases referred from different departments of the legal system to the forensic committee for assessment of legal accountability over 13-months duration were included. A specially designed form was prepared for data collection. Cases were classified into five groups: murder, robbery, financial offences, violent and simple offences and a group for other offences. Data were subjected to statistical analysis and comparisons between different groups of subjects were performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results Men constituted 93% of cases. In all, 73% of offenders were younger than 40 years old. Schizophrenia cases made up 13% of the total, substance related cases constituted 56% and amphetamine cases alone made up 21%; 10% of cases were antisocial personality disorders, and 51% of cases were classified as having a low education level. Unemployment was found in 34% of cases. The final decision of the forensic committee was full responsibility in 46% of cases and partial responsibility in 11% of cases, with 33% considered non-responsible. A total of 58% of cases had had contact with psychiatric healthcare prior to the offence and in 9% of cases contact had been in the previous 12 weeks. A history of similar offences was found in 32% of cases. In all, 14% of the offences were murders, 8% were sexual crimes, and 31% were violent/simple crimes. Conclusions The ability of the legal system to detect cases was good, while the ability of the healthcare system to predict crimes and offences was weak, as 58% of cases had had previous contact with the healthcare system previously. Substance abuse, especially amphetamine abuse, played an important role. PMID:20148107

2010-01-01

205

New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) Mental Health Scholarship Program  

E-print Network

New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) Mental Health Scholarship Program One in an agency program providing mental health services in contract with the Bureau of Mental Health. Individuals mental health services to adults that is in contract with the Bureau of Mental Health in the NYC DOHMH

Qiu, Weigang

206

Neuroscience and Mental Health Page 1 New program proposal: Neuroscience and Mental Health  

E-print Network

Neuroscience and Mental Health Page 1 New program proposal: Neuroscience and Mental Health · B.Sc. Honours in Neuroscience and Mental Health · B.Sc. Major in Neuroscience and Mental Health · B.Sc. General in Neuroscience and Mental Health · Minor in Neuroscience and Mental Health 1: Objectives 1.1: Mission

207

Comorbid internet addiction in male clients of inpatient addiction rehabilitation centers: psychiatric symptoms and mental comorbidity.  

PubMed

Addictive Internet use has recently been proposed to be included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Still, little is known about its nosological features, including comorbidity with other mental disorders and disorder-specific psychopathological symptoms. To investigate whether Internet addiction (IA) is an issue in patients in addiction treatment, 1826 clients were surveyed in 15 inpatient rehabilitation centers. Male patients meeting criteria for comorbid IA (n = 71) were compared with a matched control group of male patients treated for alcohol addiction without addictive Internet use (n = 58). The SCL-90-R, the Patient Health Questionnaire, and the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder were used to assess associated psychiatric symptoms and further comorbid disorders. Comorbid IA was associated with higher levels of psychosocial symptoms, especially depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and interpersonal sensitivity. Moreover, the patients with IA more frequently met criteria for additional mental disorders. They display higher rates of psychiatric symptoms, especially depression, and might be in need of additional therapeutic treatment. In rehabilitation centers, a regular screening for IA is recommended to identify patients with this (non-substance-related) addiction and supply them with additional disorder-specific treatment. PMID:24177479

Wölfling, Klaus; Beutel, Manfred E; Koch, Andreas; Dickenhorst, Ulrike; Müller, Kai W

2013-11-01

208

The elderly in a mental subnormality hospital: A comparison with the elderly psychiatric patient  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 6 % of the patients in a mental subnormality hospital were over the age of 65, in contrast to 61 % of patients in a psychiatric hospital. The mean time spent in institutional care was 46.4 years for the mentally handicapped individuals. The level of self care of the mentally handicapped patients was generally better than that of the

Brian R. Ballinger

1978-01-01

209

Mental health priorities in Vietnam: a mixed-methods analysis  

PubMed Central

Background The Mental Health Country Profile is a tool that was generated by the International Mental Health Policy and Services Project to inform policy makers, professionals and other key stakeholders about important issues which need to be considered in mental health policy development. The Mental Health Country Profile contains four domains, which include the mental health context, resources, provision and outcomes. We have aimed to generate a Mental Health Country Profile for Vietnam, in order to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the Vietnamese mental health situation, in order to inform future reform efforts and decision-making. Methods This study used snowball sampling to identify informants for generating a Mental Health Country Profile for Vietnam, and the data gathering was done through semi-structured interviews and collection of relevant reports and documents. The material from the interviews and documents was analysed according to qualitative content analysis. Results Marked strengths of the Vietnam mental health system are the aims to move toward community management and detection of mental illness, and the active involvement of several multilateral organizations and NGOs. However, there are a number of shortages still found, including the lack of treatment interventions apart from medications, the high proportion of treatments to be paid out-of-pocket, prominence of large tertiary psychiatric hospitals, and a lack of preventative measures or mental health information to the public. Conclusions At the end of this decade, mental health care in Vietnam is still characterised by unclear policy and poor critical mass especially within the governmental sector. This initial attempt to map the mental health situation of Vietnam suffers from a number of limitations and should be seen as a first step towards a comprehensive profile. PMID:20813036

2010-01-01

210

Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Teens > Mind > Mental Health > Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care Print A A A Text Size What's in ... if you're concerned about paying for mental health care. Lots of people need help and worry that ...

211

Economic Stress and Mental Health  

PubMed Central

This paper correlates economic stress with minority status, resource allocations for mental health programs, and vulnerability to mental disability. Several hypotheses are advanced: 1. A major and recurring psychological pattern of the American national character is prowhite, antiblack paranoia. 2. Mental health fiscal allocations and programmatic determinations in ghetto, lower socioeconomic, minority-populated urban areas are predicated on political and racist considerations, the underlying motivation being to keep minorities at greater risk of mental disability. 3. Economic privation and stress increase vulnerability to mental illness, especially in a minority population for whom health, mental health, educational, and social services are grossly inadequate. 4. Poverty and economic stress combine with health systems that are unresponsive to the needs of blacks and other minorities, resulting in the perpetuation of disabilities and other conditions in blacks that are potentially preventable. 5. Health and mental health resources should be increased rather than diminished during periods of economic stress, especially in the public sector. 6. In order to provide each citizen with access to quality health and mental health care regardless of race and/or economic status, there must be enacted a national health insurance program based on tax-levy monies that will cover all aspects of health and mental health care. 7. Racism and social status will continue to be powerful determinants of the quality of service that white professionals render to black patients and to poor white patients, unless our training institutions mount a massive campaign to train appropriately and to include significant numbers of minority candidates and trainees in the effort. To date this effort is virtually nonexistent. PMID:439171

Butts, Hugh F.

1979-01-01

212

Teens and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... 2007) The American Psychiatric Foundation, recognizing the important role adults can have in a teen's life, established the "Typical or Troubled?" school education program to encourage and equip adults (such as ...

213

Education in mental health promotion and its impact on the participants' attitudes and perceived mental health  

PubMed Central

Background Although the promotion of mental health (MHP) through education and training is widely accepted, there is scarce evidence for its effectiveness in the literature from outcome studies worldwide. The present study aimed to assess the effect of a three-semester MHP educational program on the recipients' opinions towards mental illness and on their own self-assessed health. Methods Respondents were 78 attendees who completed the assessment battery at the first (baseline) and the last session (end) of the training course. They were primary care physicians or other professionals, or key community agents, working in the greater Athens area. The course consisted of 44 sessions (4 h each), over a 3-semester period, focusing on the principles and methods of mental health promotion, the main aspects of major psychiatric disorders, and on relevant to health skills. Assessment instruments included the Opinion about Mental Illness (OMI) scale and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Results The mean scores of three OMI factors, that is, social discrimination, social restriction and social integration, and the two GHQ-28 subscales, that is, anxiety/insomnia and social dysfunction, were significantly improved by the end of the training course. Conclusions The results of this study provide evidence, with limitations, for the short-term effectiveness of the implemented educational MHP program on an adult group of recipients-key agents in their community. Because interventions for strengthening positive opinions about mental illness and enhancing self-assessed health constitute priority aims of mental health promotion, it would be beneficial to further investigate the sustainability of the observed positive changes. In addition it would be useful to examine (a) the possible interplay between the two outcome measures, that is, the effect of opinions of recipients about mental health on their perceived health, and (b) the applicability of this intervention in individuals with different sociodemographic profiles. PMID:22196397

2011-01-01

214

Examining Reports of Mental Health in Adults with Williams Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prior research suggests that individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have a disposition towards anxiety. Information regarding this is typically derived from parents and carers. The perspectives of the individuals with WS are rarely included in research of this nature. We examined the mental health of 19 adults with WS using explicit (psychiatric

Stinton, Chris; Tomlinson, Katie; Estes, Zachary

2012-01-01

215

Mental Health Problems in Adults with Williams Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although many researchers have investigated emotional and behavioral difficulties in individuals with Williams syndrome, few have used standardized diagnostic assessments. We examined mental health problems in 92 adults with Williams syndrome using the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disabilities--PAS-ADD (Moss,…

Stinton, Chris; Elison, Sarah; Howlin, Patricia

2010-01-01

216

Responsive Changes in Mental Health Practice in Wisconsin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Delivery of mental health care is changing dramatically at the state and county levels in Wisconsin. These new trends are affecting psychiatric institutions and rehabilitation personnel in reference to staffing patterns, the roles of occupational therapists, certified occupational therapy assistants, patient population and level of acute care and the type and site of intervention. Therapists are moving to more community-based

Linda Samuel

1998-01-01

217

Local suffering and the global discourse of mental health and human rights: An ethnographic study of responses to mental illness in rural Ghana  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Global Movement for Mental Health has brought renewed attention to the neglect of people with mental illness within health policy worldwide. The maltreatment of the mentally ill in many low-income countries is widely reported within psychiatric hospitals, informal healing centres, and family homes. International agencies have called for the development of legislation and policy to address these abuses.

Ursula M Read; Edward Adiibokah; Solomon Nyame

2009-01-01

218

Suicide Ideation in Older Adults: Relationship to Mental Health Problems and Service Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To assess the prevalence of suicide ideation among community-dwelling older adults and the relationship between suicide ideation, major psychiatric disorder, and mental health service use. Design and Methods: We use data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 1.2: Mental Health and Well-being (CCHS 1.2). We estimate the prevalence of…

Corna, Laurie M.; Cairney, John; Streiner, David L.

2010-01-01

219

National Institute of Mental Health: Child and Adolescent Mental Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed as a public service by the National Institute of Mental Health, this Web site contains a wealth of materials that will be very useful to mental health practitioners, parents, and those who work with young people in any capacity. First-time visitors will want to read the brief notes on the mental health of children and adolescents, as well as the section dealing with the treatment of children with mental disorders, which answers some basic questions about various disorders and psychotropic medicines commonly prescribed to treat these conditions. The Educational Materials section provides a number of booklets, fact sheets, and additional Web sites on such conditions as autism, depression, learning disabilities, and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Researchers and health care professionals will want to examine the sections devoted to current research reports and multi-center collaborations, including the Child and Adolescent Research Consortium and the Child Abuse and Neglect Working Group.

220

Online social networking and mental health.  

PubMed

During the past decade, online social networking has caused profound changes in the way people communicate and interact. It is unclear, however, whether some of these changes may affect certain normal aspects of human behavior and cause psychiatric disorders. Several studies have indicated that the prolonged use of social networking sites (SNS), such as Facebook, may be related to signs and symptoms of depression. In addition, some authors have indicated that certain SNS activities might be associated with low self-esteem, especially in children and adolescents. Other studies have presented opposite results in terms of positive impact of social networking on self-esteem. The relationship between SNS use and mental problems to this day remains controversial, and research on this issue is faced with numerous challenges. This concise review focuses on the recent findings regarding the suggested connection between SNS and mental health issues such as depressive symptoms, changes in self-esteem, and Internet addiction. PMID:25192305

Pantic, Igor

2014-10-01

221

WHO: Global Health Observatory: Mental Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While more than 800,000 people die from suicide globally each year, the median amount of the health budget allocated to mental health in 2011 was 2.8%. In Afghanistan, six out of every 100,000 men committed suicide. In the United States, that number was 19. These and other data can be gleaned from the age-standardized suicide rates interactive graph on the World Health OrganizationâÂÂs Global Health Observatory website dedicated to issues of Mental Health. Additionally, the page provides links to reports on Policy and financing of mental health, Human resources (in terms of the number of psychiatrists available per 100,000 people in a given country), and Mental health care delivery.

222

Parental mental illness and psychiatric disorders in "at risk" children.  

PubMed

Data are reported from psychiatric evaluations of a large group of communication disordered children and their parents who presented to a community speech clinic. Systematic psychiatric evaluations involving the use of standardized interviews, questionnaires, and DSM-III diagnostic criteria reveal that approximately 50% of the children have definable DSM-III psychiatric disorders and approximately the same percentage of children have at least one psychiatrically ill parent. Comparisons of children with psychiatrically ill parents and children with psychiatrically well parents show that parental psychiatric disorder is associated with increased psychopathology in the children. However, other factors, particularly psychosocial stress, are more strongly correlated with the presence of childhood psychopathology. There are few correlations between the types of parental psychiatric disorders and the types of childhood disorders. PMID:6501236

Cantwell, D P; Baker, L

1984-12-01

223

School Mental Health: A Federal Perspective  

E-print Network

School Mental Health: A Federal Perspective David Esquith Director for the Office of Safe Ingrid Donato Branch Chief, Mental Health Promotion, Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) #12;Health Resources and Services Administration Maternal

Weber, David J.

224

Mental Health in Pediatric Settings: Distribution of Disorders and Factors Related to Service Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesTo examine child psychiatric disorders in pediatric settings and identify factors associated with parents' use of pediatricians as resources concerning emotional\\/behavioral issues and use of mental health services.

MARGARET J. BRIGGS-GOWAN; SARAH McCUE HORWITZ; MARY E. SCHWAB-STONE; JOHN M. LEVENTHAL; PHILIP J. LEAF

2000-01-01

225

Islamic Values and Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental well-being is as important as physical well-being for sound life of man, and perhaps even more important, since physical illnesses are related in varying degrees to psychological problems. Modern psychology emphasizes essential criteria for mental health and well-being. These include positive relationships with others, productivity and…

Nassir, Balkis

226

Psychiatric Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease: Mental Status Examination versus Caregiver Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To examine possible reasons for conflicting prevalence data on psychiatric features of Alzheimer's disease, compared results of mental status examination by physician with questionnaire completed by caregivers in eliciting 12 different psychiatric symptoms. Found agreement only on categories suggesting agitation. Formal examination showed more…

Seltzer, Benjamin; Buswell, Arthur

1994-01-01

227

The treatment gap in mental health care.  

PubMed Central

Mental disorders are highly prevalent and cause considerable suffering and disease burden. To compound this public health problem, many individuals with psychiatric disorders remain untreated although effective treatments exist. We examine the extent of this treatment gap. We reviewed community-based psychiatric epidemiology studies that used standardized diagnostic instruments and included data on the percentage of individuals receiving care for schizophrenia and other non-affective psychotic disorders, major depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and alcohol abuse or dependence. The median rates of untreated cases of these disorders were calculated across the studies. Examples of the estimation of the treatment gap for WHO regions are also presented. Thirty-seven studies had information on service utilization. The median treatment gap for schizophrenia, including other non-affective psychosis, was 32.2%. For other disorders the gap was: depression, 56.3%; dysthymia, 56.0%; bipolar disorder, 50.2%; panic disorder, 55.9%; GAD, 57.5%; and OCD, 57.3%. Alcohol abuse and dependence had the widest treatment gap at 78.1%. The treatment gap for mental disorders is universally large, though it varies across regions. It is likely that the gap reported here is an underestimate due to the unavailability of community-based data from developing countries where services are scarcer. To address this major public health challenge, WHO has adopted in 2002 a global action programme that has been endorsed by the Member States. PMID:15640922

Kohn, Robert; Saxena, Shekhar; Levav, Itzhak; Saraceno, Benedetto

2004-01-01

228

Migration and mental health in Europe (the state of the mental health in Europe working group: appendix 1)  

PubMed Central

Background This paper is a part of the work of the group that carried out the report "The state of the mental health in Europe" (European Commission, DG Health and Consumer Protection, 2004) and deals with the mental health issues related to the migration in Europe. Methods The paper tries to describe the social, demographical and political context of the emigration in Europe and tries to indicate the needs and (mental) health problems of immigrants. A review of the literature concerning mental health risk in immigrant is also carried out. The work also faces the problem of the health policy toward immigrants and the access to health care services in Europe. Results Migration during the 1990s has been high and characterised by new migrations. Some countries in Europe, that have been traditionally exporters of migrants have shifted to become importers. Migration has been a key force in the demographic changes of the European population. The policy of closed borders do not stop migration, but rather seems to set up a new underclass of so-called "illegals" who are suppressed and highly exploited. In 2000 there were also 392.200 asylum applications. The reviewed literature among mental health risk in some immigrant groups in Europe concerns: 1) highest rate of schizophrenia; suicide; alcohol and drug abuse; access of psychiatric facilities; risk of anxiety and depression; mental health of EU immigrants once they returned to their country; early EU immigrants in today disadvantaged countries; refugees and mental health Due to the different condition of migration concerning variables as: motivation to migrations (e.g. settler, refugees, gastarbeiters); distance for the host culture; ability to develop mediating structures; legal residential status it is impossible to consider "migrants" as a homogeneous group concerning the risk for mental illness. In this sense, psychosocial studies should be undertaken to identify those factors which may under given conditions, imply an increased risk of psychiatric disorders and influence seeking for psychiatric care. Comments and Remarks Despite in the migrants some vulnerable groups were identified with respect to health problems, in many European countries there are migrants who fall outside the existing health and social services, something which is particularly true for asylum seekers and undocumented immigrants. In order to address these deficiencies, it is necessary to provide with an adequate financing and a continuity of the grants for research into the multicultural health demand. Finally, there is to highlight the importance of adopting an integrated approach to mental health care that moves away from psychiatric care only. PMID:16135246

2005-01-01

229

[Financial crisis and mental health in Greece].  

PubMed

Several studies indicate an association between economic crises and psychological burden. To investigate the possible impact of the current economic crisis on mental health in Greece, the association between two economic indicators (unemployment and average income) and mental health variables (psychiatric clinic admittance, visits to outpatients' departments and emergency units, suicides, homicides, mortality rates and divorces) was studied. The data were gathered by the Greek Statistical Service and some others were provided by the following hospitals: Eginition Hospital, Psychiatric Hospital of Attica, Athens General Hospital and Evaggelismos Hospital. Simple and multiple regression analyses were performed on the data. There was no significant correlation between the level of unemployment, as well as the average income, and admittance to the psychiatric clinics. A significant correlation was isolated between unemployment and visits to outpatients' department (R2 = 0.40, p = 0.001) and emergency unit (R2 = 0.49, p = 0.0002) of Eginition Hospital. The unemployment rate during the period 1981-2008 was positively associated with the number of homicides (R2 = 0.16, beta = 0.000049, p = 0.03), as well as the number of divorces (R2 = 0.20, beta = 0.005, p = 0.02) during the same period. The average income showed positive association with the visits to both outpatients' department (R2 = 0.55, p < 0.001) and emergency unit (R2 = 0,37, p = 0.004) of Eginition Hospital. However, the data from the 4 hospitals of the study revealed a negative correlation between average income and visits to outpatients' departments (R2 = 0.70, p = 0.02) and emergency units (R2 = 0.90, p < 0.001). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation between the average income and suicide rates (R2 = 0.37, p = 0.007), as well as a positive correlation between the average income and divorce rates (R2 = 0.73, p < 0.001) were found. The findings show several similarities with previous surveys in countries with analogous economic crises, such as the Former Eastern Bloc countries, Asian countries and the USA. Future studies, at a more late stage of the economic crisis, are expected to reveal more reliable associations with mental health. Finally, these findings are expected to inform intervention programmes dealing with prevention or mitigation of the impact of economic crisis on citizens' mental health. PMID:21888184

Giotakos, O; Karabelas, D; Kafkas, A

2011-01-01

230

Services and trends in Israel's mental health system.  

PubMed

Despite a rapidly growing population, continuing funding shortages, and threats to its national security, Israel has developed a comprehensive mental health care system, based on the psychiatric hospital. Services are provided through several networks, including government-financed and for-profit hospitals, government-financed mental health clinics in each of 23 service areas, and four health funds. Other networks provide care for specific groups such as soldiers, kibbutz members, orthodox Jews, and Israeli Arabs. The system's reliance on the hospital creates special problems, such as dependency and fragmentation of care, and a community mental health model adopted almost 20 years ago has yet to achieve the goal of shifting treatment to the community. However, Israel's mental health system is in a transition period. By drawing on its many strengths and learning from other countries' experience, Israel has the potential for developing a unique community-focused system. PMID:8045545

Kates, N

1994-05-01

231

Mental health service use by the elderly in nursing homes.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. Because current Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act regulations influence the disposition of US nursing home residents who have mental illness, National Nursing Home Survey (1985) data are analyzed for predictors of mental health service use. METHODS. Elderly residents' rates of mental health service use are presented. Logistic regression yielded odds ratios for treatment by both mental health specialists and general practitioners for client and service system variables. RESULTS. Among the two thirds of elderly residents with a mental disorder (including dementia), only 4.5% receive any mental health treatment in a 1-month period. The ratio of specialist to general practitioner care is approximately 1:1. Patients seen by a specialist are likely to be younger (aged 65 to 74); live in the Northeast; and have a diagnosis of schizophrenia (13:1), dementia (3:1), or other mental disorders (5:1). Prior residence in a psychiatric hospital predicts care by both health professional types. Rural location, nonproprietary ownership of the nursing home, and aggressive behavior point to general physician care. CONCLUSIONS. Our findings indicate significant neglect of the mental health needs of older nursing home residents and underscore the importance of monitoring the regulations for screening and treatment of mental disorders under the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. PMID:8438968

Burns, B J; Wagner, H R; Taube, J E; Magaziner, J; Permutt, T; Landerman, L R

1993-01-01

232

Mental Health Care: Who's Who  

MedlinePLUS

... with a master’s degree or doctoral degree in psychology (Psy.D.), philosophy (Ph.D.) or education (Ed. ... work experience. Licensed Professional Counselor: Master’s degree in psychology, counseling or a related field. Mental Health Counselor: ...

233

Rurality and Mental Health Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diversity within rural areas renders rural–urban comparisons difficult. The association of mental health treatment rates with\\u000a levels of rurality is investigated here using Rural–Urban Continuum Codes. Data from the 1996–1999 panels of the Medical Expenditure\\u000a Panel Survey are aggregated to provide annual treatment rates for respondents reporting mental health problems. Data show\\u000a that residents of the most rural areas receive

Emily J. Hauenstein; Stephen Petterson; Virginia Rovnyak; Elizabeth Merwin; Barbara Heise; Douglas Wagner

2007-01-01

234

Mental illness stigma among nurses in psychiatric wards of teaching hospitals in the north-west of Iran  

PubMed Central

Background: Stigma is one of the obstacles in the treatment and regaining the mental health of people with mental illness. The aim was determination of mental illness stigma among nurses in psychiatric wards. This study was conducted in psychiatric wards of teaching hospitals in Tabriz, Urmia, and Ardabil in the north-west of Iran. Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive analysis study in which 80 nurses participated. A researcher-made questionnaire was used, which measured demographic characteristics and mental illness stigma in the three components of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral. All data were analyzed using SPSS13 software and descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: Majority of nurses (72.5%) had medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness. About half of them (48.8%) had great inclination toward the social isolation of patients. The majority of them (62.5%) had positive emotional responses and 27.5% had stereotypical views. There was a significant correlation between experience of living with and kinship of nurses to person with mental illness, with prejudice toward and discrimination of patients. There was also a significant correlation between interest in the continuation of work in the psychiatric ward and prejudice, and also between educational degree and stereotypical views. Conclusions: The data suggest there is a close correlation between the personal experience of nurses and existence of mental illness stigma among them. Therefore, the implementation of constant educational programs on mental illness for nurses and opportunities for them to have direct contact with treated patients is suggested. PMID:23922602

Ebrahimi, Hossein; Namdar, Hossein; Vahidi, Maryam

2012-01-01

235

Yale College Council Committee on Mental Health  

E-print Network

Yale College Council Committee on Mental Health Revised September 2013 Mental Health Reference of emergency. #12;Yale College Council Committee on Mental Health September 2013 Resource Contact Information and are trained to counsel and support freshmen on a wide variety of issues. Residential College Mental Health

236

Cannabis Use and Mental Health Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates whether cannabis use leads to worse mental health. To do so, we account for common unobserved factors affecting mental health and cannabis consumption by modeling mental health jointly with the dynamics of cannabis use. Our main finding is that using cannabis increases the likelihood of mental health problems, with current use having a larger effect than past

Jenny Williams

2009-01-01

237

WHEN PARENTS WITH SEVERE MENTAL ILLNESS LOSE CONTACT WITH THEIR CHILDREN: ARE PSYCHIATRIC SYMPTOMS OR SUBSTANCE USE TO BLAME?  

PubMed Central

This study compared parental psychiatric symptom severity, and the absence or presence of severe substance abuse, as predictors of contact with minor children for a representative sample of adults with diagnoses of serious mental illness (N = 45). Child contact and psychiatric symptom severity were measured during regularly scheduled 6-month research interviews over a total 30-month period following each participant’s entry into the project. Severe substance abuse was documented as present or absent for the 6-month interval preceding each interview. Results revealed that incidence of severe substance abuse was repeatedly associated with less frequent parent-child contact, even after controlling for psychiatric symptoms, diagnosis, gender, age, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Neither psychiatric diagnosis nor symptom severity predicted frequency of child contact when substance abuse was taken into account. Mental health agencies offering parenting classes for adults with serious mental illness should incorporate substance use interventions to reduce loss of child custody and strengthen parent-child relationships. PMID:20011665

Jones, Danson; Macias, Rosemarie Lillianne; Gold, Paul B.; Barreira, Paul; Fisher, William

2009-01-01

238

Western voodoo: providing mental health care to Haitian refugees.  

PubMed

This article described certain aspects of Haitian life, voodoo and its role in Haitian society, the quality and quantity of psychiatric and mental health care for Haitians in Haiti, and suggestions for providing appropriate mental health care to Haitian refugees in the United States. Conway and Buchanan (1985) described what has helped Haitian refugees adapt in the transition to life in the United States: the strengths from their cultural heritage, such as fortitude; perseverance in the most arduous circumstances; deep religious faith; high self-respect; reliance on the extended family; and the tradition of sharing. Building on these assets may assist Western mental health-care providers in offering culturally sensitive mental health care to Haitians. PMID:2607490

Gustafson, M B

1989-12-01

239

New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) Mental Health Scholarship Program  

E-print Network

New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) Mental Health Scholarship Program One in an agency program providing mental health services in contract with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Bureau of Mental Health (BMH) or Bureau of Children, Youth and Families (CYF). Individuals

Qiu, Weigang

240

Web Sites Related to Mental Health Web Sites Related to Mental Health  

E-print Network

Web Sites Related to Mental Health Web Sites Related to Mental Health American Academy of Child://www.psychologicalscience.org/ Canadian Mental Health Association http://www.cmha.ca/ Center for Mental Health Services Research http://gwbweb.wustl.edu/Users/cmhsr/ Depression and Related Affective Disorders Association http://www.drada.org/ Disaster Mental Health http

de Lijser, Peter

241

Mental Health Status, Drug Treatment Use, and Needle Sharing among Injection Drug Users  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship among mental health symptoms, drug treatment use, and needle sharing in a sample of 507 injection drug users (IDUs). Mental health symptoms were measured through the ASI psychiatric scale. A logistic regression model identified that some of the ASI items were associated with needle sharing in an opposing…

Lundgren, Lena M.; Amodeo, Maryann; Chassler, Deborah

2005-01-01

242

The Effects of Federal Versus State Funding and Academic Affiliation on Mental Health Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compares mental health services in three facilities on two domains: federal versus state funding and academic affiliation. Data from a cross-sectional study of psychiatric outpatients is utilized to compare 196 VA patients to 337 non-VA patients treated in two state mental health agencies. The strength of academic affiliation of the facilities and the degree of participation in research

Rani A. Desai; David J. Dausey; Michael Sernyak; Robert A. Rosenheck

2005-01-01

243

Mental Health Practitioners' Reflections on Psychological Work in Uganda: Exploring Perspectives from Different Professions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Butabika-East London Link collaborated with Ugandan mental health services to train mental health professionals (psychiatric clinical officers, "PCOs", and clinical psychologists and psychiatrists, "Core Group") in psychological therapies. The aims of this research were to investigate how professionals were applying and…

Hall, Jennifer; d'Ardenne, Patricia; Nsereko, James; Kasujja, Rosco; Baillie, Dave; Mpango, Richard; Birabwa, Harriet; Hunter, Elaine

2014-01-01

244

Immigrant and refugee health: mental health conditions.  

PubMed

Immigrants leave their homes for unfamiliar destinations in search of better lives for themselves and their families. Many immigrants experience profound loss and emotional distress as they adjust to life in different societies. Despite these challenges, the prevalence of mental health conditions among immigrants is low, whereas children of immigrants have rates equal to those of native populations. The prevalence of mental health conditions is high among refugees, who comprise a specific subgroup of immigrants who have been displaced forcibly and often have experienced severe trauma. Cultural factors, such as stigma and somatization of emotional symptoms, make it less likely that immigrants and refugees from certain groups will ever present to mental health subspecialists. Strong therapeutic relationships, cultural sensitivity, involvement of family members, judicious use of medications, and knowledge of available community resources are important tools that can aid clinicians who treat immigrants and refugees with mental health conditions. PMID:25127536

Rew, Karl T; Clarke, S Lindsey; Gossa, Weyinshet; Savin, Daniel

2014-08-01

245

Burnout and work environments of public health nurses involved in mental health care  

PubMed Central

Aims: (1) To examine whether prevalence of burnout is higher among community psychiatric nurses working under recently introduced job specific work systems than among public health nurses (PHNs) engaged in other public health services. (2) To identify work environment factors potentially contributing to burnout. Methods: Two groups were examined. The psychiatric group comprised 525 PHNs primarily engaged in public mental health services at public health centres (PHCs) that had adopted the job specific work system. The control group comprised 525 PHNs primarily engaged in other health services. Pines' Burnout Scale was used to measure burnout. Respondents were classified by burnout score into three groups: A (mentally stable, no burnout); B (positive signs, risk of burnout); and C (burnout present, action required). Groups B and C were considered representative of "burnout". A questionnaire was also prepared to investigate systems for supporting PHNs working at PHCs and to define emergency mental health service factors contributing to burnout. Results: Final respondents comprised 785 PHNs. Prevalence of burnout was significantly higher in the psychiatric group (59.2%) than in the control group (51.5%). Responses indicating lack of job control and increased annual frequency of emergency overtime services were significantly correlated with prevalence of burnout in the psychiatric group, but not in the control group. Conclusions: Prevalence of burnout is significantly higher for community psychiatric nurses than for PHNs engaged in other services. Overwork in emergency services and lack of job control appear to represent work environment factors contributing to burnout. PMID:15317917

Imai, H; Nakao, H; Tsuchiya, M; Kuroda, Y; Katoh, T

2004-01-01

246

What parents of mentally ill children need and want from mental health professionals.  

PubMed

Child psychiatric hospitalization is a time of crisis for the parents of a child with a mental disorder. Prior to hospitalization, the child's problematic behavior has escalated. Parents have various types of contact with mental health professionals prior to, during, and after the hospitalization, which influence their ability to care for their child. This paper reports a qualitative descriptive study of what parents need and want from mental health professionals during this time frame. During the study, parents spontaneously talked about what they needed and wanted from mental health professionals, including nursing personnel. The perspectives of 38 parents of 29 hospitalized children were obtained through interviews. Parents identified needing informational, emotional, and instrumental support most often in the interviews. Specific examples from the data are included in this report. PMID:12217225

Scharer, Kathleen

2002-09-01

247

Children of farm laborers: utilization of services for mental health problems.  

PubMed

Utilization of various types of services for children's mental health problems was examined among 112 agricultural farm worker families. Pairs of mothers and children (aged 8 to 11) were interviewed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children and the Child and Adolescent Services Assessment. Sixty-four percent of the children met criterion for one or more psychiatric diagnoses. Children with a psychiatric diagnosis were five times more likely to see a health professional for a mental health problem compared to children without a psychiatric diagnosis However, less than half of the children with a psychiatric diagnosis saw a health professional for their mental health problems. Families also consulted with school professionals, religious leaders, and non-professionals (such as friends) concerning their children's mental health, but families of children who had a psychiatric diagnosis were not significantly more likely to report these types of consultations than were families of children who did not have a psychiatric diagnosis. These findings are discussed in terms of recommendations for improving the mental health service delivery system for rural children. PMID:8840076

Martin, S L; Kupersmidt, J B; Harter, K S

1996-08-01

248

The Role of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in the Maintenance of the Subjugation of Women: Implications for the Training of Future Mental Health Professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the publication of the first edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 1952), the diagnostic classification of mental health issues has been rooted in an individualistic view of mental disorders. Although many of the changes in subsequent editions have resulted in clearer diagnostic classification, this individualistic approach fails to take into account the

Ann M. Lazaroff

249

Evolving systems of care: Individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder in custody of civil and forensic psychiatric services.  

PubMed

Following psychiatric deinstitutionalization and changes in involuntary civil commitment laws, many individuals with severe mental disorders have been receiving mental health services through the back door, that is, the criminal justice system. Significant changes to the section of Criminal Code of Canada dealing with individuals with mental disorders have led to significant annual increases in the number of individuals declared Not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD), many of whom are directed to civil psychiatric settings. The goal of the present study was to describe the psychosociocriminological and risk characteristics of individuals found NCRMD remanded to civil psychiatric hospitals (CPH) compared to a forensic psychiatric hospital (FPH). This study was conducted between October 2004 and August 2006 in the sole FPH of the province of Québec and two large CPH in the Montréal metropolitan area. The final sample for the current study consisted of 96 men: 60 from the FPH and 36 from the two CPH. Results indicate that individuals in both settings have similar psychosociocriminal profiles, including PCL-R scores, but that individuals in CPH have higher scores in the Risk subscale of the HCR-20 than do their counterparts in the FPH. This difference is due to a higher score on two items: exposure to destabilizing factors and noncompliance with remediation attempts. Results are discussed in terms of the need for civil psychiatric settings to implement risk assessment and management programs into their services, and the need for further research into forensic mental health services. PMID:19720502

Crocker, A G; Côté, G

2009-09-01

250

Counseling and Mental Health Services OUR MISSION  

E-print Network

Counseling and Mental Health Services Page 1 OUR MISSION The mission of Counseling and Mental Disclosure and Confidentiality The privacy of your mental health information, including all written of all disciplines involved in your treatment. Uses and Disclosures of Your Mental Health Information

Alpay, S. Pamir

251

Cost-effectiveness of mental health services for persons with a dual diagnosis A literature review and the CCMHCP  

Microsoft Academic Search

People suffering from comorbid mental illness and substance abuse disorders (the dually diagnosed) are thought to constitute large portions of clients treated as outpatients by public-sector community-based mental health providers. These providers dispense units of ambulatory mental health services and treatments incrementally to maintain clients in the community and out of psychiatric hospitals. Community maintenance is one step, albeit critical,

Jay Johnson

2000-01-01

252

Mental health and illness in traditional India and China.  

PubMed

Biomedical knowledge underlies the science of all national systems of psychiatry and is integral to international psychiatry. It is grounded in Western systems of thought, values, and world views. In assessing the cultural and national presuppositions of contemporary psychiatry, it is desirable to analyze other systems of practice. In this article, some of the characteristics of ancient, non-Western traditions of mental health and approaches to mental illness are discussed. In reviewing salient characteristics of the approach to mental health and illness of India and China, one is provided with a vivid illustration of the interplay between culture and a system of psychiatric practice. The secular and essentially impersonal features of modern biomedical psychiatry contrast with the spiritual, value-laden, but also naturalistic basis of ancient traditions and approaches to mental health and illness. PMID:11593863

Fàbrega, H

2001-09-01

253

Community Mental Health Services in Latin America for People with Severe Mental Disorders  

PubMed Central

Mental disorders are highly prevalent in Latin American countries and exact a serious emotional toll, yet investment in public mental health remains insufficient. Most countries of the region have developed national and local initiatives to improve delivery of mental health services over the last 22 years, following the technical leadership of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO). It is especially notable that PAHO/WHO facilitated the development of national policies and plans, as well as local programs, to deliver specialized community care for persons with severe mental disorders. Nevertheless, at present, the majority of Latin American countries maintain a model of services for severe mental disorders based primarily on psychiatric hospitals that consume most of the national mental health budget. To accelerate the pace of change, this article emphasizes the need to develop cross-country regional initiatives that promote mental health service development, focusing on severe mental disorders. As one specific example, the authors describe work with RedeAmericas, which has brought together an interdisciplinary group of international investigators to research regional approaches and train a new generation of leaders in public mental health. More generally, four regional strategies are proposed to complement the work of PAHO/ WHO in Latin America: 1) to develop multi-country studies on community services, 2) to study new strategies and interventions in countries with more advanced mental health services, 3) to strengthen advocacy groups by cross-country interchange, and 4) to develop a network of well-trained leaders to catalyze progress across the region.

Minoletti, Alberto; Galea, Sandro; Susser, Ezra

2013-01-01

254

IINational Institute of Mental Health  

E-print Network

IINational Institute of Mental Health U. S. D E P A R T M E N T O F H E A L T H A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S N A T I O N A L I N S T I T U T E S O F H E A L T H of the National Institute of Mental Health Breaking Ground, Breaking Through: The Strategic Plan for Mood Disorders Research #12;PREFACE

Bandettini, Peter A.

255

Predictors of Criminal Justice Outcomes Among Mental Health Courts Participants: The Role of Perceived Coercion and Subjective Mental Health Recovery  

PubMed Central

Internationally, one effort to reduce the number of people with serious mental illness (SMI) in jails and prisons is the development of Mental Health Courts (MHC). Research on MHCs to date has been disproportionately focused on the study of recidivism and re-incarceration over the potential of these problem-solving courts to facilitate mental health recovery and affect the slope or gradient of opportunity for recovery. Despite the strong conceptual links between the MHC approach and the recovery-orientation in mental health, the capacity for MHCs to facilitate recovery has not been explored. This user-informed mental health and criminal justice (MH/CJ) community based participatory (CBPR) study assesses the extent to which MHC practices align with recovery-oriented principles and may subsequently affect criminal justice outcomes. We report on the experiences and perceptions of 51 MHC participants across four metropolitan Mental Health Courts. Specifically, the current study assesses: 1) how defendants’ perceptions of court practices, particularly with regard to procedural justice and coercion, relate to perceptions of mental health recovery and psychiatric symptoms, and, 2) how perceptions of procedural justice and mental health recovery relate to subsequent criminal justice outcomes. The authors hypothesized that perceived coercion and mental health recovery would be inversely related, that perceived coercion would be associated with worse criminal justice outcomes, and perceptions of mental health recovery would be associated with better criminal justice outcomes. Results suggest that perceived coercion in the MHC experience was negatively associated with perceptions of recovery among MHC participants. Perceptions of “negative pressures,” a component of coercion, were important predictors of criminal justice involvement in the 12 month period following MHC admission, even when controlling for other factors that were related to criminal justice outcomes, and that an increase in procedural justice was associated with a decrease in symptoms but curiously not to an increase in attitudes toward recovery. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:24039547

Yanos, Philip T.; Kopelovich, Sarah L.; Koerner, Joshua; Alexander, Mary Jane

2013-01-01

256

Major Mental Illness in a Sexual Minority Psychiatric Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: In this study, the authors compare a lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) sample in treatment for major psychiatric disorders with a general psychiatric population sample. Methods: Participants were interviewed utilizing a multi-item, multiple-choice questionnaire with some open-ended questions. Study participants were categorized by biological sex at birth and sexual identity. Parameters assessed included age of symptom onset, number

Ronald E. Hellman; Lori Sudderth; Anna M. Avery

2002-01-01

257

Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors  

PubMed Central

Previous studies about unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) showed that they are a highly vulnerable group who have greater psychiatric morbidity than the general population. This review focuses on mental health issues among URMs. Articles in databases PsycINFO, Medline and PubMed from 1998 to 2008 addressing this topic were reviewed. The literature had a considerable emphasis on the assessment of PTSD symptoms. Results revealed higher levels of PTSD symptoms in comparison to the norm populations and accompanied refugee minors. In several studies, age and female gender predicted or influenced PTSD symptoms. The existing literature only permits limited conclusions on this very hard to reach population. Future research should include the analysis of long-term outcomes, stress management and a more thorough analysis of the whole range of psychopathology. Additionally, the development of culturally sensitive norms and standardized measures for diverse ethnic groups is of great importance. PMID:19341468

Huemer, Julia; Karnik, Niranjan S; Voelkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Granditsch, Elisabeth; Dervic, Kanita; Friedrich, Max H; Steiner, Hans

2009-01-01

258

Indian research on disaster and mental health  

PubMed Central

The primary source for this annotation on disaster mental health research is the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. Key words like disasters, earthquake, cyclone, tsunami and flood were searched from its electronic database and relevant articles are discussed. The cross-referenced articles and relevant researches conducted on disasters in India which are published elsewhere were the secondary sources of information. There have been many epidemiological studies and only a few interventional studies on disasters in India. Prevalence figures of psychiatric disorders varied considerably across studies, secondary to nature and severity of disaster, degree of loss, support available and probably also due to the study methodology. Suggestions for intervention included pre-disaster planning, training of disaster workers, utilization of community-level volunteers as counselors, and strengthening existing individual, social and spiritual coping strategies. There is a need for more longitudinal follow-up studies and interventional studies. PMID:21836696

Kar, Nilamadhab

2010-01-01

259

J. KRISHNAMURTI'S TEACHINGS - RELEVANCE TO MENTAL HEALTH  

PubMed Central

The technique of J.Krishnamurti's communication marked by a dyadic style, ‘pariprasna’, a sense of togetherness, absence of persuasion and authoritativeness could be incorporated into psychotherapeutic sessions. Self-reliance and a genuine feeling of psychological oneness with others and to see things ‘as they are’ are discussed. The need for desirelessness to avoid conflicts and psychologically dying moment to moment to overcome fears e.g. of death and resolving chronic resentment is explained. A new way of ending sorrow has been pointed out. Krishnamurti's ideas on meditation have been dealt with briefly. Many of these concepts could be assimilated into psychiatric practice and towards promotion of mental health. Krishnamurti's call for a ‘total transformation’ of instant nature within the individual's psyche to effect a societal change is highlighted. Finally, a brief evaluation of Krishnamurti's contribution has been offered. PMID:21743741

Rao, A. Venkoba

1995-01-01

260

Mental Health Issues in Rural Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five papers cover recent developments in rural mental health nursing. "Rural Mental Health Care: A Survey of the Research" (Karen Babich) chronicles recent interest in understanding the rural population's character and the nature of mental health services needed by and provided to rural America. Lauren Aaronson ("Using Health Beliefs in a Nursing…

Babich, Karen S., Comp.

261

Psychiatric and Psychosocial Correlates of Sexual Risk Behavior among Adults with Severe Mental Illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are disproportionately affected by HIV\\/AIDS. This study examined multivariate correlates\\u000a of sexual risk among 152 adults with SMI receiving outpatient psychiatric treatment. Structured interviews assessed psychiatric,\\u000a psychosocial, and behavioral risk factors. The majority was sexually active (65%), and many reported unprotected intercourse\\u000a (73%), multiple partners (45%), and sex trading (21%) in the past year.

Christina S. Meade; Kathleen J. Sikkema

2007-01-01

262

The Relationship Between Gratitude and Burnout in Mental Health Professionals.  

E-print Network

??This study investigated the relationship between gratitude and burnout in mental health professionals. Participants consisted of 65 mental health treatment providers from community mental health… (more)

Lanham, Michelle E.

2011-01-01

263

Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

Dixon, Decia Nicole

2009-01-01

264

Mental Health Resources on UAA Campus Student Health and  

E-print Network

Mental Health Resources on UAA Campus Student Health and Counseling Center Psychological Services Health Education YES YES YES Mental Health Screening Events YES NO YES Situational Crisis Management YES Nurse Practitioners, Licensed Counselors, Graduate Interns Graduate Psychology Interns Supervised

Duddleston, Khrys

265

[Protection of mental health: a priority task of the state and the society].  

PubMed

The paper is devoted to the World Health Day 2001--Mental Health Day. It gives a history of World Health Day. The state of the psychiatric science in Russia, the reforms carried out in psychiatry during the last decade and some measures of the perspective development of Russian psychiatry, proposed by the scientists and by the heads of some regional psychiatric services during the last years are considered. PMID:11490452

Iastrebov, V S

2001-01-01

266

Mental health consultations in a prison population: a descriptive study  

PubMed Central

Background The psychiatric morbidity among prison inmates is substantially higher than in the general population. We do, however, have insufficient knowledge about the extent of psychiatric treatment provided in our prisons. The aim of the present study was to give a comprehensive description of all non-pharmacological interventions provided by the psychiatric health services to a stratified sample of prison inmates. Methods Six medium/large prisons (n = 928) representing 1/3 of the Norwegian prison population and with female and preventive detention inmates over-sampled, were investigated cross-sectionally. All non-pharmacological psychiatric interventions, excluding pure correctional programs, were recorded. Those receiving interventions were investigated further and compared to the remaining prison population. Results A total of 230 of the 928 inmates (25 %) had some form of psychiatric intervention: 184 (20 %) were in individual psychotherapy, in addition 40 (4 %) received ad hoc interventions during the registration week. Group therapy was infrequent (1 %). The psychotherapies were most often of a supportive (62 %) or behavioural-cognitive (26 %) nature. Dynamic, insight-oriented psychotherapies were infrequent (8 %). Concurrent psychopharmacological treatment was prevalent (52 %). Gender and age did not correlate with psychiatric interventions, whereas prisoner category (remanded, sentenced, or preventive detention) did (p < 0.001). Most inmates had a number of defined problem areas, with substance use, depression, anxiety, and personality disorders most prevalent. Three percent of all inmates were treated for a psychotic disorder. Remand prisoners averaged 14 sessions per week per 100 inmates, while sentenced inmates and those on preventive detention averaged 22 and 25 sessions per week per 100 inmates, respectively. Five out of six psychiatric health services estimated the inmates' psychiatric therapy needs as adequately met, both overall and in the majority of individual cases. Conclusion Our results pertain only to prisons with adequate primary and mental health services and effective diversion from prison of individuals with serious mental disorders. Given these important limitations, we do propose that the service estimates found may serve as a rough guideline to the minimum number of sessions a prison's psychiatric health services should be able to fulfil in order to serve the inmates psychiatric needs. The results rely on the specialist services' own estimates only. Future studies should take other important informants, including the inmates themselves, into consideration. PMID:16759383

Kjelsberg, Ellen; Hartvig, Paal; Bowitz, Harald; Kuisma, Irene; Norbech, Peder; Rustad, Aase-Bente; Seem, Marthe; Vik, Tom-Gunnar

2006-01-01

267

Career development and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusion While the extent of linkages and the patterning of the relationships between career development and mental health is yet to be fully studied and articulated, this paper has argued that such connections do exist. Given such a premise, it has been contended that career counseling does serve as a therapeutic modality as it provides dislocated, unhappy, maladjusted or underemployed

Edwin L. Herr

1989-01-01

268

Psychologists in Mental Health: 1966.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes major characteristics of 11,638 psychologists in the 1966 National Science Foundation's Register of Scientific and Technical Personnel who identified their positions as being related to the field of mental health. They make up 61.2 percent of all psychologists in the Register. Findings include: (1) The median age is 41, (2)…

Jones, Donald R.

269

Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... emotion as well as muscle movement. For years, mental health professionals have recognized that coping with a chronic disorder like dystonia is similar to grieving a loss, such as a death or divorce. Common phases of dealing with dystonia include denial, ...

270

Learning, Mental Health, and Testing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Achievement and intelligence tests have been criticized for their adverse effects on the mental health and intellectual development of children. The fault is not with the testing, but with the instructional program. Reforms in testing must be accomplished as part of a revolution in the total instructional program encompassing: (1) a shift from a…

Heathers, Glen

271

Poverty and Women's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the prevalence and rise of poverty in the United States, which is found particularly among women, children, and those from minority groups. Discusses the positive association between poverty and mental health problems. Describes the impact of poverty on women, and the need for research to discover the psychological impact of poverty. (JS)

Belle, Deborah

1990-01-01

272

Students & Mental Health Resource Pack  

E-print Network

this care? 4.4 What services should be available? 4.5 What support can be provided by the college? Support to the worrying levels of students' dropping-out of their studies and the rise in suicide and attempted suicide to students with experience of mental health problems and those who became ill for the first time at college

Stevenson, Mark

273

Childhood Mental Ability and Lifetime Psychiatric Contact: A 66-Year Follow-Up Study of the 1932 Scottish Mental Ability Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tested the hypothesis that intelligence is related to the risk of mental illness by linking childhood mental ability data to registers of psychiatric contact in a stable population of 4,199 adults in Scotland. Findings show intelligence to be an independent predictor of psychiatric contact, with each standard deviation decrease in IQ resulting in…

Walker, Nicholas P.; McConville, Pauline M; Hunter, David; Deary, Ian J.; Whalley, Lawrence J.

2002-01-01

274

Social Capital and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social capital is a compound and complex construct, an umbrella term under which social cohesion, social support, social integration\\u000a and\\/or participation are often lumped together. Beyond its growing appeal to policy makers, practitioners and researchers\\u000a in public health in general and mental health in particular, social capital is now also an integral part of broad-based discussions\\u000a on social-ecological resilience, ecosystem

Astier M. Almedom; Douglas Glandon

275

What do African American youth with a mental illness think about help-seeking and psychiatric medication?: Origins of stigmatizing attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stigma greatly impacts African Americans' underutilization of mental health treatment. Stigmatizing attitudes are attributed to racial mistrust, familial, religious and cultural beliefs. However, most research on influences of these attitudes has been conducted with adults. Origins among adolescents may be unique because they have different competing influences relative to development. Identifying these influences is crucial to promoting utilization of psychiatric

Derrick Kranke; Joseph Guada; Bridget Kranke; Jerry Floersch

2011-01-01

276

December, 2013 Addiction & Mental Health Learning Events  

E-print Network

Cognition December, 2013 Addiction & Mental Health Learning Events Information & Evaluation Services, Addiction and Mental Health, Edmonton Zone http://www.intranet2.capitalhealth.ca/regional%2, Addictions and Related Disorders conference in Richmond, BC. http://conference2013.jackhirose

MacMillan, Andrew

277

The Transcultural Wellness Center: Rehabilitation and Recovery in Asian and Pacific Islander Mental Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asian and Pacific Islander Americans (APIAs) are a diverse group, representing many cultures of origin, a range of immigration experiences, and varying access to economic and other resources. Despite stereotypes such as the “model minority” and cultural values that stigmatize mental illness and complicate mental health help-seeking, APIAs' psychiatric rehabilitation and recovery needs are significant. These needs are inadequately treated

Rebecca P. Cameron; Hendry Ton; Cynthia Yang; Marya C. Endriga; Mei-Fang Lan; Alan K. Koike

2008-01-01

278

Is Graduate Social Work Education Promoting a Critical Approach to Mental Health Practice?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sample of 71 psychopathology course syllabi from 58 different graduate schools of social work was analyzed to determine whether different viewpoints and the concomitant empirical evidence were presented regarding 4 significant mental health topics: concepts of mental disorder, reliability and validity of psychiatric diagnoses, biological…

Lacasse, Jeffrey R.; Gomory, Tomi

2003-01-01

279

[Incidence and risk factors for mental abnormalities in children of psychiatric inpatients].  

PubMed

Children of mentally ill parents are exposed to a variety of stress- and harmful life events. To which extent the mental illness of one or both parents affects their children's mental development is barely studied. Therefore, over a period of 6 months 142 patients with children below the age of 18 (n=237 children), who were admitted to the Dept. for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy 1 of the Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, were questioned for abnormalities in their children's mental development. Additionally all these patients were assessed for their family situation, demographic data and psychiatric disorder. 38.4% (n=91) of the children showed mental abnormalities. The most common one were emotional (n=41), social (n=41) and learning (n=34) disabilities. Parental duration of the illness (p=0.001), age of the children (p=0.044), illness of both parents (p=0.008), longlasting family conflicts (p=0.003) and living with only one parent (p=0.012) were correlated significantly with mental abnormalities in children. The results confirm an increase risk for mental abnormalities in children of psychiatric patients. This risk varies with existing risk and protective factors, which can be partially influenced. Therefore children of mentally ill parents with problems in their mental development should be detected early. Even if genetic risk factors cannot be changed reducing known psychosocial risk factors and promotion protective factors can significantly influence a healthy development of these vulnerable children. PMID:22136941

Stelzig-Schöler, Renate; Hasselbring, Laura; Yazdi, Kurosch; Thun-Hohenstein, Leonhard; Stuppäck, Christoph; Aichhorn, Wolfgang

2011-01-01

280

STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH POLICY  

E-print Network

, safety and welfare at work of all those "lawfully on the premises" Protect against discrimination, gender reassignment and pregnancy and maternity. Make reasonable adjustments to support students do not cause harm Duty to act reasonably to protect the health, safety and welfare of students

Martin, Ralph R.

281

Johnson & Johnson Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program  

E-print Network

the mental health authority and state vocational rehabilitation and provides IPS trainer training the collaboration between the state mental health authority and the state #12;vocational rehabilitation of implementing evidence-based supported employment with close collaboration between mental health and vocational

Myers, Lawrence C.

282

Marital Rights, Mental Health, and Public Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author discusses a comprehensive literature review on the mental health effects of marriage denial on lesbians and gay men and the role of mental health arguments in advocacy for marriage equality. The review, by Gil Herdt and Robert Kertzner, studied more than 150 reports on how marriage is related to mental health and the psychological effects of discrimination as

Robert Kertzner

2009-01-01

283

The ABCs of Children's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U.S. Surgeon General's 2000 Report on Children's Mental Health estimates that one in five children and adolescents will experience a significant mental-health problem during their school years. While the family is the primary source of support for a child's mental health, the increased stress and fracturing of today's life make it imperative…

Whelley, Pete; Cash, Gene; Bryson, Dixie

2002-01-01

284

Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

1996-01-01

285

Young People's Experiences of Mental Health Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore young people's experiences of mental health care in Australia with the aim of informing the headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation. The interviews revealed that significant numbers of respondents had been aware of their mental health problems for several years before seeking help and…

Cohen, Anjalee; Medlow, Sharon; Kelk, Norm; Hickie, Ian; Whitwell, Bradley

2009-01-01

286

ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS MENTAL HEALTH INFORMATION  

E-print Network

ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS MENTAL HEALTH INFORMATION Item No Req Price Total £ Help is at Hand? Helping you get through it Feeling overwhelmed: Helping you stay safe Men and depression Mental health in pregnancy Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Personality disorders Physical illness and mental health Post

Chittka, Lars

287

Becoming Indispensable through Mental Health Promotion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Both educational attainment and mental health are part of the whole development of the child. School psychologists are indispensable in the schools because they alone bridge the gap between learning and mental health. They become even more in demand when they demonstrate that they can leverage mental health through educational interventions, and…

Sandoval, Jonathan

288

A PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH  

E-print Network

A PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH DIAGNOSES, 2000-2010 #12; #12; i A Profile of Kentucky Medicaid Mental Health Diagnoses, 20002010 BY Michael T. Childress have received a mental or behavioral health diagnosis from 2000 to 2010. A Profile of Kentucky

Hayes, Jane E.

289

Postdoctoral Fellowships National Institute of Mental Health  

E-print Network

Postdoctoral Fellowships National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program Bethesda, Maryland, USA The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Section on Neuroadaptation and Protein; National Institute of Mental Health; 10 Center Drive, Room 2D54; Bethesda, MD 20892-1298, USA or via e

Bandettini, Peter A.

290

STAFF GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH  

E-print Network

STAFF GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH DIFFICULTIES MARCH 2007 #12;1 1. INTRODUCTION This document seeks to give basic advice to staff who may encounter students with mental health difficulties and guidance mechanisms in respect of mental health. These guidelines do not give detailed medical advice

Guo, Zaoyang

291

Promoting Student Interest in Mental Health Nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors related to undergraduate nursing education are among the issues inhibiting interest in mental health nursing as a field of practice. To gain more understanding about views about mental health nursing, a survey was conducted with undergraduate nursing students at a major university in Australia after implementation of a mental health nursing course. The data provide information about student beliefs,

Cynthia M. Stuhlmiller

2005-01-01

292

Mental Health Consultation in Child Care and  

E-print Network

Mental Health Consultation in Child Care and Early Childhood Settings Opportunities to Expand-922-1300 · www.cpeip.fsu.edu #12;Mental Health Consultation in Child Care and Early Childhood Settings ....................................... 27 Strategies for Implementing Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation in Child Care

McQuade, D. Tyler

293

The Role of Bilingual Workers without Professional Mental Health Training in Mental Health Services for Refugees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the use of bilingual workers who do not have formal mental health training as mediators and providers of mental health care for refugees. The introduction provides a background discussion of the need for refugee mental health services, the characteristics of bilingual mental health workers, and the work places and expectations…

Egli, Eric

294

Older Adult Patients with Both Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Disorders: Prevalence and Health Service Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence and service use among older adults with concurrent psychiatric and substance abuse disorders (the “dually diagnosed”) was examined in a cross-sectional survey of a representative national sample of Department of Veterans Affairs mental health program patients (N = 91,752). Rates of dual diagnosis declined significantly (P = 0.001) as the age of the respondents increased (26.7% of patients

Holly G. Prigerson; Rani A. Desai; Robert A. Rosenheck

2001-01-01

295

From Mental Disorder to Iatrogenic Hypogonadism: Dilemmas in Conceptualizing Gender Identity Variants as Psychiatric Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The categorization of gender identity variants (GIVs) as “mental disorders” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association is highly controversial among professionals as well as among persons with GIV.\\u000a After providing a brief history of GIV categorizations in the DSM, this paper presents some of the major issues of the ongoing\\u000a debate:

Heino F. L. Meyer-Bahlburg

2010-01-01

296

A behavioral weight-loss intervention for persons with serious mental illness in psychiatric rehabilitation centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:Overweight and obesity are epidemic in populations with serious mental illnesses. We developed and pilot-tested a behavioral weight-loss intervention appropriately tailored for persons with serious mental disorders.Methods:We conducted a single-arm pilot study in two psychiatric rehabilitation day programs in Maryland, and enrolled 63 overweight or obese adults. The 6-month intervention provided group and individual weight management and group physical activity

G L Daumit; A T Dalcin; G J Jerome; D R Young; J Charleston; R M Crum; C Anthony; J H Hayes; P B McCarron; E Khaykin; L J Appel

2011-01-01

297

Psychiatry and the death penalty: dilemma for mental health professionals.  

PubMed

The arguments for and against mental health professionals' participation in death penalty proceedings are presented against the background of U.S. Supreme Court decisions which have had a bearing on this issue. It is concluded that the possibility of presenting mitigating psychologic testimony in such proceedings necessitates the possibility of exacerbating psychiatric testimony and that hence, mental health professionals who testify for the prosecution in such cases do not, on a wider view, violate their hippocratic oaths or other ethical codes. A number of safeguards, however, should be instituted with respect to such testimony. Psychiatrists, psychologists or other qualified mental health professionals should (1) testify with medical "possibility" or "probability," (2) not be permitted to address ultimate legal issues and (3) be permitted, in fact encouraged, to present alternative interpretations of forensic psychiatric findings. It is further argued that in addition to being justified in testifying for the prosecution on death penalty cases, mental health professionals may have a moral rationale for treating death row prisoners and restoring them to competency. PMID:3070607

Kermani, E J; Drob, S L

1988-01-01

298

Mental health in the Middle East: an Egyptian perspective.  

PubMed

This article introduces the reader to mental health in the Middle East with an Egyptian perspective, from the Pharaonic era through the Islamic Renaissance, up until the current state. During Pharaonic times, mental illness was not known as such, as there was no separator between Soma and Psyche. Actually, mental disorders were described as symptoms of the heart and uterine diseases, as stated in Eber's and Kahoun's papyri. In spite of the mystical culture, mental disorders were attributed and treated on a somatic basis. In the Islamic era, mental patients were never subjected to any torture or maltreatment because of the inherited belief that they may be possessed by a good Moslem genie. The first mental hospital in Europe was located in Spain, following the Arab invasion, and from then on it propagated to other European countries. The 14th century Kalawoon Hospital in Cairo had four departments, including medicine, surgery, ophthalmology, and mental disorders. Six centuries earlier, psychiatry in general hospitals was recognized in Europe. The influence of Avicenna and Elrazi and their contributions to European medicine is well-known. This article discusses further the current state of the mental health services in Egypt and the transcultural studies of the prevalence and phenomenology of anxiety, schizophrenia, depression, suicide, conversion, and obsessive compulsive disorders. An outline of psychiatric disorders in children is discussed. The problem of drug abuse is also addressed, especially that in Egypt after 1983, where drugs like heroine replaced the common habit of hashish. PMID:10547710

Okasha, A

1999-12-01

299

Men's mental health: Connection to urologic health.  

PubMed

Historically, the specialty of urology has focused on single-system diseases. In recent years, however, there has been increasing recognition of the interconnectivity between the various systems, such as cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, erectile dysfunction and prostate cancer. This constellation of disease/syndrome and dysfunction may place urologists at the centre of men's overall health concerns. As urologists considering taking on a leadership role in men's health, they should also consider their potential in helping men suffering from the significant burden of a mental health disorder. Urologists may have a unique opportunity to identify mental health issues in their male patients, influence healthy behaviour change, and successfully refer men, who might otherwise not seek help, to appropriate medical/psychological care. PMID:25243041

Matthew, Andrew; Elterman, Dean

2014-07-01

300

Psychiatric Comorbidity, Health Status, and Functional Impairment Associated with Alcohol Abuse and Dependence in Primary Care Patients: Findings of the PRIME MD-1000 Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the psychiatric comorbidity, health, and functioning of 1,000 primary care patients with alcohol abuse and dependence (AAD). Psychiatric symptomatology was assessed with the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) diagnostic system, which resulted in a 71 percent increase in physician recognition of AAD. Other findings…

Johnson, Jeffrey G.

1995-01-01

301

Integrating mental health into public health: The community mental health development project in India  

PubMed Central

The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and its public health institutes are collaborating with Asia Australia Mental Health on an innovative community mental health development project designed to enhance initiatives under the District Mental Health Program and increase accessibility of essential community mental health services. The project is an exciting opportunity to create positive change in meeting the challenges of community mental health care in India. It recognizes that no one single model of care can be applied to all the community in the country and that locally appropriate models working in close partnership with local communities is required. Targeted and skill-based training programs are useful to build local leadership capacity in implementing quality and culturally appropriate community mental health services.

Ng, Chee; Chauhan, Ajay P.; Chavan, Bir Singh; Ramasubramanian, Chellamuthu; Singh, Amool R.; Sagar, Rajesh; Fraser, Julia; Ryan, Brigid; Prasad, Jagdish; Singh, Sujeet; Das, Jayanta; Isaac, Mohan

2014-01-01

302

Seminar in Health and Mental Health Economics Spring 2012  

E-print Network

and mental health measurement; (3) prescription drugs and medical devices; (4 21 Health and Mental Health Measurement (2) February 28 Prescription Drugs. Justin Sydnor (UW Business) March 13 Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices (2

Sheridan, Jennifer

303

Terrorism, suicide bombing, fear and mental health.  

PubMed

This paper is based on the Bruce Burns Memorial Trust Lecture, Terrorism and Mental Health, presented in October 2005, in Birmingham. In addition to written sources, it is informed by the author's experience and contact with military and police experts in this arena over 28 years as a member of the British Army. The diagnosis and treatment of post traumatic mental disorders are not addressed in this paper. The author explores the general phenomenon of terrorism, in an endeavour to inform understanding of terrorist acts. He stresses the need for contextualisation of acts of terror, their perpetrators, their effects on populations and individuals, and attention to the psychology of groups. The author aims to invite and inform further thought and debate on the subject by raising a wide range of issues which do not sit comfortably within a strict psychiatric, research-based paradigm. The author covers a brief history of terrorism; organisational requirements of terror groups and the process of recruiting personnel to them; the means, motives and opportunities terrorists exploit in their work; the need for communication with terror groups; sacrificial death; governmental responses to terrorist acts and fear and mental health. The author proposes that terrorist organisations perform some of the functions of a family; that acts of terror are 'propaganda by deed'; that terrorism, or more precisely the media's treatment of it, breeds 'formless fears' which may directly lead to the development of fear-based symptoms and illness within societies. He notes that terrorism is an enterprise from which many players ('experts', media, politicians, etc.) benefit; that terrorism has its shadow in counter-terrorism, which may range from benign to malignant and that psychiatry could, in this context, acknowledge its bias towards individual psychologies and rectify its lack of understanding of groups and the behaviours of individuals within them. PMID:17566906

Palmer, Ian

2007-06-01

304

Improving mental health practices in primary care: findings from recent research.  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews restraints on the provision of mental health services in primary health care under the broad categories of physician profile, patient behavior, the nature of psychiatric illness as presented in primary care, and service system characteristics. An extensive research agenda is proposed toward improving mental health care in primary care settings. Research recommendations focus on the following types of issues: seeking a better understanding of the clinical decision making process when confronted with psychological or emotional problems, designing more focused mental health training for primary care physicians and nurses, providing patient education to encourage communication of psychosocial problems to medical providers, clarifying the nature and course of psychiatric disorder in primary care, designing innovative clinical interventions applicable to primary care, and examining organizational models for better coordination of health and mental health services. PMID:3923537

Burns, B J; Burke, J D

1985-01-01

305

Smoking Behaviour and Mental Health Disorders--Mutual Influences and Implications for Therapy  

PubMed Central

Tobacco use is strongly associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Smokers are more likely than non-smokers to meet current criteria for mental health conditions, such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders and psychosis. Evidence also suggest that smokers with psychiatric disorders may have more difficulty quitting, offering at least a partial explanation for why smoking rates are higher in this population. The mechanisms linking mental health conditions and cigarette smoking are complex and likely differ across each of the various disorders. The most commonly held view is that patients with mental health conditions smoke in an effort to regulate the symptoms associated with their disorder. However some recent evidence suggests that quitting smoking may actually improve mental health symptoms. This is particularly true if the tobacco cessation intervention is integrated into the context of ongoing mental health treatment. In this paper we reviewed and summarized the most relevant knowledge about the relationship between tobacco use and dependence and psychiatric disorders. We also reviewed the most effective smoking cessation strategies available for patients with psychiatric comorbidity and the impact of smoking behavior on psychiatric medication. PMID:24157506

Minichino, Amedeo; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Calo, Wanda Katharina; Spagnoli, Francesco; Francesconi, Marta; Vicinanza, Roberto; Delle Chiaie, Roberto; Biondi, Massimo

2013-01-01

306

Descriptive Analysis of a Novel Health Care Approach: Reverse Colocation--Primary Care in a Community Mental Health "Home"  

PubMed Central

Objective: Persons with serious mental illness have increased rates of chronic medical conditions, have limited access to primary care, and incur significant health care expenditures. Few studies have explored providing medical care for these patients in the ambulatory mental health setting. This study describes a real-world population of mental health patients receiving primary care services in a community mental health clinic to better understand how limited primary care resources are being utilized. Method:Chart review was performed on patients receiving colocated primary care (colocation group, N = 143) and randomly chosen patients receiving mental health care only (mental-health group, N = 156) from January 2006 through June 2011. Demographic and mental and physical health variables were assessed. Results: Compared to the mental-health group, the colocation patients had more psychiatric hospitalizations (mean = 1.07 vs 0.23, P < .01), were more likely to be homeless (P < .01), and were more likely to require intensive case management (P < .01). Interestingly, the colocation group was not more medically ill than the mental-health group on key metabolic measures, including mean body mass index (colocation = 27.8 vs mental-health = 28.7, P = .392), low-density liprotein (colocation = 110.0 vs mental-health = 104.4, P = .480), and glucose (colocation = 94.1 vs mental-health = 109.2, P = .059). The most common medical disorders in the colocation group were related to metabolic syndrome. Conclusions: Colocated primary care services were allocated on the basis of severity of psychiatric impairment rather than severity of medical illness. This program serves as a model for other systems to employ for integrated primary and behavioral health services for patients with serious mental illness. PMID:24511447

Sirna, Megan; Mangurian, Christina; Dilley, James W.; Shumway, Martha

2013-01-01

307

Pediatric and adolescent mental health emergencies in the emergency medical services system.  

PubMed

Emergency department (ED) health care professionals often care for patients with previously diagnosed psychiatric illnesses who are ill, injured, or having a behavioral crisis. In addition, ED personnel encounter children with psychiatric illnesses who may not present to the ED with overt mental health symptoms. Staff education and training regarding identification and management of pediatric mental health illness can help EDs overcome the perceived limitations of the setting that influence timely and comprehensive evaluation. In addition, ED physicians can inform and advocate for policy changes at local, state, and national levels that are needed to ensure comprehensive care of children with mental health illnesses. This report addresses the roles that the ED and ED health care professionals play in emergency mental health care of children and adolescents in the United States, which includes the stabilization and management of patients in mental health crisis, the discovery of mental illnesses and suicidal ideation in ED patients, and approaches to advocating for improved recognition and treatment of mental illnesses in children. The report also addresses special issues related to mental illness in the ED, such as minority populations, children with special health care needs, and children's mental health during and after disasters and trauma. PMID:21518712

Dolan, Margaret A; Fein, Joel A

2011-05-01

308

Relationship Between Loneliness, Psychiatric Disorders and Physical Health ? A Review on the Psychological Aspects of Loneliness  

PubMed Central

Human beings are social species which require safe and secure social surroundings to survive. Satisfying social relationships are essential for mental and physical well beings. Impaired social relationship can lead to loneliness. Since the time of dawn, loneliness is perceived as a global human phenomenon. Loneliness can lead to various psychiatric disorders like depression, alcohol abuse, child abuse, sleep problems, personality disorders and Alzheimer’s disease. It also leads to various physical disorders like diabetes, autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and cardiovascular diseases like coronary heart disease, hypertension (HTN), obesity, physiological aging, cancer, poor hearing and poor health. Left untended, loneliness can have serious consequences for mental and physical health of people. Therefore it is important to intervene at the right time to prevent loneliness, so that physical and mental health of patients is maintained. PMID:25386507

Shoib, Sheikh; Shah, Tabindah; Mushtaq, Sahil

2014-01-01

309

Mental health problems in youths committed to juvenile institutions: prevalences and treatment needs  

PubMed Central

Many international studies show that adolescents in coercive institutional care display high prevalences of mental disorders, especially in the form of disruptive behavior disorders [including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder], anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. High degrees of overlap across mental disorders have also been reported. In addition, institutionalized adolescents are often traumatized. Despite this well-documented psychiatric morbidity, the mental health care needs of detained adolescents are often overlooked. The main objective of this study is to assess prevalences of psychiatric disorders, results of intelligence tests, and previous contacts with child and adolescent psychiatric services among adolescents in institutional care. DSM-IV diagnoses, mental health contacts, substance abuse, neurocognitive abilities, and school performance were registered in 100 adolescents (92 boys, 8 girls) aged 12–19 years (mean age 16.0; SD ± 1.5) consecutively committed to Swedish juvenile institutions between 2004 and 2007. At least one psychiatric disorder was diagnosed in 73% of the subjects: 48% met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for AD/HD, 17% for an autism spectrum disorder, and 10% for a mental retardation. The collapsed prevalence for psychiatric disorders requiring specialist attention was 63%. Our data indicate that systematic diagnostic procedures are crucial in the treatment planning for institutionalized adolescents. Adequate treatment strategies need to be designed and implemented to meet the extensive mental health care needs of this vulnerable population. PMID:20949366

Anckarsater, Henrik; Nilsson, Thomas

2010-01-01

310

Mental health of hospital consultants: the effects of stress and satisfaction at work  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryBackground Burnout and psychiatric morbidity among gastroenterologists, surgeons, radiologists, and oncologists in the UK have been estimated by means of a questionnaire-based survey. The relationship between consultants' mental health and their job stress and satisfaction, as well as their job and demographic characteristics, were also examined.Methods Psychiatric morbidity was estimated using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. The three components of

A. J Ramirez; J Graham; M. A Richards; W. M Gregory; A Cull

1996-01-01

311

The mental health of war-wounded refugees: an 8-year follow-up.  

PubMed

The complex nature of recent wars and armed conflicts has forced many war-injured persons into exile. To investigate their long-term mental health, three instruments for assessing mental health (HSCL-25, PTSS-10, and a Well-Being scale) were presented to 44 war-wounded refugees from nine different countries 8 years after arrival in Sweden. The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms was high and corresponds to findings in previous studies of refugee patient populations. A lower level of mental health was associated with higher education, unemployment, and poor physical health. The findings suggest a high psychiatric morbidity and a need for psychiatric interventions in this refugee group. Methodological issues to be considered in research on sequels of war traumas are discussed. PMID:12080207

Hermansson, Ann-Charlotte; Timpka, Toomas; Thyberg, Mikael

2002-06-01

312

Creativity, mental health, and alcoholism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Findings from a research project on the creative process spanning a 25?year period are applied to considerations regarding mental health and creativity. Two specific creative functions are described: (a) homospatial process?actively conceiving two or more discrete entities occupying the same space, a conception leading to the articulation of new identities; and (b) janusian process?actively conceiving multiple opposites or antitheses simultaneously.

Albert Rothenberg

1990-01-01

313

Mental Health Net: Professional Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of a much larger meta-resource, this site contains annotated, rated resources in over 25 subject categories, as well as associations, academic departments, employment, mailing lists, and newsgroups, among other resources. MHN has a rating system (one to four stars), based on content, presentation, ease of use, and overall experience. Interestingly, users are also allowed to interactively vote thumbs up or down on annotated resources. Mental Health Net and CMHC Systems maintain this site.

1998-01-01

314

Social ties and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is generally agreed that social ties play a beneficial role in the maintenance of psychological well-being. In this targeted\\u000a review, we highlight four sets of insights that emerge from the literature on social ties and mental health outcomes (defined\\u000a as stress reactions, psychological well-being, and psychological distress, including depressive symptoms and anxiety). First,\\u000a the pathways by which social networks

Ichiro Kawachi; Lisa F. Berkman

2001-01-01

315

Child Physical Abuse and Adult Mental Health: A National Study  

PubMed Central

This study characterizes adults who report being physically abused during childhood, and examines associations of reported type and frequency of abuse with adult mental health. Data were derived from the 2000–2001 and 2004–2005 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a large cross-sectional survey of a representative sample (N = 43,093) of the U.S. population. Weighted means, frequencies, and odds ratios of sociodemographic correlates and prevalence of psychiatric disorders were computed. Logistic regression models were used to examine the strength of associations between child physical abuse and adult psychiatric disorders adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, other childhood adversities, and comorbid psychiatric disorders. Child physical abuse was reported by 8% of the sample and was frequently accompanied by other childhood adversities. Child physical abuse was associated with significantly increased adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of a broad range of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders (AOR = 1.16–2.28), especially attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and bipolar disorder. A dose-response relationship was observed between frequency of abuse and several adult psychiatric disorder groups; higher frequencies of assault were significantly associated with increasing adjusted odds. The long-lasting deleterious effects of child physical abuse underscore the urgency of developing public health policies aimed at early recognition and prevention. PMID:22806701

Sugaya, Luisa; Hasin, Deborah S.; Olfson, Mark; Lin, Keng-Han; Grant, Bridget F.; Blanco, Carlos

2013-01-01

316

Smartphone Ownership and Interest in Mobile Applications to Monitor Symptoms of Mental Health Conditions  

PubMed Central

Background Patient retrospective recollection is a mainstay of assessing symptoms in mental health and psychiatry. However, evidence suggests that these retrospective recollections may not be as accurate as data collection though the experience sampling method (ESM), which captures patient data in “real time” and “real life.” However, the difficulties in practical implementation of ESM data collection have limited its impact in psychiatry and mental health. Smartphones with the capability to run mobile applications may offer a novel method of collecting ESM data that may represent a practical and feasible tool for mental health and psychiatry. Objective This paper aims to provide data on psychiatric patients’ prevalence of smartphone ownership, patterns of use, and interest in utilizing mobile applications to monitor their mental health conditions. Methods One hundred psychiatric outpatients at a large urban teaching hospital completed a paper-and-pencil survey regarding smartphone ownership, use, and interest in utilizing mobile applications to monitor their mental health condition. Results Ninety-seven percent of patients reported owning a phone and 72% reported that their phone was a smartphone. Patients in all age groups indicated greater than 50% interest in using a mobile application on a daily basis to monitor their mental health condition. Conclusions Smartphone and mobile applications represent a practical opportunity to explore new modalities of monitoring, treatment, and research of psychiatric and mental health conditions. PMID:25098314

Friedman, Rohn; Keshavan, Matcheri

2014-01-01

317

Issues in Children's Mental Health. Special Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report examines issues related to children's mental health in Virginia. The report discusses the effects of children's mental illness, presents risk and protective factors, and describes the incidence of children's mental health problems. Information specific to Virginia is presented, including the prevalence of youth suicide,…

Nimmo, Margaret L.

318

Synergy, 2003. Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each issue in the 2002 edition of the Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network (ATMHN) newsletter represents a theme critical to mental health practitioners. The Winter 2002 issue features articles on the psychological consequences of interpreters in relation to working with torture and trauma clients, addressing language issues on mental

Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network, Parramatta.

319

Mental Health Counseling: A Stakeholder's Manifesto.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the original dreams of the founders of the American Mental Health Counselors Association; looks at history and comments on the state of mental health counseling as it has struggled to evolve as a profession. Urges those in the counseling profession to consider an acquisitions and mergers corporate mentality to ensure and enhance the…

Beck, Edward S.

1999-01-01

320

On being invisible in the mental health system.  

PubMed

The author provides a case study of her daughter's sexual abuse as a child and subsequent experiences as a chronically mentally ill client in the mental health system. Information from 17 years of mental health records and anecdotal accounts are used to illustrate the effects of the abuse, her attempts to reach out for help, and the system's failure to respond. There is evidence that a significant subset of psychiatric patients were severely sexually traumatized in childhood. Yet standard interview schedules consistently neglect to ask questions about such abuse, appropriate treatment is seldom available, and clients are often retraumatized by current practices. Psychiatry's historic resistance to addressing abuse as etiology is being challenged today by powerful economic, political, and professional forces leading to the emergence of a new trauma-based paradigm. PMID:10138011

Jennings, A

1994-01-01

321

Psychiatric disorders and sleep issues.  

PubMed

Sleep issues are common in people with psychiatric disorders, and the interaction is complex. Sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, can precede and predispose to psychiatric disorders, can be comorbid with and exacerbate psychiatric disorders, and can occur as part of psychiatric disorders. Sleep disorders can mimic psychiatric disorders or result from medication given for psychiatric disorders. Impairment of sleep and of mental health may be different manifestations of the same underlying neurobiological processes. For the primary care physician, key tools include recognition of potential sleep effects of psychiatric medications and familiarity with treatment approaches for insomnia in depression and anxiety. PMID:25134876

Sutton, Eliza L

2014-09-01

322

Stress, Coping, and Black Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the fact that blacks are disproportionately exposed to social conditions considered to be antecedents of psychiatric disorder, epidemiologic studies have not conclusively demonstrated that blacks exhibit higher rates of mental illness than whites. The present paper employed a research approach which considered not only rates of psychological distress, but also the stressors that blacks face and thc various coping

Harold W. Neighbors; James S. Jackson; Phillip J. Bowman; Gerald Gurin

1983-01-01

323

Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

1994-01-01

324

Estimating the number of children exposed to parental psychiatric disorders through a national health survey  

PubMed Central

Objective Children whose parents have psychiatric disorders experience an increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders, and have higher rates of developmental problems and mortality. Assessing the size of this population is important for planning of preventive strategies which target these children. Methods National survey data (CCHS 1.2) was used to estimate the number of children exposed to parental psychiatric disorders. Disorders were diagnosed using the World Psychiatric Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI) (12 month prevalence). Data on the number of children below 12 years of age in the home, and the relationship of the respondents with the children, was used to estimate exposure. Parent-child relations were identified, as was single parenthood. Using a design-based analysis, the number of children exposed to parental psychiatric disorders was calculated. Results Almost 570,000 children under 12 live in households where the survey respondent met criteria for one or more mood, anxiety or substance use disorders in the previous 12 months, corresponding to 12.1% of Canadian children under the age of 12. Almost 3/4 of these children have parents that report receiving no mental health care in the 12 months preceding the survey. For 17% of all Canadian children under age 12, the individual experiencing a psychiatric disorder is the only parent in the household. Conclusion The high number of children exposed causes major concern and has important implications. Although these children will not necessarily experience adversities, they possess an elevated risk of accidents, mortality, and of developing psychiatric disorders. We expect these estimates will promote further research and stimulate discussion at both health policy and planning tables. PMID:19228427

Bassani, Diego G; Padoin, Cintia V; Philipp, Diane; Veldhuizen, Scott

2009-01-01

325

Mental health services for people with intellectual disability in Israel--a review of options.  

PubMed

Intellectual disability (ID) (often also referred to as "mental retardation," "development disability," "mental handicap," "learning disability" or as "generalized learning difficulties") is common in all countries. Many people with ID suffer from psychiatric/behavioral/emotional disturbances (known as "dual diagnosis"). Specialist psychiatric services are needed to address these problems effectively, but are not currently available in most countries, including Israel. This article sets out to describe the problems, current services in Israel, approaches in other countries and proposed solutions for Israel. We believe it important to enforce laws against discrimination based on disability, to raise the general awareness, knowledge and skills among generic mental health professionals on the topic of intellectual disability by inclusion in university, postgraduate and in-service training curricula, to work towards a form of subspecialty within psychiatry along the lines of the model in the United Kingdom and to establish specialized psychiatric services, possibly functioning as back-up to the generic psychiatric services. PMID:17338442

Stawski, Mike; Merrick, Joav

2006-01-01

326

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  

MedlinePLUS

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Home Newsroom Site Map Contact Us SAMHSA Search Search Data Visit ... SAMHSA's mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities. The ...

327

Hepatitis C infection, antiviral treatment and mental health: a European expert consensus statement.  

PubMed

Mental health problems frequently occur in chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and during antiviral treatment with pegylated interferon-alpha (PegIFN?) and ribavirin. Depression is one of the most important complications during antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection. However, an increased prevalence of depression, fatigue, and cognitive disturbances has also been reported in untreated HCV-positive patients. Patients with psychiatric disorders or drug addiction also have an increased risk of HCV infection. Furthermore, because of possible drug-drug interactions, new antivirals administered together with PegIFN? and ribavirin may complicate psychiatric side effect management, even if no specific psychiatric adverse events are known so far for these new drugs. The European liver patient's organization (ELPA) organised a European expert conference to review the literature and develop expert recommendations for the management of mental health problems in HCV infected patients. This paper results from the output of the 2011 EASL meeting and subsequent dialogue with patient groups and relevant experts in Europe. It summarises the current knowledge of HCV infection and the brain; prevalence, course, and neurobiology of IFN-? associated psychiatric side effects; possible risk factors for IFN-? associated depression and suicide attempts; psychiatric management of HCV infected patients before and during antiviral treatment; prevention of IFN- ? associated psychiatric side effects; and psychiatric aspects of the new antivirals. The summarised current knowledge about mental health changes before and during antiviral treatment should improve interdisciplinary management of HCV infected patients. PMID:22878466

Schaefer, Martin; Capuron, Lucile; Friebe, Astrid; Diez-Quevedo, Crisanto; Robaeys, Geert; Neri, Sergio; Foster, Graham R; Kautz, Achim; Forton, Daniel; Pariante, Carmine M

2012-12-01

328

A survey of staff attitudes to smoking-related policy and intervention in psychiatric and general health care settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Although the move to smoke-free hospital settings is generally a popular initiative, it may be a more challenging and controversial issue in mental health care. A survey was carried out to investigate differences in attitudes between clinical staff in psychiatric and general medical settings to smoke-free policy and intervention. Method The sample comprised 2574 NHS staff working in two

Lisa McNally; Adenekan Oyefeso; Jan Annan; Katherine Perryman; Roger Bloor; Steve Freeman; Barbara Wain; Hilary Andrews; Martin Grimmer; Arthur Crisp; Deji Oyebode; A. Hamid Ghodse

2006-01-01

329

The Relationship between Parental Psychiatric Disorder and Child Physical and Sexual Abuse: Findings from the Ontario Health Supplement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study interviewed 8,548 participants in the Ontario Mental Health Supplement about parental psychiatric history and childhood physical and sexual abuse. Respondents reporting a parental history of depression, mania, or schizophrenia had a two to threefold increase in the rates of physical, sexual, or any abuse. (Contains references.) (CR)

Walsh, Christine; MacMillan, Harriet; Jamieson, Ellen

2002-01-01

330

Faster return to work after psychiatric consultation for sicklisted employees with common mental disorders compared to care as usual. A randomized clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Introduction Return to work (RTW) of employees on sick leave for common mental disorders may require a multidisciplinary approach. This article aims to assess time to RTW after a psychiatric consultation providing treatment advice to the occupational physician (OP) for employees on sick leave for common mental disorders in the occupational health (OH) setting, compared to care as usual (CAU). Methods Cluster randomized clinical trial evaluating patients of 12 OPs receiving consultation by a psychiatrist, compared to CAU delivered by 12 OPs in the control group. 60 patients suffering from common mental disorders and ? six weeks sicklisted were included. Follow up three and six months after inclusion. Primary outcome measure was time to RTW. Intention- to-treat multilevel analysis and a survival analysis were performed to evaluate time to RTW in both groups. Results In CAU, referral was the main intervention. Both groups improved in terms of symptom severity and quality of life, but time to RTW was significantly shorter in the psychiatric consultation group. At three months follow up, 58% of the psychiatric consultation group had full RTW versus 44% of the control group, a significant finding (P = 0.0093). Survival analysis showed 68 days earlier RTW after intervention in the psychiatric consultation group (P = 0.078) compared to CAU. Conclusion Psychiatric consultation for employees on sick leave in the OH setting improves time to RTW in patients with common mental disorders as compared to CAU. In further research, focus should be on early intervention in patients with common mental disorders on short sick leave duration. Psychiatric consultation might be particularly promising for improvement of RTW in those patients. Trial registration number ISRCTN: 86722376 PMID:20856601

van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Hoedeman, Rob; de Jong, Fransina J; Meeuwissen, Jolanda AC; Drewes, Hanneke W; van der Laan, Niels C; Ader, Herman J

2010-01-01

331

U.S. military enlisted accession mental health screening: history and current practice.  

PubMed

Through the stimulus of war and concerns about neuropsychiatric disability, the U.S. military developed methods to rapidly screen the mental health of World War I and II draftees. Intelligence testing and brief psychiatric screening expanded the accession physical examination and underwent revision to identify only gross mental health disability. Supplemental psychiatric evaluations and written psychological screening tools were abandoned after postwar assessments; they demonstrated poor predictive power in evaluating recruit service capacity for combat environments. Currently, only three mental health accession tools are used to screen applicants before their entrance into military service, namely, educational achievement, cognitive testing, and a cursory psychiatric evaluation. The Navy and Air Force use a fourth screening measure during entry-level training. Educational attainment with high school graduation has been the strongest predictor of finishing a service term. The purpose of this article is to provide both a historical review and a review of testing efforts. PMID:17274262

Cardona, Robert Andrew; Ritchie, Elspeth Cameron

2007-01-01

332

Trucking organization and mental health disorders of truck drivers.  

PubMed

There are over 3 million truck drivers employed in the commercial transportation and material moving occupations, one of the largest occupational groups in the United States. Workers in this large and growing occupational segment are at risk for a range of occupational health-induced conditions, including mental health and psychiatric disorders due to high occupational stress, low access and use of health care, and limited social support. The purpose of this study was to explore male truck drivers' mental health risks and associated comorbidities, using a cross-sectional and quantitative design. Data were collected from a random sample of 316 male truckers between the ages of 23 and 76 at a large truck stop located within a 100-mile radius of Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, using a self-administered 82-item questionnaire. Surveyed truckers were found to have significant issues affecting their mental health, such as loneliness (27.9%), depression (26.9%), chronic sleep disturbances (20.6%), anxiety (14.5%), and other emotional problems (13%). Findings have potential to help researchers develop interventions to improve the emotional and occupational health of truck drivers, a highly underserved population. Mental health promotion, assessment, and treatment must become a priority to improve the overall trucking environment for truckers, the transportation industry, and safety on US highways. PMID:22757596

Shattell, Mona; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Collins, Chad; Sönmez, Sevil; Fehrenbacher, Caitlin

2012-07-01

333

Stress, burnout, and job dissatisfaction in mental health workers.  

PubMed

As the industrial world has transformed toward a service economy, a particular interest has developed in mental health problems at the workplace. The risk for burnout is significantly increased in certain occupations, notably for health care workers. Beyond the effects of an extensive workload, many working hours, or long night shifts, the medical field has specific stressors. Physicians work in emotionally demanding environments with patients, families, or other medical staff. They must make quick decisions while faced with a quite frequent information overload. All of these stressors have to be weighed against a rapidly changing organizational context within medicine. Today, economics objectives have priority over medical values in health care. In principal, mental health workers should experience similar work stressors and the same contextual factors as health professionals from other medical disciplines. However, several studies have identified stressors that are unique to the psychiatric profession. These challenges range from the stigma of this profession, to particularly demanding relationships with patients and difficult interactions with other mental health professionals as part of multidisciplinary teams to personal threats from violent patients. Other sources of stress are a lack of positive feedback, low pay, and a poor work environment. Finally, patient suicide is a major stressor, upon which a majority of mental health workers report post-traumatic stress symptoms. PMID:22926058

Rössler, Wulf

2012-11-01

334

A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of Childhood Trauma on Symptoms and Functioning of People with Severe Mental Health Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the relationship between childhood trauma and the psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial functioning of adults with severe mental health problems. Participants (n?=?31) were recruited from the caseloads of community mental health services in Northern Ireland and assessed at baseline, 9 months, and 18 months. More than half had a history of childhood trauma (n?=?17). There were no differences

Gavin Davidson; Ciaran Shannon; Ciaran Mulholland; Jim Campbell

2009-01-01

335

When special needs categories for exceptional students overlap mental health diagnoses: The Canadian experience and its Charter implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores Canadian 'educational' categorical systems for special needs students and their relation to mental health diagnoses. Parents wishing to access special education services for their children are generally required to consent to their children being formally assessed. Frequently, the school board committee will require a psychological or psychiatric assessment which may lead to diagnosis of a mental health

Sonja Grover

2003-01-01

336

Building primary care practitioners’ attitudes and confidence in mental health skills in post-conflict Bosnia and Herzegovina  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our program attempted to integrate community mental health in primary care settings in post-conflict Travnik, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The training program underwent an extensive evaluation to determine its impact on the mental health knowledge, confidence in performing medical and psychiatric procedures, skills and attitudes of 93 Bosnian primary care practitioners (PCPs). There was a significant improvement in PCPs confidence in

David C. Henderson; Aida Kapetanovic; Melissa A. Culhane; James Lavelle; Kate Miley; Deborah Gray; Christina P. Borba; Richard F. Mollica

2008-01-01

337

Identification and treatment of TBI and co-occurring psychiatric symptoms among OEF/OIF/OND veterans seeking mental health services within the State of Colorado: establishing consensus for best practices.  

PubMed

This paper highlights the results of a consensus meeting regarding best practices for the assessment and treatment of co-occurring traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mental health (MH) problems among Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn Veterans seeking care in non-Veterans Affairs Colorado community MH settings. Twenty individuals with expertise in TBI screening, assessment, and intervention, as well as the state MH system, convened to establish and review questions and assumptions regarding care for this Veteran population. Unanimous consensus regarding best practices was achieved. Recommendations for improving care for Veterans seeking care in community MH settings are provided. PMID:23325070

Olson-Madden, Jennifer H; Brenner, Lisa A; Matarazzo, Bridget B; Signoracci, Gina M

2013-04-01

338

Toward a new architecture for global mental health.  

PubMed

Current efforts in global mental health (GMH) aim to address the inequities in mental health between low-income and high-income countries, as well as vulnerable populations within wealthy nations (e.g., indigenous peoples, refugees, urban poor). The main strategies promoted by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other allies have been focused on developing, implementing, and evaluating evidence-based practices that can be scaled up through task-shifting and other methods to improve access to services or interventions and reduce the global treatment gap for mental disorders. Recent debates on global mental health have raised questions about the goals and consequences of current approaches. Some of these critiques emphasize the difficulties and potential dangers of applying Western categories, concepts, and interventions given the ways that culture shapes illness experience. The concern is that in the urgency to address disparities in global health, interventions that are not locally relevant and culturally consonant will be exported with negative effects including inappropriate diagnoses and interventions, increased stigma, and poor health outcomes. More fundamentally, exclusive attention to mental disorders identified by psychiatric nosologies may shift attention from social structural determinants of health that are among the root causes of global health disparities. This paper addresses these critiques and suggests how the GMH movement can respond through appropriate modes of community-based practice and ongoing research, while continuing to work for greater equity and social justice in access to effective, socially relevant, culturally safe and appropriate mental health care on a global scale. PMID:25358524

Kirmayer, Laurence J; Pedersen, Duncan

2014-12-01

339

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

2007-01-01

340

[Dangerous states and mental health disorders: perceptions and reality].  

PubMed

Image of Madness was always strongly linked with the notion of "dangerousness", provoking fear and social exclusion, despite the evolution of psychiatric practices and organisation, and the emphasis on user's rights respect. Mediatization and politicization of this issue through news item combining crime and mental illness, reinforce and spread out this perception. This paper presents a review of the litterature on social perceptions associating "dangerousness", "Insanity" and "mental illness", available data about the link between "dangerous states" and "psychiatric disorders", as well as the notion of "dangerousness" and the assessment of "dangerous state" of people suffering or not from psychiatric disorders. MAPPING OF SOCIAL REPRESENTATIONS: The French Survey "Mental Health in General Population: Images and Realities (MHGP)" was carried out between 1999 and 2003, on a representative sample of 36.000 individuals over 18 years old. It aims at describing the social representations of the population about "insanity/insane" and "mental illness/mentally ill". The results show that about 75% of the people interviewed link "insanity" or "mental illness" with "criminal or violent acts". Young people and those with a high level of education more frequently categorize violent and dangerous behaviours in the field of Mental illness rather than in that of madness. CORRELATION BETWEEN DANGEROUS STATE AND PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS: in the scientific literature, all experts reject the hypothesis of a direct link between violence and mental disorder. Besides, 2 tendencies appear in their conclusions: on one hand, some studies establish a significative link between violence and severe mental illness, compared with the general population. On the other hand, results show that 87 to 97% of des aggressors are not mentally ills. Therefore, the absence of scientific consensus feeds the confusion and reinforce the link of causality between psychiatric disorders and violence. OFFICIAL FIGURES BY THE MINISTRY OF JUSTICE: according to the French Ministry of Justice, there is a lack of significative data in general population, that would allow the accurate evaluation of the proportion of authors of crimes and offences presenting a "dangerous state", either of criminological order or related to a psychiatric disorder. FROM "DANGEROUSNESS" TO "DANGEROUS STATE": the vagueness of the notion of "dangerousness" aggravates the confusion and reinforce the negative social representations attached to subjects labelled as "mentally ills". A way to alleviate this stigmatisation would be to stop using the word "dangerous", and rather use those of "dangerous states". Assessment of dangerous states is complex and needs to take into account several heterogeneous factors (circumstances of acting, social and family environment...). Besides, it is not a linear process for a given individual. Those risk factors of "dangerous state" lead to the construction of evaluation or prediction scales, which limits lay in the biaises of over or under predictive value. The overestimation of dangerousness is harmful, not only to individuals wrongly considered as "dangerous", but also to the society which, driven by safety concerns, agrees on the implementation of inaccurate measures. A FEW TRACKS FOR REMEDIATION: the representations linking "mental illness" and "dangerousness" are the major vectors of stigma, and deeply anchored in the collective popular imagination. They are shared by all population categories, with no distinction of age, gender, professional status or level of education. To overcome those prejudices, one has to carefully study their basis, their criteria, document them with statistical data, look for consistency and scientific rigour, in the terminology as well as in the methodology. Moreover, one has to encourage ex

Tassone-Monchicourt, C; Daumerie, N; Caria, A; Benradia, I; Roelandt, J-L

2010-01-01

341

Incidence and Documentation of Cognitive Impairment Among Older Adults With Severe Mental Illness in a Community Mental Health Setting  

PubMed Central

Objective Cognitive impairments among older adults are commonly linked to poor medical and psychiatric treatment adherence, increased disability, and poor health outcomes. Recent investigations suggest that cognitive impairments are frequently not recognized by healthcare providers and are often poorly documented in medical records. Older adults utilizing services at community mental health centers have numerous risk factors for developing cognitive impairment. Few studies have explored the incidence and documentation of cognitive impairments in this patient population. Methods Data were collected from 52 ethnically diverse older adults with severe mental illness who were participating in treatment at a large community mental health center. Cognitive impairment was diagnosed by neuropsychologists utilizing the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale-2 (DRS). Measures of depression severity and substance abuse history were also obtained. An age and education corrected DRS total score falling at or below the tenth percentile was used as the criteria for diagnosing cognitive impairment. A medical chart review was subsequently conducted to determine the documentation of cognitive impairments among this patient population. Results Cognitive impairment was exhibited by 60% of participants and documented in medical charts for 17% of the sample. Conclusions Preliminary data suggests that cognitive impairment is common in individuals with severe mental illness treated at community mental health centers, but these cognitive impairments are not well recognized or documented. The impact of cognitive impairment on psychiatric treatment and case management among community mental health patients is therefore poorly understood. PMID:19092314

Mackin, R. Scott; Arean, Patricia A.

2011-01-01

342

AIMHI NT 'Mental Health Story Teller Mob': Developing stories in mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Australian Integrated Mental Health Initiative in the Northern Territory is one of a number of sites funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council. The project has been working with Aboriginal Mental Health Workers (AMHWs), and the Top End Division of General Practice (TEDGP) to adapt mental health information to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander context through

Tricia Nagel; Carolyn Thompson

2007-01-01

343

Recognition rights, mental health consumers and reconstructive cultural semantics  

PubMed Central

Introduction Those in mental health-related consumer movements have made clear their demands for humane treatment and basic civil rights, an end to stigma and discrimination, and a chance to participate in their own recovery. But theorizing about the politics of recognition, 'recognition rights' and epistemic justice, suggests that they also have a stake in the broad cultural meanings associated with conceptions of mental health and illness. Results First person accounts of psychiatric diagnosis and mental health care (shown here to represent 'counter stories' to the powerful 'master narrative' of biomedical psychiatry), offer indications about how experiences of mental disorder might be reframed and redefined as part of efforts to acknowledge and honor recognition rights and epistemic justice. However, the task of cultural semantics is one for the entire culture, not merely consumers. These new meanings must be negotiated. When they are not the result of negotiation, group-wrought definitions risk imposing a revision no less constraining than the mis-recognizing one it aims to replace. Contested realities make this a challenging task when it comes to cultural meanings about mental disorder. Examples from mental illness memoirs about two contested realities related to psychosis are examined here: the meaninglessness of symptoms, and the role of insight into illness. They show the magnitude of the challenge involved - for consumers, practitioners, and the general public - in the reconstruction of these new meanings and realities. Conclusion To honor recognition rights and epistemic justice acknowledgement must be made of the heterogeneity of the effects of, and of responses to, psychiatric diagnosis and care, and the extent of the challenge of the reconstructive cultural semantics involved. PMID:22244148

2012-01-01

344

Understanding locally, culturally, and contextually relevant mental health problems among Rwandan children and adolescents affected by HIV\\/AIDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In assessing the mental health of HIV\\/AIDS-affected children and adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa, researchers often employ mental health measures developed in other settings. However, measures derived from standard Western psychiatric criteria are frequently based on conceptual models of illness or terminology that may or may not be an appropriate for diverse populations. Understanding local perceptions of mental health problems can

Theresa S. Betancourt; Julia E. Rubin-Smith; William R. Beardslee; Sara N. Stulac; Ildephonse Fayida; Steven Safren

2011-01-01

345

Substance Parity Laws and the Detection and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders Among Adolescents in Mental Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the association between substance use parity laws and the detection\\/treatment of co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders among adolescents seeking treatment within a mental health setting. Data were drawn from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration 1997 Client\\/Patient Sample Survey (CPSS). The CPSS is a nationally representative survey of mental health service use obtained from

Lisa C. Dierker; Eve M. Sledjeski; Stephanie Marshall; Sarah Johnson

2009-01-01

346

Perceived stress, internal resources, and social support as determinants of mental health among young adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Mental health is a central determinant of quality of life. While psychiatric morbidity of populations has been studied extensively, the role of perceived stress, social support, and internal resources as determinant of health is still poorly understood. Methods: We surveyed 2000 randomly selected university students. Perceived stress was measured by the Brief Encounter Psychosocial Instrument, social support by the

Patrick A. Bovier; Eric Chamot; Thomas V. Perneger

2004-01-01

347

Using Decision Support to Address Racial Disparities in Mental Health Service Utilization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unfortunately, racial disparities are well documented in the delivery of behavioral health services. This study examines the effects of implementing a decision support process, integrating clinical information into the administration of mental health services, on racial disparities in psychiatric hospital admissions for children in state custody.…

Rawal, Purva H.; Anderson, Tanya R.; Romansky, Jill R.; Lyons, John S.

2008-01-01

348

Capacity-Building for African American Mental Health Training and Research: Lessons from the Howard-Dartmouth Collaborative Summer School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Many psychiatric residents have traditionally received little-or-no training in cross cultural approaches to psychiatric training and research. Method: The Dartmouth-Howard Collaboration summer school training program had a 5-year grant to explore approaches to enhancing understanding of cultural factors in mental health treatment and…

Hipolito, Maria M. S.; Malik, Mansoor; Carpenter-Song, Elizabeth; Whitley, Rob

2012-01-01

349

Mental Health Knowledge and Attitudes Among Social Workers Employed in a Supported Education Program for Adult Students with Schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To explore mental health knowledge and attitudes to persons with psychiatric impairments among social workers involved in a supported education program (SEP) for adults with psychiatric disabilities. Methods: All social workers employed in an SEP countrywide (n = 25) and a control group of social workers from other psychosocial rehabilitation programs, matched by age, sex, marital status, and both years of

ALEXANDER M. PONIZOVSKY; SHIFRA SHVARTS; RACHEL SASSON; ALEXANDER GRINSHPOON

2008-01-01

350

Tibetan Psychiatry and Mental Health  

E-print Network

book on Tibetan medicine. That book was a major breakthrough and has been very important. So, thank you very much, Miss Winder. Now the top:: for my talk this morning is Tibetan psychiatry and mental health. I must teU you that when I first started... fortune to meet was Mr. Gene Smith, whom many of you may know as one of the greatest scholars of Tibetan literature. He immediately told me that there were actu­ ally three whole chapters of the rGyud-bii exclusively devoted to the subject of psychiatry...

Clifford, Terry

1993-01-01

351

Findings from mental health screening of newly arrived refugees in Colorado.  

PubMed Central

States are required to provide a public health screening for all newly arrived refugees in the United States. In 1997, a comprehensive program was created to include both a physical examination and a mental health screening. This article provides a complete description of the mental health screening process, including two illustrative cases, and reports information about the refugees who participated in the program. Ten percent of screened refugees were offered mental health referrals; of those, 37% followed up. Refugees who presented for treatment reported a higher number of symptoms upon screening compared with those who were offered referrals but did not follow up. Psychiatric evaluation confirmed that those who screened positive and presented for treatment were experiencing a high level of suffering and qualified for mental health diagnoses. The findings support inclusion of a mental health screening as part of the public health screening. PMID:16134561

Savin, Daniel; Seymour, Deborah J.; Littleford, Linh Nguyen; Bettridge, Juli; Giese, Alexis

2005-01-01

352

Psychiatric Issues in Behavioral Health Disability  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter explores the essential differences between two important professional roles that a psychiatrist may routinely\\u000a practice. The distinction is important because of the separate professional responsibilities associated with each. A psychiatrist\\u000a may engage in the psychiatric disability or workers’ compensation process in either a forensic role or as a treating provider.\\u000a Thus, it is imperative for a psychiatrist to

Bettina B. Kilburn

353

The World Health Organization and the contested beginnings of psychiatric epidemiology as an international discipline: one rope, many strands.  

PubMed

This paper focuses on the relatively late emergence of psychiatric epidemiology as an international discipline, through local-global exchanges during the first 15 years of the World Health Organization (WHO). Building an epidemiological canon within WHO's Mental Health Programme faced numerous obstacles. First, an idealist notion of mental health inherent in WHO's own definition of health contributed to tensions around the object of psychiatric epidemiology. Second, the transfer of methods from medical epidemiology to research on mental disorders required mobilizing conceptual justifications, including a 'contagion argument'. Third, epidemiological research at WHO was stymied by other public health needs, resource scarcity and cultural barriers. This history partly recapitulates the development of psychiatric epidemiology in North America and Europe, but is also shaped by concerns in the developing world, translated through first-world 'experts'. Resolving the tensions arising from these obstacles allowed WHO to establish its international schizophrenia research, which in turn provided proof of concept for psychiatric epidemiology in the place of scepticism within and without psychiatry. PMID:25031048

Lovell, Anne M

2014-08-01

354

Mental health, gender, and drug court completion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drug-involved offenders report high rates of mental health problems that can negatively impact criminal justice outcomes.\\u000a Yet, relatively little attention has been given to the mental health issues of drug court offenders. Therefore, this study\\u000a examined 449 participants in a Delaware drug court and investigated relationships between mental health, gender, and program\\u000a completion. Bivariate results indicated that gender was related

Alison R. Gray; Christine A. Saum

2005-01-01

355

The challenge of auditing mental health.  

PubMed

A changing environment which includes increased competition and changing philosophies of providing mental health services reflect an increased need for an information gathering instrument to provide the foundation for developing strategic plans in mental health organizations. The initial step in the planning process is collecting and systematizing the data necessary to the organization's functioning. A marketing audit specifically designed to encompass the special problems encountered in the mental health organization is presented in this paper. PMID:10303626

Hill, C J

1989-01-01

356

Marriage and Mental Health among Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marriage is widely thought to confer mental health benefits, but little is known about how this apparent benefit may vary across the life course. Early marriage, which is nonnormative, could have no, or even negative, mental health consequences for young adults. Using survey data from waves 1 and 3 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 11,695),

Jeremy E. Uecker

2012-01-01

357

Mental Health Care in Primary Care Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE To assess family physicians' interactions with mental health professionals (MHPs), their satisfaction with the delivery of mental health care in primary health care settings, and their perceptions of areas for improvement. DESIGN Mailed survey. SETTING Province of Saskatchewan. PARTICIPANTS All FPs in Saskatchewan (N = 816) were invited to participate in the study; 31 were later determined to be

C. C. Doebbeling; Syed M. Shah

2004-01-01

358

Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care Quick Links Facts for Families - Numerical List Facts for Families - Keyword (Alphabetical) Facts for Families No. 107; Updated December 2012 Click ...

359

Mental Health: An Interdisciplinary and International Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The World Federation for Mental Health was founded as an international apolitical organization concerned with quality of life rather than merely the absence or prevention of mental illness. An examination of the manner and extent to which mental problems arise in different cultural settings can provide data needed to understand the relationship…

Klineberg, Otto

360

Student Mental Health Services in Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Facts about mental and emotional illness and implications for student mental health services in higher education are reviewed. Psychoses, which are types of mental illness that are usually quite severe, are discussed in terms of symptoms, as are neuroses, which cause severe distress and impair coping with living conditions but are not as…

Blai, Boris, Jr.

361

Status and requirements of geriatric mental health services in India: An evidence-based commentary  

PubMed Central

In view of appreciable improvements in health care services in India, the longevity and life expectancy have almost doubled. As a result, there is significant demographic transition, and the population of older adults in the country is growing rapidly. Epidemiological surveys have revealed enormous mental health morbidity in older adults (aged 60 years and above) and have necessitated immediate need for the development of mental health services in India. The present population of older adults was used to calculate psychiatric morbidity based on the reported epidemiological data. The demographic and social changes, health care planning, available mental health care services and morbidity data were critically examined and analyzed. The service gap was calculated on the basis of available norms for the country vis-à-vis average mental health morbidity. Data from a recent epidemiological study indicated an average of 20.5% mental health morbidity in older adults. Accordingly, it was found that, at present, 17.13 million older adults (total population, 83.58 millions) are suffering from mental health problems in India. A differing, but in many aspects similar, picture emerged with regard to human resource and infrastructural requirements based on the two norms for the country to meet the challenges posed by psychiatrically ill older adults. A running commentary has been provided based on the available evidences and strategic options have been outlined to meet the requirements and minimize the gap. There is an urgent need to develop the subject and geriatric mental health care services in India. PMID:22556431

Tiwari, S. C.; Pandey, Nisha M.

2012-01-01

362

Rural Schools' Mental Health Needs  

E-print Network

d b y t h e A m er ic an P sy ch o lo g ic al A ss o ci at io n o r o n e o f it s al li ed p u b li sh er s. T h is a rt ic le i s in te n d ed s o le ly f o r th e p er so n al u se o f th e in d iv id u al u se r an d i... health services (Harowski, Turner, LeVine, Schank & Leichter, 2006}.The available research indicates the mental health needs of rural populations are heterogeneous and shift on the basis of an array of changing socioeconomic factors, including...

Lee, Steven W.; Lohmeier, Jill H.; Niileksela, Christopher Robert; Oeth, Jessica

2009-01-01

363

Indian health care professionals' attitude towards spiritual healing and its role in alleviating stigma of psychiatric services.  

PubMed

Persons with mental illnesses in India and rest of developing world continue to consult religious/spiritual (R/S) healers or traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) professionals prior to seeking psychiatric services that are devoid of spiritual components of care. We aim to understand TCAM and allopathic professionals' perspectives on patients' R/S needs within mental health services, cross-sectional study was conducted at five TCAM and two allopathic tertiary care hospitals in three different Indian states; 393 participants completed RSMPP, a self-administered, semi-structured survey questionnaire. Perspectives of TCAM and allopathic health professionals on role of spirituality in mental health care were compared. Substantial percentage, 43.7 % TCAM and 41.3 % allopathic, of participants believe that their patients approach R/S or TCAM practitioners for severe mental illness; 91.2 % of TCAM and 69.7 % of allopaths were satisfied with R/S healers (p = 0.0019). Furthermore, 91.1 % TCAM and 73.1 % allopaths (p = 0.000) believe that mental health stigma can be minimized by integrating with spiritual care services. Overall, 87 % of TCAM and 73 % of allopaths agreed to primary criterion variable: 'spiritual healing is beneficial and complementary to psychiatric care.' A quarter of allopaths (24.4 %) and 38 % of TCAM physicians reportedly cross-refer their grieving patients to religious/TCAM healer and psychiatrist/psychologist, respectively; on logistic regression, significant (p < 0.05) predictors were clinical interactions/references to r/s healers. Providing spiritual care within the setup of psychiatric institution will not only complement psychiatric care but also alleviate stigma against mental health services. Implications on developing spiritual care services like clinical chaplaincy are discussed. PMID:24430129

Ramakrishnan, P; Rane, A; Dias, A; Bhat, J; Shukla, A; Lakshmi, S; Ansari, B K; Ramaswamy, R S; Reddy, R A; Tribulato, A; Agarwal, A K; SatyaPrasad, N; Mushtaq, A; Rao, P H; Murthy, P; Koenig, H G

2014-12-01

364

Holistic health: does it really include mental health?  

PubMed

Holistic health, incorporating mind and body as equally important and unified components of health, is a concept utilized in some health care arenas in the United States (U.S.) over the past 30 years. However, in the U.S., mental health is not seen as conceptually integral to physical health and, thus, holistic health cannot be realized until the historical concept of mind-body dualism, continuing stigma regarding mental illness, lack of mental health parity in insurance, and inaccurate public perceptions regarding mental illness are adequately addressed and resolved. Until then, mental and physical health will continue to be viewed as disparate entities rather than parts of a unified whole. We conclude that the U.S. currently does not generally incorporate the tenets of holistic health in its view of the mental and physical health of its citizens, and provide some suggestions for changing that viewpoint. PMID:17370005

McClanahan, Kimberly K; Huff, Marlene B; Omar, Hatim A

2006-01-01

365

When Parents With Severe Mental Illness Lose Contact With Their Children: Are Psychiatric Symptoms or Substance Use to Blame?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared parental psychiatric symptom severity, and the absence or presence of severe substance abuse, as predictors of contact with minor children for a representative sample of adults with diagnoses of serious mental illness (N = 45). Child contact and psychiatric symptom severity were measured during regularly scheduled 6-month research interviews over a total 30-month period following each participant's entry into

Danson Jones; Rosemarie Lillianne Macias; Paul B. Gold; Paul Barreira; William Fisher

2008-01-01

366

When Parents with Severe Mental Illness Lose Contact with Their Children: Are Psychiatric Symptoms or Substance Use to Blame?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared parental psychiatric symptom severity, and the absence or presence of severe substance abuse, as predictors of contact with minor children for a representative sample of adults with diagnoses of serious mental illness (N = 45). Child contact and psychiatric symptom severity were measured during regularly scheduled 6-month…

Jones, Danson; Macias, Rosemarie Lillianne; Gold, Paul B.; Barreira, Paul; Fisher, William

2008-01-01

367

Adherence and mental side effects during hepatitis C treatment with interferon alfa and ribavirin in psychiatric risk groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychiatric disorders or drug addiction are often regarded as contraindications against the use of interferon alfa (IFN-?) in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Our aim was to obtain prospective data on adherence to as well as efficacy and mental side effects of treatment with IFN-? in different psychiatric risk groups compared with controls. In a prospective trial, 81 patients with

Martin Schaefer; Folkhard Schmidt; Christian Folwaczny; Reinhard Lorenz; Gaby Martin; Norbert Schindlbeck; Walter Heldwein; Michael Soyka; Heinz Grunze; August Koenig; Klaus Loeschke

2003-01-01

368

Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders: Phenomenologically Based Diagnosis in Patients Who Abuse Alcohol or Drugs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders (PRISM) is a psychiatric diagnostic Inter- view designed to diagnose DSM-IV substance and mental disorders in patients who abuse alcohol or drugs. Primary disorders tested In the DSM-III-R version of the interview showed improved reliability over existing instruments, and substantially improved reliability for major depressive dis- order (MOD). Developments for DSM-IV

Deborah Hasin; Kristin Trautman; Jean Endicott

1998-01-01

369

Towards Horizon 2020: challenges and advances for clinical mental health research – outcome of an expert survey  

PubMed Central

Background The size and increasing burden of disease due to mental disorders in Europe poses substantial challenges to its population and to the health policy of the European Union. This warrants a specific research agenda concerning clinical mental health research as one of the cornerstones of sustainable mental health research and health policy in Europe. The aim of this research was to identify the top priorities needed to address the main challenges in clinical research for mental disorders. Methods The research was conducted as an expert survey and expert panel discussion during a scientific workshop. Results Eighty-nine experts in clinical research and representing most European countries participated in this survey. Identified top priorities were the need for new intervention studies, understanding the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of mechanisms of disease, and research in the field of somatic-psychiatric comorbidity. The “subjectivity gap” between basic neuroscience research and clinical reality for patients with mental disorders is considered the main challenge in psychiatric research, suggesting that a shift in research paradigms is required. Conclusion Innovations in clinical mental health research should bridge the gap between mechanisms underlying novel therapeutic interventions and the patient experience of mental disorder and, if present, somatic comorbidity. Clinical mental health research is relatively underfunded and should receive specific attention in Horizon 2020 funding programs. PMID:25061300

van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; van Os, Jim; Knappe, Susanne; Schumann, Gunter; Vieta, Eduard; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lewis, Shôn W; Elfeddali, Iman; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Linszen, Donald; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Haro, Josep Maria

2014-01-01

370

Mental health priorities in Vietnam: a mixed-methods analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Mental Health Country Profile is a tool that was generated by the International Mental Health Policy and Services Project to inform policy makers, professionals and other key stakeholders about important issues which need to be considered in mental health policy development. The Mental Health Country Profile contains four domains, which include the mental health context, resources, provision and

Maria Niemi; Huong T Thanh; Tran Tuan; Torkel Falkenberg

2010-01-01

371

Global mental health: from science to action.  

PubMed

This article charts the historical development of the discipline of global mental health, whose goal is to improve access to mental health care and reduce inequalities in mental health outcomes between and within nations. The article begins with an overview of the contribution of four scientific foundations toward the discipline's core agenda: to scale up services for people with mental disorders and to promote their human rights. Next, the article highlights four recent, key events that are indicative of the actions shaping the discipline: the Mental Health Gap Action Programme to synthesize evidence on what treatments are effective for a range of mental disorders; the evidence on task shifting to nonspecialist health workers to deliver these treatments; the Movement for Global Mental Health's efforts to build a common platform for professionals and civil society to advocate for their shared goal; and the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health, which has identified the research priorities that, within the next decade, can lead to substantial improvements in the lives of people living with mental disorders. The article ends by examining the major challenges for the field, and the opportunities for addressing them in the future. PMID:22335178

Patel, Vikram

2012-01-01

372

The impact of racism on the delivery of health care and mental health services.  

PubMed

This article presents research findings useful in formulating a Best Practices Model for the delivery of mental health services to underserved minority populations. Aspects of the role of racism in health care delivery and public health planning are explored. An argument is made for inclusion of the legacy of the slavery experience and the history of racism in America in understanding the current health care crisis in the African-American population. The development of an outline in APA DSM IV for the use of cultural formulations in psychiatric diagnosis is discussed. PMID:11525081

Hollar, M C

2001-01-01

373

Mental Health: The Search for a Definition  

PubMed Central

Various attempts to define the concept of “mental health” are examined. Value judgments permeate much mental health literature. Their use militates against obtaining an objective definition, capable of universal application. The acceptance of a definition including a value judgment implies taking an attitude toward a particular society and its social ideals. Present limits of competence only allow us to describe “mental health” conceptually. Such “untechnical” proposals are liable to be confused with “technical” (“scientific”) propositions. Multiple criteria are likely to be helpful in improving our concept of “mental health”. The intrusion of morals into the world of health is discussed as part of the contemporary intellectual dilemma of determined human behaviour versus human responsibility and the reality of moral values. It is suggested that “mental health” might consist simply of an individual's possession of insight into his own personality, combined with an honest recognition and acceptance of his condition. PMID:14145470

Tucker, D. K.; le Riche, W. Harding

1964-01-01

374

Psychiatric disorders in adopted children: a profile from the Ontario Child Health Study.  

PubMed

Studies of clinical populations suggest that adopted children are overrepresented among children using mental health facilities, whereas studies using non clinical populations of adopted children have reached mixed conclusions about whether or not there is an increased psychological risk associated with adoption. Data from the Ontario Child Health Study, a community survey of children aged four to 16 years, which included a subpopulation of adopted children, were used to: 1. profile the characteristics of adoptive families; 2. examine the strength of adoptive status as a marker for psychiatric and educational morbidity; and 3. determine the extent to which adoptive status has an independent relationship with psychiatric and educational morbidities. The findings were: 1. adoptive mothers were significantly older than non adoptive mothers, but otherwise adoptive families did not differ significantly from non adoptive families, 2. adoption in boys, but not in girls, was a significant marker for psychiatric disorder and poor school performance; adoption in adolescent girls was a significant marker for substance use; and 3. multivariate analyses demonstrated no independent effect of adoption on psychiatric disorder or poor school performance; for adolescents, adoptive status did have an independent relationship with substance use for girls. The implications of these findings will be discussed. PMID:1477821

Lipman, E L; Offord, D R; Racine, Y A; Boyle, M H

1992-11-01

375

Occupational Mental Health: A Study of Work-Related Mental Health among Clinical Nurses  

PubMed Central

Objective: This paper reports a study performed to investigate and assess the mental health as well as the demographic characteristics of nurses to examine their mental health status based on four physical, anxiety, social-function and depression items. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was accomplished on 86 nurses working at three hospitals, affiliated to Iranian health ministry, in Ilam city(western Iran) all the cases were selected by purposeful sampling method. Data was collected by a two-part questionnaire containing individual data and GHQ -28 Standardized Questionnaire. The GHO-28 was developed by Goldberg, in 1978, as a screening tool to detect those likely to have or be at risk of developing psychiatric disorders. The GHQ-28 is a 28-item measure of emotional distress in medical settings. Analysis was done by SPSS 18 software. Results: The majority of participants were females(50.6 vs.49.4) of 35-40 years old(27.2% ), 84 percent were married(vs.16%), 35.8 percent with 10-15 years of record(vs.33.3% less than 5), 22.2% with 5-10, and 8.6% with more than 15-years of work record. The majority of participants have worked in surgical wards of hospitals. The analysis of GHQ results showed that 43.2%(n=35) of participants were suspected to suffer from mental disorders(vs.56.8% n=46 healthy participants); of all the suspected cases, 12.3% were supposed to have physical symptoms, 16% anxiety symptoms, 42% social dysfunction, and 6.2% symptoms of depression. In general, the participants demonstrated a Mean±SD of mental health score equal to 23.65±9.43. Conclusion: Research results showed that the high prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among nurses is alarming. It was concluded that providing efficient adequate and appropriate support services for this group can result in more healthy nurses as well as promotion of public health. PMID:25386506

Taghinejad, Hamid; Kikhavani, Sattar; Jaafarpour, Molouk; Azadi, Arman

2014-01-01

376

Disclosure of domestic violence in mental health settings: a qualitative meta-synthesis.  

PubMed

Little is known about how psychiatric services respond to service users' experiences of domestic violence. This qualitative meta-synthesis examined the healthcare experiences and expectations of mental health service users experiencing domestic violence. Twenty-two biomedical, social science, grey literature databases and websites were searched, supplemented by citation tracking and expert recommendations. Qualitative studies which included mental health service users (aged ? 16 years) with experiences of domestic violence were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently extracted data from included papers and assessed quality. Findings from primary studies were combined using meta-synthesis techniques. Twelve studies provided data on 140 female and four male mental health service users. Themes were generally consistent across studies. Overarching theoretical constructs included the role of professionals in identifying domestic violence and facilitating disclosures, implementing personalized care and referring appropriately. Mental health services often failed to identify and facilitate disclosures of domestic violence, and to develop responses that prioritized service users' safety. Mental health services were reported to give little consideration to the role of domestic violence in precipitating or exacerbating mental illness and the dominance of the biomedical model and stigma of mental illness were found to inhibit effective responses. Mental health services often fail to adequately address the violence experienced by mental health service users. This meta-synthesis highlights the need for mental health services to establish appropriate strategies and responses to domestic violence to ensure optimal care of this vulnerable population. PMID:25137109

Trevillion, Kylee; Hughes, Bryony; Feder, Gene; Borschmann, Rohan; Oram, Siân; Howard, Louise M

2014-08-01

377

Disclosure of domestic violence in mental health settings: A qualitative meta-synthesis  

PubMed Central

Little is known about how psychiatric services respond to service users’ experiences of domestic violence. This qualitative meta-synthesis examined the healthcare experiences and expectations of mental health service users experiencing domestic violence. Twenty-two biomedical, social science, grey literature databases and websites were searched, supplemented by citation tracking and expert recommendations. Qualitative studies which included mental health service users (aged ? 16 years) with experiences of domestic violence were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently extracted data from included papers and assessed quality. Findings from primary studies were combined using meta-synthesis techniques. Twelve studies provided data on 140 female and four male mental health service users. Themes were generally consistent across studies. Overarching theoretical constructs included the role of professionals in identifying domestic violence and facilitating disclosures, implementing personalized care and referring appropriately. Mental health services often failed to identify and facilitate disclosures of domestic violence, and to develop responses that prioritized service users’ safety. Mental health services were reported to give little consideration to the role of domestic violence in precipitating or exacerbating mental illness and the dominance of the biomedical model and stigma of mental illness were found to inhibit effective responses. Mental health services often fail to adequately address the violence experienced by mental health service users. This meta-synthesis highlights the need for mental health services to establish appropriate strategies and responses to domestic violence to ensure optimal care of this vulnerable population. PMID:25137109

Trevillion, Kylee; Hughes, Bryony; Feder, Gene; Borschmann, Rohan; Oram, Sian

2014-01-01

378

Mental health of female foreign spouses in transnational marriages in southern Taiwan  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to investigate the mental health status, and the risk factors associated with mild psychiatric disorders, of female foreign spouses (from Vietnam, Indonesia, and mainland China) in southern Taiwan, and to understand the mental health needs of these women. Methods One hundred and twenty nine participants were willing to participate in this study. All participants fulfilled all questionnaires which included demographic information, the Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ), the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), and the Mental Health Care Needs Questionnaire (MHCNQ). Results By multiple linear regression, neuroticism characteristics (p = 0.000), the dimension of knowledge of the level of their own psychological disturbance (p = 0.001), dimension of friends assistance (p = 0.033), and dimension of religion comfort (p = 0.041) in mental health care needs could be used to predict possible mild psychiatric disorders. Furthermore, SEM model showed that Indonesian or Vietnamese spouses have more likely degree in mental health care needs (? = -0.24, p = 0.003), compared with Chinese ones. A higher level of neuroticism was associated with a greater likelihood of mild psychiatric disorder (? = 0.54, p < 0.001), and of mental health care needs (? = 0.21, p = 0.013). A higher degree of mental health care needs was related to a greater likelihood of mild psychiatric disorder (? = 0.14, p = 0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, we have obtained a better understanding of the mental health status of female foreign spouses in transnational marriages, who face many difficulties. Indonesian or Vietnamese spouses tend to more likely degree in mental health care needs than Chinese spouses, and then indirectly influenced their mental health status. Some individuals with a neurotic personality are exposed to high risk and might suffer from mild psychiatric symptoms. The needs for psychological counseling and religion therapy were the first priority for these women, particularly the Indonesian and Vietnamese spouses. From these findings, we have a better understanding of how to assist these female foreign spouses in future. PMID:21208454

2011-01-01

379

Mental Health and Work: Issues and Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Australia, there is increasing attention being paid to the promotion of mental health and the prevention of serious mental disorder by policymakers, funders, academics and service providers. This has required a shift in thinking to focus on health and well being, not just on illness and treatment. The National Action Plan for Promotion,…

Morrow, Lou, Ed.; Verins, Irene, Ed.; Willis, Eileen, Ed.

380

Segmenting the mental health care market.  

PubMed

The authors report the results of a segmentation study of the mental health care market. A random sample of 387 residents of a western city were interviewed by telephone. Cluster analysis of the data identified six market segments. Each is described according to the mental health care services to which it is most sensitive. Implications for targeting the segments are discussed. PMID:10104017

Stone, T R; Warren, W E; Stevens, R E

1990-03-01

381

The Elementary Mental Health Operations Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the results of a study that investigated the effectiveness of four Elementary Mental Health Operations (ELMHO) programs in Pinellas County, Florida. ELMHO programs were designed to provide school-based mental health services to children and their families to help elementary students with emotional disabilities learn to cope…

Struchen, Wendy L.; Hall, Judy

382

Mental health in the aftermath of conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors survey the recent literature on the mental health effects of conflict. They highlight the methodological challenges faced in this literature, which include the lack of validated mental health scales in a survey context, the difficulties in measuring individual exposure to conflict, and the issues related to making causal inferences from observed correlations. They illustrate how some of these

Lakshmi Iyer

2009-01-01

383

College Mental Health at the Cutting Edge?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As someone who has been involved in college mental health in three different roles, the author would say those who work in this field inhabit a strange space. College mental health centers are generally seen as somewhat peripheral to the core mission of universities by upper administration. Counseling centers do not reside within academic…

Schwartz, Victor

2013-01-01

384

Minority Status, Aging, and Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews findings on mental health and life satisfaction among aged blacks, Mexican Americans, and Native Americans. Mental health and life satisfaction of these groups was no lower than might be anticipated based on their relative socioeconomic standing. Little is known about how ethnicity and minority group status influence psychopathology and…

Markides, Kyriakos S.

1986-01-01

385

Migrant Farmworker Stress: Mental Health Implications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: The number of Latinos in rural regions of the United States is increasing. Little is known about factors that undermine the mental health of this segment of the rural population. Purpose: The goal of this study is to determine which stressors inherent in farmwork and the farmworker lifestyle contribute to poor mental health. Methods: An…

Hiott, Ann E.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Davis, Stephen W.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

2008-01-01

386

Children's Mental Health and School Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An integrative review of literature was undertaken to examine the impact of children's mental health on their school success. The literature confirmed a confluence of problems associated with school performance and child and adolescent mental health. Poor academic functioning and inconsistent school attendance were identified as early signs of…

DeSocio, Janiece; Hootman, Janis

2004-01-01

387

Student Mental Health: Reframing the "Problem"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author contends that to understand the concern over student mental health, one must first consider what students are reporting about themselves. Students with mental health issues are intellectually capable; rising numbers of accepted students with diagnosed psychological conditions confirm this. However, many conditions…

Bertram, Margaret

2010-01-01

388

Yale College Council Committee on Mental Health  

E-print Network

Yale College Council Committee on Mental Health Revised January 2014 Mental Health Reference Sheet therapies conducted by supervised Yale clinical psychology graduate students. Call for a 20 minute phone screen, before a longer intake appointment and assignment to a therapist. Yale Stress Center (Click Here

389

Qualitative Research Methods in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the evidence base for the study of mental health problems develops, there is a need for increasingly rigorous and systematic research methodologies. Complex questions require complex methodological approaches. Recognising this, the MRC guidelines for developing and testing complex interventions place qualitative methods as integral to each stage of intervention development and implementation. However, mental health research has lagged behind

Sarah Peters

2010-01-01

390

Funding Early Childhood Mental Health Services & Supports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is the first of a two-part series on financing early childhood mental health services. It discusses the need for a systemic approach to financing early childhood mental health services and supports and presents a matrix to assist states and communities in the design of comprehensive financing systems. The vertical axis of the matrix…

Wishmann, Amy; Kates, Donald; Kaufmann, Roxane

391

Advance Directives for Mental Health Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advance directives are designed to establish a person's preferences for treatment if the person becomes incompetent in the future or unable to communicate those preferences to treatment providers. Mental health advance directives are similar to the more commonly used directives for end-of-life medical decisions. A patient must be competent to execute a mental health advance directive, and the directive must

Debra S. Srebnik; John Q. La Fond

392

Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

2012-01-01

393

School Mental Health: Politics, Power and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress has been made in the implementation of school mental health promotion, but there are some underlying issues that need to be recognised and addressed to ensure that the outcomes of current endeavours are maximised. These issues are politics, power and practice, and they reflect the different concerns and perspectives of some of the stakeholders, politicians, the media, mental health

Louise Rowling

2008-01-01

394

Unemployment Impairs Mental Health: Meta-Analyses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effect of unemployment on mental health was examined with meta-analytic methods across 237 cross-sectional and 87 longitudinal studies. The average overall effect size was d = 0.51 with unemployed persons showing more distress than employed persons. A significant difference was found for several indicator variables of mental health (mixed…

Paul, Karsten I.; Moser, Klaus

2009-01-01

395

Women's mental health in Pakistan  

PubMed Central

In Pakistan, societal attitudes and norms, as well as cultural practices (Karo Kari, exchange marriages, dowry, etc.), play a vital role in women's mental health. The religious and ethnic conflicts, along with the dehumanizing attitudes towards women, the extended family system, role of in-laws in daily lives of women, represent major issues and stressors. Such practices in Pakistan have created the extreme marginalisation of women in numerous spheres of life, which has had an adverse psychological impact. Violence against women has become one of the acceptable means whereby men exercise their culturally constructed right to control women. Still, compared to other South Asian countries, Pakistani women are relatively better off than their counterparts. PMID:16633458

Niaz, Unaiza

2004-01-01

396

Issues in mental health care benefits: the costs of mental health parity.  

PubMed

This Issue Brief discusses issues in mental health care benefits. It describes the current state of employment-based mental health benefits and discusses studies and issues regarding full mental health parity. It also includes an analysis of the effect of full mental parity on the uninsured population and the effects of the limited mental health parity provision contained in the VA-HUD appropriations bill. The final section discusses the implications of mental health parity for health plans and health insurers. When employers began to provide health insurance benefits to their employees and their families, they extended coverage to include mental health benefits under the same terms as other health care services. Many employers continued to add mental health benefits through the 1970s and early 1980s until cost pressures required employers to re-examine all health care benefits that were offered. They quickly found that, while only a small proportion of the beneficiaries used mental health care services, the costs associated with this care were very high. As a result, employers placed limits on mental health benefits in an attempt to make the insurance risk more manageable. The general strategies employers have used to manage their health care costs are cost sharing, utilization review, managed care, and the packaging of provider services. Employers' cost management strategies may be restricted, however. Five states have mental health parity laws, but three of the states--Rhode Island, Maine, and New Hampshire--apply these laws only to the seriously mentally ill. In addition, 31 states mandate that mental health benefits be provided. However, state mandates apply only to insured plans, not to self-insured employer plans, which are exempt from state regulation of health plans under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). A number of recent studies have examined the effect of mental health parity on health insurance premiums in a "typical" preferred provider organization and on the uninsured. In general, the studies concluded that mental health parity could increase health insurance premiums, decrease health insurance coverage for non-mental health related illnesses, and increase the number of uninsured individuals. All studies of mental health parity, and mandated benefits in general, assume that there is a strong likelihood that increased health benefit costs would be passed along to workers in the form of higher cost sharing for health insurance, lower wage growth, or lower growth in other employee benefits. PMID:10164993

Fronstin, P

1997-02-01

397

Management of Frontotemporal Dementia in Mental Health and Multidisciplinary Settings  

PubMed Central

Diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in the mental health setting and issues pertaining to longitudinal care of this population in a specialty clinic are reviewed. FTD is often misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder, most commonly as a mood disorder. FTD has features that overlap with those of major depression, mania, obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. We describe these features and how to differentiate FTD from these psychiatric disorders. This paper also describes practical issues in the management of FTD, specifically the issues that clinicians, patients and their families face in managing this disease. Areas of clinical care along the continuum are explored; FTD care involves collaborative management of symptoms and disability, and assisting patients and families in adapting to the disease. PMID:23611352

Wylie, Mary Anne; Shnall, Adriana; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Huey, Edward D.

2014-01-01

398

Addressing disparities in mental health agencies: Strategies to implement the national clas standards in mental health.  

PubMed

Historically, the mental health system has not effectively addressed the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse individuals (President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, 2003), which has contributed to significant racial and ethnic disparities in mental health care (USDHHS, 2001). This paper focuses on exploring how a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Minority Health policy initiative, the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and Health Care (or the National CLAS Standards), may be used by mental health agencies to reduce mental health care disparities. The National CLAS Standards are a set of action steps that inform and facilitate the implementation of culturally and linguistically appropriate services. We first discuss the role of cultural and linguistic competency in mental health care disparities reduction efforts, and then describe specific strategies to facilitate the organizational implementation of the National CLAS Standards. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25383992

Barksdale, Crystal L; Kenyon, Jennifer; Graves, Darci L; Jacobs, C Godfrey

2014-11-01

399

Minor depression during adolescence and mental health outcomes during adulthood  

PubMed Central

Data from a community-based prospective longitudinal study were used to investigate the association of minor depressive disorder during adolescence with adverse mental health outcomes during adulthood. Structured diagnostic interviews were administered to a community-based sample of 755 individuals during adolescence and adulthood. Results indicated that minor depressive disorder during adolescence was associated with elevated risk for subsequent psychiatric disorders during adulthood, including major depressive disorder, ?1 disruptive disorders and clinically relevant impairment after corresponding and co-occurring disorders were controlled statistically. PMID:19721119

Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Patricia; Kasen, Stephanie

2009-01-01

400

Managed Mental Health Care: Intentional Misdiagnosis of Mental Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors provide an overview of the effectiveness of managed health care systems and their impact on mental health counselors. They review ethical and legal dilemmas involving informed consent, confidentiality, client autonomy, competence, treatment plans, and termination that had not existed prior to the introduction of…

Braun, Sharon A.; Cox, Jane A.

2005-01-01

401

Mental health policy in Eastern Europe: a comparative analysis of seven mental health systems  

PubMed Central

Background The objective of this international comparative study is to describe and compare the mental health policies in seven countries of Eastern Europe that share their common communist history: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. Methods The health policy questionnaire was developed and the country-specific information was gathered by local experts. The questionnaire includes both qualitative and quantitative information on various aspects of mental health policy: (1) basic country information (demography, health, and economic indicators), (2) health care financing, (3) mental health services (capacities and utilisation, ownership), (4) health service purchasing (purchasing organisations, contracting, reimbursement of services), and (5) mental health policy (policy documents, legislation, civic society). Results The social and economic transition in the 1990s initiated the process of new mental health policy formulation, adoption of mental health legislation stressing human rights of patients, and a strong call for a pragmatic balance of community and hospital services. In contrast to the development in the Western Europe, the civic society was suppressed and NGOs and similar organizations were practically non-existent or under governmental control. Mental health services are financed from the public health insurance as any other health services. There is no separate budget for mental health. We can observe that the know-how about modern mental health care and about direction of needed reforms is available in documents, policies and programmes. However, this does not mean real implementation. Conclusions The burden of totalitarian history still influences many areas of social and economic life, which also has to be taken into account in mental health policy. We may observe that after twenty years of health reforms and reforms of health reforms, the transition of the mental health systems still continues. In spite of many reform efforts in the past, a balance of community and hospital mental health services has not been achieved in this part of the world yet. PMID:24467832

2014-01-01

402

Page 1 of 2 Mental Health Services Provider Information  

E-print Network

medicine, psychologist offering psychological services and nurses who provide mental health services to patients." · Mental Health Services are defined as "assessment, diagnosis, treatment or counseling, conditions or disorders." · Positions that may qualify as Mental Health Service Providers include

Lichtarge, Olivier

403

42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

2013-10-01

404

Master of Education Degree Program Clinical Mental Health Counseling  

E-print Network

Master of Education Degree Program Clinical Mental Health Counseling information about field experiences in the clinical mental health counseling program students develop requisite counseling skills and direct knowledge of mental health

Duchowski, Andrew T.

405

42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

2012-10-01

406

42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

2011-10-01

407

[Mental retardation and sexual abuse. 65 mentally retarded men submitted to forensic psychiatric examination because of sex offences].  

PubMed

65 mentally impaired men charged with different sexual crimes were submitted to judicial psychiatric examination. 37% of these men had previously stayed in institutions for the mentally impaired, two thirds had worked for a period. Half of the charged men were functionally retarded and the rest were assessed as functioning at an even lower level. Approximately every third man suffered from serious behavioural symptoms and personality disturbances. Most of the abuse was towards acquaintances or persons in the local environment. Almost half of the men used violence in connection with the abuse. Two thirds of the victims were under the age of 16 years. About half of the men were charged with sexual abuse of minors, and a few with rape. The majority were charged, and almost half were placed under preventive detention. PMID:8322353

Noreik, K; Grünfeld, B

1993-06-20

408

Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

2010-01-01

409

Racial/ethnic disparities in children's emergency mental health after economic downturns.  

PubMed

African American children-more than other race/ethnicities-rely on emergency psychiatric care. One hypothesized cause of this overrepresentation involves heightened sensitivity to economic downturns. We test whether the African American/white difference in psychiatric emergency visits increases in months when the regional economy contracts. We applied time-series methods to California Medicaid claims (1999-2008; N = 7.1 million visits). One month following mass layoffs, African American youths use more emergency mental health services than do non-Hispanic whites. Economic downturns may provoke or uncover mental disorder especially among African American youth who by and large do not participate in the labor force. PMID:23397232

Bruckner, Tim; Kim, Yonsu; Snowden, Lonnie

2014-05-01

410

Does Integrated Behavioral Health Care Reduce Mental Health Disparities for Latinos? Initial Findings  

PubMed Central

Integrated behavioral health care (IBHC) is a model of mental health care service delivery that seeks to reduce stigma and service utilization barriers by embedding mental health professionals into the primary care team. This study explored whether IBHC service referrals, utilization, and outcomes were comparable for Latinos and non-Latino White primary care patients. Data for the current study were collected from 793 consecutive patients (63.8% Latino; M age = 29.02 years [SD = 17.96]; 35.1% under 18 years; 65.3% women; 54.3% uninsured) seen for behavioral health services in 2 primary care clinics during a 10.5 month period. The most common presenting concerns were depression (21.6%), anxiety (18.5%), adjustment disorder (13.0%), and externalizing behavior problems (9.8%). Results revealed that while Latino patients had significantly lower self-reported psychiatric distress, significantly higher clinician-assigned global assessment of functioning scores, and fewer received a psychiatric diagnosis at their initial visit compared to non-Latino White patients, both groups had comparable utilization rates, comparable and clinically significant improvements in symptoms (Cohen’s d values > .50), and expressed high satisfaction with integrated behavioral services. These data provide preliminary evidence suggesting integration of behavioral health services into primary care clinics may help reduce mental health disparities for Latinos. PMID:25309845

Bridges, Ana J.; Andrews, Arthur R.; Villalobos, Bianca T.; Pastrana, Freddie A.; Cavell, Timothy A.; Gomez, Debbie

2014-01-01

411

[Toward further reform of mental health care and welfare].  

PubMed

The Committee for Investigating the Future of Mental Health Care and Welfare, launched in 2008 by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, issued its final report in September 2009. The 2009 report was an expert-driven interim review of implementation of the 10-year plan proposed in the 2004 "Vision for Reforming Mental Health Care and Welfare," which marked its midpoint in 2009, and was conducted in order to identify priority issues in the final five years of the plan. The report recognizes that "mental illness significantly impairs quality of life and causes great socioeconomic loss"; that "health care and welfare assistance systems that support the ability of people with mental disorders to live in the community are inadequate"; and that "large numbers of patients with schizophrenia remain institutionalized over the long term. The report notes that this is due to previous policies that promoted institutionalized care, with regard to which concerned parties, including government entities, have expressed regret." The new approach described in the report can be summarized as (1) promoting the basic principle of moving from institutionalized care toward community-based care, based on the vision for reform noted above; (2) creating a society where patients who have mental disorders can receive high-quality health care, and depending on the patients' symptoms and wishes where they can receive appropriate health care and welfare services while continuing to live independently and securely in the community; and (3) speeding up the process of reform in mental health care and welfare. The core focus of reform is expressed in four fundamental principles: (1) restructuring mental health care (restructuring and improving the healthcare system by upgrading community-centered healthcare, shifting the focus of hospital care to the acute stage, and similar efforts) ; (2) improving the quality of mental health care (improving the quality of health care provided to each individual patient, whether it involves pharmacological or psychosocial therapy, and also improving the quality of health care by promoting staff development) ; (3) strengthening community living support systems (developing welfare services that support the ability of persons with disabilities to live in the community, improving care management, improving emergency and community health services, securing places of residence, etc.) ; and (4) prioritizing increased awareness and understanding of psychiatric illness (promoting an accurate understanding of mental disorders so that patients can obtain help at an early stage, and so that people with mental disorders can live as fully-participating members of the community). The committee also reviewed the targets stated in the vision for reform, and established a new maximum limit of 150,000 patients institutionalized with schizophrenia (the number was 196,000 in 2005). By 2011, the committee will also set a concrete target for the number of patients institutionalized with dementia. Preserving the 2004 goals expressed under the vision for reform, the mean target ratio of patients remaining hospitalized in psychiatric wards less than one year, for all prefectures, was set at 24% or less, while the target discharge rate for patients hospitalized for one year or longer, for each prefecture, was fixed at a minimum of 29%. PMID:21706855

Higuchi, Teruhiko

2011-01-01

412

A Multisite Study of the Prevalence of HIV With Rapid Testing in Mental Health Settings.  

PubMed

Objectives. We estimated HIV prevalence and risk factors among persons receiving mental health treatment in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Baltimore, Maryland, January 2009 to August 2011. Methods. We used a multisite, cross-sectional design stratified by clinical setting. We tested 1061 individuals for HIV in university-based inpatient psychiatric units (n?=?287), intensive case-management programs (n?=?273), and community mental health centers (n?=?501). Results. Fifty-one individuals (4.8%) were HIV-infected. Confirmed positive HIV tests were 5.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]?=?3.7%, 9.4%) for inpatient units, 5.1% (95% CI?=?3.1%, 8.5%) for intensive case-management programs, and 4.0% (95% CI?=?2.6%, 6.1%) for community mental health centers. Characteristics associated with HIV included Black race, homosexual or bisexual identity, and HCV infection. Conclusions. HIV prevalence for individuals receiving mental health services was about 4 times as high as in the general population. We found a positive association between psychiatric symptom severity and HIV infection, indicating that engaging persons with mental illness in appropriate mental health treatment may be important to HIV prevention. These findings reinforce recommendations for routine HIV testing in all clinical settings to ensure that HIV-infected persons receiving mental health services are identified and referred to timely infectious disease care. PMID:24524493

Blank, Michael B; Himelhoch, Seth S; Balaji, Alexandra B; Metzger, David S; Dixon, Lisa B; Rose, Charles E; Oraka, Emeka; Davis-Vogel, Annet; Thompson, William W; Heffelfinger, James D

2014-12-01

413

Stigma and Mental Illness: Investigating Attitudes of Mental Health and Non-Mental-Health Professionals and Trainees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors explored attitudes toward adults with mental illness. Results suggest that mental health trainees and professionals had less stigmatizing attitudes than did non-mental-health trainees and professionals. Professionals receiving supervision had higher mean scores on the Benevolence subscale than did professionals who were not receiving…

Smith, Allison L.; Cashwell, Craig S.

2010-01-01

414

New directions for community mental health centers.  

PubMed

Community Mental Health Centers and other quasi-public authorities are operating within a larger health market characterized by the rapid unfolding of a number of key trends in consumer behavior, provider supply, and financing. Each of these trends, though not readily apparent, is strongly reflected in the specialty mental health sector. Mental health managers are faced with fundamental choices about the direction of their respective organizations and the adequacy of their resources to proceed. Mr. Kipp outlines the market dynamics at issue, describes three basic alternatives, and offers some guidelines for management in charting a course. PMID:10287206

Kipp, M F

1987-01-01

415

Mental Health Screenings in Juvenile Detention Centers: Predictors of Mental Health Service Utilization and Recidivism  

E-print Network

Mental Health Screenings in Juvenile Detention Centers: Predictors of Mental Health Service Utilization and Recidivism Laura M. White1 , Matthew C. Aalsma1 1 Department of Pediatrics, Section meet criteria for mental illness. Unfortunately, the juvenile justice system does not consistently

Zhou, Yaoqi

416

Arab culture and mental health care.  

PubMed

This selective review describes recent literature and the author's experience with mental illness and mental health care, and the impact of cultural transformation on mental health in some Arab Islamic cultures, particularly in Egypt, Qatar and Kuwait. Traditional extended Arab families provide a structure for their members that may sometimes prevent and or compensate for the effects of parental loss and mental disability. The role of traditional families in the care of members and in medical decision-making is discussed. The impact of cultural change on Arab culture is also examined, as is the effect of intergenerational conflict in traditional families. PMID:19091731

Fakhr El-Islam, M

2008-12-01

417

Marxism, social psychology, and the sociology of mental health.  

PubMed

The political activism of the 1960s brought with it activism in the mental health field, broadly defined as antipsychiatry. Included in this social phenomenon are R.D. Laing and his colleagues, mental patients' rights activists, movements against psycho-technological abuses such as psychosurgery, Marxist and radical critiques of mainstream psychiatric practices, and feminist therapy. Some aspects of this broad movement have been influenced or even directed by Marxist perspectives. When Marxist influences have not predominated, antipsychiatric points of view still have much affinity with Marxism. This broad-based criticism of mental health practices and ideologies not only influences the mental health field, but also affects general Marxist social theory, adding to traditional Marxism a concern with feminist issues and the politics of personal and family life. This article explores the progress made by these antipsychiatric perspectives, and examines their limitations as well. Four schools of thought in Marxist psychology--Freudo-Marxism, orthodox-economist Marxism, see Marxist medical model, and "ideology-critique"--are explored to see how they can contribute to the further production of Marxist psychological theory and practice. PMID:6735539

Brown, P

1984-01-01

418

Reducing Disparities in Mental Health Care: Suggestions from the Dartmouth–Howard Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents recent collaborative efforts between the Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center and Howard University\\u000a to understand (and ultimately reduce) disparities in mental health care among African Americans. Researchers from Dartmouth\\u000a and Howard recently formalized a longstanding collaboration through the support of a grant aimed at understanding recovery\\u000a and rehabilitation for African Americans with severe mental illness. Grant-sponsored efforts have

Elizabeth Carpenter-Song; Rob Whitley; William Lawson; Ernest Quimby; Robert E. Drake

2011-01-01

419

The Prevalence and Incidence of Mental Ill-Health in Adults with Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: While there is considerable literature on adults with Down syndrome who have dementia, there is little published on the epidemiology of other types of mental ill-health in this population. Method: Longitudinal cohort study of adults with Down syndrome who received detailed psychiatric assessment (n = 186 at the first time point; n =…

Mantry, D.; Cooper, S. -A.; Smiley, E.; Morrison, J.; Allan, L.; Williamson, A.; Finlayson, J.; Jackson, A.

2008-01-01

420

International employment and children: Geographical mobility and mental health among children of professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The literature concerning geographical mobility, psychiatric disturbances and mental health among children of professional and executive level migrants is reviewed. Most studies were found to be conceptually and methodologically flawed, tending to find whatever they set out to look for. Various problems that might be experienced by geographically mobile children, both in the short and the long term are reviewed.

Mary Haour-Knipe

1989-01-01

421

An Investigation into the Length of Hospital Stay for Deaf Mental Health Service Users  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study looked at the average length of hospital stay for inpatients in a specialist deaf mental health service over a 10-year period, in comparison to that of a general psychiatric hearing cohort. In addition, two case studies of deaf inpatients were carried out looking specifically at the prerequisite factors governing discharge. Finally, a…

Baines, Di; Patterson, Neil; Austen, Sally

2010-01-01

422

Youth Characteristics Associated with Intensity of Service Use in a School-Based Mental Health Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several epidemiological studies have reported that large numbers of children and adolescents suffer from diagnosable psychiatric conditions, however most of them do not receive treatment. The schools are a key setting where youth with mental health problems are identified and linked to treatment. In this study we examine the demographic and…

Burnett-Zeigler, Inger; Lyons, John S.

2012-01-01

423

Black Women And Sickle Cell Disease: Implications For Mental Health Disparities Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative study sought to center the personal experiences of Black American women affected by Sickle Cell disease (SCD) within the broader policy discussion of mental health disparities. Previous research suggests that stress may serve as a trigger for painful episodes which may contribute to increased rates of psychiatric morbidity in this population. The sample consisted of 10 women who

Portia L. Cole

424

Parent Perspectives on Community Mental Health Services for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The community mental health (CMH) system provides treatment for behavioral and psychiatric problems in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Although parent stakeholder perspectives are important to improving care, these perspectives have not been systematically examined for this population in the CMH sector. Twenty-one semi-structured…

Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Baker-Ericzen, Mary; Stadnick, Nicole; Taylor, Robin

2012-01-01

425

Knowledge and Attitude regarding Recovery among Mental Health Practitioners in Sweden  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim was to investigate the knowledge and the attitude regarding recovery among practitioners working in the Swedish mental health system, Personligt Ombud (PO), Supported Housing Team (SHT) and Psychiatric Out Patient Service (POPS), to determine whether and how knowledge and attitude regarding recovery differ between the three services. A…

Klockmo, Carolina; Marnetoft, Sven-Uno; Nordenmark, Mikael; Dalin, Rolf

2012-01-01

426

Intellectual Disability and Mental Ill Health: A View of Australian Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This general review situates Australian research within a framework that quantifies and describes mental health needs of the population with intellectual disabilities across the life span, surveys service provision, and develops the evidence base to inform clinicians regarding assessment and management of psychopathology and psychiatric disorder…

Torr, Jennifer

2013-01-01

427

Workplace culture and mental health are interwoven.  

PubMed

Workplace health is a serious issue. Illness and injury take a significant toll on employers, employees and the bottom line. Research has focused primarily on the physical health and injury side of the workplace health equation, with much less attention being paid to the mental health factors that affect employers, employees, families, productivity, efficiency, quality, creativity and innovation. PMID:15829767

Service, John

2004-01-01

428

Promoting and Protecting Mental Health as Flourishing: A Complementary Strategy for Improving National Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes the conception and diagnosis of the mental health continuum, the findings supporting the two continua model of mental health and illness, and the benefits of flourishing to individuals and society. Completely mentally healthy adults—individuals free of a 12-month mental disorder and flourishing—reported the fewest missed days of work, the fewest half-day or greater work cutbacks, the healthiest

Corey L. M. Keyes

2007-01-01

429

Mental Health Service Use by Persons of Asian Ancestry With DSM-IV Mental Disorders in the United States  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study compared the prevalence and odds of mental health service utilization among people of Asian ancestry with lifetime DSM-IV mood, anxiety, alcohol, and drug use disorders with utilization by members of other racial and ethnic groups with similar disorders. Methods Between 2001 and 2002, a total of 43,093 noninstitutionalized individuals were assessed by the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) study of lifetime prevalence of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders and mental health service utilization among various ethnic and racial groups. Results Among individuals with lifetime mood disorders, Asians had significantly lower mental health service utilization compared with whites (odds ratio [OR]=.31, 95% confidence interval [CI]=.21–.46), Hispanics (OR=.49, CI=.33–71), and Native Americans (OR=.27, CI=.15–.48) but similar utilization compared with blacks. There were no statistically significant differences in lifetime mental health service utilization for alcohol and drug use disorders among racial and ethnic groups. Conclusions Asians with lifetime mood disorders underutilized mental health services even after adjustment was made for socioeconomic variables and years of residency in the United States. Future studies of culture-specific attitudes, correlates, and barriers to mental health service utilization are warranted. PMID:21969644

Lee, Su Yeon; Martins, Silvia S.; Keyes, Katherine M.; Lee, Hochang B.

2013-01-01

430

Study protocol for the development of a European measure of best practice for people with long term mental health problems in institutional care (DEMoBinc)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This study aims to build a measure for assessing and reviewing the living conditions, care and human rights of people with longer term mental health problems in psychiatric and social care institutions. Protection of their human rights is imperative since impaired mental capacity secondary to mental illness can make them vulnerable to abuse and exploitation from others. They also

Helen Killaspy; Michael King; Christine Wright; Sarah White; Paul McCrone; Thomas Kallert; Jorge Cervilla; Jiri Raboch; Georgi Onchev; Roberto Mezzina; Durk Wiersma; Andrzej Kiejna; Dimitris Ploumpidis; José Miguel Caldas de Almeida

2009-01-01

431

Latent or Manifest Observers: Two Dichotomous Approaches of Surveillance in Mental Health Nursing  

PubMed Central

Background. Surveillance is a central activity among mental health nursing, but it is also questioned for its therapeutic value and considered to be custodial. Aim. The aim of this study was to describe how mental health nurses use different approaches to observe patients in relation to the practice of surveillance in psychiatric nursing care. Methods. In this study, Spradley's twelve-step ethnographic method was used. Results. Mental health nurses use their cultural knowing to observe patients in psychiatric care in various ways. Two dichotomous approaches were identified: the latent and the manifest approach. Discussion. Different strategies and techniques for observing patients are structured along two dichotomies. The underlying relationships between these two different dichotomous positions transform the act of observing into surveillance. This is further developed in a theoretical model called the powerful scheme of observation and surveillance (PSOS). PMID:21994817

Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; Eriksson, Henrik

2011-01-01

432

Latent or manifest observers: two dichotomous approaches of surveillance in mental health nursing.  

PubMed

Background. Surveillance is a central activity among mental health nursing, but it is also questioned for its therapeutic value and considered to be custodial. Aim. The aim of this study was to describe how mental health nurses use different approaches to observe patients in relation to the practice of surveillance in psychiatric nursing care. Methods. In this study, Spradley's twelve-step ethnographic method was used. Results. Mental health nurses use their cultural knowing to observe patients in psychiatric care in various ways. Two dichotomous approaches were identified: the latent and the manifest approach. Discussion. Different strategies and techniques for observing patients are structured along two dichotomies. The underlying relationships between these two different dichotomous positions transform the act of observing into surveillance. This is further developed in a theoretical model called the powerful scheme of observation and surveillance (PSOS). PMID:21994817

Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; Eriksson, Henrik

2011-01-01

433

Mental health epidemiological research in South America: recent findings  

PubMed Central

This paper aims to review the recent mental health epidemiological research conducted in South America. The Latin American and the Caribbean (LILACS) database was searched from 1999 to 2003 using a specific strategy for identification of cohort, case-control and cross-sectional population-based studies in South America. The authors screened references and identified relevant studies. Further studies were obtained contacting local experts in epidemiology. 140 references were identified, and 12 studies were selected. Most selected studies explored the prevalence and risk factors for common mental disorders, and several of them used sophisticated methods of sample selection and analysis. There is a need for improving the quality of psychiatric journals in Latin America, and for increasing the distribution and access to research data. Regionally relevant problems such as violence and substance abuse should be considered in designing future investigations in this area. PMID:16633474

Silva de Lima, Mauricio; Garcia de Oliveira Soares, Bernardo; de Jesus Mari, Jair

2004-01-01

434

How Stigma Interferes with Mental Health Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many people who would benefit from mental health services opt not to pursue them or fail to fully participate once they have begun. One of the reasons for this disconnect is stigma; namely, to avoid the label of mental illness and the harm it brings, people decide not to seek or fully participate in care. Stigma yields 2 kinds of harm that may…

Corrigan, Patrick

2004-01-01

435

Culturally Sensitive Refugee Mental Health Training Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, based on a survey conducted during the summer and fall of 1986, identifies culturally sensitive training programs for professionals, paraprofessionals, and others who provide mental health services to refugees. An introductory section discusses the language, cultural, racial, experiential, and socioeconomic factors of refugee mental

Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Refugees Assistance Program - Mental Health Technical Assistance Center.

436

The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law is the nation's leading legal advocate for the rights of adults and children with mental disabilities. The Center uses a coordinated strategy of federal policy advocacy, legal support for a nationwide network of advocates, and creation of educational materials to help families, professionals,…

Carty, Lee; Burley, Christopher

2004-01-01

437

[The role of families in the Quebec mental health system].  

PubMed

Purpose. This paper aims to summarize the current situation regarding the role of families of persons with mental disorders within the mental health system in Quebec.Methods. We made a research in the most recent and pertinent papers or books regarding: 1) the history of the family involvement in the mental health system in Quebec; 2) the present situation of these families and the models that we can see and 3) identify in recent governmental or research documents recommendations regarding a greater empowerment of the families in the mental health system.Results. The research provides a historical perspective to the roles occupied by families. First the family was described as a causal agent; the work of the psychoanalyst Freud described the family unit as a source of conflicts in the areas of affect and sexual dynamics, and which results in the appearance of psychiatric symptoms. Later, this view of a causal agent came both from the point of view of genetic and from expressed emotions. In the 70's new perspectives such as general systems theory (von Bertalanffy, 1968), described the family as responsive to mental disorder of one of its members rather than a responsible agent. With the deinstitutionalization movement, the family was perceived as a source of solutions for persons with mental illness, but also as persons who can live some burden. This subject became well described and a several studies reported about adverse effects of caring for a person with mental disorder on the health, well-being and feeling of caregiver burden. In the 90's, some government action plans called for the relationship between the family and the health system as a partnership. Also, families want to be involved in decisions about care and to be informed about the diagnosis and treatment options. ( Lefley et Wasow, 1993)A new model developed by FFAPAMM that identifies three main roles enables to contextualize the current role in the current system. This model, called CAP lists and describes three roles of families that, if they are dependent on the past, continue to mingle in our time. These roles are:Accompanist: the role imposed by being near a person with mental illness (Fradet, 2012). As an accompanist, the family needs to establish relationships with health professionals. Accompanists want to be considered by stakeholders and be respected in their desire to share information and participate in decisions.Client: this is the role that derives from the accompanist when the caregiver receives care services for its psychological or physical problems related to the fact support a sick person.Partner: it is relative to the involvement (or not) the role of family members in the organization of care. It is a role of participation and decision-making. In this context, we also speak of participation in the consultation mechanisms.Recommendations from a Quebec research project and a report of the Commission on Mental Health of Canada will consider a future where the needs and aspirations of families will be taken into account in mental health general services, short term health care, community mental health services. There are also some guidelines regarding education for professionals about the needs of families and about changing politics.Conclusion. There exists in all associations of families of person with mental disorders, training on topics such as how to behave towards different mental disorders or aggressiveness near reached. A project of the Douglas Institute has hired a family member to the emergency room to help families better manage this often difficult time and to facilitate communication with stakeholders. Another project called "Learning to come closer without aggression" has helped more than 200 family members undergo training inspired by the Omega approach, which helps them better manage their own behavior in situations of aggression with their loved one. PMID:25120120

Bonin, Jean-Pierre; Chicoine, Gabrielle; Fradet, Hélène; Larue, Caroline; Racine, Hélène; Jacques, Marie-Claude; St-Cyr Tribble, Denise

2014-01-01

438

Attitudes of Mental Health Professionals about Mental Illness: A Review of the Recent Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A large body of research has documented public attitudes toward people with mental illness. The current attitudes of the people who provide services to those with psychiatric disorders are important to understand, as well. The authors review what studies over the past 5 years reveal about the attitudes of psychiatric professionals. Empirical…

Wahl, Otto; Aroesty-Cohen, Eli

2010-01-01

439

The Physical and Mental Health of Children in Foster Care  

PubMed Central

Background To evaluate physical and mental health in children in foster care and comparison with general population. Methods: The study is carried out between September 2011 and April 2012 into nine group homes in Rome. It involved 112 children ranging in age 2–17 years, living in temporary care facilities or institutes. All data came out of clinical history and physical exams, validated by a pediatrician. Such data were being then compared with samples of general population. Results: Significant themes were high percentage of children with psychiatric disorders in foster care (22.3%); high percentage of psychiatric disorders diagnosed immediately while arriving at the foster care (56%); no significant differences in weight, height and BMI between children in foster care and general population; significant differences (P<0.05) for allergy, gastrointestinal diseases and caries between children in foster care and general population. Conclusion: The results suggest that the physical health of children in group homes is no worse than that of children living care in their own homes and that the foster care provides necessary conditions to support the growth of the children and their physical, mental and social needs. PMID:23785675

FERRARA, Pietro; ROMANI, Lorenza; BOTTARO, Giorgia; IANNIELLO, Francesca; FABRIZIO, Giovanna Carmela; CHIARETTI, Antonio; ALVARO, Francesco

2013-01-01

440

Psychological Assessment of Forensic Psychiatric Outpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1960s decrease in long-term residential mental health care resulted in former psychiatric patients being admitted to correctional and forensic psychiatric facilities. Although psychologists face challenges in managing and treating this displaced population, assessment data plays a pivotal role in the determination of appropriate aftercare for the mentally ill parolee. This article discusses the assessment protocol utilized by the Forensic

Ron J. Nieberding; J. Tatum Moore; Anna P. Dematatis

2002-01-01