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Sample records for psychogeriatric nursing home

  1. [Language of caregivers to the elderly in a psychogeriatric nursing home].

    PubMed

    de Wilde, I; de Bot, K

    1989-06-01

    Speech addressed to children is more redundant and less complex than speech directed to adults. To what extent do such 'baby talk' features occur in speech to demented elderly? This study is conducted to obtain descriptive information on the speech environment of institutionalized elderly people. The results show that caregivers use documented features of the simplified register of baby talk in communication with their psychogeriatric patients. PMID:2749867

  2. The meaning of urgency in the allocation of scarce health care resources; a comparison between renal transplantation and psychogeriatric nursing home care.

    PubMed

    Varekamp, I; Meiland, F J; Hoos, A M; Wendte, J F; de Haes, J C; Krol, L J

    1998-05-01

    In the juridical and ethical literature on patient selection criteria it is an unargued premise that those who are most urgently in need of treatment or care will be given priority. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the medical practice of waiting list problems and patient selection at the microlevel, especially with respect to urgency. Thus, the study intends to contribute to the medical ethical discussion on patient selection for scarce resources. The results of qualitative research into the meaning and occurrence of urgency in two health care services, renal transplantation and psychogeriatric nursing home care, are discussed. In the first sector, patients are seldom considered urgent. Criteria for urgency are technical dialysis problems or severe psychological burden due to protracted dialysis treatment. In contrast, psychogeriatric patients are often considered urgent, with the principal criterion being too heavy a care load for informal carers. Both health care services show variation in assigning urgency codes. It appears that the exact meaning of urgency is not self-evident and that admission of urgent patients to nursing homes can be negotiated by professionals or informal carers. This points to the necessity of a discussion within these services as to the actual content matter of urgency. Further, professionals involved in renal transplantation raise several moral and practical arguments against giving patients priority, even if they need treatment urgently. It shows that distributive justice cannot always be applied. Occasionally non-urgent patients are rated urgent as they have been waiting very long due to specific allocation procedures. In these cases urgency is granted in an unexpected way that is ultimately in accordance with the notion of procedural justice. PMID:10180678

  3. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  4. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  5. Psychogeriatric consultation. General Hospital versus home for the aged.

    PubMed

    Lippert, G P; Conn, D; Schogt, B; Ickowicz, A

    1990-09-01

    As more elderly persons are institutionalized in long-term care settings, there will be an increasing need for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C/L) services. An understanding of how patterns of C/L service provision differ in these settings from those in the general hospital is important for efficient use of resources. In this study, certain characteristics of psychiatric consultations for the elderly patients in a general hospital were compared to consultations in a home for the aged. Three groups of 30 patients were examined: patients age 60 and over in a general hospital (GH), patients under age 60 in a general hospital (GHY), and patients in a home for the aged (HA). GH and GHY shared many characteristics, but there were significant differences between HA and GH: Consultations for HA were less likely to be urgent and more likely to be for management. Dementia was diagnosed in 70% of HA versus 27% in GH. Types of interventions were similar in GH and HA except that more psychotherapy was done in HA. In HA more contact was made with allied health professionals, while in GH there was more contact with medical personnel. GH patients were seen more intensively during the first 2 weeks following referral. We conclude that the major part-time attendance of a psychiatrist skilled in both the behavioral management of demented patients and liaison with allied health professionals is likely to be sufficient in long-term care institutions for elderly patients. However, the psychiatrist must also be proficient in the education of the staff of the institution so as to encourage the referral of all those patients who require psychiatric attention. PMID:2210349

  6. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... up like a hospital. The staff provides medical care, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapy. ... relationships with residents. Some nursing homes have special care units for people with serious memory problems such ...

  7. National Nursing Home Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  8. Alternatives to Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this website may not be available. Alternatives to nursing homes Before you make any decisions about long ... live and what help you may need. A nursing home may not be your only choice. Discharge ...

  9. Falls in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for health care providers. Learn More Falls in Nursing Homes Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... 5 Why do falls occur more often in nursing homes? Falling can be a sign of other ...

  10. Nursing staff knowledge and beliefs about pain in elderly nursing home residents with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zwakhalen, Sandra MG; Hamers, Jan PH; Peijnenburg, Rieneke HA; Berger, Martijn PF

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aging is known to be associated with a high prevalence (up to 80%) of persistent pain among residents of nursing homes. However, even with high pain prevalence rates, nursing home residents are at risk for undertreatment. Knowledge deficits and beliefs among nurses influence staff behaviour in pain assessment and management. OBJECTIVES: To develop a psychometrically sound questionnaire and to gather information about knowledge and beliefs of nursing staff regarding various aspects of pain in elderly patients with dementia. In addition, the differences among several categories of nurses (based on educational level and work experience) with respect to beliefs about pain were investigated. METHODS: Participants were 123 staff members of psychogeriatric wards in two nursing homes in the Netherlands (mean of 11.4 years of experience). Their results were compared with those of two groups of nurses, one consisting of 25 registered nurse PhD students in nursing science and the other consisting of 20 trainee pain nurse specialists. RESULTS: The main findings indicate that nursing home staff respondents showed knowledge deficits about several aspects of pain, even though they were satisfied about the way pain was assessed and treated at their wards. Specific knowledge deficits were found regarding pain treatment and medication in elderly nursing home residents. Staff educational level seemed to influence their beliefs and knowledge about pain in elderly nursing home patients. PMID:17717609

  11. Infrastructural arrangements for integrated care: implementing an electronic nursing plan in a psychogeriatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Ellingsen, Gunnar; Munkvold, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The paper contributes to the conceptualisation of “integrated care” in heterogeneous work practices. A dynamic perspective is developed, emphasising how integrated care is malleable, open, and achieved in practice. Furthermore, we explore the role of nursing plans in integrated care practices, underscoring the inherent difficulties of building one common infrastructural system for integrated care. Methods Empirically, we studied the implementation of an electronic nursing plan in a psychiatric ward at the University Hospital of North Norway. We conducted 80 hours of participant observation and 15 interviews. Results While the nursing plan was successful as a formal tool among the nurses, it was of limited use in practice where integrated care was carried out. In some instances, the use of the nursing plan even undermined integrated care. Conclusion Integrated care is not a constant entity, but is much more situated and temporal in character. A new infrastructural system for integrated care should not be envisioned as replacing most of the existing information sources, but rather seen as an extension to the heterogeneous ensemble of existing ones. PMID:17627295

  12. Nursing homes in China.

    PubMed

    Chu, Leung-Wing; Chi, Iris

    2008-05-01

    China will face a dramatic transition from a young to an aged society in the coming 30 to 40 years. In 2000, there were 88,110,000 persons aged 65 years and older, which represented 7% of the population. This percentage is projected to increase to 23% in 2050. Regarding health and long-term care for older adults, the current challenge is to build a comprehensive system of care for older adults. Nursing home care is an inevitable care model for frail older adults in China, which is largely sponsored by the government of China with contributions from some nongovernment organizations and private investors. China is a large country. Within the country, long-term care varies greatly between rural and urban areas, and among the different economic developing areas. In urban and better-developed areas, the range of services exists; however, in rural and less-developed areas, the range of services is limited. The "Star Light Program" and "Beloved Care Engineering" were recent government initiatives to improve aged care. They were launched in 2001 and have dramatically increased the number of both senior centers and nursing homes for older adults. While the quantity of nursing homes is still inadequate with an additional mismatch problem between the supply and demand, the quality of care in most nursing homes is suboptimal. At present, most administrative and frontline workers in nursing homes have received little training in elder care. There is a need for good-quality structured training in long-term care for all types of staff. Moreover, quality standard for care, including standard setting, assessment, and monitoring, is an important issue and needs substantial improvement for nursing homes in China. Currently, 1.5% of older people live in nursing homes and apartments for older people. Because of the peculiar 4-2-1 family structure in China, we expect the prevalence of nursing home placement of older adults will increase in the coming years. The government of China has

  13. Quality Assurance in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balgopal, Pallassana R.; And Others

    This manual, developed for the nursing home employee, examines the concept of quality assurance in nursing homes, describes the benefits of an effective quality assurance program, and provides guidelines to aid nursing homes in developing an appropriate quality assurance program. After a brief introduction, a working definition of quality…

  14. Legal Issues in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    This paper examines the variety of legal rules and processes which have been established to assess and ensure that the quality of care provided in nursing homes satisfies an acceptable level. It begins with a general overview of nursing home law. Areas discussed in this section include: (1) sources of nursing home law; (2) theories of liability;…

  15. [Accidents in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Mediås, I B; Fiskerud, R

    1991-08-20

    169 "injury situations" involving 61 patients were registered in a nursing home during one year. Four patients were sent to hospital. A few patients had several falls. Men were more prone to injury than women. Age itself seemed to be of no importance. Patients on shortterm admittance were at high risk. In general patients with dementia were not at higher risk but suffered the more serious injuries and were also involved in various episodes of patient violence. The risk of injuries is generally high in nursing homes. A certain risk must be accepted, but it is important to introduce prophylactic measures. A larger nursing staff might have prevented some of the situations. PMID:1926073

  16. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance. PMID:26154352

  17. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  18. NATIONAL NURSING HOME SURVEY (NNHS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) is a continuing series of national sample surveys of nursing homes, their residents, and their staff.The survey was conducted in 1973-74, 1977, 1985, 1995, 1997, and 1999. Although each of these surveys emphasized different topics, they all...

  19. Evolution of an active psychogeriatric day hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, S. E.; Carlson, S.

    1976-01-01

    A geriatric day hospital was established as part of the psychogeriatric unit of the Royal Ottawa Hospital. While initially this day hospital was integrated with day hospital programs of other units, it became apparent that a separate facility was desirable. The activities and programs of the psychogeriatric day hospital, run by one registered nurse, were integrated with those of the geriatric inpatient unit. It was found to be advantageous for inpatients and day hospital patients to share the same physical facilities. The majority of day hospital patients came from the inpatient unit; almost all had affective disorders. The emphasis was on reintegration into the community. During the 1st year of operation there were 75 patients in the program; only 3 needed admission to the inpatient unit and 1 was readmitted after discharge. PMID:991034

  20. An international definition for "nursing home".

    PubMed

    Sanford, Angela M; Orrell, Martin; Tolson, Debbie; Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Arai, Hidenori; Bauer, Juergen M; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Dong, Birong; Ga, Hyuk; Goel, Ashish; Hajjar, Ramzi; Holmerova, Iva; Katz, Paul R; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Rolland, Yves; Visvanathan, Renuka; Woo, Jean; Morley, John E; Vellas, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    There is much ambiguity regarding the term "nursing home" in the international literature. The definition of a nursing home and the type of assistance provided in a nursing home is quite varied by country. The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics and AMDA foundation developed a survey to assist with an international consensus on the definition of "nursing home." PMID:25704126

  1. Gaps in nurse staffng and nursing home resident needs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Unruh, Lynn; Wan, Thomas T H

    2013-01-01

    Trends in nurse staffing levels in nursing homes from 1997 to 2011 varied across the category of nurse and the type of nursing home. The gaps found in this study are important to consider because nurses may become overworked and this may negatively affect the quality of services and jeopardize resident safety. Nursing home administrators should consider improving staffing strategically. Staffing should be based not only on the number of resident days, but also allocated according to particular resident needs. As the demand for nursing home care grows, bridging the gap between nurse staffing and resident nursing care needs will be especially important in light of the evidence linking nurse staffing to the quality of nursing home care. Until more efficient nursing care delivery exits, there may be no other way to safeguard quality except to increase nurse staffing in nursing homes. PMID:24592533

  2. [Teledermatology within Dutch nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Lubeek, Satish F K; Mommers, Roland J M; van der Geer, Eric R; van de Kerkhof, Peter C M; Gerritsen, Marie-Jeanne Rianne P

    2016-06-01

    Skin problems are common within the nursing home population and could have a significant impact on quality of life. As a form of long-distance consultation teledermatology offers several potential benefits within this frail population. In this review we discuss several aspects of teledermatology, especially in relation to the nursing home population. Several studies demonstrated that teledermatology is a cost-effective and easy-to-use consultation method, which could significantly reduce the amount of hospital visits. However, teledermatology is only used in a limited number of Dutch nursing homes in daily practice due to several factors. For the optimal implementation of teledermatological consultation there are some important logistical, legal and financial framework conditions. In conclusion, teledermatology has a lot to offer within the nursing home population and therefore teledermatology will hopefully be increasingly used in daily practice within the near future. PMID:27098424

  3. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  4. Does quality influence consumer choice of nursing homes? Evidence from nursing home to nursing home transfers.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Richard A; Banaszak-Holl, Jane C; Fries, Brant E; Turenne, Marc N

    2003-01-01

    We estimated Cox proportional hazards models using assessment data from the Minimum Data Set to test whether nursing home residents and their proxies respond to quality of care by changing providers. Various indicators of poor quality increased the likelihood of transfer. Residents of for-profit homes or homes with excess capacity also were more likely to transfer. Inability to participate in care decisions and factors indicating frailty limited residents' ability to transfer. The apparent responsiveness to quality is encouraging. Nonetheless, because the absolute transfer rate is low, significant barriers to movement among nursing homes still may exist. PMID:15055834

  5. Reversible dementia: two nursing home patients with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Reintjes, Wesley; Romijn, Marloes D M; Hollander, Daan; Ter Bruggen, Jan P; van Marum, Rob J

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (VGKC-LE) is a rare disease that is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for medical practitioners. Two patients with VGKC-LE, both developing dementia are presented. Following treatment, both patients showed remarkable cognitive and functional improvement enabling them to leave the psychogeriatric nursing homes they both were admitted to. Patients with VGKC-LE can have a major cognitive and functional improvement even after a diagnostic delay of more than 1 year. Medical practitioners who treat patients with unexplained cognitive decline, epileptic seizures, or psychiatric symptoms should be aware of LE as an underlying rare cause. PMID:26170033

  6. Going Home: Analysis of Nursing Home Discharges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retsinas, Joan; Garrity, Patricia

    1986-01-01

    Previous research has shown that only nursing home "short stayers" will return to the community. Analyzed data to predict factors important both to discharge and tenure. Independent variables included age, sex, past residence, prognosis, and family ties. Results point to prognosis as a key predictor both of discharge and of tenure. (Author/ABB)

  7. The Natural History of Nursing Home Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Mary Ann; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Former nursing home residents (N=197) were followed for 2 years after discharge. Four subgroups of patients were identified on the basis of different patterns of survival and use of health care resources: those who returned home, died in nursing homes, transferred to hospitals, or transferred to other nursing homes. (NRB)

  8. Automatic Home Nursing Activity Recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gang; Tang, Chunqiang

    2009-01-01

    The rapid deployment of Web-based, consumer-centric electronic medical records (CEMRs) is an important trend in healthcare. In this paper, we incorporate nursing knowledge into CEMR so that it can automatically recommend home nursing activities (HNAs). Those more complex HNAs are made clickable for users to find detailed implementation procedures. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our techniques using USMLE medical exam cases. PMID:20351888

  9. Clashes At Nursing Homes Not Uncommon

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159335.html Clashes at Nursing Homes Not Uncommon 20 percent of residents affected ... 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many elderly adults in nursing homes face aggressive or disturbing behavior from their ...

  10. Future Development of Nursing Home Quality Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Lewis, Teresa; Mueller, Christine

    2005-01-01

    Nursing home quality indicators have been developed over the past 10 years to quantify nursing home quality and to draw systematic comparisons between facilities. Although these indicators have been applied widely for nursing home regulation, quality improvement, and public reporting, researchers and stakeholders have raised concerns about their…

  11. Medical specialist attendance in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Katrin; Butz, Stefanie; Bentzel, Jenny; Boulkhemair, Dalila; Lühmann, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The care in nursing homes was examined based on scientific studies. The analysis focuses on dementia and type II diabetes. There is evidence for deficits in the supply of medical specialist attendance to nursing home residents with these diseases in Germany. Compared with corresponding guidelines the medical care for nursing home residents may be too low or inadequate. PMID:23755088

  12. Best practice in psychogeriatric care.

    PubMed

    Orb, A; Davis, P; Wynaden, D; Davey, M

    2001-03-01

    This paper presents a best practice model for psychogeriatric care. Best practice is becoming one of the most common expressions used in the area of health care, and is often referred to in government reports and documents. The definition of 'best practice', however, is still evolving. What then, is best practice? And how can the principles of best practice be applied and integrated into the clinical speciality of psychogeriatrics? The article emphasizes the importance of evidence-based interventions and the need to focus on the pragmatic aspects of providing best practice in the clinical area of psychogeriatrics; that is, what works best in practice? The position taken by the authors of this paper is that the conceptualization of a best practice model in psychogeriatrics is necessary in order to describe and explain the different components involved in the service provided. This conceptualization also communicates and articulates the role of the major stakeholders, and the key players in the achievement of best practice. A psychogeriatric service may become more coherent, more goal-orientated and more efficient if a model is utilized. This paper outlines a proposed model of best practice in psychogeriatrics, and discusses the potential implications for achieving desirable clinical outcomes. PMID:11421969

  13. Report Cards and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Lowe, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We first describe which states have produced nursing home report cards; second, we compare what information is provided in these report cards; third, we identify data sources used to produce the report cards; and, finally, we examine seven factors previously shown to be associated with the usefulness of report-card information and provide…

  14. Nursing homes: The new frontier.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jane; Zuber, Kim

    2015-09-01

    As the population continues to age, we will see a larger percentage of end-stage CKD patients in nursing homes, both skilled and long-term facilities. This is a fragile population and will take buy-in from all practitioners to care for them. Even with the dietitian to manage a complicated and detailed menu, the social worker to manage the transportation and multiple issues with equipment, the therapy staff to protect against loss of ADLs, the recreational therapist to protect against loss of cognitive function and the medical staff (APs, nursing, physicians), this population will continue to present both challenges and opportunities. PMID:26521633

  15. Estimating patient-level nursing home costs.

    PubMed Central

    Schlenker, R E; Shaughnessy, P W; Yslas, I

    1985-01-01

    This article presents a methodology developed to estimate patient-level nursing home costs. Such estimates are difficult to obtain because most cost data for nursing homes are available from Medicare or Medicaid cost reports, which provide only average values per patient-day across all patients (or all of a particular payer's patients). The methodology presented in this article yields "resource consumption" (RC) measures of the variable cost of nursing staff care incurred in treating individual nursing home patients. Results from the application of the methodology are presented, using data collected in 1980 on a sample of 961 nursing home patients in 74 Colorado nursing homes. This type of approach could be used to link nursing home payments to the care needs of individual patients, thus improving the overall equity of the payment system and possibly reducing the access barriers facing especially Medicaid patients with high-cost care needs. PMID:3921494

  16. Nursing Homes as Teaching Institutions: Legal Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the trend toward affiliation of nursing homes with educational programs as clinical teaching institutions for medical, nursing, and allied health students. Reviews potential ethical and legal issues for the nursing home administrator, professional staff member, educator, and student, including informed consent, supervisory…

  17. Infections and antibiotic resistance in nursing homes.

    PubMed Central

    Nicolle, L E; Strausbaugh, L J; Garibaldi, R A

    1996-01-01

    Infections occur frequently in nursing home residents. The most common infections are pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and skin and soft tissue infection. Aging-associated physiologic and pathologic changes, functional disability, institutionalization, and invasive devices all contribute to the high occurrence of infection. Antimicrobial agent use in nursing homes is intense and usually empiric. All of these factors contribute to the increasing frequency of antimicrobial agent-resistant organisms in nursing homes. Programs that will limit the emergence and impact of antimicrobial resistance and infections in nursing homes need to be developed. PMID:8665472

  18. Nursing Home Staff Turnover: Impact on Nursing Home Compare Quality Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John; Men, Aiju

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We used data from a large sample of nursing homes to examine the association between staff turnover and quality. Design and Methods: The staff turnover measures came from primary data collected from 2,840 nursing homes in 2004 (representing a 71% response rate). Data collection included measures for nurse aides, licensed practical nurses,…

  19. Nursing Home Staffing and Quality under the Nursing Home Reform Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Grabowski, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We examine whether the Nursing Home Reform Act (NHRA) improved nursing home staffing and quality. Design and Methods: Data from 5,092 nursing homes were linked across the 1987 Medicare/Medicaid Automated Certification System and the 1993 Online Survey, Certification and Reporting system. A dummy-year model was used to examine the effects…

  20. Nursing Home Length of Stay Patterns: Results from the 1985 National Nursing Home Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Denise A.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    1990-01-01

    Estimated length of stay (LOS) for elderly nursing home patients. Converted discharges from 1985 National Nursing Home Survey into admission cohort and adding reported immediate previous nursing home LOS to surveyed LOS. Ultimate length of aggregated stay was longer than unaggregated estimates for elderly discharged residents. Mean aggregated stay…

  1. Rurality and Nursing Home Quality: Evidence from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Yu; Meng, Hongdao; Miller, Nancy A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To evaluate the impact of rural geographic location on nursing home quality of care in the United States. Design and Methods: The study used cross-sectional observational design. We obtained resident- and facility-level data from 12,507 residents in 1,174 nursing homes from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. We used…

  2. 2. VIEW NORTH SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION OF NURSES HOME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTH SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION OF NURSES HOME NO. 2 ON LEFT AND SOUTH ELEVATION OF NURSES HOME NO. 1 ON RIGHT - Jersey City Hospital, Nurses Homes, 112-114 Clifton Place, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  3. 38 CFR 17.57 - Use of community nursing homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of community nursing... MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.57 Use of community nursing homes. (a) Nursing home care in a contract public or private nursing home facility may be authorized for the...

  4. 38 CFR 17.57 - Use of community nursing homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of community nursing... MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.57 Use of community nursing homes. (a) Nursing home care in a contract public or private nursing home facility may be authorized for the...

  5. 38 CFR 17.57 - Use of community nursing homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of community nursing... MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.57 Use of community nursing homes. (a) Nursing home care in a contract public or private nursing home facility may be authorized for the...

  6. 38 CFR 17.57 - Use of community nursing homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of community nursing... MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.57 Use of community nursing homes. (a) Nursing home care in a contract public or private nursing home facility may be authorized for the...

  7. 38 CFR 17.57 - Use of community nursing homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of community nursing... MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.57 Use of community nursing homes. (a) Nursing home care in a contract public or private nursing home facility may be authorized for the...

  8. Engaging nursing home residents with dementia in activities: The effects of modeling, presentation order, time of day, and setting characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Thein, Khin; Dakheel-Ali, Maha; Marx, Marcia S.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the impact of setting characteristics and presentation effects on engagement with stimuli in a group of 193 nursing home residents with dementia (recruited from a total of seven nursing homes). Engagement was assessed through systematic observations using the Observational Measurement of Engagement (OME), and data pertaining to setting characteristics (background noise, light, and number of persons in proximity) were recorded via the environmental portion of the Agitation Behavior Mapping Inventory (ABMI; Cohen-Mansfield, Werner, & Marx, (1989). An observational study of agitation in agitated nursing home residents. International Psychogeriatrics, 1, 153–165). Results revealed that study participants were engaged more often with moderate levels of sound and in the presence of a small group of people (from four to nine people). As to the presentation effects, multiple presentations of the same stimulus were found to be appropriate for the severely impaired as well as the moderately cognitively impaired. Moreover, modeling of the appropriate behavior significantly increased engagement, with the severely cognitively impaired residents receiving the greatest benefit from modeling. These findings have direct implications for the way in which caregivers could structure the environment in the nursing home and how they could present stimuli to residents in order to optimize engagement in persons with dementia. PMID:20455123

  9. Moral Hazard in Nursing Home Use

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C.; Gruber, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Nursing home expenditures are a rapidly growing share of national health care spending with the government functioning as the dominant payer of services. Public insurance for nursing home care is tightly targeted on income and assets, which imposes a major tax on savings; moreover, low state reimbursement for Medicaid patients has been shown to lower treatment quality, and bed supply constraints may deny access to needy individuals. However, expanding eligibility, increasing Medicaid reimbursement, or allowing more nursing home bed slots has the potential to induce more nursing home use, increasing the social costs of long term care. A problem in evaluating this tradeoff is that we know remarkably little about the effects of government policy on nursing home utilization. We attempt to address this shortcoming using multiple waves of the National Long-Term Care Survey, matched to changing state Medicaid rules for nursing home care. We find consistent evidence of no effect of Medicaid policies on nursing home utilization, suggesting that demand for nursing home care is relatively inelastic with respect to public program generosity. From a policy perspective, this finding indicates that changes in overall Medicaid generosity will not have large effects on utilization. PMID:17095111

  10. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  11. Assessing Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes: Using the Nursing Home Survey on Resident Safety

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Wagner, Laura M.; Perera, Subashan; Ferguson, Jamie C.; Handler, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the overall responses of nursing home staff to a newly developed nursing home specific survey instrument to assess patient safety culture (PSC) and to examine whether nursing home staff (including Administrator / Manager, Licensed Nurse, Nurse Aide, Direct Care Staff, and Support Staff) differ in their PSC ratings. Methods Data were collected in late 2007 through early 2008 using a survey administered to staff in each of 40 nursing homes. In four of these nursing homes the responses of different staff were identified. The Nursing Home Survey on Patient Safety Culture (NHSPSC) was used to assess 12 domains of the PSC and identify differences in PSC perceptions between staff. Results For the 40 nursing homes in the sample, the overall facility response rate was 72%. For the four nursing homes of interest, the overall facility response rate was 68.9%. The aggregate NHSPSC scores, using all staff types for all survey items, show that most respondents report a poor PSC. However, Administrators / Managers had more positive scores than the other staff types (p<0.05) across most domains. Conclusions Staff in nursing homes generally agree that PSC is poor. This may have a significant impact on quality of care and quality of life for residents. PMID:22130345

  12. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall. PMID:26421775

  13. Sex and the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Levine, Murray

    2016-01-01

    The current article discusses the case of Henry Rahons. A nearly 80 year old man who was accused by the local district attorney of having unlawful sexual contact with Donna, his second wife of some seven years who had developed Alzheimer's disease in her later years. Under Iowa law, he was accused of having sexually abused her because she had "a mental defect or incapacity which precludes giving consent" to sex acts. A jury acquitted Henry of the charge of sexually abusing his wife. The evidence was equivocal that a sex act occurred on May 23, 2014, the date specified in the indictment. This article addresses the ability to assessed competence to consent to sex in similar situations. The current rules and attitudes about senior sex in nursing homes needs to be reevaluated. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27196391

  14. Ownership Conversions and Nursing Home Performance

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C; Stevenson, David G

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of ownership conversions on nursing home performance. Data Source Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting system data from 1993 to 2004, and the Minimum Data Set (MDS) facility reports from 1998 to 2004. Study Design Regression specification incorporating facility fixed effects, with terms to identify trends in the pre- and postconversion periods. Principal Findings The annual rate of nursing home conversions almost tripled between 1994 and 2004. Our regression results indicate converting facilities are generally different throughout the pre/postconversion years, suggesting little causal effect of ownership conversions on nursing home performance. Before and after conversion, nursing homes converting from nonprofit to for-profit status generally exhibit deterioration in their performance, while nursing homes converting from for-profit to nonprofit status generally exhibit improvement. Conclusions Policy makers have expressed concern regarding the implications of ownership conversions for nursing home performance. Our results imply that regulators and policy makers should not only monitor the outcomes of nursing home conversions, but also the targets of these conversions. PMID:18355255

  15. Cops, Consultants, and Goldfish: Variations in Nursing Home Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, John A.

    Nursing home regulatory agencies are subjected to a variety of pressures. Nursing home residents' families and friends want the agencies to "get tough" while the nursing home industry wants agencies to act as consultants rather than cops. The task of regulating nursing homes in the United States is primarily carried out by units of state…

  16. Reducing energy costs in nursing homes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The handbook presents ideas and techniques for energy conservation in nursing homes. Case studies were developed of nursing homes located in different parts of the US. The typical nursing home assessed was proprietary, of intermediate-care level, medicaid-certified, and had less than 200 beds. Specific energy conservation measures were analyzed to determine the energy and dollar savings that could be realized. These include reducing heat loss through the building shell; reducing hot water costs; recovering the heat generated by dryers; reducing lighting costs; reducing heating and cooling costs, and analyzing fuels and fuel rates. A case for converting electric clothes dryers to gas was analyzed. (MCW)

  17. International survey of nursing home research priorities.

    PubMed

    Morley, John E; Caplan, Gideon; Cesari, Matteo; Dong, Birong; Flaherty, Joseph H; Grossberg, George T; Holmerova, Iva; Katz, Paul R; Koopmans, Raymond; Little, Milta O; Martin, Finbarr; Orrell, Martin; Ouslander, Joseph; Rantz, Marilyn; Resnick, Barbara; Rolland, Yves; Tolson, Debbie; Woo, Jean; Vellas, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    This article reports the findings of a policy survey designed to establish research priorities to inform future research strategy and advance nursing home practice. The survey was administered in 2 rounds during 2013, and involved a combination of open questions and ranking exercises to move toward consensus on the research priorities. A key finding was the prioritization of research to underpin the care of people with cognitive impairment/dementia and of the management of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia within the nursing home. Other important areas were end-of-life care, nutrition, polypharmacy, and developing new approaches to putting evidence-based practices into routine practice in nursing homes. It explores possible innovative educational approaches, reasons why best practices are difficult to implement, and challenges faced in developing high-quality nursing home research. PMID:24703926

  18. Nursing Homes: Making the Right Choice

    MedlinePlus

    ... visiting. For example, look for: Medicare and Medicaid certification Handicap access Residents who look well cared for ... Ask to see the current inspection report and certification of any nursing home you are considering. Visit ...

  19. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  20. Independence Training in Nursing-Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltes, Margret M.; Zerbe, Melissa B.

    1976-01-01

    Single-subject reversal designs were used in teaching elderly nursing-home residents to change dependency behavior and to reacquire and maintain self-feeding skills. Fast control of self-feeding was obtained. Results are discussed. (Author)

  1. Participatory ergonomic improvement in nursing home.

    PubMed

    Udo, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Mikio; Udo, Akihiro; Branlund, Ben

    2006-01-01

    The number of nursing home has increased largely in Japan since 1990. The Long-term Care Insurance in 2000 has accelerated the increase of nursing homes. The care giving and cooking in nursing homes have high risk factors of muscle-skeletal diseases (MSDs). However, the working conditions have not yet been improved. Thus, the incidence of low back pain and cervico-brachial disorder is very high among the care workers and cooks. Therefore, it is important to prevent the MSDs among the care workers and cooks. This study has been conducted to make a model of the participatory improvement focusing on low back pain in a nursing home for three years. As a result of the study, many improvements have been implemented and the incidence of low back pain has been reduced. PMID:16610548

  2. Pay-for-Performance in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Briesacher, Becky A.; Field, Terry S.; Baril, Joann; Gurwitz, Jerry H.

    2009-01-01

    Information on the impact of pay-for-performance programs is lacking in the nursing home setting. This literature review (1980-2007) identified 13 prior examples of pay-for-performance programs in the nursing home setting: 7 programs were active as of 2007, while 6 had been terminated. The programs were mostly short-lived, varied considerably in the choice of performance measures and pay incentives, and evaluations of the impact were rare. PMID:19544931

  3. [Nursing care at home and secularism].

    PubMed

    Lecointre, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    The question of secularism, long-time confined to schools and the relationships between the Church and State, is today being raised in the field of public health. Nurses are directly affected and are integrating this dimension of secularism into their care practices. A private practice nurse describes the effect these changes are having on her practice in patients' homes. PMID:26654502

  4. Reassessing nurse aide job satisfaction in a Texas nursing home.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mark A; Horne, Kathleen K; Huerta, Timothy R

    2011-09-01

    This article reports a study that replicates and extends Castle's 2007 study by examining factors related to satisfaction of nurse aides at Carillon House, a 120-bed nonprofit skilled nursing facility in Lubbock, Texas. The Nursing Home Nurse Aide Job Satisfaction Questionnaire was adapted to allow for the collection of qualitative responses and administered to the nursing staff. The results suggest that satisfaction among nurse aides is related to rewards, workload, and the team environment created among coworkers. These findings differ from what is generally found in the literature and may be related to the higher-than-average satisfaction rating of nurse aides at this facility. The study provides evidence that large-scale surveys may have ignored a stratified effect where higher satisfaction organizations have different driving forces than what has been demonstrated in the literature to date. PMID:21634313

  5. Nursing home culture change: what does it mean to nurses?

    PubMed

    Bellot, Jennifer

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore, from the perspectives of licensed nurses, the organizational culture, work environment, and factors influencing culture change in two nursing homes participating in the Wellspring Program. All licensed nurses ≥ 0.25 full-time equivalent from two nursing homes were invited to complete the Organizational Culture Inventory and the Work Environment Scale. A subset of respondents was invited to participate in subsequent interviews. Data indicated unresolved conflict, low employee satisfaction, high work demands, and managerial control in the workplace. Qualitatively, three categories emerged: Confusion over culture change, role, and documentation; Conflict over the integration of traditional care with a resident-centered model; and Commitment to providing quality nursing care to the resident. To ensure the successful implementation of culture change, consideration must be given to clarity of communication, anticipation of role conflict, and building on the underlying strength of job commitment. PMID:22998657

  6. Nursing Home Administrators' Opinions of the Nursing Home Compare Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In November of 2002 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services publicly reported on a national basis the quality of nursing homes on the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) Web site. This study examines administrators' opinions of this initiative and whether it has fostered quality improvement. Design and Methods: Data used in this…

  7. Eldercare at Home: Choosing a Nursing Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... at home. Problems such as frequent incontinence, dangerous wandering, inability to sleep at night (a disrupted sleep - ... a security system to prevent confused residents from wandering out of the building? Are there accessible outdoor ...

  8. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  9. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  10. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  11. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  12. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  13. Nursing priorities for the 1980's: hospitals and nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Aiken, L H

    1981-02-01

    It is clear that the two institutions where nurses play a critical role--hospitals and nursing homes--are experiencing major problems. Patients in these institutions are not receiving the full benefits of the best health care America has to offer. Organized nursing has the opportunity and capacity to resolve these difficulties and in the process improve both patient care and the importance of our profession. The time is right for change. To date, nursing has not taken on this difficult leadership task. I believe we will remain dependent on other professions unless we take on significant responsibilities for resolving the problems facing these two institutions. The GMENAC report on health manpower suggests that out profession should not rely on others for public policy recommendations which will affect our future. Nursing has greater respect and national visibility than ever before. Within this decade, nursing has the potential ability to help resolve the crisis affecting these two institutions. The future of the nation's hospitals, nursing homes, those for whom we care, and of the nursing profession may depend upon how we respond to these two challenges in the years ahead. PMID:6906951

  14. [Ways to make cooperation between hospital nurse and home visiting nurse in treating a final stage cancer patient at home].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hamae; Ohori, Yoko; Shino, Satoko; Marutani, Harumi; Numata, Kumiko; Sato, Yasutomo

    2005-12-01

    Due to a payment system based on Comprehensive Medical Evaluation has been adopted, both a shorter hospitalization and the use of home nursing care have been increasing. A good cooperation between hospital and home visiting nurses is desired in order to transfer continued nursing. Regarding a home nursing care service for the most terminal cancer patients, we conducted a survey of 459 home visiting nurses with twelve questions in five categories: (1) Before transferring to home care, (2) Right after the transfer to home care, (3) Patient in a stable period, (4) Time of near death and (5) Other (Requests to hospital nurses). The following issues became clearer in terms of how hospital and home visiting nurses should be cooperating with the handling of last stage terminal cancer patients: (1) A home visiting nurse should have a coordinating role with a hospital nurse when the patient is discharged from the hospital. (2) A participation of home visiting nurses on the coordination guidance at the time of a patient discharge is influenced by a manpower of the nursing station. (3) Even though home visiting nurses found a discrepancy between the hospital information and what patients and their families were getting from the hospital, home visiting nurses have learned through the job to clarify what patient and family needs were, and they responded accordingly. (4) A coordination between hospital and home visiting nurses was needed quite often when the patient's time has come to die at home. PMID:16422484

  15. Nursing Homes for Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Alma L.; Mutzebaugh, Carole A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a community college's development and implementation of a second-year nursing curriculum which involved clinical experience in an extended care facility in which learning took place in the following areas: the normal physical and developmental aging process; rehabilitation for chronic illness; and specific psychiatric nursing principles…

  16. Nursing home administrators' level of job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Job satisfaction has been shown to have a direct relationship to the quality of work. Are nursing home administrators satisfied with their work? How do they compare with their counterparts in other industries? The results of this survey, using the Job Description Index (JDI) and the Job in General (JIG) scale as published by Bowling Green State University, indicate that nursing home administrators have a more compressed rate of job satisfaction than their counterparts in other industries. They focus their dissatisfaction on their coworkers and pay. They demonstrate dissatisfaction by rotating their positions at a rate of every 31 months. This suggests some significant problems in the development and maintenance of quality care and some areas that could be addressed to raise the level of satisfaction among nursing home administrators. PMID:15499807

  17. [Nursing diagnoses of the elderly at home].

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Maria do Livramento Fortes; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; de Brito, Cleidiane Maria Sales; Sousa, Suéli Nolêto Silva; da Silva, Dâmaris Rebeca Soares

    2008-01-01

    The descriptive study, with quantitative approach, that has had as objective to do the characterization of ill elderly at home attended by the ESF teams of the Satellite's District in Teresina - PI and to collect Nursing Diagnoses and it respective interventions. This descriptive study was constituted by 50 seniors interviewed at home, the results showed that most of the women in age between of 60 and 79 years were ill at home for one or five years at least. There were eight Nursing Diagnoses (ND) prevalent, in which 98% of the seniors were identified with the ND - Inadequate Control of Therapeutic Regime, and in 72% the deambulation was prejudiced with mobility's limitation and, for all diagnoses were proposed nursing interventions objectifying the conquest of autonomy and independence of these seniors. PMID:18797782

  18. Dangerous Urinary Tract Infections Common in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159308.html Dangerous Urinary Tract Infections Common in Nursing Homes Study found 1 in 20 residents developed ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in nursing home residents can often have serious effects, including ...

  19. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  20. Nurses in independent care homes: issues, challenges and potential.

    PubMed

    Morris-Thompson, Trish; Marks-Maran, Diane

    Many registered nurses in the UK work in the social care sector in independent care homes and nursing homes. This article explores the challenges related to providing nursing care for adults in care homes, issues arising for nurses and nursing in the social care sector, and providing a career pathway for nurses in the social care sector. Steps need to be taken to ensure that cooperation, collaboration and leadership in nursing in the social care sector is recognised and that appropriate representation of nurses in social care takes place at national level. PMID:26203504

  1. 38 CFR 17.58 - Evacuation of community nursing homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to another facility that meets certain minimum standards, as set forth in 38 CFR 51.59(c)(1... nursing homes. 17.58 Section 17.58 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.58 Evacuation of community nursing homes....

  2. 38 CFR 17.58 - Evacuation of community nursing homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to another facility that meets certain minimum standards, as set forth in 38 CFR 51.59(c)(1... nursing homes. 17.58 Section 17.58 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.58 Evacuation of community nursing homes....

  3. 38 CFR 17.58 - Evacuation of community nursing homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to another facility that meets certain minimum standards, as set forth in 38 CFR 51.59(c)(1... nursing homes. 17.58 Section 17.58 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.58 Evacuation of community nursing homes....

  4. Geropsychology Training in a VA Nursing Home Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karel, Michele J.; Moye, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing need for professional psychology training in nursing home settings, and nursing homes provide a rich environment for teaching geropsychology competencies. We describe the nursing home training component of our Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Predoctoral Internship and Geropsychology Postdoctoral Fellowship programs. Our…

  5. Medicaid Nursing Home Pay for Performance: Where Do We Stand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arling, Greg; Job, Carol; Cooke, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Nursing home pay-for-performance (P4P) programs are intended to maximize the value obtained from public and private expenditures by measuring and rewarding better nursing home performance. We surveyed the 6 states with operational P4P systems in 2007. We describe key features of six Medicaid nursing home P4P systems and make…

  6. Leisure-Time Activities in Selected Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tague, Jean Ruth

    This study sought to identify leisure interests and participation patterns of residents over 65 in selected nursing homes in Los Angeles County, California, together with general and professional beliefs of nursing home administrators and authorities on aging as to leisure activities for aged nursing home patients. Interviews were held with 107…

  7. What Is Nursing Home Quality and How Is It Measured?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Ferguson, Jamie C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this commentary, we examine nursing home quality and indicators that have been used to measure nursing home quality. Design and Methods: A brief review of the history of nursing home quality is presented that provides some context and insight into currently used quality indicators. Donabedian's structure, process, and outcome (SPO)…

  8. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  9. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  10. Kansas Nursing Home Medication Aide Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartel, Myrna J.; Fornelli, Linda K.

    This curriculum guide is designed to aid Kansas instructors in conducting a course for teaching nursing home medication aides. Covered first are various introductory topics such as the role and responsibilities of medication aides, pharmacodynamics, forms in which medication is now available, common medical abbreviations, mathematics and weights…

  11. Factors Associated with Increasing Nursing Home Closures

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Nicholas G; Engberg, John; Lave, Judith; Fisher, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We determine the rate of nursing home closures for 7 years (1999–2005) and examine internal (e.g., quality), organizational (e.g., chain membership), and external (e.g., competition) factors associated with these closures. Design and Method The names of the closed facilities and dates of closure from state regulators in all 50 states were obtained. This information was linked to the Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting data, which contains information on internal, organizational, and market factors for almost all nursing homes in the United States. Results One thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine facilities closed over this time period (1999–2005). The average annual rate of closure was about 2 percent of facilities, but the rate of closure was found to be increasing. Nursing homes with higher rates of deficiency citations, hospital-based facilities, chain members, small bed size, and facilities located in markets with high levels of competition were more likely to close. High Medicaid occupancy rates were associated with a high likelihood of closure, especially for facilities with low Medicaid reimbursement rates. Implications As states actively debate about how to redistribute long-term care services/dollars, our findings show that they should be cognizant of the potential these decisions have for facilitating nursing home closures. PMID:19674434

  12. Is There Evidence of Cream Skimming among Nursing Homes following the Publication of the Nursing Home Compare Report Card?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Ladd, Heather; Weimer, David L.; Spector, William D.; Zinn, Jacqueline S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A national quality report card for nursing homes, Nursing Home Compare, has been published since 2002. It has been shown to have some, albeit limited, positive impact on quality of care. The objective of this study was to test empirically the hypothesis that nursing homes have responded to the publication of the report by adopting cream…

  13. End-of-Life Decision Making for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Survey of Nursing Home Social Services Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Debra

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to describe nursing home social services staff roles and perceptions related to end-of-life medical decision making for nursing home residents in endstage dementia. Using a self-designed questionnaire, 138 nursing home social services staff from across New York State answered questions about advance directives,…

  14. Father attendance in nurse home visitation.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, John R; Olds, David L

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the rates and predictors of father attendance at nurse home visits in replication sites of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP). Early childhood programs can facilitate father involvement in the lives of their children, but program improvements require an understanding of factors that predict father involvement. The sample consisted of 29,109 low-income, first-time mothers who received services from 694 nurses from 80 sites. We conducted mixed-model multiple regression analyses to identify population, implementation, site, and nurse influences on father attendance. Predictors of father attendance included a count of maternal visits (B = 0.12, SE = 0.01, F = 3101.77), frequent contact between parents (B = 0.61, SE = 0.02, F = 708.02), cohabitation (B = 1.41, SE = 0.07, F = 631.51), White maternal race (B = 0.77, SE = 0.06, F = 190.12), and marriage (B = 0.42, SE = 0.08, F = 30.08). Random effects for sites and nurses predicted father-visit participation (2.7 & 6.7% of the variance, respectively), even after controlling for population sociodemographic characteristics. These findings suggest that factors operating at the levels of sites and nurses influence father attendance at home visits, even after controlling for differences in populations served. Further inquiry about these influences on father visit attendance is likely to inform program-improvement efforts. PMID:25521707

  15. Father Attendance in Nurse Home Visitation

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, John R.; Olds, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the rates and predictors of father attendance at nurse home visits in replication sites of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP). Early childhood programs can facilitate father involvement in the lives of their children, but program improvements require an understanding of factors that predict father involvement. The sample consisted of 29,109 low-income, first-time mothers who received services from 694 nurses from 80 sites. We conducted mixed-model multiple regression analyses to identify population, implementation, site, and nurse influences on father attendance. Predictors of father attendance included a count of maternal visits (B = 0.12, SE = 0.01, F = 3101.77), frequent contact between parents (B = 0.61, SE = 0.02, F = 708.02), cohabitation (B = 1.41, SE = 0.07, F = 631.51), White maternal race (B = 0.77, SE = 0.06, F = 190.12), and marriage (B = 0.42, SE = 0.08, F = 30.08). Random effects for sites and nurses predicted father-visit participation (2.7 & 6.7% of the variance, respectively), even after controlling for population sociodemographic characteristics. These findings suggest that factors operating at the levels of sites and nurses influence father attendance at home visits, even after controlling for differences in populations served. Further inquiry about these influences on father visit attendance is likely to inform program-improvement efforts. PMID:25521707

  16. Nursing home nurses' perceptions of emergency transfers from nursing homes to hospital: A review of qualitative studies using systematic methods.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Barbara; Parkinson, Lynne; Dwyer, Trudy; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to describe nursing home nurses' perceptions around emergency transfers to hospital. Transfers are costly and traumatic for residents, and efforts are underway to avoid hospitalization. Nurses play a key role in transfers, yet their views are underreported. A systematic review of qualitative studies was undertaken, guided by Joanna Briggs Institute methods. From seven reviewed studies, it was clear nursing home nurses are challenged by the complexity of the transfer process and understand their need for appropriate clinical knowledge, skills and resources. Communication is important, yet nurses often use persuasive and targeted communication. Ambiguity, strained relationships and negative perceptions of residents' experiences around hospitalization contribute to conflict and uncertainty. Nurses are more confident when there is a plan. Transferring a resident is a complex process and special skills, knowledge and resources are required, but may be lacking. Efforts to formalize the transfer process and improve communication and collaboration amongst all stakeholders is needed and would be well received. PMID:26163012

  17. Private Investment Purchase and Nursing Home Financial Health

    PubMed Central

    Cadigan, Rebecca Orfaly; Stevenson, David G; Caudry, Daryl J; Grabowski, David C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of nursing home acquisition by private investment firms on nursing home costs, revenue, and overall financial health. Data Sources Merged data from the Medicare Cost Reports and the Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting system for the period 1998–2010. Study Design Regression specification incorporating facility and time fixed effects. Principal Findings We found little impact on the financial health of nursing homes following purchase by private investment companies. However, our findings did suggest that private investment firms acquired nursing home chains in good financial health, possibly to derive profit from the company’s real estate holdings. Conclusions Private investment acquired facilities are an important feature of today’s nursing home sector. Although we did not observe a negative impact on the financial health of nursing homes, this development raises important issues about ownership oversight and transparency for the entire nursing home sector. PMID:25104476

  18. Optimizing Antibiotic Use in Nursing Homes Through Antibiotic Stewardship.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Philip D; Huslage, Kirk; Kistler, Christine E; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship is becoming a requirement for nursing homes. Programs should be interdisciplinary and multifaceted; should have support from nursing home administrators; and should aim to promote antibiotics only when needed, not just in case. Recommended components include use of evidence-based guidelines; ongoing monitoring of antibiotic prescriptions, cultures, and study results; monitoring of health outcomes; use of nursing home-specific antibiograms; regular reporting and feedback to medical providers and nurses; and education of residents and families. PMID:27621341

  19. The influence of registered nurse staffing on the quality of nursing home care.

    PubMed

    Munroe, D J

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which registered nurse (RN) staffing patterns influenced nursing home quality. Based upon extensive literature review, a model for nursing home quality was developed. Using data from reports of 455 Medicare-certified skilled nursing facilities, structural, process, and outcome factors thought to influence quality were entered into the model and analyzed using ordinary least squares regression. A small, though statistically significant, proportion of the variance in quality nursing home care was explained by the equation. A positive, significant relationship existed between nursing home quality and the ratio of RN hours to licensed vocational nurse (LVN) hours per resident day. PMID:2374834

  20. Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Fall Prevention Education Program in Turkish Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uymaz, Pelin E.; Nahcivan, Nursen O.

    2016-01-01

    Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly living in nursing homes. There is a need to implement and evaluate fall prevention programs in nursing homes to reduce the number of falls. The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of a nurse-led fall prevention education program in a sample of nursing home…

  1. Job Satisfaction of Nurse Aides in Nursing Homes: Intent to Leave and Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John; Anderson, Ruth; Men, Aiju

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between job satisfaction of nurse aides and intent to leave and actual turnover after 1 year is examined. Design and Methods: Data came from a random sample of 72 nursing homes from 5 states (Colorado, Florida, Michigan, New York, and Oregon). From these nursing homes, we collected 1,779 surveys from nurse aides (a…

  2. Why Do They Stay? Job Tenure among Certified Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Joshua M.; Squillace, Marie R.; Anderson, Wayne L.; Khatutsky, Galina

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study identifies factors related to job tenure among certified nursing assistants (CNAs) working in nursing homes. Design and Methods: The study uses 2004 data from the National Nursing Home Survey, the National Nursing Assistant Survey, and the Area Resource File. Ordinary least squares regression analyses were conducted with length…

  3. The Roles and Functions of Medical Directors in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Aman

    2015-03-01

    The medical director is an important member of the healthcare team in a nursing home, and is responsible for overall coordination of care and for implementation of policies related to care of the residents in a nursing home. The residents in nursing homes are frail, medically complex, and have multiple disabilities. The medical director has an important leadership role in assisting nursing home administration in providing quality care that is consistent with current standards of care. This article provides an overview of roles and functions of the medical director, and suggests ways the medical director can be instrumental in achieving excellent care in today's nursing facilities. PMID:26056830

  4. The Influence of Consistent Assignment on Nursing Home Deficiency Citations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The association of consistent assignment of nurse aides (NAs) with quality of care and quality of life of nursing home residents is examined (using 5 groups of deficiency citations). Methods: Data used came from a survey of nursing home administrators, the Online Survey Certification and Reporting data, and the Area Resource File. The…

  5. Measuring End-of-Life Care Processes in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan; Norton, Sally A.; Quill, Timothy; Ladwig, Susan; Veazie, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to develop measures of end-of-life (EOL) care processes in nursing homes and to validate the instrument for measuring them. Design and Methods: A survey of directors of nursing was conducted in 608 eligible nursing homes in New York State. Responses were obtained from 313 (51.5% response rate) facilities.…

  6. The 24-h recall instrument for home nursing to measure the activity profile of home nurses: development and psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Gosset, Christiane; Heyden, Isabelle; Van Geert, Michel; Moons, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Home health care today is challenged by a shift from an acute to a chronic health-care model, moving the focus of care from the hospital to home-care setting. This increased focus on care at home emphasizes the need for an efficient, effective, and transparent management of home health care. However, it is not precisely known what home-care nurses do; what kind of care is received by patients; what the performance of home nurses is; and what the impact of the increasing need for home nursing is on the current and future role of home nurses. In this respect, it is necessary to gain a clear insight into the activity profile of home nurses, but there is no gold standard to measure their activities. This study reports on the development and psychometric testing of the '24-hour recall instrument for home nursing' to measure the activity profile of home nurses. Five home nurses in Belgium, simultaneously with the researcher, registered the performed activities in a total of 69 patients, using the 24-h recall instrument for home nursing. The validity and the interrater reliability of this instrument were high: the proportions that observed agreement were very high; the strength of kappa agreement was substantial to almost perfect; the prevalence index showed great variety; and the bias index was low. The findings in this study support the validity evidence based on test content and the interrater reliability of the 24-h recall instrument. This instrument can help to shape practice and policy by making the home nursing profession more transparent: a clear insight into the kind of care that is provided by home nurses and is received by the patients in primary care contributes to the development of a clear definition of the role of home nurses in health care. PMID:24479985

  7. Nursing home deficiency citations for safety

    PubMed Central

    Castle, NG; Wagner, LM; Ferguson, JC; Handler, SM

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency citations for safety violations in U.S. nursing homes from 2000 to 2007 are examined (representing a panel of 119,472 observations). Internal (i.e., operating characteristics of the facility), organizational (i.e., characteristics of the facility itself) and external (i.e., characteristics outside of the influence of the organization) factors associated with these deficiency citations are examined. The findings show that nursing homes increasingly receive deficiency citations for resident safety issues. Low staffing levels, poor quality of care, and an unfavorable Medicaid mix (occupancy and reimbursement) are associated with the likelihood of receiving deficiency citations for safety violations. In many cases, this likely influences the quality of life and quality of care of residents. PMID:21207305

  8. Prevention of unethical actions in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Solum, Eva Merethe; Slettebø, Ashild; Hauge, Solveig

    2008-07-01

    Ethical problems regularly arise during daily care in nursing homes. These include violation of patients' right to autonomy and to be treated with respect. The aim of this study was to investigate how caregivers emphasize daily dialogue and mutual reflection to reach moral alternatives in daily care. The data were collected by participant observation and interviews with seven caregivers in a Norwegian nursing home. A number of ethical problems linked to 10 patients were disclosed. Moral problems were revealed as the caregivers acted in ways that they knew were against patients' interest. We used a theoretical interpretation according to Habermas' discourse ethics on the importance of dialogue when deciding moral courses of action for patients. This theory has four basic requirements: communicative competence, equality, self-determination, and openness about motives. PMID:18515442

  9. Nursing home deficiency citations for safety.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G; Wagner, Laura M; Ferguson, Jamie C; Handler, Steven M

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency citations for safety violations in U.S. nursing homes from 2000 to 2007 are examined (representing a panel of 119,472 observations). Internal (i.e., operating characteristics of the facility), organizational factors (i.e., characteristics of the facility itself), and external factors (i.e., characteristics outside of the influence of the organization) associated with these deficiency citations are examined. The findings show that nursing homes increasingly receive deficiency citations for resident safety issues. Low staffing levels, poor quality of care, and an unfavorable Medicaid mix (occupancy and reimbursement) are associated with the likelihood of receiving deficiency citations for safety violations. In many cases, this likely influences the quality of life and quality of care of residents. PMID:21207305

  10. [Compassionate care and the nursing home's charter].

    PubMed

    Poivet, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The creation of a nursing home for dependent elderly people, disabled people or those with dementia provided an opportunity to reflect on the institute's charter. The main objective was to create a place in which residents and professionals feel good. An inter-professional collaborative approach focusing on the needs and aptitudes of the residents favoured the creation of an ideal climate. Thanks to the commitment of all concerned, the objectives have been achieved. PMID:27173631

  11. Factors influencing the recommendation of nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Becker, B W; Kaldenberg, D O

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews and compares the perceptions of nursing homes by residents and their proxies (family, friends, etc.) and reports that residents tended to give higher ratings to services than do their proxies. The analysis attempts to determine why residents give higher marks, which group the facility should look to for feedback, and whether the ratings will help organize the strengths and weaknesses in the facility to produce positive word of mouth within the community. PMID:11209476

  12. [Interventions after diagnosing pain in nursing home residents with dementia: the pilot implementation of an observational pain scale (PACSLAC-D)].

    PubMed

    van t'Hof, C E; Zwakhalen, S M G; Hamers, J P H

    2011-04-01

    Pain occurs regularly among nursing home residents with dementia. There are indications that appliance of structural pain assessment can contribute to the adequate diagnosis of pain. The aim of this study is to gain insight into applied interventions after diagnosing pain with an observational pain scale (PACSLAC-D) among nursing home resident with dementia. During a six week period pain was measured twice a week, among 22 residents of a psychogeriatric nursing home ward, using the PACSLAC-D. Interventions undertaken as a result of a pain score were inventoried on a data-sheet. After the third and sixth week implementation of pain assessment was evaluated. In total 264 pain assessments using the PACSLAC-D were conducted. Of all scheduled standardized measurements 90% was completed. Sixty observations resulted in a pain score. Completed datasheets (N=39) showed that a pain score often (N=17) did not result in any intervention. The majority of interventions that were undertaken consisted of a non pharmacological approach (N=19). Evaluation meetings indicated that the PACSLAC-D was considered useful, though the chosen procedure of standardized measurements twice a week was not yet ideal. This study demonstrates that although there was a high compliance rate, pain relieving interventions were not frequently applied. PMID:21574503

  13. 77 FR 72738 - Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 51 RIN 2900-AO57 Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care... agreements with State homes for the nursing home care of certain disabled veterans. This rulemaking is required to implement a change in law that revises how VA will pay for care provided to these veterans...

  14. Family Perceptions of Geriatric Foster Family and Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Rose, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Relatives (N=62) of matched pairs of patients in geriatric foster homes and nursing homes rated care provided to their relatives. Significantly more foster family patients had positive pre-placement attitudes than did nursing home patients. Upon follow-up, relatives of foster patients reported seeing more patient improvement, satisfaction,…

  15. Organizational Characteristics Associated with Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The association between certified nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse turnover and the organizational characteristics of nursing homes are examined. Design and Methods: Hypotheses for eight organizational characteristics are examined (staffing levels, top management turnover, resident case mix, facility quality,…

  16. Healing at Home: 100 Years of Public Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Ellen T.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "Now More than Ever" (Fahy); "Healing at Home" (photo essay); "Amelia Greenwald: Pioneer in International Public Health Nursing" (Mayer); "Alaska's Watched Pot" (Nord); and "Gertrude Weld Peabody: Unsung Patron of Public Health Nursing Education" (Doona). (JOW)

  17. Return to nursing home investment: Issues for public policy

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Carliss Y.; Bishop, Christine E.

    1984-01-01

    Because Government policy does much to determine the return available to nursing home investment, the profitability of the nursing home industry has been a subject of controversy since Government agencies began paying a large portion of the Nation's nursing home bill. Controversy appears at several levels. First is the rather narrow concern, often conceived in accounting terms, of the appropriate reimbursement of capital-related expense under Medicaid and Medicare. Second is the concern about how return to capital affects the flow of investment into nursing homes, leading either to inadequate access to care or to over-capacity. Third is the concern about how-sources of return to nursing home investment affect the pattern of nursing home ownership and the amount of equity held by owners since the pattern of ownership and amount of equity have been linked to quality of care. PMID:10310945

  18. Nurses take center stage in private duty home care.

    PubMed

    Brackett, Nicole

    2013-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act gives America's largest group of health care providers--nurses--a unique chance to lead in improving outcomes, increasing patient satisfaction, and lowering costs. Nurses' roles continue to grow in settings from hospitals and long-term care facilities to home health and hospice agencies. Nurses are also key players in private duty home care, where they serve as care coordinators for clients. Working directly with doctors, therapists, in-home caregivers, and families, nurses are critical in delivering quality, seamless in-home care. PMID:24069792

  19. Management of agitation in nursing home patients.

    PubMed

    Billig, N

    1996-08-01

    Agitation in demented nursing home residents is a major clinical problem with which patients, families and staff are required to cope. Agitation may be secondary to a variety of psychiatric, environmental and medical problems, and thus attempts must be made to [correction of be] clarify aetiological issues before initiating a treatment plan. Treatments for agitation are imperfect, and clinicians should be prepared to work through several to find the best for a given patient and clinical situation. Cognitive/behavioural/environmental treatments have the advantage of few or no adverse effects and no drug-drug interactions. Some of these define rather basic nursing management techniques for coping with agitated older adults, while others attempt to diminish specific behaviours. The use of pharmacological interventions should be reserved for those patients in whom other measures have been unsuccessful. While the range of medications that have been used to treat various kinds of agitated behaviours is large, there are few double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in this area and fewer still in nursing home populations. No one class and no one medication has been identified as a treatment of choice. While we work to find the aetiological mechanisms of irreversible forms of dementia, and the possible treatments for the underlying disorders, the challenge to develop more effective medications with better adverse effect profiles is before us. PMID:8820795

  20. A longitudinal analysis of nursing home outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Porell, F; Caro, F G; Silva, A; Monane, M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate resident and facility attributes associated with long-term care health outcomes in nursing homes. DATA SOURCES: Quarterly Management Minutes Questionnaire (MMQ) survey data for Medicaid case-mix reimbursement of nursing homes in Massachusetts from 1991 to 1994, for specification of outcomes and resident attributes. Facility attributes are specified from cost report data. STUDY DESIGN: Multivariate logistic and "state-dependence" regression models are estimated for survival, ADL functional status, incontinence status, and mental status outcomes from longitudinal residence histories of Medicaid residents spanning 3 to 36 months in length. Outcomes are specified to be a function of resident demographic and diagnostic attributes and facility-level operating and nurse staffing attributes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The estimated parameters for resident demographic and diagnostic attributes showed a great deal of construct validity with respect to clinical expectations regarding risk factors for adverse outcomes. Few facility attributes were associated with outcomes generally, and none was significantly associated with all four outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of uniform associations between facility attributes and the various long-term care health outcomes studied suggests that strong facility performance on one health outcome may coexist with much weaker performance on other outcomes. This has implications for the aggregation of individual facility performance measures on multiple outcomes and the development of overall outcome performance measures. PMID:9776939

  1. Certified Nursing Assistants’ Explanatory Models of Nursing Home Resident Depression

    PubMed Central

    Piven, Mary Lynn; Anderson, Ruth A.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explored how Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) understood resident depression. Interviews with 18 CNAs, working in two nursing homes were guided by Kleinman’s Explanatory Models of Illness framework. Interview data were content analyzed and CNAs’ descriptions of depression were compared to the MDS 2.0 Mood Screen and to DSM-IV-TR Depression Criteria. CNAs identified causes, signs, and symptoms of depression, but they were unsure about the duration and normalcy of depression in residents. Although they had no formal training, CNAs felt responsible for detecting depression and described verbal and non-verbal approaches that they used for emotional care of depressed residents. CNAs hold potential to improve the detection of depression and contribute to the emotional care of residents. Attention to knowledge deficits and facility barriers may enhance this capacity. PMID:18390825

  2. What pediatric home care offers the nurse.

    PubMed

    Peirson, G S

    1993-01-01

    Pammy had never been home in her 16 months of life. She'd never been in a car seat, seen her sister go off to school, or sat outside in her stroller. Today was the first day of a new life. While her Dad finished putting the crib together and the respiratory therapist arrived with the missing ventilator connector, her mother and her nurse Judy were accompanying her in the ambulance home. Soon her tube-feeding bag was hanging on a hook next to the "Welcome Home, Pammy" sign that a neighbor had made on his computer, and her four-year-old brother was building a runway under the nurse's feet. The back-up ventilator filled a quarter of the small living room, and the tubing, suction catheters, vent parts, formula, and water bottles filled the closet in Pammy's room--large enough because Mom and Dad had moved out of the master bedroom. Judy had helped Pam's mother set up the room a week ago and already had a sense of her concerns, the four-year-old's busyness, and the irregular schedule that the father worked. This would be an enjoyable, but challenging experience. PMID:8295516

  3. Person-Environment Interactions Contributing to Nursing Home Resident Falls

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Elizabeth E.; Nguyen, Tam H.; Shaha, Maya; Wenzel, Jennifer A.; DeForge, Bruce R.; Spellbring, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Although approximately 50% of nursing home residents fall annually, the surrounding circumstances remain inadequately understood. This study explored nursing staff perspectives of person, environment, and interactive circumstances surrounding nursing home falls. Focus groups were conducted at two nursing homes in the mid-Atlantic region with the highest and lowest fall rates among corporate facilities. Two focus groups were conducted per facility: one with licensed nurses and one with geriatric nursing assistants. Thematic and content analysis revealed three themes and 11 categories. Three categories under the Person theme were Change in Residents’ Health Status, Decline in Residents’ Abilities, and Residents’ Behaviors and Personality Characteristics. There were five Nursing Home Environment categories: Design Safety, Limited Space, Obstacles, Equipment Misuse and Malfunction, and Staff and Organization of Care. Three Interactions Leading to Falls categories were identified: Reasons for Falls, Time of Falls, and High-Risk Activities. Findings highlight interactions between person and environment factors as significant contributors to resident falls. PMID:20077985

  4. Are nursing homes adequately staffed? The silent epidemic of malnutrition and dehydration in nursing home residents. Until mandatory staffing standards are created and enforced, residents are at risk.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Debra; Hooten, Jack

    2007-07-01

    Providing care to produce positive resident outcomes is an ethical duty of nursing home staff. Research has shown that inadequate staffing levels present an increased health risk to nursing home residents. Nursing home residents may experience dehydration and malnutrition caused by inadequate staffing. Continued research in the area of nutrition and dehydration in nursing home residents may positively influence changes in staffing levels at nursing homes. Currently, residents living in understaffed nursing homes and not receiving proper care are the victims. It is time for nurses to forcefully lobby for national mandatory nurse staffing standards. PMID:17672164

  5. Workplace Stress and Ethical Challenges Experienced by Nursing Staff in a Nursing Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vondras, Dean D.; Flittner, Diane; Malcore, Sylvia A.; Pouliot, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    This research explores the workplace stress and ethical challenges reported by healthcare staff in a nursing home. A brief self-report survey was administered to 44 members of the nursing staff in a not-for-profit nursing home. The survey included items that elicited identification of specific workplace stressors and ethical challenges and global…

  6. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses’ Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs in nursing homes. Design and Methods: The sample included 863 RNs working as staff RNs in 282 skilled nursing facilities in New Jersey. Two-level hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for the RNs nested by nursing homes. Results: Controlling for individual and nursing home characteristics, staff RNs’ participation in facility affairs, supportive manager, and resource adequacy were positively associated with RNs’ job satisfaction. Ownership status was significantly related to job satisfaction; RNs working in for-profit nursing homes were less satisfied. Implications: A supportive practice environment is significantly associated with higher job satisfaction among RNs working in nursing homes. Unlike other nursing home characteristics, specific dimensions of the nursing practice environment can be modified through administrative actions to enhance RN job satisfaction. PMID:21908803

  7. Patient safety culture assessment in the nursing home

    PubMed Central

    Handler, S M; Castle, N G; Studenski, S A; Perera, S; Fridsma, D B; Nace, D A; Hanlon, J T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess patient safety culture (PSC) in the nursing home setting, to determine whether nursing home professionals differ in their PSC ratings, and to compare PSC scores of nursing homes with those of hospitals. Methods The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was modified for use in nursing homes (PSC‐NH) and distributed to 151 professionals in four non‐profit nursing homes. Mean scores on each PSC‐NH dimension were compared across professions (doctors, pharmacists, advanced practitioners and nurses) and with published benchmark scores from 21 hospitals. Results Response rates were 68.9% overall and 52–100% for different professions. Most respondents (76%) were women and had worked in nursing homes for an average of 9.8 years, and at their current facility for 5.4 years. Professions agreed on 11 of 12 dimensions of the survey and differed significantly (p<0.05) only in ratings for one PSC dimension (attitudes about staffing issues), where nurses and pharmacists believed that they had enough employees to handle the workload. Nursing homes scored significantly lower (ie, worse) than hospitals (p<0.05) in five PSC dimensions (non‐punitive response to error, teamwork within units, communication openness, feedback and communication about error, and organisational learning). Conclusions Professionals in nursing homes generally agree about safety characteristics of their facilities, and the PSC in nursing homes is significantly lower than that in hospitals. PSC assessment may be helpful in fostering comparisons across nursing home settings and professions, and identifying targets for interventions to improve patient safety. PMID:17142586

  8. Reorganizing the nursing home industry: a proposal.

    PubMed

    Shulman, D; Galanter, R

    1976-01-01

    This paper proposes a reorganization of the nursing home industry with capital facilities owned by government, but with management conducted through a system of competitive contracts with the private sector. The paper explicity demonstrates in real estate finance terms how the present system of private ownership of capital facilities inherently impedes providing a high quality of care. The authors believe that in the proposed industry reorganization, market forces, instead of working against quality care, would be supportive of quality care in a framework that would involve generally less regulation than exists today. PMID:1272543

  9. Social Support in Elderly Nursing Home Populations: Manifestations and Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rash, Elizabeth M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of social support and the influencing factors on social support in nursing home environments. Observations and staff questionnaires from two central Florida nursing homes were used in this grounded theory study to answer the following questions: (1) How is social support manifested? and…

  10. The Effects of Monthly Psychiatric Consultation in a Nursing Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourigny-Rivard, Marie-France; Drury, Marilyn

    1987-01-01

    Studied the effects of monthly psychiatric consultation in a nursing home. Suggested that consultation was primarily useful to staff providing direct care to referred residents. Cited benefits to residents as increased staff awareness and acceptance of emotional problems and increased frequency of therapeutic programs offered at the nursing home.…

  11. Medicaid Spenddown among Nursing Home Residents in Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arling, Greg; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined Medicaid spenddown among nursing home residents from 72 Wisconsin facilities. Found only small proportion of discharges had spent down to Medicaid eligibility, but this group's long stays contributed heavily to nursing home days. Estimated over 40 percent of those who spent down did so within six months, 58 percent within a year, and 76…

  12. Patients' Anticipation of Stress in Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Shayna; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined anticipation of stresses in 223 patients recently admitted to nursing homes, who completed the stresses in Institutional Care Scale (SIC). Factor analysis revealed five factors significantly related to psychological and physical variables. Suggests using SIC for admission screening in nursing homes. Appendix contains the SIC. (NRB)

  13. Observational Learning among Older Adults Living in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Colleen D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate learning by older adults living in nursing homes through observational learning based on Bandura's (1977) social learning theory. This quantitative study investigated if older adults could learn through observation. The nursing homes in the study were located in the midwestern United States. The…

  14. Top Management Team Characteristics and Innovation in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Banaszak-Holl, Jane

    1997-01-01

    Examines how demographic characteristics of the top management team in 236 nursing homes can affect the adoption of innovations. Results indicate that managers of non-chain nursing homes showed a greater association between demographic factors and innovation. Job tenure, educational background, and professional involvement were important…

  15. Why Won't Physicians Make Nursing Home Visits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Janet B.; Hewes, Helene T.

    1986-01-01

    Michigan physicians (N=930) were asked whether they made nursing home visits and if not, why not. A typology was developed to differentiate among various physician types based on reasons given. Six physician types were found, each identified with a different policy lever that could be used to encourage them to treat nursing home patients. (Author)

  16. Are ADNs Prepared to Be Home Health Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Monahan, Frances D.

    1997-01-01

    Responses from 132 of 350 home health nurses identified techniques and skills associate degree nurses (ADNs) should acquire to work for home health agencies. Accredited ADN programs reported that only 24 of the techniques are taught in all programs and 55 of the skills are taught in 90% of the programs. (SK)

  17. Medicare Part D and the Nursing Home Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, David G.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Newhouse, Joseph P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore how the introduction of Medicare Part D is changing the operations of long-term-care pharmacies (LTCPs) and nursing homes, as well as implications of those changes for nursing home residents. Design and Methods: We reviewed existing sources of information and interviewed stakeholders across…

  18. Organizational Climate Determinants of Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Zhdanova, Ludmila S.; Elsouhag, Dalia; Lichtenberg, Peter; Luborsky, Mark R.; Arnetz, Bengt B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing costly adverse events, such as medication errors and falls, among nursing home residents. However, little is known regarding critical organizational determinants of a positive safety culture in nursing homes. The aim of this study…

  19. OCCUPATIONAL TRENDS IN IDAHO HOSPITALS AND LICENSED NURSING HOMES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEEMAN, ADDISON C.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO OBTAIN INFORMATION ON THE CURRENT LABOR FORCE IN HOSPITALS AND NURSING HOMES AND FUTURE MANPOWER NEEDS WHICH WOULD BE HELPFUL TO PLANNERS OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS, EMPLOYERS, WORKERS, AND YOUTH ENTERING THE LABOR MARKET. ADMINISTRATORS OR PERSONNEL OFFICERS OF 14 HOSPITALS AND 13 NURSING HOMES,…

  20. Learning Opportunities for Nurses Working within Home Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Solveig

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore home care nurses' experience of learning in a multicultural environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study was based on qualitative research design. Data were collected through repeated interviews with registered home care nurses working in a multicultural area. The data were analyzed through a…

  1. Establishing and Maintaining Intimate Relationships among Nursing Home Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crose, Royda

    1990-01-01

    Argues that nursing home mental health counselors should address nursing home residents' need for assistance in conflict resolution, having meaningful social interactions, and in developing and maintaining feelings of self-worth. Describes benefits of group therapy approach using life review format to help build basic trust and feelings of…

  2. Nursing Home Litigation and Tort Reform: A Case for Exceptionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studdert, David M.; Stevenson, David G.

    2004-01-01

    The medical malpractice crisis that is currently spreading across the United States bears many similarities to earlier crises. One novel aspect of the current crisis is the explicit inclusion of litigation against nursing homes as a target of reform. Encouraged by the nursing home industry, policymakers are considering the extension of…

  3. Geriatric Training Needs of Nursing-Home Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Rosenfeld, Vera; Madjar, Jack; Kakuriev, Michael; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Medical care in nursing homes is not provided by board-licensed geriatricians; it mainly comes from physicians in need of educational programs in the field of geriatrics. Such programs, based on curriculum guidelines, should be developed. The purpose of this study was to seek input from nursing home physicians on their perceived needs for training…

  4. Improving Nursing Home Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine R.; Fink, Regina; Pepper, Ginny; Hutt, Eveyln; Vojir, Carol P.; Scott, Jill; Clark, Lauren; Mellis, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Effective pain management remains a serious problem in the nursing home setting. Barriers to achieving optimal pain practices include staff knowledge deficits, biases, and attitudes that influence assessment and management of the residents' pain. Design and Methods: Twelve nursing homes participated in this intervention study: six…

  5. [Internal and external assessment of nursing home residents' satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Stéphane; Cohen, Nadia; Bertin-Hugault, François; Sanchez, Marc Antoine; Dramé, Moustapha; Denormandie, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement procedures and measuring the satisfaction of nursing home residents is a major priority. A study assessed the differences between the results of a survey conducted by internal staff and of one carried out by an external service provider to evaluate the satisfaction of the residents of a nursing home. PMID:27449308

  6. The Teaching Nursing Home as an Academic Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Philip G.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the origins of the teaching nursing home concept, describes its goals and major components, and explores some of the problems in developing it as an academic program. Asserts that the teaching nursing home, if properly developed, can be a strong academic program that improves geriatric patient care, research, and teaching. (Author/ABB)

  7. Preparing Tomorrow’s Nursing Home Nurses: The Wisconsin-Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program

    PubMed Central

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly-skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This paper reports on development, implementation and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working with older adults and in nursing homes, while concurrently increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience. PMID:25162659

  8. The Impact of Certificate-of-Need Laws on Nursing Home and Home Health Care Expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Momotazur; Galarraga, Omar; Zinn, Jacqueline S.; Grabowski, David C.; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, nursing homes and home health care agencies have been influenced by several Medicare and Medicaid policy changes including the adoption of prospective payment for Medicare-paid postacute care and Medicaid-paid long-term home and community-based care reforms. This article examines how spending growth in these sectors was affected by state certificate-of-need (CON) laws, which were designed to limit the growth of providers and have remained unchanged for several decades. Compared with states without CON laws, Medicare and Medicaid spending in states with CON laws grew faster for nursing home care and more slowly for home health care. In particular, we observed the slowest growth in community-based care in states with CON for both the nursing home and home health industries. Thus, controlling for other factors, public postacute and long-term care expenditures in CON states have become dominated by nursing homes. PMID:26223431

  9. The role of the clinical nurse specialist in home healthcare.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jennifer H

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating clinical nurse specialists (CNS) into home healthcare models is crucial for agencies that want to be on the leading edge of healthcare. As an advanced practice nurse, the CNS adds value by working with patients, home healthcare clinicians, and systems to improve patient outcomes. The CNS is a change agent who directly impacts the client during transitions in and out of home care, throughout the course of chronic disease management, and by assuring quality care is delivered by field clinicians. PMID:25654346

  10. Nursing Home Resident Symptomatology Triggering Transfer: Avoiding Unnecessary Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Ashcraft, Alyce S.; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nursing home resident symptomatology and medical diagnoses associated with nursing home to hospital transfers. A retrospective chart review of documented transfers was conducted at a 120-bed, nonprofit urban Continuing Care Retirement Center nursing home facility located in the southwestern United States. The transferred residents (n = 101) had seventy different medical diagnoses prior to hospital transfer with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and congestive heart failure most frequently reported. Most frequently reported symptomatology included fatigue, lethargy or weakness, shortness of breath, and change in level of consciousness. Multiple symptomatology was indicative of a wide variety of medical diagnoses. The diagnoses and symptomatology recorded in this paper identify the importance of strategic planning concerning assessment and communication of common nursing home resident symptomatology and the importance of basic nursing and diagnostic procedures for prevention of potentially avoidable hospitalizations. PMID:23091714

  11. Nursing home case mix in Wisconsin. Findings and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Arling, G; Zimmerman, D; Updike, L

    1989-02-01

    Along with many other states, Wisconsin is considering a case mix approach to Medicaid nursing home reimbursement. To support this effort, a nursing home case mix model was developed from a representative sample of 410 Medicaid nursing home residents from 56 facilities in Wisconsin. The model classified residents into mutually exclusive groups that were homogeneous in their use of direct care resources, i.e., minutes of direct care time (weighted for nurse skill level) over a 7-day period. Groups were defined initially by intense, Special, or Routine nursing requirements. Within these nursing requirement categories, subgroups were formed by the presence/absence of behavioral problems and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL). Wisconsin's current Skilled/Intermediate Care (SNF/ICF) classification system was analyzed in light of the case mix model and found to be less effective in distinguishing residents by resource use. The case mix model accounted for 48% of the variance in resource use, whereas the SNF/ICF classification system explained 22%. Comparisons were drawn with nursing home case mix models in New York State (RUG-II) and Minnesota. Despite progress in the study of nursing home case mix and its application to reimbursement reform, methodologic and policy issues remain. These include the differing operational definitions for nursing requirements and ADL dependency, the inconsistency in findings concerning psychobehavioral problems, and the problem of promoting positive health and functional outcomes based on models that may be insensitive to change in resident conditions over time. PMID:2493112

  12. Sexual Abuse of Older Residents in Nursing Homes: A Focus Group Interview of Nursing Home Staff

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Maria Helen; Kilvik, Astrid; Malmedal, Wenche

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to increase knowledge of sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. A qualitative approach was used. Through a focus group interview with staff in nursing homes, the aim was to reveal employees' thoughts, experiences, and attitudes. Findings from the focus group interview show that sexual abuse of older residents is a taboo topic among health professionals. Acts of sexual abuse are difficult to imagine; it is hard to believe that it occurs. The fact that staff are not aware that it could happen, or have a hard time believing that it actually happens, can amplify the residents' vulnerable position as potential victims of abuse, and it makes it even more challenging to report or uncover such acts. The study highlights the need for education of all health care workers in Norway as well as more research on sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. Furthermore, there is a need for good policies and reporting systems, as an important step towards addressing sexual abuse of the aged in a more appropriate way. Further research must aim to reveal more about this taboo area. PMID:26078879

  13. Analysis of nursing home capital reimbursement systems

    PubMed Central

    Boerstler, Heidi; Carlough, Tom; Schlenker, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    An increasing number of States are using a fair-rental approach for reimbursement of nursing home capital costs. In this study, two variants of the fair-rental capital-reimbursement approach are compared with the traditional cost-based approach in terms of after-tax cash flow to the investor, cost to the State, and rate of return to investor. Simulation models were developed to examine the effects of each capital-reimbursement approach both at specific points in time and over various periods of time. Results indicate that although long-term costs were similar for the three systems, both fair-rental approaches may be superior to the traditional cost-based approach in promoting and controlling industry stability and, at the same time, in providing an adequate return to investors. PMID:10110878

  14. Terminal patients in Belgian nursing homes: a cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Vanden Berghe, Paul; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Policy makers and health care payers are concerned about the costs of treating terminal patients. This study was done to measure the costs of treating terminal patients during the final month of life in a sample of Belgian nursing homes from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative care with those of usual care. This multicenter, retrospective cohort study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of nursing homes. Health care costs included fixed nursing home costs, medical fees, pharmacy charges, other charges, and eventual hospitalization costs. Data sources consisted of accountancy and invoice data. The analysis calculated costs per patient during the final month of life at 2007/2008 prices. Nineteen nursing homes participated in the study, generating a total of 181 patients. Total mean nursing home costs amounted to 3,243 € per patient during the final month of life. Total mean nursing home costs per patient of 3,822 € for patients receiving usual care were higher than costs of 2,456 € for patients receiving palliative care (p = 0.068). Higher costs of usual care were driven by higher hospitalization costs (p < 0.001). This study suggests that palliative care models in nursing homes need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. PMID:22367732

  15. Contextual determinants of US nursing home racial/ethnic diversity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jullet A; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Lapane, Kate L; Laberge, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We hypothesized that for-profit/chain affiliated nursing homes, those in states with higher Medicaid reimbursement, and those in more competitive markets would have greater resident racial/ethnic diversity than nursing homes not meeting these criteria. Using 2004 Online Survey, Certification and Reporting data, Minimum Data Set, Lewis Mumford Center for Comparative Urban and Regional Research data, and the Area Resource File, we included U.S. Medicare/Medicaid certified nursing homes (N = 8950) located in 310 Metropolitan Statistical Areas. The dependent variable quantified facility-level multiracial diversity. Ordinary least squares regression showed support for the hypothesized relationships: for-profit/chain affiliated nursing homes were more diverse than nursing homes in all other ownership/chain member categories, while higher Medicaid per-diem rates, greater residential diversity, and stronger market competition were also positively associated with nursing home racial/ethnic composition. Results suggest there is room for policy changes to achieve equitable access to all levels of nursing home services for minority elders. PMID:24581072

  16. Delirium in the Nursing Home Emergency Department Patient

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin H.; Morandi, Alessandro; Ely, E. Wesley; Callison, Clay; Zhou, Chuan; Storrow, Alan B.; Dittus, Robert S.; Habermann, Ralf; Schnelle, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Nursing home patients are an important segment of the aging population, but are often neglected in emergency department (ED) delirium studies. We sought to determine if nursing home patients are more likely to present to the ED with delirium compared to non-nursing home patients, and explore how variations in their delirium risk factor profiles contribute to this relationship. Design Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting Tertiary care, academic ED. Participants Three hundred forty one English speaking patients who were 65 years and older. Measurements Delirium status was determined by using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) administered by trained research assistants. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine if nursing home residence was associated with delirium. Odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were reported. Results Of the 341 patients enrolled, 58 (17%) resided in a nursing home. A total of 38 (11.2%) patients were considered to have delirium in the ED. Twenty two (37.9%) and 16 (5.7%) of nursing home and non-nursing home patients, respectively, had delirium in the ED with an unadjusted OR (95%CI) of 10.2 (4.9 – 21.2). After adjusting for dementia, a Katz ADL < 5, hearing impairment, and the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), nursing home residence was independently associated with delirium in the ED (adjusted OR = 4.2, 95%CI: 1.8 – 9.7). Conclusion In the ED setting, nursing home patients were more likely to present with delirium, and this relationship persisted after adjusting for delirium risk factors. PMID:19484845

  17. A Measure of Palliative Care in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sarah; Bott, Marjorie; Boyle, Diane; Gajewski, Byron; Tilden, Virginia P.

    2010-01-01

    Context Efforts to improve care for nursing home residents stand to be enhanced by measures to assess the degree to which staff provide palliative care. As the incidence of death in nursing homes increases with the aging population, the gap in measurement must be addressed. To that end, we report the development and psychometric testing of a nursing home palliative care survey. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Palliative Care Survey for use in nursing homes. Methods Psychometric evaluation of the instrument was completed in two phases. Phase 1 focused on individual item analyses and subsequent revision or deletion of items, and Phase 2 evaluated evidence for reliability and validity. Phase 1 included 26 nursing homes and staff (n = 717) and Phase 2 included 85 nursing homes and staff (n = 2779). Data were analyzed using item-total correlations, Cronbach’s alpha, confirmatory factor analysis, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results Support was obtained for a 51-item Palliative Care Survey (PCS) made up of two constructs Palliative Care Practice and Palliative Care Knowledge. Conclusion The PCS measures the extent to which nursing home staff engage in palliative care practices and have knowledge consistent with good end-of-life care. Both practice and knowledge are an essential foundation to providing good end-of-life care to nursing home residents. Efforts to improve care for the dying in nursing homes have been slowed by an absence of measurement tools that capture care processes; a gap, which the Palliative Care Survey reported here, helps fill. PMID:20797836

  18. 42 CFR 431.704 - Nursing homes designated by other terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nursing homes designated by other terms. 431.704... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.704 Nursing homes designated by other terms. If a State licensing law does not use the term “nursing home,” the CMS Administrator will determine the...

  19. 42 CFR 431.704 - Nursing homes designated by other terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nursing homes designated by other terms. 431.704... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.704 Nursing homes designated by other terms. If a State licensing law does not use the term “nursing home,” the CMS Administrator will determine the...

  20. 42 CFR 431.704 - Nursing homes designated by other terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing homes designated by other terms. 431.704... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.704 Nursing homes designated by other terms. If a State licensing law does not use the term “nursing home,” the CMS Administrator will determine the...

  1. 42 CFR 431.704 - Nursing homes designated by other terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nursing homes designated by other terms. 431.704... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.704 Nursing homes designated by other terms. If a State licensing law does not use the term “nursing home,” the CMS Administrator will determine the...

  2. 42 CFR 431.704 - Nursing homes designated by other terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nursing homes designated by other terms. 431.704... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.704 Nursing homes designated by other terms. If a State licensing law does not use the term “nursing home,” the CMS Administrator will determine the...

  3. Infections in Nursing Homes: Epidemiology and Prevention Programs.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Ana; Cassone, Marco; Mody, Lona

    2016-08-01

    This review summarizes current literature pertaining to infection prevention in nursing home population including post-acute care patients and long-term care residents. Approximately 2 million infections occur each year and more than one-third of older adults harbor multidrug-resistant organisms in this setting. Surveillance, hand hygiene, isolation precautions, resident and employee health programs, education, and antibiotic stewardship are essential elements of infection prevention and control programs in nursing homes. This article discusses emerging evidence suggesting the usefulness of interactive multimodal bundles in reducing infections and antimicrobial resistance, thereby enhancing safety and quality of care for older adults in nursing homes. PMID:27394025

  4. Muslim nursing homes in the United States: barriers and prospects.

    PubMed

    Alfarah, Ziad; Ramadan, Fadi H; Cury, Emily; Brandeis, Gary H

    2012-02-01

    Historically, many nursing homes in the United States have been established by religious groups. This was done to provide care for the elderly when care could not be furnished in other venues. Despite several attempts reported in the literature, there are currently no Muslim nursing homes in the United States. In the Arab and Muslim world, the acceptance and success of such an institution has been somewhat variable. As the Arab Muslim population in the United States ages and becomes more frail, the Muslim community will have to evaluate the need to establish nursing homes to provide care for elderly. PMID:21889415

  5. [Work related predictors for "satisfaction with dementia care" among nurses working in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sascha G; Palm, Rebecca; Dichter, Martin; Hasselhorn, Hans Martin

    2011-04-01

    In German nursing homes dementia care is gaining increasing relevance. Dementia care is known to bear the high risk of a substantial occupational burden among nursing staff. Within this context, the "nurses' satisfaction with the care for residents with dementia" is investigated. Secondary data of the German 3q-study is used to assess degrees of nurses' satisfaction with the care for residents with dementia and potential work related predictors. Data from 813 nurses and nursing aides working in 53 nursing homes were included. 42% of all nursing staff was dissatisfied with the care for residents with dementia in their institution, however, pronounced differences were found between the institutions. Registered nurses and nurses in leading positions were more dissatisfied. A multiple regression analysis indicates that high "quantitative demands", low "leadership quality" and "social interaction with other professions" are strong predictors for nurses' satisfaction with the care for residents with dementia. No association was found for "emotional demands" and "possibilities for development". The results indicate that the "nurses" satisfaction with the care for residents with dementia" may be a highly relevant work factor for nursing staff in nursing homes which deserves additional attention in practice and research. The high predictive power of several work organisational factors implies that preventive action should also include work organisational factors. PMID:21480173

  6. The Employment of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants in U.S. Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intrator, Orna; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vince; Gifford, David; Bourbonniere, Meg; Zinn, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Nursing facilities with nurse practitioners or physician assistants (NPs or PAs) have been reported to provide better care to residents. Assuming that freestanding nursing homes in urban areas that employ these professionals are making an investment in medical infrastructure, we test the hypotheses that facilities in states with higher…

  7. Characteristics and Recruitment Paths of Certified Nursing Assistants in Rural and Urban Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Probst, Janice C.; Baek, Jong-Deuk; Laditka, Sarah B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Most nursing home care is provided by certified nursing assistants (CNAs), but little is known about rural CNAs. Purpose: To develop a representative geographic profile of the CNA workforce, focusing on paths leading to present job. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of data from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS), a…

  8. The Influence of Nurse Staffing Levels on Quality of Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyer, Kathryn; Thomas, Kali S.; Branch, Laurence G.; Harman, Jeffrey S.; Johnson, Christopher E.; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the relationship between increasing certified nursing assistants (CNAs) and licensed nurse staffing ratios and deficiencies in Florida nursing homes over a 4-year period. Methods: Data from Florida staffing reports and the Online Survey Certification and Reporting database examine the relationship among staffing…

  9. Articulation Matrix for Home Health Aide, Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This document demonstrates the relationships among four Florida nursing education programs (home health aide, nursing assistant, patient care assistant, and practical nursing) by listing student performance standards and indicating which ones are required in each program. The 268 student performance standards are arranged in 23 areas of…

  10. Nurse Delegation in Home Care: Research Guiding Policy Change.

    PubMed

    Young, Heather M; Farnham, Jennifer; Reinhard, Susan C

    2016-09-01

    The current study evaluated nurse delegation in home care, a pilot program introduced in 2007 in New Jersey to promote home care options for consumers needing assistance with medical/nursing tasks. Findings on readiness for the program, barriers and facilitating factors, experience with the program, and recommendations are summarized and presented. Methods included surveys and interviews with participants in nurse delegation, observations of planning and implementation meetings, and review meeting minutes. Major findings were no negative outcomes for consumers, improvements in quality of life and quality of care for consumers, high readiness and increasing satisfaction with experience in delegation, perception of nurse delegation in home care as a valued option, and the challenges of ensuring adequate staffing. Subsequent changes in regulation in New Jersey are underway, translating this research into policy. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(9), 7-15.]. PMID:27571400

  11. Assisted Living Expansion and the Market for Nursing Home Care

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C; Stevenson, David G; Cornell, Portia Y

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the effect of market-level changes in assisted living supply on nursing home utilization and resident acuity. Data Sources Primary data on the supply of assisted living over time were collected from 13 states from 1993 through 2007 and merged with nursing home-level data from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting System and market-level information from the Area Resource File. Study Design Least squares regression specification incorporating market and time-fixed effects. Principal Findings A 10 percent increase in assisted living capacity led to a 1.4 percent decline in private-pay nursing home occupancy and a 0.2–0.6 percent increase in patient acuity. Conclusions Assisted living serves as a potential substitute for nursing home care for some healthier individuals with greater financial resources, suggesting implications for policy makers, providers, and consumers. PMID:22578039

  12. A State Profile of IT Sophistication in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Gregory L.

    2008-01-01

    In healthcare, IT sophistication has been defined as the diversity and maturity of information system hardware and software that support clinical services. Clinical services relevant to this study include resident care management, clinical support and administrative activities in nursing homes. An IT sophistication survey previously validated in acute care settings and adapted for nursing homes was used to develop a state profile of Missouri nursing homes. The IT survey was disseminated via paper and electronic methods as chosen by a selected responder that had IT oversight and knowledge of IT stakeholders. A census of 199 respondents completed the survey, representing a 41% (199/491) response rate. Findings support recent literature indicating a higher percentage of nursing homes are still using technology for administrative purposes; however, there is growing recognition that technologies with greater functionality, is used more extensively for electronic and automated transfer of resident care information. PMID:18999316

  13. [Supervising student nurses in the provision of home care].

    PubMed

    Talon-Chrétien, Marie-Claire; Prigent, Alexane; Thirion, Lucille

    2016-01-01

    The private practice nurse may be required to supervise a student during their provision of care to patients in their home. These situations can be mutually rewarding and open the way for discussion around the quality of care. PMID:27393989

  14. Family Caregivers Define and Manage the Nursing Home Placement Process.

    PubMed

    Koplow, Sarah M; Gallo, Agatha M; Knafl, Kathleen A; Vincent, Catherine; Paun, Olimpia; Gruss, Valerie

    2015-08-01

    The nursing home placement process is complex and difficult for family caregivers. This qualitative descriptive study examines the experiences of caregivers involved in the management of care and placement of an older family member using the Family Management Style Framework. Ten caregivers were recruited from four nursing homes in the Midwest. The caregivers were interviewed shortly after placement and again 3 months post-placement. Results provide a unique understanding of care management and the nursing home placement process from the perspective of the primary family caregiver. Overall, there were similarities across the same types of caregiving dyads, for example, spousal and adult-children caregivers. Caregivers expressed the need to maintain the identity of their older family member, a familial responsibility for caregiving, and change in their family relationship over time. Appreciating caregivers' challenges and needs gives health care professionals a better understanding for how to provide assistance for a smoother nursing home transition. PMID:25691220

  15. Nursing Home eTool: Occupational Hazards in Long Term Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Newsroom Small Business Anti-Retaliation eTools Home : Nursing Home Scope | References | Site Map | Credits Nursing Home eTool Bloodborne Pathogens Ergonomics Dietary Laundry Maintenance ...

  16. Improving care transitions from hospital to home: standardized orders for home health nursing with remote telemonitoring.

    PubMed

    Heeke, Sheila; Wood, Felecia; Schuck, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A task force at a multihospital health care system partnered with home health agencies to improve gaps during the discharge transition process. A standardized order template for home health nursing and remote telemonitoring was developed to decrease discrepancies in communication between hospital health care providers and home health nurses caring for patients with heart failure. Pilot results showed significantly improved communication with no readmissions, using the order template. PMID:23938358

  17. Spiritual caring: end of life in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Touhy, Theris A; Brown, Cynthia; Smith, Carol J

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore spiritual care for dying nursing home residents from the perspectives of registered nurses, practical nurses, certified nursing assistants, advanced practice nurses, and physicians. Five major themes emerged: honoring the person's dignity, intimate knowing in the nursing home environment, wishing we could do more, personal knowing of self as caregiver, and struggling with end-of-life treatment decisions. Spiritual caring was described within the context of deep personal relationships, holistic care, and support for residents. Spiritual care responses and similarities and differences in the experiences of participants are presented. Education and research about how to assist residents and families as they struggle with difficult end-of-life decisions, adequate time and staff to provide the kind of care they "wished they could," and development of models that honor the close connection and attachment of staff to residents could enhance end-of-life care in this setting. PMID:16190010

  18. Alzheimer's treatment in nursing homes: room for improvement.

    PubMed

    Bright-Long, Lory

    2006-02-01

    Managing Alzheimer's disease (AD) continues to challenge long-term care physicians and administrators. Although pharmacologic treatment can substantially benefit AD patients in the nursing home setting, common misconceptions and skepticism about its value are barriers to treatment use. Aggressive treatment for AD maximizes patient function and independence and is cost-effective. Herein we discuss state-of-the-art treatment of AD with a view to providing nursing home physicians a framework from which to make treatment decisions. PMID:16461250

  19. [Training and representation of dementia of workers in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Stéphane; Gallin, Aurélie; Stefanuto, Muriel; Treffel, Sylvie; Antoine, Marc; Denormandie, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Training could be a lever for improving the quality of care of residents with dementia in nursing homes by changing social representations. Beyond a simple assessment of acquired knowledge, a change of social representations could be indicative of a true appropriation of the content of the training. A study was carried out to assess the impact of training on nursing home caregivers' representations of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26976314

  20. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) at home: prototype high-tech home care nursing.

    PubMed

    Davis, J H

    1996-01-01

    Current economic and demographic trends in the United States indicate the demand for complex treatments, such as infusion therapies at home, will continue to escalate. In light of the increasingly acute and autonomous nature of home health practice, examination of home care nursing process affecting patient care outcomes is crucial. This study explored the cognitive, technical, and interpersonal components included in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) home care nursing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate psychometrically the Schmele Instrument to Measure the Process of Nursing Practice in Home Health (SIMP-H) so that it may be used to examine high-tech home care nursing process. Home visits must be observed to identify the specific cognitive, technical, and interpersonal components included in high-tech home care nursing that are important for patient care outcomes. This study captured high-tech home care nursing process on videotape, which provided a medium for evaluating interobserver reliability for the SIMP-H. Results revealed an interobserver reliability coefficient of .72. PMID:9025400

  1. Care on demand in nursing homes: a queueing theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    van Eeden, Karin; Moeke, Dennis; Bekker, René

    2016-09-01

    Nursing homes face ever-tightening healthcare budgets and are searching for ways to increase the efficiency of their healthcare processes without losing sight of the needs of their residents. Optimizing the allocation of care workers plays a key role in this search as care workers are responsible for the daily care of the residents and account for a significant proportion of the total labor expenses. In practice, the lack of reliable data makes it difficult for nursing home managers to make informed staffing decisions. The focus of this study lies on the 'care on demand' process in a Belgian nursing home. Based on the analysis of real-life 'call button' data, a queueing model is presented which can be used by nursing home managers to determine the number of care workers required to meet a specific service level. Based on numerical experiments an 80/10 service level is proposed for this nursing home, meaning that at least 80 percent of the clients should receive care within 10 minutes after a call button request. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to develop a quantitative model for the 'care on demand' process in a nursing home. PMID:25542224

  2. Being a Nursing Home Resident: A Challenge to One's Identity

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Maria; Them, Christa

    2013-01-01

    Going into a nursing home can turn out to be a critical life experience if elderly people are afraid of losing their independence and identity after having moved into a nursing home. In order to find out what nursing home residents need in their first year after having moved into a nursing home to maintain their identity and self-determination, 20 problem-orientated interviews with residents of three nursing homes in the Austrian province of Salzburg were conducted and analysed based on content analysis according to Mayring. The participants of this study resist against having decisions taken away from them and fight for their independence and identity. In order to be able to cope with these strains, they need the help of family members, professionals, and identity-forming conversations in new social networks in the nursing home. The study participants draw enough strength from their faith in order to fight for their independence. They develop a new identity close to their previous identity by maintaining autonomy and mobility with a clear focus on the future. PMID:23691302

  3. Decision Factors Nurses Use to Assess Pain in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Todd B; Parish, Abby; Mion, Lorraine C

    2015-10-01

    Nurses caring for older people with various psychiatric illnesses face many obstacles when treating pain. One setting with a high percentage of psychiatric conditions is long-term care where more than half of residents have some form of dementia, and behavioral symptoms of dementia (BSDs) may mimic behavioral displays of pain. Furthermore, two-thirds of nursing home residents have pain. Thus, many nursing home residents with dementia have pain that may be confounded by BSDs. Since many people with dementia are at risk for poor pain management, determining current methods in which nurses assess and manage pain in nursing home residents will aid in recognizing potential barriers to using current pain management guidelines and help develop strategies to enhance nurses' assessment and management of pain in this vulnerable population. The aim of this study was to explore nursing home nurses' cues and practices to identify and alleviate pain in nursing home residents with dementia. Nurses use the constructs of 'comfort' and 'quality of life' as key components in their overall pain assessment strategy in people with dementia. Indeed, the extensive process they use involving frequent reassessment and application of interventions is geared towards "appearance of comfort." Nurses reported difficulty in ascertaining whether a person with dementia was in pain, and they expressed further difficulty determining the intensity associated with resident pain. Nurses further reported that residents with dementia who are not well know by the staff were are greater risk of poor pain management. It was not unusual for nurses to discuss the importance of conflict resolution among family members as well as allowing for open expression of family's concerns. Nurses had to focus not only on the resident's comfort, but also the families' level of comfort with pain management, especially at the end-of-life. Findings support further use and development of discomfort behavior scales to help

  4. Innovative leadership and management in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sarah Yeun-Sim; Keatinge, Diana

    2004-11-01

    The Australian Aged Care Reform Package, implemented from October 1997, has led radical changes in nursing practice in residential aged care facilities. Apart from anecdotal evidence, however, little is known about the impact of the Reform Package on nursing staff and their practice in nursing home facilities. In an attempt to explore these issues a qualitative explorative research study was conducted in one nursing home during 2000-2001. The study found that the impact of policy change on nursing staff and their practice depended on the management's leadership in interpreted the new policy and implemented innovative strategies in order to meet its requirements. The findings of the study highlight management's 'no them vs. us' and 'holistic' approach that considered both nursing staff and residents as whole beings. Integral to this approach was management's recognition that in order to facilitate teamwork, appropriate standards of nursing practice and resident care, and staff job satisfaction four resource elements must be provided. These elements comprise material, environmental, psychosocial and psychological resources. Management's provision of each of these resources ensured that nurses considered this nursing home 'a nice place to work'. PMID:15509274

  5. Institutional loyalty and job satisfaction among nurse aides in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Grau, L; Chandler, B; Burton, B; Kolditz, D

    1991-02-01

    The high rate of turnover among nurse aides employed in nursing homes has been associated with the low job status and the poor job benefits accorded workers. However, this is not always the case. Competitive benefit packages and limited labor market opportunities increase the likelihood that nurse aides in some nursing homes may stay on the job despite their dissatisfaction with it. The present study investigated "institutional loyalty," an attitudinal proxy for job turnover, among 219 nurse aides for its relationship to a number of job-related factors. Somewhat unexpectedly, the quality of the social environment of the nursing home was found to be as important as attitudes toward job benefits in accounting for institutional loyalty. PMID:10108823

  6. Outcomes of polypharmacy in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Bruce K; Bell, Christina L; Inaba, Michiko; Masaki, Kamal H

    2012-05-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of the outcomes of polypharmacy in nursing homes. Our review had some limitations. First, we only included studies beginning in 1990, and significant earlier studies are not included. Only English language articles were included. We only researched studies from MEDLINE, and may have missed studies based on our search terms and search tools. There are many definitions of polypharmacy in the literature, including number of medications or inappropriate medications. In this review, we defined polypharmacy as a high number of medications, but not inappropriate medications. It was not surprising that polypharmacy was consistently associated with an increased number of potentially inappropriate drugs. The majority of studies were viewed showed that polypharmacy was associated with increased ADEs, increased DDIs, and increased hospitalizations. We were surprised that polypharmacy was not consistently linked with falls, fractures, and mortality. For the mortality studies, it has been postulated that perhaps some patients receiving 10 or more medications may have been moribund or receiving end-of-life or hospice care. It is possible that the number of medications is not as important as the number of potentially in appropriate drugs. There need to be more studies on these outcomes, using different definitions of polypharmacy. Polypharmacy was associated with increased costs. The drug-related morbidity and mortality, including those resulting from inappropriate medications and increased staff time, led to increased costs. Use of consultant pharmacists has been shown to decrease polypharmacy costs. PMID:22500540

  7. Newly qualified Project 2000 staff nurses in Scottish nursing homes: issues for education.

    PubMed

    Runciman, Phyllis; Dewar, Belinda; Goulbourne, Alison

    2002-10-01

    The contribution of nursing homes to nurse education in the UK is growing. This article presents educational issues raised by nine senior Nurse Managers from nursing homes in one Scottish health board. The Managers were interviewed as part of a larger Scottish study of employers' views of the skills of newly qualified Project 2000 staff nurses. Perceptions of the adequacy of the skills of newly qualified diplomates in first staff nurse posts in nursing homes following registration were explored. Impressions were mixed but generally favourable. The perceived strengths - confidence, knowledge and a questioning approach, and perceived limitations - in practical and organisational skills, matched closely those of senior Nurse Managers in the NHS sector. Managers noted the significance for learning of the business and customer care ethos of nursing home care and of the exacting skill requirements of specialist and increasingly acute care demands within this sector. There was uncertainty about and concern to strengthen preceptorship support. Matters for debate include the adequacy of telephone support versus in person on-site support for newly qualified nurses, whether expectations of initial performance are realistic and whether skill requirements differ between independent and NHS sectors. The potential value of NHS and independent health care inter-sectoral dialogue and networking is suggested. PMID:12384041

  8. Organizational determinants of service quality in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Steffen, T M; Nystrom, P C

    1997-01-01

    This study analyzed four prominent organizational factors thought to influence service quality in nursing homes. Perceptions of service quality were collected from over 400 family members who regularly visited residents in 41 nursing homes. Service quality was measured along five dimensions identified by marketing research on customers in service industries. These five dimensions were responsiveness, reliability, assurance, empathy, and tangibles. Perceptions of service quality exhibited significant associations with each of the four organizational factors: ownership, funding mix, facility size, and nurse staffing. Implications for health services administration are discussed. PMID:10167453

  9. Nursing Home Life: A Guide for Residents and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This guide represents part of AARP's comprehensive consumer education effort in the area of long-term care. The purpose of the guide is to provide information for consumers as they look for a nursing home, arrange for admission, and adjust to life in the home after admission. Section 1 introduces the guide. Section 2 describes how to assess needs,…

  10. Job Turnover and Job Satisfaction among Nursing Home Aides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxman, Howard M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Interviewed 234 aides in seven nursing homes concerning job turnover rate, job satisfaction, and perception of milieu. A positive association found between turnover rate and aides' perceptions of the homes' order, organization, and control suggested that job turnover would lessen with more involvement in the decision-making process. (JAC)

  11. Nursing Home Quality, Cost, Staffing, and Staff Mix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rantz, Marilyn J.; Hicks, Lanis; Grando, Victoria; Petroski, Gregory F.; Madsen, Richard W.; Mehr, David R.; Conn, Vicki; Zwygart-Staffacher, Mary; Scott, Jill; Flesner, Marcia; Bostick, Jane; Porter, Rose; Maas, Meridean

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the processes of care, organizational attributes, cost of care, staffing level, and staff mix in a sample of Missouri homes with good, average, and poor resident outcomes. Design and Methods: A three-group exploratory study design was used, with 92 nursing homes randomly selected from all nursing…

  12. An Empirical Evaluation of a Model Geropsychiatric Nursing Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurian, B.; Chanowitz, B.

    1987-01-01

    Describes sub-acute diagnostic and treatment nursing home program for difficult to manage older adults with medical and psychiatric illness. Notes that assessment and discharge can be completed within seven months, and that among sample population studied, almost equal percentages were discharged to state institutions, remained in the study home,…

  13. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  14. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  15. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  16. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  17. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  18. Nursing home prices and market structure: the effect of assisted living industry expansion.

    PubMed

    Bowblis, John R

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, there has been substantial expansion of facility-based alternatives to nursing home care, such as assisted living facilities. This paper analyzes the relationship between expansion of the assisted living industry, nursing home market structure and nursing home private pay prices using a two-year panel of nursing homes in the State of Ohio. Fixed effect regressions suggest that the expansion of assisted living facilities are associated with increased nursing home concentration, but find no effect on private pay nursing home prices. This would be consistent with assisted livings reducing demand for nursing homes by delaying entry into a nursing home, though assisted livings are not direct competitors of nursing homes. PMID:23889775

  19. The meaning of receiving help from home nursing care.

    PubMed

    Moe, Aud; Hellzen, Ove; Enmarker, Ingela

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of receiving help from home nursing care for the chronically ill, elderly persons living in their homes. The study was carried out in Norway. Data were collected by narrative interviews and analysed by phenomenological hermeneutic interpretations. Receiving help from home nursing care sometimes meant 'Being ill and dependent on help'. Other times it meant 'Being at the mercy of help'. It could also mean 'Feeling inferior as a human being'. Sometimes help was given by nurses who were respectful and proficient at caring for an elderly person, while at other times nurses seemed to be incompetent and worked with a paternalistic attitude without respect for privacy. Receiving help also meant elderly persons wanted to be regarded and approached as equal human beings, supported in the courage to meet challenges in life. PMID:23625732

  20. Foster home care for the frail elderly as an alternative to nursing home care: an experimental evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, J S; Volland, P J

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a program (Community Care Program) in which some elderly hospital patients who were candidates for nursing home placement were placed in foster homes. Caregivers were carefully trained and supervised. A total of 112 elderly inpatients were randomly assigned to placement in a nursing home or a foster care home. Patients and caregivers were interviewed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after placement. Community Care Program patients were more likely to maintain or improve ADL (activities of daily living) and mental status scores. They also had better nursing outcomes and were more likely to get out of the house than were nursing home patients. Nursing home patients had higher life satisfaction, and participated in more social and recreational activities. The Community Care Program was 17 per cent less costly than nursing home care. The results suggest that foster care may be a viable alternative for a segment of the nursing home population. PMID:3674248

  1. Motivators for Physical Activity among Ambulatory Nursing Home Older Residents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuh-Min; Li, Yueh-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-identified motivators for regular physical activity among ambulatory nursing home older residents. A qualitative exploratory design was adopted. Purposive sampling was performed to recruit 18 older residents from two nursing homes in Taiwan. The interview transcripts were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Five motivators of physical activity emerged from the result of analysis: eagerness for returning home, fear of becoming totally dependent, improving mood state, filling empty time, and previously cultivated habit. Research on physical activity from the perspectives of nursing home older residents has been limited. An empirically grounded understanding from this study could provide clues for promoting and supporting lifelong engagement in physical activity among older residents. The motivators reported in this study should be considered when designing physical activity programs. These motivators can be used to encourage, guide, and provide feedback to support older residents in maintaining physical activity. PMID:25054175

  2. Nursing Home Medical Staff Organization: Correlates with Quality Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul R.; Karuza, Jurgis; Lima, Julie; Intrator, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the relationship between how medical care is organized and delivered in nursing homes. Taking a lead from the acute care arena, we hypothesize that nursing home medical staff organization (NHMSO) is an important predictor of clinical outcomes in the nursing home. Methods A total of 202 usable surveys from a two-wave survey process using the Dillman Method were returned from medical directors who were randomly selected from the AMDA membership and were asked to fill out a survey on the structure of medical organization in their primary nursing home practice. Quality measures that are likely to be affected by physician practice patterns were culled from NH Compare and OSCAR data sets and matched to the physician surveys, i.e., long stay residents' prevalence of pain, restraint use, catheter use, pressure ulcers, pneumococcal vaccination, influenza vaccination, presence of advanced directives, prescription of antibiotics, and prevalence of depression. Results Using a series of hierarchical multiple regressions, significant R2 changes were found when the medical staff organization dimensions were added in the regressions after controlling for nursing home structural characteristics for the following outcomes: pneumococcal vaccination and restraint use. Near significant findings were noted for pain prevalence among long stay residents, catheter use and prevalence of pressure ulcers. Conclusions This study is the first to demonstrate a relationship between medical staff organizational dimensions and clinical outcomes in the nursing home setting and as such represents an initial “proof of concept.” NHMSO should be considered as a potentially important mediating or moderating variable in the quality of care equation for nursing homes. PMID:21450190

  3. Ineffective Staff, Ineffective Supervision, or Ineffective Administration? Why Some Nursing Homes Fail to Provide Adequate Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, John E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study involved 530 nursing staff working in 25 for-profit and nonprofit nursing homes, 2 of which failed to meet residential care standards. Nursing home climate in failed homes was perceived as being significantly lower in human relations and higher in laissez-faire and status orientation dimensions that the climate in the successful homes.…

  4. Nursing Staffs' Views on Physical and Psychosocial Care Provision in Slovenian Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Habjanić, Ana; Elo, Satu; Micetić-Turk, Dusanka; Isola, Arja

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nursing staffs' perceptions of the physical and psychological care needs of elderly residents, their views on the relative importance of these needs and their perceived ability to meet them. The literature reveals that the quality of elder care in nursing homes should comprise both physical and psychosocial care. Despite this, the nursing staffs' perceptions of the physical and psychosocial care provision have not often been researched. As a method cross-sectional research design was used, with structured questionnaires and unstructured interviews. Our sample consisted of members of the nursing staff from four nursing homes in Slovenia (survey: N = 148; interview: N = 16). The resulting data was processed by means of statistical analysis and conventional content analysis. The nursing staff reported more knowledge of, skills with and willingness to meet residents'physical needs than psychosocial needs. On the other hand, communication, conversation, self-care and a home-like environment were considered by nursing staff as marking quality elder care. Consequently, nursing home administrators should try to strengthen psychosocial care provision to improve the residents' quality of life. Conversation, as the most often recognised aspect of psychosocial care, should be promoted, since improvements in this area would not be costly, and each nursing staff member may decide individually how best to include more conversation in the daily routines of elder care provision. PMID:26987155

  5. Integrating new graduate nurses in home health care.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Carl A

    2009-10-01

    In 2005, the home health nursing sector of a large Canadian health authority was on its way toward changing a hiring prerequisite of acute care (medical or surgical) experience for entry to practice into home care nursing. At that time, home healthcare services in Canada and the United States were generally requiring acute care experience as prerequisites for working in home health. However, much of the research beginning as early as early 2000 challenged this perspective and universities and colleges offering baccalaureate degrees in nursing began including home health content in their curricula. The findings from research add to the ongoing critique of this acute care requirement and support the concept that acute care and home care are different practice areas with distinct competencies. This article discusses the contextual background that influenced the undertaking of our research, the relevant research literature, our research findings, model for integration, and evaluation of our pilot and lessons learned. The successes seen as a result of New Graduate integration are now being utilized by other home care nursing offices as a result of this work. PMID:19820662

  6. Racial Segregation and Quality of Care Disparity in US Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Momotazur; Foster, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we examine the contributions of travel distance and preferences for racial homogeneity as sources of nursing home segregation and racial disparities in nursing home quality. We first theoretically characterize the distinctive implications of these mechanisms for nursing home racial segregation. We then use this model to structure an empirical analysis of nursing home sorting. We find little evidence of differential willingness to pay for quality by race among first-time nursing home entrants, but do find significant distance and race-based preference effects. Simulation exercises suggest that both effects contribute importantly to racial disparities in nursing home quality. PMID:25461895

  7. Racial segregation and quality of care disparity in US nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Momotazur; Foster, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the contributions of travel distance and preferences for racial homogeneity as sources of nursing home segregation and racial disparities in nursing home quality. We first theoretically characterize the distinctive implications of these mechanisms for nursing home racial segregation. We then use this model to structure an empirical analysis of nursing home sorting. We find little evidence of differential willingness to pay for quality by race among first-time nursing home entrants, but do find significant distance and race-based preference effects. Simulation exercises suggest that both effects contribute importantly to racial disparities in nursing home quality. PMID:25461895

  8. Unintentional Discontinuation of Chronic Medications for Seniors in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Stall, Nathan M.; Fischer, Hadas D.; Wu, C. Fangyun; Bierman, Arlene S.; Brener, Stacey; Bronskill, Susan; Etchells, Edward; Fernandes, Olavo; Lau, Davina; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Rochon, Paula; Urbach, David R.; Bell, Chaim M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transitions of care leave patients vulnerable to the unintentional discontinuation of medications with proven efficacy for treating chronic diseases. Older adults residing in nursing homes may be especially susceptible to this preventable adverse event. The effect of large-scale policy changes on improving this practice is unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of a national medication reconciliation accreditation requirement for nursing homes on rates of unintentional medication discontinuation after hospital discharge. It was a population-based retrospective cohort study that used linked administrative records between 2003 and 2012 of all hospitalizations in Ontario, Canada. We identified nursing home residents aged ≥66 years who had continuous use of ≥1 of the 3 selected medications for chronic disease: levothyroxine, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). In 2008 medication reconciliation became a required practice for accreditation of Canadian nursing homes. The main outcome measures included the proportion of patients who restarted the medication of interest after hospital discharge at 7 days. We also performed a time series analysis to examine the impact of the accreditation requirement on rates of unintentional medication discontinuation. The study included 113,088 adults aged ≥66 years who were nursing home residents, had an acute hospitalization, and were discharged alive to the same nursing home. Overall rates of discontinuation at 7-days after hospital discharge were highest in 2003–2004 for all nursing homes: 23.9% for thyroxine, 26.4% for statins, and 23.9% for PPIs. In most of the cases, these overall rates decreased annually and were lowest in 2011–2012: 4.0% for thyroxine, 10.6% for statins, and 8.3% for PPIs. The time series analysis found that nursing home accreditation did not significantly lower medication discontinuation rates for any of the 3 drug groups. From 2003

  9. Pandemic Influenza Planning in Nursing Homes: Are We Prepared?

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Lona; Cinti, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Avian influenza or Influenza A (H5N1) is caused by a viral strain that occurs naturally in wild birds, but to which humans are immunologically naïve. If an influenza pandemic occurs, it is expected to have dire consequences, including millions of deaths, social disruption, and enormous economic consequences. The Department of Health and Human Resources plan, released in November 2005, clearly affirms the threat of a pandemic. Anticipating a disruption in many factions of society, every segment of the healthcare industry, including nursing homes, will be affected and will need to be self-sufficient. Disruption of vaccine distribution during the seasonal influenza vaccine shortage during the 2004/05 influenza season is but one example of erratic emergency planning. Nursing homes will have to make vital decisions and provide care to older adults who will not be on the initial priority list for vaccine. At the same time, nursing homes will face an anticipated shortage of antiviral medications and be expected to provide surge capacity for overwhelmed hospitals. This article provides an overview of current recommendations for pandemic preparedness and the potential effect of a pandemic on the nursing home industry. It highlights the need for collaborative planning and dialogue between nursing homes and various stakeholders already heavily invested in pandemic preparedness. PMID:17767687

  10. Overworked RNs, social workers cause high nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    1999-04-01

    Using benchmarking to stanch the loss of employees. Many nursing homes and long-term care facilities have a burdensome employee turnover rate, in some cases approaching 400% annually. A benchmarking study conducted by Southern University and the Louisiana State Nursing Home Association revealed that the factors widely believed to cause the problem--wages, benefits, and workload--are not to blame. Take a look at the results. PMID:10557961

  11. Working Conditions and Mental Health of Nursing Staff in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Mawn, Barbara; Gore, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Nursing staff in nursing homes suffer from poor mental health, probably associated with stressful working conditions. Working conditions may distribute differently among nursing assistants, licensed practical nurses, and registered nurses due to their different levels in the organizational hierarchy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the association between working conditions and mental health among different nursing groups, and examine the potential moderating effect of job group on this association. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,129 nursing staff in 15 for-profit non-unionized nursing homes. Working conditions included both physical and psychosocial domains. Multivariate linear regression modeling found that mental health was associated with different working conditions in different nursing groups: physical safety (β = 2.37, p < 0.05) and work-family conflict (β = -2.44, p < 0.01) in NAs; work-family conflict (β = -4.17, p < 0.01) in LPNs; and physical demands (β = 10.54, p < 0.05) in RNs. Job group did not moderate the association between working conditions and mental health. Future workplace interventions to improve mental health should reach to nursing staff at different levels and consider tailored working condition interventions in different nursing groups. PMID:27104634

  12. The pivotal role of the director of nursing in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Elena O; Mueller, Christine; Anderson, Kathryn L; Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The impending wave of aging boomers heightens long-standing concerns for the quality and cost of nursing home care. As industry and policy leaders continue efforts to remedy substandard nursing home care delivery practices, development of a well-prepared and adequately supported workforce of directors of nursing (DONs) is essential to ensuring the industry's readiness for the aging wave population. Directors of nursing are in pivotal positions to influence nursing home quality and costs; however, research demonstrating the extent of this influence-actual and potential-is lacking, and industry leaders have collectively failed to address the current or future capacity of this workforce. A long history of inattention to the DON position, coupled with low expectations for the competencies and requisite educational preparation, has potentially compromised the capacity of DONs to promote and sustain high-quality, cost-effective nursing home care. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive overview and discussion of the current and potential capacity of DONs to lead the delivery of high-quality, cost-effective nursing home care from industry, educational and professional development, healthcare policy, and organizational contexts. Proposed strategies and recommendations to enhance and promote the future capacity of DONs are also presented. PMID:20234245

  13. Nurse Aide Empowerment Strategies and Staff Stability: Effects on Nursing Home Resident Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Theresa; Brannon, Diane; Mor, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the moderating effect of staff stability on the relationship between management practices used to empower nurse aides and resident outcomes in a multistate sample of nursing homes. An adaptation of Kanter's theory of structural power in organizations guided the framework for the model used in this study. Design and…

  14. Decreased rehospitalization costs through intermittent nursing visits to nursing home patients.

    PubMed

    Chappell, H; Dickey, C

    1993-03-01

    This study determined if visits by a nurse to patients in contract nursing homes would reduce the cost of patient returns to the discharging medical center. The authors discuss an approach that reduced readmissions and emergency room visits, producing a net savings of $70,394.90. PMID:8473929

  15. Prevalence of Nursing Assistant Training and Certification Programs within Nursing Homes, 1997-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Denise A.; Jung, Hye-Young; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe how the prevalence of nurse aide training and competency evaluation programs (NATCEPs) provided in the nursing home (NH) setting changed between 1997 and 2007, to explore the environmental factors that may be influencing the prevalence of these programs, and to examine how the changing prevalence…

  16. Nursing Assistant Perceptions of Their Role in Quality Improvement Processes in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Davila, Heather; Abrahamson, Kathleen; Mueller, Christine; Inui, Thomas S; Black, Aaron G; Arling, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Nursing assistants provide the majority of direct resident care in nursing homes and are centrally involved in implementing quality improvement (QI), yet little is known about their experiences in QI. Interviews with nursing assistants found that respondents perceive themselves as having a unique and important role in QI. They described key outcomes of QI as positive gains in the daily lives of residents, improved work processes, and increased time between staff and residents. PMID:26796975

  17. A motivational interviewing education intervention for home healthcare nurses.

    PubMed

    Pyle, Joni J

    2015-02-01

    The ability of registered nurses to communicate well with their patients is foundational to patient-centered care, the management of chronic illness, and general healthcare. It is also vital to the nurse-patient relationship. Nurses, however, tend to identify with their patients' physical needs and rely heavily on the technical skills with which they feel more comfortable. This lack of ability to communicate well with their patients can result in poor nurse-patient understanding, can lead to poor patient outcomes, and a lack of patient engagement and involvement in their care. Motivational interviewing (MI), a patient-centered manner of communication, is a means to direct the nurse-patient interaction in a way that is patient centered. Brief education of MI has shown to be effective in increasing the self-efficacy of nurses in their ability to communicate well with their patients. In 2 geographically diverse Pennsylvania home care settings, MI education was provided to 20 nurses. The educational intervention was designed to increase the self-efficacy of nurses regarding their ability to affect the negative behaviors of chronically ill patients. A pretest and posttest was administered to the nurse participants to determine the effectiveness of the educational intervention. This evidence-based education increased the nurses' overall communication self-efficacy by 25%. PMID:25654455

  18. Family Members' Experience With Hospice in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Gage, L Ashley; Washington, Karla; Oliver, Debra Parker; Kruse, Robin; Lewis, Alexandra; Demiris, George

    2016-05-01

    Research has documented numerous benefits and challenges associated with receipt of hospice care in nursing homes; however, study of this partnership from the perspective of residents' family members has been limited. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to explore family members' experience with hospice services received in the nursing home setting. Researchers conducted a secondary data analysis of 175 family member interviews using a thematic analytic approach. Findings highlighted the critical role of communication in supporting residents and their family members. Care coordination, support and oversight, and role confusion also impacted family members' experience of hospice care in the nursing home. Efforts directed at enhancing communication and more clearly articulating the roles of members of the health care team are indicated. PMID:25422516

  19. Staffing Subsidies and the Quality of Care in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew D.; Lee, Yong Suk

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about the quality of state-financed nursing home care has led to the wide-scale adoption by states of pass-through subsidies, in which Medicaid reimbursement rates are directly tied to staffing expenditure. We examine the effects of Medicaid pass-through on nursing home staffing and quality of care by adapting a two-step FGLS method that addresses clustering and state-level temporal autocorrelation. We find that pass-through subsidies increases staffing by about 1% on average and 2.7% in nursing homes with a low share of Medicaid patients. Furthermore, pass-through subsidies reduce the incidences of pressure ulcer worsening by about 0.9%. PMID:25814437

  20. Why do nursing homes close? An analysis of newspaper articles.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew; Castle, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Using Non-numerical Unstructured Data Indexing Searching and Theorizing (NUD'IST) software to extract and examine keywords from text, the authors explored the phenomenon of nursing home closure through an analysis of 30 major-market newspapers over a period of 66 months (January 1, 1999 to June 1, 2005). Newspaper articles typically represent a careful analysis of staff impressions via interviews, managerial perspectives, and financial records review. There is a current reliance on the synthesis of information from large regulatory databases such as the Online Survey Certification And Reporting database, the California Office of Statewide Healthcare Planning and Development database, and Area Resource Files. Although such databases permit the construction of studies capable of revealing some reasons for nursing home closure, they are hampered by the confines of the data entered. Using our analysis of newspaper articles, the authors are able to add further to their understanding of nursing home closures. PMID:22873933

  1. Snoezelen activity: the Good Shepherd Nursing Home experience.

    PubMed

    Minner, De; Hoffstetter, Patty; Casey, Linda; Jones, Delores

    2004-01-01

    Care of the resident with dementia can be both challenging and unpredictable. Activities provided for nursing home residents often have rules and may be a source of frustration for residents with advancing dementia. Snoezelen, or multisensory therapy, offers a failure-free activity in an enabling environment that can both stimulate and relax the resident with dementia. Good Shepherd Nursing Home in Versailles, Mo, undertook a 1-year outcome-based quality improvement project to find if use of Snoezelen therapy could reduce the number of behavioral symptoms that residents were suffering from. While there are still barriers to the use Snoezelen therapy, employees at Good Shepherd Nursing Home believe that the use of Snoezelen therapy has been a successful and rewarding experience for both residents and staff members. PMID:15535540

  2. Doll therapy: an intervention for nursing home residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Juh Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The use of dolls as a therapeutic intervention for nursing home residents with dementia is relatively new. The current article describes a research study implemented with nursing home residents in Korea to examine the effects of doll therapy on their mood, behavior, and social interactions. A one-group, pretest-posttest design was used to measure the impact of doll therapy on 51 residents with dementia. Linear regression demonstrated statistically significant differences in aggression, obsessive behaviors, wandering, negative verbalization, negative mood, and negative physical appearance after introduction of the doll therapy intervention. Interactions with other individuals also increased over time. Findings support the benefits of doll therapy for nursing home residents with dementia; however, further research is needed to provide more empirical evidence and explore ethical considerations in the use of doll therapy in this vulnerable population. PMID:25622273

  3. The challenges of a home-based nursing consultation business.

    PubMed

    Schulmeister, L

    1999-03-01

    The transition from working in a traditional setting to working at home alone can be challenging for new nurse consultants. Home-based consultants can use a variety of strategies to stay focused and connected, such as having a designated work area, limiting distractions, and networking. Nurse consultants can obtain information about business management from community resources, and computer on-line services offer a means of contacting other small-business owners. Ongoing business evaluations, which include professional accomplishments as well as an examination of income and expenses, help in planning. Home-based nurse consultants can increase the likelihood of business success by setting objectives, working diligently, and networking with others in the business community. PMID:10382409

  4. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78). Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and quality of care is

  5. Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

  6. 75 FR 45207 - Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application for Assistance for Hiring...

  7. 78 FR 55778 - Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application for Assistance for Hiring...

  8. 75 FR 62185 - Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application for Assistance for Hiring...

  9. 78 FR 75959 - Agency Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application...

  10. Understanding Nurses Decisions to Treat Pain in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea L.; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing home (NH) residents with dementia continue to receive inadequate pain treatment. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how nurses make decisions to pharmacologically treat pain in NH residents with dementia. Using Grounded Dimensional Analysis, 15 in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 nurses from 4 Skilled Nursing Facilities in Wisconsin. Nurses experienced varying levels of certainty regarding suspected pain in response to certain resident characteristics and whether pain was perceived as visible/obvious or non-visible/not obvious. Nurses felt highly uncertain about pain in residents with dementia. Suspected pain in residents with dementia was nearly always conceptualized as a change in behavior which nurses responded to by trialing multiple interventions in attempts to return the resident to baseline, which despite current recommendations, did not include pain relief trials. Residents with dementia were described as being at greatest risk for experiencing underassessment, undertreatment and delayed treatment for pain. PMID:23330944

  11. Sexual Abuse of Older Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Malmedal, Wenche; Iversen, Maria Helen; Kilvik, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Despite an increasing literature related to elder abuse, sexual abuse of older persons in general and of vulnerable adults living in nursing homes in particular is still sparsely described. The purpose of this study was to assess the state of knowledge on the subject of sexual abuse against older nursing home residents through a literature review. Systematic searches in reference databases including Cinahl, Medline, OVID Nursing Database, ISI Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and SveMed + were conducted. Through several phases of selection of the articles, using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, six articles were chosen for a deeper examination. Findings from the review show that sexual abuse occurs in nursing homes and that both older women and men are victims of sexual abuse. Perpetrators appear mainly to be staff and other residents and mainly to be men, but also women abuse both older men and older women. Findings from the literature review show that there is a need for knowledge and further research on the topic of sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. Furthermore, there is a need for good policies and reporting systems, as an important step in seriously addressing sexual abuse against older persons. PMID:25642347

  12. Survey-based Indices for Nursing Home Quality Incentive Reimbursement

    PubMed Central

    Willemain, Thomas R.

    1983-01-01

    Incentive payments are a theoretically appealing complement to nursing home quality assurance systems that rely on regulatory enforcement. However, the practical aspects of incentive program design are not yet well understood. After reviewing the rationale for incentive approaches and recent State and. Federal initiatives, the article considers a basic program design issue: creating an index of nursing home quality. It focuses on indices constructed from routine licensure and certification survey results because State initiatives have relied heavily on these readily accessible data. It also suggests a procedure for creating a survey-based index and discusses a sampling of Implementation issues. PMID:10309858

  13. [Scale development of job stress for home care nurses].

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong-Sook; Lee, Ga-Eon

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a job stress scale for hospital-based home care nurses in Korea. The process was construction of the conceptual framework, development of the preliminary items, verification of the content validity, item analysis and test of the reliability. The preliminary items were based on literature review and in-depth interviews with home care nurses. As a result, eight categories and sixty items were selected. These were reviewed by seven specialists for content validity and finally fifty one items were chosen. Data was collected from 180 home care nurses who were engaged in 87 hospitals from August to September 2003. The result of item analysis one was excepted. The final item count was 50. Categories were as follows: overload work (8 items), lack of specialized knowledge and technique (5 items), ethical dilemma (4 items), role conflict (5 items), interpersonal relationships (6 items), visiting home environment (9 items), driving conditions (4 items) and lack of administrative support (9 items), The reliability of the scale by Cronbach's alpha was .948 and the domain's reliability ranged from .649 to .841. The result of this study could be used to measure the job stress of home care nurses. However, for further validity and reliability, repeated studies will be necessary. PMID:15613845

  14. Overcoming challenges of conducting research in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Catharine; Smythe, Analisa; Galant-Miecznikowska, Magdalena; Bentham, Peter; Oyebode, Jan

    2016-05-27

    In the UK, one third of the 850,000 people with dementia live in care homes. This article explores the process of carrying out research in nursing homes, identifying barriers and enabling factors, and making recommendations for researchers. The authors' experiences derive from an ongoing study investigating the effect of educational interventions to promote and embed person-centred care, designed for nurses caring for the people with dementia in nursing homes. Design issues arose from the need to use cluster randomisation which requires a large sample size, implementation fidelity, poor compliance and high numbers of participants lost to follow up. Further difficulties included gaining ethical approval, recruitment, raising concerns and the practicalities of participant retention. There are many benefits of conducting research in care homes, for the homes themselves, their staff and residents. These include training and education, networking and empowerment of staff and subsequent improved standards of care. For the research team, benefits include opportunities to contribute to an underserved setting, to advance care standards and improve nurses' working lives. PMID:27231082

  15. [Handling of laundry and garbage in nursing homes. A survey in 22 homes].

    PubMed

    Hansen, D; Ross, B; Hilgenhöner, M; Loss, R; Grandek, M; Blättler, T; Popp, W

    2011-11-01

    Management of infectious diseases in nursing homes is as important as it is in hospitals. Therefore, a standardized questionnaire was used for the detailed assessment of the handling of laundry and garbage with a special focus on methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in 22 nursing homes in Germany. The study focused on the prevention of occupational diseases in the nursing home staff. Despite a few isolated problems, the situation of MRSA-positive patients was not as alarming as expected: guidelines for MRSA as published by KRINKO were often followed by the healthcare workers. However, general problems with managing garbage and laundry were identified. Many nursing homes lacked protective clothing and a sufficient garbage management plan. In addition, the handling of laundry was a problem in that the clothing of the patients and the working clothes of the staff were often washed at home rather than in accredited laundries. Thus, the awareness for hygienic problems needs to be raised, e.g., by expanding hygienic control for the nursing homes. PMID:22015787

  16. Top Nurse-Management Staffing Collapse and Care Quality in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Selina R.; Corazzini, Kirsten; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Director of nursing turnover is linked to staff turnover and poor quality of care in nursing homes; however the mechanisms of these relationships are unknown. Using a complexity science framework, we examined how nurse management turnover impacts system capacity to produce high quality care. This study is a longitudinal case analysis of a nursing home (n = 97 staff) with 400% director of nursing turnover during the study time period. Data included 100 interviews, observations and documents collected over 9 months and were analyzed using immersion and content analysis. Turnover events at all staff levels were nonlinear, socially mediated and contributed to dramatic care deficits. Federal mandated, quality assurance mechanisms failed to ensure resident safety. High multilevel turnover should be elevated to a sentinel event for regulators. Suggestions to magnify positive emergence in extreme conditions and to improve quality are provided. PMID:24652943

  17. A Survey of Nursing Home Staffing Patterns and General Needs in the State of Maine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine's Regional Medical Program Research and Evaluation Service, Augusta.

    A study of nursing homes in Maine was conducted by student researchers during the summer, 1970, under Maine's Regional Medical Program (MRMP). The survey, focusing on staffing patterns and general needs in nursing homes in Maine, was conducted in order to determine ways in which MRMP might assist the nursing homes and the Maine Department of…

  18. Nursing Home Staff Characteristics and Knowledge Gain from a Didactic Workshop on Depression and Behavior Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Suzanne; Burton, Elizabeth G.

    2004-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent and serious problem among nursing home residents. Nursing home staff members are gatekeepers for mental health treatment for residents, but may know little about depression and its management. We evaluated a didactic workshop for nursing home staff on depressive symptoms and management. Results for 58 staff participants…

  19. 75 FR 39622 - Proposed Information Collection (Request for Nursing Home Information in Connection with Claim...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Request for Nursing Home Information in Connection with Claim for... who are patients in nursing home. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed.... Title: Request for Nursing Home Information in Connection with Claim for Aid and Attendance, VA Form...

  20. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  1. 75 FR 56662 - Agency Information Collection (Request for Nursing Home Information in Connection With Claim for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Request for Nursing Home Information in Connection With Claim for... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0652.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Request for Nursing Home... 21-0779 is used to determine veterans residing in nursing homes eligibility for pension and aid...

  2. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  3. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  4. 42 CFR 422.133 - Return to home skilled nursing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Return to home skilled nursing facility. 422.133....133 Return to home skilled nursing facility. (a) General rule. MA plans must provide coverage of posthospital extended care services to Medicare enrollees through a home skilled nursing facility if...

  5. 78 FR 29439 - Proposed Information Collection (Request for Nursing Home Information in Connection With Claim...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Request for Nursing Home Information in Connection With Claim for... who are patients in nursing home. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed...: Request for Nursing Home Information in Connection with Claim for Aid and Attendance, VA Form 21-0779....

  6. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  7. 42 CFR 422.133 - Return to home skilled nursing facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Return to home skilled nursing facility. 422.133....133 Return to home skilled nursing facility. (a) General rule. MA plans must provide coverage of posthospital extended care services to Medicare enrollees through a home skilled nursing facility if...

  8. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  9. Coming to Terms: African-Americans' Complex Ways of Coping with Life in a Nursing Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groger, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Based on qualitative interviews with 14 nursing home residents and 13 caregivers, this article explores how elders adapted to life in a nursing home, and how their caregivers came to embrace nursing home placement as the optimal way to meet their elders' need for care. These processes were mediated by two mechanisms: the function the institution…

  10. Differences between Newly Admitted Nursing Home Residents in Rural and Nonrural Areas in a National Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, Jane Nelson; Phillips, Charles D.; Hawes, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research in specific locales indicates that individuals admitted to rural nursing homes have lower care needs than individuals admitted to nursing homes in urban areas, and that rural nursing homes differ in their mix of short-stay and chronic-care residents. This research investigates whether differences in acuity are a function…