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Sample records for psychrophilic microorganisms challenges

  1. Quantitative Ecology of Psychrophilic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, J. L; Redmond, Mary L.

    1966-01-01

    To obtain information on the importance of psychrophiles in nature, 95 samples of soil, water, mud, and various foods were quantitatively assayed for their content of psychrophilic bacteria and fungi and also for mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria and fungi. Thousands to millions of psychrophilic bacteria were present per gram of soil and represented 0.5 to 86% of the bacterial population. Also, about 25% of the fungi in uncultivated soil were psychrophilic. In stream and river water, psychrophilic bacteria constituted 16 to 47% of the bacterial population; in lake water, 41 to 76%; and in lake mud, 11 to 33%. Large numbers of psychrophilic bacteria were present in dairy products, meats, and other foods, and accounted for 35 to 93% of the bacterial population of meats. In contrast, thermophilic bacteria usually comprised 1% or less of the bacterial population in all of the materials examined. The data indicate that psychrophiles are both ubiquitous and numerous in nature, and probably play important roles in the cycles of matter. PMID:5914497

  2. Psychrophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Khawar S.; Williams, Timothy J.; Wilkins, David; Yau, Sheree; Allen, Michelle A.; Brown, Mark V.; Lauro, Federico M.; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2013-05-01

    Psychrophilic (cold-adapted) microorganisms make a major contribution to Earth's biomass and perform critical roles in global biogeochemical cycles. The vast extent and environmental diversity of Earth's cold biosphere has selected for equally diverse microbial assemblages that can include archaea, bacteria, eucarya, and viruses. Underpinning the important ecological roles of psychrophiles are exquisite mechanisms of physiological adaptation. Evolution has also selected for cold-active traits at the level of molecular adaptation, and enzymes from psychrophiles are characterized by specific structural, functional, and stability properties. These characteristics of enzymes from psychrophiles not only manifest in efficient low-temperature activity, but also result in a flexible protein structure that enables biocatalysis in nonaqueous solvents. In this review, we examine the ecology of Antarctic psychrophiles, physiological adaptation of psychrophiles, and properties of cold-adapted proteins, and we provide a view of how these characteristics inform studies of astrobiology.

  3. Overexpression, purification, and enthalpy of unfolding of ferricytochrome c552 from a psychrophilic microorganism

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Victoria F.; Chen, WeiTing; Harvilla, Paul B.; Magyar, John S.

    2013-01-01

    The psychrophilic, hydrocarbonoclastic microorganism Colwellia psychrerythraea is important in global nutrient cycling and bioremediation. In order to investigate how this organism can live so efficiently at low temperatures (~4 °C), thermal denaturation studies of a small electron transfer protein from Colwellia were performed. Colwellia cytochrome c552 was overexpressed in E. coli, isolated, purified, and characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The melting temperature (Tm) and the van’t Hoff enthalpy (ΔHvH) were determined. These values suggest an unexpectedly high stability for this psychrophilic cytochrome. PMID:24275750

  4. The Characterization of Psychrophilic Microorganisms and their potentially useful Cold-Active Glycosidases Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brenchly, Jean E.

    2008-06-30

    Our studies of novel, cold-loving microorganisms have focused on two distinct extreme environments. The first is an ice core sample from a 120,000 year old Greenland glacier. The results of this study are particularly exciting and have been highlighted with press releases and additional coverage. The first press release in 2004 was based on our presentation at the General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology and was augmented by coverage of our publication (Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 2005. Vol. 71:7806) in the Current Topics section of the ASM news journal, “Microbe.” Of special interest for this report was the isolation of numerous, phylogenetically distinct and potentially novel ultrasmall microorganisms. The detection and isolation of members of the ultrasmall population is significant because these cells pass through 0.2 micron pore filters that are generally used to trap microorganisms from environmental samples. Thus, analyses by other investigators that examined only cells captured on the filters would have missed a significant portion of this population. Only a few ultrasmall isolates had been obtained prior to our examination of the ice core samples. Our development of a filtration enrichment and subsequent cultivation of these organisms has added extensively to the collection of, and knowledge about, this important population in the microbial world.

  5. Biotechnological uses of enzymes from psychrophiles

    PubMed Central

    Cavicchioli, R.; Charlton, T.; Ertan, H.; Omar, S. Mohd; Siddiqui, K. S.; Williams, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The bulk of the Earth's biosphere is cold (e.g. 90% of the ocean's waters are ≤ 5°C), sustaining a broad diversity of microbial life. The permanently cold environments vary from the deep ocean to alpine reaches and to polar regions. Commensurate with the extent and diversity of the ecosystems that harbour psychrophilic life, the functional capacity of the microorganisms that inhabitat the cold biosphere are equally diverse. As a result, indigenous psychrophilic microorganisms provide an enormous natural resource of enzymes that function effectively in the cold, and these cold‐adapted enzymes have been targeted for their biotechnological potential. In this review we describe the main properties of enzymes from psychrophiles and describe some of their known biotechnological applications and ways to potentially improve their value for biotechnology. The review also covers the use of metagenomics for enzyme screening, the development of psychrophilic gene expression systems and the use of enzymes for cleaning. PMID:21733127

  6. Adaptational properties and applications of cold-active lipases from psychrophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maiangwa, Jonathan; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Shariff, Fairolniza Mohd; Leow, Thean Chor

    2015-03-01

    Psychrophilic microorganisms are cold-adapted with distinct properties from other thermal classes thriving in cold conditions in large areas of the earth's cold environment. Maintenance of functional membranes, evolving cold-adapted enzymes and synthesizing a range of structural features are basic adaptive strategies of psychrophiles. Among the cold-evolved enzymes are the cold-active lipases, a group of microbial lipases with inherent stability-activity-flexibility property that have engaged the interest of researchers over the years. Current knowledge regarding these cold-evolved enzymes in psychrophilic bacteria proves a display of high catalytic efficiency with low thermal stability, which is a differentiating feature with that of their mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts. Improvement strategies of their adaptive structural features have significantly benefited the enzyme industry. Based on their homogeneity and purity, molecular characterizations of these enzymes have been successful and their properties make them unique biocatalysts for various industrial and biotechnological applications. Although, strong association of lipopolysaccharides from Antarctic microorganisms with lipid hydrolases pose a challenge in their purification, heterologous expression of the cold-adapted lipases with affinity tags simplifies purification with higher yield. The review discusses these cold-evolved lipases from bacteria and their peculiar properties, in addition to their potential biotechnological and industrial applications. PMID:25472009

  7. Some like it cold: understanding the survival strategies of psychrophiles

    PubMed Central

    De Maayer, Pieter; Anderson, Dominique; Cary, Craig; Cowan, Don A

    2014-01-01

    Much of the Earth’s surface, both marine and terrestrial, is either periodically or permanently cold. Although habitats that are largely or continuously frozen are generally considered to be inhospitable to life, psychrophilic organisms have managed to survive in these environments. This is attributed to their innate adaptive capacity to cope with cold and its associated stresses. Here, we review the various environmental, physiological and molecular adaptations that psychrophilic microorganisms use to thrive under adverse conditions. We also discuss the impact of modern “omic” technologies in developing an improved understanding of these adaptations, highlighting recent work in this growing field. PMID:24671034

  8. Meeting the challenges of toxic microorganisms and pathogens: Implications for food safety and public health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An interdisciplinary approach is needed to meet the longstanding and emerging challenges for protecting animals and humans from illnesses caused by feed- or food-borne microorganisms and their toxins. The reports in this special issue illustrate some components of a broad-based approach for charact...

  9. The structure of ferricytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H

    PubMed Central

    Harvilla, Paul B.; Wolcott, Holly N.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 40% of all proteins are metalloproteins, and approximately 80% of Earth’s ecosystems are at temperatures ≤ 5 °C, including 90% of the global ocean. Thus, an essential aspect of marine metallobiochemistry is an understanding of the structure, dynamics, and mechanisms of cold adaptation of metalloproteins from marine microorganisms. Here, the molecular structure of the electron-transfer protein cytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H has been determined by X-ray crystallography (PDB: 4O1W). The structure is highly superimposable with that of the homologous cytochrome from the mesophile Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Based on structural analysis and comparison of psychrophilic, psychrotolerant, and mesophilic sequences, a methionine-based ligand-substitution mechanism for psychrophilic protein stabilization is proposed. PMID:24727932

  10. The structure of ferricytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H.

    PubMed

    Harvilla, Paul B; Wolcott, Holly N; Magyar, John S

    2014-06-01

    Approximately 40% of all proteins are metalloproteins, and approximately 80% of Earth's ecosystems are at temperatures ≤5 °C, including 90% of the global ocean. Thus, an essential aspect of marine metallobiochemistry is an understanding of the structure, dynamics, and mechanisms of cold adaptation of metalloproteins from marine microorganisms. Here, the molecular structure of the electron-transfer protein cytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H has been determined by X-ray crystallography (PDB: ). The structure is highly superimposable with that of the homologous cytochrome from the mesophile Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Based on structural analysis and comparison of psychrophilic, psychrotolerant, and mesophilic sequences, a methionine-based ligand-substitution mechanism for psychrophilic protein stabilization is proposed. PMID:24727932

  11. Plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria and their role in adaptation to cold environments.

    PubMed

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Extremely cold environments are a challenge for all organisms. They are mostly inhabited by psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria, which employ various strategies to cope with the cold. Such harsh environments are often highly vulnerable to the influence of external factors and may undergo frequent dynamic changes. The rapid adjustment of bacteria to changing environmental conditions is crucial for their survival. Such "short-term" evolution is often enabled by plasmids-extrachromosomal replicons that represent major players in horizontal gene transfer. The genomic sequences of thousands of microorganisms, including those of many cold-active bacteria have been obtained over the last decade, but the collected data have yet to be thoroughly analyzed. This report describes the results of a meta-analysis of the NCBI sequence databases to identify and characterize plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria. We have performed in-depth analyses of 66 plasmids, almost half of which are cryptic replicons not exceeding 10 kb in size. Our analyses of the larger plasmids revealed the presence of numerous genes, which may increase the phenotypic flexibility of their host strains. These genes encode enzymes possibly involved in (i) protection against cold and ultraviolet radiation, (ii) scavenging of reactive oxygen species, (iii) metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and lipids, (iv) energy production and conversion, (v) utilization of toxic organic compounds (e.g., naphthalene), and (vi) resistance to heavy metals, metalloids and antibiotics. Some of the plasmids also contain type II restriction-modification systems, which are involved in both plasmid stabilization and protection against foreign DNA. Moreover, approx. 50% of the analyzed plasmids carry genetic modules responsible for conjugal transfer or mobilization for transfer, which may facilitate the spread of these replicons among various bacteria, including across species boundaries

  12. Plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria and their role in adaptation to cold environments

    PubMed Central

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Extremely cold environments are a challenge for all organisms. They are mostly inhabited by psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria, which employ various strategies to cope with the cold. Such harsh environments are often highly vulnerable to the influence of external factors and may undergo frequent dynamic changes. The rapid adjustment of bacteria to changing environmental conditions is crucial for their survival. Such “short-term” evolution is often enabled by plasmids—extrachromosomal replicons that represent major players in horizontal gene transfer. The genomic sequences of thousands of microorganisms, including those of many cold-active bacteria have been obtained over the last decade, but the collected data have yet to be thoroughly analyzed. This report describes the results of a meta-analysis of the NCBI sequence databases to identify and characterize plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria. We have performed in-depth analyses of 66 plasmids, almost half of which are cryptic replicons not exceeding 10 kb in size. Our analyses of the larger plasmids revealed the presence of numerous genes, which may increase the phenotypic flexibility of their host strains. These genes encode enzymes possibly involved in (i) protection against cold and ultraviolet radiation, (ii) scavenging of reactive oxygen species, (iii) metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and lipids, (iv) energy production and conversion, (v) utilization of toxic organic compounds (e.g., naphthalene), and (vi) resistance to heavy metals, metalloids and antibiotics. Some of the plasmids also contain type II restriction-modification systems, which are involved in both plasmid stabilization and protection against foreign DNA. Moreover, approx. 50% of the analyzed plasmids carry genetic modules responsible for conjugal transfer or mobilization for transfer, which may facilitate the spread of these replicons among various bacteria, including across species

  13. A study of psychrophilic organisms isolated from the manufacture and assembly areas of spacecraft to be used in the Viking mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. L.; Winans, L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The sampling of soils from the manufacture and assembly areas of the Viking spacecraft is reported and the methodology employed in the analysis of these samples for psychrophilic microorganisms, and temperature studies on these organisms is outlined. Results showing the major types of organisms and the percentage of obligate psychrophiles in each sample are given and discussed. Emphasis in all areas is toward application of these results to the objectives of the planetary quarantine program.

  14. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: research challenges concerning the impact of airborne micro-organisms on the atmosphere and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Bardin, M.; Jaenicke, R.; Vogel, B.; Leyronas, C.; Ariya, P. A.; Psenner, R.

    2011-01-01

    For the past 200 years, the field of aerobiology has explored the abundance, diversity, survival and transport of micro-organisms in the atmosphere. Micro-organisms have been explored as passive and severely stressed riders of atmospheric transport systems. Recently, an interest in the active roles of these micro-organisms has emerged along with proposals that the atmosphere is a global biome for microbial metabolic activity and perhaps even multiplication. As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and roles in atmospheric processes of biological particles in the atmosphere, here we describe the pertinence of questions relating to the potential roles that air-borne micro-organisms might play in meteorological phenomena. For the upcoming era of research on the role of air-borne micro-organisms in meteorological phenomena, one important challenge is to go beyond descriptions of abundance of micro-organisms in the atmosphere toward an understanding of their dynamics in terms of both biological and physico-chemical properties and of the relevant transport processes at different scales. Another challenge is to develop this understanding under contexts pertinent to their potential role in processes related to atmospheric chemistry, the formation of clouds, precipitation and radiative forcing. This will require truly interdisciplinary approaches involving collaborators from the biological and physical sciences, from disciplines as disparate as agronomy, microbial genetics and atmosphere physics, for example.

  15. A study of psychrophilic organisms isolated from the manufacture and assembly areas of spacecraft to be used in the Viking mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. L.; Winans, L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The ability of psychrophilic microorganisms to grow in some of the environmental conditions suggested for Mars is studied with particular attention given to the effects of moisture and nutrients on growth. Results of growth with the slide culture technique are presented and indicate that this technique can be a rapid and sensitive technique for demonstration of microbial growth under various environmental conditions. Additional soil samples have been obtained from Cape Kennedy, and results of these assays at various low temperatures for psychrophilic populations are presented. The heat resistance of some of the psychrophilic sporeformers have been determined. Psychrophilic organisms were isolated from the teflon ribbons at Cape Kennedy and characterization of these was begun. In addition, heat survivors from the teflon ribbons are being investigated, and partial characterizations of these are presented.

  16. Psychrophilic and Psychrotolerant Microbial Extremophiles in Polar Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.

    2010-01-01

    The microbial extremophiles that inhabit the polar regions of our planet are of tremendous significance. The psychrophilic and psychrotolerant microorganisms, which inhabit all of the cold environments on Earth have important applications to Bioremediation, Medicine, Pharmaceuticals, and many other areas of Biotechnology. Until recently, most of the research on polar microorganisms was confined to studies of polar diatoms, yeast, fungi and cyanobacteria. However, within the past three decades, extensive studies have been conducted to understand the bacteria and archaea that inhabit the Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice, glaciers, ice sheets, permafrost and the cryptoendolithic, cryoconite and ice-bubble environments. These investigations have resulted in the discovery of many new genera and species of anaerobic and aerobic microbial extremophiles. Exotic enzymes, cold-shock proteins and pigments produced by some of the extremophiles from polar environments have the potential to be of great benefit to Mankind. Knowledge about microbial life in the polar regions is crucial to understanding the limitations and biodiversity of life on Earth and may provide valuable clues to the Origin of Life on Earth. The discovery of viable microorganisms in ancient ice from the Fox Tunnel, Alaska and the deep Vostok Ice has shown that microorganisms can remain alive while cryopreserved in ancient ice. The psychrophilic lithoautotrophic homoacetogen isolated from the deep anoxic trough of Lake Untersee is an ideal candidate for life that might inhabit comets or the polar caps of Mars. The spontaneous release of gas from within the Anuchin Glacier above Lake Untersee may provide clues to the ice geysers that erupt from the tiger stripe regions of Saturn s moon Enceladus. The methane productivity in the lower regimes of Lake Untersee may also provide insights into possible mechanisms for the recently discovered methane releases on Mars. Since most of the other water bearing bodies of our

  17. Thermally Stable Amylases from Antarctic Psychrophilic Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrolysis of starch in cold environments by psychrophilic species of bacteria is believed to be accomplished through the production of special cold-adapted amylases. These amylases are reportedly thermally labile with low (<40 deg C) temperature optima and high specific activities at 0 to 25 deg C....

  18. Challenges to a blow/fill/seal process with airborne microorganisms having different resistances to dry heat.

    PubMed

    Poisson, Patrick; Sinclair, Colin S; Tallentire, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Controlled challenges with air dispersed microorganisms having widely different resistances to dry heat, carried out on 624 BFS machine processing growth medium, have shown that higher the heat resistance, the greater the extent of vial contamination. Differences in heat resistance affected also the extent of vial contamination when parison and vial formation were knowingly manipulated through changes made to each of three process variables, provision of ballooning air, mould vacuum delay, and parison extrusion rate. The findings demonstrate that, in this investigational system, exposure of challenge micoorganisms to heat inherent in the process has a controlling influence on vial contamination, an influence that could also control microbiological risk in production environments. PMID:17089701

  19. A study of psychrophilic organisms isolated from the manufacture and assembly areas of spacecraft to be used in the Viking mission, 1 January - 30 June 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. L.; Winans, L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Soil samples from the areas associated with the Viking spacecraft were analyzed for major generic groups of microorganisms and the percentage of obligate psychrophiles. Results are presented which show the distribution of organisms isolated at low temperatures and the methods employed for subjecting samples to simulated Martian conditions. Emphasis is placed on application of these results to the objectives of the quarantine program.

  20. Quantitative ecology and dry-heat resistance of psychrophiles. M.S. Thesis; [in soil samples from Viking spacecraft manufacturing areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winans, L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of growth at 7 C were enumerated and isolated from soil samples from the manufacture area (Denver, Colorado) and assembly area (Cape Kennedy, Florida) of the Viking spacecraft. Temperature requirements were determined for these isolates, and those growing at 3 C, but not at 32 C were designated as obligate psychrophiles in this investigation. These were identified to major generic groups, and the population density of obligate psychrophiles from the various groups was determined. Dry heat D-values were found for those spores that demonstrated growth or survival under a simulated Martian environment.

  1. Psychrophilic Biomass Producers in the Trophic Chain of the Microbial Community of Lake Untersee, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    The study of photosynthetic microorganisms from the Lake Untersee samples showed dispersed distribution of phototrophs within 80 m water column. Lake Untersee represents a unique ecosystem that experienced complete isolation: sealed by the Anuchin Glacier for many millennia. Consequently, its biocenosis has evolved over a significant period of time without exchange or external interaction with species from other environments. The major producers of organic matter in Lake Untersee are represented by phototrophic and chemolithotrophic microorganisms. This is the traditional trophic scheme for lacustrine ecosystems on Earth. Among the phototrophs, diatoms were not found, which differentiates this lake from other known ecosystems. The dominant species among phototrophs was Chlamydomonas sp. with typical morphostructure: green chloroplasts, bright red round spot, and two polar flagella near the opening. As expected, the physiology of studied phototrophs was limited by low temperature, which defined them as obligate psychrophilic microorganisms. By the quantity estimation of methanogenesis in this lake, the litho-autotrophic production of organic matter is competitive with phototrophic production. However, pure cultures of methanogens have not yet been obtained. We discuss the primary producers of organic matter and the participation of our novel psychrophilic homoacetogen into the litho-autotrophic link of biomass production in Lake Untersee.

  2. Psychrophilic and mesophilic fungi in frozen food products.

    PubMed

    KUEHN, H H; GUNDERSON, M F

    1963-07-01

    The mold flora of certain frozen pastries and chicken pies was investigated. Molds were determined qualitatively or quantitatively, or both, by preparing pour plates of the blended product and incubating the plates at various temperatures. The mesophilic fungal flora developed on plates incubated at 10 and 20 C, whereas psychrophilic fungi were obtained on plates incubated at 0 and 5 C. About 2,000 cultures of fungi, representing about 100 different species, were isolated from various products. Four different brands of blueberry, two brands of cherry pastries, two brands of apple, and one brand of raspberry pastries were examined. In addition, two brands of chicken pies were studied. Blueberry pastries had a much higher total fungal population than the other products, although different brands of blueberry pastries varied considerably. Blueberry pastries had from 347 to 1,586 psychrophilic fungi per g. Cherry pastries had about 70 to 110 psychrophiles per g, and apple pastries had 19 to 92 psychrophiles per g. Chicken pies contained very few psychrophilic fungi, about 15 per g. Aureobasidium pullulans was recovered most frequently. About 90% of the psychrophilic fungi found in blueberry products was A. pullulans. Depending upon the brand of cherry pastry, either Phoma spp. or A. pullulans was the most common fungus present. Apple pastries also displayed brand variation, but were unique in having many mesophilic aspergilli. This genus was generally absent from other products. The Penicillium content of apple pastries was also rather high; 50% of the psychrophilic flora was represented by this genus. The psychrophilic fungal flora of chicken pies was composed primarily of penicillia (50%) and Chrysosporium pannorum (46%). PMID:13927344

  3. Genomics of an extreme psychrophile, Psychromonas ingrahamii

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Monica; Staley, James T.; Danchin, Antoine; Wang, T.; Brettin, Tom; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Thompson, Linda S

    2008-05-01

    Background: The genome sequence of the sea-ice bacterium Psychromonas ingrahamii 37, which grows exponentially at -12C, may reveal features that help to explain how this extreme psychrophile is able to grow at such low temperatures. Determination of the whole genome sequence allows comparison with genes of other psychrophiles and mesophiles. Results: Correspondence analysis of the composition of all P. ingrahamii proteins showed that (1) there are 6 classes of proteins, at least one more than other bacteria, (2) integral inner membrane proteins are not sharply separated from bulk proteins suggesting that, overall, they may have a lower hydrophobic character, and (3) there is strong opposition between asparagine and the oxygen-sensitive amino acids methionine, arginine, cysteine and histidine and (4) one of the previously unseen clusters of proteins has a high proportion of "orphan" hypothetical proteins, raising the possibility these are cold-specific proteins. Based on annotation of proteins by sequence similarity, (1) P. ingrahamii has a large number (61) of regulators of cyclic GDP, suggesting that this bacterium produces an extracellular polysaccharide that may help sequester water or lower the freezing point in the vicinity of the cell. (2) P. ingrahamii has genes for production of the osmolyte, betaine choline, which may balance the osmotic pressure as sea ice freezes. (3) P. ingrahamii has a large number (11) of three-subunit TRAP systems that may play an important role in the transport of nutrients into the cell at low temperatures. (4) Chaperones and stress proteins may play a critical role in transforming nascent polypeptides into 3-dimensional configurations that permit low temperature growth. (5) Metabolic properties of P. ingrahamii were deduced. Finally, a few small sets of proteins of unknown function which may play a role in psychrophily have been singled out as worthy of future study. Conclusion: The results of this genomic analysis provide a

  4. Genomics of an extreme psychrophile, Psychromonas ingrahamii

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Monica; Staley, James T; Danchin, Antoine; Wang, Ting Zhang; Brettin, Thomas S; Hauser, Loren J; Land, Miriam L; Thompson, Linda S

    2008-01-01

    Background The genome sequence of the sea-ice bacterium Psychromonas ingrahamii 37, which grows exponentially at -12C, may reveal features that help to explain how this extreme psychrophile is able to grow at such low temperatures. Determination of the whole genome sequence allows comparison with genes of other psychrophiles and mesophiles. Results Correspondence analysis of the composition of all P. ingrahamii proteins showed that (1) there are 6 classes of proteins, at least one more than other bacteria, (2) integral inner membrane proteins are not sharply separated from bulk proteins suggesting that, overall, they may have a lower hydrophobic character, and (3) there is strong opposition between asparagine and the oxygen-sensitive amino acids methionine, arginine, cysteine and histidine and (4) one of the previously unseen clusters of proteins has a high proportion of "orphan" hypothetical proteins, raising the possibility these are cold-specific proteins. Based on annotation of proteins by sequence similarity, (1) P. ingrahamii has a large number (61) of regulators of cyclic GDP, suggesting that this bacterium produces an extracellular polysaccharide that may help sequester water or lower the freezing point in the vicinity of the cell. (2) P. ingrahamii has genes for production of the osmolyte, betaine choline, which may balance the osmotic pressure as sea ice freezes. (3) P. ingrahamii has a large number (11) of three-subunit TRAP systems that may play an important role in the transport of nutrients into the cell at low temperatures. (4) Chaperones and stress proteins may play a critical role in transforming nascent polypeptides into 3-dimensional configurations that permit low temperature growth. (5) Metabolic properties of P. ingrahamii were deduced. Finally, a few small sets of proteins of unknown function which may play a role in psychrophily have been singled out as worthy of future study. Conclusion The results of this genomic analysis provide a

  5. Dry-heat resistance of selected psychrophiles. [Viking lander in spacecraft sterilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winans, L.; Pflug, I. J.; Foster, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The dry-heat resistance characteristics of spores of psychrophilic organisms isolated from soil samples from the Viking spacecraft assembly areas at Cape Kennedy Space Flight Center, Cape Canaveral, Fla., were studied. Spore suspensions were produced, and dry-heat D values were determined for the microorganisms that demonstrated growth or survival under a simulated Martian environment. The dry-heat tests were carried out by using the planchet-boat-hot plate system at 110 and 125 C with an ambient relative humidity of 50% at 22 C. The spores evaluated had a relatively low resistance to dry heat. D (110 C) values ranged from 7.5 to 122 min, whereas the D (125 C) values ranged from less than 1.0 to 9.8 min.

  6. Microorganism immobilization

    DOEpatents

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    1981-01-01

    Live metabolically active microorganisms are immobilized on a solid support by contacting particles of aggregate material with a water dispersible polyelectrolyte such as gelatin, crosslinking the polyelectrolyte by reacting it with a crosslinking agent such as glutaraldehyde to provide a crosslinked coating on the particles of aggregate material, contacting the coated particles with live microorganisms and incubating the microorganisms in contact with the crosslinked coating to provide a coating of metabolically active microorganisms. The immobilized microorganisms have continued growth and reproduction functions.

  7. Identity and physiology of a new psychrophilic eukaryotic green alga, Chlorella sp., strain BI, isolated from a transitory pond near Bratina Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Ivanov, Alexander G; Modla, Shannon; Czymmek, Kirk; Hüner, Norman P A; Priscu, John C; Lisle, John T; Hanson, Thomas E

    2008-09-01

    Permanently low temperature environments are one of the most abundant microbial habitats on earth. As in most ecosystems, photosynthetic organisms drive primary production in low temperature food webs. Many of these phototrophic microorganisms are psychrophilic; however, functioning of the photosynthetic processes of these enigmatic psychrophiles (the "photopsychrophiles") in cold environments is not well understood. Here we describe a new chlorophyte isolated from a low temperature pond, on the Ross Ice Shelf near Bratina Island, Antarctica. Phylogenetic and morphological analyses place this strain in the Chlorella clade, and we have named this new chlorophyte Chlorella BI. Chlorella BI is a psychrophilic species, exhibiting optimum temperature for growth at around 10 degrees C. However, psychrophily in the Antarctic Chlorella was not linked to high levels of membrane-associated poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Unlike the model Antarctic lake alga, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241, Chlorella BI has retained the ability for dynamic short term adjustment of light energy distribution between photosystem II (PS II) and photosystem I (PS I). In addition, Chlorella BI can grow under a variety of trophic modes, including heterotrophic growth in the dark. Thus, this newly isolated photopsychrophile has retained a higher versatility in response to environmental change than other well studied cold-adapted chlorophytes. PMID:18661097

  8. Identity and physiology of a new psychrophilic eukaryotic green alga, Chlorella sp., strain BI, isolated from a transitory pond near Bratina Island, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan-Kiss, R. M.; Ivanov, A.G.; Modla, S.; Czymmek, K.; Huner, N.P.A.; Priscu, J.C.; Lisle, J.T.; Hanson, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    Permanently low temperature environments are one of the most abundant microbial habitats on earth. As in most ecosystems, photosynthetic organisms drive primary production in low temperature food webs. Many of these phototrophic microorganisms are psychrophilic; however, functioning of the photosynthetic processes of these enigmatic psychrophiles (the 'photopsychrophiles') in cold environments is not well understood. Here we describe a new chlorophyte isolated from a low temperature pond, on the Ross Ice Shelf near Bratina Island, Antarctica. Phylogenetic and morphological analyses place this strain in the Chlorella clade, and we have named this new chlorophyte Chlorella BI. Chlorella BI is a psychrophilic species, exhibiting optimum temperature for growth at around 10??C. However, psychrophily in the Antarctic Chlorella was not linked to high levels of membrane-associated poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Unlike the model Antarctic lake alga, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241, Chlorella BI has retained the ability for dynamic short term adjustment of light energy distribution between photosystem II (PS II) and photosystem I (PS I). In addition, Chlorella BI can grow under a variety of trophic modes, including heterotrophic growth in the dark. Thus, this newly isolated photopsychrophile has retained a higher versatility in response to environmental change than other well studied cold-adapted chlorophytes. ?? 2008 Springer.

  9. Psychrophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor treatment of domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam L; Skerlos, Steven J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2013-03-15

    A bench-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) equipped with submerged flat-sheet microfiltration membranes was operated at psychrophilic temperature (15 °C) treating simulated and actual domestic wastewater (DWW). Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal during simulated DWW operation averaged 92 ± 5% corresponding to an average permeate COD of 36 ± 21 mg/L. Dissolved methane in the permeate stream represented a substantial fraction (40-50%) of the total methane generated by the system due to methane solubility at psychrophilic temperatures and oversaturation relative to Henry's law. During actual DWW operation, COD removal averaged 69 ± 10%. The permeate COD and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) averaged 76 ± 10 mg/L and 24 ± 3 mg/L, respectively, indicating compliance with the U.S. EPA's standard for secondary effluent (30 mg/L BOD(5)). Membrane fouling was managed using biogas sparging and permeate backflushing and a flux greater than 7 LMH was maintained for 30 days. Comparative fouling experiments suggested that the combination of the two fouling control measures was more effective than either fouling prevention method alone. A UniFrac based comparison of bacterial and archaeal microbial communities in the AnMBR and three different inocula using pyrosequencing targeting 16S rRNA genes suggested that mesophilic inocula are suitable for seeding psychrophilic AnMBRs treating low strength wastewater. Overall, the research described relatively stable COD removal, acceptable flux, and the ability to seed a psychrophilic AnMBR with mesophilic inocula, indicating future potential for the technology in practice, particularly in cold and temperate climates where DWW temperatures are low during part of the year. PMID:23295067

  10. Anaerobic Psychrophiles from Alaska, Antarctica, and Patagonia: Implications to Possible Life on Mars and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Ng, Joseph; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microorganisms preserved within the permafrost, glaciers, and polar ice sheets of planet Earth provide analogs for microbial life forms that may be encountered in ice or permafrost of Mars, Europa, Callisto, Ganymede, asteroids, comets or other frozen worlds in the Cosmos. The psychrophilic and psychrotolerant microbes of the terrestrial cryosphere help establish the thermal and temporal limitations of life on Earth and provide clues to where and how we should search for evidence of life elsewhere in the Universe. For this reason, the cold-loving microorganisms are directly relevant to Astrobiology. Cryo-preserved microorganisms can remain viable (in deep anabiosis) in permafrost and ice for millions of years. Permafrost, ice wedges, pingos, glaciers, and polar ice sheets may contain intact ancient DNA, lipids, enzymes, proteins, genes, and even frozen and yet viable ancient microbiota. Some microorganisms carry out metabolic processes in water films and brine, acidic, or alkaline channels in permafrost or ice at temperatures far below 0 T. Complex microbial communities live in snow, ice-bubbles, cryoconite holes on glaciers and ancient microbial ecosystems are cryopreserved within the permafrost, glaciers, and polar caps. In the Astrobiology group of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama at Huntsville, we have employed advanced techniques for the isolation, culture, and phylogenetic analysis of many types of microbial extremophiles. We have also used the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to study the morphology, ultra-microstructure and chemical composition of microorganisms in ancient permafrost and ice. We discuss several interesting and novel anaerobic microorganisms that we have isolated and cultured from the Pleistocene ice of the Fox Tunnel of Alaska, guano of the Magellanic Penguin, deep sea sediments from the vicinity of the Rainbow Hydrothermal Vent and enrichment cultures from ice of the Patriot Hills of Antarctica

  11. Anaerobic Psychrophiles from Alaska, Antarctica, and Patagonia: Implications to Possible Life on Mars and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Ng, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms preserved within the permafrost, glaciers, and polar ice sheets of planet Earth provide analogs for microbial life forms that may be encountered in ice or permafrost of Mars, Europa, Callisto, Ganymede, asteroids, comets or other frozen worlds in the Cosmos. The psychrophilic and psychrotolerant microbes of the terrestrial cryosphere help establish the thermal and temporal limitations of life on Earth and provide clues to where and how we should search for evidence of life elsewhere in the Universe. For this reason, the cold-loving microorganisms are directly relevant to Astrobiology. Cryopreserved microorganisms can remain viable (in deep anabiosis) in permafrost and ice for millions of years. Permafrost, ice wedges, pingos, glaciers, and polar ice sheets may contain intact ancient DNA, lipids, enzymes, proteins, genes, and even frozen and yet viable ancient microbiota. Some microorganisms carry out metabolic processes in water films and brine, acidic, or alkaline channels in permafrost or ice at temperatures far below 0 C. Complex microbial communities live in snow, ice-bubbles, cryoconite holes on glaciers and ancient microbial ecosystems are cryopreserved within the permafrost, glaciers, and polar caps. In the Astrobiology group of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama at Huntsville, we have employed advanced techniques for the isolation, culture, and phylogenetic analysis of many types of microbial extremophiles. We have also used the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to study the morphology, ultra-microstructure and chemical composition of microorganisms in ancient permafrost and ice. We discuss several interesting and novel anaerobic microorganisms that we have isolated and cultured from the Pleistocene ice of the Fox Tunnel of Alaska, guano of the Magellanic Penguin, deep-sea sediments from the vicinity of the Rainbow Hydrothermal Vent and enrichment cultures from ice of the Patriot Hills of Antarctica

  12. Characterization of a Facultatively Psychrophilic Bacterium, Vibrio rumoiensis sp. nov., That Exhibits High Catalase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yumoto, Isao; Iwata, Hideaki; Sawabe, Tomoo; Ueno, Keisuke; Ichise, Nobutoshi; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Kawasaki, Kosei

    1999-01-01

    A novel facultatively psychrophilic bacterium, strain S-1, which exhibits extraordinarily high catalase activity was isolated from the drain pool of a fish product processing plant that uses H2O2 as a bleaching and microbicidal agent. The catalase activity of the isolate was 1 or 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of Corynebacterium glutamicum, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and five other species tested in this study. The strain seemed to possess only one kind of catalase, according to the results of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cell extract. The optimum temperature for catalase activity was about 30°C, which was about 20°C lower than that for bovine catalase activity. Electron microscopic observation revealed that the surface of the microorganism was covered by blebs. Although the isolate was nonflagellated, its taxonomic position on the basis of physiological and biochemical characteristics and analysis of 16S rRNA sequence and DNA-DNA relatedness data indicated that strain S-1 is a new species belonging to the genus Vibrio. Accordingly, we propose the name Vibrio rumoiensis. The type strain is S-1 (FERM P-14531). PMID:9872761

  13. Anaerobic psychrophiles from Lake Zub and Lake Untersee, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Alisa; Pikuta, Elena V.; Guisler, Melissa; Stahl, Sarah; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-08-01

    The study of samples from Antarctica 2008 and 2009 expeditions organized and successfully conducted by Richard Hoover led to the isolation of diverse anaerobic strains with psychrotolerant and psychrophilic physiology. Due to the fact that Lake Untersee has never been subject to microbiological study, this work with the samples has significant and pioneering impact to the knowledge about the biology of this unique ecosystem. Also, the astrobiological significance for the study of these ecosystems is based on new findings of ice covered water systems on other bodies of our solar system. Anaerobic psychrotolerant strain LZ-22 was isolated from a frozen sample of green moss with soils around the rhizosphere collected near Lake Zub in Antarctica. Morphology of strain LZ-22 was observed to be motile, rod shaped and spore-forming cells with sizes 1 x 5-10 μm. This new isolate is a mesophile with the maximum temperature of growth at 40°C. Strain LZ-22 is able to live on media without NaCl and in media with up to 7 % (w/v) NaCl. It is catalase negative and grows only on sugars with the best growth rate being on lactose. The strain is a neutrophile and grows between pH 5 and 9.0 with the optimum at 7.8. Another two strains UL7-96mG and LU-96m7P were isolated from deep water samples of Lake Untersee. Proteolytic strain LU-96m7P had a truly psychrophilic nature and refused to grow at room temperature. Sugarlytic strain UL7-96mG was found to be psychrotolerant, but its rate of growth at 3°C was very high compared with other mesophiles. Two homoacetogenic psychrophilic strains A7AC-96m and AC-DS7 were isolated and purified from samples of Lake Untersee; both of them are able to grow chemolithotrophically on H2+CO2. In the presence of lactate, these strains are able to grow only at 0-18 °C, and growth at 22 °C was observed only with yeast extract stimulation. In this paper, physiological and morphological characteristics of novel psychrophilic and psychrotolerant isolates

  14. Anaerobic Psychrophiles from Lake Zub and Lake Untersee, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Alisa; Pikuta, Elena V.; Guisler, Melissa; Stahl, Sarah; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    The study of samples from Antarctica 2008 and 2009 expeditions organized and successfully conducted by Richard Hoover led to the isolation of diverse anaerobic strains with psychrotolerant and psychrophilic physiology. Due to the fact that Lake Untersee has never been subject to microbiological study, this work with the samples has significant and pioneering impact to the knowledge about the biology of this unique ecosystem. Also, the astrobiological significance for the study of these ecosystems is based on new findings of ice covered water systems on other bodies of our solar system. Anaerobic psychrotolerant strain LZ-22 was isolated from a frozen sample of green moss with soils around the rhizosphere collected near Lake Zub in Antarctica. Morphology of strain LZ-22 was observed to be motile, rod shaped and spore-forming cells with sizes 1 x 5-10 micron. This new isolate is a mesophile with the maximum temperature of growth at 40C. Strain LZ-22 is able to live on media without NaCl and in media with up to 7% (w/v) NaCl. It is catalase negative and grows only on sugars with the best growth rate being on lactose. The strain is a neutrophile and grows between pH 5 and 9.0 with the optimum at 7.8. Another two strains UL7-96mG and LU-96m7P were isolated from deep water samples of Lake Untersee. Proteolytic strain LU-96m7P had a truly psychrophilic nature and refused to grow at room temperature. Sugarlytic strain UL7-96mG was found to be psychrotolerant, but its rate of growth at 3C was very high compared with other mesophiles. Two homoacetogenic psychrophilic strains A7AC-96m and AC-DS7 were isolated and purified from samples of Lake Untersee; both of them are able to grow chemolithotrophically on H2+CO2. In the presence of lactate, these strains are able to grow only at 0-18C, and growth at 22C was observed only with yeast extract stimulation. In this paper, physiological and morphological characteristics of novel psychrophilic and psychrotolerant isolates from

  15. Classifying Microorganisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn J.; Lang, Michael; Goodmanis, Ben

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on an activity in which students sample air at school and generate ideas about how to classify the microorganisms they observe. The results are used to compare air quality among schools via the Internet. Supports the development of scientific inquiry and technology skills. (DDR)

  16. Psychrophilic Enzymes: From Folding to Function and Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Feller, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Psychrophiles thriving permanently at near-zero temperatures synthesize cold-active enzymes to sustain their cell cycle. Genome sequences, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies suggest various adaptive features to maintain adequate translation and proper protein folding under cold conditions. Most psychrophilic enzymes optimize a high activity at low temperature at the expense of substrate affinity, therefore reducing the free energy barrier of the transition state. Furthermore, a weak temperature dependence of activity ensures moderate reduction of the catalytic activity in the cold. In these naturally evolved enzymes, the optimization to low temperature activity is reached via destabilization of the structures bearing the active site or by destabilization of the whole molecule. This involves a reduction in the number and strength of all types of weak interactions or the disappearance of stability factors, resulting in improved dynamics of active site residues in the cold. These enzymes are already used in many biotechnological applications requiring high activity at mild temperatures or fast heat-inactivation rate. Several open questions in the field are also highlighted. PMID:24278781

  17. In-storage psychrophilic anaerobic digestion: acclimated microbial kinetics.

    PubMed

    King, Susan; Courvoisier, Pierre; Guiot, Serge; Barrington, Suzelle

    2012-01-01

    In-storage psychrophilic anaerobic digestion develops by microbial acclimation in covered swine-manure storage tanks, producing CH4 and stabilizing organic matter. To optimize the system's performance, the process kinetics must be understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate kinetic parameters describing the major stages in the digestion process, and to investigate the effect of temperature acclimation on these parameters. Specific activity tests were performed using manure inocula and five substrates at three incubation temperatures. Extant substrate activities were determined analytically for each case, and intrinsic kinetic parameters for glucose uptake were estimated by grid search fitting to the Monod model. The results demonstrate that this acclimated microbial community exhibits different kinetic parameters to those of the mesophilic communities currently modelled in the literature, with increased activity at low temperatures, varying with substrate and temperature. For glucose, the higher uptake is accompanied by lower microbial yield and half-saturation constant. Decomposing these values suggests that active psychrophilic and mesophilic microbial populations co-exist within the community. This work also confirms that a new method of assessing microbial substrate kinetics must be developed for manure microbial communities, separating microbial mass from other suspended organics. PMID:22988638

  18. Improving the Thermostability and Activity of a Thermophilic Subtilase by Incorporating Structural Elements of Its Psychrophilic Counterpart

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bi-Lin; Dai, Meihong; Chen, Yuanhao; Meng, Dongheng; Wang, Yasi; Fang, Nan; Tang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of the structural elements of thermostable enzymes into their less stable counterparts is generally used to improve enzyme thermostability. However, the process of engineering enzymes with both high thermostability and high activity remains an important challenge. Here, we report that the thermostability and activity of a thermophilic subtilase were simultaneously improved by incorporating structural elements of a psychrophilic subtilase. There were 64 variable regions/residues (VRs) in the alignment of the thermophilic WF146 protease, mesophilic sphericase, and psychrophilic S41. The WF146 protease was subjected to systematic mutagenesis, in which each of its VRs was replaced with those from S41 and sphericase. After successive rounds of combination and screening, we constructed the variant PBL5X with eight amino acid residues from S41. The half-life of PBL5X at 85°C (57.1 min) was approximately 9-fold longer than that of the wild-type (WT) WF146 protease (6.3 min). The substitutions also led to an increase in the apparent thermal denaturation midpoint temperature (Tm) of the enzyme by 5.5°C, as determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Compared to the WT, PBL5X exhibited high caseinolytic activity (25 to 95°C) and high values of Km and kcat (25 to 80°C). Our study may provide a rational basis for developing highly stable and active enzymes, which are highly desired in industrial applications. PMID:26150464

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Sporosarcina globispora W 25T (DSM 4), a Psychrophilic Bacterium Isolated from Soil and River Water

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie-ping; Liu, Guo-hong; Xiao, Rong-feng; Zheng, Xue-fang; Shi, Huai; Ge, Ci-bin

    2015-01-01

    Sporosarcina globispora W 25T (DSM 4) is a Gram-positive, round-spore-forming, and psychrophilic bacterium. Here, we report the 5.66-Mb genome sequence of S. globispora W 25T, which will accelerate the application of this psychrophile and provide useful information for genomic taxonomy and phylogenomics of Bacillus-like bacteria. PMID:26494677

  20. Characterization of psychrophilic alanine racemase from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Esaki, N; Soda, K; Kawai, H

    1999-03-16

    A psychrophilic alanine racemase gene from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SOLR with a plasmid pYOK3. The gene starting with the unusual initiation codon GTG showed higher preference for codons ending in A or T. The enzyme purified to homogeneity showed the high catalytic activity even at 0 degrees C and was extremely labile over 35 degrees C. The enzyme was found to have a markedly large Km value (5.0 microM) for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor in comparison with other reported alanine racemases, and was stabilized up to 50 degrees C in the presence of excess amounts of PLP. The low affinity of the enzyme for PLP may be related to the thermolability, and may be related to the high catalytic activity, initiated by the transaldimination reaction, at low temperature. The enzyme has a distinguishing hydrophilic region around the residue no. 150 in the deduced amino acid sequence (383 residues), whereas the corresponding regions of other Bacillus alanine racemases are hydrophobic. The position of the region in the three dimensional structure of C atoms of the enzyme was predicted to be in a surface loop surrounding the active site. The region may interact with solvent and reduce the compactness of the active site. PMID:10080917

  1. Denitrification characteristics of a marine origin psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Liu, Ying; Sun, Guangdong; Gao, Xiyan; Zhang, Qingling; Liu, Zhipei

    2011-01-01

    A psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium, strain S1-1, was isolated from a biological aerated filter conducted for treatment of recirculating water in a marine aquaculture system. Strain S1-1 was preliminarily identified as Psychrobacter sp. based on the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, which showed 100% sequence similarity to that of Psychrobacter sp. TSBY-70. Strain S1-1 grew well either in high nitrate or high nitrite conditions with a removal of 100% nitrate or 63.50% nitrite, and the total nitrogen removal rates could reach to 46.48% and 31.89%, respectively. The results indicated that nitrate was mainly reduced in its logarithmic growth phase with a very low level accumulation of nitrite, suggesting that the aerobic denitrification process of strain S1-1 occurred mainly in this phase. The GC-MS results showed that N2O was formed as the major intermediate during the aerobic denitrifying process of strain S1-1. Finally, factors affecting the growth of strain S1-1 and its aerobic denitrifying ability were also investigated. Results showed that the optimum aerobic denitrification conditions for strain S1-1 were sodium succinate as carbon source, C/N ratio15, salinity 10 g/L NaCl, incubation temperature 20 degrees C and initial pH 6.5. PMID:22432315

  2. Psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic triosephosphate isomerases from three clostridial species.

    PubMed Central

    Shing, Y W; Akagi, J M; Himes, R H

    1975-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase was purified to homogeneity as judged by analytical gel electrophoresis from clostridium sp. strain 69, clostridium pasteurianum, and C. thermosaccharolyticum, which grow optimally at 18, 37, and 55 C, respectively. Comparative studies on these purified proteins showed that they had the same molecular weight (53,000) and subunit molecular weight (26,500). They were equally susceptible to the active site-directed inhibitor, glycidol phosphate. However, their temperature and pH optima, as well as their stabilities to heat, urea, and sodium dodecyl sulfate, differed. The proteins also had different mobilities in acrylamide gel electrophoresis. This difference in ionic character was also reflected in the elution behavior of the enzymes from hydroxyapatite and in the isoelectric points determined by isoelectric focusing in acrylamide gel. The amino acid composition of these proteins showed that the thermophilic enzyme contains a greater amount of proline than the other enzymes. The ratio of acidic amino acids to basic amino acids was 1.79, 1.38, and 1.66 for the thermophilic mesophilic and psychrophilic enzymes, respectively. This is consistent with the relative isoelectric point values of these three enzymes. Images PMID:235509

  3. Performance of media types in psychrophilic anaerobic treatment of dairy wastewater in attached films packed bed reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Vartak, D.R.; Engler, C.R.; Ricke, S.C.

    1996-12-31

    Retention of microorganisms in anaerobic digesters by providing an attachment medium potentially can increase their productivity at lower operating temperatures. The objective of this work was to investigate the effectiveness of attached-film bioreactors; for psychrophilic anaerobic digestion of dairy manure. Eight digesters were maintained in an environmental chamber, with the temperature varied between 37 and 10{degrees}C. Two digesters were packed with limestone gravel, two with pieces cut from non-woven polyester matting, two with a combination of limestone gravel and polyester pieces, and two had no packing. Digester operation was initiated at a temperature of 37{degrees}C. After the digesters reached stable operation at the initial temperature, the temperature was lowered slowly to 10{degrees}C. The temperature was held at 10{degrees}C for five weeks after stabilizing. It was found that the polyester medium with its high porosity and surface to volume ratio had the best overall performance in terms of methane productivity at both 37 and 10{degrees}C.

  4. Structural Investigation of the Oligosaccharide Portion Isolated from the Lipooligosaccharide of the Permafrost Psychrophile Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4

    PubMed Central

    Casillo, Angela; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Filomena, Sannino; Lindner, Buko; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2015-01-01

    Psychrophilic microorganisms have successfully colonized all permanently cold environments from the deep sea to mountain and polar regions. The ability of an organism to survive and grow in cryoenviroments depends on a number of adaptive strategies aimed at maintaining vital cellular functions at subzero temperatures, which include the structural modifications of the membrane. To understand the role of the membrane in the adaptation, it is necessary to characterize the cell-wall components, such as the lipopolysaccharides, that represent the major constituent of the outer membrane. The aim of this study was to investigate the structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) isolated from the cold-adapted Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4. The strain, isolated from a 20,000-to-30,000-year-old continuously frozen permafrost in Siberia, was cultivated at 4 °C. The LOS was isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical methods. In particular, it was degraded either by mild acid hydrolysis or by hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and by ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry. The oligosaccharide was characterized by the substitution of the heptose residue, usually linked to Kdo in the inner core, with a glucose, and for the unusual presence of N-acetylmuramic acid. PMID:26204948

  5. Structural Investigation of the Oligosaccharide Portion Isolated from the Lipooligosaccharide of the Permafrost Psychrophile Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4.

    PubMed

    Casillo, Angela; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Filomena, Sannino; Lindner, Buko; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2015-07-01

    Psychrophilic microorganisms have successfully colonized all permanently cold environments from the deep sea to mountain and polar regions. The ability of an organism to survive and grow in cryoenviroments depends on a number of adaptive strategies aimed at maintaining vital cellular functions at subzero temperatures, which include the structural modifications of the membrane. To understand the role of the membrane in the adaptation, it is necessary to characterize the cell-wall components, such as the lipopolysaccharides, that represent the major constituent of the outer membrane. The aim of this study was to investigate the structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) isolated from the cold-adapted Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4. The strain, isolated from a 20,000-to-30,000-year-old continuously frozen permafrost in Siberia, was cultivated at 4 °C. The LOS was isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical methods. In particular, it was degraded either by mild acid hydrolysis or by hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and by ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry. The oligosaccharide was characterized by the substitution of the heptose residue, usually linked to Kdo in the inner core, with a glucose, and for the unusual presence of N-acetylmuramic acid. PMID:26204948

  6. Psychrophilic versus psychrotolerant bacteria--occurrence and significance in polar and temperate marine habitats.

    PubMed

    Helmke, E; Weyland, H

    2004-07-01

    The numerical dominance and ecological role of psychrophilic bacteria in bottom sediments, sea ice, surface water and melt pools of the polar oceans were investigated using isolates, colony forming units (CFU) and metabolic activities. All sediment samples of the Southern Ocean studied showed a clear numerical dominance of cold-loving bacteria. In Arctic sediments underlying the influence of cold polar water bodies psychrophiles prevailed also but they were less dominant in sediments influenced by the warm Atlantic Water. A predominance of psychrophiles was further found in consolidated Antarctic sea ice as well as in multiyear Arctic sea ice and in melt pools on top of Arctic ice floes. A less uniform adaptation response was, however, met in polar surface waters. In the very northern part of the Fram Strait (Arctic Ocean) we found bacterial counts and activities at 1 degree C exceeding those at 22 degrees C. In surface water of the Weddell Sea (Southern Ocean) psychrophiles also dominated numerically in early autumn but the dominance declined obviously with the onset of winter-water and a decrease of chlorphyll a. Otherwise in surface water of the Southern Ocean CFUs were higher at 22 degrees C than at 1 degree C while activities were vice versa indicating at least a functional dominance of psychrophiles. Even in the temperate sediments of the German Bight true psychrophiles were present and a clear shift towards cold adapted communities in winter observed. Among the polar bacteria a more pronounced cold adaptation of Antarctic in comparison with Arctic isolates was obtained. The results and literature data indicate that stenothermic cold adapted bacteria play a significant role in the global marine environment. On the basis of the temperature response of our isolates from different habitats it is suggested to expand the definition of Morita in order to meet the cold adaptation strategies of the bacteria in the various cold habitats. PMID:15559972

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Acetobacterium bakii DSM 8239, a Potential Psychrophilic Chemical Producer through Syngas Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soonkyu; Song, Yoseb

    2015-01-01

    Acetobacterium bakii DSM 8239 is an anaerobic, psychrophilic, and chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that is a potential platform for producing commodity chemicals from syngas fermentation. We report here the draft genome sequence of A. bakii DSM 8239 (4.14 Mb) to elucidate its physiological and metabolic properties related to syngas fermentation. PMID:26404601

  8. Genome Sequence of the Antarctic Psychrophile Bacterium Planococcus antarcticus DSM 14505

    PubMed Central

    Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Planococcus antarcticus DSM 14505 is a psychrophile bacterium that was isolated from cyanobacterial mat samples, originally collected from ponds in McMurdo, Antarctica. This orange-pigmented bacterium grows at 4°C and may possess interesting enzymatic activities at low temperatures. Here we report the first genomic sequence of P. antarcticus DSM 14505. PMID:22843594

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Psychrobacter alimentarius PAMC 27889, a Psychrophile Isolated from an Antarctic Rock Sample.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaejin; Kwon, Miye; Yang, Jae Young; Woo, Jusun; Lee, Hong Kum; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Psychrobacter alimentarius PAMC 27889, a Gram-negative, psychrophilic bacterium, was isolated from an Antarctic rock sample. Here, we report the complete genome of P. alimentarius PAMC 27889, which has the nonmevalonate methylerythritol phosphate pathway of terpenoid biosynthesis and a complete gene cluster for benzoate degradation. PMID:27445386

  10. Metabolic Influence of Psychrophilic Diatoms on Travertines at the Huanglong Natural Scenic District of China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyong; Dong, Faqin; Ehrlich, Hermann; Zhao, Xueqing; Liu, Mingxue; Dai, Qunwei; Li, Qiongfang; An, Dejun; Dong, Hailiang

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are a highly diversified group of algae that are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems, and various species have different nutrient and temperature requirements for optimal growth. Here, we describe unusual psychrophilic diatoms of Cymbella in a travertine deposition environment in southwestern China in winter season. Travertine surfaces are colonized by these psychrophilic diatoms, which form biofilms of extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) with active metabolic activities in extremely cold conditions. The travertine in Huanglong, is a typical single crystalline calcite with anisotropic lattice distortions of unit cell parameters along axes of a and c, and this structure is suggestive of some level of metabolic mediation on mineralization. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) results further confirmed the occurrence of biogenic distortion of the crystal lattice of travertine calcite. Overall, our results imply that the metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms may be particularly important for promoting formation and dissolution of travertine in extremely cold environments of Huanglong. The EPS of psychrophilic diatoms will protect travertine from HCO3− etching and provide template for forming travertine when water re-flowing, in warm season. PMID:25522049

  11. Efficient aspartic acid production by a psychrophile-based simple biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Takahisa; Hamada, Mai; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Kato, Junichi

    2015-10-01

    We previously constructed a Psychrophile-based Simple bioCatalyst (PSCat) reaction system, in which psychrophilic metabolic enzymes are inactivated by heat treatment, and used it here to study the conversion of aspartic acid from fumaric acid mediated by the activity of aspartate ammonia-lyase (aspartase). In Escherichia coli, the biosynthesis of aspartic acid competes with that of L-malic acid produced from fumaric acid by fumarase. In this study, E. coli aspartase was expressed in psychrophilic Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10 heat treated at 50 °C for 15 min. The resultant PSCat could convert fumaric acid to aspartic acid without the formation of L-malic acid because of heat inactivation of psychrophilic fumarase activity. Furthermore, alginate-immobilized PSCat produced high yields of aspartic acid and could be re-used nine times. The results of our study suggest that PSCat can be applied in biotechnological production as a new approach to increase the yield of target compounds. PMID:26254042

  12. Metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms on travertines at the Huanglong natural scenic district of China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Dong, Faqin; Ehrlich, Hermann; Zhao, Xueqing; Liu, Mingxue; Dai, Qunwei; Li, Qiongfang; An, Dejun; Dong, Hailiang

    2014-12-01

    Diatoms are a highly diversified group of algae that are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems, and various species have different nutrient and temperature requirements for optimal growth. Here, we describe unusual psychrophilic diatoms of Cymbella in a travertine deposition environment in southwestern China in winter season.Travertine surfaces are colonized by these psychrophilic diatoms, which form biofilms of extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) with active metabolic activities in extremely cold conditions. The travertine in Huanglong, is a typical single crystalline calcite with anisotropic lattice distortions of unit cell parameters along axes of a and c, and this structure is suggestive of some level of metabolic mediation on mineralization Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) results further confirmed the occurrence of biogenic distortion of the crystal lattice of travertine calcite.Overall, our results imply that the metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms may be particularly important for promoting formation and dissolution of travertine in extremely cold environments of Huanglong. The EPS of psychrophilic diatoms will protect travertine from HCO3− etching and provide template for forming travertine when water re-flowing, in warm season. PMID:25590097

  13. Metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms on travertines at the Huanglong Natural Scenic District of China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Dong, Faqin; Ehrlich, Hermann; Zhao, Xueqing; Liu, Mingxue; Dai, Qunwei; Li, Qiongfang; An, Dejun; Dong, Hailiang

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are a highly diversified group of algae that are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems, and various species have different nutrient and temperature requirements for optimal growth. Here, we describe unusual psychrophilic diatoms of Cymbella in a travertine deposition environment in southwestern China in winter season. Travertine surfaces are colonized by these psychrophilic diatoms, which form biofilms of extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) with active metabolic activities in extremely cold conditions. The travertine in Huanglong, is a typical single crystalline calcite with anisotropic lattice distortions of unit cell parameters along axes of a and c, and this structure is suggestive of some level of metabolic mediation on mineralization. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) results further confirmed the occurrence of biogenic distortion of the crystal lattice of travertine calcite. Overall, our results imply that the metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms may be particularly important for promoting formation and dissolution of travertine in extremely cold environments of Huanglong. The EPS of psychrophilic diatoms will protect travertine from HCO3- etching and provide template for forming travertine when water re-flowing, in warm season. PMID:25522049

  14. Catalase Activity of Psychrophilic Bacteria Grown at 2 and 30 C1

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Hilmer A.; Ishibashi, Sandra T.; Reid, Ann; Ito, June S.

    1963-01-01

    Catalase activity was measured in resting-cell suspensions of psychrophilic bacteria grown at 2 and at 30 C. Enzyme activity decreased in both cell-suspension types as harvest age increased. At comparable physiological age, cells grown at 2 C had more catalase than cells grown at 30 C. PMID:13959237

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Psychrobacter alimentarius PAMC 27889, a Psychrophile Isolated from an Antarctic Rock Sample

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaejin; Kwon, Miye; Yang, Jae Young; Woo, Jusun; Lee, Hong Kum; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Psychrobacter alimentarius PAMC 27889, a Gram-negative, psychrophilic bacterium, was isolated from an Antarctic rock sample. Here, we report the complete genome of P. alimentarius PAMC 27889, which has the nonmevalonate methylerythritol phosphate pathway of terpenoid biosynthesis and a complete gene cluster for benzoate degradation. PMID:27445386

  16. Stepwise Adaptations to Low Temperature as Revealed by Multiple Mutants of Psychrophilic α-Amylase from Antarctic Bacterium*

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, Alexandre; D'Amico, Salvino; Barumandzadeh, Roya; Matagne, André; Feller, Georges

    2011-01-01

    The mutants Mut5 and Mut5CC from a psychrophilic α-amylase bear representative stabilizing interactions found in the heat-stable porcine pancreatic α-amylase but lacking in the cold-active enzyme from an Antarctic bacterium. From an evolutionary perspective, these mutants can be regarded as structural intermediates between the psychrophilic and the mesophilic enzymes. We found that these engineered interactions improve all the investigated parameters related to protein stability as follows: compactness; kinetically driven stability; thermodynamic stability; resistance toward chemical denaturation, and the kinetics of unfolding/refolding. Concomitantly to this improved stability, both mutants have lost the kinetic optimization to low temperature activity displayed by the parent psychrophilic enzyme. These results provide strong experimental support to the hypothesis assuming that the disappearance of stabilizing interactions in psychrophilic enzymes increases the amplitude of concerted motions required by catalysis and the dynamics of active site residues at low temperature, leading to a higher activity. PMID:21900238

  17. FK506-Binding Protein 22 from a Psychrophilic Bacterium, a Cold Shock-Inducible Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase with the Ability to Assist in Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Budiman, Cahyo; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation of microorganisms to low temperatures remains to be fully elucidated. It has been previously reported that peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases) are involved in cold adaptation of various microorganisms whether they are hyperthermophiles, mesophiles or phsycrophiles. The rate of cis-trans isomerization at low temperatures is much slower than that at higher temperatures and may cause problems in protein folding. However, the mechanisms by which PPIases are involved in cold adaptation remain unclear. Here we used FK506-binding protein 22, a cold shock protein from the psychrophilic bacterium Shewanella sp. SIB1 (SIB1 FKBP22) as a model protein to decipher the involvement of PPIases in cold adaptation. SIB1 FKBP22 is homodimer that assumes a V-shaped structure based on a tertiary model. Each monomer consists of an N-domain responsible for dimerization and a C-catalytic domain. SIB1 FKBP22 is a typical cold-adapted enzyme as indicated by the increase of catalytic efficiency at low temperatures, the downward shift in optimal temperature of activity and the reduction in the conformational stability. SIB1 FKBP22 is considered as foldase and chaperone based on its ability to catalyze refolding of a cis-proline containing protein and bind to a folding intermediate protein, respectively. The foldase and chaperone activites of SIB1 FKBP22 are thought to be important for cold adaptation of Shewanella sp. SIB1. These activities are also employed by other PPIases for being involved in cold adaptation of various microorganisms. Despite other biological roles of PPIases, we proposed that foldase and chaperone activities of PPIases are the main requirement for overcoming the cold-stress problem in microorganisms due to folding of proteins. PMID:21954357

  18. Adaptation and acclimation of photosynthetic microorganisms to permanently cold environments.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Priscu, John C; Pocock, Tessa; Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Huner, Norman P A

    2006-03-01

    Persistently cold environments constitute one of our world's largest ecosystems, and microorganisms dominate the biomass and metabolic activity in these extreme environments. The stress of low temperatures on life is exacerbated in organisms that rely on photoautrophic production of organic carbon and energy sources. Phototrophic organisms must coordinate temperature-independent reactions of light absorption and photochemistry with temperature-dependent processes of electron transport and utilization of energy sources through growth and metabolism. Despite this conundrum, phototrophic microorganisms thrive in all cold ecosystems described and (together with chemoautrophs) provide the base of autotrophic production in low-temperature food webs. Psychrophilic (organisms with a requirement for low growth temperatures) and psychrotolerant (organisms tolerant of low growth temperatures) photoautotrophs rely on low-temperature acclimative and adaptive strategies that have been described for other low-temperature-adapted heterotrophic organisms, such as cold-active proteins and maintenance of membrane fluidity. In addition, photoautrophic organisms possess other strategies to balance the absorption of light and the transduction of light energy to stored chemical energy products (NADPH and ATP) with downstream consumption of photosynthetically derived energy products at low temperatures. Lastly, differential adaptive and acclimative mechanisms exist in phototrophic microorganisms residing in low-temperature environments that are exposed to constant low-light environments versus high-light- and high-UV-exposed phototrophic assemblages. PMID:16524924

  19. Adaptation and Acclimation of Photosynthetic Microorganisms to Permanently Cold Environments

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M.; Priscu, John C.; Pocock, Tessa; Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Huner, Norman P. A.

    2006-01-01

    Persistently cold environments constitute one of our world's largest ecosystems, and microorganisms dominate the biomass and metabolic activity in these extreme environments. The stress of low temperatures on life is exacerbated in organisms that rely on photoautrophic production of organic carbon and energy sources. Phototrophic organisms must coordinate temperature-independent reactions of light absorption and photochemistry with temperature-dependent processes of electron transport and utilization of energy sources through growth and metabolism. Despite this conundrum, phototrophic microorganisms thrive in all cold ecosystems described and (together with chemoautrophs) provide the base of autotrophic production in low-temperature food webs. Psychrophilic (organisms with a requirement for low growth temperatures) and psychrotolerant (organisms tolerant of low growth temperatures) photoautotrophs rely on low-temperature acclimative and adaptive strategies that have been described for other low-temperature-adapted heterotrophic organisms, such as cold-active proteins and maintenance of membrane fluidity. In addition, photoautrophic organisms possess other strategies to balance the absorption of light and the transduction of light energy to stored chemical energy products (NADPH and ATP) with downstream consumption of photosynthetically derived energy products at low temperatures. Lastly, differential adaptive and acclimative mechanisms exist in phototrophic microorganisms residing in low-temperature environments that are exposed to constant low-light environments versus high-light- and high-UV-exposed phototrophic assemblages. PMID:16524924

  20. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fairlamb, Alan H; Gow, Neil A R; Matthews, Keith R; Waters, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies. PMID:27572976

  1. Cloning and expression of phosphoglycerate mutase from the psychrophilic yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaafar, Nardiah Rizwana; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad

    2015-09-01

    The conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to 2-phosphoglycerate during glycolysis and gluconeogenesis is catalyzed by phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM). Better understanding of metabolic reactions performed by this enzyme has been studied extensively in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we report a phosphoglycerate mutase from the psychrophilic yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica. cDNA encoding for PGM from G. antarctica PI12, a psychrophilic yeast isolated from sea ice at Casey Station, Antarctica was amplified. The gene was then cloned into a cloning vector and sequenced, which verified its identity as the gene putatively encoding for PGM. The recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) as inclusion bodies and this was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot.

  2. Acidification of In-Storage-Psychrophilic-Anaerobic-Digestion (ISPAD) process to reduce ammonia volatilization: Model development and validation.

    PubMed

    Madani-Hosseini, Mahsa; Mulligan, Catherine N; Barrington, Suzelle

    2016-06-01

    In-Storage-Psychrophilic-Anaerobic-Digestion (ISPAD) is an ambient temperature treatment system for wastewaters stored for over 100days under temperate climates, which produces a nitrogen rich digestate susceptible to ammonia (NH3) volatilization. Present acidification techniques reducing NH3 volatilization are not only expensive and with secondary environmental effects, but do not apply to ISPAD relying on batch-to-batch inoculation. The objectives of this study were to identify and validate sequential organic loading (OL) strategies producing imbalances in acidogen and methanogen growth, acidifying ISPAD content one week before emptying to a pH of 6, while also preserving the inoculation potential. This acidification process is challenging as wastewaters often offer a high buffering capacity and ISPAD operational practices foster low microbial populations. A model simulating the ISPAD pH regime was used to optimize 3 different sequential OLs to decrease the ISPAD pH to 6.0. All 3 strategies were compared in terms of biogas production, volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration, microbial activity, glucose consumption, and pH decrease. Laboratory validation of the model outputs confirmed that a sequential OL of 13kg glucose/m(3) of ISPAD content over 4days could indeed reduce the pH to 6.0. Such OL competes feasibly with present acidification techniques. Nevertheless, more research is required to explain the 3-day lag between the model results and the experimental data. PMID:27060886

  3. Endotoxin Structures in the Psychrophiles Psychromonas marina and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis Contain Distinctive Acyl Features

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Charles R.; Alpuche, Giancarlo M.; Landis, Corinne A.; Sandman, Benjamin C.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid A is the essential component of endotoxin (Gram-negative lipopolysaccharide), a potent immunostimulatory compound. As the outer surface of the outer membrane, the details of lipid A structure are crucial not only to bacterial pathogenesis but also to membrane integrity. This work characterizes the structure of lipid A in two psychrophiles, Psychromonas marina and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis, and also two mesophiles to which they are related using MALDI-TOF MS and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC-MS. P. marina lipid A is strikingly similar to that of Escherichia coli in organization and total acyl size, but incorporates an unusual doubly unsaturated tetradecadienoyl acyl residue. P. cryohalolentis also shows structural organization similar to a closely related mesophile, Acinetobacter baumannii, however it has generally shorter acyl constituents and shows many acyl variants differing by single methylene (-CH2-) units, a characteristic it shares with the one previously reported psychrotolerant lipid A structure. This work is the first detailed structural characterization of lipid A from an obligate psychrophile and the second from a psychrotolerant species. It reveals distinctive structural features of psychrophilic lipid A in comparison to that of related mesophiles which suggest constitutive adaptations to maintain outer membrane fluidity in cold environments. PMID:25010385

  4. Combined anaerobic-aerobic treatment of landfill leachates under mesophilic, submesophilic and psychrophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Gladchenko, M; Epov, A

    2003-01-01

    As a first step of treatment of landfill leachates (total COD--1,430-3,810 mg/l, total nitrogen 90-162 mg/l), a performance of laboratory UASB reactors has been investigated under mesophilic (30 degrees C), sub-mesophilic (20 degrees C) and psychrophilic (10 degrees C) conditions. Under hydraulic retention times (HRT) of around 7 h, when the average organic loading rates (OLR) were around 5 g COD/l/day, the total COD removal accounted for 81% (on the average) with the effluent concentrations close to anaerobic biodegradability limit (0.25 g COD/l) for mesophilic and sub-mesophilic regimes. The psychrophilic treatment conducted under the average HRT of 8 h and the average OLR of 4.22 g COD/l/day showed a total COD removal of 47% producing the effluents (0.75 g COD/l) more suitable for subsequent biological nitrogen removal. All three anaerobic regimes used for leachate treatment were quite efficient for elimination of heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) by concomitant precipitation in the form of insoluble sulphides inside the sludge bed. The application of aerobic/anoxic biofilter as a sole polishing step for psychrophilic anaerobic effluents was acceptable for elimination of biodegradable COD and nitrogen approaching the current standards for direct discharge of treated wastewater. PMID:14640233

  5. Structural prediction of a novel laminarinase from the psychrophilic Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 and its temperature adaptation analysis.

    PubMed

    Parvizpour, Sepideh; Razmara, Jafar; Jomah, Ashraf Fadhil; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Illias, Rosli Mohd

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present a novel psychrophilic β-glucanase from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 yeast that has been structurally modeled and analyzed in detail. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to model a psychrophilic laminarinase from yeast. Because of the low sequence identity (<40%), a threading method was applied to predict a 3D structure of the enzyme using the MODELLER9v12 program. The results of a comparative study using other mesophilic, thermophilic, and hyperthermophilic laminarinases indicated several amino acid substitutions on the surface of psychrophilic laminarinase that totally increased the flexibility of its structure for efficient catalytic reactions at low temperatures. Whereas several structural factors in the overall structure can explain the weak thermal stability, this research suggests that the psychrophilic adaptation and catalytic activity at low temperatures were achieved through existence of longer loops and shorter or broken helices and strands, an increase in the number of aromatic and hydrophobic residues, a reduction in the number of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, a higher total solvent accessible surface area, and an increase in the exposure of the hydrophobic side chains to the solvent. The results of comparative molecular dynamics simulation and principal component analysis confirmed the above strategies adopted by psychrophilic laminarinase to increase its catalytic efficiency and structural flexibility to be active at cold temperature. PMID:25721655

  6. Microorganisms and Chemical Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the importance of microorganisms in chemical pollution and pollution abatement. Selected chemical pollutants are chosen to illustrate that microorganisms synthesize hazardous substances from reasonably innocuous precursors, while others act as excellent environmental decontaminating agents by removing undesirable natural and synthetic…

  7. Extracellular enzymes produced by microorganisms isolated from maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Loperena, Lyliam; Soria, Verónica; Varela, Hermosinda; Lupo, Sandra; Bergalli, Alejandro; Guigou, Mairan; Pellegrino, Andrés; Bernardo, Angela; Calviño, Ana; Rivas, Federico; Batista, Silvia

    2012-05-01

    Antarctic environments can sustain a great diversity of well-adapted microorganisms known as psychrophiles or psychrotrophs. The potential of these microorganisms as a resource of enzymes able to maintain their activity and stability at low temperature for technological applications has stimulated interest in exploration and isolation of microbes from this extreme environment. Enzymes produced by these organisms have a considerable potential for technological applications because they are known to have higher enzymatic activities at lower temperatures than their mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts. A total of 518 Antarctic microorganisms, were isolated during Antarctic expeditions organized by the Instituto Antártico Uruguayo. Samples of particules suspended in air, ice, sea and freshwater, soil, sediment, bird and marine animal faeces, dead animals, algae, plants, rocks and microbial mats were collected from different sites in maritime Antarctica. We report enzymatic activities present in 161 microorganisms (120 bacteria, 31 yeasts and 10 filamentous fungi) isolated from these locations. Enzymatic performance was evaluated at 4 and 20°C. Most of yeasts and bacteria grew better at 20°C than at 4°C, however the opposite was observed with the fungi. Amylase, lipase and protease activities were frequently found in bacterial strains. Yeasts and fungal isolates typically exhibited lipase, celullase and gelatinase activities. Bacterial isolates with highest enzymatic activities were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis as Pseudomonas spp., Psychrobacter sp., Arthrobacter spp., Bacillus sp. and Carnobacterium sp. Yeasts and fungal strains, with multiple enzymatic activities, belonged to Cryptococcus victoriae, Trichosporon pullulans and Geomyces pannorum. PMID:22806048

  8. Effect of a cold shock on the activity and composition of the communities of ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms in a chestnut soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherobaeva, A. S.; Stepanov, A. L.; Kravchenko, I. K.

    2012-05-01

    The simulation of a cold shock was performed in an incubation experiment with soil microcosms by a sharp decrease of the temperature to negative values and the subsequent analysis of the nitrification rate of the ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms. Three procedures of the cold shock effect were selected: long, short-time, and cyclic. A significant decrease of the nitrifying activity was recorded after the long effect, whereas the 8-, 16-, and 24-hour cold shocks did not affect the intensity of nitrification. A cyclic temperature decrease alternating with periods of incubation under high temperatures also did not affect the nitrifying activity of the microorganisms. We suppose that the domination of mesophilic microorganisms with a resistant enzyme system or of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant microorganisms contributes to the preservation of a high nitrification level in soils with frequent alternations of high and low temperatures.

  9. Psychrophilic pseudomonas in antarctic freshwater lake at stornes peninsula, larsemann hills over east Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Abhishek; Bharti, Pawan K; Goyal, Pankaj; Varma, Ajit; Jindal, Tanu

    2015-01-01

    The Larsemann Hills is an ice-free area of approximately 50 km(2), located halfway between the Vestfold Hills and the Amery Ice Shelf on the south-eastern coast of Prydz Bay, Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica (69º30'S, 76º19'58″E). The ice-free area consists of two major peninsulas (Stornes and Broknes), four minor peninsulas, and approximately 130 islands. The Larsemann Hills area contains more than 150 lakes at different Islands and Peninsulas. Nine lake water samples were collected in a gamma sterilized bottles and were kept in an ice pack to prevent any changes in the microbial flora of the samples during the transportation. The water samples were transported to the lab in vertical position maintaining the temperature 1-4 °C with ice pack enveloped conditions. Samples were studied for Psychrophilic bacterial count, Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella and Total MPN Coliform per 100 ml. Psychrophillic counts were found in the range of 12 cfu to 1.6 × 10(2) cfu in all the samples. MPN Coliform per 100 ml was found to be absent in all the samples. No growth and characteristics colonies observed when tested for Salmonella and S.aureus. Pseudomonas sp. was found in ST-2 lake water sample as characteristics colonies (Optimum Growth) were observed on selective media at 22 and 25 °C. Further several biochemical tests were also performed to confirm the presence of this Potential Psychrophilic Pseudomonas sp. for its further application in Science and Technology. PMID:26543717

  10. The Antarctic psychrophile, Chlamydomonas subcaudata, is deficient in state I-state II transitions.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Ivanov, Alexander G; Huner, Norman P A

    2002-01-01

    State I-State II transitions were monitored in vivo and in vitro in the Antarctic, psychrophillic, green alga, Chlamydomonas subcaudata, as changes in the low-temperature (77 K) chlorophyll fluorescence emission maxima at 722 nm (F722) relative to 699 nm (F699). As expected, the control mesophillic species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was able to modulate the light energy distribution between photosystem II and photosystem I in response to exposure to four different conditions: (i) dark/anaerobic conditions, (ii) a change in Mg2+ concentration, (iii) red light, and (iv) increased incubation temperature. This was correlated with the ability to phosphorylate both of its major light-harvesting polypeptides. In contrast, exposure of C. subcaudata to the same four conditions induced minimum alterations in the 77 K fluorescence emission spectra, which was correlated with the ability to phosphorylate only one of its major light-harvesting polypeptides. Thus, C. subcaudata appears to be deficient in the ability to undergo a State I-State II transition. Functionally, this is associated with alterations in the apparent redox status of the intersystem electron transport chain and with higher rates of photosystem I cyclic electron transport in the psychrophile than in the mesophile, based on in vivo P700 measurements. Structurally, this deficiency is associated with reduced levels of Psa A/B relative to D1, the absence of specific photosystem I light-harvesting polypeptides [R.M. Morgan et al. (1998) Photosynth Res 56:303-314] and a cytochrome b6/f complex that exhibits a form of cytochrome f that is approximately 7 kDa smaller than that observed in C. reinhardtii. We conclude that the Antarctic psychrophile, C. subcaudata, is an example of a natural variant deficient in State I-State II transitions. PMID:11859846

  11. Challenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle "Challenger" in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy. (Contains 4 figures and 2 footnotes.)

  12. Challenger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-09-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy.

  13. Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas R.

    1975-01-01

    Domestic and international challenges facing the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness are discussed; and U.S. and Russian programs in testing and correcting children's vision, developing eye safety programs in agriculture and industry, and disseminating information concerning the detection and treatment of cataracts are compared. (SB)

  14. Characterization of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from the psychrophilic bacteria Desulfotalea psychrophila, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Psychrobacter arcticus, Psychrobacter cryohalolentis, Psychromonas ingrahamii, Psychroflexus torquis, and Photobacterium profundum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) play essential roles in DNA replication, recombination and repair in Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they find numerous applications in diverse molecular biology and analytical methods. Results We report the characterization of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from the psychrophilic bacteria Desulfotalea psychrophila (DpsSSB), Flavobacterium psychrophilum (FpsSSB), Psychrobacter arcticus (ParSSB), Psychrobacter cryohalolentis (PcrSSB), Psychromonas ingrahamii (PinSSB), Photobacterium profundum (PprSSB), and Psychroflexus torquis (PtoSSB). The proteins show a high differential within the molecular mass of their monomers and the length of their amino acid sequences. The high level of identity and similarity in respect to the EcoSSB is related to the OB-fold and some of the last amino acid residues. They are functional as homotetramers, with each monomer encoding one single stranded DNA binding domain (OB-fold). The fluorescence titrations indicated that the length of the ssDNA-binding site size is approximately 30 ± 2 nucleotides for the PinSSB, 31 ± 2 nucleotides for the DpsSSB, and 32 ± 2 nucleotides for the ParSSB, PcrSSB, PprSSB and PtoSSB. They also demonstrated that it is salt independent. However, when the ionic strength was changed from low salt to high, binding-mode transition was observed for the FpsSSB, at 31 ± 2 nucleotides and 45 ± 2 nucleotides, respectively. As expected, the SSB proteins under study cause duplex DNA destabilization. The greatest decrease in duplex DNA melting temperature was observed in the presence of the PtoSSB 17°C. The SSBs in question possess relatively high thermostability for proteins derived from cold-adapted bacteria. Conclusion The results showed that SSB proteins from psychrophilic microorganisms are typical bacterial SSBs and possess relatively high thermostability

  15. Micro-organ device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); von Gustedt-Gonda, legal representative, Iris (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  16. Micro-Organ Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  17. Temperature-Sensitive Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis PT13a Expressing Essential Proteins of Psychrophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Duplantis, Barry N.; Puckett, Stephanie M.; Rosey, Everett L.; Ameiss, Keith A.; Hartman, Angela D.; Pearce, Stephanie C.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic genes based on deduced amino acid sequences of the NAD-dependent DNA ligase (ligA) and CTP synthetase (pyrG) of psychrophilic bacteria were substituted for their native homologues in the genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 13a (PT13a). The resulting strains were rendered temperature sensitive (TS) and did not revert to temperature resistance at a detectable level. At permissive temperatures, TS strains grew like the parental strain in broth medium and in macrophage-like cells, but their growth was slowed or stopped when they were shifted to a restrictive temperature. When injected into BALB/c mice at the base of the tail, representing a cool site of the body, the strains with restrictive temperatures of 37, 38.5, and 39°C persisted for less than 1 day, 4 to 7 days, and 20 to 28 days, respectively. The wild-type strain persisted at the site of inoculation for at least 28 days. The wild-type strain, but not the TS strains, was also found in spleen-plus-liver homogenates within 1 day of inoculation of the tail and was detectable in these organs for at least 28 days. Intramuscular vaccination of White Leghorn chickens with the PT13a strain carrying the psychrophilic pyrG gene provided some protection against colonization of the reproductive tract and induced an anti-S. enterica antibody response. PMID:26187965

  18. Psychrophilic one- and two-step systems for pre-treatment of winery waste water.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S V; Gladchenko, M A; Sklyar, V I; Kizimenko, Y S; Shcherbakov, S S

    2001-01-01

    The operation performance of a single and two (in series) laboratory UASB reactors (working volume of 2.7 l, recycle ratio varied from 1:1 to 1:18) treating diluted wine vinasse was investigated under psychrophilic conditions (4-10 degrees C). For a single UASB reactor seeded with granular sludge, the average organic loading rates (OLR) applied were 4.7, 3.7 and 1.7 g COD/l/d (hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were around 1 d) at 9-11, 6-7 and 4-5 degrees C, respectively. The average total COD removal for preacidified vinasse wastewater was around 60% for all the temperature regimes tested. For two UASB reactors in series, the average total COD removal for treatment of non-preacidified wastewater exceeded 70% (the average OLRs for a whole system were 2.2, 1.8 and 1.3 g COD/l/d under HRTs of 2 days at 10, 7 and 4 degrees C, respectively). In situ determinations of kinetic sludge characteristics (Vm and Km) revealed the existence of substantial mass-transfer limitations for the soluble substrates inside the reactor sludge bed. Therefore an application of higher recycle rations is essential for enhancement of UASB pre-treatment under psychrophilic conditions. The produced anaerobic effluents were shown to be efficiently post-treated aerobically--final effluent COD concentrations were around 0.1 g/l. PMID:11579923

  19. Purification and characterization of cold-adapted beta-agarase from an Antarctic psychrophilic strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang; Hu, Qiushi; Li, Yuquan; Xu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    An extracellular β-agarase was purified from Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21, a Psychrophilic agar-degrading bacterium isolated from Antarctic Prydz Bay sediments. The purified agarase (Aga21) revealed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with an apparent molecular weight of 80 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature of the agarase were 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively. However, it maintained as much as 85% of the maximum activities at 10 °C. Significant activation of the agarase was observed in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, K+; Ca2+, Na+, Ba2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Sr2+ and EDTA inhibited the enzyme activity. The enzymatic hydrolyzed product of agar was characterized as neoagarobiose. Furthermore, this work is the first evidence of cold-adapted agarase in Antarctic psychrophilic bacteria and these results indicate the potential for the Antarctic agarase as a catalyst in medicine, food and cosmetic industries. PMID:26413048

  20. Characterization of recombinant glutathione reductase from the psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mikyoung; Barnwell, Callie V; Grunden, Amy M

    2015-07-01

    Glutathione reductases catalyze the reduction of oxidized glutathione (glutathione disulfide, GSSG) using NADPH as the substrate to produce reduced glutathione (GSH), which is an important antioxidant molecule that helps maintain the proper reducing environment of the cell. A recombinant form of glutathione reductase from Colwellia psychrerythraea, a marine psychrophilic bacterium, has been biochemically characterized to determine its molecular and enzymatic properties. C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was shown to be a homodimer with a molecular weight of 48.7 kDa using SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and gel filtration. The C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase sequence shows significant homology to that of Escherichia coli glutathione reductase (66 % identity), and it possesses the FAD and NADPH binding motifs, as well as absorption spectrum features which are characteristic of flavoenzymes such as glutathione reductase. The psychrophilic C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase exhibits higher k cat and k cat/K m at lower temperatures (4 °C) compared to mesophilic Baker's yeast glutathione reductase. However, C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was able to complement an E. coli glutathione reductase deletion strain in oxidative stress growth assays, demonstrating the functionality of C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase over a broad temperature range, which suggests its potential utility as an antioxidant enzyme in heterologous systems. PMID:26101017

  1. Purification and characterization of a cold-adapted pullulanase from a psychrophilic bacterial isolate.

    PubMed

    Qoura, Farah; Elleuche, Skander; Brueck, Thomas; Antranikian, Garabed

    2014-11-01

    There is a considerable potential of cold-active biocatalysts for versatile industrial applications. A psychrophilic bacterial strain, Shewanella arctica 40-3, has been isolated from arctic sea ice and was shown to exhibit pullulan-degrading activity. Purification of a monomeric, 150-kDa pullulanase was achieved using a five-step purification approach. The native enzyme was purified 50.0-fold to a final specific activity of 3.0 U/mg. The enzyme was active at a broad range of temperature (10-50 °C) and pH (5-9). Optimal activity was determined at 45 °C and pH 7. The presence of various metal ions is tolerated by the pullulanase, while detergents resulted in decreased activity. Complete conversion of pullulan to maltotriose as the sole product and N-terminal amino acid sequence indicated that the enzyme is a type-I pullulanase and belongs to rarely characterized pullulan-degrading enzymes from psychrophiles. PMID:25069876

  2. Functional responses and adaptation of mesophilic microbial communities to psychrophilic anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Gunnigle, Eoin; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Fuszard, Matthew; Botting, Catherine H; Sheahan, Jerome; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Abram, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Psychrophilic (<20°C) anaerobic digestion (AD) represents an attractive alternative to mesophilic wastewater treatment. In order to investigate the AD microbiome response to temperature change, with particular emphasis on methanogenic archaea, duplicate laboratory-scale AD bioreactors were operated at 37°C followed by a temperature drop to 15°C. A volatile fatty acid-based wastewater (composed of propionic acid, butyric acid, acetic acid and ethanol) was used to provide substrates representing the later stages of AD. Community structure was monitored using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, as well as DNA and cDNA-based DGGE analysis, while the abundance of relevant methanogens was followed using qPCR. In addition, metaproteomics, microautoradiography-fluorescence in situ hybridization, and methanogenic activity measurements were employed to investigate microbial activities and functions. Methanomicrobiales abundance increased at low temperature, which correlated with an increased contribution of CH4 production from hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at 15°C. Methanosarcinales utilized acetate and H2/CO2 as CH4 precursors at both temperatures and a partial shift from acetoclastic to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was observed for this archaeal population at 15°C. An upregulation of protein expression was reported at low temperature as well as the detection of chaperones indicating that mesophilic communities experienced stress during long-term exposure to 15°C. Overall, changes in microbial community structure and function were found to underpin the adaptation of mesophilic sludge to psychrophilic AD. PMID:26507125

  3. Draft genome of Cryobacterium sp. MLB-32, an obligate psychrophile from glacier cryoconite holes of high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Kapse, Neelam; Arora, Preeti; Singh, Shiv Mohan; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K

    2015-06-01

    Obligate psychrophilic, Cryobacterium sp. MLB-32, was isolated from cryoconite holes of high Arctic glaciers. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of the putative novel species of the genus Cryobacterium, providing opportunities for biotechnological and agricultural exploitation of its genome features. PMID:25659801

  4. Fossil Microorganisms in Archaean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astafleva, Marina; Hoover, Richard; Rozanov, Alexei; Vrevskiy, A.

    2006-01-01

    Ancient Archean and Proterozoic rocks are the model objects for investigation of rocks comprising astromaterials. The first of Archean fossil microorganisms from Baltic shield have been reported at the last SPIE Conference in 2005. Since this confeence biomorphic structures have been revealed in Archean rocks of Karelia. It was determined that there are 3 types of such bion structures: 1. structures found in situ, in other words microorganisms even-aged with rock matrix, that is real Archean fossils biomorphic structures, that is to say forms inhabited early formed rocks, and 3. younger than Archean-Protherozoic minerali microorganisms, that is later contamination. We made attempt to differentiate these 3 types of findings and tried to understand of burial of microorganisms. The structures belongs (from our point of view) to the first type, or real Archean, forms were under examination. Practical investigation of ancient microorganisms from Green-Stone-Belt of Northern Karelia turns to be very perspective. It shows that even in such ancient time as Archean ancient diverse world existed. Moreover probably such relatively highly organized cyanobacteria and perhaps eukaryotic formes existed in Archean world.

  5. Micro-Organ Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steven R.; Leslie, Julia; Chang, Robert C.; Starly, Binil; Sun, Wei; Culbertson, Christopher; Holtorf, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organ devices (MODs) are being developed to satisfy an emerging need for small, lightweight, reproducible, biological-experimentati on apparatuses that are amenable to automated operation and that imp ose minimal demands for resources (principally, power and fluids). I n simplest terms, a MOD is a microfluidic device containing a variety of microstructures and assemblies of cells, all designed to mimic a complex in vivo microenvironment by replicating one or more in vivo micro-organ structures, the architectures and composition of the extr acellular matrices in the organs of interest, and the in vivo fluid flows. In addition to microscopic flow channels, a MOD contains one or more micro-organ wells containing cells residing in microscopic e xtracellular matrices and/or scaffolds, the shapes and compositions o f which enable replication of the corresponding in vivo cell assembl ies and flows.

  6. Microorganisms and Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    Provides information to update Institute of Biology's Studies in Biology No. 111, "Microorganisms and Man," by W. C. Noble and Jay Naidoo (Edward Arnold, 1979). Topics include: (1) food poisoning; (2) airborn infections in man; (3) infection in animals and plants; and (4) biodegradation and biosynthesis. (JN)

  7. Thermally Induced Leakage from Vibrio marinus, an Obligately Psychrophilic Marine Bacterium1

    PubMed Central

    Haight, Roger D.; Morita, Richard Y.

    1966-01-01

    Haight, Rodger D. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Richard Y. Morita. Thermally induced leakage from Vibrio marinus, an obligately psychrophilic bacterium. J. Bacteriol. 92:1388–1393. 1966.—Leakage of various cellular components into the surrounding menstruum occurred when Vibrio marinus was subjected to temperatures above 20 C (organism's maximal growth temperature). These materials, listed in decreasing rates of leakage, were identified as protein, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and amino acids. The amount of polar amino acids increased as the time and temperature of heat treatment were increased, whereas the nonpolar amino acids decreased. The ribonucleic acid in the supernatant fluid resulting from heat treatment was both polymeric and nonpolymeric. Leakage of cellular components may be one of the reasons that V. marinus MP-1 loses viability when exposed to temperatures above its maximal temperature for growth. PMID:5924270

  8. NOVEL ICE-BINDING PROTEINS FROM A PSYCHROPHILIC ANTARCTIC ALGA (CHLAMYDOMONADACEAE, CHLOROPHYCEAE)(1).

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A; Janech, Michael G; Fritsen, Christian H

    2009-02-01

    Many cold-adapted unicellular plants express ice-active proteins, but at present, only one type of such proteins has been described, and it shows no resemblance to higher plant antifreezes. Here, we describe four isoforms of a second and very active type of extracellular ice-binding protein (IBP) from a unicellular chlamydomonad alga collected from an Antarctic intertidal location. The alga is a euryhaline psychrophile that, based on sequences of the alpha tubulin gene and an IBP gene, appears to be the same as a snow alga collected on Petrel Island, Antarctica. The IBPs, which do not resemble any known antifreezes, have strong recrystallization inhibition activity and have an ability to slow the drainage of brine from sea ice. These properties, by maintaining liquid environments, may increase survival of the cells in freezing environments. The IBPs have a repeating TXT motif, which has previously been implicated in ice binding in insect antifreezes and a ryegrass antifreeze. PMID:27033652

  9. Identification of miniature plasmids in psychrophilic Arctic bacteria of the genus Variovorax.

    PubMed

    Ciok, Anna; Dziewit, Lukasz; Grzesiak, Jakub; Budzik, Karol; Gorniak, Dorota; Zdanowski, Marek K; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2016-04-01

    The Svalbard archipelago (Spitsbergen Island) is the northernmost landmass in the European Arctic and has a variety of small- and medium-sized glaciers. The plasmidome of eleven psychrophilic strains of Variovorax spp. isolated from the ice surface of Hans and Werenskiold Glaciers of Spitsbergen Island, was defined. This analysis revealed the presence of six plasmids whose nucleotide sequences have been determined. Four of them, exhibiting high reciprocal sequence similarity, possess unique structures, since their genomes lack any recognized genes. These miniature replicons, not exceeding 1 kb in size, include pHW69V1 (746 bp), which is the smallest autonomous replicon so far identified in free-living bacteria. The miniature plasmids share no similarity with known sequences present in the databases. In silico and experimental analyses identified conserved DNA regions essential for the initiation of replication of these replicons. PMID:26917781

  10. Psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion of dairy cow feces: Long-term operation

    SciTech Connect

    Massé, Daniel I. Cata Saady, Noori M.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion (PDAD) of cow feces (CF) is feasible. • PDAD of CF is as efficient as mesophilic and thermophilic AD at TCL 21 days. • CF (13–16% TS at OLR 5.0 g TCOD{sub fed} kg{sup −1} inoculum d{sup −1}) yielded 222 ± 27 {sub N}L CH{sub 4} kg{sup −1} VS fed. - Abstract: This paper reports experimental results which demonstrate psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion of cow feces during long-term operation in sequence batch reactor. Cow feces (13–16% total solids) has been anaerobically digested in 12 successive cycles (252 days) at 21 days treatment cycle length (TCL) and temperature of 20 °C using psychrotrophic anaerobic mixed culture. An average specific methane yield (SMY) of 184.9 ± 24.0, 189.9 ± 27.3, and 222 ± 27.7 {sub N}L CH{sub 4} kg{sup −1} of VS fed has been achieved at an organic loading rate of 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 g TCOD kg{sup −1} inoculum d{sup −1} and TCL of 21 days, respectively. The corresponding substrate to inoculum ratio (SIR) was 0.39 ± 0.06, 0.48 ± .02, 0.53 ± 0.05, respectively. Average methane production rate of 10 ± 1.4 {sub N}L CH{sub 4} kg{sup −1} VS fed d{sup −1} has been obtained. The low concentration of volatile fatty acids indicated that hydrolysis was the reaction limiting step.

  11. Inactivation of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra N.; Schenk, Marcela; Raffellini, Silvia; López-Malo, Aurelio

    Minimal processing techniques for food preservation allow better retention of product flavor, texture, color, and nutrient content than comparable conventional treatments. A wide range of novel alternative physical factors have been intensely investigated in the last two decades. These physical factors can cause inactivation of microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures (e.g., high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, ultrasound, pulsed light, and ultraviolet light). These technologies have been reported to reduce microorganism population in foods while avoiding the deleterious effects of severe heating on quality. Among technologies, high-energy ultrasound (i.e., intensities higher than 1 W/cm2, frequencies between 18 and 100 kHz) has attracted considerable interest for food preservation applications (Mason et al., 1996; Povey and Mason, 1998).

  12. Detecting the presence of microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, Judd R. (Inventor); Stoner, Glenn E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The presence of microorganisms in a sample is determined by culturing microorganisms in a growth medium which is in contact with a measuring electrode and a reference electrode and detecting a change in potential between the electrodes caused by the presence of the microorganisms in the medium with a high impedance potentiometer.

  13. Temperature Sensitivity Conferred by ligA Alleles from Psychrophilic Bacteria upon Substitution in Mesophilic Bacteria and a Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Pankowski, Jarosław A.; Puckett, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    We have assembled a collection of 13 psychrophilic ligA alleles that can serve as genetic elements for engineering mesophiles to a temperature-sensitive (TS) phenotype. When these ligA alleles were substituted into Francisella novicida, they conferred a TS phenotype with restrictive temperatures between 33 and 39°C. When the F. novicida ligA hybrid strains were plated above their restrictive temperatures, eight of them generated temperature-resistant variants. For two alleles, the mutations that led to temperature resistance clustered near the 5′ end of the gene, and the mutations increased the predicted strength of the ribosome binding site at least 3-fold. Four F. novicida ligA hybrid strains generated no temperature-resistant variants at a detectable level. These results suggest that multiple mutations are needed to create temperature-resistant variants of these ligA gene products. One ligA allele was isolated from a Colwellia species that has a maximal growth temperature of 12°C, and this allele supported growth of F. novicida only as a hybrid between the psychrophilic and the F. novicida ligA genes. However, the full psychrophilic gene alone supported the growth of Salmonella enterica, imparting a restrictive temperature of 27°C. We also tested two ligA alleles from two Pseudoalteromonas strains for their ability to support the viability of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that lacked its essential gene, CDC9, encoding an ATP-dependent DNA ligase. In both cases, the psychrophilic bacterial alleles supported yeast viability and their expression generated TS phenotypes. This collection of ligA alleles should be useful in engineering bacteria, and possibly eukaryotic microbes, to predictable TS phenotypes. PMID:26773080

  14. Temperature Sensitivity Conferred by ligA Alleles from Psychrophilic Bacteria upon Substitution in Mesophilic Bacteria and a Yeast Species.

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Jarosław A; Puckett, Stephanie M; Nano, Francis E

    2016-01-01

    We have assembled a collection of 13 psychrophilic ligA alleles that can serve as genetic elements for engineering mesophiles to a temperature-sensitive (TS) phenotype. When these ligA alleles were substituted into Francisella novicida, they conferred a TS phenotype with restrictive temperatures between 33 and 39°C. When the F. novicida ligA hybrid strains were plated above their restrictive temperatures, eight of them generated temperature-resistant variants. For two alleles, the mutations that led to temperature resistance clustered near the 5' end of the gene, and the mutations increased the predicted strength of the ribosome binding site at least 3-fold. Four F. novicida ligA hybrid strains generated no temperature-resistant variants at a detectable level. These results suggest that multiple mutations are needed to create temperature-resistant variants of these ligA gene products. One ligA allele was isolated from a Colwellia species that has a maximal growth temperature of 12°C, and this allele supported growth of F. novicida only as a hybrid between the psychrophilic and the F. novicida ligA genes. However, the full psychrophilic gene alone supported the growth of Salmonella enterica, imparting a restrictive temperature of 27°C. We also tested two ligA alleles from two Pseudoalteromonas strains for their ability to support the viability of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that lacked its essential gene, CDC9, encoding an ATP-dependent DNA ligase. In both cases, the psychrophilic bacterial alleles supported yeast viability and their expression generated TS phenotypes. This collection of ligA alleles should be useful in engineering bacteria, and possibly eukaryotic microbes, to predictable TS phenotypes. PMID:26773080

  15. Complete genome sequence of Pedobacter cryoconitis PAMC 27485, a CRISPR-Cas system-containing psychrophile isolated from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaejin; Jung, You-Jung; Lee, Hong Kum; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun

    2016-05-20

    Pedobacter cryoconitis PAMC 27485, an aerobic, Gram-negative, facultatively psychrophilic bacterium, was isolated from Antarctic soil. Here we report the complete genome of P. cryoconitis PAMC 27485, which contains a type II CRISPR-Cas system and genes encoding useful enzymes (e.g. proteases). The genome sequence of P. cryoconitis PAMC 27485 could provide insights into its adaptive immune system against foreign genetic elements and biotechnological potential. PMID:27015980

  16. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  17. Systems Biology of Industrial Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Marta; Salazar, Margarita; Nielsen, Jens

    The field of industrial biotechnology is expanding rapidly as the chemical industry is looking towards more sustainable production of chemicals that can be used as fuels or building blocks for production of solvents and materials. In connection with the development of sustainable bioprocesses, it is a major challenge to design and develop efficient cell factories that can ensure cost efficient conversion of the raw material into the chemical of interest. This is achieved through metabolic engineering, where the metabolism of the cell factory is engineered such that there is an efficient conversion of sugars, the typical raw materials in the fermentation industry, into the desired product. However, engineering of cellular metabolism is often challenging due to the complex regulation that has evolved in connection with adaptation of the different microorganisms to their ecological niches. In order to map these regulatory structures and further de-regulate them, as well as identify ingenious metabolic engineering strategies that full-fill mass balance constraints, tools from systems biology can be applied. This involves both high-throughput analysis tools like transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis, as well as the use of mathematical modeling to simulate the phenotypes resulting from the different metabolic engineering strategies. It is in fact expected that systems biology may substantially improve the process of cell factory development, and we therefore propose the term Industrial Systems Biology for how systems biology will enhance the development of industrial biotechnology for sustainable chemical production.

  18. Toward understanding life under subzero conditions: the significance of exploring psychrophilic "cold-shock" proteins.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Emanuele

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the behavior of proteins under freezing conditions is vital for detecting and locating extraterrestrial life in cold environments, such as those found on Mars and the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. This review highlights the importance of studying psychrophilic "cold-shock" proteins, a topic that has yet to be explored. A strategy for analyzing the psychrophilic RNA helicase protein CsdA (Psyc_1082) from Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4 as a key protein for life under freezing temperatures is proposed. The experimental model presented here was developed based on previous data from investigations of Escherichia coli, P. arcticus 273-4, and RNA helicases. P. arcticus 273-4 is considered a model for life in freezing environments. It is capable of growing in temperatures as cold as -10°C by using physiological strategies to survive not only in freezing temperatures but also under low-water-activity and limited-nutrient-availability conditions. The analyses of its genome, transcriptome, and proteome revealed specific adaptations that allow it to inhabit freezing environments by adopting a slow metabolic strategy rather than a cellular dormancy state. During growth at subzero temperatures, P. arcticus 273-4 genes related to energy metabolism and carbon substrate incorporation are downregulated, and genes for maintenance of membranes, cell walls, and nucleic acid motion are upregulated. At -6°C, P. arcticus 273-4 does not upregulate the expression of either RNA or protein chaperones; however, it upregulates the expression of its cold-shock induced DEAD-box RNA helicase protein A (CsdA - Psyc_1082). CsdA - Psyc_1082 was investigated as a key helper protein for sustaining life in subzero conditions. Proving CsdA - Psyc_1082 to be functional as a key protein for life under freezing temperatures may extend the known minimum growth temperature of a mesophilic cell and provide key information about the mechanisms that underlie cold-induced biological systems in

  19. Gravitaxis in unicellular microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hader, D P

    1999-01-01

    Orientation of organisms with respect to the gravitational field of the Earth has been studied for more than 100 years in a number of unicellular microorganisms including flagellates and ciliates. Several hypotheses have been developed how the weak stimulus is perceived. Intracellular statoliths have been found to be involved in gravitaxis of Loxodes, while no specialized organelles have been detected in other ciliates, e.g. Paramecium. Also in the slime mold Physarum no specialized gravireceptors have been identified yet. In the flagellate Euglena gracilis the whole cell body, which is denser than the surrounding medium, seems to act as a statolith pressing onto the lower membrane where it activates mechanosensitive ion channels. Similar results were obtained for the ciliate Paramecium. In contrast to the flagellate Euglena, several ciliates have been found to show gravikinesis, which is defined as a dependence of the swimming velocity on the direction of movement in the gravity field. PMID:11542630

  20. Gravitaxis in unicellular microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.

    1999-01-01

    Orientation of organisms with respect to the gravitational field of the Earth has been studied for more than 100 years in a number of unicellular microorganisms including flagellates and ciliates. Several hypotheses have been developed how the weak stimulus is perceived. Intracellular statoliths have been found to be involved in gravitaxis of Loxodes, while no specialized organelles have been detected in other ciliates, e.g. Paramecium. Also in the slime mold Physarum no specialized gravireceptors have been identified yet. In the flagellate Euglena gracilis the whole cell body, which is denser than the surrounding medium, seems to act as a statolith pressing onto the lower membrane where it activates mechanosensitive ion channels. Similar results were obtained for the ciliate Paramecium. In contrast to the flagellate Euglena, several ciliates have been found to show gravikinesis, which is defined as a dependence of the swimming velocity on the direction of movement in the gravity field.

  1. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ward, Donald E.; Shockley, Keith R.; Chang, Lara S.; Levy, Ryan D.; Michel, Joshua K.; Conners, Shannon B.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this review, we exploit genome sequence data to compare hyperthermophilic microorganisms from the euryarchaeotal genus Pyrococcus , the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus , and the bacterium Thermotoga maritima . An overview of the proteases in these organisms is given based on those proteases that have been characterized and on putativemore » proteases that have been identified from genomic sequences, but have yet to be characterized. The analysis revealed both similarities and differences in the mechanisms utilized for proteolysis by each of these hyperthermophiles and indicated how these mechanisms relate to proteolysis in less thermophilic cells and organisms.« less

  2. Psychrophile spoilers dominate the bacterial microbiome in musculature samples of slaughter pigs.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evelyne; Wetzels, Stefanie U; Pinior, Beate; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Wagner, Martin; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to disentangle the microbial diversity on porcine musculature. The hypervariable V1-V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified from DNA samples of clinically healthy slaughter pigs (n=8). Pyrosequencing yielded 37,000 quality-controlled reads and a diverse microbiome with 54-159 OTUs per sample was detected. Interestingly, 6 out of 8 samples were strongly dominated by 1-2 highly abundant OTUs (best hits of highly abundant OTUs: Serratia proteamaculans, Pseudomonas syringae, Aeromonas allosaccharophila, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Acidiphilium cryptum and Escherichia coli). In 1g musculature scraping, 3.20E+06 16S rRNA gene copies and 4.45E+01 Enterobacteriaceae rRNA gene copies were detected with qPCR. We conclude that i.) next-generation sequencing technologies help encompass the full content of complex, bacterial contamination, ii.) psychrophile spoilers dominated the microbiota and iii.) E. coli is an effective marker species for pork contamination, as it was one of very few abundant species being present in all samples. PMID:26943946

  3. Rhodoferax antarcticus sp. nov., a moderately psychrophilic purple nonsulfur bacterium isolated from an Antarctic microbial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madigan, M. T.; Jung, D. O.; Woese, C. R.; Achenbach, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    A new species of purple nonsulfur bacteria isolated from an Antarctic microbial mat is described. The organism, designated strain ANT.BR, was mildly psychrophilic, growing optimally at 15-18 degrees C with a growth temperature range of 0-25 degrees C. Cells of strain ANT.BR were highly motile curved rods and spirals, contained bacteriochlorophyll a, and showed a multicomponent in vivo absorption spectrum. A specific phylogenetic relationship was observed between strain ANT.BR and the purple bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans FR2T, and the two organisms shared several physiological and other phenotypic properties, with the notable exception of growth temperature optimum. Tests of genomic DNA hybridization, however, showed Rfx. fermentans FR2T and strain ANT.BR to be genetically distinct bacteria. Because of its unique set of properties, especially its requirement for low growth temperatures, we propose to recognize strain ANT.BR as a new species of the genus Rhodoferax, Rhodoferax antarcticus, named for its known habitat, the Antarctic.

  4. Massilia eurypsychrophila sp. nov. a facultatively psychrophilic bacteria isolated from ice core.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Liu, Yongqin; Gu, Zhengquan; Xu, Baiqing; Wang, Ninglian; Jiao, Nianzhi; Liu, Hongcan; Zhou, Yuguang

    2015-07-01

    Strain B528-3(T), a Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic, facultatively psychrophilic bacterium with polar flagella, was isolated from an ice core drilled from Muztagh Glacier, Xinjiang, China. The novel isolate was classified into the genus Massilia. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the novel isolate shares a pairwise similarity of less than 97% with those of all the type strains of the genus Massilia. The major fatty acids of strain B528-3(T) were summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH) (57.31%), C16:0 (11.46%) and C18:1ω7c (14.72%). The predominant isoprenoid quinone was Q-8. The DNA G + C content was 62.2 mol% (Tm). The major polar lipids of this bacterium were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. From the genotypic and phenotypic data, it is evident that strain B528-3(T) represents a novel species of the genus Massilia, for which the name Massilia eurypsychrophila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is B528-3(T) ( = JCM 30074(T) = CGMCC 1.12828(T)). PMID:25851590

  5. Production of Two Extracellular Alkaline Phosphatases by a Psychrophilic Arthrobacter Strain

    PubMed Central

    de Prada, P.; Loveland-Curtze, J.; Brenchley, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    We surveyed our collection of psychrophilic bacteria to determine the types of phosphatases they produce and whether any had heat-labile activities with potential applications. Assays at different temperatures showed that the activity from one isolate was optimal at 45(deg)C and decreased dramatically above 55(deg)C. This isolate, D10, had the rod-coccus morphological cycle and cell wall amino acids associated with members of the Arthrobacter genus. Interestingly, we found that this strain made two extracellular phosphatases that could be separated by ammonium sulfate fractionation and migration during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. One enzyme, designated D10A, hydrolyzed both X-phos (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate) and para-nitrophenyl phosphate as substrates and had activity over a broad pH range of 7 to 11. The second enzyme, D10B, lacked activity against X-phos and had a narrow pH range of about 8 to 9. In addition, the D10B enzyme required calcium for activity. The levels of activity of both enzymes decreased for cells grown in media containing more than 100 (mu)M P(infi). These results not only demonstrate the existence of different enzymes from one Arthrobacter strain but also suggest ways in which other studies may have missed phosphatases with unknown requirements. PMID:16535422

  6. Biodegradation potentiality of psychrophilic bacterial strain Oleispira antarctica RB-8(T).

    PubMed

    Gentile, G; Bonsignore, M; Santisi, S; Catalfamo, M; Giuliano, L; Genovese, L; Yakimov, M M; Denaro, R; Genovese, M; Cappello, S

    2016-04-15

    The present study is focused on assessing the growth and hydrocarbon-degrading capability of the psychrophilic strain Oleispira antarctica RB-8(T). This study considered six hydrocarbon mixtures that were tested for 22days at two different cultivation temperatures (4 and 15°C). During the incubation period, six sub-aliquots of each culture at different times were processed for total bacterial abundance and GC-FID (gas chromatography-flame ionization detection) hydrocarbon analysis. Results from DNA extraction and DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining showed a linear increase during the first 18days of the experiment in almost all the substrates used; both techniques showed a good match, but the difference in values obtained was approximately one order of magnitude. GC-FID results revealed a substantial hydrocarbon degradation rate in almost all hydrocarbon sources and in particular at 15°C rather than 4°C (for commercial oil engine, oily waste, fuel jet, and crude oil). A more efficient degradation was observed in cultures grown with diesel and bilge water at 4°C. PMID:26912198

  7. High rate psychrophilic anaerobic digestion of high solids (35%) dairy manure in sequence batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Saady, Noori M Cata; Massé, Daniel I

    2015-06-01

    Zero liquid discharge is increasingly adopted as an objective for waste treatment process. The objective of this study was to increase the feed total solids (TS) and the organic loading rate (OLR) fed to a novel psychrophilic (20°C) dry anaerobic digestion (PDAD). Duplicate laboratory-scale bioreactors were fed cow feces and wheat straw (35% TS in feed) at OLR of 6.0 g TCOD kg(-1) inoculum d(-1) during long-term operation (147 days consisting of 7 successive cycles). An overall average specific methane yield (SMY) of 151.8±7.9 N L CH4 kg(-1) VS fed with an averaged volatile solids removal of 42.4±4.3% were obtained at a volatile solids-based inoculum-to-substrate ratio (ISR) of 2.13±0.2. The operation was stable as indicated by biogas and VFAs profiles and the results were reproducible in successive cycles; a maximum SMY of 163.3±5.7 N L CH4 kg(-1) VS fed was obtained. Hydrolysis was the reaction limiting step. High rate PDAD of 35% TS dairy manure is possible in sequential batch reactor within 21 days treatment cycle length. PMID:25804501

  8. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have occurred over the

  9. The genome sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the role of genome evolution in cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michele A; Lauro, Federico M; Williams, Timothy J; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S; DeFrancisci, Davide; Chong, Kevin WY; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H; DeMaere, Matthew Z; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain; Ivanova, N; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michele; Lapidus, Alla L.; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five-tiered evidence rating (ER) system that ranked annotations from ER1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea, which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino-acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall, membrane, envelope biogenesis COG genes are overrepresented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are overrepresented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two overrepresented COG categories appear to have been acquired from - and -Proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they have an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have occurred over the last several thousand years as it

  10. Molecular Structural Basis for the Cold Adaptedness of the Psychrophilic β-Glucosidase BglU in Micrococcus antarcticus.

    PubMed

    Miao, Li-Li; Hou, Yan-Jie; Fan, Hong-Xia; Qu, Jie; Qi, Chao; Liu, Ying; Li, De-Feng; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2016-04-01

    Psychrophilic enzymes play crucial roles in cold adaptation of microbes and provide useful models for studies of protein evolution, folding, and dynamic properties. We examined the crystal structure (2.2-Å resolution) of the psychrophilic β-glucosidase BglU, a member of the glycosyl hydrolase 1 (GH1) enzyme family found in the cold-adapted bacterium Micrococcus antarcticus. Structural comparison and sequence alignment between BglU and its mesophilic and thermophilic counterpart enzymes (BglB and GlyTn, respectively) revealed two notable features distinct to BglU: (i) a unique long-loop L3 (35 versus 7 amino acids in others) involved in substrate binding and (ii) a unique amino acid, His299 (Tyr in others), involved in the stabilization of an ordered water molecule chain. Shortening of loop L3 to 25 amino acids reduced low-temperature catalytic activity, substrate-binding ability, the optimal temperature, and the melting temperature (Tm). Mutation of His299 to Tyr increased the optimal temperature, the Tm, and the catalytic activity. Conversely, mutation of Tyr301 to His in BglB caused a reduction in catalytic activity, thermostability, and the optimal temperature (45 to 35°C). Loop L3 shortening and H299Y substitution jointly restored enzyme activity to the level of BglU, but at moderate temperatures. Our findings indicate that loop L3 controls the level of catalytic activity at low temperatures, residue His299 is responsible for thermolability (particularly heat lability of the active center), and long-loop L3 and His299 are jointly responsible for the psychrophilic properties. The described structural basis for the cold adaptedness of BglU will be helpful for structure-based engineering of new cold-adapted enzymes and for the production of mutants useful in a variety of industrial processes at different temperatures. PMID:26801571

  11. Extensive Gene Acquisition in the Extremely Psychrophilic Bacterial Species Psychroflexus torquis and the Link to Sea-Ice Ecosystem Specialism

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shi; Powell, Shane M.; Wilson, Richard; Bowman, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Sea ice is a highly dynamic and productive environment that includes a diverse array of psychrophilic prokaryotic and eukaryotic taxa distinct from the underlying water column. Because sea ice has only been extensive on Earth since the mid-Eocene, it has been hypothesized that bacteria highly adapted to inhabit sea ice have traits that have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Here we compared the genomes of the psychrophilic bacterium Psychroflexus torquis ATCC 700755T, associated with both Antarctic and Arctic sea ice, and its closely related nonpsychrophilic sister species, P. gondwanensis ACAM 44T. Results show that HGT has occurred much more extensively in P. torquis in comparison to P. gondwanensis. Genetic features that can be linked to the psychrophilic and sea ice-specific lifestyle of P. torquis include genes for exopolysaccharide (EPS) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis, numerous specific modes of nutrient acquisition, and proteins putatively associated with ice-binding, light-sensing (bacteriophytochromes), and programmed cell death (metacaspases). Proteomic analysis showed that several genes associated with these traits are highly translated, especially those involved with EPS and PUFA production. Because most of the genes relating to the ability of P. torquis to dwell in sea-ice ecosystems occur on genomic islands that are absent in closely related P. gondwanensis, its adaptation to the sea-ice environment appears driven mainly by HGT. The genomic islands are rich in pseudogenes, insertional elements, and addiction modules, suggesting that gene acquisition is being followed by a process of genome reduction potentially indicative of evolving ecosystem specialism. PMID:24391155

  12. Cytochrome f from the Antarctic psychrophile, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO 241: structure, sequence, and complementation in the mesophile, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Gretes, Michael; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Savitch, Leonid V; Simmonds, John; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Hüner, Norman P A

    2006-04-01

    Although cytochrome f from the Antarctic psychrophile, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO 241, exhibits a lower apparent molecular mass (34 kD) than that of the mesophile C. reinhardtii (41 kD) based on SDS-PAGE, both proteins are comparable in calculated molecular mass and show 79% identity in amino acid sequence. The difference in apparent molecular mass was maintained after expression of petA from both Chlamydomonas species in either E. coli or a C. reinhardtii DeltapetA mutant and after substitution of a unique third cysteine-292 to phenylalanine in the psychrophilic cytochrome f. Moreover, the heme of the psychrophilic form of cytochrome f was less stable upon heating than that of the mesophile. In contrast to C. raudensis, a C. reinhardtii DeltapetA mutant transformed with petA from C. raudensis exhibited the ability to undergo state transitions and a capacity for intersystem electron transport comparable to that of C. reinhardtii wild type. However, the C. reinhardtii petA transformants accumulated lower levels of cytochrome b ( 6 ) /f complexes and exhibited lower light saturated rates of O(2) evolution than C. reinhardtii wild type. We show that the presence of an altered form of cytochrome f in C. raudensis does not account for its inability to undergo state transitions or its impaired capacity for intersystem electron transport as previously suggested. A combined survey of the apparent molecular mass, thermal stability and amino acid sequences of cytochrome f from a broad range of mesophilic species shows unequivocally that the observed differences in cytochrome f structure are not related to psychrophilly. Thus, caution must be exercised in relating differences in amino acid sequence and thermal stability to adaptation to cold environments. PMID:16425016

  13. Characterization of a cryptic plasmid pSM429 and its application for heterologous expression in psychrophilic Pseudoalteromonas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pseudoalteromonas is an important genus widespread in marine environment, and a lot of psychrophilic Pseudoalteromonas strains thrive in deep sea and polar sea. By now, there are only a few genetic systems for Pseudoalteromonas reported and no commercial Pseudoalteromonas genetic system is available, which impedes the study of Pseudoalteromonas, especially for psychrophilic strains. The aim of this study is to develop a heterologous expression system for psychrophilic Pseudoalteromonas. Results A cryptic plasmid pSM429 isolated from psychrophilic Pseudoalteromonas sp. BSi20429 from the Arctic sea ice, was sequenced and characterized. The plasmid pSM429 is 3874 bp in length, with a G+C content of 28%. Four putative open reading frames (ORFs) were identified on pSM429. Based on homology, the ORF4 was predicted to encode a replication initiation (Rep) protein. A shuttle vector (Escherichia coli, Pseudoalteromonas), pWD, was constructed by ligating pSM429 and pUC19 and inserting a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) cassette conferring chloramphenicol resistance. To determine the minimal replicon of pSM429 and to check the functionality of identified ORFs, various pWD derivatives were constructed. All derivatives except the two smallest ones were shown to allow replication in Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM20429, a plasmid-cured strain of Pseudoalteromonas sp. BSi20429, suggesting that the orf4 and its flanking intergenic regions are essential for plasmid replication. Although not essential, the sequence including some repeats between orf1 and orf2 plays important roles in segregational stability of the plasmid. With the aid of pWD-derived plasmid pWD2, the erythromycin resistance gene and the cd gene encoding the catalytic domain of a cold-adapted cellulase were successfully expressed in Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM20429. Conclusions Plasmid pSM429 was isolated and characterized, and the regions essential for plasmid replication and stability were determined

  14. Complete genome sequence of the Sporosarcina psychrophila DSM 6497, a psychrophilic Bacillus strain that mediates the calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenkai; Xiao, Xiang; Zhang, Yu

    2016-05-20

    Sporosarcina psychrophila DSM 6497 is a gram positive, spore-formation psychrophilic bacterial strain, widely distributed in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Here we report its complete sequence including one circular chromosome of 4674191bp with a GC content of 40.3%. Genes encoding urease are predicted in the genome, which provide insight information on the microbiologically mediated urea hydrolysis process. This urea hydrolysis can further lead to an increase of carbonate anion and alkalinity in the environment, which promotes the microbiologically induced carbonate precipitation with various applications, such as the bioremediation of calcium rich wastewater and bio-reservation of architectural patrimony. PMID:27015981

  15. Local entropy difference upon a substrate binding of a psychrophilic α-amylase and a mesophilic homologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Takahiro; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2011-01-01

    Psychrophilic α-amylase from the antarctic bacterium pseudoalteromonashaloplanktis (AHA) and its mesophilic homologue, porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA) are theoretically investigated with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We carried out 240-ns MD simulations for four systems, AHA and PPA with/without the bound substrate, and examined protein conformational entropy changes upon the substrate binding. We developed an analysis that decomposes the entropy changes into contributions of individual amino acids, and successfully identified protein regions responsible for the entropy changes. The results provide a molecular insight into the structural flexibilities of those enzymes related to the temperature dependences of the enzymatic activity.

  16. NH4+ transport system of a psychrophilic marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain ABE-1.

    PubMed

    Chou, M; Matsunaga, T; Takada, Y; Fukunaga, N

    1999-05-01

    NH4(+) transport system of a psychrophilic marine bacterium Vibrio sp. strain ABE-1 (Vibrio ABE-1) was examined by measuring the uptake of [14C]methylammonium ion (14CH3NH3+) into the intact cells. 14CH3NH3+ uptake was detected in cells grown in medium containing glutamate as the sole nitrogen source, but not in those grown in medium containing NH4Cl instead of glutamate. Vibrio ABE-1 did not utilize CH3NH3+ as a carbon or nitrogen source. NH4Cl and nonradiolabeled CH3NH3+ completely inhibited 14CH3NH3+ uptake. These results indicate that 14CH3NH3+ uptake in this bacterium is mediated via an NH4+ transport system and not by a specific carrier for CH3NH3+. The respiratory substrate succinate was required to drive 14CH3NH3+ uptake and the uptake was completely inhibited by KCN, indicating that the uptake was energy dependent. The electrochemical potentials of H+ and/or Na+ across membranes were suggested to be the driving forces for the transport system because the ionophores carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and monensin strongly inhibited uptake activities at pH 6.5 and 8.5, respectively. Furthermore, KCl activated 14CH3NH3+ uptake. The 14CH3NH3+ uptake activity of Vibrio ABE-1 was markedly high at temperatures between 0 degrees and 15 degrees C, and the apparent Km value for CH3NH3+ of the uptake did not change significantly over the temperature range from 0 degrees to 25 degrees C. Thus, the NH4+ transport system of this bacterium was highly active at low temperatures. PMID:10356994

  17. PLASTICITY OF THE PSYCHROPHILIC GREEN ALGA CHLAMYDOMONAS RAUDENSIS (UWO 241) (CHLOROPHYTA) TO SUPRAOPTIMAL TEMPERATURE STRESS(1).

    PubMed

    Possmayer, Marc; Berardi, Gino; Beall, Benjamin F N; Trick, Charles G; Hüner, Norman P A; Maxwell, Denis P

    2011-10-01

    Chlamydomonas raudensis  H. Ettl (UWO 241) is a psychrophilic green alga endemic to Lake Bonney, Antarctica. The objective of this study was to investigate the response of UWO 241 to incubation at 24°C, a temperature close to optimum for related mesophilic species. Using chl a fluorescence analysis, shifting cells from a growth temperature of 10°C-24°C resulted in a decline in PSII photochemical efficiency with light energy being directed away from photochemistry and toward dissipative pathways. Using the SYTOX Green assay, it was determined that UWO 241 cells die when incubated at 24°C under growth irradiance with a half-time of 34.9 h. The role of light in cell death was minor as cell death occurred in darkness at 24°C with a half-time of 43.7 h. To examine the plasticity of UWO 241 to temperature stress, 10°C-grown cells were shifted to 24°C for 12 h and then returned to 10°C to recover. The 12 h incubation at 24°C, which resulted in <10% cell death, led to declines in both light-saturated rates of photosynthesis and respiration, PSII photochemistry and energy partitioning, and changes to transcript abundances-those associated with the light-harvesting protein of PSII and ferredoxin declining rapidly, whereas transcripts of specific heat-shock proteins (HSPs) increased. Within 24-48 h of being transferred back to 10°C, all parameters returned to levels occurring in 10°C-grown cells. This research shows, for the first time, that 24°C is a temperature that is lethal to UWO 241, and yet this organism displays considerable physiological and molecular plasticity. PMID:27020192

  18. Sphingobacterium psychroaquaticum sp. nov., a psychrophilic bacterium isolated from Lake Michigan water.

    PubMed

    Albert, Richard A; Waas, Nancy E; Pavlons, Shawn C; Pearson, Jamie L; Ketelboeter, Laura; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-03-01

    A psychrophilic, Gram-negative bacterium, designated MOL-1(T), was isolated from water of Lake Michigan. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the sequence of strain MOL-1(T) has sequence similarity of 95.6, 94.8, 94.3, 94.3, 94.2 and 93.9 %, respectively, to the 16S rRNA gene sequences of Sphingobacterium shayense HS39(T), S. lactis WCC 4512(T), S. composti T5-12(T), S. daejeonense TR6-04(T), S. bambusae IBFC2009(T) and S. alimentarium WCC 4521(T). The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH and summed feature 3 (iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and/or C16 : 1ω7c). Menaquinone MK-7 is the predominant respiratory quinone, while sym-homospermidine is the predominant polyamine. The polar lipid profile is composed of the predominant lipids phosphatidylethanolamine and unidentified polar lipid L2, with moderate amounts of unidentified polar lipids L1, L5 and L6 and unidentified aminophospholipids APL1 and APL2 and minor to trace amounts of unidentified polar lipids L3, L4, L7, L8, L9 and L10, unidentified phospholipid PL4 and unidentified aminophospholipid APL3. After molecular and phenotypic studies, including chemotaxonomic analyses, it was concluded that strain MOL-1(T) represents a novel Sphingobacterium species, for which the name Sphingobacterium psychroaquaticum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MOL-1(T) ( = NRRL B-59232(T)  = DSM 22418(T)). PMID:22659507

  19. Cloning and in-silico analysis of beta-1,3-xylanase from psychrophilic yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, Nooraisyah Mohamad; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2015-09-01

    A beta-1,3-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.32) gene from psychrophilic yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica has been identified via genome data mining. The enzyme was grouped into GH26 family based on Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CaZY) database. The molecular weight of this protein was predicted to be 42 kDa and is expected to be soluble for expression. The presence of signal peptide suggested that this enzyme may be released extracellularly into the marine environment of the host's habitat. This supports the theory that such enzymatic activity is required for degradation of nutrients of polysaccharide origins into simpler carbohydrates outside the environment before it could be taken up inside the cell. The sequence for this protein showed very little conservation (< 30%) with other beta-1,3-xylanases from available databases. Based on the phylogenetic analysis, this protein also showed distant relationship to other xylanases from eukaryotic origin. The protein may have undergone major substitution in its gene sequence order to adapt to the cold climate. This is the first report of beta-1,3-xylanase gene isolated from a psychrophilic yeast.

  20. Sensor arrays for detecting microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A sensor array for detecting a microorganism comprising first and second sensors electrically connected to an electrical measuring apparatus, wherein the sensors comprise a region of nonconducting organic material and a region of conducting material compositionally that is different than the nonconducting organic material and an electrical path through the regions of nonconducting organic material and the conducting material. A system for identifying microorganisms using the sensor array, a computer and a pattern recognition algorithm, such as a neural net are also disclosed.

  1. Textiles for protection against microorganism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauperl, O.

    2016-04-01

    Concerning micro-organisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, there is a huge progress in the development of textile materials and procedures which should effectively protect against these various pathogens. In this sense there is especially problematic hospital environment, where it is necessary to take into account properly designed textile material which, when good selected and composed, act as a good barrier against transfer of micro-organisms through material mainly in its wet state. Respect to this it is necessary to be familiar with the rules regarding selection of the input material, the choice of proper yarn construction, the choice of the proper weaving mode, the rules regarding selection of antimicrobial-active compound suitable for (eco-friendly) treatment, and the choice of the most appropriate test method by which it is possible objectively to conclude on the reduction of selected microorganism. As is well known, fabrics are three-dimensional structures with void and non-void areas. Therefore, the physical-chemical properties of the textile material/fabric, the surface characteristics together with the shape of microorganism, and the carriers' characteristics contribute to control the transfer of microorganism through textile material. Therefore, careful planning of textile materials and treatment procedure with the compound which is able to reduce micro-organism satisfactory is particularly important, especially due to the fact that in hospital environment population with impaired immune system is mainly presented.

  2. Algibacter psychrophilus sp. nov., a psychrophilic bacterium isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Jung, You-Jung; Lee, Yung Mi; Baek, Kiwoon; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Cho, Yirang; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ji Hee; Lee, Hong Kum

    2015-06-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, yellow-pigmented, flexirubin-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile and psychrophilic bacterial strain, PAMC 27237T, was isolated from marine sediment of the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Strain PAMC 27237T grew at 0-20 °C (optimally at 17 °C), at pH 5.0-9.5 (optimally at pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0-3.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimally at 1.5-2.5 %). The major fatty acids (≥5 %) were iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, C17 : 0 2-OH, anteiso-C15 : 0, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c/C16 : 1ω7c), iso-C15 : 0 3-OH, anteiso-C17 : 1ω9c, anteiso-C15 : 1 A, iso-C16 : 0 3-OH and iso-C15 : 1 G. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids, four unidentified lipids and a glycolipid. The major respiratory quinone was MK-6. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain PAMC 27237T belongs to the genus Algibacter, showing high similarities with the type strains of Algibacter agarivorans (97.2 %), Algibacter agarilyticus (97.0 %) and Algibacter mikhailovii (96.4 %). Average nucleotide identity values between strain PAMC 27237T and the type strains of A. agarivorans and A. agarilyticuswere 83.1 and 84.2 %, respectively, and mean genome-to-genome distances were 22.4-24.2 %, indicating that strain PAMC 27237T is clearly distinguished from the most closely related species of the genus Algibacter. The genomic DNA G+C content calculated from genome sequences was 33.5 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data presented, strain PAMC 27237T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Algibacter, for which the name Algibacter psychrophilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PAMC 27237T ( = KCTC 42130T = JCM 30370T). PMID:25740931

  3. Interactions between novel micro-organisms and intestinal flora.

    PubMed

    Aureli, P; Franciosa, G

    2002-09-01

    Microbial strains traditionally used to ferment food have a long history of safe use and are, therefore, considered as generally recognised as safe. Many of these micro-organisms have also functional attributes and are included among probiotics. New species and strains of bacteria with desirable technological and functional properties are constantly being identified; in addition, micro-organisms can be engineered by recently developed biotechnological tools in order to accelerate strain improvement. Although the potentialities of novel micro-organisms with better probiotic and technological properties are promising, it cannot be assumed that they share the safety record of traditional micro-organisms, since they may pose unique challenges for human health. The risk assessment and safety evaluation of novel micro-organisms must focus, primarily, on their potential harmful effects, both direct and indirect, upon host resident intestinal microflora. Genetically modified micro-organisms need further assessment for the complete characterisation of the DNA rearrangement and of the final product, in order to establish the "substantial equivalence" with the parental strain. PMID:12408436

  4. Spirochaeta psychrophila sp. nov., a psychrophilic spirochaete isolated from subseafloor sediment, and emended description of the genus Spirochaeta.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masayuki; Sakai, Sanae; Yamanaka, Yuko; Saito, Yumi; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2014-08-01

    An obligately anaerobic, psychrophilic spirochaete, strain MO-SPC1(T), was isolated from a methanogenic microbial community grown in a continuous-flow bioreactor. Originally, this community was obtained from subseafloor sediments off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan in the north-western Pacific Ocean. The cells were motile, Gram-stain-negative, helical, 0.25-0.55×3.6-15 µm, with a wavelength of approximately 0.5-0.6 µm. Strain MO-SPC1(T) grew at 0-18 °C (optimally at 15 °C), at pH 6.0-7.5 (optimally at pH 6.8-7.0) and in 20-70 g NaCl l(-1) (optimally at 30-40 NaCl l(-1)). The strain grew chemo-organotrophically with mono-, di- and polysaccharides. The major end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The abundant polar lipids of strain MO-SPC1(T) were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, unknown phospholipids and an unknown lipid. The major cellular fatty acids (>5% of the total) were C(14 : 0), C(16 : 0), iso-C(13 : 0), iso-C(14 : 0), iso-C(15 : 0), anteiso-C(13 : 0) and anteiso-C(15 : 0). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the fatty acids iso-C(13 : 0) and anteiso-C(13 : 0) from a species of the genus Spirochaeta. Isoprenoid quinones were not found. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 39.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis showed that strain MO-SPC1(T) was affiliated with the genus Spirochaeta, and its closest relatives were Spirochaeta isovalerica MA-2(T) (95.6% sequence identity) and Spirochaeta litoralis R1(T) (89.4%). Based on its phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic traits, strain MO-SPC1(T) is placed in a separate taxon at the level of a novel species within the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta psychrophila sp. nov. is proposed, reflecting its true psychrophilic physiology. The type strain is MO-SPC1(T) ( = JCM 17280(T) = DSM 23951(T)). To our knowledge, this is the first report of an

  5. PCB breakdown by anaerobic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Recently, altered PCB cogener distribution patterns observed in anaerobic sediment samples from the upper Hudson River are being attributed to biologically mediated reductive dechlorination. The authors report their successful demonstration of biologically mediated reductive dechlorination of an Aroclor mixture. In their investigation, they assessed the ability of microorganisms from PCB-contaminated Hudson River sediments (60-562 ppm PCBs) to dechlorinate Aroclor 1242 under anaerobic conditions by eluting microorganisms from the PCB- contaminated sediments and transferring them to a slurry of reduced anaerobic mineral medium and PCB-free sediments in tightly stoppered bottles. They observed dechlorination to be the most rapid at the highest PCB concentration tried by them.

  6. Light-stimulated growth of proteorhodopsin-bearing sea-ice psychrophile Psychroflexus torquis is salinity dependent

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shi; Powell, Shane M; Wilson, Richard; Bowman, John P

    2013-01-01

    Proteorhodopsins (PRs) are commonly found in marine prokaryotes and allow microbes to use light as an energy source. In recent studies, it was reported that PR stimulates growth and survival under nutrient-limited conditions. In this study, we tested the effect of nutrient and salinity stress on the extremely psychrophilic sea-ice bacterial species Psychroflexus torquis, which possesses PR. We demonstrated for the first time that light-stimulated growth occurs under conditions of salinity stress rather than nutrient limitation and that elevated salinity is related to increased growth yields, PR levels and associated proton-pumping activity. PR abundance in P. torquis also is post-transcriptionally regulated by both light and salinity and thus could represent an adaptation to its sea-ice habitat. Our findings extend the existing paradigm that light provides an energy source for marine prokaryotes under stress conditions other than nutrient limitation. PMID:23788334

  7. Triacylglyceride composition and fatty acyl saturation profile of a psychrophilic and psychrotolerant fungal species grown at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Blair, Hannah B; Fischer, Amy E; Gerdes, Cheyenne L; Gilmore, David F; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is a psychrophilic fungus that infects cutaneous tissues in cave dwelling bats, and it is the causal agent for white nose syndrome (WNS) in North American (NA) bat populations. Geomyces pannorum is a related psychrotolerant keratinolytic species that is rarely a pathogen of mammals. In this study, we grew P. destructans and G. pannorum in static liquid cultures at favourable and suboptimal temperatures to: 1) determine if triacylglyceride profiles are species-specific, and 2) determine if there are differences in fatty acyl (FA) saturation levels with respect to temperature. Total lipids isolated from both fungal spp. were separated by thin-layer chromatography and determined to be primarily sterols (∼15 %), free fatty acids (FFAs) (∼45 %), and triacylglycerides (TAGs) (∼50 %), with minor amounts of mono-/diacylglycerides and sterol esters. TAG compositions were profiled by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). Total fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and acyl lipid unsaturation levels were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Pseudogymnoascus destructans produced higher proportions of unsaturated 18C fatty acids and TAGs than G. pannorum. Pseudogymnoascus destructans and G. pannorum produced up to a two-fold increase in 18:3 fatty acids at 5 °C than at higher temperatures. TAG proportion for P. destructans at upper and lower temperature growth limits was greater than 50 % of total dried mycelia mass. These results indicate fungal spp. alter acyl lipid unsaturation as a strategy to adapt to cold temperatures. Differences between their glycerolipid profiles also provide evidence for a different metabolic strategy to support psychrophilic growth, which may influence P. destructans' pathogenicity to bats. PMID:25209638

  8. Dry anaerobic digestion of high solids content dairy manure at high organic loading rates in psychrophilic sequence batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Massé, Daniel I; Saady, Noori M Cata

    2015-05-01

    Cow manure with bedding is renewable organic biomass available around the year on dairy farms. Developing efficient and cost-effective psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion (PDAD) processes could contribute to solving farm-related environmental, energy, and manure management problems in cold-climate regions. This study was to increase the organic loading rate (OLR), fed to a novel psychrophilic (20 °C) dry anaerobic digestion of 27% total solid dairy manure (cow feces and wheat straw) in sequence batch reactor (PDAD-SBR), by 133 to 160%. The PDAD-SBR process operated at treatment cycle length of 21 days and OLR of 7.0 and 8.0 g total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) kg(-1) inoculum day(-1) (5.2 ± 0.1 and 5.8 ± 0.0 g volatile solids (VS) kg(-1) inoculum day(-1)) for four successive cycles (84 days) produced average specific methane yields (SMYs) of 147.1 ± 17.2 and 143.2 ± 11.7 normalized liters (NL) CH4 kg(-1) VS fed, respectively. PDAD of cow feces and wheat straw is possible with VS-based inoculum-to-substrate ratio of 1.45 at OLR of 8.0 g TCOD kg(-1) inoculum day(-1). Hydrolysis was the limiting step reaction. The VS removal averaged around 57.4 ± 0.5 and 60.5 ± 5.7% at OLR 7.0 and 8.0 g TCOD kg(-1) inoculum day(-1), respectively. PMID:25773978

  9. Degradation properties of various macromolecules of cultivable psychrophilic bacteria from the deep-sea water of the South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Yan; Liang, Jing; Song, Qinghao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The deep-sea water of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG, 20°S-45°S) is a cold and ultra-oligotrophic environment that is the source of cold-adapted enzymes. However, the characteristic features of psychrophilic enzymes derived from culturable microbes in the SPG remained largely unknown. In this study, the degradation properties of 174 cultures from the deep water of the SPG were used to determine the diversity of cold-adapted enzymes. Thus, the abilities to degrade polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and DNA at 4, 16, and 28 °C were investigated. Most of the isolates showed one or more extracellular enzyme activities, including amylase, chitinase, cellulase, lipase, lecithinase, caseinase, gelatinase, and DNase at 4, 16, and 28 °C. Moreover, nearly 85.6 % of the isolates produced cold-adapted enzymes at 4 °C. The psychrophilic enzyme-producing isolates distributed primarily in Alteromonas and Pseudoalteromonas genera of the Gammaproteobacteria. Pseudoalteromonas degraded 9 types of macromolecules but not cellulose, Alteromonas secreted 8 enzymes except for cellulase and chitinase. Interestingly, the enzymatic activities of Gammaproteobacteria isolates at 4 °C were higher than those observed at 16 or 28 °C. In addition, we cloned and expressed a gene encoding an α-amylase (Amy2235) from Luteimonas abyssi XH031(T), and examined the properties of the recombinant protein. These cold-active enzymes may have huge potential for academic research and industrial applications. In addition, the capacity of the isolates to degrade various types of organic matter may indicate their unique ecological roles in the elemental biogeochemical cycling of the deep biosphere. PMID:27342115

  10. Characterization of the N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase (NeuB) from the psychrophilic fish pathogen Moritella viscosa.

    PubMed

    Berg, Tor Olav; Gurung, Man Kumari; Altermark, Bjørn; Smalås, Arne O; Ræder, Inger Lin U

    2015-01-30

    Moritella viscosa is a Gram-negative psychrophilic bacterium that causes winter ulcer disease in Atlantic salmon and cod. Its genome reveals that it possesses the ability to synthesize sialic acids. Indeed, sialic acid can be isolated from the bacterium and when analyzed using HPLC-MS/MS, the presence of N-acetylneuraminic acid was confirmed. Thus, the N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase NeuB from M. viscosa (MvNeuB) was recombinantly produced and characterized. The optimum pH and temperature for MvNeuB activity are 7.5 and 30 °C, respectively. The KM for N-acetylmannosamine and phosphoenolpyruvate is 18±5 and 0.8±0.2 mM, respectively. The kcat value (∼225 min(-1)) for both N-acetylmannosamine and phosphoenolpyruvate is the highest turnover number found for an enzyme in this class until the date. A calorimetric study of MvNeuB shows that the enzyme has a two-step transition peak probably reflecting the two domains these proteins consist of. MvNeuB is less stable at higher temperature and has a high catalytic activity at lower temperature compared to mesophilic counterparts. Enzymes from psychrophilic organisms are generally cold adapted meaning they can maintain adequate function near the freezing point of water. Cold adapted enzymes are catalytically more efficient at lower temperature and are more thermo-labile compared to their mesophilic counterparts. MvNeuB is a typical cold adapted enzyme and could be further explored for production of sialic acids and derivates at low temperatures. PMID:25498013

  11. Airborne microorganisms from waste containers.

    PubMed

    Jedlicka, Sabrina S; Stravitz, David M; Lyman, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    In physician's offices and biomedical labs, biological waste is handled every day. This waste is disposed of in waste containers designed for holding red autoclave bags. The containers used in these environments are closed hands-free containers, often with a step pedal. While these containers protect the user from surface-borne microorganisms, the containers may allow airborne microorganisms to escape via the open/close mechanism because of the air current produced upon open/close cycles. In this study, the air current was shown to be sufficient to allow airborne escape of microorganisms held in the container, including Aspergillus niger. However, bacterial cultures, such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis did not escape. This may be due to the choice of bacterial cultures and the absence of solid waste, such as dust or other particulate matter in the waste containers, that such strains of bacteria could travel on during aerosolization. We compared these results to those obtained using a re-designed receptacle, which mimimizes air currents, and detected no escaping microorganisms. This study highlights one potential source of airborne contamination in labs, hospitals, and other environments that dispose of biological waste. PMID:23047084

  12. How microorganisms avoid phagocyte attraction.

    PubMed

    Bestebroer, Jovanka; De Haas, Carla J C; Van Strijp, Jos A G

    2010-05-01

    Microorganisms have developed several mechanisms to modulate the host immune system to increase their survival and propagation in the host. Their presence in the host is not only revealed by self-produced peptides but also through host-derived chemokines and active complement fragments. These so-called chemoattractants are recognized by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on leukocyte cell membranes. Activation of GPCRs triggers leukocyte activation and guides their recruitment to the site of infection. Therefore, GPCRs play a central role in leukocyte trafficking leading to microbial clearance. It is therefore not surprising that microorganisms are able to sabotage this arm of the immune response. Different microorganisms have evolved a variety of tactics to modulate GPCR activation. Here, we review the mechanisms and proteins used by major human pathogens and less virulent microorganisms that affect GPCR signaling. While viruses generally produce receptor and chemoattractant mimics, parasites and bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Bordetella pertussis secrete proteins that affect receptor signaling, directly antagonize receptors, cleave stimuli, and even prevent stimulus generation. As the large arsenal of GPCR modulators aids prolonged microbial persistence in the host, their study provides us a better understanding of microbial pathogenesis. PMID:20059549

  13. BIOCONCENTRATION OF TOXAPHENE BY MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses (glc) of extracts from whole cultures (medium and microorganisms) gave the same 'fingerprint' chromatogram as the control, indicating that toxaphene was not degraded even after extended periods of time. The insecticide was also added to autoclaved cultures of bacteria, f...

  14. Smaller Fleas: Viruses of Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Paul; Abedon, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    Life forms can be roughly differentiated into those that are microscopic versus those that are not as well as those that are multicellular and those that, instead, are unicellular. Cellular organisms seem generally able to host viruses, and this propensity carries over to those that are both microscopic and less than truly multicellular. These viruses of microorganisms, or VoMs, in fact exist as the world's most abundant somewhat autonomous genetic entities and include the viruses of domain Bacteria (bacteriophages), the viruses of domain Archaea (archaeal viruses), the viruses of protists, the viruses of microscopic fungi such as yeasts (mycoviruses), and even the viruses of other viruses (satellite viruses). In this paper we provide an introduction to the concept of viruses of microorganisms, a.k.a., viruses of microbes. We provide broad discussion particularly of VoM diversity. VoM diversity currently spans, in total, at least three-dozen virus families. This is roughly ten families per category—bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and protist—with some virus families infecting more than one of these microorganism major taxa. Such estimations, however, will vary with further discovery and taxon assignment and also are dependent upon what forms of life one includes among microorganisms. PMID:24278736

  15. An overview of siderophores for iron acquisition in microorganisms living in the extreme.

    PubMed

    De Serrano, Luis O; Camper, Anne K; Richards, Abigail M

    2016-08-01

    Siderophores are iron-chelating molecules produced by microbes when intracellular iron concentrations are low. Low iron triggers a cascade of gene activation, allowing the cell to survive due to the synthesis of important proteins involved in siderophore synthesis and transport. Generally, siderophores are classified by their functional groups as catecholates, hydroxamates and hydroxycarboxylates. Although other chemical structural modifications and functional groups can be found. The functional groups participate in the iron-chelating process when the ferri-siderophore complex is formed. Classified as acidophiles, alkaliphiles, halophiles, thermophiles, psychrophiles, piezophiles, extremophiles have particular iron requirements depending on the environmental conditions in where they grow. Most of the work done in siderophore production by extremophiles is based in siderophore concentration and/or genomic studies determining the presence of siderophore synthesis and transport genes. Siderophores produced by extremophiles are not well known and more work needs to be done to elucidate chemical structures and their role in microorganism survival and metal cycling in extreme environments. PMID:27457587

  16. Venturing into new realms? Microorganisms in space.

    PubMed

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Cockell, Charles; Rettberg, Petra

    2016-09-01

    One of the biggest challenges of science is the determination of whether extraterrestrial life exists. Although potential habitable areas might be available for complex life, it is more likely that microbial life could exist in space. Many extremotolerant and extremophilic microbes have been found to be able to withstand numerous, combined environmental factors, such as high or low temperatures and pressures, high-salt conditions, high doses of radiation, desiccation or nutrient limitations. They may even survive the transit from one planet to another. Terrestrial Mars-analogue sites are one focus of researchers, in order to understand the microbial diversity in preparation for upcoming space missions aimed at the detection of life. However, such missions could also pose a risk with respect to contamination of the extraterrestrial environment by accidentally transferred terrestrial microorganisms. Closer to the Earth, the International Space Station is the most enclosed habitat, where humans work and live-and with them numerous microorganisms. It is still unknown how microbes adapt to this environment, possibly even creating a risk for the crew. Information on the microbiology of the ISS will have an impact on the planning and implementation of long-term human spaceflights in order to ensure a safe, stable and balanced microbiome on board. PMID:27354346

  17. Optimization of cold-active lipase production from psychrophilic bacterium Moritella sp. 2-5-10-1 by statistical experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanfu; Zhang, Chunyu; Hou, Yanhua; Lin, Xuezheng; Shen, Jihong; Guan, Xiangyu

    2013-01-01

    Statistical experimental designs were applied to optimize cold-active lipase production by the psychrophilic bacterium Moritella sp. 2-5-10-1. First, a Plackett-Burmen design (PBD) was used to evaluate the significant effects of various fermentation parameters. The results indicated that soybean meal, temperature, and Tween-80 had significant influences on lipase production. The levels of these variables were optimized subsequently using central composite design (CCD). A quadratic regression model of cold-active lipase production was built, and verification experiments confirmed its validity. On subsequent scale-up in a 10-L bioreactor using optimized conditions, cold-active lipase production (30.56 U/mL) was obtained. The results clearly indicated that the model was adequate even on a large scale. To our knowledge, this is the first report of statistical optimization of cold-active lipase production by a psychrophilic bacterium. PMID:23291744

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of tetrameric malate dehydrogenase from the novel Antarctic psychrophile Flavobacterium frigidimaris KUC-1

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Tomomi; Oikawa, Tadao; Muraoka, Ikuo; Soda, Kenji; Hata, Yasuo

    2007-11-01

    A psychrophilic malate dehydrogenase from the novel Antarctic bacterium F. frigidimaris KUC-1 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals contained one tetrameric molecule per asymmetric unit. The best crystal diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. Flavobacterium frigidimaris KUC-1 is a novel psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from Antarctic seawater. Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is an essential metabolic enzyme in the citric acid cycle and has been cloned, overexpressed and purified from F. frigidimaris KUC-1. In contrast to the already known dimeric form of MDH from the psychrophile Aquaspirillium arcticum, F. frigidimaris MDH exists as a tetramer. It was crystallized at 288 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.80 Å. It contains one tetrameric molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  19. A study of psychrophilic organisms isolated from the manufacture and assembly areas of spacecraft to be used in the Viking mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of storage of dry heat treated Teflon ribbons under nitrogen gas followed by high vacuum on the recovery of hardy organisms from the ribbons was studied. A similar experiment was performed on spore crops of hardy organisms recovered previously from Cape Canaveral. Hardy organisms have been inoculated onto slides and subjected to an artificial Martian environment in an attempt to demonstrate their growth in this environment. Additional experiments using the artificial Martian environment include response of soil samples from the VAB with both constant temperature and freeze-thaw cycles. These experiments were performed with dried soil and soil containing added water. Other investigations included the effect of heatshock on soil samples, psychrophilic counts of new soil samples from the manufacture area of the Viking spacecraft, effect of pour plate versus spread plate on psychrophilic counts, and preparation of spore crops of hardy organisms from Cape Canaveral.

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis of Anaerobic Psychrophilic Enrichment Cultures Obtained from a Greenland Glacier Ice Core

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Peter P.; Miteva, Vanya I.; Brenchley, Jean E.

    2003-01-01

    The examination of microorganisms in glacial ice cores allows the phylogenetic relationships of organisms frozen for thousands of years to be compared with those of current isolates. We developed a method for aseptically sampling a sediment-containing portion of a Greenland ice core that had remained at −9°C for over 100,000 years. Epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry results showed that the ice sample contained over 6 × 107 cells/ml. Anaerobic enrichment cultures inoculated with melted ice were grown and maintained at −2°C. Genomic DNA extracted from these enrichments was used for the PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with bacterial and archaeal primers and the preparation of clone libraries. Approximately 60 bacterial inserts were screened by restriction endonuclease analysis and grouped into 27 unique restriction fragment length polymorphism types, and 24 representative sequences were compared phylogenetically. Diverse sequences representing major phylogenetic groups including alpha, beta, and gamma Proteobacteria as well as relatives of the Thermus, Bacteroides, Eubacterium, and Clostridium groups were found. Sixteen clone sequences were closely related to those from known organisms, with four possibly representing new species. Seven sequences may reflect new genera and were most closely related to sequences obtained only by PCR amplification. One sequence was over 12% distant from its closest relative and may represent a novel order or family. These results show that phylogenetically diverse microorganisms have remained viable within the Greenland ice core for at least 100,000 years. PMID:12676695

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of anaerobic psychrophilic enrichment cultures obtained from a greenland glacier ice core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Peter P.; Miteva, Vanya I.; Brenchley, Jean E.

    2003-01-01

    The examination of microorganisms in glacial ice cores allows the phylogenetic relationships of organisms frozen for thousands of years to be compared with those of current isolates. We developed a method for aseptically sampling a sediment-containing portion of a Greenland ice core that had remained at -9 degrees C for over 100,000 years. Epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry results showed that the ice sample contained over 6 x 10(7) cells/ml. Anaerobic enrichment cultures inoculated with melted ice were grown and maintained at -2 degrees C. Genomic DNA extracted from these enrichments was used for the PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with bacterial and archaeal primers and the preparation of clone libraries. Approximately 60 bacterial inserts were screened by restriction endonuclease analysis and grouped into 27 unique restriction fragment length polymorphism types, and 24 representative sequences were compared phylogenetically. Diverse sequences representing major phylogenetic groups including alpha, beta, and gamma Proteobacteria as well as relatives of the Thermus, Bacteroides, Eubacterium, and Clostridium groups were found. Sixteen clone sequences were closely related to those from known organisms, with four possibly representing new species. Seven sequences may reflect new genera and were most closely related to sequences obtained only by PCR amplification. One sequence was over 12% distant from its closest relative and may represent a novel order or family. These results show that phylogenetically diverse microorganisms have remained viable within the Greenland ice core for at least 100,000 years.

  2. Phosphate Biomineralization of Cambrian Microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Rozanov, Alexei Yu.; Hoover, Richard B.; Westall, Frances

    1998-01-01

    As part of a long term study of biological markers (biomarkers), we are documenting a variety of features which reflect the previous presence of living organisms. As we study meteorites and samples returned from Mars, our main clue to recognizing possible microbial material may be the presence of biomarkers rather than the organisms themselves. One class of biomarkers consists of biominerals which have either been precipitated directly by microorganisms, or whose precipitation has been influenced by the organisms. Such microbe-mediated mineral formation may include important clues to the size, shape, and environment of the microorganisms. The process of fossilization or mineralization can cause major changes in morphologies and textures of the original organisms. The study of fossilized terrestrial organisms can help provide insight into the interpretation of mineral biomarkers. This paper describes the results of investigations of microfossils in Cambrian phosphate-rich rocks (phosphorites) that were found in Khubsugul, Northern Mongolia.

  3. Gene cloning of cold-adapted isocitrate lyase from a psychrophilic bacterium, Colwellia psychrerythraea, and analysis of amino acid residues involved in cold adaptation of this enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuhya; Watanabe, Seiya; Yamaoka, Naoto; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    The gene (icl) encoding cold-adapted isocitrate lyase (ICL) of a psychrophilic bacterium, Colwellia psychrerythraea, was cloned and sequenced. Open reading frame of the gene was 1,587 bp in length and corresponded to a polypeptide composed of 528 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology with that of cold-adapted ICL from other psychrophilic bacterium, C. maris (88% identity), but the sequential homology with that of the Escherichia coli ICL was low (28% identity). Primer extension analysis revealed that transcriptional start site for the C. psychrerythraea icl gene was guanine, located at 87 bases upstream of translational initiation codon. The expression of this gene in the cells of an E. coli mutant defective in ICL was induced by not only low temperature but also acetate. However, cis-acting elements for cold-inducible expression known in the several other bacterial genes were absent in the promoter region of the C. psychrerythraea icl gene. The substitution of Ala214 for Ser in the C. psychrerythraea ICL introduced by point mutation resulted in the increased thermostability and lowering of the specific activity at low temperature, indicating that Ala214 is important for psychrophilic properties of this enzyme. PMID:17965824

  4. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morford, Megan A.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Caro, Janicce I.; Spencer, LaShelle E.; Richards, Jeffery T.; Strayer, Richard F.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, like aboard the International Space Station or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of the Synthetic Biology project, Cow in a Column, was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel-through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) in order to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms were optimized in the laboratory and the desired end-products, sugars and lipids, were analyzed. Trichoderma reesei, a known cellulolytic fungus, was utilized to drive the production of glucose, with the intent that the produced glucose would serve as the carbon source for milk fat production and be a substitute for the milk sugar lactose. Lipid production would be carried out by Rhodosporidium toruloides, yeast known to accumulate those lipids that are typically found in milk fat. Results showed that glucose and total lipid content were below what was expected during this phase of experimentation. In addition, individual analysis of six fatty acids revealed that the percentage of each fatty acid was lower than naturally produced bovine milk. Overall, this research indicates that microorganisms could be utilized to breakdown inedible solid waste to produce useable products. For future work, the production of the casein protein for milk would require the development of a genetically modified organism, which was beyond the scope of the original project. Additional trials would be needed to further refine the required

  5. Phylogenetic relationships among subsurface microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nierzwicki-Bauer, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made from 6/90--3/91 toward completion of our project, Phylogenetic Relationships among subsurface microorganisms. 16S rRNA was sequenced, and based on the sequence the SMCC isolates were assigned to preliminary groups. Microorganisms were obtained at various depths at the Savannah River Site, including the Surface (0 m), Congaree (91 m), and Middendorf (244 m, 259 m, 265 m). Sequence data from four isolates from the Congaree formation indicate these microorganisms can be divided into Pseudomonas spp. or Acinetobacter spp. Three 16S rRNA probes were synthesized based on sequence data. The synthesized probes were tested through in situ hybridization. Optimal conditions for in situ hybridization were determined. Because stability of RNA-DNA hybrids is dependent on hybridization stringency, related organisms can be differentiated using a single probe under different strigencies. The results of these hybridizations agree with results obtained by Balkwill and Reeves using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The RNA content of a cell reflects its metabolic state. Cells which are starved for four days are not detectable with the homologous 16S rRNA probe. However, within 15 minutes of refeeding, detectable rRNA appeared. This suggests that organisms which are undetectable in environmental samples due to starvation may be detectable after addition of nutrients. Stepwise addition of specific nutrients could indicate which nutrients are rate limiting for growth. Preliminary experiments with soil samples from the Hanford Site indicate indigenous microorganisms can be detected by oligionucleotide probes. Further, using multiple probes based on universal sequences increases the number of organisms detected. Double label experiments, using a rhodamine-labelled oligionucleotide probe with free coumarin succinimidyl ester will allow simultaneous detection of total bacteria and specific 16S rRNA containing bacteria. 4 tabs. (MHB)

  6. Predatory Microorganisms Would Help Reclaim Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjaminson, Morris A.; Lehrer, Stanley

    1995-01-01

    Wastewater-reclamation systems of proposed type use predatory, nonpathogenic microorganisms to consume pathogenic microorganisms. Unlike some other wastewater-reclamation systems, these systems do not require use of toxic chemicals, intense heat, or ionizing radiation (conductivity rays or ultraviolet) to destroy microorganisms.

  7. 40 CFR 725.85 - Microorganism identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Microorganism identity. 725.85 Section... to Information § 725.85 Microorganism identity. (a) Claims applicable to the period prior to... specific microorganism identity at the time of submission of the information. This claim will apply only...

  8. 40 CFR 725.420 - Recipient microorganisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recipient microorganisms. 725.420 Section 725.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS General Exemptions for New Microorganisms § 725.420 Recipient...

  9. 40 CFR 725.85 - Microorganism identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Microorganism identity. 725.85 Section 725.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Confidentiality and Public Access to Information § 725.85 Microorganism...

  10. 40 CFR 725.420 - Recipient microorganisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recipient microorganisms. 725.420 Section 725.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS General Exemptions for New Microorganisms § 725.420 Recipient...

  11. 40 CFR 725.420 - Recipient microorganisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recipient microorganisms. 725.420 Section 725.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS General Exemptions for New Microorganisms § 725.420 Recipient...

  12. 40 CFR 725.420 - Recipient microorganisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recipient microorganisms. 725.420 Section 725.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS General Exemptions for New Microorganisms § 725.420 Recipient...

  13. 40 CFR 725.85 - Microorganism identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Microorganism identity. 725.85 Section... ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Confidentiality and Public Access to Information § 725.85 Microorganism identity. (a) Claims applicable to the period prior...

  14. A unique capsular polysaccharide structure from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H that mimics antifreeze (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Casillo, Angela; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Sannino, Filomena; Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; Ewert, Marcela; Deming, Jody W; Lanzetta, Rosa; Marino, Gennaro; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Randazzo, Antonio; Tutino, Maria L; Corsaro, M Michela

    2015-01-14

    The low temperatures of polar regions and high-altitude environments, especially icy habitats, present challenges for many microorganisms. Their ability to live under subfreezing conditions implies the production of compounds conferring cryotolerance. Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H, a γ-proteobacterium isolated from subzero Arctic marine sediments, provides a model for the study of life in cold environments. We report here the identification and detailed molecular primary and secondary structures of capsular polysaccharide from C. psychrerythraea 34H cells. The polymer was isolated in the water layer when cells were extracted by phenol/water and characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy together with chemical analysis. Molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations were also performed. The polysaccharide consists of a tetrasaccharidic repeating unit containing two amino sugars and two uronic acids bearing threonine as substituent. The structural features of this unique polysaccharide resemble those present in antifreeze proteins and glycoproteins. These results suggest a possible correlation between the capsule structure and the ability of C. psychrerythraea to colonize subfreezing marine environments. PMID:25525681

  15. Photosynthetic microorganisms in cold environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kviderova, Jana; Hajek, Josef; Elster, Josef; Bartak, Milos; Vaczi, Peter; Nedbalova, Linda

    The polar regions are considered as a model of extraterrestrial ecosystems. Depending on the average temperature, temperature variation and water availability, these conditions could be used as a model of Mars or Europa (e.g. (Elster and Benson, 2004). Two cases are presented: 1) Stable temperature and water availability The environment of cryosestic communities, i.e. organisms living in snow, is characterized by very stable temperature; the diurnal variations do not exceed 1 -2 ° C (Kváderová, 2010) and a are not usually exposed to freeze/thaw. Water is not usually limiting since the water content could reach up to 54 % (Nedbalová et al., 2008). The windblown sediments are important a source of nutrient and could provide protection against the excess of radiation. The nutrient concentrations in the snow are low are depleted rapidly when massive algal blooms forms. Such environment could be found near Mars polar caps or in Europa ice cover. The snow algae are the most important primary producers in snow. Their adaptation strategy is dependent on the developmental stages; the motile stages avoid the harsh conditions (e.g. high light) and sessile stages acclimatize to actual conditions. The main genera Chlamydomonas and Chloromonas (both Chlorophyta) are psychrophilic. Their growth optimum temperature is lower than 15 ° C and their growth is inhibited at temperatures above 20 ° C. 2) Unstable temperature and water availability The deglaciated surfaces, inhabited by lichen communities, are typical by variation in temper-ature and moisture. The temperature could range several tens ° C within a short time and the water availability is usually very limited. Due to temperature variation, the lichens are subjected to many freeze/thaw cycles. Such environments could be found in Martian deserts. The lichens are symbotic organisms composed of a mycobiont (heterotrophic fungi) and photo-bionts (algae and/or cyanobacteria). Majority of lichens are dehydrated in the field

  16. Identification of a microscopically selected microorganism in milk samples.

    PubMed

    Bracke, Nathalie; Van Poucke, Mario; Baert, Bram; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Bels, Lobke; Den Broeck, Wim Van; Peelman, Luc; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-02-01

    Identification of unwanted microbial contaminants microscopically observed in food products is challenging due to their low abundance in a complex matrix, quite often containing other microorganisms. Therefore, a selective identification method was developed using laser capture microdissection in combination with direct-captured cell PCR. This procedure was validated with Geobacillus stearothermophilus and further used to identify microbial contaminants present in some industrial milk samples. The microscopically observed contaminants were identified as mainly Methylobacterium species. PMID:24290827

  17. [Taxonomical status of the psychrotolerant Antarctic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Romanovskaia, V A; Gladka, G V; Tashireva, A A; Tashirev, A B

    2013-01-01

    The aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria, dominating in soils and phytocenosis of the Antarctic Region, on combination of morphological and biochemical properties belong to several taxons of Bacteria domain. Gram-negative strains 3189, 3415 (fam. Halomonadaceae, Halomonas sp.) and 3088, 3468, 3469 (fam. Moraxellaceae, Psychrobacter sp.) belong to phylum Proteobacteria, to class Gammaproteobacteria. Gram-negative strains 3294 3392 (Rhizobiales, fam. Methylobacteriaceae, Methylobacterium sp.) relate to class Alphaproteobacteria of this phylum. Gram-positive strains 3179, 3275, 3470, 3471 (fam. Microbacteriaceae, Cryobacterium sp.), 3054, 3058, 3411 (fam. Corynebacteriaceae, Corynebacterium sp.) and 3194, 3398 (fam. Micrococcaceae, Micrococcus sp.) relate to phylum Actinobacteria, class Actinobacteria. Thus, the psychrophilic and psychrotolerant Antarctic bacteria (aerobic chemoorganotrophic) isolated from phytocenosis and soils of polar region are characterized by wide taxonomic variety. PMID:24450178

  18. Structure prediction of Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate dioxygenase from a psychrophilic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Nik Yusnoraini; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Raih, Mohd Firdaus; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2015-09-01

    A cDNA encoding Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent dioxygenases was isolated from psychrophilic yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica PI12. We have successfully amplified 1,029 bp cDNA sequence that encodes 342 amino acid with predicted molecular weight 38 kDa. The prediction protein was analysed using various bioinformatics tools to explore the properties of the protein. Based on a BLAST search analysis, the Fe2OX amino acid sequence showed 61% identity to the sequence of oxoglutarate/iron-dependent oxygenase from Rhodosporidium toruloides NP11. SignalP prediction showed that the Fe2OX protein contains no putative signal peptide, which suggests that this enzyme most probably localised intracellularly.The structure of Fe2OX was predicted by homology modelling using MODELLER9v11. The model with the lowest objective function was selected from hundred models generated using MODELLER9v11. Analysis of the structure revealed the longer loop at Fe2OX from G.antarctica that might be responsible for the flexibility of the structure, which contributes to its adaptation to low temperatures. Fe2OX hold a highly conserved Fe(II) binding HXD/E…H triad motif. The binding site for 2-oxoglutarate was found conserved for Arg280 among reported studies, however the Phe268 was found to be different in Fe2OX.

  19. Dioszegia antarctica sp. nov. and Dioszegia cryoxerica sp. nov., psychrophilic basidiomycetous yeasts from polar desert soils in Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Russell J.; Connell, L.; Redman, R.; Barrett, A.; Iszard, M.; Fonseca, A.

    2010-01-01

    During a survey of the culturable soil fungal population in samples collected in Taylor Valley, South Victoria Land, Antarctica, 13 basidiomycetous yeast strains with orange-coloured colonies were isolated. Phylogenetic analyses of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and partial LSU rRNA gene sequences showed that the strains belong to the Dioszegia clade of the Tremellales (Tremellomycetes, Agaricomycotina), but did not correspond to any of the hitherto recognized species. Two novel species, Dioszegia antarctica sp. nov. (type strain ANT-03-116T =CBS 10920T =PYCC 5970T) and Dioszegia cryoxerica sp. nov. (type strain ANT-03-071T =CBS 10919T =PYCC 5967T), are described to accommodate ten and three of these strains, respectively. Analysis of ITS sequences demonstrated intrastrain sequence heterogeneity in D. cryoxerica. The latter species is also notable for producing true hyphae with clamp connections and haustoria. However, no sexual structures were observed. The two novel species can be considered obligate psychrophiles, since they failed to grow above 20 °C and grew best between 10 and 15 °C.

  20. Characterization of NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase isozymes from a psychrophilic bacterium, Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kaori; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) isozymes of a psychrophilic bacterium, Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H, were characterized. The coexistence of monomeric and homodimeric IDHs in this bacterium was confirmed by Western blot analysis, the genes encoding two monomeric (IDH-IIa and IDH-IIb) and one dimeric (IDH-I) IDHs were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the three IDH proteins were purified. Both of the purified IDH-IIa and IDH-IIb were found to be cold-adapted enzymes while the purified IDH-I showed mesophilic properties. However, the specific activities of IDH-IIa and IDH-IIb were lower even at low temperatures than that of IDH-I. Therefore, IDH-I was suggested to be important for the growth of this bacterium. The results of colony formation of E. coli transformants carrying the respective IDH genes and IDH activities in their crude extracts indicated that the expression of the IDH-IIa gene is cold-inducible in the E. coli cells. PMID:27033696

  1. In silico analysis of β-1,3-glucanase from a psychrophilic yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Salimeh; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Rabu, Amir; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2014-09-01

    1,3-beta-glucanase is an industrially important enzyme having wide range of applications especially in food industry. It is crucial to gain an understanding about the structure and functional aspects of various beta-1,3-glucanase produced from diverse sources. In this, study a cDNA encoding β-1,3-glucanase (GaExg55) was isolated from a psychrophilic yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica PI12. The cDNA sequence has been submitted to Genbank with an accession number (KJ436377). Subsequently, the perdition protein was analyzed using various bioinformatics tools to explore the properties of the protein. GaEXG55 is consisting of 1,440-bp nucleotides encoding 480 amino acid residues. Alignment of the deduced amino acid for GaExg55 with other exo-β-1,3-glucanase available at the NCBI database indicate that deduced amino acids shared a consensus motif NEP, which is signature pattern of GH5 hydrolases. Predicted molecular weight of GaExg55 is 53.66 kDa. GaExg55 sequences possesses signal peptide sequence and it is highly conserved with other fungal exo-beta-1,3 glucanase.

  2. Characterization of a salt-tolerant family 42 beta-galactosidase from a psychrophilic antarctic Planococcus isolate.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, P P; Brenchley, J E

    2000-06-01

    We isolated a gram-positive, halotolerant psychrophile from a hypersaline pond located on the McMurdo Ice Shelf in Antarctica. A phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of this organism showed that it is a member of the genus Planococcus. This assignment is consistent with the morphology and physiological characteristics of the organism. A gene encoding a beta-galactosidase in this isolate was cloned in an Escherichia coli host. Sequence analysis of this gene placed it in glycosidase family 42 most closely related to an enzyme from Bacillus circulans. Even though an increasing number of family 42 glycosidase sequences are appearing in databases, little information about the biochemical features of these enzymes is available. Therefore, we purified and characterized this enzyme. The purified enzyme did not appear to have any metal requirement, had an optimum pH of 6.5 and an optimum temperature of activity at 42 degrees C, and was irreversibly inactivated within 10 min when it was incubated at 55 degrees C. The enzyme had an apparent K(m) of 4.9 micromol of o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, and the V(max) was 467 micromol of o-nitrophenol produced/min/mg of protein at 39 degrees C. Of special interest was the finding that the enzyme remained active at high salt concentrations, which makes it a possible reporter enzyme for halotolerant and halophilic organisms. PMID:10831422

  3. Cellulolytic Microorganisms from Thermal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Raman, Babu; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Podar, Mircea; Elkins, James G

    2012-01-01

    Thermal, anaerobic environments rich in decaying plant material are a potential source of novel cellulolytic bacteria. Samples collected from geothermal aquifers in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were used to select for cellulolytic thermophiles. Laboratory enrichments on dilute-acid pretreated plant biomass (switchgrass, Populus), and crystalline cellulose (Avicel) resulted in the isolation of 247 environmental clones. The majority of individual clones were affiliated with the cellulolytic bacteria of phylum Firmicutes, followed by xylanolytic and saccharolytic members of the phylum Dictyoglomi. Among the Firmicutes, the clones were affiliated with the genera Caldicellulosiruptor (54.4%), Caloramator (11.5%), Thermoanaerobacter (8.8%), Thermovenabulum (4.1%), and Clostridium (2.0%). From established anaerobic thermophilic enrichments a total of 81 single strains of the genera Caldicellulosiruptor (57%) and Thermoanaerobacter (43%) were isolated. With continuous flow enrichment on Avicel, increases in the relative abundance of Caloramator sp. was observed over clones detected from the Caldicellulosiruptor. Complex communities of interacting microorganisms bring about cellulose decomposition in nature, therefore using up-to-date approaches may yield novel cellulolytic microorganisms with high activity and a rapid rate of biomass conversion to biofuels.

  4. Rapid Detection of Microorganisms--State of Art and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, George

    2008-03-01

    For the last several decades, nutrient-based culture growth methods have been accepted as the standard for microorganism detection and identification. However, since the discovery of nucleic acids and molecular breakthrough technologies such as restriction enzymes and polymerase chain reactions, the detection and identification of microorganisms have advanced to culture-independent methods that fall under the category of rapid microbial detections. Here, we present an overview of major rapid microbial detection technologies. These technologies will include both amplification and non-amplification based methods for the detection and identification of target microorganisms. The technologies described can be applied to detecting a wide variety of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, mycoplasma, and fungi and have the potential sensitivity to detect a single microorganism. Also in this presentation, we will present examples of real-life applications as well as future challenges for the advancement of the field of rapid microbiology.

  5. Sterol and steroid catabolites from cholesterol produced by the psychrophile Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis.

    PubMed

    Gelzo, Monica; Lamberti, Anna; Spano, Giuseppe; Dello Russo, Antonio; Corso, Gaetano; Masullo, Mariorosario

    2014-09-01

    Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, a psychrotrophilic marine bacterium of biotechnological interest, shows anti-biofilm properties and is particularly relevant for cold storage of vacuum packed seafood. We focused our interest on the activation of cholesterol metabolism in this bacterium as the presence in its genome of a putative 3-ketosteroid-Δ(1) -dehydrogenase. This study reports GC-MS and LC-MS/MS profiles of sterols/steroids and their derivatives found in cell extracts of P. haloplanktis grown in a medium with a low content of cholesterol. Here, for the first time, we suggest that P. haloplanktis produces some intermediates of cholesterol catabolism, putatively identified as 24-hydroxycholest-1,4-dien-3-one-26-oic acid, chol-1,4-dien-3-one-24-oic acid, 26-hydroxycholest-4-en-3-one, and pregn-4-en-3-one-20-carboxylic acid, a finding already reported in other microorganisms. The presence of these compounds, also considered steroid precursors, produced by P. haloplanktis in vacuum packed seafood could be of interest for healthy of consumers, as well as, for biotechnological applications in pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25230192

  6. Antimicrobial metabolites from marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Habbu, Prasanna; Warad, Vijayanand; Shastri, Rajesh; Madagundi, Smita; Kulkarni, Venkatrao H

    2016-02-01

    Marine ecological niches have recently been described as "particularly promising" sources for search of new antimicrobials to combat antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. Marine organisms are excellent sources for many industrial products, but they are partly explored. Over 30 000 compounds have been isolated from marine sources. Bacteria, fungi, and cyanobacteria obtained from various marine sources secret several industrially useful bioactive compounds, possessing antibacterial, antifungal, and antimycobacterial activities. Sustainable cultivation methods for promising marine organisms and biotechnological processes for selected compounds can be developed, along with the establishment of biosensors for monitoring the target compounds. The semisynthetic modifications of marine-based bioactive compounds produce their new derivatives, structural analogs and mimetics that could serve as novel lead compounds against resistant pathogens. The present review focuses on promising antimicrobial compounds isolated from marine microbes from 1991-2013. PMID:26968676

  7. Swimming of a Ciliated Microorganism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2013-11-01

    We propose a 2D model to consider the locomotion of a ciliated microorganism in a viscous fluid. The model consists of a circular body whose boundary is covered by a finite number of cilia. Stokes paradox does not hold due to the self-propelling nature of the organism. Using a regularized Stokeslet method, we determine numerically the time-dependent swimming motion for prescribed kinematics (undulatory beat) of the individual cilium. Phase differences between neighboring cilia result in metachronal waves characteristic of biological cilia. We compare our results based on the discrete cilia approach with the envelope model proposed by JR Blake. We then study the net locomotion as function of the metachronal wave. We find that, for a given geometry and cilia density, there is an optimal wave number (phase difference) for locomotion in terms of velocity of propulsion and efficiency.

  8. The impact of permafrost-associated microorganisms on hydrate formation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Liebner, Susanne; Spangenberg, Erik; Wagner, Dirk; Schicks, Judith M.

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between gas hydrates, microorganisms and the surrounding sediment is extremely complex: On the one hand, microorganisms producing methane provide the prerequisite for gas hydrate formation. As it is known most of the gas incorporated into natural gas hydrates originates from biogenic sources. On the other hand, as a result of microbial activity gas hydrates are surrounded by a great variety of organic compounds which are not incorporated into the hydrate structure but may influence the formation or degradation process. For gas hydrate samples from marine environments such as the Gulf of Mexico a direct association between microbes and gas hydrates was shown by Lanoil et al. 2001. It is further assumed that microorganisms living within the gas hydrate stability zone produce biosurfactants which were found to enhance the hydrate formation process significantly and act as nucleation centres (Roger et al. 2007). Another source of organic compounds is sediment organic matter (SOM) originating from plant material or animal remains which may also enhance hydrate growth. So far, the studies regarding this relationship were focused on a marine environment. The scope of this work is to extend the investigations to microbes originating from permafrost areas. To understand the influence of microbial activity in a permafrost environment on the methane hydrate formation process and the stability conditions of the resulting hydrate phase we will perform laboratory studies. Thereby, we mimic gas hydrate formation in the presence and absence of methanogenic archaea (e.g. Methanosarcina soligelidi) and other psychrophilic bacteria isolated from permafrost environments of the Arctic and Antarctic to investigate their impact on hydrate induction time and formation rates. Our results may contribute to understand and predict the occurrences and behaviour of potential gas hydrates within or adjacent to the permafrost. Lanoil BD, Sassen R, La Duc MT, Sweet ST, Nealson KH

  9. Functional Basis of Microorganism Classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chengsheng; Delmont, Tom O.; Vogel, Timothy M.; Bromberg, Yana

    2015-01-01

    Correctly identifying nearest “neighbors” of a given microorganism is important in industrial and clinical applications where close relationships imply similar treatment. Microbial classification based on similarity of physiological and genetic organism traits (polyphasic similarity) is experimentally difficult and, arguably, subjective. Evolutionary relatedness, inferred from phylogenetic markers, facilitates classification but does not guarantee functional identity between members of the same taxon or lack of similarity between different taxa. Using over thirteen hundred sequenced bacterial genomes, we built a novel function-based microorganism classification scheme, functional-repertoire similarity-based organism network (FuSiON; flattened to fusion). Our scheme is phenetic, based on a network of quantitatively defined organism relationships across the known prokaryotic space. It correlates significantly with the current taxonomy, but the observed discrepancies reveal both (1) the inconsistency of functional diversity levels among different taxa and (2) an (unsurprising) bias towards prioritizing, for classification purposes, relatively minor traits of particular interest to humans. Our dynamic network-based organism classification is independent of the arbitrary pairwise organism similarity cut-offs traditionally applied to establish taxonomic identity. Instead, it reveals natural, functionally defined organism groupings and is thus robust in handling organism diversity. Additionally, fusion can use organism meta-data to highlight the specific environmental factors that drive microbial diversification. Our approach provides a complementary view to cladistic assignments and holds important clues for further exploration of microbial lifestyles. Fusion is a more practical fit for biomedical, industrial, and ecological applications, as many of these rely on understanding the functional capabilities of the microbes in their environment and are less concerned

  10. Biocorrosion produced by Thiobacillus-like microorganisms.

    PubMed

    López, A I; Marín, I; Amils, R

    1994-01-01

    Biocorrosion can be produced by many different microorganisms through diverse mechanisms. The biocorrosion produced by acidophilic microorganisms of the genus Thiobacillus is based on the production of sulfuric acid and ferric ion from pyrites or related mineral structures, as a result of the chemolithotrophic metabolism of these microorganisms. The products of this aerobic respiration are also powerful oxidant elements, which can produce chemical oxidations of other metallic structures. The Tinto River, a very unusual extremophilic habitat (pH around 2, and high concentration of ferric ion), product of the growth of strict chemolithotrophic microorganisms, is discussed as a model case. PMID:7946115

  11. Plants and microorganisms as drivers of mineral weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsova, K.; Chorover, J.; Maier, R.; Hunt, E.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2011-12-01

    Plants and microorganisms play important role in mineral weathering and soil formation modifying their environment to make it more hospitable for life. This presentation summarizes several collaborative studies that focused on understanding how interactions between plants and microorganisms, where plants provide the energy through photosynthesis, drive mineral weathering and result in soil formation. Plants influence weathering through multiple mechanisms that have been previously established, such as increase in CO2 concentration in the soil through root respiration and degradation of plant residues and exudates by heterotrophic microorganisms, release of organic acids that promote mineral dissolution, removal of weathering products from soil solution through uptake, and water redistribution. Weathering processes result in nutrient release that satisfies immediate needs of the plants and microorganisms, as well as precipitation of secondary phases, that provide surfaces for retention of nutrients and organic carbon accumulation. What makes understanding contribution of plants and microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, to mineral weathering challenging is the fact that they closely interact, enhancing and amplifying each other's contribution. In order to address multiple processes that contribute to and result from biological weathering a combination of chemical, biological, mineralogical, and computational techniques and methodologies is needed. This complex array of methodologies includes bulk techniques, such as determination of total dissolved organic and inorganic carbon and nitrogen, ion chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography to characterize amount and composition of exuded organic acids, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine concentrations of lithogenic elements in solution, X-ray diffraction to characterize changes in mineral composition of the material, DNA extraction to characterize community structure, as well

  12. Crystallographic analysis of new psychrophilic haloalkane dehalogenases: DpcA from Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 and DmxA from Marinobacter sp. ELB17.

    PubMed

    Tratsiak, Katsiaryna; Degtjarik, Oksana; Drienovska, Ivana; Chrast, Lukas; Rezacova, Pavlina; Kuty, Michal; Chaloupkova, Radka; Damborsky, Jiri; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana

    2013-06-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases are hydrolytic enzymes with a broad range of potential practical applications such as biodegradation, biosensing, biocatalysis and cellular imaging. Two newly isolated psychrophilic haloalkane dehalogenases exhibiting interesting catalytic properties, DpcA from Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 and DmxA from Marinobacter sp. ELB17, were purified and used for crystallization experiments. After the optimization of crystallization conditions, crystals of diffraction quality were obtained. Diffraction data sets were collected for native enzymes and complexes with selected ligands such as 1-bromohexane and 1,2-dichloroethane to resolutions ranging from 1.05 to 2.49 Å. PMID:23722854

  13. Rapidly evolving microorganisms with high biofuel tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Zhang, Qiucen; Lang, Wendy; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Replacing non-renewable energy sources is one of the biggest and most exciting challenges of our generation. Algae and bacteria are poised to become major renewable biofuels if strains can be developed that provide a high,consistent and robust yield of oil. One major stumbling block towards this goal is the lack of tolerance to high concentrations of biofuels like isobutanol. Using traditional bioengineering techniques to remedy this face the hurdle of identifying the correct pathway or gene to modify. But the multiplicity of interactions inside a cell makes it very hard to determine what to modify a priori. Instead, we propose a technology that does not require prior knowledge of the genes or pathways to modify. In our approach that marries microfabrication and ecology, spatial heterogeneity is used as a knob to speed up evolution in the desired direction. Recently, we have successfully used this approach to demonstrate the rapid emergence of bacterial antibiotic resistance in as little as ten hours. Here, we describe our experimental results in developing new strains of micro-organisms with high oil tolerance. Besides biofuel production, our work is also relevant to oil spill clean-ups.

  14. The Antarctic Psychrophile Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 Preferentially Phosphorylates a Photosystem I-Cytochrome b6/f Supercomplex1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Szyszka-Mroz, Beth; Pittock, Paula; Ivanov, Alexander G.; Lajoie, Gilles; Hüner, Norman P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 (UWO 241) is a psychrophilic green alga isolated from Antarctica. A unique characteristic of this algal strain is its inability to undergo state transitions coupled with the absence of photosystem II (PSII) light-harvesting complex protein phosphorylation. We show that UWO 241 preferentially phosphorylates specific polypeptides associated with an approximately 1,000-kD pigment-protein supercomplex that contains components of both photosystem I (PSI) and the cytochrome b6/f (Cyt b6/f) complex. Liquid chromatography nano-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify three major phosphorylated proteins associated with this PSI-Cyt b6/f supercomplex, two 17-kD PSII subunit P-like proteins and a 70-kD ATP-dependent zinc metalloprotease, FtsH. The PSII subunit P-like protein sequence exhibited 70.6% similarity to the authentic PSII subunit P protein associated with the oxygen-evolving complex of PSII in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Tyrosine-146 was identified as a unique phosphorylation site on the UWO 241 PSII subunit P-like polypeptide. Assessment of PSI cyclic electron transport by in vivo P700 photooxidation and the dark relaxation kinetics of P700+ indicated that UWO 241 exhibited PSI cyclic electron transport rates that were 3 times faster and more sensitive to antimycin A than the mesophile control, Chlamydomonas raudensis SAG 49.72. The stability of the PSI-Cyt b6/f supercomplex was dependent upon the phosphorylation status of the PsbP-like protein and the zinc metalloprotease FtsH as well as the presence of high salt. We suggest that adaptation of UWO 241 to its unique low-temperature and high-salt environment favors the phosphorylation of a PSI-Cyt b6/f supercomplex to regulate PSI cyclic electron transport rather than the regulation of state transitions through the phosphorylation of PSII light-harvesting complex proteins. PMID:26169679

  15. Morphological and Molecular Characterizations of Psychrophilic Fungus Geomyces destructans from New York Bats with White Nose Syndrome (WNS)

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Springer, Deborah J.; Behr, Melissa J.; Ramani, Rama; Li, Xiaojiang; Peck, Marcia K.; Ren, Ping; Bopp, Dianna J.; Wood, Britta; Samsonoff, William A.; Butchkoski, Calvin M.; Hicks, Alan C.; Stone, Ward B.; Rudd, Robert J.; Chaturvedi, Sudha

    2010-01-01

    Background Massive die-offs of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) have been occurring since 2006 in hibernation sites around Albany, New York, and this problem has spread to other States in the Northeastern United States. White cottony fungal growth is seen on the snouts of affected animals, a prominent sign of White Nose Syndrome (WNS). A previous report described the involvement of the fungus Geomyces destructans in WNS, but an identical fungus was recently isolated in France from a bat that was evidently healthy. The fungus has been recovered sparsely despite plentiful availability of afflicted animals. Methodology/Principal Findings We have investigated 100 bat and environmental samples from eight affected sites in 2008. Our findings provide strong evidence for an etiologic role of G. destructans in bat WNS. (i) Direct smears from bat snouts, Periodic Acid Schiff-stained tissue sections from infected tissues, and scanning electron micrographs of bat tissues all showed fungal structures similar to those of G. destructans. (ii) G. destructans DNA was directly amplified from infected bat tissues, (iii) Isolations of G. destructans in cultures from infected bat tissues showed 100% DNA match with the fungus present in positive tissue samples. (iv) RAPD patterns for all G. destructans cultures isolated from two sites were indistinguishable. (v) The fungal isolates showed psychrophilic growth. (vi) We identified in vitro proteolytic activities suggestive of known fungal pathogenic traits in G. destructans. Conclusions/Significance Further studies are needed to understand whether G. destructans WNS is a symptom or a trigger for bat mass mortality. The availability of well-characterized G. destructans strains should promote an understanding of bat–fungus relationships, and should aid in the screening of biological and chemical control agents. PMID:20520731

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Novel Psychrophilic, Neutrophilic, Fe-Oxidizing, Chemolithoautotrophic α- and γ-Proteobacteria from the Deep Sea†

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, K. J.; Rogers, D. R.; Wirsen, C. O.; McCollom, T. M.

    2003-01-01

    We report the isolation and physiological characterization of novel, psychrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) from low-temperature weathering habitats in the vicinity of the Juan de Fuca deep-sea hydrothermal area. The FeOB were cultured from the surfaces of weathered rock and metalliferous sediments. They are capable of growth on a variety of natural and synthetic solid rock and mineral substrates, such as pyrite (FeS2), basalt glass (∼10 wt% FeO), and siderite (FeCO3), as their sole energy source, as well as numerous aqueous Fe substrates. Growth temperature characteristics correspond to the in situ environmental conditions of sample origin; the FeOB grow optimally at 3 to 10°C and at generation times ranging from 57 to 74 h. They are obligate chemolithoautotrophs and grow optimally under microaerobic conditions in the presence of an oxygen gradient or anaerobically in the presence of nitrate. None of the strains are capable of using any organic or alternate inorganic substrates tested. The bacteria are phylogenetically diverse and have no close Fe-oxidizing or autotrophic relatives represented in pure culture. One group of isolates are γ-Proteobacteria most closely related to the heterotrophic bacterium Marinobacter aquaeolei (87 to 94% sequence similarity). A second group of isolates are α-Proteobacteria most closely related to the deep-sea heterotrophic bacterium Hyphomonas jannaschiana (81 to 89% sequence similarity). This study provides further evidence for the evolutionarily widespread capacity for Fe oxidation among bacteria and suggests that FeOB may play an unrecognized geomicrobiological role in rock weathering in the deep sea. PMID:12732565

  17. UV Radiation and Visible Light Induce hsp70 Gene Expression in the Antarctic Psychrophilic Ciliate Euplotes focardii.

    PubMed

    Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Passini, Valerio; Colombetti, Giuliano; Miceli, Cristina; La Terza, Antonietta; Marangoni, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    The psychrophilic ciliate Euplotes focardii inhabits the shallow marine coastal sediments of Antarctica, where, over millions of years of evolution, it has reached a strict molecular adaptation to such a constant-temperature environment (about -2 °C). This long evolution at sub-zero temperatures has made E. focardii unable to respond to heat stress with the activation of its heat shock protein (hsp) 70 genes. These genes can, however, be expressed in response to other stresses, like the oxidative one, thus indicating that the molecular adaptation has exclusively altered the heat stress signaling pathways, while it has preserved hsp70 gene activation in response to other environmental stressors. Since radiative stress has proved to be affine to oxidative stress in several organisms, we investigated the capability of UV radiation to induce hsp70 transcription. E. focardii cell cultures were exposed to several different irradiation regimes, ranging from visible only to a mixture of visible, UV-A and UV-B. The irradiation values of each spectral band have been set to be comparable with those recorded in a typical Antarctic spring. Using Northern blot analysis, we measured the expression level of hsp70 immediately after irradiation (0-h-labeled samples), 1 h, and 2 h from the end of the irradiation. Surprisingly, our results showed that besides UV radiation, the visible light was also able to induce hsp70 expression in E. focardii. Moreover, spectrophotometric measurements have revealed no detectable endogenous pigments in E. focardii, making it difficult to propose a possible explanation for the visible light induction of its hsp70 genes. Further research is needed to conclusively clarify this point. PMID:25666535

  18. The Antarctic Psychrophile Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 Preferentially Phosphorylates a Photosystem I-Cytochrome b6/f Supercomplex.

    PubMed

    Szyszka-Mroz, Beth; Pittock, Paula; Ivanov, Alexander G; Lajoie, Gilles; Hüner, Norman P A

    2015-09-01

    Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 (UWO 241) is a psychrophilic green alga isolated from Antarctica. A unique characteristic of this algal strain is its inability to undergo state transitions coupled with the absence of photosystem II (PSII) light-harvesting complex protein phosphorylation. We show that UWO 241 preferentially phosphorylates specific polypeptides associated with an approximately 1,000-kD pigment-protein supercomplex that contains components of both photosystem I (PSI) and the cytochrome b₆/f (Cyt b₆/f) complex. Liquid chromatography nano-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify three major phosphorylated proteins associated with this PSI-Cyt b₆/f supercomplex, two 17-kD PSII subunit P-like proteins and a 70-kD ATP-dependent zinc metalloprotease, FtsH. The PSII subunit P-like protein sequence exhibited 70.6% similarity to the authentic PSII subunit P protein associated with the oxygen-evolving complex of PSII in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Tyrosine-146 was identified as a unique phosphorylation site on the UWO 241 PSII subunit P-like polypeptide. Assessment of PSI cyclic electron transport by in vivo P700 photooxidation and the dark relaxation kinetics of P700(+) indicated that UWO 241 exhibited PSI cyclic electron transport rates that were 3 times faster and more sensitive to antimycin A than the mesophile control, Chlamydomonas raudensis SAG 49.72. The stability of the PSI-Cyt b₆/f supercomplex was dependent upon the phosphorylation status of the PsbP-like protein and the zinc metalloprotease FtsH as well as the presence of high salt. We suggest that adaptation of UWO 241 to its unique low-temperature and high-salt environment favors the phosphorylation of a PSI-Cyt b₆/f supercomplex to regulate PSI cyclic electron transport rather than the regulation of state transitions through the phosphorylation of PSII light-harvesting complex proteins. PMID:26169679

  19. Rhodoglobus vestalii gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel psychrophilic organism isolated from an Antarctic Dry Valley lake.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Peter P; Loveland-Curtze, Jennifer; Miteva, Vanya I; Brenchley, Jean E

    2003-07-01

    A novel, psychrophilic, gram-positive bacterium (designated strain LV3T) from a lake near the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica, has been isolated and characterized. This organism formed red-pigmented colonies, had an optimal growth temperature of 18 degrees C and grew on a variety of media between -2 and 21 degrees C. Scanning electron micrographs of strain LV3T that showed small rods with unusual bulbous protuberances during all phases of growth were of particular interest. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was approximately 62 mol%. The cell walls contained ornithine as the diamino acid. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0, iso-C16:0 and anteiso-C17:0. Cells grown at -2 degrees C contained significant amounts of anteiso-C15:1. The major menaquinones found in strain LV3T were MK-11 and MK-12. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain LV3T was a member of the family Microbacteriaceae and related to, but distinct from, organisms belonging to the genera Agreia, Leifsonia and Subtercola. In addition, alignments of 16S rRNA sequences showed that the sequence of strain LV3T contained a 13 bp insertion that was found in only a few related sequences. Based on the low growth temperature, unusual cell shape, distinct 16S rRNA gene sequence and structure and cell-wall amino acid and menaquinone compositions, Rhodoglobus vestalii gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain LV3T (= ATCC BAA-534T = CIP 107482T). PMID:12892115

  20. Purification and Characterization of a Psychrophilic, Calcium-Induced, Growth-Phase-Dependent Metalloprotease from the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    PubMed Central

    Secades, P.; Alvarez, B.; Guijarro, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a fish pathogen that commonly affects salmonids. This bacterium produced an extracellular protease with an estimated molecular mass of 55 kDa. This enzyme, designated Fpp1 (F. psychrophilum protease 1), was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from the culture supernatant by using ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic chromatography, and size exclusion chromatography. On the basis of its biochemical characteristics, Fpp1 can be included in the group of metalloproteases that have an optimum pH for activity of 6.5 and are inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, or EGTA but not by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. Fpp1 activity was dependent on calcium ions not only for its activity but also for its thermal stability. In addition to calcium, strontium and barium can activate the protein. The enzyme showed typical psychrophilic behavior; it had an activation energy of 5.58 kcal/mol and was more active at temperatures between 25 and 40°C, and its activity decreased rapidly at 45°C. Fpp1 cleaved gelatin, laminin, fibronectin, fibrinogen, collagen type IV, and, to a lesser extent, collagen types I and II. Fpp1 also degraded actin and myosin, basic elements of the fish muscular system. The presence of this enzyme in culture media was specifically dependent on the calcium concentration. Fpp1 production started early in the exponential growth phase and reached a maximum during this period. Addition of calcium during the stationary phase did not induce Fpp1 production at all. Besides calcium and the growth phase, temperature also seems to play a role in production of Fpp1. In this study we found that production of Fpp1 depends on factors such as calcium concentration, growth phase of the culture, and temperature. The combination of these parameters corresponds to the combination in the natural host during outbreaks of disease caused by F. psychrophilum. Consequently, we suggest that environmental host

  1. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls by microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, O.; Sudo, R.

    1980-05-01

    The biodegradation of PCB's by microorganisms and the degradation pathway of PCB's are investigated. Experimental methods and materials are described. Only several strains of bacteria, Achromobacter sp., Alcaligenes sp., Acinetobacter sp., Pseudomonas sp., and soil microorganisms were able to decompose PCB's. A possible relationships between the structure and biodegradability of related biphenyl compounds was examined. (5 diagrams, 11 graphs, 18 references, 1 table)

  2. Microorganisms detected by enzyme-catalyzed reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vango, S. P.; Weetall, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Enzymes detect the presence of microorganisms in soils. The enzyme lysozymi is used to release the enzyme catalase from the microorganisms in a soil sample. The catalase catalyzes the decomposition of added hydrogen peroxide to produce oxygen which is detected manometrically. The partial pressure of the oxygen serves as an index of the samples bacteria content.

  3. Biofouling of marbles by oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Zeki; Öztürk, Ayten; Çolak, Emel

    2015-08-01

    Phototrophic microorganisms disfigure the surfaces of different types of stone. Stone structure is damaged by the activity of photoautotrophic and other microorganisms. However, to date few, investigations have been undertaken into the relationship between microorganisms and the properties of different types of marble. In this study, biological activity of photoautotrophic microorganisms on three types of marble (Yatagan White, Giallo Anticato and Afyon White) was investigated under laboratory conditions over a short period of time. The three types of marble supported the growth of phototrophic microbial communities on their outer and inner layers, turning their original colour from white to a yellowish green colour. The porosity of the marble types facilitated filamentous microbial growth in the presence of water. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the accumulation of aggregates such as small spherical, fibrillar, calcified globular bodies on the inner surfaces of the marbles. This suggests that the microscopic characteristics of particular marble types may stimulate the growth of certain types of microorganisms. PMID:25801371

  4. Pathogenic Microorganisms and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunsaier; Li, Jingnan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Accumulating reports have demonstrated that there is an association between pathogenic microorganisms and pancreatic cancer. Summary A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that microbiota are likely to influence pancreatic carcinogenesis. This review summarizes the literature on studies examining infections that have been linked to pancreatic cancer. Key Message Helicobacter pylori infection may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer; chronic hepatitis virus and oral microbiota may also play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Practical Implications Considering the worldwide burden of the disease, the association between microbiota and pancreatic cancer in this review may provide new ideas to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies in this direction are urgently needed. PMID:26673459

  5. Lantibiotic production by pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Karen M; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2012-09-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesised, post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides produced by Gram positive bacteria, many which have broad-ranging antimicrobial activities. Lantibiotics have long been the subject of investigation with a view to their application as food preservatives or chemotherapeutic agents for clinical and veterinary medicine, while the associated biosynthetic machinery has been employed for peptide engineering purposes. However, although many lantibiotics are produced by generally regarded as safe or food-grade bacteria, it is increasingly apparent that a number of Gram positive pathogens, including strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus uberis and Enterococcus faecalis, also produce these compounds. It is proposed that production of these antimicrobials may provide the associated microorganisms with a competitive advantage when colonizing/infecting a host, thereby enhancing the virulence of the producing strain. Here we review the production of lantibiotics by these pathogens and discuss how their production may contribute to their disease-causing potential. PMID:22708496

  6. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Akano, T.; Fukatsu, K.; Miyasaka, H. |

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen is a clean energy alternative to the fossil fuels, the main source of greenhouse gas emissions. We developed a stable system for the conversion of solar energy into hydrogen using photosynthetic microorganisms. Our system consists of the following three stages: (1) Photosynthetic starch accumulation in green microalgae (400 L x2); (2) Dark anaerobic fermentation of the algal starch biomass to produce hydrogen and organic compounds (155 L x2); and (3) Further conversion of the organic compounds to produce hydrogen using photosynthetic bacteria (three types of reactors, parallel plate, raceway, and tubular). We constructed a test plant of this process at Nankoh power plant of Kansai Electric Power Company in Osaka, Japan, and carried out a series of tests using CO{sub 2} obtained from a chemical absorption pilot-plant. The photobiological hydrogen production process used a combination of a marine alga, Chlamydomonas sp. MGA 161 and marine photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas sp. W-1S. The dark anaerobic fermentation of algal starch biomass was also investigated. Sustained and stable starch accumulation, starch degradation in the algal cell, and hydrogen production from algal fermentation and photosynthetic bacteria in the light were demonstrated during several experiments. 3 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  7. A start-up of psychrophilic anaerobic sequence batch reactor digesting a 35 % total solids feed of dairy manure and wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Saady, Noori M Cata; Massé, Daniel I

    2015-12-01

    Zero liquid discharge is currently an objective in livestock manure management to minimize water pollution. This paper reports the start-up phase of a novel psychrophilic (20 °C) dry anaerobic digestion of dairy manure with bedding fed at 35 % total solids and an organic loading rate of 3.0 g total chemical oxygen demand kg(-1) inoculum day(-1) in anaerobic sequence batch reactors. The specific methane (CH4) yield ranged from 165.4 ± 9.8 to 213.9 ± 13.6 NL CH4 kg(-1) volatile solids (VS) with an overall average of 188 ± 17 NL CH4 kg(-1) VS during 11 successive start-up cycles (231 days) and a maximum CH4 production rate of 10.2 ± 0.6 NL CH4 kg(-1) VS day(-1). The inoculum-to-substrate (VS-based) ratio ranged from 4.06 to 4.47. Although methanogenesis proceeded fairly well the hydrolysis seemed to be the rate limiting step. It is possible start up psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion of cow feces and wheat straw at feed TS of 35 % within 7-10 successive cycles (147-210 days). PMID:26289773

  8. Psychrophilic and psychrotolerant fungi on bats and the presence of Geomyces spp. on bat wings prior to the arrival of white nose syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lynnaun J A N; Miller, Andrew N; McCleery, Robert A; McClanahan, Rod; Kath, Joseph A; Lueschow, Shiloh; Porras-Alfaro, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Since 2006, Geomyces destructans, the causative agent of white nose syndrome (WNS), has killed over 5.7 million bats in North America. The current hypothesis suggests that this novel fungus is an invasive species from Europe, but little is known about the diversity within the genus Geomyces and its distribution on bats in the United States. We documented the psychrophilic and psychrotolerant fungal flora of hibernating bats prior to the arrival of WNS using culture-based techniques. A total of 149 cultures, which were obtained from 30 bats in five bat hibernacula located in four caves and one mine, were sequenced for the entire internal transcribed spacer (ITS) nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) region. Approximately 53 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 97% similarity were recovered from bat wings, with the community dominated by fungi within the genera Cladosporium, Fusarium, Geomyces, Mortierella, Penicillium, and Trichosporon. Eleven Geomyces isolates were obtained and placed in at least seven distinct Geomyces clades based on maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses. Temperature experiments revealed that all Geomyces strains isolated are psychrotolerant, unlike G. destructans, which is a true psychrophile. Our results confirm that a large diversity of fungi, including several Geomyces isolates, occurs on bats prior to the arrival of WNS. Most of these isolates were obtained from damaged wings. Additional studies need to be conducted to determine potential ecological roles of these abundant Geomyces strains isolated from bats. PMID:23811520

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. Strain TG-14, a Psychrophilic Bacterium Isolated from Sediment-Laden Stratified Basal Ice from Taylor Glacier, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Hye Yeon; Lee, Sung Gu; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Doyle, Shawn; Christner, Brent C.

    2012-01-01

    The psychrophilic bacterium Paenisporosarcina sp. TG-14 was isolated from sediment-laden stratified basal ice from Taylor Glacier, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which may provide useful information on the cold adaptation mechanism in extremely variable environments. PMID:23144403

  10. Applications of Electromigration Techniques: Electromigration Techniques in Detection of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziubakiewicz, Ewelina; Buszewski, Bogusław

    The detection and identification of microbes is a challenge and an important aspect in many fields of our lives from medicine to bioterrorism defense. However, the analysis of such complex molecules brings a lot of questions mainly about their behavior. Bacteria are biocolloid, whose surface charge originates from the ionization of carboxyl, phosphate, or amino groups and the adsorption of ions from solution. Consequently, the charged cell wall groups determine the spontaneous formation of the electrical double layer. In this chapter application of electromigration techniques for microorganism's identification and separation are described. This approach represents the possibility to apply electromigration techniques in medical diagnosis, detection of food contamination, and sterility testing.

  11. Sphaerochaeta multiformis sp. nov., an anaerobic, psychrophilic bacterium isolated from subseafloor sediment, and emended description of the genus Sphaerochaeta.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masayuki; Sakai, Sanae; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Saito, Yayoi; Yamanaka, Yuko; Saito, Yumi; Tame, Akihiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Löffler, Frank E; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    An anaerobic, psychrophilic bacterium, strain MO-SPC2(T), was isolated from a methanogenic microbial community in a continuous-flow bioreactor that was established from subseafloor sediments collected from off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan in the north-western Pacific Ocean. Cells were pleomorphic: spherical, annular, curved rod, helical and coccoid cell morphologies were observed. Motility only occurred in helical cells. Strain MO-SPC2(T) grew at 0-17 °C (optimally at 9 °C), at pH 6.0-8.0 (optimally at pH 6.8-7.2) and in 20-40 g NaCl l(-1) (optimally at 20-30 NaCl l(-1)). The strain grew chemo-organotrophically with mono-, di- and polysaccharides. The major end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The abundant polar lipids of strain MO-SPC2(T) were phosphatidylglycolipids, phospholipids and glycolipids. The major cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0, C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω9. Isoprenoid quinones were not detected. The G+C content of the DNA was 32.3 mol%. 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis showed that strain MO-SPC2(T) was affiliated with the genus Sphaerochaeta within the phylum Spirochaetes, and its closest relatives were Sphaerochaeta pleomorpha Grapes(T) (88.4 % sequence identity), Sphaerochaeta globosa Buddy(T) (86.7 %) and Sphaerochaeta coccoides SPN1(T) (85.4 %). Based on phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic traits, strain MO-SPC2(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Sphaerochaeta, for which the name Sphaerochaeta multiformis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MO-SPC2(T) ( = JCM 17281(T) = DSM 23952(T)). An emended description of the genus Sphaerochaeta is also proposed. PMID:25249566

  12. Kinetic analysis of the psychrophilic anaerobic digestion of wastewater derived from the production of proteins from extracted sunflower flour.

    PubMed

    Borja, Rafael; González, Esther; Raposo, Francisco; Millán, Francisco; Martín, Antonio

    2002-07-31

    A kinetic analysis of the anaerobic digestion process of wastewater derived from the production of protein isolates from extracted sunflower flour was carried out. The digestion was conducted in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed reactor with saponite (magnesium silicate) as support for the mediating bacteria at psychrophilic temperature (15-19 degrees C). Soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD(s)) removal efficiencies in the range of 95.9-69.0% were achieved in the reactor at organic loading rates (OLR) of between 0.57 and 2.49 g total COD (COD(t))/L d, hydraulic retention times (HRT) of between 20.0 and 4.5 days, and average feed total COD concentration of 11.3 g/L. The yield coefficient of methane production was 0.32 L of methane (at STP) per gram of COD(t) removed. The total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) levels and the TVFA/alkalinity ratio were lower than the suggested limits for digester failure for OLR and HRT up to 2.26 g COD(t)/L d and 5.0 days, respectively. The specific rate of substrate uptake, r (g COD(s)/g VSS d), correlated with the concentration of biodegradable substrate, S (g COD(s)/L), through an equation of the Michaelis-Menten type. The maximum substrate utilization rate, k, and the Michaelis constant, K(s)(), were found to be 0.125 g COD(s)/g VSS d and 124 mg COD(s)/L, respectively. This proposed model predicted the behavior of the reactor very accurately showing deviations lower than 10% between the experimental and theoretical values of substrate uptake rates. A mass (COD(t)) balance around the reactor allowed the COD equivalent of methane volume (W(CH)4) to be obtained, which gave a value of 2.89 g COD(t)/L CH(4), which was virtually coincident with the theoretical value of 2.86 g COD(t)/L CH(4). PMID:12137487

  13. Detection of microorganisms using terahertz metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. J.; Hong, J. T.; Choi, S. J.; Kim, H. S.; Park, W. K.; Han, S. T.; Park, J. Y.; Lee, S.; Kim, D. S.; Ahn, Y. H.

    2014-05-01

    Microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria cause many human diseases and therefore rapid and accurate identification of these substances is essential for effective treatment and prevention of further infections. In particular, contemporary microbial detection technique is limited by the low detection speed which usually extends over a couple of days. Here we demonstrate that metamaterials operating in the terahertz frequency range shows promising potential for use in fabricating the highly sensitive and selective microbial sensors that are capable of high-speed on-site detection of microorganisms in both ambient and aqueous environments. We were able to detect extremely small amounts of the microorganisms, because their sizes are on the same scale as the micro-gaps of the terahertz metamaterials. The resonant frequency shift of the metamaterials was investigated in terms of the number density and the dielectric constants of the microorganisms, which was successfully interpreted by the change in the effective dielectric constant of a gap area.

  14. PARTICLE-ASSOCIATED MICROORGANISMS IN STORMWATER RUNOFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research investigated the effects of blending and chemical addition before analysis of the concentration of microorganisms in stormwater runoff to determine whether clumped or particle-associated organisms play a significant role. All organisms, except for Escherichia coli, ...

  15. Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-07-01

    Advances in instrumentation, proteomics, and bioinformatics have contributed to the successful applications of mass spectrometry (MS) for detection, identification, and classification of microorganisms. These MS applications are based on the detection of organism-specific biomarker molecules, which allow differentiation between organisms to be made. Intact proteins, their proteolytic peptides, and nonribosomal peptides have been successfully utilized as biomarkers. Sequence-specific fragments for biomarkers are generated by tandem MS of intact proteins or proteolytic peptides, obtained after, for instance, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. In combination with proteome database searching, individual biomarker proteins are unambiguously identified from their tandem mass spectra, and from there the source microorganism is also identified. Such top-down or bottom-up proteomics approaches permit rapid, sensitive, and confident characterization of individual microorganisms in mixtures and are reviewed here. Examples of MS-based functional assays for detection of targeted microorganisms, e.g., Bacillus anthracis, in environmental or clinically relevant backgrounds are also reviewed.

  16. Automated systems for identification of microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Stager, C E; Davis, J R

    1992-01-01

    Automated instruments for the identification of microorganisms were introduced into clinical microbiology laboratories in the 1970s. During the past two decades, the capabilities and performance characteristics of automated identification systems have steadily progressed and improved. This article explores the development of the various automated identification systems available in the United States and reviews their performance for identification of microorganisms. Observations regarding deficiencies and suggested improvements for these systems are provided. PMID:1498768

  17. Differential thermal effects on the energy distribution between photosystem II and photosystem I in thylakoid membranes of a psychrophilic and a mesophilic alga.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Kiss, Rachael; Ivanov, Alexander G; Williams, John; Mobashsher Khan; Huner, Norman P A

    2002-04-12

    Sensitivity of the photosynthetic thylakoid membranes to thermal stress was investigated in the psychrophilic Antarctic alga Chlamydomonas subcaudata. C. subcaudata thylakoids exhibited an elevated heat sensitivity as indicated by a temperature-induced rise in F(o) fluorescence in comparison with the mesophilic species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This was accompanied by a loss of structural stability of the photosystem (PS) II core complex and functional changes at the level of PSI in C. reinhardtii, but not in C. subcaudata. Lastly, C. subcaudata exhibited an increase in unsaturated fatty acid content of membrane lipids in combination with unique fatty acid species. The relationship between lipid unsaturation and the functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus under elevated temperatures is discussed. PMID:11997125

  18. Functional microorganisms for functional food quality.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, M; Cagno, R Di; De Angelis, M

    2010-09-01

    Functional microorganisms and health benefits represent a binomial with great potential for fermented functional foods. The health benefits of fermented functional foods are expressed either directly through the interactions of ingested live microorganisms with the host (probiotic effect) or indirectly as the result of the ingestion of microbial metabolites synthesized during fermentation (biogenic effect). Since the importance of high viability for probiotic effect, two major options are currently pursued for improving it--to enhance bacterial stress response and to use alternative products for incorporating probiotics (e.g., ice cream, cheeses, cereals, fruit juices, vegetables, and soy beans). Further, it seems that quorum sensing signal molecules released by probiotics may interact with human epithelial cells from intestine thus modulating several physiological functions. Under optimal processing conditions, functional microorganisms contribute to food functionality through their enzyme portfolio and the release of metabolites. Overproduction of free amino acids and vitamins are two classical examples. Besides, bioactive compounds (e.g., peptides, γ-amino butyric acid, and conjugated linoleic acid) may be released during food processing above the physiological threshold and they may exert various in vivo health benefits. Functional microorganisms are even more used in novel strategies for decreasing phenomenon of food intolerance (e.g., gluten intolerance) and allergy. By a critical approach, this review will aim at showing the potential of functional microorganisms for the quality of functional foods. PMID:20830633

  19. Gene cloning and characterization of the very large NAD-dependent l-glutamate dehydrogenase from the psychrophile Janthinobacterium lividum, isolated from cold soil.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ryushi; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2007-08-01

    NAD-dependent l-glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) activity was detected in cell extract from the psychrophile Janthinobacterium lividum UTB1302, which was isolated from cold soil and purified to homogeneity. The native enzyme (1,065 kDa, determined by gel filtration) is a homohexamer composed of 170-kDa subunits (determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). Consistent with these findings, gene cloning and sequencing enabled deduction of the amino acid sequence of the subunit, which proved to be comprised of 1,575 amino acids with a combined molecular mass of 169,360 Da. The enzyme from this psychrophile thus appears to belong to the GDH family characterized by very large subunits, like those expressed by Streptomyces clavuligerus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (about 180 kDa). The entire amino acid sequence of the J. lividum enzyme showed about 40% identity with the sequences from S. clavuligerus and P. aeruginosa enzymes, but the central domains showed higher homology (about 65%). Within the central domain, the residues related to substrate and NAD binding were highly conserved, suggesting that this is the enzyme's catalytic domain. In the presence of NAD, but not in the presence of NADP, this GDH exclusively catalyzed the oxidative deamination of l-glutamate. The stereospecificity of the hydride transfer to NAD was pro-S, which is the same as that of the other known GDHs. Surprisingly, NAD-GDH activity was markedly enhanced by the addition of various amino acids, such as l-aspartate (1,735%) and l-arginine (936%), which strongly suggests that the N- and/or C-terminal domains play regulatory roles and are involved in the activation of the enzyme by these amino acids. PMID:17526698

  20. A horizontally acquired group II intron in the chloroplast psbA gene of a psychrophilic Chlamydomonas: In vitro self-splicing and genetic evidence for maturase activity

    PubMed Central

    ODOM, OBED W.; SHENKENBERG, DAVID L.; GARCIA, JOSHUA A.; HERRIN, DAVID L.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of known group II introns are from chloroplast genomes, yet the first self-splicing group II intron from a chloroplast gene was reported only recently, from the psbA gene of the euglenoid, Euglena myxocylindracea. Herein, we describe a large (2.6-kb) group II intron from the psbA gene (psbA1) of a psychrophilic Chlamydomonas sp. from Antarctica that self-splices accurately in vitro. Remarkably, this intron, which also encodes an ORF with putative reverse transcriptase, maturase, and endonuclease domains, is in the same location, and is related to the E. myxocylindracea intron, as well as to group IIB2 introns from cyanobacteria. In vitro self-splicing of Chs.psbA1 occurred via a lariat, and required Mg2+ (>12 mM) and NH4+. Self-splicing was improved by deleting most of the ORF and by using pre-RNAs directly from transcription reactions, suggestive of a role for folding during transcription. Self-splicing of Chs.psbA1 pre-RNAs showed temperature optima of ~44°C, but with a broad shoulder on the low side of the peak; splicing was nearly absent at 50°C, indicative of thermolability. Splicing of wild-type Chs.psbA1 also occurred in Escherichia coli, but not when the ORF was disrupted by mutations, providing genetic evidence that it has maturase activity. This work provides the first description of a ribozyme from a psychrophilic organism. It also appears to provide a second instance of interkingdom horizontal transfer of this group IIB2 intron (or a close relative) from cyanobacteria to chloroplasts. PMID:15208445

  1. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Drake, Steven K; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F; Sacks, David B; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple 'fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html . Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26510657

  2. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Drake, Steven K.; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Sacks, David B.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple `fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html.

  3. Microorganism characterization by single particle mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Scott C

    2009-01-01

    In recent years a major effort by several groups has been undertaken to identify bacteria by mass spectrometry at the single cell level. The intent of this review is to highlight the recent progress made in the application of single particle mass spectrometry to the analysis of microorganisms. A large portion of the review highlights improvements in the ionization and mass analysis of bio-aerosols, or particles that contain biologically relevant molecules such as peptides or proteins. While these are not direct applications to bacteria, the results have been central to a progression toward single cell mass spectrometry. Developments in single particle matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) are summarized. Recent applications of aerosol laser desorption/ionization (LDI) to the analysis of single microorganisms are highlighted. Successful applications of off-line and on-the-fly aerosol MALDI to microorganism detection are discussed. Limitations to current approaches and necessary future achievements are also addressed. PMID:18949817

  4. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmele, Michele; Morford, Megan; Khodadad, Christina; Spencer, Lashelle; Richards, Jeffrey; Strayer, Richard; Caro, Janicce; Hummerick, Mary; Wheeler, Ray

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, such as aboard the International Space Station (ISS) or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of this project was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel- through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms.

  5. Selective enumeration of probiotic microorganisms in cheese.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Reza; Mortazavian, Amir M; Amiri-Rigi, Atefeh

    2012-02-01

    Cheese is a dairy product which has a good potential for delivery of probiotic microorganisms into the human intestine. To be considered to offer probiotic health benefits, probiotics must remain viable in food products above a threshold level (e.g., 10(6) cfu g(-1)) until the time of consumption. In order to ensure that a minimal number of probiotic bacteria is present in the cheese, reliable methods for enumeration are required. The choice of culture medium for selective enumeration of probiotic strains in combination with starters depends on the product matrix, the target group and the taxonomic diversity of the bacterial background flora in the product. Enumeration protocol should be designed as a function of the target microorganism(s) to be quantified in the cheese. An overview of some series of culture media for selective enumeration of commercial probiotic cultures is presented in this review. PMID:22029912

  6. Functional Properties of Microorganisms in Fermented Foods

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Jyoti P.; Shin, Dong-Hwa; Jung, Su-Jin; Chae, Soo-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Fermented foods have unique functional properties imparting some health benefits to consumers due to presence of functional microorganisms, which possess probiotics properties, antimicrobial, antioxidant, peptide production, etc. Health benefits of some global fermented foods are synthesis of nutrients, prevention of cardiovascular disease, prevention of cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, allergic reactions, diabetes, among others. The present paper is aimed to review the information on some functional properties of the microorganisms associated with fermented foods and beverages, and their health-promoting benefits to consumers. PMID:27199913

  7. Functional Properties of Microorganisms in Fermented Foods.

    PubMed

    Tamang, Jyoti P; Shin, Dong-Hwa; Jung, Su-Jin; Chae, Soo-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Fermented foods have unique functional properties imparting some health benefits to consumers due to presence of functional microorganisms, which possess probiotics properties, antimicrobial, antioxidant, peptide production, etc. Health benefits of some global fermented foods are synthesis of nutrients, prevention of cardiovascular disease, prevention of cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, allergic reactions, diabetes, among others. The present paper is aimed to review the information on some functional properties of the microorganisms associated with fermented foods and beverages, and their health-promoting benefits to consumers. PMID:27199913

  8. Inactivation of microorganisms by electrohydraulic shock.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, S E; Speck, M L

    1967-09-01

    The electrohydraulic shock treatment of microorganisms was accomplished by discharging high-voltage electricity (8 to 15 kv) across an electrode gap below the surface of aqueous suspensions of the microorganisms. This treatment was effective in destroying Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus subtilis, and bacteriophage specific for S. cremoris ML1. The presence of added protein in bacterial suspensions resulted in reduced bactericidal action. Water subjected to electrohydraulic treatment retained a certain amount of toxicity when copper-core electrodes were used to apply the treatment. This was caused by copper liberated from the electrode during electrohydraulic discharge. PMID:4965615

  9. Metabolic activity of microorganisms in evaporites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, L. J.; Giver, L. J.; White, M. R.; Mancinelli, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Crystalline salt is generally considered so hostile to most forms of life that it has been used for centuries as a preservative. Here, we present evidence that prokaryotes inhabiting a natural evaporite crust of halite and gypsum are metabolically active while inside the evaporite for at least 10 months. In situ measurements demonstrated that some of these "endoevaporitic" microorganisms (probably the cyanobacterium Synechococcus Nageli) fixed carbon and nitrogen. Denitrification was not observed. Our results quantified the slow microbial activity that can occur in salt crystals. Implications of this study include the possibility that microorganisms found in ancient evaporite deposits may have been part of an evaporite community.

  10. Raman Spectroscopic Techniques for Planetary Exploration: Detecting Microorganisms through Minerals.

    PubMed

    Verkaaik, Mattheus F C; Hooijschuur, Jan-Hein; Davies, Gareth R; Ariese, Freek

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy can provide highly specific chemical fingerprints of inorganic and organic materials and is therefore expected to play a significant role in interplanetary missions, especially for the search for life elsewhere in our solar system. A major challenge will be the unambiguous detection of low levels of biomarkers on a mineral background. In addition, these biomarkers may not be present at the surface but rather inside or underneath minerals. Strong scattering may prevent focusing deeper into the sample. In this paper, we report the detection of carotenoid-containing microorganisms behind mineral layers using time-resolved Raman spectroscopy (TRRS). Two extremophiles, the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans and the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, were detected through translucent and transparent minerals using 440 nm excitation under resonance conditions to selectively enhance the detection of carotenoids. Using 3 ps laser pulses and a 250 ps gated intensified CCD camera provided depth selectivity for the subsurface microorganisms over the mineral surface layer and in addition lowered the contribution of the fluorescent background. Raman spectra of both organisms could be detected through 5 mm of translucent calcite or 20 mm of transparent halite. Multilayered mineral samples were used to further test the applied method. A separate tunable laser setup for resonance Raman and a commercial confocal Raman microscope, both with continuous (non-gated) detection, were used for comparison. This study demonstrates the capabilities of TRRS for the depth-selective analysis through scattering samples, which could be used in future planetary exploration to detect microorganisms or biomarkers within or behind minerals. PMID:26186197

  11. [DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY OF MICROORGANISMS TO POLYHEXAMETHYLENEGUANIDINE].

    PubMed

    Lysytsya, A V; Mandygra, Y M; Bojko, O P; Romanishyna, O O; Mandygra, M S

    2015-01-01

    Factors identified that affect the sensitivity of microorganisms to polyhexamethyleneguanidine (PHMG). Salts of PHMG chloride, valerate, maleate, succinate was to use. Test strains of Esherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Leptospira interrogans, Paenibacillus larvae, Mycobacterium bovis, M. avium, M. fortuitum, Aspergillus niger and some strains of viruses are taken as objects of research. We have determined that the cytoplasm membrane phospholipids is main "target" for the polycation molecules of PHMG. A differential sensitivity of the microorganisms to this drug is primarily determined by relative amount of lipids in membrane and their accessibility. Such trends exist: increase the relative contents of anionic lipids and more negative surface electric potential of membrane, and reduction of the sizes fat acid remainder of lipids bring to increase of microorganism sensitivity. Types of anion salt PHMG just have a certain value. Biocide activity of PHMG chloride is more, than its salts with organic acid. Feasibility of combining PHMG with other biocides in the multicomponent disinfectants studied and analyzed. This combination does not lead to a significant increase in the sensitivity of microorganisms tested in most cases. Most species of pathogenic bacteria can be quickly neutralized by aqueous solutions of PHMG in less than 1% concentrations. PMID:26638480

  12. Human recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Espejo-Mojica, Ángela J; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Rodríguez, Alexander; Mosquera, Ángela; Díaz, Dennis; Beltrán, Laura; Díaz, Sergio; Pimentel, Natalia; Moreno, Jefferson; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Sánchez, Oscar F; Córdoba, Henry; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Barrera, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are caused by accumulation of partially degraded substrates within the lysosome, as a result of a function loss of a lysosomal protein. Recombinant lysosomal proteins are usually produced in mammalian cells, based on their capacity to carry out post-translational modifications similar to those observed in human native proteins. However, during the last years, a growing number of studies have shown the possibility to produce active forms of lysosomal proteins in other expression systems, such as plants and microorganisms. In this paper, we review the production and characterization of human lysosomal proteins, deficient in several LSDs, which have been produced in microorganisms. For this purpose, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Ogataea minuta have been used as expression systems. The recombinant lysosomal proteins expressed in these hosts have shown similar substrate specificities, and temperature and pH stability profiles to those produced in mammalian cells. In addition, pre-clinical results have shown that recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms can be taken-up by cells and reduce the substrate accumulated within the lysosome. Recently, metabolic engineering in yeasts has allowed the production of lysosomal enzymes with tailored N-glycosylations, while progresses in E. coli N-glycosylations offer a potential platform to improve the production of these recombinant lysosomal enzymes. In summary, microorganisms represent convenient platform for the production of recombinant lysosomal proteins for biochemical and physicochemical characterization, as well as for the development of ERT for LSD. PMID:26071627

  13. Metagenomics: Application of Genomics to Uncultured Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Handelsman, Jo

    2004-01-01

    Metagenomics (also referred to as environmental and community genomics) is the genomic analysis of microorganisms by direct extraction and cloning of DNA from an assemblage of microorganisms. The development of metagenomics stemmed from the ineluctable evidence that as-yet-uncultured microorganisms represent the vast majority of organisms in most environments on earth. This evidence was derived from analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified directly from the environment, an approach that avoided the bias imposed by culturing and led to the discovery of vast new lineages of microbial life. Although the portrait of the microbial world was revolutionized by analysis of 16S rRNA genes, such studies yielded only a phylogenetic description of community membership, providing little insight into the genetics, physiology, and biochemistry of the members. Metagenomics provides a second tier of technical innovation that facilitates study of the physiology and ecology of environmental microorganisms. Novel genes and gene products discovered through metagenomics include the first bacteriorhodopsin of bacterial origin; novel small molecules with antimicrobial activity; and new members of families of known proteins, such as an Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter, RecA, DNA polymerase, and antibiotic resistance determinants. Reassembly of multiple genomes has provided insight into energy and nutrient cycling within the community, genome structure, gene function, population genetics and microheterogeneity, and lateral gene transfer among members of an uncultured community. The application of metagenomic sequence information will facilitate the design of better culturing strategies to link genomic analysis with pure culture studies. PMID:15590779

  14. [DATABASE FOR DEPOSITARY DEPARTMENT OF MICROORGANISMS].

    PubMed

    Brovarnyk, V; Golovach, T M

    2015-01-01

    The database on microorganism culture depositary is designed with using MS Access 2010. Three major modules, namely general description, administration, storage, compound database kernel. Description of information in these modules is given. Web page of the depositary is developed on the database. PMID:26638488

  15. ATMOSPHERIC BENZENE DEPLETION BY SOIL MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaseous benzene was rapidly depleted in exposure chambers containing viable soils and plants. When separate components of the system were analyzed, no benzene was detected in soils, plants, or water. Soil microorganisms were shown to be responsible for metabolizing benzene, yield...

  16. Biomechanics of Aquatic Micro-Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedley, T. J.

    Aquatic micro-organisms play a major role in ocean ecology, the global carbon cycle and bioreactor engineering. The complex foodweb of an oceanic ecosystem may be modelled in terms of a few species of different types whose population densities obey coupled differential equations. However the functions and constants that appear in those equations depend in a complex way on the details of the dynamics of individual organisms and how they interact in larger scale phenomena. This talk will survey some of the following topics: (1) the fluid dynamics of micro-organism swimming, (2) the effect on nutrient uptake of an organism’s swimming motions, (3) chemotaxis in bacteria, (4) capture rate of phytoplankton by zooplankton when they all swim in a turbulent environment, (5) pattern-formation (e.g. bioconvection) in suspensions of upswimming micro-organisms (algae and bacteria), (6) the hydrodynamic interactions between swimming model micro-organisms and (7) their effect on the rheology and transport properties of the suspension as a whole. The long-term goal is to formulate a continuum model for concentrated suspensions of swimmers; this is not yet realised and may be impossible!

  17. PESTICIDE METABOLISM IN PLANTS AND MICROORGANISMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding pesticide metabolism in plants and microorganisms is necessary for pesticide development, safe and efficient use, as well as for developing pesticide bioremediation strategies for contaminated soil and water. Pesticide biotransformation may occur via multi-step processes known as meta...

  18. Engineered microorganisms having resistance to ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Ruegg, Thomas Lawrence; Thelen, Michael P.

    2016-03-22

    The present invention provides for a method of genetically modifying microorganisms to enhance resistance to ionic liquids, host cells genetically modified in accordance with the methods, and methods of using the host cells in a reaction comprising biomass that has been pretreated with ionic liquids.

  19. Microorganism lipid droplets and biofuel development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingmei; Zhang, Congyan; Shen, Xipeng; Zhang, Xuelin; Cichello, Simon; Guan, Hongbin; Liu, Pingsheng

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD) is a cellular organelle that stores neutral lipids as a source of energy and carbon. However, recent research has emerged that the organelle is involved in lipid synthesis, transportation, and metabolism, as well as mediating cellular protein storage and degradation. With the exception of multi-cellular organisms, some unicellular microorganisms have been observed to contain LDs. The organelle has been isolated and characterized from numerous organisms. Triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in LDs can be in excess of 50% of the dry weight in some microorganisms, and a maximum of 87% in some instances. These microorganisms include eukaryotes such as yeast and green algae as well as prokaryotes such as bacteria. Some organisms obtain carbon from CO2 via photosynthesis, while the majority utilizes carbon from various types of biomass. Therefore, high TAG content generated by utilizing waste or cheap biomass, coupled with an efficient conversion rate, present these organisms as bio-tech ‘factories’ to produce biodiesel. This review summarizes LD research in these organisms and provides useful information for further LD biological research and microorganism biodiesel development. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(12): 575-581] PMID:24355300

  20. Radiation sensitivity of hyperthermal composting microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-Il; Yoon, Min-Chul; Kim, Jae-Hun; Yamashita, Masamichi; Kim, Geun Joong; Lee, Ju-Woon

    In the space station and vehicles designed for long human mission, high-temperature compost is a promising technology for decomposing organic waste and producing the fertilizers. In space, the microorganisms could have the changed biological activities or even be mutated by ionizing irradiation. Therefore, in this study, the effect of gamma irradiation on the sensitivity of bacteria in hyperthermal composting was investigated. The sequence analysis of the amplified 16s rDNA genes and amoA gene were used for the identification of composting microorganisms. Viability of microorganisms in compost soil after gamma irradiation was directly visualized with LIVE/DEAD Baclight viability kit. The dominant bacterial genera are Weissella cibaria and Leuconostoc sp. and fungus genera are Metschnikowia bicuspidate and Pichia guilliermondii, respectively. By the gamma irradiation up to the dose of 1 kGy, the microbial population was not changed. Also, the enzyme activities of amylase and cellulose were sustained by the gamma irradiation. These results show that these hyperthermia microorganisms might have the high resistance to gamma radiation and could be used for agriculture in the Space Station.

  1. Measuring micro-organism gas production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Pearson, A. O.; Mills, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Transducer, which senses pressure buildup, is easy to assemble and use, and rate of gas produced can be measured automatically and accurately. Method can be used in research, in clinical laboratories, and for environmental pollution studies because of its ability to detect and quantify rapidly the number of gas-producing microorganisms in water, beverages, and clinical samples.

  2. Metal resistance in acidophilic microorganisms and its significance for biotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Dopson, Mark; Holmes, David S

    2014-10-01

    Extremely acidophilic microorganisms have an optimal pH of <3 and are found in all three domains of life. As metals are more soluble at acid pH, acidophiles are often challenged by very high metal concentrations. Acidophiles are metal-tolerant by both intrinsic, passive mechanisms as well as active systems. Passive mechanisms include an internal positive membrane potential that creates a chemiosmotic gradient against which metal cations must move, as well as the formation of metal sulfate complexes reducing the concentration of the free metal ion. Active systems include efflux proteins that pump metals out of the cytoplasm and conversion of the metal to a less toxic form. Acidophiles are exploited in a number of biotechnologies including biomining for sulfide mineral dissolution, biosulfidogenesis to produce sulfide that can selectively precipitate metals from process streams, treatment of acid mine drainage, and bioremediation of acidic metal-contaminated milieux. This review describes how acidophilic microorganisms tolerate extremely high metal concentrations in biotechnological processes and identifies areas of future work that hold promise for improving the efficiency of these applications. PMID:25104030

  3. The future of starch bioengineering: GM microorganisms or GM plants?

    PubMed Central

    Hebelstrup, Kim H.; Sagnelli, Domenico; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Plant starches regularly require extensive modification to permit subsequent applications. Such processing is usually done by the use of chemical and/or physical treatments. The use of recombinant enzymes produced by large-scale fermentation of GM microorganisms is increasingly used in starch processing and modification, sometimes as an alternative to chemical or physical treatments. However, as a means to impart the modifications as early as possible in the starch production chain, similar recombinant enzymes may also be expressed in planta in the developing starch storage organ such as in roots, tubers and cereal grains to provide a GM crop as an alternative to the use of enzymes from GM microorganisms. We here discuss these techniques in relation to important structural features and modifications of starches such as: starch phosphorylation, starch hydrolysis, chain transfer/branching and novel concepts of hybrid starch-based polysaccharides. In planta starch bioengineering is generally challenged by yield penalties and inefficient production of the desired product. However, in some situations, GM crops for starch bioengineering without deleterious effects have been achieved. PMID:25954284

  4. Recent trends in ionic liquid (IL) tolerant enzymes and microorganisms for biomass conversion.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Maria Del Carmen; Saadeddin, Anas

    2015-01-01

    Second generation biofuel production depends on lignocellulosic (LC) biomass transformation into simple sugars and their subsequent fermentation into alcohols. However, the main obstacle in this process is the efficient breakdown of the recalcitrant cellulose to sugar monomers. Hence, efficient feedstock pretreatment and hydrolysis are necessary to produce a cost effective biofuel. Recently, ionic liquids (ILs) have been recognized as a promising solvent able to dissolve different biomass feedstocks, providing higher sugar yields. However, most of the hydrolytic enzymes and microorganisms are inactivated, completely or partially, in the presence of even low concentrations of IL, making necessary the discovery of novel hydrolytic enzymes and fermentative microorganisms that are tolerant to ILs. In this review, the current state and the challenges of using ILs as a pretreatment of LC biomass was evaluated, underlining the advances in the discovery and identification of new IL-tolerant enzymes and microorganisms that could improve the bioprocessing of biomass to fuels and chemicals. PMID:24494700

  5. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2012-02-21

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  6. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

    2013-04-30

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  7. Sea Ice Microorganisms: Environmental Constraints and Extracellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ewert, Marcela; Deming, Jody W.

    2013-01-01

    Inherent to sea ice, like other high latitude environments, is the strong seasonality driven by changes in insolation throughout the year. Sea-ice organisms are exposed to shifting, sometimes limiting, conditions of temperature and salinity. An array of adaptations to survive these and other challenges has been acquired by those organisms that inhabit the ice. One key adaptive response is the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which play multiple roles in the entrapment, retention and survival of microorganisms in sea ice. In this concept paper we consider two main areas of sea-ice microbiology: the physico-chemical properties that define sea ice as a microbial habitat, imparting particular advantages and limits; and extracellular responses elicited in microbial inhabitants as they exploit or survive these conditions. Emphasis is placed on protective strategies used in the face of fluctuating and extreme environmental conditions in sea ice. Gaps in knowledge and testable hypotheses are identified for future research. PMID:24832800

  8. Experimental study on biological mixing by micro-organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Jang, Yonghee; Byun, Doyoung; Nam, Sungwon; Park, Sungsu; Kim, Minjun

    2010-11-01

    Recently, the most challenge in a microfluidic device remains in acting on the device without external source such as syringe pump, magnetic driven force, and electrohydrodynamic force. Instead of the artificial external force, biological propelled mechanism has been paid much attention. Most of micro-organisms have shown to generate straight motion, vibration, and rolling motion. Those motions can be applied to numerous part of micro-actuator or biological robot. In this paper, we investigated the flow field induced by swimming Tetrahymena and suggest this for mixing mechanism. Using micro-particle image velocimetry system, we visualized dynamic motions by DC, AC, and AC+DC galvanotaxis. Due to the periodic signal of AC voltage, Tetrahymena swimming is easily controlled on any desired direction. AC galvanotaxis also allows it to stop at a position only by changing the applied frequency and voltage. Therefore, this galvanotactic motion control can be applied to biological micro-mixer in the microfluidic device.

  9. Cloning of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of a psychrophilic bacterium from the Alaskan Fox Permafrost Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsic, Damien; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2002-02-01

    Extreme cold environments on Earth, such as polar regions or deep ocean harbor a variety of life forms that have developed unique molecular mechanisms that allow them not only to survive, but also to proliferate under hostile conditions. Such organisms are specially relevant to astrobiology studies because they help determine the environmental limits within which life can exist. They can also have a huge potential for biotechnological applications, because of the unique properties of their macromolecules. In this study we focused on a newly isolated bacterium from the Fox Permafrost Tunnel, FTR1, that grows anaerobically at +2 degree(s)C. We describe the molecular phylogenetic analysis of this microorganism, through the cloning, sequencing and analysis of its 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Our results suggests that FTR1 is a novel species belonging to the Carnobacterium genus.

  10. Local climatic adaptation in a widespread microorganism

    PubMed Central

    Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Charron, Guillaume; Samani, Pedram; Dubé, Alexandre K.; Sylvester, Kayla; James, Brielle; Almeida, Pedro; Sampaio, José Paulo; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Bell, Graham; Landry, Christian R.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the ability of organisms to locally adapt is critical for determining the outcome of rapid climate changes, yet few studies have addressed this question in microorganisms. We investigated the role of a heterogeneous climate on adaptation of North American populations of the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus. We found abundant among-strain variation for fitness components across a range of temperatures, but this variation was only partially explained by climatic variation in the distribution area. Most of fitness variation was explained by the divergence of genetically distinct groups, distributed along a north–south cline, suggesting that these groups have adapted to distinct climatic conditions. Within-group fitness components were correlated with climatic conditions, illustrating that even ubiquitous microorganisms locally adapt and harbour standing genetic variation for climate-related traits. Our results suggest that global climatic changes could lead to adaptation to new conditions within groups, or changes in their geographical distributions. PMID:24403328

  11. Microorganisms detection on substrates using QCL spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Jiménez, Amira C.; Ortiz-Rivera, William; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Vázquez-Ayala, Iris; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    Recent investigations have focused on the improvement of rapid and accurate methods to develop spectroscopic markers of compounds constituting microorganisms that are considered biological threats. Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) systems have revolutionized many areas of research and development in defense and security applications, including his area of research. Infrared spectroscopy detection based on QCL was employed to acquire mid infrared (MIR) spectral signatures of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), Escherichia coli (Ec) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (Se), which were used as biological agent simulants of biothreats. The experiments were carried out in reflection mode on various substrates such as cardboard, glass, travel baggage, wood and stainless steel. Chemometrics statistical routines such as principal component analysis (PCA) regression and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the recorded MIR spectra. The results show that the infrared vibrational techniques investigated are useful for classification/detection of the target microorganisms on the types of substrates studied.

  12. Assessment of microorganisms from Indonesian Oil Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kadarwati, S.; Udiharto, M.; Rahman, M.; Jasjfi, E.; Legowo, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Petroleum resources have been the mainstay of the national development in Indonesia. However, resources are being depleted after over a century of exploitation, while the demand continues to grow with the rapid economic development of the country. In facing the problem, EOR has been applied in Indonesia, such as the steamflooding project in Duri field, but a more energy efficient technology would be preferable. Therefore, MEOR has been recommended as a promising solution. Our study, aimed at finding indigenous microorganisms which can be developed for application in MEOR, has isolated microbes from some oil fields of Indonesia. These microorganisms have been identified, their activities studied, and the effects of their metabolisms examined. This paper describes the research carried out by LEMIGAS in this respect, giving details on the methods of sampling, incubation, identification, and activation of the microbes as well as tests on the effects of their metabolites, with particular attention to those with potential for application in MEOR.

  13. UV inactivation of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.; Ossoff, S.F.; Lobe, D.C.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dumais, C.M.; Qualls, R.G.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-06-01

    Survival was measured as a function of the dose of germicidal UV light for the bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sonnei, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis spores, the enteric viruses poliovirus type 1 and simian rotavirus SA11, the cysts of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii, as well as for total coliforms and standard plate count microorganisms from secondary effluent. The doses of UV light necessary for a 99.9% inactivation of the cultured vegetative bacteria, total coliforms, and standard plate count microorganisms were comparable. However, the viruses, the bacterial spores, and the amoebic cysts required about 3 to 4 times, 9 times, and 15 times, respectively, the dose required for E. coli. These ratios covered a narrower relative dose range than that previously reported for chlorine disinfection of E. coli, viruses, spores, and cysts.

  14. Solubilization of Australian lignites by microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Catcheside, D.E.A.; Mallett, K.J.; Cox, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Australia has substantial lignite deposits, particularly in the Latrobe Valley in Victoria where 4.10/sup 10/ tons are accessible with available technologies. The authors have investigated the susceptibility of these coal to solubilization by microorganisms, including species additional to those already identified as active on North American lignites. The data presented here show that acid oxidized lignites from the Latrobe Valley are solubilized by each of seven species of microorganisms previously found to be active on Leonardite and oxidized North American lignites. These are the wood rot fungi: Trametes versicolor, Poria placenta and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, the lignin degrading prokaryote Streptomyces viridosporus and three fungi isolated from lignite in Mississippi: Candida ML-13, Cunninghamelia YML-1 and Penicillium waksmanii.

  15. Structural and chemical modification of Fe-rich smectite associated with microbial Fe-respiration by psychrophilic bacteria in King George Island, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, H. S.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, O. S.; Park, K.; Lee, J.; Yoon, H.; Kim, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Biotic/abiotic redox reaction is a ubiquitous process in a mineral alteration and an elemental cycling in the sediments/ocean. The role of psychrophiles in clay mineral alteration was tested in the soil for the seven sites from the coast to the inland at Barton Peninsula. Batch experiments of microbe-mineral interaction under the various temperatures (4 ℃, 15 ℃) that mimics the Antarctic condition were performed to understand the mechanism of biogeochemical alteration of clay minerals. After 12 months incubation of the bulk surface soil samples in the M1 minimal medium, the extent of Fe reduction was reached up to 49 and 42 % at 4 ℃ and 15 ℃. The increase in CEC corresponds to the extent of Fe reduction. Moreover, precipitations of secondary phase mineral such as vivianite were observed only in 12 months enrichment samples at 4 ℃ and 15 ℃. Sulfate reducing bacteria and Fe-reducing bacteria capable of reducing Fe were identified by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. The Fe reduction coupled to oxidation of organic matter might be enhanced by cooperation of a consortium of Sulfate reducing bacteria and Fe-reducing bacteria. Moreover, Nitrate reducing bacteria which have an ability to oxidize ferrous iron anaerobically with nitrate reduction were identified at 15 ℃. The lower values observed in the extent of Fe reduction at 15 ℃ may be associated with Fe-oxidation induced by nitrate reduction.In order to verify the mechanism of microbial Fe reduction in clay minerals at low temperatures (4 and 15 ℃), Fe-rich Nontronite (NAu-1) and Psychrophilic bacteria were incubated for 4 months in anaerobic condition. Total structural Fe in NAu-1 is 16.4 % and 99.6 % of the total Fe is ferric. The extent of Fe reduction in nontronite was reached up to 11.5 % and 11 % at 4 ℃ and 15 ℃, respectively. The structural modification of biologically Fe-reduced nontronite was observed in the (001) peak shift to the lower 2 theta indicating the layer collapse associated with K

  16. MICROORGANISMS DIE-OFF RATES IN URBAN STORMWATER RUNOFF 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater best management practices (BMPs) are often considered effective tools to mitigate the effects of stormwater pollutants before they are discharged to receiving waters. However, BMP performance for microorganisms removal is not well documented. Microorganisms die-off in ...

  17. ESTIMATING MICROORGANISM DENSITIES IN AEROSOLS FROM SPRAY IRRIGATION OF WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes current knowledge about estimating the density of microorganisms in the air near wastewater management facilities, with emphasis on spray irrigation sites. One technique for modeling microorganism density in air is provided and an aerosol density estimati...

  18. MICROORGANISMS DIE-OFF RATES IN URBAN STORMWATER RUNOFF 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater best management practices (BMPs) are often considered effective tools to mitigate the effects of stormwater pollutants before they are discharged to receiving waters. However, BMP performance for microorganisms removal is not well documented. Microorganisms die-off in...

  19. Investigation to identify paint coatings resistive to microorganism growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, C. W.; Kemp, H. T.

    1971-01-01

    All selected coatings contain nutrients that support microbial growth and survival. Incorporation of microbiocidal agents into coatings more susceptible to attack is recommended for improved inhibition of microorganism growth and for increased protection against deterioration of coatings by microorganisms.

  20. MODELING THE FATE OF MICROORGANISMS IN WATER, WASTEWATER, AND SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The natural environment is filled with microorganisms, most of which are natural residents and colonize various ecological niches. These microorganisms either live independently within the environment, or live in association with various host organisms. There also are places and ...

  1. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morford, Megan A.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Mccoy, LaShelle E.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Strayer, Richard F.; Caro, Janicce L.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, such as aboard the International Space Station (ISS) or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of this project was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel- through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms were optimized in the laboratory and the desired end-products, sugars and lipids, were analyzed. Trichoderma reesei, a known cellulolytic fungus, was utilized to drive the production of glucose, with the intent that the produced glucose would serve as the carbon source for milk fat production and be a substitute for the milk sugar lactose. Lipid production would be carried out by Rhodosporidium toruloides, yeast known to accumulate those lipids that are typically found in milk fat. Results showed that glucose and total lipid content were below what was expected during this phase of experimentation. In addition, individual analysis of six fatty acids revealed that the percentage of each fatty acid was lower than naturally produced bovine milk. Overall, this research indicates that microorganisms could be utilized to breakdown inedible solid waste to produce useable products.

  2. Mass Spectrometer for Airborne Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria and other micro-organisms identified continously with aid of new technique for producing samples for mass spectrometer. Technique generates aerosol of organisms and feeds to spectrometer. Given species of organism produces characteristic set of peaks in mass spectrum and thereby identified. Technique useful for monitoring bacterial makeup in environmental studies and in places where cleanliness is essential, such as hospital operating rooms, breweries, and pharmaceutical plants.

  3. Consolidated bioprocessing method using thermophilic microorganisms

    DOEpatents

    Mielenz, Jonathan Richard

    2016-02-02

    The present invention is directed to a method of converting biomass to biofuel, and particularly to a consolidated bioprocessing method using a co-culture of thermophilic and extremely thermophilic microorganisms which collectively can ferment the hexose and pentose sugars produced by degradation of cellulose and hemicelluloses at high substrate conversion rates. A culture medium therefor is also provided as well as use of the methods to produce and recover cellulosic ethanol.

  4. Pressure inactivation of microorganisms at moderate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, P.; Ludwig, H.

    1986-05-01

    The inactivation of bacteria, bacterial spores, yeasts and molds by high hydrostatic pressure was investigated over a pressure range up to 3000 bar. Survival curves were measured as a function of temperature and pressure applied on the microorganisms. Conditions are looked for under which heat or radiation sensitive pharmaceutical preparations can be sterilized by high pressure treatment at moderate temperatures. All organisms tested can be inactivated in the range of 2000-2500 bar and between 40-60 degrees.

  5. Prokaryotic silicon utilizing microorganisms in the biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    Although a little study has been done to determine the silicon utilizing prokaryotes, our previous experiments indicated that almost all Gram-positive bacteria are silicon utilizing; one of them, Streptococci survived exposure on the lunar surface for a long period in experiment done by others. Our initial experiments with these Gram positive microorganisms showed that there were limited growths of these microorganisms on carbon free silicate medium probably with the help of some carry over carbon and nitrogen during cultivation procedures. However, increase in growth rate after repeated subcultures could not be explained at present. The main groups of prokaryotes which were found silicon utilizing microorganisms were Mycobacterium, Bacillus, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, and Clostridium. In a another previous study by us when silicon level was studied in such grown up cells on carbon "free" silicate medium by electron prove microanalyser, it was found that silicon in cells grown on carbon "free" silicate medium was much higher (24.9%) than those grown on conventional carbon based medium (0.84%). However, these initial findings are encouraging for our future application of this group of organisms on extraterrestrial surfaces for artificial micro-ecosystem formation. It was found that when electropositive elements are less in extraterrestrial situation, then polymerization of silicon-oxygen profusion may occur easily, particularly in carbon and nitrogen paucity in the rocky worlds of the Universe.

  6. Complete nitrification by a single microorganism.

    PubMed

    van Kessel, Maartje A H J; Speth, Daan R; Albertsen, Mads; Nielsen, Per H; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Kartal, Boran; Jetten, Mike S M; Lücker, Sebastian

    2015-12-24

    Nitrification is a two-step process where ammonia is first oxidized to nitrite by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and/or archaea, and subsequently to nitrate by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. Already described by Winogradsky in 1890, this division of labour between the two functional groups is a generally accepted characteristic of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Complete oxidation of ammonia to nitrate in one organism (complete ammonia oxidation; comammox) is energetically feasible, and it was postulated that this process could occur under conditions selecting for species with lower growth rates but higher growth yields than canonical ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. Still, organisms catalysing this process have not yet been discovered. Here we report the enrichment and initial characterization of two Nitrospira species that encode all the enzymes necessary for ammonia oxidation via nitrite to nitrate in their genomes, and indeed completely oxidize ammonium to nitrate to conserve energy. Their ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) enzymes are phylogenetically distinct from currently identified AMOs, rendering recent acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from known ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms unlikely. We also found highly similar amoA sequences (encoding the AMO subunit A) in public sequence databases, which were apparently misclassified as methane monooxygenases. This recognition of a novel amoA sequence group will lead to an improved understanding of the environmental abundance and distribution of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. Furthermore, the discovery of the long-sought-after comammox process will change our perception of the nitrogen cycle. PMID:26610025

  7. Genomics, metagenomics and proteomics in biomining microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Lissette; Chi, An; Beard, Simon; Orell, Alvaro; Guiliani, Nicolas; Shabanowitz, Jeff; Hunt, Donald F; Jerez, Carlos A

    2006-01-01

    The use of acidophilic, chemolithotrophic microorganisms capable of oxidizing iron and sulfur in industrial processes to recover metals from minerals containing copper, gold and uranium is a well established biotechnology with distinctive advantages over traditional mining. A consortium of different microorganisms participates in the oxidative reactions resulting in the extraction of dissolved metal values from ores. Considerable effort has been spent in the last years to understand the biochemistry of iron and sulfur compounds oxidation, bacteria-mineral interactions (chemotaxis, quorum sensing, adhesion, biofilm formation) and several adaptive responses allowing the microorganisms to survive in a bioleaching environment. All of these are considered key phenomena for understanding the process of biomining. The use of genomics, metagenomics and high throughput proteomics to study the global regulatory responses that the biomining community uses to adapt to their changing environment is just beginning to emerge in the last years. These powerful approaches are reviewed here since they offer the possibility of exciting new findings that will allow analyzing the community as a microbial system, determining the extent to which each of the individual participants contributes to the process, how they evolve in time to keep the conglomerate healthy and therefore efficient during the entire process of bioleaching. PMID:16288845

  8. Biomining: metal recovery from ores with microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Axel; Hedrich, Sabrina; Vasters, Jürgen; Drobe, Malte; Sand, Wolfgang; Willscher, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Biomining is an increasingly applied biotechnological procedure for processing of ores in the mining industry (biohydrometallurgy). Nowadays the production of copper from low-grade ores is the most important industrial application and a significant part of world copper production already originates from heap or dump/stockpile bioleaching. Conceptual differences exist between the industrial processes of bioleaching and biooxidation. Bioleaching is a conversion of an insoluble valuable metal into a soluble form by means of microorganisms. In biooxidation, on the other hand, gold is predominantly unlocked from refractory ores in large-scale stirred-tank biooxidation arrangements for further processing steps. In addition to copper and gold production, biomining is also used to produce cobalt, nickel, zinc, and uranium. Up to now, biomining has merely been used as a procedure in the processing of sulfide ores and uranium ore, but laboratory and pilot procedures already exist for the processing of silicate and oxide ores (e.g., laterites), for leaching of processing residues or mine waste dumps (mine tailings), as well as for the extraction of metals from industrial residues and waste (recycling). This chapter estimates the world production of copper, gold, and other metals by means of biomining and chemical leaching (bio-/hydrometallurgy) compared with metal production by pyrometallurgical procedures, and describes new developments in biomining. In addition, an overview is given about metal sulfide oxidizing microorganisms, fundamentals of biomining including bioleaching mechanisms and interface processes, as well as anaerobic bioleaching and bioleaching with heterotrophic microorganisms. PMID:23793914

  9. Stress-tolerant P-solubilizing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, N; Eichler-Löbermann, B; Vassileva, M

    2012-08-01

    Drought, high/low temperature, and salinity are abiotic stress factors accepted as the main reason for crop yield losses in a world with growing population and food price increases. Additional problems create nutrient limitations and particularly low P soil status. The problem of phosphate fertilizers, P plant nutrition, and existing phosphate bearing resources can also be related to the scarcity of rock phosphate. The modern agricultural systems are highly dependent on the existing fertilizer industry based exclusively of this natural, finite, non-renewable resource. Biotechnology offers a number of sustainable solutions that can mitigate these problems by using plant beneficial, including P-solubilizing, microorganisms. This short review paper summarizes the current and future trends in isolation, development, and application of P-solubilizing microorganisms in stress environmental conditions bearing also in mind the imbalanced cycling and unsustainable management of P. Special attention is devoted to the efforts on development of biotechnological strategies for formulation of P-solubilizing microorganisms in order to increase their protection against adverse abiotic factors. PMID:22722910

  10. Protein Languages Differ Depending on Microorganism Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Grzymski, Joseph J.; Marsh, Adam G.

    2014-01-01

    Few quantitative measures of genome architecture or organization exist to support assumptions of differences between microorganisms that are broadly defined as being free-living or pathogenic. General principles about complete proteomes exist for codon usage, amino acid biases and essential or core genes. Genome-wide shifts in amino acid usage between free-living and pathogenic microorganisms result in fundamental differences in the complexity of their respective proteomes that are size and gene content independent. These differences are evident across broad phylogenetic groups–a result of environmental factors and population genetic forces rather than phylogenetic distance. A novel comparative analysis of amino acid usage–utilizing linguistic analyses of word frequency in language and text–identified a global pattern of higher peptide word repetition in 376 free-living versus 421 pathogen genomes across broad ranges of genome size, G+C content and phylogenetic ancestry. This imprint of repetitive word usage indicates free-living microorganisms have a bias for repetitive sequence usage compared to pathogens. These findings quantify fundamental differences in microbial genomes relative to life-history function. PMID:24828817

  11. 40 CFR 725.88 - Uses of a microorganism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uses of a microorganism. 725.88... CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Confidentiality and Public Access to Information § 725.88 Uses of a microorganism. (a) Assertion of claim. A person who...

  12. 40 CFR 725.88 - Uses of a microorganism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Uses of a microorganism. 725.88... CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Confidentiality and Public Access to Information § 725.88 Uses of a microorganism. (a) Assertion of claim. A person who...

  13. Cow, sheep and llama manure at psychrophilic anaerobic co-digestion with low cost tubular digesters in cold climate and high altitude.

    PubMed

    Martí-Herrero, J; Alvarez, R; Cespedes, R; Rojas, M R; Conde, V; Aliaga, L; Balboa, M; Danov, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the co-digestion of cow and llama manure combined with sheep manure, in psychrophilic conditions and real field low cost tubular digesters adapted to cold climate. Four digesters were monitored in cold climate conditions; one fed with cow manure, a second one with llama manure, the third one with co-digestion of cow-sheep manure and the fourth one was fed with llama-sheep manure. The slurry had a mean temperature of 16.6 °C, the organic load rate was 0.44 kgvs m(-3) d(-1) and the hydraulic retention time was 80 days. After one hundred days biogas production was stable, as was the methane content and the pH of the effluent. The co-digestion of cow-sheep manure results in a biogas production increase of 100% compared to the mono-digestion of cow manure, while co-digestion of llama-sheep manure results in a decrease of 50% in biogas production with respect to mono-digestion of llama manure. PMID:25656868

  14. Point Mutation Ile137-Met Near Surface Conferred Psychrophilic Behaviour and Improved Catalytic Efficiency to Bacillus Lipase of 1.4 Subfamily.

    PubMed

    Goomber, Shelly; Kumar, Arbind; Singh, Ranvir; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2016-02-01

    Bacillus lipolytic enzymes of subfamily 1.4 are industrially attractive because of its alkaline optimum pH and broad substrate specificity. The activity and stability of these enzymes for a limited temperature range (30-50 °C) need attention for its industrial application. In the present study, Bacillus subtilis LipJ was rationally designed for low-temperature adaptation. Small amino acids with lower volume and without side chain branches have high occurrence among psychrophilic proteins. Met residue is reported to be preferred for cold adaptation as it is thermolabile in nature and undergoes oxidation at high temperature. Therefore, the Ile137 residue, three residues downstream the catalytic residue Asp133, was substituted by Met. Biochemical study demonstrated that variant Ile137Met was optimally active at 20 °C whereas parent enzyme was most active at 37 °C. The variant retained 70-80 % relative activity at 10 °C where parent enzyme demonstrated low activity. Ile137Met was observed to be unstable at and above 30 °C. Kinetic study demonstrated increased K m and k cat values for variant referring improved catalytic efficiency but poor substrate affinity. Homolog modelling predicted lowered number of weak interactions by substituted Met137 as molecular basis of increased flexibility of variant. Hence, increased structure flexibility might be responsible for poor substrate affinity but increased molecular motion for higher catalysis at cold. PMID:26520838

  15. Transcriptome-wide analysis of DEAD-box RNA helicase gene family in an Antarctic psychrophilic alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenlin; Huang, Xiaohang

    2015-09-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicase family proteins have been identified in almost all living organisms. Some of them play a crucial role in adaptation to environmental changes and stress response, especially in the low-temperature acclimation in different kinds of organisms. Compared with the full swing study in plants and bacteria, the characters and functions of DEAD-box family proteins had not been surveyed in algae. To identify genes critical for freezing acclimation in algae, we screened DEAD-box RNA helicase genes from the transcriptome sequences of a psychrophilic microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L which was isolated from Antarctic sea ice. Totally 39 DEAD-box RNA helicase genes had been identified. Most of the DEAD-box RNA helicase have 1:1 homologous relationships in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L with several exceptions. The homologous proteins in ICE-L to the helicases critical for cold or freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana had been identified based on phylogenetic comparison studies. The response of these helicase genes is not always identical in the Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L and Arabidopsis under the same low-temperature treatment. The expression of several DEAD-box RNA helicase genes including CiRH5, CiRH25, CiRH28, and CiRH55 were significantly up-regulated under freezing treatment of ICE-L and their function in freezing acclimation of ICE-L deserved further investigation. PMID:26174530

  16. Nucleoside 2'-deoxyribosyltransferase from psychrophilic bacterium Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus--preparation of an immobilized biocatalyst for the enzymatic synthesis of therapeutic nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Fresco-Taboada, Alba; Serra, Immacolata; Fernández-Lucas, Jesús; Acebal, Carmen; Arroyo, Miguel; Terreni, Marco; de la Mata, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoside 2'-deoxyribosyltransferase (NDT) from the psychrophilic bacterium Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus CECT 4074 has been cloned and produced for the first time. A preliminary characterization of the recombinant protein indicates that the enzyme is an NDT type II since it catalyzes the transfer of 2'-deoxyribose between purines and pyrimidines. The enzyme (BpNDT) displays a high activity and stability in a broad range of pH and temperature. In addition, different approaches for the immobilization of BpNDT onto several supports have been studied in order to prepare a suitable biocatalyst for the one-step industrial enzymatic synthesis of different therapeutic nucleosides. Best results were obtained by adsorbing the enzyme on PEI-functionalized agarose and subsequent cross-linking with aldehyde-dextran (20 kDa and 70% oxidation degree). The immobilized enzyme could be recycled for at least 30 consecutive cycles in the synthesis of 2'-deoxyadenosine from 2'-deoxyuridine and adenine at 37 °C and pH 8.0, with a 25% loss of activity. High conversion yield of trifluridine (64.4%) was achieved in 2 h when 20 mM of 2'-deoxyuridine and 10 mM 5-trifluorothymine were employed in the transglycosylation reaction catalyzed by immobilized BpNDT at 37 °C and pH 7.5. PMID:25090115

  17. Sequence and structural investigation of a novel psychrophilic α-amylase from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 for cold-adaptation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Aizi Nor Mazila; Azhar, Mohd Akmal; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Rabu, Amir; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Illias, Rosli Md

    2013-08-01

    A novel α-amylase was isolated successfully from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 using DNA walking and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods. The structure of this psychrophilic α-amylase (AmyPI12) from G. antarctica PI12 has yet to be studied in detail. A 3D model of AmyPI12 was built using a homology modelling approach to search for a suitable template and to generate an optimum target-template alignment, followed by model building using MODELLER9.9. Analysis of the AmyPI12 model revealed the presence of binding sites for a conserved calcium ion (CaI), non-conserved calcium ions (CaII and CaIII) and a sodium ion (Na). Compared with its template-the thermostable α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BSTA)-the binding of CaII, CaIII and Na ions in AmyPI12 was observed to be looser, which suggests that the low stability of AmyPI12 allows the protein to work at different temperature scales. The AmyPI12 amino acid sequence and model were compared with thermophilic α-amylases from Bacillus species that provided the highest structural similarities with AmyPI12. These comparative studies will enable identification of possible determinants of cold adaptation. PMID:23686283

  18. Purification, characterization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a cold-active lipase (CpsLip) from the psychrophilic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H.

    PubMed

    Do, Hackwon; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Kwon, Mi Hyun; Song, Hye Eun; An, Jun Yop; Eom, Soo Hyun; Lee, Sung Gu; Kim, Hak Jun

    2013-08-01

    The putative lipase CpsLip from the psychrophilic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H encodes a 34,538 Da, 308-amino-acid protein. In this study, CpsLip (UniProtKB code Q486T5) was expressed as an N-terminal hexahistidine fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. The expression and purification of CpsLip enabled characterization of the lipase enzymatic properties of the protein. The optimal activity temperature and pH of the recombinant protein were 298 K and pH 7, respectively. CpsLip maintained over 80% activity in the low-temperature range (278-288 K), thereby suggesting that CpsLip is a cold-active lipase. Substrate-specificity analysis demonstrated that CpsLip exhibits maximum activity towards the C12 acyl group. In addition, sequence-alignment results revealed that CpsLip has a highly conserved catalytic triad in the active site consisting of residues Ser111, Asp135 and His283. Moreover, purified CpsLip was successfully crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and a complete diffraction data set was collected to 4.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation on the BL-5A beamline of the Photon Factory. PMID:23908044

  19. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K

    2016-10-01

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials. PMID:27573579

  20. Extremophilic microorganisms as candidates for extraterrestrial life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seckbach, Joseph; Oren, Aharon

    2000-12-01

    Microbial life is found all over the globe. Diverse communities are even found in such places in which extreme conditions with respect of temperature, salinity, pH, and pressure prevail. Many of these environments were until recently considered too harsh to harbor microbial life. The micro-organisms adapted to an existence at the edge of life are termed extremophiles. They include members of the Prokaryotes (domains Archaea and Bacteria) and the Eukarya, including algae and protozoa. Extremophilic microbes thrive at low and high temperatures -- from subzero levels to above the boiling point of water, at both sides of the pH scale -- in acidic as well as in alkaline media, in hypersaline environments with salt concentrations of up to saturation, at high pressure, both in the deep sea and in the terrestrial deep subsurface where they are exposed to pressures of hundreds of atmospheres, and in other extreme conditions. In many cases they tolerate combinations of more than one environmental stress factor. Some of the extremophiles may be considered as 'living fossils' since their environment resembles the conditions that may have existed during the time life arose on Earth, more than 3.5 billion years ago. In view of these properties the extremophilic micro-organisms may be considered as model organisms when exploring the possibilities of the existence of extraterrestrial life. For example, the microbes discovered in ice cores recovered from the depth of the Lake Vostok in Antarctica may serve as a model simulating conditions prevailing in the permafrost subsurface of Mars or Jupiter's moon Europa. Microbial life in the Dead Sea or in Great Salt Lake may resemble halophilic life forms that may exist elsewhere in the universe, adapted to life at low water activities. Likewise, hyperthermophilic micro-organisms present on Earth in hot springs, hydrothermal vents and other sites heated by volcanic activity in terrestrial or marine areas, may resemble life forms that may

  1. Complete nitrification by a single microorganism

    PubMed Central

    van Kessel, Maartje A.H.J.; Speth, Daan R.; Albertsen, Mads; Nielsen, Per H.; Op den Camp, Huub J.M.; Kartal, Boran; Jetten, Mike S.M.; Lücker, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nitrification is a two-step process where ammonia is considered to first be oxidized to nitrite by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and/or archaea (AOA), and subsequently to nitrate by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Described by Winogradsky already in 18901, this division of labour between the two functional groups is a generally accepted characteristic of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle2. Complete oxidation of ammonia to nitrate in one organism (complete ammonia oxidation; comammox) is energetically feasible and it was postulated that this process could occur under conditions selecting for species with lower growth-rates but higher growth-yields than canonical ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms3. Still, organisms catalysing this process have not yet been discovered. Here, we report the enrichment and initial characterization of two Nitrospira species that encode all enzymes necessary for ammonia oxidation via nitrite to nitrate in their genomes, and indeed completely oxidize ammonium to nitrate to conserve energy. Their ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) enzymes are phylogenetically distinct from currently identified AMOs, rendering recent acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from known ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms unlikely. We also found highly similar amoA sequences (encoding the AMO subunit A) in public sequence databases, which were apparently misclassified as methane monooxygenases. This recognition of a novel amoA sequence group will lead to an improved understanding on the environmental abundance and distribution of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. Furthermore, the discovery of the long-sought-after comammox process will change our perception of the nitrogen cycle. PMID:26610025

  2. Biofilms: Survival Mechanisms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, Rodney M.; Costerton, J. William

    2002-01-01

    Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes

  3. Screening of biosurfactants from cloud microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancelme, Martine; Canet, Isabelle; Traikia, Mounir; Uhliarikova, Yveta; Capek, Peter; Matulova, Maria; Delort, Anne-Marie; Amato, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The formation of cloud droplets from aerosol particles in the atmosphere is still not well understood and a main source of uncertainties in the climate budget today. One of the principal parameters in these processes is the surface tension of atmospheric particles, which can be strongly affected by trace compounds called surfactants. Within a project devoted to bring information on atmospheric surfactants and their effects on cloud droplet formation, we focused on surfactants produced by microorganisms present in atmospheric waters. From our unique collection of microorganisms, isolated from cloud water collected at the Puy-de-Dôme (France),1 we undertook a screening of this bank for biosurfactant producers. After extraction of the supernatants of the pure cultures, surface tension of crude extracts was determined by the hanging drop technique. Results showed that a wide variety of microorganisms are able to produce biosurfactants, some of them exhibiting strong surfactant properties as the resulting tension surface decreases to values less then 35 mN.m-1. Preliminary analytical characterization of biosurfactants, obtained after isolation from overproducing cultures of Rhodococcus sp. and Pseudomonas sp., allowed us to identify them as belonging to two main classes, namely glycolipids and glycopeptides. 1. Vaïtilingom, M.; Attard, E.; Gaiani, N.; Sancelme, M.; Deguillaume, L.; Flossmann, A. I.; Amato, P.; Delort, A. M. Long-term features of cloud microbiology at the puy de Dôme (France). Atmos. Environ. 2012, 56, 88-100. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by the French-USA ANR SONATA program and the French-Slovakia programs Stefanik and CNRS exchange.

  4. Quartz crystal microbalance biosensor for rapid detection of aerosolized microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farka, Zdenĕk.; Kovár, David; Skládal, Petr

    2015-05-01

    Biological warfare agents (BWAs) represent the current menace of the asymmetric war. The early detection of BWAs, especially in the form of bioaerosol, is a challenging task for governments all around the world. Label-free quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) immunosensor and electrochemical immunosensor were developed and tested for rapid detection of BWA surrogate (E. coli) in the form of bioaerosol. Two immobilization strategies for the attachment of antibody were tested; the gold sensor surface was activated by cysteamine and then antibody was covalently linked either using glutaraldehyde, or the reduced antibodies were attached via Sulfo-SMCC. A portable bioaerosol chamber was constructed and used for safe manipulation with aerosolized microorganisms. The dissemination was done using a piezoelectric humidifier, distribution of bioaerosol inside the chamber was ensured using three 12-cm fans. The whole system was controlled remotely using LAN network. The disseminated microbial cells were collected and preconcentrated using the wetted-wall cyclone SASS 2300, the analysis was done using the on-line linked immunosensors. The QCM immunosensor had limit of detection 1×104 CFU·L-1 of air with analysis time 16 min, the whole experiment including dissemination and sensor surface regeneration took 40 min. In case of blank (disseminated sterile buffer), no signal change was observed. The electrochemical immunosensor was able to detect 150 CFU·L-1 of air in 20 min; also in this case, no interferences were observed. Reference measurements were done using particle counter Met One 3400 and by cultivation method on agar plates. The sensors have proved to be applicable for rapid screening of microorganisms in air.

  5. Nature's Helpers: Using Microorganisms to Remove Trichloroethene (TCE) from Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. G.; Krajmlanik-Brown, R.; Fajardo-Williams, D.; Halloum, I.

    2015-12-01

    Organic chlorinated solvents, such as perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), are toxic pollutants threatening ground water quality worldwide and present at many superfund sites. Bioremediation using microorganisms is a promising, green, efficient, and sustainable approach to remove PCE and TCE contamination from soil and groundwater. Under anaerobic conditions, specialized microorganisms (dechlorinators) can reduce these chlorinated ethenes to ethene, an innocuous product, and gain energy for growth by a process known as reductive dechlorination. Dechlorinators are most often present in the environment and in dechlorinating cultures alongside other microbes such as fermenters, methanogens, and acetogens. Fermenters, methanogens, and acetogens syntrophically provide essential nutrients and growth factors to dechlorinators, most specifically to the only members able to reduce TCE all the way to ethene: Dehalococcoides; unfortunately, they also compete with dechlorinators for electron donors. My laboratory devises reductive chlorination platforms to study competition and syntrophy among Dehalococcoides, and other microbes to optimize remediation reactions and transport in the subsurface. We look at competing processes present as part of the natural soil chemistry and microbiology and address these challenges through a combination of enrichment techniques, molecular microbial ecology (deep sequencing), water chemistry, and electron balances. We have applied knowledge gathered in my laboratory to: 1) enrich microbial dechlorinating cultures capable of some of the fastest rates of TCE to ethene dechlorination ever reported, and 2) successfully design and operate three different continuous dechlorinating reactor types. We attribute our successful reactor operations to our multidisciplinary approach which links microbiology and engineering. Our reactors produce robust dechlorinating cultures used for in-situ bioaugmentation of PCE and TCE at contaminated sites

  6. Engineering photosynthesis in plants and synthetic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Maurino, Veronica G; Weber, Andreas P M

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria, algae, and plants, sustain life on earth by converting light energy, water, and CO(2) into chemical energy. However, due to global change and a growing human population, arable land is becoming scarce and resources, including water and fertilizers, are becoming exhausted. It will therefore be crucial to design innovative strategies for sustainable plant production to maintain the food and energy bases of human civilization. Several different strategies for engineering improved photosynthesis in crop plants and introducing novel photosynthetic capacity into microorganisms have been reviewed. PMID:23028016

  7. Lead resistance in micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Jarosławiecka, Anna; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is an element present in the environment that negatively affects all living organisms. To diminish its high toxicity, micro-organisms have developed several mechanisms that allow them to survive exposure to Pb(II). The main mechanisms of lead resistance involve adsorption by extracellular polysaccharides, cell exclusion, sequestration as insoluble phosphates, and ion efflux to the cell exterior. This review describes the various lead resistance mechanisms, and the regulation of their expression by lead binding regulatory proteins. Special attention is given to the Pbr system from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34, which involves a unique mechanism combining efflux and lead precipitation. PMID:24124204

  8. Microorganisms in human milk: lights and shadows.

    PubMed

    Civardi, Elisa; Garofoli, Francesca; Tzialla, Chryssoula; Paolillo, Piermichele; Bollani, Lina; Stronati, Mauro

    2013-10-01

    Human milk has been traditionally considered germ free, however, recent studies have shown that it represents a continuous supply of commensal and potentially probiotic bacteria to the infant gut. Mammary microbioma may exercise anti-infective, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and metabolic properties. Moreover human milk may be a source of pathogenic microorganism during maternal infection, if contaminated during expression or in case of vaccination of the mother. The non-sterility of breast milk can, thus, be seen as a protective factor, or rarely, as a risk factor for the newborn. PMID:24059550

  9. Temperature response of Antarctic cryptoendolithic photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocampo-Friedmann, R.; Meyer, M. A.; Chen, M.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Growth responses to temperatures between 12.5 [degrees] C and 25 degrees C were determined for five photosynthetic microorganisms isolated from the Ross Desert cryptoendolithic community. Among eukaryotic algae, two strains of Trebouxia sp. have an upper temperature limit of 20 degrees C, and two strains of Hemichloris antarctica of 25 degrees C. The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp., in contrast, grows at temperatures above 25 degrees C. These and earlier studies suggest that the eukaryotic algae of the Antarctic cryptoendolithic community have an upper temperature limit near 25 degrees C.

  10. Microorganisms and biomolecules in space hard environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horneck, G.

    1981-01-01

    Microorganisms and biomolecules exposed to space vacuum and to different intensities of selected wavelengths of solar ultraviolet radiation is studied. The influence of these factors, applied singly or simultaneously, on the integrity of microbial systems and biomolecules is measured. Specifically, this experiment will study in Bacillus subtilis spores (1) disturbances in subsequent germination, outgrowth, and colony formation; (2) photochemical reactions of the DNA and protein in vivo and in vitro and their role in biological injury; and (3) the efficiency of repair processes in these events.

  11. Resistance of soil microorganisms to starvation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M.; Alexander, M.

    1972-01-01

    Most groups of soil microorganisms died when exposed to prolonged starvation in a carbon-free solution, but the relative abundance of Bacillus and actinomycetes increased with time. Certain nonspore-forming bacteria also persisted. The ability of individual soil isolates to endure starvation in solution was not correlated with their glycogen content or rate of endogenous respiration. However, cells of the resistant populations were rich in poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, whereas the starvation-susceptible bacteria generally contained little of this substance. Poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate was used rapidly in cells deprived of exogenous sources of carbon.

  12. Nonenzymatic microorganism identification based on ribosomal RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Jeffrey T.; Pierini, Alicia M.; Stokes, Jeffrey A.; Wahlund, Thomas M.; Read, Betsy; Bechtel, James H.; Bronk, Burt V.

    1999-11-01

    Effective defense against biological warfare (BW) agents requires rapid, fieldable and accurate systems. For micro- organisms like bacteria and viruses, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a valuable target with multiple advantages of species specificity and intrinsic target amplification. Vegetative and spore forms of bacteria contain approximately 104 copies of rRNA. Direct detection of rRNA copies can eliminate some of the interference and preparation difficulties involved in enzymatic amplification methods. In order to apply the advantages of rRNA to BW defense, we are developing a fieldable system based on 16S rRNA, physical disruption of the micro-organism, solid phase hybridization, and fluorescence detection. Our goals include species-specific identification, complete operation from raw sample to identification in 15 minutes or less, and compact, fieldable instrumentation. Initial work on this project has investigated the lysis and hybridization steps, the species-specificity of oligonucleotides probes, and the development of a novel electromagnetic method to physically disrupt the micro- organisms. Target bacteria have been Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Continuing work includes further development of methods to rapidly disrupt the micro-organisms and release the rRNA, improved integration and processing, and extension to bacterial and mammalian viruses like MS2 and vesicular stomatitis virus.

  13. Industrial and environmental applications of halophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2010-01-01

    In comparison with the thermophilic and the alkaliphilic extremophiles, halophilic microorganisms have as yet found relatively few biotechnological applications. Halophiles are involved in centuries-old processes such as the manufacturing of solar salt from seawater and the production of traditional fermented foods. Two biotechnological processes involving halophiles are highly successful: the production of beta-carotene by the green alga Dunaliella and the production of ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid), used as a stabilizer for enzymes and now also applied in cosmetic products, from moderately halophilic bacteria. The potential use of bacteriorhodopsin, the retinal protein proton pump of Halobacterium, in optoelectronic devices and photochemical processes is being explored, and may well lead to commercial applications in the near future. Demand for salt-tolerant enzymes in current manufacturing or related processes is limited. Other possible uses of halophilic microorganisms such as treatment of saline and hypersaline wastewaters, and the production of exopolysaccharides, poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoate bioplastics and biofuel are being investigated, but no large-scale applications have yet been reported. PMID:20662374

  14. Medical Significance of Microorganisms in Spacecraft Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark

    2007-01-01

    Microorganisms can spoil food supplies, contaminate drinking water, release noxious volatile compounds, initiate allergic responses, contaminate the environment, and cause infectious diseases. International acceptability limits have been established for bacterial and fungal contaminants in air and on surfaces, and environmental monitoring is conducted to ensure compliance. Allowable levels of microorganism in water and food have also been established. Environmental monitoring of the space shuttle, the Mir, and the ISS have allowed for some general conclusions. Generally, the bacteria found in air and on interior surfaces are largely of human origin such as Staphylococcus spp., Micrococcus spp. Common environmental genera such as Bacillus spp. are the most commonly isolated bacteria from all spacecraft. Yeast species associated with humans such as Candida spp. are commonly found. Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., and Cladosporium spp. are the most commonly isolated filamentous fungi. Microbial levels in the environment differ significantly depending upon humidity levels, condensate accumulation, and availability of carbon sources. However, human "normal flora" of bacteria and fungi can result in serious, life-threatening diseases if human immunity is compromised. Disease incidence is expected to increase as mission duration increases.

  15. Diversity of Thermophilic Microorganisms within Hawaiian Fumaroles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, C. A.; Anderson, S.; Anderson, C.

    2007-12-01

    Fumaroles provide heat and moisture characteristic of an environment suitable for thermophilic microorganisms. On the Island of Hawaii, fumaroles are scattered across the southeastern portion of the island as a result of the volcanic activity from Kilauea Crater and Pu'u' O'o vent. We used metagenomics to detect 16S rDNA from archaeal and bacterial thermophilic microorganisms indicating their presence in Hawaiian fumaroles. The fumaroles sampled exist along elevation and precipitation gradients; varying from sea level to 4,012ft and annual rainfall from less than 20in to greater than 80in. To determine the effects of environmental gradients (including temperature, pH, elevation, and precipitation) on microbial diversity within and among fumaroles, we obtained 22 samples from 7 fumaroles over a three-day period in February of 2007. Temperature variations within individual fumaroles vary from 2.3oC to 35oC and the pH variances that range from 0.4 to 2.0. Temperatures of the different fumaroles range from 29.9oC to greater than 105oC, with pH values that vary from 2.55 to 6.93. Further data on the microbial diversity within fumaroles and among fumaroles will be determined once the sequencing of the microbial 16S rDNA regions is completed. We are currently assembling and sequencing clone libraries of bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA fragments from fumaroles.

  16. DIALYSIS FLASK FOR CONCENTRATED CULTURE OF MICROORGANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Philipp; Gallup, D. M.

    1963-01-01

    Gerhardt, Philipp (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), and D. M. Gallup. Dialysis flask for concentrated culture of microorganisms. J. Bacteriol 86:919–929. 1963.—A twin-chambered dialysis flask was designed with a supported membrane clamped between a reservoir of medium in the bottom and a small volume of culture above, the unit being mounted on a shaking machine to provide aeration and agitation. The performance of different dialysis membranes and membrane filters was compared in glucose-diffusion and bacterial-culture tests. Some of the variables in dialysis culture were assessed and the growth response was characterized, with Serratia marcescens as the test organism. The general usefulness and concentrating effect of dialysis culture were demonstrated in trials with 16 representative types of microorganisms. Dialysis culture was shown to be especially suitable for producing dense populations of cells or their macromolecular products in an environment free from complex medium constituents, for removing toxic products that limit growth or fermentation, and for supplying oxygen by diffusion without the damage from usual aeration procedures. Images PMID:14080802

  17. Bioremediation of trinitrotolulene by a ruminal microorganism

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taejin; Williamson, K.J.; Craig, A.M.

    1995-10-01

    2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been widely used for the production of explosives because of its low boiling point, high stability, low impact sensitivity, and safe manufacture. More than 1,100 military facilities, each potentially contaminated with munitions waste, are expected to require treatment of more than one million cubic yards of contaminated soils. The cost associated with remediation of these sites has been estimated to be in excess of $1.5 billion. Recently, researchers have studied ruminal microorganisms in relation to their ability to degrade xenobiotic compounds. Many of these organisms are strict anaerobes with optimal redox potentials as low as -420 mV. Ruminal organisms have been shown capable of destroying some pesticides, such as parathion, p-nitrophenol, and biphenyl-type compounds; thiono isomers, and nitrogen-containing heterocyclic plant toxins such as the pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Many of these compounds have structures similar to TNT. A TNT-degrading ruminal microorganism has been isolated from goat rumen fluid with successive enrichments on triaminotoluene (TAT) and TNT. The isolate, designated G.8, utilizes nitrate and lactate as the primary energy source. G.8 was able to tolerate and metabolite levels of TNT up to the saturation point of 125 mg/l.

  18. Sterilization of Microorganisms by Ozone and Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnyj, V. V.; Klosovskij, A. V.; Panasko, T. A.; Shvets, O. M.; Semenova, O. T.; Taran, V. S.; Tereshin, V. I.

    2008-03-01

    The results of recent experimental methods of sterilization of microorganisms with the use of ozone and ultrasound are presented. The main aim was to optimize the process of sterilization in water solution taking into account the ozone concentration, the power of ultrasonic emitter and the temperature of water. In the present work, the ultrasonic cavitation with simultaneous ozone generation has been used. The high ozone concentration in water solution was achieved by two-barrier glow discharge generated at atmospheric pressure and a cooling thermo-electric module. Such a sterilizer consists of ozone generator in a shape of flat electrodes covered with dielectric material and a high-voltage pulsed power supply of 250 W. The sterilization camera was equipped with ultrasonic source operated at 100 W. The experiments on the inactivation of bacteria of the Bacillus Cereus type were carried out in the distilled water saturated by ozone. The ozone concentration in the aqueous solution was 10 mg/1, whereas the ozone concentration at the output of ozone generator was 30 mg/1. The complete inactivation of spores took 15 min. Selection of the temperature of water, the ozone concentrations and ultrasonic power allowed to determine the time necessary for destroying the row of microorganisms.

  19. Microorganisms capable of metabolizing the herbicide metolachlor.

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, A; Zhang, R W; Bollag, J M

    1987-01-01

    We screened several strains of microorganisms and microbial populations for their ability to mineralize or transform the herbicide metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)-acetami de] because such cultures would potentially be useful in the cleanup of contaminated sites. Although we used various inocula and enrichment culture techniques, we were not able to isolate microorganisms that could mineralize metolachlor. However, strains of Bacillus circulans, Bacillus megaterium, Fusarium sp., Mucor racemosus, and an actinomycete were found to transform metolachlor. Several metabolites could be determined with high-performance liquid chromatography. The tolerance of the strains to high concentrations of metolachlor was also evaluated for the usefulness of the strains for decontamination. Tolerance of the actinomycete to metolachlor concentrations over 200 ppm (200 micrograms/ml) was low and could not be increased by doubling the sucrose concentration in the growth medium or by using a large biomass as inoculum. However, a Fusarium sp. could grow and transform metolachlor up to a concentration of 300 ppm. PMID:3105457

  20. Microorganisms Resistant to Free-Living Amoebae

    PubMed Central

    Greub, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Free-living amoebae feed on bacteria, fungi, and algae. However, some microorganisms have evolved to become resistant to these protists. These amoeba-resistant microorganisms include established pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Legionella spp., Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycobacterium avium, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Francisella tularensis, and emerging pathogens, such as Bosea spp., Simkania negevensis, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, and Legionella-like amoebal pathogens. Some of these amoeba-resistant bacteria (ARB) are lytic for their amoebal host, while others are considered endosymbionts, since a stable host-parasite ratio is maintained. Free-living amoebae represent an important reservoir of ARB and may, while encysted, protect the internalized bacteria from chlorine and other biocides. Free-living amoebae may act as a Trojan horse, bringing hidden ARB within the human “Troy,” and may produce vesicles filled with ARB, increasing their transmission potential. Free-living amoebae may also play a role in the selection of virulence traits and in adaptation to survival in macrophages. Thus, intra-amoebal growth was found to enhance virulence, and similar mechanisms seem to be implicated in the survival of ARB in response to both amoebae and macrophages. Moreover, free-living amoebae represent a useful tool for the culture of some intracellular bacteria and new bacterial species that might be potential emerging pathogens. PMID:15084508

  1. Large-scale production of diesel-like biofuels - process design as an inherent part of microorganism development.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Maria C; Heijnen, Joseph J; van der Wielen, Luuk A M

    2013-06-01

    Industrial biotechnology is playing an important role in the transition to a bio-based economy. Currently, however, industrial implementation is still modest, despite the advances made in microorganism development. Given that the fuels and commodity chemicals sectors are characterized by tight economic margins, we propose to address overall process design and efficiency at the start of bioprocess development. While current microorganism development is targeted at product formation and product yield, addressing process design at the start of bioprocess development means that microorganism selection can also be extended to other critical targets for process technology and process scale implementation, such as enhancing cell separation or increasing cell robustness at operating conditions that favor the overall process. In this paper we follow this approach for the microbial production of diesel-like biofuels. We review current microbial routes with both oleaginous and engineered microorganisms. For the routes leading to extracellular production, we identify the process conditions for large scale operation. The process conditions identified are finally translated to microorganism development targets. We show that microorganism development should be directed at anaerobic production, increasing robustness at extreme process conditions and tailoring cell surface properties. All the same time, novel process configurations integrating fermentation and product recovery, cell reuse and low-cost technologies for product separation are mandatory. This review provides a state-of-the-art summary of the latest challenges in large-scale production of diesel-like biofuels. PMID:23650260

  2. Minerals and Microorganisms in Evaporite Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Brigmon, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Traditional analysis of evaporite environments have either focused on the geology or the halophilic organisms. It is relatively rare that the two have been combined and even rarer that both disciplines have been incorporated in comparing evaporite sites. The variation in evaporite environments does influence microbial ecology and fossilization processes as each site varies in pH, temperature, presence or absence springs, and spring chemistry. Understanding the evaporite environments is important for planetary scientists as they serve as analogs for evaluating extraterrestrial materials, including the potential for water and ultimately life. For example Mars lander, rover and orbital missions have identified the evaporite signatures of gypsum, carbonates and chlorides, all indicating that water existed at sometime in the planets geological history. Terrestrial evaporite sites all possess halophilic tolerant life. In some instances such as the Dead Sea, Israel, it is restricted to microbial life, but in other sites there are higher life forms. The microbes associated with these evaporite sites can produce biofilms as a method to develop their own microenvironments. Microorganisms can be observed colonizing specific ecological niches or gradients can be created by these environments. These gradients occur due the localized drying and weathering patterns that create different soil chemistry. The microorganisms in turn colonize specific areas more suitable to their specific metabolic needs. For example, under anaerobic conditions with sulfur and methane prevalent methanogenic and/or sulfur reducing microbial species may be observed. However, under similar chemistry environments with the exception of aerobic conditions sulfur oxidizer and/or methanotrophic microorganism may occur. Because of their conspicuous colored pigments purple sulfur bacteria are frequently observed in anoxic zones of lakes, sulfur springs, and stratified evaporite crusts. Some of these bacteria

  3. Psychrophilic (6--15 {degree}C) high-rate anaerobic treatment of malting wastewater in a two-module expanded granular sludge bed system

    SciTech Connect

    Rebac, S.; Lier, J.B. van; Lens, P.; Cappellen, J. van; Vermeulen, M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lettinga, G.; Dekkers, F.; Swinkels, K.T.M.

    1998-11-01

    Psychrophilic (6--15 C) anaerobic treatment of malting wastewater was investigated. A two-module expanded granular sludge bed reactor system with a total volume of 140 dm{sup 3} was used to treat malting wastewater having a soluble and total chemical oxygen demand (COD) between 233 and 1778 mg dm{sup {minus}3} and between 317 and 4422 mg dm{sup {minus}3}, respectively. The removal efficiencies at 6 C were 47 and 71% of the soluble and volatile fatty acids (VFA) COD, at organic loading rates (OLR) ranging between 3.3 and 5.8 kg of COD m{sup {minus}3} day{sup {minus}1}. The removal efficiencies at 10--15 C were 67--78 and 90--96% of the soluble and VFA COD at an OLR between 2.8 and 12.3 kg of COD m{sup {minus}3} day{sup {minus}1}. The specific methanogenic activity of the sludge present in each module increased 2--3-fold during system operation for 400 days. The relatively high concentration of suspended solids in the influent (25% of the total COD) caused a deterioration of the sludge bed in the first reactor module. This was aggravated by excessive growth of acidifying biomass, which persisted in the first module sludge bed and resulted in granular sludge flotation. However, the second module could accommodate the increased OLR, this providing a very high effluent quality (soluble COD < 200 mg dm{sup {minus}3}) of the total system. The stability of module 1 concerning suspended solids could be restored by presettling the wastewater.

  4. Structural and Chemical Modification of Fe-Rich Smectite Associated with Microbial Fe-Respiration By Psychrophilic Bacteria in King George Island, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kim, J.; Lim, H. S.; Yoon, H.; Lee, Y. K.; Park, K.; Lee, J.; Kim, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Surface soil samples were collected from Antarctic exploration (2010/2011, 2011/2012) at Barton Peninsula, King George Island, West Antarctica to determine the feasible biological alteration of clay minerals in Antarctica where the physical weathering is considered to be a major process. Seven areas (1226-1, 1226-2, 0101-4, 0105-1, 0105-2, 0107-2, 0107-3) from the coast toward the inland were investigated. The duration of exposure of soil samples to the air depending on the retraction of ice to the inland may affect the microbial activity resulting in the biogeochemical mineral alteration. The multiline of techniques for example, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), wet chemistry analysis including the extent of Fe(III) reduction, and batch experiments of microbe-mineral interaction under the low temperature that mimics the Antarctic condition to understand the mechanism of biogeochemical alteration of clay minerals. Clay minerals of smectite, mica, chlorite and kaolinite were detected in the XRD profiles. The variation of relative amount of clay minerals in the regions indicated that the physical/biological alteration might be different depending on the duration of ice retraction. From the batch experiment using Nontronite (NAu-1), moreover, we confirm that Psychrophilic bacteria (Shewanella sp. isolated from King George Island) reduce structural Fe(III) of clay mineral, and occur structural change of smectite at low temperature (4℃ and 15℃). The present study, therefore, would present the feasibility of biological effects on chemical modification through the structural changes in clay mineral in cold environment and suggest a new pathway of Fe-supply into the Antarctic Ocean.

  5. Genetic engineering of microorganisms for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Wang, Qun; Shen, Qi; Zhan, Jumei; Zhao, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel, as one type of renewable energy, is an ideal substitute for petroleum-based diesel fuel and is usually made from triacylglycerides by transesterification with alcohols. Biodiesel production based on microbial fermentation aiming to establish more efficient, less-cost and sustainable biodiesel production strategies is under current investigation by various start-up biotechnology companies and research centers. Genetic engineering plays a key role in the transformation of microbes into the desired cell factories with high efficiency of biodiesel production. Here, we present an overview of principal microorganisms used in the microbial biodiesel production and recent advances in metabolic engineering for the modification required. Overexpression or deletion of the related enzymes for de novo synthesis of biodiesel is highlighted with relevant examples. PMID:23222170

  6. Genetic engineering of microorganisms for biodiesel production

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui; Wang, Qun; Shen, Qi; Zhan, Jumei; Zhao, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel, as one type of renewable energy, is an ideal substitute for petroleum-based diesel fuel and is usually made from triacylglycerides by transesterification with alcohols. Biodiesel production based on microbial fermentation aiming to establish more efficient, less-cost and sustainable biodiesel production strategies is under current investigation by various start-up biotechnology companies and research centers. Genetic engineering plays a key role in the transformation of microbes into the desired cell factories with high efficiency of biodiesel production. Here, we present an overview of principal microorganisms used in the microbial biodiesel production and recent advances in metabolic engineering for the modification required. Overexpression or deletion of the related enzymes for de novo synthesis of biodiesel is highlighted with relevant examples. PMID:23222170

  7. POLYPEPTIDE AND POLYSACCHARIDE PROCESSING IN HYPERTHERMOPHILIC MICROORGANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, ROBERT M.

    2008-12-22

    This project focused on the microbial physiology and biochemistry of heterotrophic hyperthermophiles with respect to mechanisms by which these organisms process polypeptides and polysaccharides under normal and stressed conditions. Emphasis is on two model organisms, for which completed genome sequences are available: Pyrococcus furiosus (growth Topt of 98°C), an archaeon, and Thermotoga maritima (growth Topt of 80°C), a bacterium. Both organisms are obligately anaerobic heterotrophs that reduce sulfur facultatively. Whole genome cDNA spotted microarrays were used to follow transcriptional response to a variety of environmental conditions in order to identify genes encoding proteins involved in the acquisition, synthesis, processing and utilization of polypeptides and polysaccharides. This project provided new insights into the physiological aspects of hyperthermophiles as these relate to microbial biochemistry and biological function in high temperature habitats. The capacity of these microorganisms to produce biohydrogen from renewable feedstocks makes them important for future efforts to develop biofuels.

  8. Early photosynthetic microorganisms and environmental evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubic, S.

    1980-01-01

    Microfossils which are preserved as shrivelled kerogenous residues provide little information about cellular organization and almost none about the metabolic properties of the organisms. The distinction between prokaryotic vs eukaryotic, and phototrophic vs chemo- and organotrophic fossil microorganisms rests entirely on morphological comparisons with recent counterparts. The residual nature of the microbial fossil record promotes the conclusion that it must be biased toward (a) most abundant organisms, (b) those most resistant to degradation, and (c) those inhabiting environments with high preservation potential e.g., stromatolites. These criteria support the cyanophyte identity of most Precambrian microbial fossils on the following grounds: (1) as primary producers they dominate prokaryotic communities in modern extreme environments, e.g., intertidal zone; (2) several morphological counterparts of modern cyanophytes and microbial fossils have been established based on structure, cell division patterns and degradation sequences. The impact of anaerobic and oxygenic microbial photosynthesis on the evolution of Precambrian environments is discussed.

  9. Adsorption of Sr by immobilized microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.S.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    Wastewaters from numerous industrial and laboratory operations can contain toxic or undesirable components such as metal ions, which must be removed before discharge to surface waters. Adsorption processes that have high removal efficiencies are attractive methods for removing such contaminants. For economic operations, it is desirable to have an adsorbent that is selective for the metal contaminant of interest, has high capacity for the contaminant, has rapid adsorption kinetics, can be economically produced, and can be regenerated to a concentrated waste product or decomposed to a low-volume waste. Selected microorganisms are potentially useful adsorbents for these applications because they can be inexpensive, have high selectivities, and have high capacities for adsorption of many heavy metals, which are often problems in a variety of industries. A laboratory-scale packed column containing microbial cells immobilized within a gelatin matrix has been prepared, and its application to removal of Sr from a simulated wastewater is described. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Laboratory studies of ocean mixing by microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Ortiz, Monica; Dabiri, John O.

    2011-11-01

    Ocean mixing plays a major role in nutrient and energy transport and is an important input to climate models. Recent studies suggest that the contribution of fluid transport by swimming microorganisms to ocean mixing may be of the same order of magnitude as winds and tides. An experimental setup has been designed in order to study the mixing efficiency of vertical migration of plankton. To this end, a stratified water column is created to model the ocean's density gradient. The vertical migration of Artemia Salina (brine shrimp) within the water column is controlled via luminescent signals on the top and bottom of the column. By fluorescently labelling portions of the water column, the stirring of the density gradient by the animals is visualized and quantified. Preliminary results show that the vertical movement of these organisms produces enhanced mixing relative to control cases in which only buoyancy forces and diffusion are present.

  11. Microorganism billiards in closed plane curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Madison

    Recent experiments and numerical simulations have demonstrated that many species of microorganisms reflect aspecularly from a solid surface -- due to steric and hydrodynamic interactions with the wall, their outgoing angle is fixed and independent of the angle of incidence. Motivated by these results, we discuss theory and computation of the ``aspecular billiard'', a modification of the classical billiard in which the outgoing angle is constant. We restrict our attention to closed plane curves, focusing on three canonical examples: the ellipse, the Bunimovich stadium, and the Sinai billiard. These systems can have a rich array of orbits, and the Lyapunov exponent is shown to be dependent on the billiard geometry and the outgoing angle. We apply these results to the design of tunable passive sorting mechanisms.

  12. High-pressure inactivation of dried microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Espinasse, V; Perrier-Cornet, J-M; Marecat, A; Gervais, P

    2008-01-01

    Dried microorganisms are particularly resistant to high hydrostatic pressure effects. In this study, the survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied under pressure applied in different ways. Original processes and devices were purposely developed in our laboratory for long-term pressurization. Dried and wet yeast powders were submitted to high-pressure treatments (100-150 MPa for 24-144 h at 25 degrees C) through liquid media or inert gas. These powders were also pressurized after being vacuum-packed. In the case of wet yeasts, the pressurization procedure had little influence on the inactivation rate. In this case, inactivations were mainly due to hydrostatic pressure effects. Conversely, in the case of dried yeasts, inactivation was highly dependent on the treatment scheme. No mortality was observed when dried cells were pressurized in a non-aqueous liquid medium, but when nitrogen gas was used as the pressure-transmitting fluid, the inactivation rate was found to be between 1.5 and 2 log for the same pressure level and holding time. Several hypotheses were formulated to explain this phenomenon: the thermal effects induced by the pressure variations, the drying resulting from the gas pressure release and the sorption and desorption of the gas in cells. The highest inactivation rates were obtained with vacuum-packed dried yeasts. In this case, cell death occurred during the pressurization step and was induced by shear forces. Our results show that the mechanisms at the origin of cell death under pressure are strongly dependent on the nature of the pressure-transmitting medium and the hydration of microorganisms. PMID:17573691

  13. Analysis of Membrane Lipids of Airborne Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNaughton, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    A method of characterization of airborne micro-organisms in a given location involves (1) large-volume filtration of air onto glass-fiber filters; (2) accelerated extraction of membrane lipids of the collected micro-organisms by use of pressurized hot liquid; and (3) identification and quantitation of the lipids by use of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. This method is suitable for use in both outdoor and indoor environments; for example, it can be used to measure airborne microbial contamination in buildings ("sick-building syndrome"). The classical approach to analysis of airborne micro-organisms is based on the growth of cultureable micro-organisms and does not provide an account of viable but noncultureable micro-organisms, which typically amount to more than 90 percent of the micro-organisms present. In contrast, the present method provides an account of all micro-organisms, including cultureable, noncultureable, aerobic, and anaerobic ones. The analysis of lipids according to this method makes it possible to estimate the number of viable airborne micro-organisms present in the sampled air and to obtain a quantitative profile of the general types of micro-organisms present along with some information about their physiological statuses.

  14. The ecology of micro-organisms in a closed environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, L.

    1971-01-01

    Microorganisms under closed environmental ecological conditions with reference to astronauts infectious diseases, discussing bacteria growth in Biosatellite 2 and earth based closed chamber experiments

  15. Ultrasonic manipulation of locomotive microorganisms and evaluation of their activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mitsunori; Kitamura, Norio; Terauchi, Masaki

    2002-12-01

    Acoustic manipulation of locomotive microorganisms, i.e., euglena and paramecia, was conducted by using ultrasonic standing waves of ˜3 MHz. Microorganisms were trapped at the intersections of the nodes in the two orthogonal standing waves and were transferred horizontally and vertically by the suitable ultrasonic frequency change. Aggregation of microorganisms was also observed in the process of the cyclic frequency change. The trapping efficiency depended on both ultrasonic power density and the activity of microorganisms. The effects of water temperature and illumination on their activity were evaluated by measuring the ultrasonic trapping efficiency.

  16. Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions

    DOEpatents

    Buelter, Thomas; Meinhold, Peter; Feldman, Reid M. Renny; Hawkins, Andrew C.; Urano, Jun; Bastian, Sabine; Arnold, Frances

    2012-01-17

    The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

  17. Nitrogen utilization pathways of soil microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinggera, J.; Geisseler, D.; Merbach, I.; Ludwig, B.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential nutrient for all organisms. In terrestrial ecosystems N occurs predominantly in the form of organic matter. Here, soil microorganisms can use two possible mechanisms for the uptake of organic N: the direct route and the mobilization-immobilization-turnover (MIT) route. In the direct route simple organic molecules are taken up directly into the cell. The deamination occurs inside the cell and only the surplus N is released into the soil solution. In the second route, the deamination occurs outside the cell and all N is mineralized before assimilation. To determine the importance of the different N uptake pathways of soil microorganisms an incubation experiment (21 days, 20°C) is currently being carried out. Corn leaves with different C to N ratios (20, 40) and (NH4)2SO4 have been added to three soils (Haplic Chernozem, FAO) with different fertilization histories (300dt/ha farmyard manure every second year, mineral NPK fertilizer, no fertilization) from the long-term experiment at Bad Lauchstädt. Contents of NH4+, NO3- and microbial biomass C (Cmic) and N (Nmic), CO2 production, potential protease activity, gross N mineralization and mineralization of added amino acids will be determined after 3, 7 and 21 days. Preliminary results show that the protease activity (without addition of corn residues) decreased in the order manure-fertilized soil (18.26 mg tyrosine kg-1 soil h-1) > Soil with mineral NPK fertilizer (17.45 mg tyrosine kg-1 soil h-1) > unfertilized soil (11.34 mg tyrosine kg-1 oven dry soil h-1). The turnover of amino acids after 24h was higher for the manure-fertilized soil (99.5% of the added amino acids were consumed) than for the NPK- fertilized and unfertilized soils (76%). The effects of the fertilization histories on the temporal dynamics of the different biological properties (Cmic, Nmic), CO2 production, protease activity and N mineralization rates will be presented.

  18. ISOLATION OF MICROORGANISMS FOR BIOLOGICAL DETOXIFICATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC HYDROLYSATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we isolated new microorganisms for depletion of inhibitors in lignocellulosic acid hydrolysates. A sequential enrichment strategy was used to isolate microorganisms from soil. Selection was carried out in a defined mineral medium containing a mixture of ferulic acid (5 mM), 5-hydrox...

  19. Microorganisms in Food--Their Significance and Methods of Enumeration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, S.

    1980-01-01

    Described are laboratory methods for enumerating microorganisms in food. These methods are utilized to determine if foods are potentially hazardous to the consumer due to high concentrations of microorganisms. Discussed are indicator organisms, including coliforms, interococci, yeasts, and molds; food poisoning organisms (staphylococci and…

  20. 40 CFR 725.88 - Uses of a microorganism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Uses of a microorganism. 725.88 Section 725.88 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Confidentiality and Public Access to Information § 725.88 Uses of...

  1. Microorganisms in the Coloured Rain of Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaranayake, Anil; Wickramarathne, K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    2013-02-01

    A variety of pigmented microorganisms have been identified in the red, yellow, blue and black rain that fell over Sri Lanka in December 2012 and January 2013. There is tentative evidence for the presence of similar organisms, including diatoms, in meteorites falling over the same time period. These microorganisms are likely to have served as nuclei for the condensation of rain drops.

  2. Snow as a habitat for microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoham, Ronald W.

    1989-01-01

    There are three major habitats involving ice and snow, and the microorganisms studied from these habitats are most eukaryotic. Sea ice is inhabited by algae called diatoms, glacial ice has sparse populations of green algai cal desmids, and the temporary and permanent snows in mountainous regions and high latitudes are inhabited mostly by green algal flagellates. The life cycle of green algal flagellates is summarized by discussing the effects of light, temperature, nutrients, and snow melts. Specific examples of optimal conditions and environmental effects for various snow algae are given. It is not likely that the eukaryotic snow algae presented are candidated for life on the planet Mars. Evolutionally, eukaryotic cells as know on Earth may not have had the opportunity to develop on Mars (if life evolved at all on Mars) since eukaryotes did not appear on Earth until almost two billion years after the first prokaryotic organisms. However, the snow/ice ecosystems on Earth present themselves as extreme habitats were there is evidence of prokaryotic life (eubacteria and cyanbacteria) of which literally nothing is known. Any future surveillances of extant and/or extinct life on Mars should include probes (if not landing sites) to investigate sites of concentrations of ice water. The possibility of signs of life in Martian polar regions should not be overlooked.

  3. Enrichment of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidizing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shihu; Zeng, Raymond J; Burow, Luke C; Lant, Paul; Keller, Jurg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-10-01

    The microorganisms responsible for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to denitrification have not been clearly elucidated. Three recent publications suggested it can be achieved by a denitrifying bacterium with or without the involvement of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea. A key factor limiting the progress in this research field is the shortage of enrichment cultures performing denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO). In this study, DAMO cultures were enriched from mixed inoculum including sediment from a freshwater lake, anaerobic digester sludge and return activated sludge from a sewage treatment plant. Two reactors, operated at 35°C and at 22°C, respectively, showed simultaneous methane oxidation and nitrate reduction after several months of operation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the 35°C enrichment showed the presence of an archaeon closely related to other DAMO archaea and a dominated bacterium belonging to the yet uncultivated NC10 phylum. This culture preferred nitrite to nitrate as the electron acceptor. The present study suggests that the archaea are rather methanotrophs than methanogens. The highest denitrification rate achieved was 2.35 mmol NO3 (-) -N gVSS(-1)  day(-1) . The culture enriched at 22°C contained the same NC10 bacterium observed in the culture enriched at 35°C but no archaea. PMID:23765890

  4. Flow sorting of microorganisms for molecular analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, G; Fuchs, B; Spring, S; Beisker, W; Amann, R

    1997-01-01

    Not only classical cultivation-based methods but also the new molecular approaches may result in incomplete and selective information on the natural diversity of microbial communities. Flow sorting of microorganisms from environmental samples allows the deliberate selection of cell populations of interest from highly diverse systems for molecular analysis. Several cellular parameters that can be measured by flow cytometry are useful as sort criteria. Here, we report sorting of bacteria from activated sludge, lake water, and lake sediment according to differences in light scattering, DNA content, and/or affiliation to certain phylogenetic groups as assessed by fluorescein-labeled, rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. Microscopy of the sorted cells showed that populations of originally low abundance could be strongly enriched by flow sorting (up to 280-fold), depending on the original abundance of the cells of interest and the type of sample sorted. The purity of the cells of interest could be further increased by repeated sorting, but this increase was limited by cell aggregation in the case of activated-sludge samples. It was possible to amplify almost full-length 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragments from sorted microbial cells by PCR, even after fixation with paraformaldehyde and in situ hybridization. Dot blot hybridization and sequencing demonstrated that most of the amplified rDNA originated from those cells that had been selected for by flow sorting. Comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences revealed previously unknown species of magnetotactic or activated-sludge bacteria. PMID:9361408

  5. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W. ); Benemann, J.R. , Pinole, CA )

    1991-02-01

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

  6. Hydrodynamic theory of swimming of flagellated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, J G; Bloomfield, V A

    1977-10-01

    A theory of the type commonly used in polymer hydrodynamics is developed to calculate swimming properties of flagellated microorganisms. The overall shape of the particle is modeled as an array of spherical beads which act, at the same time, as frictional elements. The fluid velocity field is obtained as a function of the forces acting at each bead through Oseen-type, hydrodynamic interaction tensors. From the force and torque equilibrium conditions, such quantities as swimming velocity, angular velocity, and efficiency can be calculated. Application is made to a spherical body propelled by a helical flagellum. A recent theory by Lighthill, and earlier formulations based on tangential and normal frictional coefficients of a curved cylinder, CT and CN, are analyzed along with our theory. Although all the theories predict similar qualitative characteristics, such as optimal efficiency and the effect of fluid viscosity, they lead to rather different numerical values. In agreement with Lighthill, we found the formalisms based on CN and CT coefficients to be somewhat inaccurate, and head-flagellum interactions are shown to play an important role. PMID:901902

  7. Autonomous support for microorganism research in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleet, Mary L.; Miller, Mark S.; Shipley, Derek, E.; Smith, Jeff D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design for performing on orbit, autonomous research on microorganisms and cultured cells/tissues is presented. An understanding of gravity and its effects on cells is crucial for space exploration as well as for terrestrial applications. The payload is designed to be compatible with the Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) launch vehicle, an orbiter middeck locker interface, and with Space Station Freedom. Uplink/downlink capabilities and sample return through controlled reentry are available for all carriers. Autonomous testing activities are preprogrammed with in-flight reprogrammability. Sensors for monitoring temperature, pH, light, gravity levels, vibrations, and radiation are provided for environmental regulation and experimental data collection. Additional experimental data acquisition includes optical density measurement, microscopy, video, and film photography. On-board full data storage capabilities are provided. A fluid transfer mechanism is utilized for inoculation, sampling, and nutrient replenishment of experiment cultures. In addition to payload design, representative experiments were developed to ensure scientific objectives remained compatible with hardware capabilities. The project is defined to provide biological data pertinent to extended duration crewed space flight including crew health issues and development of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). In addition, opportunities are opened for investigations leading to commercial applications of space, such as pharmaceutical development, modeling of terrestrial diseases, and material processing.

  8. Autonomous support for microorganism research in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleet, M. L.; Smith, J. D.; Klaus, D. M.; Luttges, M. W.

    1993-02-01

    A preliminary design for performing on orbit, autonomous research on microorganisms and cultured cells/tissues is presented. The payload is designed to be compatible with the COMercial Experiment Transporter (COMET), an orbiter middeck locker interface and with Space Station Freedom. Uplink/downlink capabilities and sample return through controlled reentry are available for all carriers. Autonomous testing activities are preprogrammed with in-flight reprogrammability. Sensors for monitoring temperature, pH, light, gravity levels, vibrations, and radiation are provided for environmental regulation and experimental data collection. Additional data acquisition includes optical density measurement, microscopy, video, and film photography. On-board data storage capabilities are provided. A fluid transfer mechanism is utilized for inoculation, sampling, and nutrient replenishment of experiment cultures. In addition to payload design, research opportunities are explored to illustrate hardware versatility and function. The project is defined to provide biological data pertinent to extended duration crewed space flight including crew health issues and development of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). In addition, opportunities are opened for investigations leading to commercial applications of space, such as pharmaceutical development, modeling of terrestrial diseases, and material processing.

  9. Evaluation of actinide biosorption by microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Happel, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    Conventional methods for removing metals from aqueous solutions include chemical precipitation, chemical oxidation or reduction, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrochemical treatment and evaporation. The removal of radionuclides from aqueous waste streams has largely relied on ion exchange methods which can be prohibitively costly given increasingly stringent regulatory effluent limits. The use of microbial cells as biosorbants for heavy metals offers a potential alternative to existing methods for decontamination or recovery of heavy metals from a variety of industrial waste streams and contaminated ground waters. The toxicity and the extreme and variable conditions present in many radionuclide containing waste streams may preclude the use of living microorganisms and favor the use of non-living biomass for the removal of actinides from these waste streams. In the work presented here, we have examined the biosorption of uranium by non-living, non-metabolizing microbial biomass thus avoiding the problems associated with living systems. We are investigating biosorption with the long term goal of developing microbial technologies for the remediation of actinides.

  10. Autonomous support for microorganism research in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttges, M. W.; Klaus, D. M.; Fleet, M. L.; Miller, M. S.; Shipley, D. E.; Smith, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design for performing on-orbit, autonomous research on microorganisms and cultured cells/tissues is presented. An understanding of gravity and its effects on cells is crucial for space exploration as well as for terrestrial applications. The payload is designed to be compatible with the COMmercial Experiment Transported (COMET) launch vehicle, an orbiter middeck locker interface, and with Space Station Freedom. Uplink/downlink capabilities and sample return through controlled reentry are available for all carriers. Autonomous testing activities are preprogrammed with inflight reprogrammability. Sensors for monitoring temperature, pH, light, gravity levels, vibration, and radiation are provided for environmental regulation and experimental data collection. Additional experiment data acquisition includes optical density measurement, microscopy, video, and file photography. Onboard full data storage capabilities are provided. A fluid transfer mechanism is utilized for inoculation, sampling, and nutrient replenishment of experiment cultures. In addition to payload design, representative experiments were developed to ensure scientific objectives remained compatible with hardware capabilities. The project is defined to provide biological data pertinent to extended duration crewed space flight including crew health issues and development of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). In addition, opportunities are opened for investigations leading to commercial applications of space, such as pharmaceutical development, modeling of terrestrial diseases, and material processing.

  11. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobutsugu; Obayashi, Akira

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  12. Autecology of microorganisms of typical Ecuador biotopes.

    PubMed

    Tashyrev, O B; Pidgorskyi, V S; Toro, Miguel Naranjo; Gualoto, Miguel; Gladka, G V; Tashyreva, H O; Rokitko, P V; Romanovskaya, V A

    2014-01-01

    34 strains of aerobic chemoorganotrophic microorganisms were isolated from 23 soil and plant samples selected from highland biotopes of Ecuador-Andes massif (Papallacta, 4020 m), ash at the foot of the volcano Tungurahua, mountainous jungle (La Favorita, 1600 m), as well as in humid tropic botanical garden (state Puyo, 950 m). In mountain jungle samples the high number of bacteria--10(5)-10(7) CFU/g of sample were represented by 2-5 morphotypes. In highland (4020 m) samples the bacterial counts made from 10(2) to 10(7) CFU/g of sample. The current study describes resistance of isolated strains to high salinity, UV radiation and toxic metal ions. The majority of isolated strains were halotolerant. Isolates from volcanic ash showed high resistance level to UV radiation--LD99,99 made 1000-1440 J/m2; resistance level for isolates from the soil of Puyo Botanical Garden and isolates from rock lichen (Papallacta) LD99,99 made 1160 and 800 J/m2 respectively. Strains isolated from mountain jungle (La Favorita) showed lower UV-resistance. In highland biotopes of Ecuador occurred bacteria resistant to toxic metal ions. The highest resistance to Hg2+ was shown by isolate of lichen from mountain jungle, the maximal growth concentration was 0.025 g/L; to Cr(VI)--by isolate from lichen rock massif--3,0 g/L. Correlation between metal-resistance, halotolerace and UV resistance for studied strains was not detected, probably because of different microbial cell damage/repair mechanisms under the action of these factors. PMID:25639037

  13. Single cell genomics of subsurface microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanauskas, R.; Onstott, T. C.; Lau, C.; Kieft, T. L.; Woyke, T.; Rinke, C.; Sczyrba, A.; van Heerden, E.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have revealed unexpected abundance and diversity of microorganisms in terrestrial and marine subsurface, providing new perspectives over their biogeochemical significance, evolution, and the limits of life. The now commonly used research tools, such as metagenomics and PCR-based gene surveys enabled cultivation-unbiased analysis of genes encoded by natural microbial communities. However, these methods seldom provide direct evidence for how the discovered genes are organized inside genomes and from which organisms do they come from. Here we evaluated the feasibility of an alternative, single cell genomics approach, in the analysis of subsurface microbial community composition, metabolic potential and microevolution at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), South Dakota, and the Witwaterstrand Basin, South Africa. We successfully recovered genomic DNA from individual microbial cells from multiple locations, including ultra-deep (down to 3,500 m) and low-biomass (down to 10^3 cells mL^-1) fracture water. The obtained single amplified genomes (SAGs) from SURF contained multiple representatives of the candidate divisions OP3, OP11, OD1 and uncharacterized archaea. By sequencing eight of these SAGs, we obtained the first genome content information for these phylum-level lineages that do not contain a single cultured representative. The Witwaterstrand samples were collected from deep fractures, biogeochemical dating of which suggests isolation from tens of thousands to tens of millions of years. Thus, these fractures may be viewed as "underground Galapagos", a natural, long-term experiment of microbial evolution within well-defined temporal and spatial boundaries. We are analyzing multiple SAGs from these environments, which will provide detailed information about adaptations to life in deep subsurface, mutation rates, selective pressures and gene flux within and across microbial populations.

  14. From the Lab to the Farm: An Industrial Perspective of Plant Beneficial Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Parnell, J Jacob; Berka, Randy; Young, Hugh A; Sturino, Joseph M; Kang, Yaowei; Barnhart, D M; DiLeo, Matthew V

    2016-01-01

    Any successful strategy aimed at enhancing crop productivity with microbial products ultimately relies on the ability to scale at regional to global levels. Microorganisms that show promise in the lab may lack key characteristics for widespread adoption in sustainable and productive agricultural systems. This paper provides an overview of critical considerations involved with taking a strain from discovery to the farmer's field. In addition, we review some of the most effective microbial products on the market today, explore the reasons for their success and outline some of the major challenges involved in industrial production and commercialization of beneficial strains for widespread agricultural application. General processes associated with commercializing viable microbial products are discussed in two broad categories, biofertility inoculants and biocontrol products. Specifically, we address what farmers desire in potential microbial products, how mode of action informs decisions on product applications, the influence of variation in laboratory and field study data, challenges with scaling for mass production, and the importance of consistent efficacy, product stability and quality. In order to make a significant impact on global sustainable agriculture, the implementation of plant beneficial microorganisms will require a more seamless transition between laboratory and farm application. Early attention to the challenges presented here will improve the likelihood of developing effective microbial products to improve crop yields, decrease disease severity, and help to feed an increasingly hungry planet. PMID:27540383

  15. From the Lab to the Farm: An Industrial Perspective of Plant Beneficial Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, J. Jacob; Berka, Randy; Young, Hugh A.; Sturino, Joseph M.; Kang, Yaowei; Barnhart, D. M.; DiLeo, Matthew V.

    2016-01-01

    Any successful strategy aimed at enhancing crop productivity with microbial products ultimately relies on the ability to scale at regional to global levels. Microorganisms that show promise in the lab may lack key characteristics for widespread adoption in sustainable and productive agricultural systems. This paper provides an overview of critical considerations involved with taking a strain from discovery to the farmer’s field. In addition, we review some of the most effective microbial products on the market today, explore the reasons for their success and outline some of the major challenges involved in industrial production and commercialization of beneficial strains for widespread agricultural application. General processes associated with commercializing viable microbial products are discussed in two broad categories, biofertility inoculants and biocontrol products. Specifically, we address what farmers desire in potential microbial products, how mode of action informs decisions on product applications, the influence of variation in laboratory and field study data, challenges with scaling for mass production, and the importance of consistent efficacy, product stability and quality. In order to make a significant impact on global sustainable agriculture, the implementation of plant beneficial microorganisms will require a more seamless transition between laboratory and farm application. Early attention to the challenges presented here will improve the likelihood of developing effective microbial products to improve crop yields, decrease disease severity, and help to feed an increasingly hungry planet. PMID:27540383

  16. Nitrogen acquisition by plants and microorganisms in a temperate grassland

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qianyuan; Qiao, Na; Xu, Xingliang; Xin, Xiaoping; Han, Jessie Yc; Tian, Yuqiang; Ouyang, Hua; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) limitation is common in most terrestrial ecosystems, often leading to strong competition between microorganisms and plants. The mechanisms of niche differentiation to reduce this competition remain unclear. Short-term 15N experiments with NH4+, NO3−, and glycine were conducted in July, August and September in a temperate grassland to evaluate the chemical, spatial and temporal niche differentiation by competition between plants and microorganisms for N. Microorganisms preferred NH4+ and NO3−, while plants preferred NO3−. Both plants and microorganisms acquired more N in August and September than in July. The soil depth had no significant effects on microbial uptake, but significantly affected plant N uptake. Plants acquired 67% of their N from the 0–5 cm soil layer and 33% from the 5–15 cm layer. The amount of N taken up by microorganisms was at least seven times than plants. Although microorganisms efficiently compete for N with plants, the competition is alleviated through chemical partitioning mainly in deeper soil layer. In the upper soil layer, neither chemical nor temporal niche separation is realized leading to strong competition between plants and microorganisms that modifies N dynamics in grasslands. PMID:26961252

  17. Nitrogen acquisition by plants and microorganisms in a temperate grassland.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianyuan; Qiao, Na; Xu, Xingliang; Xin, Xiaoping; Han, Jessie Yc; Tian, Yuqiang; Ouyang, Hua; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) limitation is common in most terrestrial ecosystems, often leading to strong competition between microorganisms and plants. The mechanisms of niche differentiation to reduce this competition remain unclear. Short-term (15)N experiments with NH4(+), NO3(-), and glycine were conducted in July, August and September in a temperate grassland to evaluate the chemical, spatial and temporal niche differentiation by competition between plants and microorganisms for N. Microorganisms preferred NH4(+) and NO3(-), while plants preferred NO3(-). Both plants and microorganisms acquired more N in August and September than in July. The soil depth had no significant effects on microbial uptake, but significantly affected plant N uptake. Plants acquired 67% of their N from the 0-5 cm soil layer and 33% from the 5-15 cm layer. The amount of N taken up by microorganisms was at least seven times than plants. Although microorganisms efficiently compete for N with plants, the competition is alleviated through chemical partitioning mainly in deeper soil layer. In the upper soil layer, neither chemical nor temporal niche separation is realized leading to strong competition between plants and microorganisms that modifies N dynamics in grasslands. PMID:26961252

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy as a probe to rapidly detect, identify, and characterize micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Lamfarraj, Hasnae; Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Pina, Patrick; Delavenne, Marc; Witthuhn, Fabienne; Allouch, Pierre; Manfait, Michel

    1999-04-01

    Fast and exact identification of a great number of microorganisms is becoming a serious challenge. Differentiation and identification of microorganisms is today mainly achieved by the use of a variety of distinct techniques based on morphological, serological aspects and a set of biochemical test. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques can be complementary and useful methods in this field due to their rapidity, 'fingerprinting' capabilities, and the molecular information that they can provide. Using SERS at Ag colloids, we have conducted pilot studies to rapidly detect and identify bacterial clinical strains. Using a Raman microspectrometer equipped with a He/Ne laser, a first attempt to record SERS spectra was made on colloidal solutions. Spectra were of good quality but not very reproducible due to the movement of the microorganisms. Strains were then put in presence of Ag colloids and direct on-plate analysis was performed. Spectra were more reproducible, with diminished fluorescence, and reveal characteristic cellular-level information. Different growth conditions and colloid preparations have been tested. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli clinical strains, responsible for nosocomial infections, have been our first test samples. An attempt has also been made to record SERS data from gold colloids in view of future measurement in the near-IR. Spectroscopic data are compared with ATR-FTIR results.

  19. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

    1992-12-22

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

  20. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.

    1992-01-01

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

  1. Submarine Volcanic Landforms and Endolithic Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisk, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Subaqueous volcanic eruptions produce characteristic landforms and lava flow morphologies that are distinct from subaerial eruptions. Eruptions from fissures on the sea floor produce hummocks rather than flat lava flows. Hummocky lava flows typically have dimensions of 500 meters wide, 5000 meters long, and 50 meters high. The hummocks are made of piles of bulbous pillows that are about 1 meter in diameter. Because of the high specific heat of water and the large temperature difference between magma and liquid water (about 1100 C) the exteriors of lava flows are quenched to glass. Cooling of lava flows in air does not have this effect, The quenched volcanic glass in aqueous environments contains microorganisms that dissolve the glass and leave secondary minerals such as clay, iron oxides, and sulfides in the voids. The microbial excavation of the glass produces a wide variety shapes and sizes. These microbially produced excavations may be 100 micrometers long by 3 micrometer diameter tubes, starbursts of radiating tubes, branching 1 micrometer diameter tubes, or other shapes. These tubes and excavations are distinctive, they are associated with bacteria, and they are preserved along with the glass. In surveys of volcanic glass from subaqueous lava flows we have found this evidence of microbial activity in rocks at ocean subbottom depths of a few meters to 1500 meters. These rocks range in age from about 1 million years to 170 millions years. Where submarine volcanic rocks have been uplifted to dry land, the glass may also preserve microbial patterns of glass alteration. Comparisons of terrestrial and Martian landforms could reveal the locations of subaqueous volcanic activity on Mars. Given the similarity of compositions of igneous rocks on the two planets, subaqueous eruptions on Mars will have quenched glass exteriors. Evidence of microbial colonization of the glass will be preserved as long as the glass is preserved. Also, the microbial activity that produces

  2. Novel method for detecting micro-organisms in blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, D; Hinder, S; Swaine, D; Bridson, E Y

    1986-01-01

    A method for detecting the growth of micro-organisms in blood culture by a visual signal is described. The system utilises a single blood culture medium that has been specifically formulated to support growth of aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic micro-organisms. The system is based on the principle that when micro-organisms grow in the medium in a sealed bottle their metabolic products create positive pressure. This positive pressure displaces the infected blood and broth into an upper chamber, which acts as a visual signal of microbial activity. All the test micro-organisms, when inoculated at less than 20 colony forming units into simulated human blood cultures, gave a positive signal. PMID:3098802

  3. Microorganisms meet solid minerals: interactions and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Ng, Daphne H P; Kumar, Amit; Cao, Bin

    2016-08-01

    In natural and engineered environments, microorganisms often co-exist and interact with various minerals or mineral-containing solids. Microorganism-mineral interactions contribute significantly to environmental processes, including biogeochemical cycles in natural ecosystems and biodeterioration of materials in engineered environments. In this mini-review, we provide a summary of several key mechanisms involved in microorganism-mineral interactions, including the following: (i) solid minerals serve as substrata for biofilm development; (ii) solid minerals serve as an electron source or sink for microbial respiration; (iii) solid minerals provide microorganisms with macro or micronutrients for cell growth; and (iv) (semi)conductive solid minerals serve as extracellular electron conduits facilitating cell-to-cell interactions. We also highlight recent developments in harnessing microbe-mineral interactions for biotechnological applications. PMID:27338573

  4. Technologies for Beneficial Microorganisms Inocula Used as Biofertilizers

    PubMed Central

    Malusá, E.; Sas-Paszt, L.; Ciesielska, J.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing need for environmentaly friendly agricultural practices is driving the use of fertilizers based on beneficial microorganisms. The latter belong to a wide array of genera, classes, and phyla, ranging from bacteria to yeasts and fungi, which can support plant nutrition with different mechanisms. Moreover, studies on the interactions between plant, soil, and the different microorganisms are shedding light on their interrelationships thus providing new possible ways to exploit them for agricultural purposes. However, even though the inoculation of plants with these microorganisms is a well-known practice, the formulation of inocula with a reliable and consistent effect under field conditions is still a bottleneck for their wider use. The choice of the technology for inocula production and of the carrier for the formulation is key to their successful application. This paper focuses on how inoculation issues can be approached to improve the performance of beneficial microorganisms used as a tool for enhancing plant growth and yield. PMID:22547984

  5. MICROORGANISMS IN BIOSOLIDS: ANALYTICAL METHODS DEVELOPMENT, STANDARDIZATION, AND VALIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this presentation is to discuss pathogens of concern in biosolids, the analytical techniques used to evaluate microorganisms in biosolids, and to discuss standardization and validation of analytical protocols for microbes within such a complex matrix. Implicatio...

  6. EVALUATING THE MAINTENANCE AND EFFECTS OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concepts and methods were identified for their utility in evaluating the persistence and potential perturbations of genetically engineered microorganisms in the environment. Novel uses of DNA reassociation kinetics and gene probe technologies, in conjunction with conventional bac...

  7. Effective Dynamics of Microorganisms That Interact with Their Own Trail.

    PubMed

    Kranz, W Till; Gelimson, Anatolij; Zhao, Kun; Wong, Gerard C L; Golestanian, Ramin

    2016-07-15

    Like ants, some microorganisms are known to leave trails on surfaces to communicate. We explore how trail-mediated self-interaction could affect the behavior of individual microorganisms when diffusive spreading of the trail is negligible on the time scale of the microorganism using a simple phenomenological model for an actively moving particle and a finite-width trail. The effective dynamics of each microorganism takes on the form of a stochastic integral equation with the trail interaction appearing in the form of short-term memory. For a moderate coupling strength below an emergent critical value, the dynamics exhibits effective diffusion in both orientation and position after a phase of superdiffusive reorientation. We report experimental verification of a seemingly counterintuitive perpendicular alignment mechanism that emerges from the model. PMID:27472143

  8. Effective Dynamics of Microorganisms That Interact with Their Own Trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, W. Till; Gelimson, Anatolij; Zhao, Kun; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2016-07-01

    Like ants, some microorganisms are known to leave trails on surfaces to communicate. We explore how trail-mediated self-interaction could affect the behavior of individual microorganisms when diffusive spreading of the trail is negligible on the time scale of the microorganism using a simple phenomenological model for an actively moving particle and a finite-width trail. The effective dynamics of each microorganism takes on the form of a stochastic integral equation with the trail interaction appearing in the form of short-term memory. For a moderate coupling strength below an emergent critical value, the dynamics exhibits effective diffusion in both orientation and position after a phase of superdiffusive reorientation. We report experimental verification of a seemingly counterintuitive perpendicular alignment mechanism that emerges from the model.

  9. Marine microorganisms as potential biofactories for synthesis of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Nam, Seung Yun; Oh, Junghwan

    2016-11-01

    The use of marine microorganisms as potential biofactories for green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles is a relatively new field of research with considerable prospects. This method is eco-friendly, time saving, and inexpensive and can be easily scaled up for large-scale synthesis. The increasing need to develop simple, nontoxic, clean, and environmentally safe production methods for nanoparticles and to decrease environmental impact, minimize waste, and increase energy productivity has become important in this field. Marine microorganisms are tiny organisms that live in marine ecosystems and account for >98% of biomass of the world's ocean. Marine microorganisms synthesize metallic nanoparticles either intracellularly or extracellularly. Marine microbially-produced metallic nanoparticles have received considerable attention in recent years because of their expected impact on various applications such as medicine, energy, electronic, and space industries. The present review discusses marine microorganisms as potential biofactories for the green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles and their potential applications. PMID:26920850

  10. Indigenous microorganisms production and the effect on composting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Bakar, Nurul-Ain; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    In this study, production of indigenous microorganisms (IMO) and effect on addition of IMO in composting process were done. Production of IMO was done in a series of steps to allow propagation of beneficial microorganisms. Effect of IMO addition in composting process was investigated by having 4 treatments; 1) rice straw without IMO nor manure and rice bran, 2) rice straw with IMO only, 3) rice straw with manure and rice bran, 4) rice straw with IMO, manure and rice bran. Production of IMO using cooked rice yields white molds. Addition of IMO during composting did not affect temperature increment. However, there were differences in numbers of microorganisms found during each stages of composting. Initial composting stage was dominated by mesophilic bacteria and actinomycetes, followed by thermophilic bacteria and later by actinomycetes upon composting completion. In conclusion, this study showed that IMO addition in composting increased microorganisms which are responsible in organic decomposition.

  11. Quest for Microorganisms Existing at High Atmosphere and Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokobori, S.; Yang, Y.; Sugino, T.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Itahashi, S.; Fujisaki, K.; Fushimi, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Hayashi, N.; Imai, E.; Itoh, T.; Kawai, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Marumo, K.; Mita, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Narumi, I.; Okudaira, K.; Shimada, H.; Tabata, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Yabuta, H.; Yamashita, M.; Yano, H.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Yamagishi, A.

    2010-04-01

    We have tested effects of various factors in space environment on survivability of Deinococcus spp. including our newly isolated species at high altitude. In "Tanpopo" mission, we are planning to expose microorganisms such as deinococcal species.

  12. Multiorganismal Insects: Diversity and Function of Resident Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Angela E.

    2015-01-01

    All insects are colonized by microorganisms on the insect exoskeleton, in the gut and hemocoel, and within insect cells. The insect microbiota is generally different from microorganisms in the external environment, including ingested food. Specifically, certain microbial taxa are favored by the conditions and resources in the insect habitat, by their tolerance of insect immunity, and by specific mechanisms for their transmission. The resident microorganisms can promote insect fitness by contributing to nutrition, especially by providing essential amino acids, B vitamins, and, for fungal partners, sterols. Some microorganisms protect their insect hosts against pathogens, parasitoids, and other parasites by synthesizing specific toxins or modifying the insect immune system. Priorities for future research include elucidation of microbial contributions to detoxification, especially of plant allelochemicals in phytophagous insects, and resistance to pathogens; as well as their role in among-insect communication; and the potential value of manipulation of the microbiota to control insect pests. PMID:25341109

  13. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CONTROL OF RELEASED MICROORGANISMS AT FIELD SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An important consideration in the environmental release of a genetically engineered microorganism (GEM) is the capability for reduction or elimination of GEM populations once their function is completed or if adverse environmental effects are observed. In this study the decontami...

  14. SAMPLING FOR ORGANIC CHEMICALS AND MICROORGANISMS IN THE SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Procedures currently used by the Ground Water Research Branch of the Environmental Protection Agency for sampling for organic pollutants and microorganisms in ground waters and subsurface earth solids are presented. Technology is described for construction of wells capable of pro...

  15. Microorganisms having enhanced resistance to acetate and methods of use

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Yang, Shihui

    2014-10-21

    The present invention provides isolated or genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced resistance to acetate as a result of increased expression of a sodium proton antiporter. The present invention also provides methods for producing such microbial strains, as well as related promoter sequences and expression vectors. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using microorganisms with enhanced resistance to acetate.

  16. Stethoscopes as potential intrahospital carriers of pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Campos-Murguía, Alejandro; León-Lara, Ximena; Muñoz, Juan M; Macías, Alejandro E; Alvarez, José A

    2014-01-01

    Stethoscopes can take part in the transmission of health care-associated infections. We cultured 112 stethoscopes by direct imprint on blood agar to estimate the prevalence of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Forty-eight (47%) produced 50 potentially pathogenic microorganisms; from these, 43 (86%) were Staphylococcus aureus, of which 18 (42%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus. We concluded that stethoscopes should be considered as potential fomites and must be disinfected routinely before and after each patient contact. PMID:24176606

  17. Rotary Apparatus Concentrates And Separates Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus concentrates and separates swimming micro-organisms of different species into concentric rings in fluid. Fluid containing high concentration of desired species removed by use of small scoop placed into fluid at radius of one of rings formed by that species. Micro-organisms concentrated into concentric rings by combined dynamic effects of upward and horizontal components of swimming, rotation of dish, gravitation, and viscosity.

  18. Method for treating wastewater using microorganisms and vascular aquatic plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method for treating wastewater compresses subjecting the wastewater to an anaerobic setting step for at least 6 hours and passing the liquid effluent from the anaerobic settling step through a filter cell in an upflow manner. There the effluent is subjected first to the action of anaerobic and facultative microorganisms, and then to the action of aerobic microorganisms and the roots of at least one vascular aquatic plant.

  19. Marine Microorganisms: perspectives for getting involved in cellulosic ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The production of ethanol has been considered as an alternative to replace part of the petroleum derivate. Brazil and the US are the leading producers, but more environmentally friendly alternatives are needed. Lignocellulose has an enormous potential but technology has to be still improve in order to economically produce ethanol. The present paper reviews the potential and problems of this technology and proposes the study of a group of microorganisms with the largest genetic pool, marine microorganism. PMID:22931793

  20. Analytical techniques for direct identification of biosignatures and microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, C.; Garcia-Descalzo, L.; Garcia-Lopez, E.; Postigo, M.; Alcazar, A.; Baquero, F.

    2012-09-01

    Rover missions to potentially habitable ecosystems require portable instruments that use minimal power, require no sample preparation, and provide suitably diagnostic information to an Earth-based exploration team. In exploration of terrestrial analogue environments of potentially habitable ecosystems it is important to screen rapidly for the presence of biosignatures and microorganisms and especially to identify them accurately. In this study, several analytical techniques for the direct identification of biosignatures and microorganisms in different Earth analogues of habitable ecosystems are compared.

  1. Microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to inhibitors and stress

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Steven D.; Yang, Shihui

    2014-07-29

    The present invention provides genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced tolerance to stress and/or inhibitors such as sodium acetate and vanillin. The enhanced tolerance can be achieved by increasing the expression of a protein of the Sm-like superfamily such as a bacterial Hfq protein and a fungal Sm or Lsm protein. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using the genetically modified microorganisms of the present invention.

  2. 40 CFR 725.15 - Determining applicability when microorganism identity or use is confidential or uncertain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... confidential version. (2) Uncertain microorganism identity. The current state of scientific knowledge leads to some imprecision in describing a microorganism. As the state of knowledge increases, EPA will...

  3. Quantity analysis of micro-organisms in bottled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Xiangyong

    2008-12-01

    Water is necessary to human being and all kinds of animals and plants. In recently years, Bottled Water become the main drinking water whatever for families or for institutions. But most of them have no conception of the water's safety or quality. To have conceptions of the count and distributing of the microorganisms in bucket pure water, we use fluorescent microscope counting stained with SYBR Green I to research the microorganisms (including virus) quantity in Bottled Water for six samples produced in different place. Analyzing shows that the quantity of the microorganisms in these water are different. Some up to 11.912×106 virus/ m L. The quality of Bottled Water needs to be improved. And the quantity of microorganisms in the water is different with different ways to keep the water. At the same time, it shows that fluorescent microscope counting stained with SYBR Green I method is simple and high sensitive to such low microorganisms quantity water sample. It can be used in the microorganisms dynamic quantity research in drinking water.

  4. Clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Questions for this month's clinical challenge are based on articles in this issue. The clinical challenge is endorsed by the RACGP Quality Improvement and Continuing Professional Development (QI&CPD) program and has been allocated four Category 2 points (Activity ID:59922). Answers to this clinical challenge are available immediately following successful completion online at http://gplearning.racgp.org.au. Clinical challenge quizzes may be completed at any time throughout the 2014-16 triennium; therefore, the previous months' answers are not published. Each of the questions or incomplete statements below is followed by four suggested answers or completions. Select the most appropriate statement as your answer. PMID:27606376

  5. The small domain of cytochrome f from the psychrophile Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO 241 modulates the apparent molecular mass and decreases the accumulation of cytochrome f in the mesophile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Loiselay, Christelle; Savitch, Leonid V; Simmonds, John; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Choquet, Yves; Hüner, Norman P A

    2007-10-01

    Cytochrome f from the psychrophile Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO 241 has a lower thermostability of its c-type heme and an apparent molecular mass that is 7 kDa lower than that of the model mesophilic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We combined chloroplast transformation, site-directed mutagensis, and the creation of chimeric fusion constructs to assess the contribution of specific domains and (or) amino acids residues to the structure, stability, and accumulation of cytochrome f, as well as its function in photosynthetic intersystem electron transport. We demonstrate that differences in the amino acid sequence of the small domain and specific charged amino acids in the large domain of cytochrome f alter the physical properties of this protein but do not affect either the thermostability of the c-type heme, the apparent half-life of cytochrome f in the presence of the chloroplastic protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol, or the capacity for photosynthetic intersystem electron transport, measured as e-/P700. However, pulse-labeling with [14C]acetate, combined with immunoblotting, indicated that the negative autoregulation of cytochrome f accumulation observed in mesophilic C. reinhardtii transformed with chimeric constructs from the psychrophile was likely the result of the defective association of the chimeric forms of cytochrome f with the other subunits of the cytochrome b6/f complex native to the C. reinhardtii wild type. These results are discussed in terms of the unique fatty acid composition of the thylakoid membranes of C. raudensis UWO 241 adapted to cold environments. PMID:17901903

  6. Biotechnological production of limonene in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Jongedijk, Esmer; Cankar, Katarina; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2016-04-01

    This mini review describes novel, biotechnology-based, ways of producing the monoterpene limonene. Limonene is applied in relatively highly priced products, such as fragrances, and also has applications with lower value but large production volume, such as biomaterials. Limonene is currently produced as a side product from the citrus juice industry, but the availability and quality are fluctuating and may be insufficient for novel bulk applications. Therefore, complementary microbial production of limonene would be interesting. Since limonene can be derivatized to high-value compounds, microbial platforms also have a great potential beyond just producing limonene. In this review, we discuss the ins and outs of microbial limonene production in comparison with plant-based and chemical production. Achievements and specific challenges for microbial production of limonene are discussed, especially in the light of bulk applications such as biomaterials. PMID:26915992

  7. Challenges and opportunities of airborne metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles. PMID:25953766

  8. Challenges and Opportunities of Airborne Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles. PMID:25953766

  9. Fluid flow enhances the effectiveness of toxin export by aquatic microorganisms: a first-passage perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas; Clark, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Aquatic microorganisms face a variety of challenges in the course of development. One central challenge is efficiently regulating the export of toxic molecules inside the developing embryo. The strategies employed should be robust with respect to the variable ocean environment and limit the chances that exported toxins are reabsorbed. In this talk we consider the first-passage problem for the uptake of exported toxins by a spherical embryo. A perturbative solution of the advection-diffusion equation reveals that a concentration boundary layer forms in the vicinity of the embryo, and that fluid flow enhances the effectiveness of toxin export. We highlight connections between the model results and recent experiments on the development of sea urchin embryos. We acknowledge financial support from the University of Michigan-Dearobrn CASL Faculty Summer Research Grant.

  10. Featherweight Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Ryan, Larry

    2012-01-01

    As science, technology education, and engineering programs suffer budget cuts, educators continue to seek cost-effective activities that engage students and reinforce standards. The featherweight challenge is a hands-on activity that challenges students to continually refine their design while not breaking the budget. This activity uses one of the…

  11. Stramenopile microorganisms associated with the massive coral Favia sp.

    PubMed

    Siboni, Nachshon; Rasoulouniriana, Diana; Ben-Dov, Eitan; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Sivan, Alex; Loya, Yossi; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    The surfaces of massive corals of the genus Favia from Eilat, Red Sea, and from Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef, are covered by a layer of eukaryotic microorganisms. These microorganisms are embedded in the coral mucus and tissue. In the Gulf of Eilat, the prevalence of corals covered by patches of eukaryotic microorganisms was positively correlated with a decrease in water temperatures (from 25-28 degrees C in the summer to 20-23 degrees C in winter). Comparisons carried out using transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed morphological similarities between the microorganisms from the two geographically distant reefs. The microorganisms found on and in the tissues were approximately 5-15 microm in diameter, surrounded by scales in their cell wall, contained a nucleus, and included unique auto-florescent coccoid bodies of approximately 1 mum. Such morphological characters suggested that these microorganisms are stramenopile protists and in particular thraustochytrids. Molecular analysis, carried out using specific primers for stramenopile 18S rRNA genes, revealed that 90% (111/123) of the clones in the gene libraries were from the Thraustochytriidae. The dominant genera in this family were Aplanochytrium sp., Thraustochytrium sp., and Labyrinthuloides sp. Ten stramenopile strains were isolated and cultured from the corals. Some strains showed > or =97% similarity to clones derived from libraries of mucus-associated microorganisms retrieved directly from these corals. Fatty acid characterization of one of the prevalent strains revealed a high percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids, including omega-3. The possible association of these stramenopiles in the coral holobiont appeared to be a positive one. PMID:20236189

  12. Biosurfactants Produced by Marine Microorganisms with Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gudiña, Eduardo J.; Teixeira, José A.; Rodrigues, Lígia R.

    2016-01-01

    Marine microorganisms possess unique metabolic and physiological features and are an important source of new biomolecules, such as biosurfactants. Some of these surface-active compounds synthesized by marine microorganisms exhibit antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm activity against a broad spectrum of human pathogens (including multi-drug resistant pathogens), and could be used instead of existing drugs to treat infections caused by them. In other cases, these biosurfactants show anti-cancer activity, which could be envisaged as an alternative to conventional therapies. However, marine biosurfactants have not been widely explored, mainly due to the difficulties associated with the isolation and growth of their producing microorganisms. Culture-independent techniques (metagenomics) constitute a promising approach to study the genetic resources of otherwise inaccessible marine microorganisms without the requirement of culturing them, and can contribute to the discovery of novel biosurfactants with significant biological activities. This paper reviews the most relevant biosurfactants produced by marine microorganisms with potential therapeutic applications and discusses future perspectives and opportunities to discover novel molecules from marine environments. PMID:26901207

  13. Interplay between microorganisms and geochemistry in geological carbon storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Altman, Susan J.; Kirk, Matthew Fletcher; Santillan, Eugenio-Felipe U.; Bennett, Philip C.

    2016-02-28

    Researchers at the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security (CFSES) have conducted laboratory and modeling studies to better understand the interplay between microorganisms and geochemistry for geological carbon storage (GCS). We provide evidence of microorganisms adapting to high pressure CO2 conditions and identify factors that may influence survival of cells to CO2 stress. Factors that influenced the ability of cells to survive exposure to high-pressure CO2 in our experiments include mineralogy, the permeability of cell walls and/or membranes, intracellular buffering capacity, and whether cells live planktonically or within biofilm. Column experiments show that, following exposure to acidic water, biomassmore » can remain intact in porous media and continue to alter hydraulic conductivity. Our research also shows that geochemical changes triggered by CO2 injection can alter energy available to populations of subsurface anaerobes and that microbial feedbacks on this effect can influence carbon storage. Our research documents the impact of CO2 on microorganisms and in turn, how subsurface microorganisms can influence GCS. Furthermore, we conclude that microbial presence and activities can have important implications for carbon storage and that microorganisms should not be overlooked in further GCS research.« less

  14. Mini-review: Inhibition of biofouling by marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Dobretsov, Sergey; Abed, Raeid M M; Teplitski, Max

    2013-01-01

    Any natural or artificial substratum exposed to seawater is quickly fouled by marine microorganisms and later by macrofouling species. Microfouling organisms on the surface of a substratum form heterogenic biofilms, which are composed of multiple species of heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, protozoa and fungi. Biofilms on artificial structures create serious problems for industries worldwide, with effects including an increase in drag force and metal corrosion as well as a reduction in heat transfer efficiency. Additionally, microorganisms produce chemical compounds that may induce or inhibit settlement and growth of other fouling organisms. Since the last review by the first author on inhibition of biofouling by marine microbes in 2006, significant progress has been made in the field. Several antimicrobial, antialgal and antilarval compounds have been isolated from heterotrophic marine bacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi. Some of these compounds have multiple bioactivities. Microorganisms are able to disrupt biofilms by inhibition of bacterial signalling and production of enzymes that degrade bacterial signals and polymers. Epibiotic microorganisms associated with marine algae and invertebrates have a high antifouling (AF) potential, which can be used to solve biofouling problems in industry. However, more information about the production of AF compounds by marine microorganisms in situ and their mechanisms of action needs to be obtained. This review focuses on the AF activity of marine heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi and covers publications from 2006 up to the end of 2012. PMID:23574279

  15. Assessment of cellulolytic microorganisms in soils of Nevados Park, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Avellaneda-Torres, Lizeth Manuela; Pulido, Claudia Patricia Guevara; Rojas, Esperanza Torres

    2014-01-01

    A systematized survey was conducted to find soil-borne microbes that degrade cellulose in soils from unique ecosystems, such as the Superpáramo, Páramo, and the High Andean Forest in the Nevados National Natural Park (NNNP), Colombia. These high mountain ecosystems represent extreme environments, such as high levels of solar radiation, low atmospheric pressure, and extreme daily changes in temperature. Cellulolytic activity of the microorganisms was evaluated using qualitative tests, such as growth in selective media followed by staining with congo red and iodine, and quantitative tests to determine the activity of endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, exoglucanase, and total cellulase. Microorganisms were identified using molecular markers, such as the 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of ribosomal DNA for fungi. Multivariate statistical analysis (MVA) was used to select microorganisms with high cellulolytic capacity. A total of 108 microorganisms were isolated from the soils and, in general, the enzymatic activities of fungi were higher than those of bacteria. Our results also found that none of the organisms studied were able to degrade all the components of the cellulose and it is therefore suggested that a combination of bacteria and/or fungi with various enzymatic activities be used to obtain high total cellulolytic activity. This study gives an overview of the potential microorganism that could be used for cellulose degradation in various biotechnological applications and for sustainable agricultural waste treatment. PMID:25763024

  16. Capillary isoelectric focusing of native and inactivated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Horká, M; Kubícek, O; Růzicka, F; Holá, V; Malinovská, I; Slais, K

    2007-07-01

    The research of microorganisms includes the development of methods for the inactivation of viruses and other microbes. It also means to efficiently eliminate the infectivity of microorganisms without damage of their integrity and structure. According to the results of the last 5 years the capillary electromigration techniques appear to be very perspective for the comparison of the methods applicable for inactivation in the diagnostics and study of the pathogens. In this paper we suggest the capillary isoelectric focusing of the model microorganisms, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans and bacteriophage PhiX 174, native or inactivated by different procedures. UV detection and fluorometric detection for the dynamically modified microbes by pyrenebutanoate on the basis of the non-ionogenic tenside were used here. Isoelectric points of native and/or dynamically modified microorganisms and other properties were compared with those obtained after microorganisms inactivation. The segmental injection of the sample pulse enabled the reproducible and efficient capillary isoelectric focusing in different pH gradients. The low-molecular-weight pI markers were used for tracing of the pH gradient. PMID:17328903

  17. Identification and Characterization of Extremophile Microorganisms with Significance to Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bej, Asim K.

    2003-01-01

    It is now well recognized that microorganisms thrive in extreme ecological conditions such as geothermal vents, polar region, acid and alkaline lakes, and the cold pressurized depth of the ocean floor of this planet. Morphological, physiological, biochemical and genetic adaptations to extreme environments by these extremophile microorganisms have generated immense interest amongst astrobiologists who increasingly believe in the existence of extraterrestrial life. The evidence collected by NASA's space probe Galileo suggested the presence of liquid water and volcanic activity on Mars and Jupiter's satellite Europa. Volcanic activity provides some of the heat necessary to keep the water on Europa from freezing that could provide important dissolved chemicals needed by living organisms. The possibility of the existence of hypersaline alkaline lakes and evaporites confined within closed volcanic basins and impact craters on Mars, and a layer of liquid water under the ice on Europa provide sufficient 'raison d'etre' to study microorganisms in similar extreme environments on Earth, which could provide us with a model that would help establish the existence of extraterrestrial life on other planetary bodies. The objectives of the summer research project were as follows: (1) application of molecular approaches to help establish new species of extremophile microorganisms isolated from a hypersaline alkaline lake; and (2) identification of a major cold-shock gene (cspA) homolog from a psychrotolerant microorganism, PmagG1.

  18. Assessment of cellulolytic microorganisms in soils of Nevados Park, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Avellaneda-Torres, Lizeth Manuela; Pulido, Claudia Patricia Guevara; Rojas, Esperanza Torres

    2014-01-01

    A systematized survey was conducted to find soil-borne microbes that degrade cellulose in soils from unique ecosystems, such as the Superpáramo, Páramo, and the High Andean Forest in the Nevados National Natural Park (NNNP), Colombia. These high mountain ecosystems represent extreme environments, such as high levels of solar radiation, low atmospheric pressure, and extreme daily changes in temperature. Cellulolytic activity of the microorganisms was evaluated using qualitative tests, such as growth in selective media followed by staining with congo red and iodine, and quantitative tests to determine the activity of endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, exoglucanase, and total cellulase. Microorganisms were identified using molecular markers, such as the 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of ribosomal DNA for fungi. Multivariate statistical analysis (MVA) was used to select microorganisms with high cellulolytic capacity. A total of 108 microorganisms were isolated from the soils and, in general, the enzymatic activities of fungi were higher than those of bacteria. Our results also found that none of the organisms studied were able to degrade all the components of the cellulose and it is therefore suggested that a combination of bacteria and/or fungi with various enzymatic activities be used to obtain high total cellulolytic activity. This study gives an overview of the potential microorganism that could be used for cellulose degradation in various biotechnological applications and for sustainable agricultural waste treatment. PMID:25763024

  19. [Effects of transgenic crops on soil microorganisms: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Xie, Ming; Peng, De-Liang

    2013-09-01

    The worldwide cultivation of transgenic crops not only provides tremendous economic benefits, but also induces the concern about the potential risks of transgenic crops on soil ecosystem in which microorganisms are involved. The potential effects of transgenic crops on soil microorganisms include the direct effects of the transgenic proteins on non-target soil microorganisms, and the indirect effects of the unintentional changes in the chemical compositions of root exudates induced by the introduction of the exogenous transgenic proteins. Most of the studies on transgenic crops suggested that transgenic crops could affect the quantity and structure of soil microbial populations. However, the perceivable effects on the soil microorganisms are inconsistent, with some in significant and others in non-significant, or some with persistent and others with non-persistent. This paper summarized the effects of different transgenic crops on soil microorganisms, and discussed the factors affecting the assessment reliability, including the species of transgenic crops and the experimental technologies and principles. Some issues needed to be paid special attention to in the future studies were put forward. PMID:24417130

  20. 9 CFR 114.5 - Micro-organisms used as seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Micro-organisms used as seed. 114.5... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.5 Micro-organisms used as seed. Micro-organisms used in the preparation of... conditions. A complete record of such micro-organisms shall be kept currently correct and a list submitted...

  1. 9 CFR 114.5 - Micro-organisms used as seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Micro-organisms used as seed. 114.5... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.5 Micro-organisms used as seed. Micro-organisms used in the preparation of... conditions. A complete record of such micro-organisms shall be kept currently correct and a list submitted...

  2. Review: Diversity of Microorganisms in Global Fermented Foods and Beverages.

    PubMed

    Tamang, Jyoti P; Watanabe, Koichi; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H

    2016-01-01

    Culturalable and non-culturable microorganisms naturally ferment majority of global fermented foods and beverages. Traditional food fermentation represents an extremely valuable cultural heritage in most regions, and harbors a huge genetic potential of valuable but hitherto undiscovered strains. Holistic approaches for identification and complete profiling of both culturalable and non-culturable microorganisms in global fermented foods are of interest to food microbiologists. The application of culture-independent technique has thrown new light on the diversity of a number of hitherto unknown and non-cultural microorganisms in naturally fermented foods. Functional bacterial groups ("phylotypes") may be reflected by their mRNA expression in a particular substrate and not by mere DNA-level detection. An attempt has been made to review the microbiology of some fermented foods and alcoholic beverages of the world. PMID:27047484

  3. Workshop on Spaceflight Alterations in Host-Microorganism Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark

    2010-01-01

    On June 11, 2009, a workshop that included internal and external experts was convened to determine the risk of changes in microorganisms that could alter host-microorganism interactions during a mission. The evidence is based in part on multiple flight experiments which indicate altered virulence in Salmonella typhimurium when cultured in flight. The workshop participants were tasked to determine if adequate information was available to initiate changes in NASA's current approach to infectious disease risk assessment and medical operations. The consensus of the participants is that the current evidence was not adequate to provide direction for operational changes; however, the evidence is compelling and clearly indicates that changes to microorganisms were occurring during spaceflight and further research is required.

  4. Multispecies Swarms of Social Microorganisms as Moving Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Finkelshtein, Alin; Ariel, Gil; Ingham, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Microorganisms use collective migration to cross barriers and reach new habitats, and the ability to form motile swarms offers a competitive advantage. Traditionally, dispersal by microbial swarm propagation has been studied in monoculture. Microorganisms can facilitate other species' dispersal by forming multispecies swarms, with mutual benefits. One party (the transporter) moves a sessile partner (the cargo). This results in asymmetric associations ranging from temporary marriages of convenience to long-term fellow travellers. In the context of the 'microbial market', the parties offer very different services in exchange. We discuss bacteria transporting bacteria, eukaryotic microorganisms moving bacteria, and bacteria facilitating the spread of eukaryotes - and ask what the benefits are, the methods of study, and the consequences of multispecies, swarming logistics networks. PMID:26822253

  5. [Conditionally pathogenic microorganisms in patients with bisphosphonate jaw osteonecrosis].

    PubMed

    Ivanyushko, T P; Polyakov, K A; Medvedev, Yu A; Shamanaev, S V; Trofimov, D Yu; Abramov, D D; Balyikin, R A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to define treatment strategy in cases of facial bones bisphosphonate induced osteonecrosis based on the study of the role of conditionally pathogenic oral microorganisms. Three typical clinical cases of bisphosphonate osteonecrosis of the facial bones were analyzed and 15 conditionally pathogenic oral microorganisms were identified in these patients using real-time PCR in saliva, wound and bone samples. A comparative analysis was carried out with purulent-inflammatory diseases of maxillofacial area. The study results proved an important role of conditionally pathogenic microorganisms of the oral cavity in the development of osteonecrosis of the facial bones. Wide range of bacterial species was identified in osteonecrosis of the facial bones patients. While bone tissue is most exposed to microbial communities, surgical treatment results in effective rehabilitation for a long period. PMID:26925566

  6. Plant development in the absence of epiphytic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, U.; Koopmann, V.; Grotha, R.

    2002-05-01

    Microorganisms (bacteria, fungi) are common residents of the roots, stems and leaves of higher plants. In order to explore the dependency of plant development on the presence of epiphytic microorganisms, the achenes (seeds) of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were sterilized and germinated under aseptic conditions. The sterility of the seedlings was determined with the agar impression method. In seedlings from non-sterile seeds (control) that were likewise raised in a germ-free environment, all plant organs investigated (stem, cotyledons and primary leaves) were contaminated with bacteria. Hypocotyl elongation was not affected by epiphytic microorganisms. However, the growth rates of the cotyledons and primary leaves were higher in sterile seedlings compared with the control. The implications of this differential inhibition of organ development by epiphytic bacteria that are transmitted via the outer surface of the seed coat are discussed. We conclude that epiphytes in the above-ground phytosphere are not necessary for the development of the sunflower seedling.

  7. Review: Diversity of Microorganisms in Global Fermented Foods and Beverages

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Jyoti P.; Watanabe, Koichi; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H.

    2016-01-01

    Culturalable and non-culturable microorganisms naturally ferment majority of global fermented foods and beverages. Traditional food fermentation represents an extremely valuable cultural heritage in most regions, and harbors a huge genetic potential of valuable but hitherto undiscovered strains. Holistic approaches for identification and complete profiling of both culturalable and non-culturable microorganisms in global fermented foods are of interest to food microbiologists. The application of culture-independent technique has thrown new light on the diversity of a number of hitherto unknown and non-cultural microorganisms in naturally fermented foods. Functional bacterial groups (“phylotypes”) may be reflected by their mRNA expression in a particular substrate and not by mere DNA-level detection. An attempt has been made to review the microbiology of some fermented foods and alcoholic beverages of the world. PMID:27047484

  8. Heavy metals and adsorbents effects on activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ong, S A; Lim, P E; Seng, C E

    2004-01-01

    The sorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from synthetic solution by powdered activated carbon (PAC), biomass, rice husk (RH) and activated rice husk (ARH) were investigate under batch conditions. After activated by concentrated nitric acid for 15 hours at 60-65 degrees C, the adsorption capacity for RH was increased. The adsorbents arranged in the increasing order of adsorption capacities to the Langmuir Q degree parameter were biomass > PAC > ARH > RH. The addition of adsorbents in base mix solution had increased the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) activated sludge microorganisms with and without the presence of metals. The increased of SOUR were due to the ability of PAC and RH in reducing the inhibitory effect of metals on microorganisms and provide a reaction site between activated sludge microorganisms and substrates. PMID:15141467

  9. Population dynamics of transgenic microorganisms in the different microecosystem conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, L. Yu.; Lobova, T. I.; Krylova, T. Yu.; Kargatova, T. V.; Maksimova, E. E.; Boyandin, A. N.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    The role of key environmental factors in adaptation of spore-forming and non-spore-forming transgenic microorganisms (TM) have been studied in model ecosystems. Model TM Escherichia coli Z905 (bearing plasmid genes of bacterial luminescence Ap rLux +) has been found to have a higher adaptation potential than TM Bacillus subtilis 2335/105 (bearing genes of human α 2-interferon Km rInf +), planned for employment as a living vaccine under varying environmental conditions. Effects of abiotic factors on migration of natural and recombinant plasmids between microorganisms under model ecosystem conditions has been estimated. The transgenic microorganisms with low copy number survived better under introduction conditions in the microcosms studied. This trend has been shown to be independent of the microcosm type and its complexity.

  10. Fluorescent antibody detection of microorganisms in terrestrial environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    The fluorescent antibody technique and its use in direct microscopic examination of the soil is discussed. Feasibility analyses were made to determine if the method could be used to simultaneously observe and recognize microorganisms in the soil. Some data indicate this may be possible. Data are also given on two related problems involving the interaction of soil microorganisms with plant roots to form symbiotic structures. One was concerned with the developmental ecology and biology of the root nodule of alder and the second was concerned with the ectotrophic mycorrhizal structure on forest trees, especially pines. In both, the fluorescent antibody detection of the microbial symbiont both as a free living form in soil, and as a root inhabiting form in the higher plant was emphasized. A third aspect of the research involved the detection of autotrophic ammonia oxidizing microorganisms in soil.

  11. Limitations to growth of microorganisms on Uranus, Neptune, and Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Halvorson, H. O.; Lewis, J.; Cameron, A. G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Reappraisal of the probabilistic policy toward planetary contamination by terrestrial microorganisms carried aboard space probes is suggested on the grounds that assignment of numerical probabilities to qualitatively unknown phenomena, as expressed in Phillips's (1974) formulation of the probability of contamination, is inappropriate. As an alternative, it is proposed that fundamental knowledge of the interacting nature of life on earth, interrelations between terrestrial organisms, and continuing effects of these organisms on earth's atmosphere and surface should guide the formulation of a sounder scientific quarantine policy. Simple conservative atmospheric models most favorable for life on Uranus and Neptune are examined. It is concluded that terrestrial microorganisms will not grow on either planet due to limitations of liquid water, atmospheric convection to lethal depths, the absence of energy sources and nutrients, the presence of ammonia and hydrogen, insufficient concentrations of biologically necessary ions, and the lack of a surface. The likelihood of terrestrial microorganism growth on Titan is found to be vanishingly small.

  12. Accumulation of motile elongated micro-organisms in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Caijuan; Sardina, Gaetano; Lushi, Enkeleida; Brandt, Luca

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on marine life by performing numerical simulations of motile microorganisms, modelled as prolate spheroids, in isotropic homogeneous turbulence. We show that the clustering and patchiness observed in laminar flows, linear shear and vortex flows, are significantly reduced in a three-dimensional turbulent flow mainly because of the complex topology; elongated micro-orgamisms show some level of clustering in the case of swimmers without any preferential alignment whereas spherical swimmers remain uniformly distributed. Micro-organisms with one preferential swimming direction (e.g. gyrotaxis) still show significant clustering if spherical in shape, whereas prolate swimmers remain more uniformly distributed. Due to their large sensitivity to the local shear, these elongated swimmers react slower to the action of vorticity and gravity and therefore do not have time to accumulate in a turbulent flow. These results show how purely hydrodynamic effects can alter the ecology of microorganisms that can vary their shape and their preferential orientation.

  13. Microorganism screening for limonene bioconversion and correlation with RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Toniazzo, Geciane; Lerin, Lindomar; de Oliveira, Débora; Dariva, Claudio; Cansian, Rogério L; Padilha, Francine Ferreira; Antunes, Octávio A C

    2006-01-01

    The use of microorganisms for biotransformations of monoterpenes has stimulated the biotechnological market. Aiming at the highest efficiency in the process of strains screening, the application of molecular biology techniques have been proposed. Based on these aspects, the objective of this work was to select different strains able to convert limonene using fermentative process and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. The results obtained in the fermentative screening, from 17 strains tested, pointed out that four microorganisms were able to convert limonene into oxygenated derivatives. The RAPD study showed a polymorphism of 96.02% and a similarity from 16.02 to 51.51%. Based on this it was possible to observe a high genetic diversity, even among strains of same species, concluding that the RAPD was not able to correlate the genetic characteristics of the microorganism with the results obtained from the biotransformation process. PMID:16915709

  14. The use of two or more microorganisms versus one microorganism in the carrier materials for biological indicators.

    PubMed

    Shintani, H

    1997-01-01

    Specification for the preparation of a biological indicator (BI) using two or more microorganisms in the carrier material were deleted from the current ISO 11138 series and Working Draft 14161 because it was assumed that the resistances of the individual microorganisms would be affected by interference from the other microorganisms. This assumption is speculative only, and has not been supported by experimental evidence. To test its validity, the author carried out an experiment to determine the resistances of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus when used alone and together in BI carrier material. In total concentrations of 10(6) cfu/0.1 mL, the organisms were applied alone and together to filter paper and dried. After incorporation into the BI, the three preparations (B. subtilis alone, B. stearothermophilus alone, and both together) were subjected to ethylene oxide sterilization or to moist-heat sterilization using the procedures described in ISO 11138-2 or ISO 11138-3, respectively. Resistances were measured in terms of decimal reduction times (D values). The D values of the preparations were determined using the survival-curve method and the limited Spearman-Karber method in conjunction with a BI evaluator resistometer. The D values of the preparations did not differ significantly with either sterilization method, providing experimental evidence that, at least under these conditions, the presence of a second microorganism in the carrier material did not interfere with the resistance of the original microorganism. PMID:9262838

  15. Biological warfare: Microorganisms as drivers of host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Poulin, Robert; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-08-01

    Understanding parasite strategies for evasion, manipulation or exploitation of hosts is crucial for many fields, from ecology to medical sciences. Generally, research has focused on either the host response to parasitic infection, or the parasite virulence mechanisms. More recently, integrated studies of host-parasite interactions have allowed significant advances in theoretical and applied biology. However, these studies still provide a simplistic view of these as mere two-player interactions. Host and parasite are associated with a myriad of microorganisms that could benefit from the improved fitness of their partner. Illustrations of such complex multi-player interactions have emerged recently from studies performed in various taxa. In this conceptual article, we propose how these associated microorganisms may participate in the phenotypic alterations induced by parasites and hence in host-parasite interactions, from an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Host- and parasite-associated microorganisms may participate in the host-parasite interaction by interacting directly or indirectly with the other partner. As a result, parasites may develop (i) the disruptive strategy in which the parasite alters the host microbiota to its advantage, and (ii) the biological weapon strategy where the parasite-associated microorganism contributes to or modulates the parasite's virulence. Some phenotypic alterations induced by parasite may also arise from conflicts of interests between the host or parasite and its associated microorganism. For each situation, we review the literature and propose new directions for future research. Specifically, investigating the role of host- and parasite-associated microorganisms in host-parasite interactions at the individual, local and regional level will lead to a holistic understanding of how the co-evolution of the different partners influences how the other ones respond, both ecologically and evolutionary. The conceptual framework we

  16. Identification of beer spoilage microorganisms using the MALDI Biotyper platform.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Michelle Elizabeth; Weiland, Florian; Meneses, Jon; Sterenberg, Nick; Hoffmann, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Beer spoilage microorganisms present a major risk for the brewing industry and can lead to cost-intensive recall of contaminated products and damage to brand reputation. The applicability of molecular profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in combination with Biotyper software was investigated for the identification of beer spoilage microorganisms from routine brewery quality control samples. Reference mass spectrum profiles for three of the most common bacterial beer spoilage microorganisms (Lactobacillus lindneri, Lactobacillus brevis and Pediococcus damnosus), four commercially available brewing yeast strains (top- and bottom-fermenting) and Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis wild yeast were established, incorporated into the Biotyper reference library and validated by successful identification after inoculation into beer. Each bacterial species could be accurately identified and distinguished from one another and from over 5600 other microorganisms present in the Biotyper database. In addition, wild yeast contaminations were rapidly detected and distinguished from top- and bottom-fermenting brewing strains. The applicability and integration of mass spectrometry profiling using the Biotyper platform into existing brewery quality assurance practices within industry were assessed by analysing routine microbiology control samples from a local brewery, where contaminating microorganisms could be reliably identified. Brewery-isolated microorganisms not present in the Biotyper database were further analysed for identification using LC-MS/MS methods. This renders the Biotyper platform a promising candidate for biological quality control testing within the brewing industry as a more rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective technology that can be tailored for the detection of brewery-specific spoilage organisms from the local environment. PMID:26857464

  17. Gut Microorganisms Found Necessary for Successful Cancer Therapy | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Humans play host to trillions of microorganisms that help our bodies perform basic functions, like digestion, growth, and fighting disease. In fact, bacterial cells outnumber the human cells in our bodies by 10 to 1.1 The tens of trillions of microorganisms thriving in our intestines are known as gut microbiota, and those that are not harmful to us are referred to as commensal microbiota. In a recent paper in Science, NCI scientists described their discovery that, in mice, the presence of commensal microbiota is needed for successful response to cancer therapy.

  18. Microbial Biosensors: Engineered Microorganisms as the Sensing Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miso; Tsai, Shen-Long; Chen, Wilfred

    2013-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors are a good alternative to enzyme-based biosensors since they offer the benefits of low cost and improved stability. In recent years, live cells have been employed as biosensors for a wide range of targets. In this review, we will focus on the use of microorganisms that are genetically modified with the desirable outputs in order to improve the biosensor performance. Different methodologies based on genetic/protein engineering and synthetic biology to construct microorganisms with the required signal outputs, sensitivity, and selectivity will be discussed. PMID:23648649

  19. Gut Microorganisms Found Necessary for Successful Cancer Therapy | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Humans play host to trillions of microorganisms that help our bodies perform basic functions, like digestion, growth, and fighting disease. In fact, bacterial cells outnumber the human cells in our bodies by 10 to 1.1 The tens of trillions of microorganisms thriving in our intestines are known as gut microbiota, and those that are not harmful to us are referred to as commensal microbiota. In a recent paper in Science, NCI scientists described their discovery that, in mice, the presence of commensal microbiota is needed for successful response to cancer therapy.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of magnolol and honokiol against periodontopathic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chang, B; Lee, Y; Ku, Y; Bae, K; Chung, C

    1998-05-01

    Magnolol (1) and honokiol (2), main compounds from the stem bark of Magnolia obovata Thunb., were evaluated for an antimicrobial activity against periodontopathic microorganisms, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella gingivalis, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga gingivalis, and Veillonella disper, and a cytotoxicity against human gingival fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Our results indicate that magnolol and honokiol, although less potent than chlorhexidine, show a significant antimicrobial activity against these microorganisms, and a relatively low cytotoxic effect on human gingival cells. Thus, it is suggested that magnolol and honokiol may have a potential therapeutic use as a safe oral antiseptic for the prevention and the treatment of periodontal disease. PMID:9619121

  1. Trapping of swimming microorganisms at lower surfaces by increasing buoyancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ilyong; Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M

    2014-11-21

    Models suggest that mechanical interactions alone can trap swimming microorganisms at surfaces. Testing them requires a method for varying the mechanical interactions. We tuned contact forces between Paramecia and surfaces in situ by varying their buoyancy with nonuniform magnetic fields. Remarkably, increasing their buoyancy can lead to ∼100% trapping at lower surfaces. A model of Paramecia in surface contact passively responding to external torques quantitatively accounts for the data implying that interactions with a planar surface do not engage their mechanosensing network and illuminating how their trapping differs from other smaller microorganisms. PMID:25479523

  2. [Epidemiology of the infection by resistant Gram-positive microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Cercenado, E

    2016-09-01

    Resistance among Gram-positive microorganisms to classical and new antimicrobials is a therapeutic threat. In Spain, methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus (25-30%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (50-60%) seems to have stabilized in the last decade. Among enterococci, vancomycin resistance is less than 5%. Both linezolid and daptomycin, in general, show good activity against these microorganisms. However, the resistance rates of Staphylococcus epidermidis to linezolid (20.9%), and of Enterococcus faecium to daptomycin (10.5%) in isolates from intensive care units are a worrying. PMID:27608305

  3. Role of microorganisms for cycling of atmospheric constituents, emphasizing the greenhouse gas methane (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, R.

    2013-12-01

    Microorganisms have contributed significantly to the formation of the atmosphere and the habitability of Earth. Microbial methanogenesis probably helped overcoming the faint sun problem on young Earth. Later on, cyanobacterial photosynthesis produced oxygen and thus restricted the life zone of methanogenic microbial communities, which nowadays contribute only about 1% to total carbon cycle. Nevertheless, methanogenesis still dominates the budget of atmospheric methane and contributes significantly to the greenhouse effect. There are numerous habitats, which exchange methane with the atmosphere, and even more in which methane is intensively cycled albeit little emitted. Methane can be a byproduct of chemical reactions in plant leaves, or of aerobic methyl phosphonate consumption in ocean water. Most commonly, however, methane is a stoichiometric catabolic product in the degradation of organic matter by anaerobic microorganisms. The degradation is achieved by a complex microbial community consisting of various species of hydrolytic and fermentative Bacteria that produce hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate as major end products, and of methanogenic Archaea that eventually convert these compounds to methane and carbon dioxide. The composition of such methanogenic microbial communities, the rates and paths of methane formation, and the isotopic composition of the produced methane all exhibit quite some variability across the different habitats in which methane is produced from organic matter decomposition, such as flooded soils, lake sediments, peatlands, animal gut systems. The structure of the microbial communities often strongly affects their function. It is a challenging task to understand the environmental and biochemical basis of the interactions of abiotic factors and microorganisms shaping the structure and function of the microbial communities in the different methanogenic habitats.

  4. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms for production of fuels and industrial chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Zeldes, Benjamin M.; Keller, Matthew W.; Loder, Andrew J.; Straub, Christopher T.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus, and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye toward potential technological advantages for high

  5. Fossil Microorganisms and Formation of Early Precambrian Weathering Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanov, A. Yu; Astafieva, M. M.; Vrevsky, A. B.; Alfimova, N. A.; Matrenichev, V. A.; Hoover, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Weathering crusts are the only reliable evidences of the existence of continental conditions. Often they are the only source of information about exogenous processes and subsequently about conditions under which the development of the biosphere occurred. A complex of diverse fossil microorganisms was discovered as a result of Scanning Electron Microscope investigations. The chemical composition of the discovered fossils is identical to that of the host rocks and is represented by Si, Al, Fe, Ca and Mg. Probably, the microorganisms fixed in rocks played the role of catalyst. The decomposition of minerals comprising the rocks and their transformation into clayey (argillaceous) minerals, most likely occurred under the influence of microorganisms. And may be unique weathering crusts of Early Precambrian were formed due to interaction between specific composition of microorganism assemblage and conditions of hypergene transformations. So it is possible to speak about colonization of land by microbes already at that time and about existence of single raw from weathering crusts (Primitive soils) to real soils.

  6. Direct detection of martian microorganisms based on fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The direct detection of microorganisms and their traces using optical microscopes is one of the most promising techniques to obtain the decisive evidences for extraterrestrial life. The most significant points of this technique are high sensitivity and spatial information with a resolution of 0.2mm. Besides, information on local environments and microscopic ecology can also be obtained. Many difficulties, however, must be solved to get reliable results. We have started to develop a noble technique based on the fluorescence microscopy with special interest to the detection of microorganisms in extreme environments including Mars. The principle is to detect molecules/subcellular organs which are responsible for the three basic characteristics of life; genetic information, metabolism, and discrimination of self from non-self. We have screened fluorescence probes and found several are applicable. We could detect almost all the microorganisms already identified. Discrimination of viable from dead cells was possible. The terrestrial microfossils, some of the artificial primitive microorganism-like-objects, dried bacteria and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixed with simulated Martian sand could be detected. We are now designing a compact detection hardware.

  7. Fate of Indicator Microorganisms Under Nutrient Management Plan Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management plans (NMPs) for application of wastewater from concentration animal feeding operations are designed to meet crop water and nutrient requirements, but implicitly assume that pathogenic microorganisms in the wastewater will be retained and die-off in the root zone. A NMP was impl...

  8. RIVERBANK FILTRATION: FATE OF DBP PRECURSORS AND SELECTED MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors and selected microorganisms during riverbank filtration (RBF) was monitored at three different mid-Western drinking water utilities. At all three sites, filtration (RBF) was monitored at three different mid-Western drinking wa...

  9. Production of gaba (γ - Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  10. Organic compatible solutes of halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mary F

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms that adapt to moderate and high salt environments use a variety of solutes, organic and inorganic, to counter external osmotic pressure. The organic solutes can be zwitterionic, noncharged, or anionic (along with an inorganic cation such as K+). The range of solutes, their diverse biosynthetic pathways, and physical properties of the solutes that effect molecular stability are reviewed. PMID:16176595

  11. Children's Anthropomorphic and Anthropocentric Ideas about Micro-Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Jenny; Grace, Marcus; Hanley, Pam

    2009-01-01

    Different views exist about whether anthropomorphic ideas assist or hinder learning in biology. This paper discusses the anthropomorphic and anthropocentric ideas children have about micro-organisms, and whether they affect their understanding. The research was carried out in primary and secondary schools in the South of England and involved 414…

  12. Fossil Microorganisms in Archaean deposits of Northern Karelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astafieva, M. M.; Hoover, R. B.; Rozanov, A. Y.; Vrevskiy, A. B.

    2005-01-01

    Newly found biomorphic microstructures from the Upper Archaean (lopian) rocks from Northern Karelia are described. The presence of various microorganisms of bacterial nature and even cyanobacteria (and possibly eukaryotic forms) is suggested. The necessity of employing methods of electron microscopy, as well as traditional methods, while studying the very early manifestations of life in Archaean and Early Proterozoic is noted.

  13. Sugarcane residue decomposition by white and brown rot microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvesting sugarcane with chopper harvesters results in up to 10 tons of field crop residue per acre. Residue management by soil microorganism decomposition offers numerous ecological and economical benefits to growers; however, this natural process is dependent on the biotic density, diversity and...

  14. Development of natural anti-tumor drugs by microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Che; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Ho, Tsing-Fen; Wu, Ho-Shing; Wei, Yu-Hong

    2011-05-01

    Discoveries of tumor-resistant pharmacological drugs have mainly resulted from screening of natural products and their analogs. Some are also discovered incidentally when studying organisms. The great biodiversity of microorganisms raises the possibility of producing secondary metabolites (e.g., mevastatin, lovastatin, epothilone, salinosporamide A) to cope with adverse environments. Recently, natural plant pigments with anti-tumor activities such as β-carotene, lycopene, curcumin and anthocyanins have been proposed. However, many plants have a long life cycle. Therefore, pigments from microorganisms represent another option for the development of novel anti-tumor drugs. Prodigiosin (PG) is a natural red pigment produced by microorganisms, i.e., Serratia marcescens and other gram-negative bacteria. The anti-tumor potential of PG has been widely demonstrated. The families of PG (PGs), which share a common pyrrolylpyrromethene (PPM) skeleton, are produced by various bacteria. PGs are bioactive pigments and are known to exert immunosuppressive properties, in vitro apoptotic effects, and in vivo anti-tumor activities. Currently the most common strain used for producing PGs is S. marcescens. However, few reports have discussed PGs production. This review therefore describes the development of an anti-tumor drug, PG, that can be naturally produced by microorganisms, and evaluates the microbial production system, fermentation strategies, purification and identification processes. The application potential of PGs is also discussed. PMID:21277252

  15. Alum affects ammonia-producing microorganisms in poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientists at the USDA-ARS in Bowling Green, KY and in Fayetteville, AR are working to uncover the microbiology of ammonia production in poultry litter. Poultry litter is a valuable nutrient source for plants and microorganisms that contains high levels of protein, nitrogen, and other minerals. Howe...

  16. Causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were designed to better understand the causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis with transients in solution ionic strength (IS). Saturated packed column experiments were conducted using two sizes of carboxyl modified latex (CML) microspheres (0.1 and 1.1...

  17. DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF PATHOGENS AND INDICATOR MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pathogenic microorganisms are routinely discharged to collection systems throughout the world along with a myriad of commensal organisms, organic and inorganic wastes. It is not surprising then that the density of any given pathogen is relatively small in relationship to the popu...

  18. The metabolism and biotechnological application of betaine in microorganism.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huibin; Chen, Ningning; Shi, Mengxun; Xian, Mo; Song, Yimin; Liu, Junhong

    2016-05-01

    Glycine betaine (betaine) is widely distributed in nature and can be found in many microorganisms, including bacteria, archaea, and fungi. Due to its particular functions, many microorganisms utilize betaine as a functional chemical and have evolved different metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis and catabolism of betaine. As in animals and plants, the principle role of betaine is to protect microbial cells against drought, osmotic stress, and temperature stress. In addition, the role of betaine in methyl group metabolism has been observed in a variety of microorganisms. Recent studies have shown that betaine supplementation can improve the performance of microbial strains used for the fermentation of lactate, ethanol, lysine, pyruvate, and vitamin B12, during which betaine can act as stress protectant or methyl donor for the biosynthesis of structurally complex compounds. In this review, we summarize the transport, synthesis, catabolism, and functions of betaine in microorganisms and discuss potential engineering strategies that employ betaine as a methyl donor for the biosynthesis of complex secondary metabolites such as a variety of vitamins, coenzymes, and antibiotics. In conclusion, the biocompatibility, C/N ratio, abundance, and comprehensive metabolic information of betaine collectively indicate that this molecule has great potential for broad applications in microbial biotechnology. PMID:27005411

  19. [Advances in researches of molluscicidal microorganisms against Oncomelania hupensis].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wan-ting; Zhou, Yi-biao; Pan, Xiang; Song, Xiu-xia; Jiang, Qing-wu

    2016-02-01

    The elimination of Oncomelania hupensis snails is important to schistosomiasis control. Recently, the application of molluscicidal organisms is considered as a safe and efficient method for snail elimination. In order to provide scientific evidences for effective control of O. hupensis and schistosomiasis, this paper summarizes the researches of molluscicidal microorganisms against O. hupensis. PMID:27356421

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Gel-entrapped catechins toward oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Muneaki; Saito, Hideo; Kikuchi, Kuniyoshi; Ishigami, Tomohiko; Toyama, Yoshio; Takami, Masao; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2011-01-01

    The oral cavity contains almost half of the commensal bacterial population present in the human body. An increase in the number of these microorganisms may result in systemic diseases such as infective endocarditis and aspiration pneumonia as well as oral infections. It is essential to control the total numbers of these microorganisms in order to suppress disease onset. Thus, we examined the antimicrobial activity of a newly developed gel-entrapped catechin (GEC) preparation against oral microorganisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of GEC was determined based on the relationship between a modified agar diffusion method and a broth microdilution method. GEC inhibited the growth of the Actinomyces, periodontopathic bacteria and Candida strains tested, but did not inhibit the growth of the oral streptococci that are important in the normal oral flora. Commercially available moisture gels containing antimicrobial components showed antimicrobial activity against all of the tested strains. After a series of washes and after a 24-h incubation, GEC retained the antimicrobial activity of the catechins. Catalase prevented GEC-induced growth inhibition of Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus mutans suggesting that hydrogen peroxide may be involved in the antimicrobial activity of catechins. These results suggest that GEC may be useful for controlling oral microorganism populations and reducing the accumulation of dental plaque, thereby helping to prevent periodontal disease and oral candidiasis. PMID:21532150

  1. Aflatoxins: mechanisms of inhibition by antagonistic plants and microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are a family of toxic fungal secondary metabolites. The rapid expansion in our knowledge about inhibition of aflatoxin biosynthesis by compounds from plants and microorganisms has enabled us to utilize them as potential biocontrol agents. Substantial efforts have been devoted to identify ...

  2. Effects of temperature on biological activity of permafrost microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kalyonova, L F; Novikova, M A; Subbotin, A M; Bazhin, A S

    2015-04-01

    The number and viability of microorganism specimens Bacillus spp. isolated from permafrost soil remained unchanged after incubation at temperatures of -16-37°C. Experiments on F1 CBA/Black-6 mice showed that incubation of bacteria at -5°C for 72 h promotes a decrease in their toxicity and an increase in their immunostimulating effect. PMID:25894776

  3. EFFECTS OF CELLULAR AGGREGATION ON THE ECOLOGY OF MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relative to what is known about the behavior of microorganisms in the free-living state, very little is known about their activities in aggregates. evertheless, a full understanding of how complex microbial systems develop and function resides not so much in improving our knowled...

  4. 21 CFR 866.2660 - Microorganism differentiation and identification device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microorganism differentiation and identification device. 866.2660 Section 866.2660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology...

  5. 21 CFR 866.2660 - Microorganism differentiation and identification device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microorganism differentiation and identification device. 866.2660 Section 866.2660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology...

  6. 21 CFR 866.2660 - Microorganism differentiation and identification device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microorganism differentiation and identification device. 866.2660 Section 866.2660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology...

  7. 21 CFR 866.2660 - Microorganism differentiation and identification device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microorganism differentiation and identification device. 866.2660 Section 866.2660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology...

  8. 21 CFR 866.2660 - Microorganism differentiation and identification device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microorganism differentiation and identification device. 866.2660 Section 866.2660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology...

  9. Alkalizing Reactions Streamline Cellular Metabolism in Acidogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Arioli, Stefania; Ragg, Enzio; Scaglioni, Leonardo; Fessas, Dimitrios; Signorelli, Marco; Karp, Matti; Daffonchio, Daniele; De Noni, Ivano; Mulas, Laura; Oggioni, Marco; Guglielmetti, Simone; Mora, Diego

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the integrated relationships among the principal cellular functions that govern the bioenergetic reactions of an organism is necessary to determine how cells remain viable and optimise their fitness in the environment. Urease is a complex enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbonic acid. While the induction of urease activity by several microorganisms has been predominantly considered a stress-response that is initiated to generate a nitrogen source in response to a low environmental pH, here we demonstrate a new role of urease in the optimisation of cellular bioenergetics. We show that urea hydrolysis increases the catabolic efficiency of Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium that is widely used in the industrial manufacture of dairy products. By modulating the intracellular pH and thereby increasing the activity of β-galactosidase, glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase, urease increases the overall change in enthalpy generated by the bioenergetic reactions. A cooperative altruistic behaviour of urease-positive microorganisms on the urease-negative microorganisms within the same environment was also observed. The physiological role of a single enzymatic activity demonstrates a novel and unexpected view of the non-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that govern the bioenergetics of a bacterial cell, highlighting a new role for cytosol-alkalizing biochemical pathways in acidogenic microorganisms. PMID:21152088

  10. Advancing oleaginous microorganisms to produce lipid via metabolic engineering technology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2013-10-01

    With the depletion of global petroleum and its increasing price, biodiesel has been becoming one of the most promising biofuels for global fuels market. Researchers exploit oleaginous microorganisms for biodiesel production due to their short life cycle, less labor required, less affection by venue, and easier to scale up. Many oleaginous microorganisms can accumulate lipids, especially triacylglycerols (TAGs), which are the main materials for biodiesel production. This review is covering the related researches on different oleaginous microorganisms, such as yeast, mold, bacteria and microalgae, which might become the potential oil feedstocks for biodiesel production in the future, showing that biodiesel from oleaginous microorganisms has a great prospect in the development of biomass energy. Microbial oils biosynthesis process includes fatty acid synthesis approach and TAG synthesis approach. In addition, the strategies to increase lipids accumulation via metabolic engineering technology, involving the enhancement of fatty acid synthesis approach, the enhancement of TAG synthesis approach, the regulation of related TAG biosynthesis bypass approaches, the blocking of competing pathways and the multi-gene approach, are discussed in detail. It is suggested that DGAT and ME are the most promising targets for gene transformation, and reducing PEPC activity is observed to be beneficial for lipid production. PMID:23685199

  11. Effect of microorganism on Greenland ice sheet surface temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, R.; Takeuchi, N.; Aoki, T.

    2012-12-01

    Greenland ice sheet holds approximately 10% of the fresh water on earth. If it melts all, sea level rises about 7.2meter. It is reported that mass of Greenland ice sheet is decreasing with temperature rising of climate change. Melting of the coastal area is particularly noticeable. It is established that 4 to 23% of the sea level rising from 1993 to 2005 is caused by the melting of Greenland ice sheet. In 2010, amount of melting per year became the largest than the past. However many climate models aren't able to simulate the recent melting of snow and ice in the Arctic including Greenland. One of the possible causes is albedo reduction of snow and ice surface by light absorbing snow impurities such as black carbon and dust and by glacial microorganisms. But there are few researches for effect of glacial microorganism in wide area. So it is important to clarify the impact of glacial microorganisms in wide area. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of microorganism on Greenland ice sheet surface temperature change using satellite images of visible, near infrared and thermal infrared wavelength range and observation carried out in northwestern Greenland. We use MODIS Land Surface Temperature Product as ice sheet surface temperature. It estimates land surface temperature based on split window method using thermal infrared bands. MODIS data is bound to cover the whole of Greenland, and calculated the ratio of the temperature change per year. Analysis period is from December 2002 to November 2010. Results of calculating Greenland ice sheet surface temperature change using the MODIS data, our analysis shows that it is upward trend in the whole region. We find a striking upward trend in northern and western part of Greenland. The rate is 0.33±0.03 degree Celsius per a year from 47.5°W to 49°W. While in the coastal area from 49°W to 50.7°W, the rate is 0.26±0.06 degree Celsius per a year. This large upward trend area is the same area as dark region

  12. Discuss the role of microorganisms in the aetiology and pathogenesis of periapical disease.

    PubMed

    Aw, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    The literature indicates that microorganisms have a critical role in the aetiology and pathogenesis of apical periodontitis. The advancement in microbiological study methods has allowed for the identification of newer species associated with the disease process. At our current understanding, however, the exact roles of specific microorganisms in apical periodontitis are not fully understood but the poly-microbial aetiology of the disease appears to be supported by the literature. The endodontic microbiota is comprised of a subset of microbiota present in the oral cavity, consisting of predominantly anaerobic bacterial species, some fungal and viral species. The pathogenesis of apical periodontitis is essentially the result of a complex interplay between bacterial and host factors, giving rise to a range of presentations depending on the balance of the interaction. The role of endodontic microbiota in the initiation and persistence of apical periodontitis means that the mainstay of endodontic treatment is the elimination of such bacteria. A challenge to the resolution of apical periodontitis after treatment lies in the inadequacy of treatment protocol in completely eradicating the pathogenic species and the inherent ability of certain species to survive the treatment. This issue should be the focus of future research as we continually search for more predictable treatment methods of achieving the resolution of apical periodontitis. PMID:27506189

  13. Microscale microbial fuel cells: Advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seokheun

    2015-07-15

    The next generation of sustainable energy could come from microorganisms; evidence that it can be seen with the given rise of Electromicrobiology, the study of microorganisms' electrical properties. Many recent advances in electromicrobiology stem from studying microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which are gaining acceptance as a future alternative "green" energy technology and energy-efficient wastewater treatment method. MFCs are powered by living microorganisms with clean and sustainable features; they efficiently catalyse the degradation of a broad range of organic substrates under natural conditions. There is also increasing interest in photosynthetic MFCs designed to harness Earth's most abundant and promising energy source (solar irradiation). Despite their vast potential and promise, however, MFCs and photosynthetic MFCs have not yet successfully translated into commercial applications because they demonstrate persistent performance limitations and bottlenecks associated with scaling up. Instead, microscale MFCs have received increasing attention as a unique platform for various applications such as powering small portable electronic elements in remote locations, performing fundamental studies of microorganisms, screening bacterial strains, and toxicity detection in water. Furthermore, the stacking of miniaturized MFCs has been demonstrated to offer larger power densities than a single macroscale MFC in terms of scaling up. In this overview, we discuss recent achievements in microscale MFCs as well as their potential applications. Further scientific and technological challenges are also reviewed. PMID:25703724

  14. Halophilic microorganisms in deteriorated historic buildings: insights into their characteristics.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, Justyna; Otlewska, Anna; Gutarowska, Beata; Pietrzak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Historic buildings are constantly being exposed to numerous climatic changes such as damp and rainwater. Water migration into and out of the material's pores can lead to salt precipitation and the so-called efflorescence. The structure of the material may be seriously threatened by salt crystallization. A huge pressure is produced when salt hydrates occupy larger spaces, which leads at the end to cracking, detachment and material loss. Halophilic microorganisms have the ability to adapt to high salinity because of the mechanisms of inorganic salt (KCl or NaCl) accumulation in their cells at concentrations isotonic to the environment, or compatible solutes uptake or synthesis. In this study, we focused our attention on the determination of optimal growth conditions of halophilic microorganisms isolated from historical buildings in terms of salinity, pH and temperature ranges, as well as biochemical properties and antagonistic abilities. Halophilic microorganisms studied in this paper could be categorized as a halotolerant group, as they grow in the absence of NaCl, as well as tolerate higher salt concentrations (Staphylococcus succinus, Virgibacillus halodenitrificans). Halophilic microorganisms have been also observed (Halobacillus styriensis, H. hunanensis, H. naozhouensis, H. litoralis, Marinococcus halophilus and yeast Sterigmatomyces halophilus). With respect to their physiological characteristics, cultivation at a temperature of 25-30°C, pH 6-7, NaCl concentration for halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms, 0-10% and 15-30%, respectively, provides the most convenient conditions. Halophiles described in this study displayed lipolytic, glycolytic and proteolytic activities. Staphylococcus succinus and Marinococcus halophilus showed strong antagonistic potential towards bacteria from the Bacillus genus, while Halobacillus litoralis displayed an inhibiting ability against other halophiles. PMID:26894235

  15. Ethical Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Michael

    2004-01-01

    All evaluators face the challenge of striving to adhere to the highest possible standards of ethical conduct. Translating the AEA's Guiding Principles and the Joint Committee's Program Evaluation Standards into everyday practice, however, can be a complex, uncertain, and frustrating endeavor. Moreover, acting in an ethical fashion can require…

  16. Quill Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2006-01-01

    Teaching high school students the "grammar" of art--the principles and elements of art and design--while also teaching them about creativity and concept can be difficult. This author has found that combining beginning lessons in line, shape, value, texture, form, and color with projects requiring innovation and inspiration, though challenging, is…

  17. Environmental challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Conable, B.; Warford, J.; Partow, Z.; Lutz, E.; Munasinghe, M.

    1991-09-01

    The contents include the following: Development and the Environment: A Global Balance; Evolution of the World Bank's Environmental Policy; Accounting for the Environment; Public Policy and the Environment; Managing Drylands; Environmental Action Plans in Africa; Agroforestry in Sub-Saharan Africa; Irrigation and the Environmental Challenge; Curbing Pollution in Developing Countries; Global Warming and the Developing World; and The Global Environment Facility.

  18. Models of Micro-Organisms: Children's Knowledge and Understanding of Micro-Organisms from 7 to 14 Years Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the expressed models that children aged 7, 11, and 14 years have about micro-organisms and microbial activity. These were elicited using a variety of data collection techniques that complemented each other, resulting in a rich dataset, and provided information about the level of knowledge and progression of ideas across the…

  19. Supramolecular Cationic Assemblies against Multidrug-Resistant Microorganisms: Activity and Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias; Sampaio, Jorge Luiz Mello; Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    The growing challenge of antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics requires novel synthetic drugs or new formulations for old drugs. Here, cationic nanostructured particles (NPs) self-assembled from cationic bilayer fragments and polyelectrolytes are tested against four multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of clinical importance. The non-hemolytic poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDDA) polymer as the outer NP layer shows a remarkable activity against these organisms. The mechanism of cell death involves bacterial membrane lysis as determined from the leakage of inner phosphorylated compounds and possibly disassembly of the NP with the appearance of multilayered fibers made of the NP components and the biopolymers withdrawn from the cell wall. The NPs display broad-spectrum activity against MDR microorganisms, including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and yeast. PMID:25809608

  20. Advanced Materials for the Recognition and Capture of Whole Cells and Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bole, Amanda L; Manesiotis, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    Selective cell recognition and capture has recently attracted significant interest due to its potential importance for clinical, diagnostic, environmental, and security applications. Current methods for cell isolation from complex samples are largely dependent on cell size and density, with limited application scope as many of the target cells do not exhibit appreciable differences in this respect. The most recent and forthcoming developments in the area of selective recognition and capture of whole cells, based on natural receptors, as well as synthetic materials utilising physical and chemical properties of the target cell or microorganism, are highlighted. Particular focus is given to the development of cell complementary surfaces using the cells themselves as templating agents, by means of molecular imprinting, and their combination with sensing platforms for rapid cell detection in complex media. The benefits and challenges of each approach are discussed and a perspective of the future of this research area is given. PMID:26662854

  1. Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow

    1996-02-20

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70.degree. C. to 90.degree. C., at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%.

  2. Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1996-02-20

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70 C to 90 C, at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%. 68 figs.

  3. Calculation of the radiative properties of photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Cornet, Jean-François; Fournier, Richard

    2015-08-01

    A generic methodological chain for the predictive calculation of the light-scattering and absorption properties of photosynthetic microorganisms within the visible spectrum is presented here. This methodology has been developed in order to provide the radiative properties needed for the analysis of radiative transfer within photobioreactor processes, with a view to enable their optimization for large-scale sustainable production of chemicals for energy and chemistry. It gathers an electromagnetic model of light-particle interaction along with detailed and validated protocols for the determination of input parameters: morphological and structural characteristics of the studied microorganisms as well as their photosynthetic-pigment content. The microorganisms are described as homogeneous equivalent-particles whose shape and size distribution is characterized by image analysis. The imaginary part of their refractive index is obtained thanks to a new and quite extended database of the in vivo absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments (that is made available to the reader). The real part of the refractive index is then calculated by using the singly subtractive Kramers-Krönig approximation, for which the anchor point is determined with the Bruggeman mixing rule, based on the volume fraction of the microorganism internal-structures and their refractive indices (extracted from a database). Afterwards, the radiative properties are estimated using the Schiff approximation for spheroidal or cylindrical particles, as a first step toward the description of the complexity and diversity of the shapes encountered within the microbial world. Finally, these predictive results are confronted to experimental normal-hemispherical transmittance spectra for validation. This entire procedure is implemented for Rhodospirillum rubrum, Arthrospira platensis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, each representative of the main three kinds of photosynthetic microorganisms, i.e. respectively

  4. How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Result from Provocation of the Immune System by Microorganisms and Viruses.

    PubMed

    Arleevskaya, Marina I; Kravtsova, Olga A; Lemerle, Julie; Renaudineau, Yves; Tsibulkin, Anatoly P

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), similar to development of a majority of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, is largely due to an inappropriate or inadequate immune response to environmental challenges. Among these challenges, infectious agents are the undisputed leaders. Since the 1870s, an impressive list of microorganisms suspected of provoking RA has formed, and the list is still growing. Although a definite causative link between a specific infectious agent and the disease has not been established, several arguments support such a possibility. First, in the absence of a defined pathogen, the spectrum of triggering agents may include polymicrobial communities or the cumulative effect of several bacterial/viral factors. Second, the range of infectious episodes (i.e., clinical manifestations caused by pathogens) may vary in the process of RA development from preclinical to late-stage disease. Third, infectious agents might not trigger RA in all cases, but trigger it in a certain subset of the cases, or the disease onset may arise from an unfortunate combination of infections along with, for example, psychological stress and/or chronic joint tissue microtrauma. Fourth, genetic differences may have a role in the disease onset. In this review, two aspects of the problem of "microorganisms and RA" are debated. First, is there an acquired immune deficiency and, in turn, susceptibility to infections in RA patients due to the too frequent and too lengthy infections, which at last break the tolerance of self antigens? Or, second, is there a congenital deficiency in tolerance and inflammation control, which may occur even with ordinary infection frequency and duration? PMID:27582741

  5. How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Result from Provocation of the Immune System by Microorganisms and Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Arleevskaya, Marina I.; Kravtsova, Olga A.; Lemerle, Julie; Renaudineau, Yves; Tsibulkin, Anatoly P.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), similar to development of a majority of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, is largely due to an inappropriate or inadequate immune response to environmental challenges. Among these challenges, infectious agents are the undisputed leaders. Since the 1870s, an impressive list of microorganisms suspected of provoking RA has formed, and the list is still growing. Although a definite causative link between a specific infectious agent and the disease has not been established, several arguments support such a possibility. First, in the absence of a defined pathogen, the spectrum of triggering agents may include polymicrobial communities or the cumulative effect of several bacterial/viral factors. Second, the range of infectious episodes (i.e., clinical manifestations caused by pathogens) may vary in the process of RA development from preclinical to late-stage disease. Third, infectious agents might not trigger RA in all cases, but trigger it in a certain subset of the cases, or the disease onset may arise from an unfortunate combination of infections along with, for example, psychological stress and/or chronic joint tissue microtrauma. Fourth, genetic differences may have a role in the disease onset. In this review, two aspects of the problem of “microorganisms and RA” are debated. First, is there an acquired immune deficiency and, in turn, susceptibility to infections in RA patients due to the too frequent and too lengthy infections, which at last break the tolerance of self antigens? Or, second, is there a congenital deficiency in tolerance and inflammation control, which may occur even with ordinary infection frequency and duration? PMID:27582741

  6. Six Siderophore-Producing Microorganisms Identified in Biological Soil Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noonan, K.; Anbar, A. D.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Poret-peterson, A. T.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are diverse microbial communities that colonize soils in arid and semi-arid environments. Cyanobacteria in BSCs are pioneer organisms that increase ecosystem habitability by providing fixed carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) as well as by reducing water run-off and increasing infiltration. Photosynthesis and N fixation, in particular, require a variety of metals in large quantities, and yet, metals are predominantly insoluble in the environments where BSCs thrive. Therefore, BSC organisms must have efficient strategies for extracting metals from soil minerals. We hypothesized that BSC microbes, particularly the cyanobacteria, produce siderophores to serve their metal-acquisition needs. Siderophores are small organic compounds that bind Fe with high affinity and are produced by a variety of microorganisms, including cyanobacteria. Most siderophores bind Fe, primarily; however, some can also bind Mo, V, and Cu. Soil siderophores are released by microbes to increase the solubility of metals from minerals and to facilitate microbial uptake. Thus, siderophores serve as chemical weathering agents and provide a direct link between soil microbes and minerals. Studying siderophore production in BSCs provides insight into how BSCs tackle the challenge of acquiring insoluble metals, and may help conservationists determine useful fertilizers for BSC growth by facilitating metal acquisition. Biological soil crusts were collected near Moab, UT. Soil slurries were prepared in deionized water and transferred to modified BG-11 agar plates. The O-CAS agar plate assay was used to screen organisms for siderophore production. Siderophore producing microbes were isolated and identified by16S rRNA gene sequencing. Cultures were then grown in 3 L batch cultures under metal limitation, and siderophore presence was monitored using the traditional liquid CAS assay. After siderophore detection, cells were removed by centrifugation, organic compounds were separated using

  7. The psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas halosplanktis TAC125 possesses a gene coding for a cold-adapted feruloyl esterase activity that shares homology with esterase enzymes from gamma-proteobacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Aurilia, Vincenzo; Parracino, Antonietta; Saviano, Michele; Rossi, Mose'; D'Auria, Sabato

    2007-08-01

    The complete genome of the psychrophilic bacteria Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125, recently published, owns a gene coding for a putative esterase activity corresponding to the ORF PSHAa1385, also classified in the Carbohydrate Active Enzymes database (CAZY) belonging to family 1 of carbohydrate esterase proteins. This ORF is 843 bp in length and codes for a protein of 280 amino acid residues. In this study we characterized and cloned the PSHAa1385 gene in Escherichia coli. We also characterized the recombinant protein by biochemical and biophysical methodologies. The PSHAa1385 gene sequence showed a significant homology with several carboxyl-esterase and acetyl-esterase genes from gamma-proteobacteria genera and yeast. The recombinant protein exhibited a significant activity towards pNP-acetate, alpha-and beta-naphthyl acetate as generic substrates, and 4-methylumbelliferyl p-trimethylammonio cinnamate chloride (MUTMAC) as a specific substrate, indicating that the protein exhibits a feruloyl esterase activity that it is displayed by similar enzymes present in other organisms. Finally, a three-dimensional model of the protein was built and the amino acid residues involved in the catalytic function of the protein were identified. PMID:17543477

  8. Soil Microorganisms of the McMurdo Sound Area, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, William L.; Boyd, Josephine W.

    1963-01-01

    A study of soil microorganisms of Ross Island and the adjacent mainland was carried out during the brief austral summer of 1961-1962. In some cases, seasonal changes in microbial numbers were observed, although microorganisms could not be detected in some soils. Bacterial species common to temperate regions were isolated from a number of different samples. Thermophilic bacteria were present in some of the soils, and a significant portion of the bacterial population was capable of growth at 2 C. The soil microflora were capable of carrying out certain reactions of the nitrogen cycle at a very slow rate. In addition to temperature, other environmental factors which might influence growth and metabolic activity were discussed. PMID:14014701

  9. Locomotion of a microorganism in weakly viscoelastic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Corato, M.; Greco, F.; Maffettone, P. L.

    2015-11-01

    In the present work we study the motion of microorganisms swimming by an axisymmetric distribution of surface tangential velocity in a weakly viscoelastic fluid. The second-order fluid constitutive equation is used to model the suspending fluid, while the well-known "squirmer model" [M. J. Lighthill, Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 5, 109 (1952), 10.1002/cpa.3160050201; J. R. Blake, J. Fluid Mech. 46, 199 (1971), 10.1017/S002211207100048X] is employed to describe the organism propulsion mechanism. A regular perturbation expansion up to first order in the Deborah number is performed, and the generalized reciprocity theorem from Stokes flow theory is then used, to derive analytical formulas for the squirmer velocity. Results show that "neutral" squirmers are unaffected by viscoelasticity, whereas "pullers" and "pushers" are slowed down and hastened, respectively. The power dissipated by the swimming microorganism and the "swimming efficiency" are also analytically quantified.

  10. [Ecological relationships between Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and its companion microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue-liang; Mao, Zhen-chuan; Chen, Guo-hua; Xie, Bing-yan

    2011-03-01

    Pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is a notorious invasive species from North America, which can kill a large amount of pine trees and causes economic losses and ecosystem destruction. There is a close relationship and ecological interaction between B. xylophilus and its companion microorganisms. This paper listed the species of companion microorganisms, reviewed their important ecological roles in the propagation and pathogenicity of the nematode, and discussed the pine wilt disease from the viewpoint of microecosystem. The companion fungi can supply food for B. xylophilus, hold the cycle of second infection of the nematode, increase the proportions of dauer juveniles, and benefit the infection and distribution of B. xylophilus. The companion bacteria can enhance the pathogenicity of B. xylophilus, promote the propagation of the nematode, benefit the pinene degradation, and thereby, promote the adaptability of the nematode. PMID:21657042

  11. Survival strategies of microorganisms in extreme saline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, J. F.

    Halophilic representatives are found in all main lines of evolutionary descendence of microbes: in archaebacteria, Gram-negative and Gram-positive eubacteria, and also in eucaryotes. In principe all halophilic microorganisms have to adapt their surface and membrane structures to their highly ionic environments. Concerning their intracellular compartment two different strategies have been developed: Inorganic ions are largely excluded in some microorganisms while such ions are actively accumulated in others. In particular the second group of organisms has to adapt the whole metabolic machinery to the highly ionic conditions of several molar salts, whereas in the first group only the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane and the extracytoplasmic structures are in contact with high concentrations of inorganic ions. In this latter group, a variety of organic solutes is accumulated in response to increases of the salinity of the environment.

  12. Ecological aspects of microorganisms inhabiting uranium mill tailings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C.L.; Landa, E.R.; Updegraff, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Numbers and types of microorganisms in uranium mill tailings were determined using culturing techniques. Arthrobacter were found to be the predominant microorganism inhabiting the sandy tailings, whereas Bacillus and fungi predominated in the slime tailings. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, capable of leaching radium, were isolated in low numbers from tailings samples but were isolated in significantly high numbers from topsoil in contact with the tailings. The results are placed in the context of the magnitude of uranium mill tailings in the United States, the hazards posed by the tailings, and how such hazards could be enhanced or diminished by microbial activities. Patterns in the composition of the microbial population are evaluated with respect to the ecological variables that influence microbial growth. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  13. Survival rates of some terrestrial microorganisms under simulated space conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, J.; Oshima, T.; Koike, K. A.; Taguchi, H.; Tanaka, R.; Nishimura, K.; Miyaji, M.

    1992-10-01

    In connection with planetary quarantine, we have been studying the survival rates of nine species of terrestrial microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, yeasts, fungi, etc.) under simulated interstellar conditions. If common terrestrial microorganisms cannot survive in space even for short periods, we can greatly reduce expenditure for sterilizing space probes. The interstellar environment in the solar system has been simulated by low temperature, high vacuum (77 k, 4 × 10-6 torr), and protons irradiation from a Van de Graaff generator. After exposure to a barrage of protons corresponding to about 250 years of irradiation in solar space, Tobacco mosaic virus. Bacillus subtilis spores, Aspergillus niger spores, and Clostridium mangenoti spores showed survival rates of 82%, 45%, 28%, and 25%, respectively. Furthermore, pathogenic Candida albicans showed 7% survival after irradiation corresponding to about 60 years in space.

  14. Influence of swimming strategy on microorganism separation by asymmetric obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdakin, I.; Jeyaram, Y.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Venken, L.; Dierckx, S.; Vanderleyden, S. J.; Silhanek, A. V.; Condat, C. A.; Marconi, V. I.

    2013-05-01

    It has been shown that a nanoliter chamber separated by a wall of asymmetric obstacles can lead to an inhomogeneous distribution of self-propelled microorganisms. Although it is well established that this rectification effect arises from the interaction between the swimmers and the noncentrosymmetric pillars, here we demonstrate numerically that its efficiency is strongly dependent on the detailed dynamics of the individual microorganism. In particular, for the case of run-and-tumble dynamics, the distribution of run lengths, the rotational diffusion, and the partial preservation of run orientation memory through a tumble are important factors when computing the rectification efficiency. In addition, we optimize the geometrical dimensions of the asymmetric pillars in order to maximize the swimmer concentration and we illustrate how it can be used for sorting by swimming strategy in a long array of parallel obstacles.

  15. Metabolic Engineering of Microorganisms for the Production of Higher Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Jun; Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to the increasing concerns about limited fossil resources and environmental problems, there has been much interest in developing biofuels from renewable biomass. Ethanol is currently used as a major biofuel, as it can be easily produced by existing fermentation technology, but it is not the best biofuel due to its low energy density, high vapor pressure, hygroscopy, and incompatibility with current infrastructure. Higher alcohols, including 1-propanol, 1-butanol, isobutanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, which possess fuel properties more similar to those of petroleum-based fuel, have attracted particular interest as alternatives to ethanol. Since microorganisms isolated from nature do not allow production of these alcohols at high enough efficiencies, metabolic engineering has been employed to enhance their production. Here, we review recent advances in metabolic engineering of microorganisms for the production of higher alcohols. PMID:25182323

  16. [Instrumental technics for the detection of microorganisms in brewing].

    PubMed

    Orive, M

    1995-03-01

    Although modern production techniques keep microorganism levels very low in both finished beer and in beer process, there is still concern about early detection and prevention of accidental proliferation of brewery spoilage microorganisms. Traditional microbiological techniques can detect such low levels, but no results are obtained before 3 to 6 days of incubation. That is why rapid or even "instant" techniques are a main objective of research in the brewing industry. In this work, some instrumental techniques (DEFT, MMCF, impedance, pH, immunology and PCR based techniques, bioluminometry) are described and considered from the point of view of their regular use in brewery Microbiological Quality Assurance Laboratories. Real case experiences are brought forward. PMID:7546445

  17. Biological Synthesis of Nanoparticles from Plants and Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Kim, Yu-Jin; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology has become one of the most promising technologies applied in all areas of science. Metal nanoparticles produced by nanotechnology have received global attention due to their extensive applications in the biomedical and physiochemical fields. Recently, synthesizing metal nanoparticles using microorganisms and plants has been extensively studied and has been recognized as a green and efficient way for further exploiting microorganisms as convenient nanofactories. Here, we explore and detail the potential uses of various biological sources for nanoparticle synthesis and the application of those nanoparticles. Furthermore, we highlight recent milestones achieved for the biogenic synthesis of nanoparticles by controlling critical parameters, including the choice of biological source, incubation period, pH, and temperature. PMID:26944794

  18. The examinations of microorganisms by correlation optics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyi, Olexander I.

    2004-06-01

    In report described methods of correlation optics, which are based on the analysis of intensity changes of quasielastic light scattering by micro-organisms and allow the type of correlation function to obtain information about the size of dispersive particles. The principle of new optical method of verification is described. In this method the gauging of intensity of an indirect illumination is carried out by static spectroscopy and processing of observed data by a method of correlation spectroscopy. The given mode of gauging allows measuring allocation of micro-organisms in size interval of 0.1 - 10.0 microns. In the report results of examinations of cultures Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus lutteus, Lamprocystis and Triocapsa bacteriachlorofil are considered.

  19. Probiotic fermented sausage: viability of probiotic microorganisms and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rouhi, M; Sohrabvandi, S; Mortazavian, A M

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are from functional foods that bring health benefits for humans. Nowadays, a major development in functional foods is related to food containing probiotic cultures, mainly lactic acid bacteria or bifidobacteria. Probiotics must be alive and ingested in sufficient amounts to exert the positive effects on the health and the well-being of the host. Therefore, viability of probiotic products (the minimum viable probiotic cells in each gram or milliliter of product till the time of consumption) is their most important characteristic. However, these organisms often show poor viability in fermented products due to their detrimental conditions. Today, the variety of fermented meat products available around the world is nearly equal to that of cheese. With meat products, raw fermented sausages could constitute an appropriate vehicle for such microorganisms into the human gastrointestinal tract. In present article, the viability of probiotic microorganisms in fermented sausage, the main factors affect their viability, and the sensorial characteristics of final product are discussed. PMID:23320906

  20. Direct Measurement of the Flow Field around Swimming Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Michel, Nicolas; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan

    2010-10-01

    Swimming microorganisms create flows that influence their mutual interactions and modify the rheology of their suspensions. While extensively studied theoretically, these flows have not been measured in detail around any freely-swimming microorganism. We report such measurements for the microphytes Volvox carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The minute (˜0.3%) density excess of V. carteri over water leads to a strongly dominant Stokeslet contribution, with the widely-assumed stresslet flow only a correction to the subleading source dipole term. This implies that suspensions of V. carteri have features similar to suspensions of sedimenting particles. The flow in the region around C. reinhardtii where significant hydrodynamic interaction is likely to occur differs qualitatively from a puller stresslet, and can be described by a simple three-Stokeslet model.

  1. Direct measurement of the flow field around swimming microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Marco; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Michel, Nicolas; Tuval, Idan

    2010-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms create flows that influence their mutual interactions and modify the rheology of their suspensions. While extensively studied theoretically, these flows have not been measured in detail around any freely-swimming microorganism. We report such measurements for the microphytes Volvox carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The minute (˜0.3%) density excess of V. carteri over water leads to a strongly dominant Stokeslet contribution, with the widely-assumed stresslet flow only a correction to the subleading source dipole term. This implies that suspensions of V. carteri have features similar to suspensions of sedimenting particles. The flow in the region around C. reinhardtii where significant hydrodynamic interaction is likely to occur differs qualitatively from a "puller" stresslet, and can be described by a simple three-Stokeslet model.

  2. The survival and growth of microorganisms in mascara during use.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L A; Julian, A J; Ahearn, D G

    1975-04-01

    Over 150 mascaras representing eight popular brands were examined for their susceptibility to microbial contamination during their use by study group members. Additional mascaras from patients with symptoms and clinical findings of long-term blepharitis also were investigated. Early in the study, two brands without preservatives supported reproducing populations of microorganisms, including potential eye pathogens. These products, as currently manufactured, were recalcitrant to microbial attack. Microbes associated with the facial skin and fingers of the study group users were typically isolated from mascaras after use. Initial microorganisms isolated from mascaras were usually transients. Establishment of reproducing populations within the cosmetics appeared related to the number of uses, personal habits of the user, and the formulation of the product. Four patients with staphylococcal blepharitis and cosmetics heavily laden with Staphylococcus epidermidis showed marked clinical improvement when they stopped using the contaminated cosmetics. The application of used eye area makeup prior to and following ocular surgery should be avoided. PMID:1119519

  3. Strategies of preserving lipids in microorganism after fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Yan, Song; Tyagi, Rajeshwar Dayal

    2015-09-01

    Microbial oil is accumulated by microorganisms as stored energy during cultivation, and will be degraded to generate energy when they are not able to obtain external energy source. As the lipid is the desired production, the in situ degradation of oil by microorganisms after fermentation or during downstream processing has to be prevented. This study investigated the effect of pH, thermal, salinity, bead milling, ultrasonication, and microwave treatment on the viability of Trichosporon oleaginosus when it was used for lipid production. The cells in broth were completely inactivated with the treatment of pH 1 and 2 for 1h, temperature 80 °C for 10 min, ultrasonication for 8 min, and microwave for 6 min, respectively. It was observed that these treatments had no impact on final product (biodiesel) composition and were considered as safe and efficient methods to preserve lipid in cells. PMID:26101961

  4. A SYSTEMATIC COMPARISON OF THE ELECTROKINETIC PROPERTIES OF ENVIRONMENTALLY IMPORTANT MICROORGANISMS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface charge of microorganisms is an important factor controlling their stability in aqueous environments and removal during water tretment practices. The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of environmentally important microorganisms in phosphate buffers was measur...

  5. Recovery of medically important microorganisms from Apollo astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiological samples were obtained from the crewmembers of the Apollo 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17 spaceflights. These specimens were analyzed for the presence of medically important microorganisms with Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Tricophyton mentagrophytes, Tricophyton rubrum, and Candida albicans being discussed in detail. Preflight isolation of crewmembers was found to coincide with a complete absence of inflight disease events and is recommended for future spaceflights. No autoinfection response (microbial shock) occurred after any of the reported spaceflights.

  6. Electrical impedance measurements: rapid method for detecting and monitoring microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Cady, P; Dufour, S W; Shaw, J; Kraeger, S J

    1978-01-01

    A conceptually simple and east-to-use technique is described that uses continuous impedance measurements for automated monitoring of microbial growth and metabolism. The method has been applied to a wide range of microorganisms. Optical clarity is not required. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the method are demonstrated. The mechanism whereby microbial growth alters the impedance of the medium is discussed, as well as potential applications of the method to clinical microbiology. Images PMID:348718

  7. Photodynamic/photocatalytic effects on microorganisms processed by nanodyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy uses laser, LED or lamp light sources in combination with dyes - exogenous photosensitizers for the enhancement and localization of photodynamic effects within the human body. We are developing a new approach of improvement of the efficiency of antimicrobial phototherapy via combined application of photosensitizers and the photocatalysts to pathogenic microorganisms. The main goal of the paper is to conduct experiments to study the action of nanodyes, based on mixtures of nanoparticles and photosensitizers, in combination with LED irradiation of pathogens.

  8. Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    1989-01-01

    A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

  9. Biotransformation of citrus aromatics nootkatone and valencene by microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Mai; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Noma, Yoshiaki; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2005-11-01

    Biotransformations of the sesquiterpene ketone nootkatone from the crude drug Alpiniae Fructus and grapefruit oil, and the sesquiterpene hydrocarbon valencene from Valencia orange oil were carried out with microorganisms such as Aspergillus niger, Botryosphaeria dothidea, and Fusarium culmorum to afford structurally interesting metabolites. Their stereostructures were established by a combination of high-resolution NMR spectral and X-ray crystallographic analysis and chemical reaction. Metabolic pathways of compounds and by A. niger are proposed. PMID:16272725

  10. Tolerance of sewage treatment plant microorganisms to mosquitocides.

    PubMed

    Tietze, N S; Olson, M A; Hester, P G; Moore, J J

    1993-12-01

    Beneficial protozoa and rotifers collected from a wastewater treatment plant in Panama City, FL, were tested for tolerance to 11 commonly used mosquito larvicides and adulticides in the laboratory. The acute effects were assessed using selected concentrations of the adulticides fenthion, malathion, naled, permethrin, and resmethrin; and the larvicides Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, Bacillus sphaericus, diflubenzuron, larviciding oil, methoprene, and temephos for the following microorganism taxa: ameoboids, flagellates, free-swimming ciliates, stalked ciliates, and rotifers. PMID:8126488

  11. Metagenomics for studying unculturable microorganisms: cutting the Gordian knot

    PubMed Central

    Schloss, Patrick D; Handelsman, Jo

    2005-01-01

    More than 99% of prokaryotes in the environment cannot be cultured in the laboratory, a phenomenon that limits our understanding of microbial physiology, genetics, and community ecology. One way around this problem is metagenomics, the culture-independent cloning and analysis of microbial DNA extracted directly from an environmental sample. Recent advances in shotgun sequencing and computational methods for genome assembly have advanced the field of metagenomics to provide glimpses into the life of uncultured microorganisms. PMID:16086859

  12. New microorganisms and processes for MEOR. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1993-12-01

    Oil reservoirs naturally contain inorganic and organic materials which may be exploited through simple mineral supplementation to support the growth of denitrifying microorganisms. The growth and metabolic products from the presence of these microorganisms will aid in the release of oil from the rock matrix and improve crude oil quality and oil field operations. These studies have been successful in defining new microorganisms and processes for MEOR. The data show that development of a mixed denitrifying microbial population in an oil reservoir environment will competitively reduce SRB populations resulting in the removal and prevention of H{sub 2}S. At the same time the products resulting from the growth of this replacement population will cause an increase in oil mobilization and oil release by mechanisms involving gas, surfactant and polymer production, and in the case of Thiobacillus growth, could cause dissolution of carbonates in the rock matrix. The establishment of this denitrifying population requires only the addition of simple inorganic chemicals without the need for organic nutrients. This new MEOR technology offers industry the potential for a simple, low cost, and effective oil recovery process, while at the same time provides a solution to the microbially generated sulfide problem.

  13. Microorganisms in periradicular tissues: Do they exist? A perennial controversy

    PubMed Central

    Dudeja, Pooja Gupta; Dudeja, Krishan Kumar; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani

    2015-01-01

    There is no greater association between the basic science and the practice of endodontics than that of microbiology. One of the strongest factors contributing to the controversies often encountered in the endodontic field is the lack of understanding that the disease processes of the pulp and periradicular tissues generally have a microbiological etiology. The vast majority of diseases of dental pulp and periradicular tissues are associated with microorganisms. After the microbial invasion of these tissues, the host responds with both nonspecific inflammatory responses and with specific immunologic responses to encounter such infections. The aim of this study is to fill the gaps in our knowledge regarding the role of microorganisms in endodontics and to discuss in depth whether their presence in periradicular lesions is a myth or a reality. An electronic search was carried out on PubMed database (custom range of almost 50 years) and Google using specific keywords and phrases. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were specified and around 50 articles were found suitable for inclusion. Full text of all the articles was retrieved and studied. Appropriate data were extracted and pooled and finally synthesized. It is important to understand the close relationship between the presence of microorganisms and endodontic disease process to develop an effective rationale for treatment. PMID:26980965

  14. Microorganisms in periradicular tissues: Do they exist? A perennial controversy.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Pooja Gupta; Dudeja, Krishan Kumar; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani

    2015-01-01

    There is no greater association between the basic science and the practice of endodontics than that of microbiology. One of the strongest factors contributing to the controversies often encountered in the endodontic field is the lack of understanding that the disease processes of the pulp and periradicular tissues generally have a microbiological etiology. The vast majority of diseases of dental pulp and periradicular tissues are associated with microorganisms. After the microbial invasion of these tissues, the host responds with both nonspecific inflammatory responses and with specific immunologic responses to encounter such infections. The aim of this study is to fill the gaps in our knowledge regarding the role of microorganisms in endodontics and to discuss in depth whether their presence in periradicular lesions is a myth or a reality. An electronic search was carried out on PubMed database (custom range of almost 50 years) and Google using specific keywords and phrases. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were specified and around 50 articles were found suitable for inclusion. Full text of all the articles was retrieved and studied. Appropriate data were extracted and pooled and finally synthesized. It is important to understand the close relationship between the presence of microorganisms and endodontic disease process to develop an effective rationale for treatment. PMID:26980965

  15. Sources of airborne microorganisms in the built environment.

    PubMed

    Prussin, Aaron J; Marr, Linsey C

    2015-01-01

    Each day people are exposed to millions of bioaerosols, including whole microorganisms, which can have both beneficial and detrimental effects. The next chapter in understanding the airborne microbiome of the built environment is characterizing the various sources of airborne microorganisms and the relative contribution of each. We have identified the following eight major categories of sources of airborne bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the built environment: humans; pets; plants; plumbing systems; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems; mold; dust resuspension; and the outdoor environment. Certain species are associated with certain sources, but the full potential of source characterization and source apportionment has not yet been realized. Ideally, future studies will quantify detailed emission rates of microorganisms from each source and will identify the relative contribution of each source to the indoor air microbiome. This information could then be used to probe fundamental relationships between specific sources and human health, to design interventions to improve building health and human health, or even to provide evidence for forensic investigations. PMID:26694197

  16. Fate and activity of microorganisms introduced into soil.

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, J A; van Overbeek, L S; van Elsas, J D

    1997-01-01

    Introduced microorganisms are potentially powerful agents for manipulation of processes and/or components in soil. Fields of application include enhancement of crop growth, protection of crops against plant-pathogenic organisms, stimulation of biodegradation of xenobiotic compounds (bioaugmentation), and improvement of soil structure. Inoculation of soils has already been applied for decades, but it has often yielded inconsistent or disappointing results. This is caused mainly by a commonly observed rapid decline in inoculant population activity following introduction into soil, i.e., a decline of the numbers of inoculant cells and/or a decline of the (average) activity per cell. In this review, we discuss the available information on the effects of key factors that determine the fate and activity of microorganisms introduced into soil, with emphasis on bacteria. The factors addressed include the physiological status of the inoculant cells, the biotic and abiotic interactions in soil, soil properties, and substrate availability. Finally, we address the possibilities available to effectively manipulate the fate and activity of introduced microorganisms in relation to the main areas of their application. PMID:9184007

  17. Possibilities for extremophilic microorganisms in microbial electrochemical systems

    PubMed Central

    Dopson, Mark; Ni, Gaofeng; Sleutels, Tom HJA

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrochemical systems exploit the metabolism of microorganisms to generate electrical energy or a useful product. In the past couple of decades, the application of microbial electrochemical systems has increased from the use of wastewaters to produce electricity to a versatile technology that can use numerous sources for the extraction of electrons on the one hand, while on the other hand these electrons can be used to serve an ever increasing number of functions. Extremophilic microorganisms grow in environments that are hostile to most forms of life and their utilization in microbial electrochemical systems has opened new possibilities to oxidize substrates in the anode and produce novel products in the cathode. For example, extremophiles can be used to oxidize sulfur compounds in acidic pH to remediate wastewaters, generate electrical energy from marine sediment microbial fuel cells at low temperatures, desalinate wastewaters and act as biosensors of low amounts of organic carbon. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances that have been made in using microbial catalysts under extreme conditions and show possible new routes that extremophilic microorganisms open for microbial electrochemical systems. PMID:26474966

  18. Possibilities for extremophilic microorganisms in microbial electrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Dopson, Mark; Ni, Gaofeng; Sleutels, Tom H J A

    2016-03-01

    Microbial electrochemical systems exploit the metabolism of microorganisms to generate electrical energy or a useful product. In the past couple of decades, the application of microbial electrochemical systems has increased from the use of wastewaters to produce electricity to a versatile technology that can use numerous sources for the extraction of electrons on the one hand, while on the other hand these electrons can be used to serve an ever increasing number of functions. Extremophilic microorganisms grow in environments that are hostile to most forms of life and their utilization in microbial electrochemical systems has opened new possibilities to oxidize substrates in the anode and produce novel products in the cathode. For example, extremophiles can be used to oxidize sulfur compounds in acidic pH to remediate wastewaters, generate electrical energy from marine sediment microbial fuel cells at low temperatures, desalinate wastewaters and act as biosensors of low amounts of organic carbon. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances that have been made in using microbial catalysts under extreme conditions and show possible new routes that extremophilic microorganisms open for microbial electrochemical systems. PMID:26474966

  19. Raft-Like Membrane Domains in Pathogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Farnoud, Amir M.; Toledo, Alvaro M.; Konopka, James B.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; London, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is thought to be compartmentalized by the presence of lipid-protein microdomains. In eukaryotic cells, microdomains composed of sterols and sphingolipids packed in a liquid-ordered state, commonly known as lipid rafts, are believed to exist. While less studied in bacterial cells, reports on the presence of sterol or protein-mediated microdomains in bacterial cell membranes are also appearing with increasing frequency. Recent efforts have been focused on addressing the biophysical and biochemical properties of lipid rafts. However, most studies have been focused on synthetic membranes, mammalian cells, and/or model, non-pathogenic microorganisms. Much less is known about microdomains in the plasma membrane of pathogenic microorganisms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of lipid rafts in pathogenic fungi and the developing field of microdomains in pathogenic bacteria. The current literature on the structure and function and of microdomains is reviewed and the potential role of microdomains in growth, pathogenesis, and drug resistance of pathogens are discussed. Better insight into the structure and function of membrane microdomains in pathogenic microorganisms might lead to a better understanding of the process of pathogenesis and development of raft-mediated approaches for new methods of therapy. PMID:26015285

  20. The diversity of microorganisms associated with Acromyrmex leafcutter ants

    PubMed Central

    Van Borm, Steven; Billen, Johan; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2002-01-01

    Background Molecular biological techniques are dramatically changing our view of microbial diversity in almost any environment that has so far been investigated. This study presents a systematic survey of the microbial diversity associated with a population of Acromyrmex leafcutter ants. In contrast to previous studies on social insects, which targeted specific groups of symbionts occurring in the gut (termites, Tetraponera ants) or in specialised cells (Camponotus ants) the objective of our present study was to do a total screening of all possible micro-organisms that can be found inside the bodies of these leafcutter ants. Results We amplified, cloned and sequenced SSU rRNA encoding gene fragments from 9 microbial groups known to have insect-associated representatives, and show that: (1) representatives of 5 out of 9 tested groups are present, (2) mostly several strains per group are present, adding up to a total of 33 different taxa. We present the microbial taxa associated with Acromymex ants in a phylogenetic context (using sequences from GenBank) to assess and illustrate to which known microorganisms they are closely related. The observed microbial diversity is discussed in the light of present knowledge on the evolutionary history of Acromyrmex leafcutter ants and their known mutualistic and parasitic symbionts. Conclusions The major merits of the screening approach documented here is its high sensitivity and specificity, which allowed us to identify several microorganisms that are promising candidates for further study of their interactions with Acromyrmex leafcutter ants or their gardens. PMID:12019020

  1. Biosorption and recycling of gold using various microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Takehiko

    2004-08-01

    In order to obtain basic information on the biosorption and recycling of gold from aqueous systems using microbial cells, the biosorption of gold by various microorganisms was investigated. Of 75 strains of microorganisms tested (25 bacteria, 19 actinomycetes, 17 fungi and 14 yeasts), high abilities of gold biosorption from a solution containing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (III) were found in some gram-negative bacterial strains, such as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Erwinia herbicola, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and P. maltophilia. Most of the gram-positive bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi and yeasts had a lower ability for gold biosorption than gram-negative bacteria. On the other hand, all of the microorganisms tested adsorbed far smaller amounts of gold from a solution containing gold dicyanoaurate (I). The biosorption of gold from a solution containing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (III) using P. maltophilia having a high adsorbing ability for gold was very rapid and was affected by the pH of the solution, external gold concentration, and cell amounts. P. maltophilia cells immobilized with polyacrylamide gel also have a high ability for gold biosorption. The gold adsorbed on the immobilized cells is easily desorbed with 0.1 M thiourea solution. The immobilized P. maltophilia cells can be used repeatedly in biosorption-desorption cycles. PMID:15754248

  2. Comparative analysis of bio fouling microorganisms after treatment with glidarc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatiuc, M.; Sabau, A.; Hnatiuc, B.; Ghita, S.

    2015-11-01

    The biofouling of the surfaces immersed in water is one of the most important problems which must be solved in the naval field. This phenomenon is amplified during the harbor operations, when the ships are stationary and there is a high density of microorganisms in the neritic area, developing the biofouling. For this reason, in order to prevent or delay the deposition of the first layers of biofouling, different methods have been used [1]. This paper presents the comparative analysis of microorganisms’ behavior obtained by using GlidArc technology for the treatment of the naval metallic surfaces [2, 3]. The main parameters identified for data processing were: the number of microorganisms shared from the point of view of sensibility to the used technology found on the metallic surfaces, the type of the naval paint and the treatment methods. For analysis it was used the epifluorescence microscopy method with. The comparative analysis follows the data processing which has the same input characteristics. Finally it was observed the microorganism's lifetime after the surface treatment.

  3. [Secretion of proteolytic enzymes by three phytopathogenic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteinases from three phytopathogenic microorganisms that belong to different fungal families and cause diseases in potatoes were studied and characterized. The oomycete Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary and the fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium culmorum were shown to secrete serine proteinases. An analysis of the substrate specificity of these enzymes and their sensitivity to synthetic and protein inhibitors allowed us to refer them to trypsin- and subtilisin-like proteinases. The correlation between the trypsin- and subtilisin-like proteinases depended on the composition of the culture medium, particularly on the form of the nitrogen source. A phylogenetic analysis was carried out. In contrast to basidiomycetes R. solani, ascomycetes F. culmorum and oomycetes P. infestans produced a similar set of exoproteinases, although they had more distant phylogenetic positions. This indicated that the secretion of serine proteinases by various phytopathogenic microorganisms also depended on their phylogenetic position. These results allowed us to suggest that exoproteinases from phytopathogenic fungi play a different role in pathogenesis. They may promote the adaptation of fungi if the range of hosts is enlarged. On the other hand, they may play an important role in the survival of microorganisms in hostile environements outside their hosts. PMID:25508654

  4. [Secretion of proteolytic enzymes by three phytopathogenic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Kudriavtseva, N N; Sof'in, A V; Revina, T A; Gvozdeva, E L; Ievleva, E V; Valueva, T A

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteinases from three phytopathogenic microorganisms that belong to different fungal families and cause diseases in potatoes were studied and characterized. The oomycete Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary and the fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium culmorum were shown to secrete serine proteinases. An analysis of the substrate specificity of these enzymes and their sensitivity to synthetic and protein inhibitors allowed us to refer them to trypsin- and subtilisin-like proteinases. The correlation between the trypsin- and subtilisin-like proteinases depended on the composition of the culture medium, particularly on the form of the nitrogen source. A phylogenetic analysis was carried out. In contrast to basidiomycetes R. solani, ascomycetes F. culmorum and oomycetes P. infestans produced a similar set of exoproteinases, although they had more distant phylogenetic positions. This indicated that the secretion of serine proteinases by various phytopathogenic microorganisms also depended on their phylogenetic position. These results allowed us to suggest that exoproteinases from phytopathogenic fungi play a different role in pathogenesis. They may promote the adaptation of fungi if the range of hosts is enlarged. On the other hand, they may play an important role in the survival of microorganisms in hostile environements outside their hosts. PMID:25474875

  5. Isolation of microorganisms for biological detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    López, M J; Nichols, N N; Dien, B S; Moreno, J; Bothast, R J

    2004-03-01

    Acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass releases furan and phenolic compounds, which are toxic to microorganisms used for subsequent fermentation. In this study, we isolated new microorganisms for depletion of inhibitors in lignocellulosic acid hydrolysates. A sequential enrichment strategy was used to isolate microorganisms from soil. Selection was carried out in a defined mineral medium containing a mixture of ferulic acid (5 mM), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF, 15 mM), and furfural (20 mM) as the carbon and energy sources, followed by an additional transfer into a corn stover hydrolysate (CSH) prepared using dilute acid. Subsequently, based on stable growth on these substrates, six isolates--including five bacteria related to Methylobacterium extorquens, Pseudomonas sp, Flavobacterium indologenes, Acinetobacter sp., Arthrobacter aurescens, and one fungus, Coniochaeta ligniaria--were chosen. All six isolates depleted toxic compounds from defined medium, but only C. ligniaria C8 (NRRL 30616) was effective at eliminating furfural and 5-HMF from CSH. C. ligniaria NRRL 30616 may be useful in developing a bioprocess for inhibitor abatement in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. PMID:12908085

  6. Food-processing enzymes from recombinant microorganisms--a review.

    PubMed

    Olempska-Beer, Zofia S; Merker, Robert I; Ditto, Mary D; DiNovi, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Enzymes are commonly used in food processing and in the production of food ingredients. Enzymes traditionally isolated from culturable microorganisms, plants, and mammalian tissues are often not well-adapted to the conditions used in modern food production methods. The use of recombinant DNA technology has made it possible to manufacture novel enzymes suitable for specific food-processing conditions. Such enzymes may be discovered by screening microorganisms sampled from diverse environments or developed by modification of known enzymes using modern methods of protein engineering or molecular evolution. As a result, several important food-processing enzymes such as amylases and lipases with properties tailored to particular food applications have become available. Another important achievement is improvement of microbial production strains. For example, several microbial strains recently developed for enzyme production have been engineered to increase enzyme yield by deleting native genes encoding extracellular proteases. Moreover, certain fungal production strains have been modified to reduce or eliminate their potential for production of toxic secondary metabolites. In this article, we discuss the safety of microorganisms used as hosts for enzyme-encoding genes, the construction of recombinant production strains, and methods of improving enzyme properties. We also briefly describe the manufacture and safety assessment of enzyme preparations and summarize options for submitting information on enzyme preparations to the US Food and Drug Administration. PMID:16769167

  7. Susceptibility of some oral microorganisms to chlorhexidine and paramonochlorophenol.

    PubMed

    do Amorim, Crystiane Venditi Gomes; Aun, Carlos Eduardo; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves

    2004-01-01

    Since the use of antimicrobial agents is required in endodontic therapies, this study aimed at determining the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of chlorhexidine digluconate and paramonochlorophenol (PMC) against microorganisms commonly found in endodontic infections. Both agents were tested by agar dilution tests against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella denticola and Prevotella melaninogenica. The MIC of chlorhexidine ranged from 2.67 to 80.00 microg/ml, and the MIC of PMC from 46.67 to 213.33 microg/ml. The highest MIC value of PMC was detected for E. faecalis whereas E. coli was the most susceptible microorganism to this agent. The highest MIC values of chlorhexidine were observed for P. aeruginosa whereas E. coli and P. denticola were the most susceptible microorganisms to this agent. Since the MIC values observed are much lower than the concentrations currently used in the endodontic therapy, it is suggested that both agents are effective in reducing the microbiota in the root canal. PMID:15619879

  8. Use of Stable Isotopes in Forensic Analysis of Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-18

    The use of isotopic signatures for forensic analysis of biological materials is well-established, and the same general principles that apply to interpretation of stable isotope content of C, N, O, and H apply to the analysis of microorganisms. Heterotrophic microorganisms derive their isotopic content from their growth substrates, which are largely plant and animal products, and the water in their culture medium. Thus the isotope signatures of microbes are tied to their growth environment. The C, N, O, and H isotope ratios of spores have been demonstrated to constitute highly discriminating signatures for sample matching. They can rule out specific samples of media and/or water as possible production media, and can predict isotope ratio ranges of the culture media and water used to produce a given sample. These applications have been developed and tested through analyses of approximately 250 samples of Bacillus subtilis spores and over 500 samples of culture media, providing a strong statistical basis for data interpretation. A Bayesian statistical framework for integrating stable isotope data with other types of signatures derived from microorganisms has been able to characterize the culture medium used to produce spores of various Bacillus species, leveraging isotopic differences in different medium types and demonstrating the power of data integration for forensic investigations.

  9. Isolated microorganisms from Iranian grapes and its derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Maulani, S; Hosseini, SM; Elikaie, A; Mirnurollahi, SM

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives The objective of this study was to monitor the microorganisms isolated from grapes and its derivative traditional products produced in Iran. Material and Methods Four kinds of grapes cultivated summer of 2010 in vineyard of Takestan and also grape derived products from Shahrod, Hamedan and Takestan were used for this study. The samples were cultured in specific media to isolate the microorganisms that might grow on or pollute the products. Results Species of bacteria and fungi isolated from 4 kinds of grapes cultivated in Takestan graveyards and also from 2 kinds of derived traditional products; grape sap and sour grape (abe-ghure locally named), were taken from Takestan, Shahrod and Hamedan cities. Also, bacteria Bacillus spp., Micrococcus spp., Clostridium spp., and fungus of Penicillium spp., and Aspergillus spp. were isolated. Conclusion The isolated bacteria were common microorganisms that grow in soil or in the organic fertilizer and may appear from the environments that samples were collected. These bacteria were not pathogenic to human. The fungus isolated from the grapes may harm humans as they produce toxin. The results suggested that bacterial diversity on grapes and its derived traditional products are expected to be monitored and described in all Iranian graveyards as Iran has been known as one of the world's biggest grape producers. PMID:22783457

  10. [The low-molecular weight antioxidants of microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Skorokhod, I O; Kurdysh, I K

    2014-01-01

    Support of optimum redox-homeostasis in the cells of microorganisms plays a substantial role in the processes of DNA synthesis, respiration, providing of immune and protective reactions, activity of enzymes, etc. The changes of the redox-status can be accompanied by the increase of the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which predetermine the damage of biologically active molecules. Adjusting of ROS concentrations is a very important process in development of microorganisms. Low-molecular antioxidants are effective inhibitors of free-radical processes. The authors of the review present the description of oxidants and consider the ways of origin and consequences of their influence on the living cells. An accent is done on phenomenological description of low-molecular antioxidants. The basic mechanisms of their action are considered. Special attention is given to the question of synergism between these protectors. The detailed study of mechanisms of functioning of low-molecular antioxidants in the cells of microorganisms will allow using these living objects in different spheres of human activity. PMID:25007444

  11. Microorganisms in desert rocks: the edge of life on Earth.

    PubMed

    Wierzchos, Jacek; de los Ríos, Asunción; Ascaso, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    This article reviews current knowledge on microbial communities inhabiting endolithic habitats in the arid and hyper-arid regions of our planet. In these extremely dry environments, the most common survival strategy is to colonize the interiors of rocks. This habitat provides thermal buffering, physical stability, and protection against incident UV radiation, excessive photosynthetically active radiation, and freeze-thaw events. Above all, through water retention in the rocks' network of pores and fissures, moisture is made available. Some authors have argued that dry environments pose the most extreme set of conditions faced by microorganisms. Microbial cells need to withstand the biochemical stresses created by the lack of water, along with temperature fluctuations and/or high salinity. In this review, we also address the variety of ways in which microorganisms deal with the lack of moisture in hyper-arid environments and point out the diversity of microorganisms that are able to cope with only the scarcest presence of water. Finally, we discuss the important clues to the history of life on Earth, and perhaps other places in our solar system, that have emerged from the study of extreme microbial ecosystems. PMID:23844476

  12. The isolation of microorganisms capable of phenol degradation.

    PubMed

    Przybulewska, Krystyna; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Nowak, Andrzej; Pochrzaszcz, Magdalena

    2006-01-01

    The results of a study on the composition of microflora settling the pilot biofilter bed that purifies the exhausting gases from a cable factory's coil-wire varnishing division are presented in this study. The ability of isolated bacterial strains to biodegrade phenol was also evaluated using culture media of various compositions. Phenol was introduced into the medium at the following concentrations: 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1 g x dm(-3). In addition, air in desiccators, where micro-organisms grew, was saturated with phenol. The isolated microorganisms were graded by the phenol decomposition rate using gas chromatography. The beds of biofilters utilized in industry appeared to be the source of microorganisms capable of degrading phenol. The most active were: Rhodococcus rhodochrous, Gordonia sputi, Pseudomonas putida. Their mixture showed higher degradation activity than the particular isolates. Isolated and identified bacteria metabolized phenol at high rate (about 14 to 42 g x m(-3) x h(-3)). PMID:16878606

  13. The challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Roger L.

    1988-01-01

    Radio systems in space are on the brink of achieving throughout data rates in the hundred of megabits. At present, radio systems operate below 60 GHz and are the traditional workhorses of satellite communications. Legal constraints and the laws of physics limit data rates on the systems. It is maintained that the challenge to provide high technology tools to develop viable high-data-rate space transmission systems can be met before the next century if three optical system and technology issues are overcome. In declining order of importance, the issues are: precise optical pointing, acquisition, and tracking; efficient laser diode optical sources producing sufficient output power; and advanced optical detector technology.

  14. Phylogenentic and enzymatic characterization of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant marine bacteria belong to γ-Proteobacteria group isolated from the sub-Antarctic Beagle Channel, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cristóbal, Héctor A; Benito, Juliana; Lovrich, Gustavo A; Abate, Carlos M

    2015-05-01

    The phylogenetic and physiological characteristics of cultivable-dependent approaches were determined to establish the diversity of marine bacteria associated with the intestines of benthonic organisms and seawater samples from the Argentina's Beagle Channel. A total of 737 isolates were classified as psychrophlic and psychrotolerant culturable marine bacteria. These cold-adapted microorganisms are capable of producing cold-active glycosyl hydrolases, such as β-glucosidases, celulases, β-galactosidases, xylanases, chitinases, and proteases. These enzymes could have potential biotechnological applications for use in low-temperature manufacturing processes. According to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of part of genes encoding 16S ribosomal DNA (ARDRA) and DNA gyrase subunit B (gyrB-RFLP), 11 operational taxonomic units (OTU) were identified and clustered in known genera using InfoStat software. The 50 isolates selected were sequenced based on near full sequence analysis of 16S rDNA and gyrB sequences and identified by their nearest neighbors ranging between 96 and 99 % of identities. Phylogenetic analyses using both genes allowed relationships between members of the cultured marine bacteria belonging to the γ-Proteobacteria group (Aeromonas, Halteromonas, Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, Serratia, Colwellia, Glacielocola, and Psychrobacter) to be evaluated. Our research reveals a high diversity of hydrolytic bacteria, and their products actuality has an industrial use in several bioprocesses at low-temperature manufacturing. PMID:25344742

  15. Detection of l-alanylaminopeptidase activity in microorganisms using fluorogenic self-immolative enzyme substrates.

    PubMed

    Cellier, Marie; James, Arthur L; Lowe, Jonathan; Orenga, Sylvain; Perry, John D; Rasul, Ari K; Stanforth, Stephen P

    2016-09-15

    A series of fluorogenic enzymatic substrates that incorporate a self-immolative spacer were synthesised for the purpose of identifying l-alanylaminopeptidase activity in microorganisms in agar media. These substrates resulted in the generation of fluorescent microorganism colonies with Gram-negative microorganisms. PMID:27396928

  16. 40 CFR 725.12 - Identification of microorganisms for Inventory and other listing purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... taxonomic designation must be provided to EPA. The genetic history of the recipient microorganism should be... distinguishing genotypic characteristics of a microorganism, such as the identity of the introduced genetic material and the methods used to construct the reported microorganism. This also may include information...

  17. 40 CFR 725.12 - Identification of microorganisms for Inventory and other listing purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... taxonomic designation must be provided to EPA. The genetic history of the recipient microorganism should be... distinguishing genotypic characteristics of a microorganism, such as the identity of the introduced genetic material and the methods used to construct the reported microorganism. This also may include information...

  18. 40 CFR 725.92 - Data from health and safety studies of microorganisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... microorganisms. 725.92 Section 725.92 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Confidentiality and Public Access to Information § 725.92 Data from health and safety studies of microorganisms....

  19. 9 CFR 114.5 - Micro-organisms used as seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Micro-organisms used as seed. 114.5 Section 114.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.5 Micro-organisms used as seed. Micro-organisms used in the preparation...

  20. 9 CFR 114.5 - Micro-organisms used as seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Micro-organisms used as seed. 114.5 Section 114.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.5 Micro-organisms used as seed. Micro-organisms used in the preparation...

  1. 77 FR 54499 - Microorganisms; General Exemptions From Reporting Requirements; Revisions to Recipient Organisms...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ...EPA received petitions to add Trichoderma reesei and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens to the list of microorganisms that may be used as recipient microorganisms in order to qualify for the exemption from full notification and reporting procedures under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for new microorganisms that are being manufactured for introduction into commerce. Based on EPA's evaluation......

  2. Supercooled Water Brines Within Permafrost-An Unknown Ecological Niche for Microorganisms: A Model for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilichinsky, D.; Rivkina, E.; Shcherbakova, V.; Laurinavichuis, K.; Tiedje, J.

    2003-06-01

    This study describes brine lenses (cryopegs) found in Siberian permafrost derived from ancient marine sediment layers of the Arctic Ocean. The cryopegs were formed and isolated from sediment ~100,000-120,000 years ago. They remain liquid at the in situ temperature of -10°C as a result of their high salt content (170-300 g/L). [14C] Glucose is taken up by the cryopeg biomass at -15°C, indicating microbial metabolism at low temperatures in this habitat. Furthermore, aerobic, anaerobic heterotrophs, sulfate reducers, acetogens, and methanogens were detected by most probable number analysis. Two psychrophilic microbes were isolated from the cryopegs, a Clostridium and a Psychrobacter. The closest relatives of each were previously isolated from Antarctica. The cryopeg econiche might serve as a model for extraterrestrial life, and hence is of particular interest to astrobiology.

  3. A Comprehensive Characterization of Microorganisms and Allergens in Spacecraft Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, V.A.; Ott, C.M.; Garcia, V.M.; John, J.; Buttner, M.P.; Cruz, P.; Pierson, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    The determination of risk from infectious disease during long-duration missions is composed of several factors including the concentration and the characteristics of the infectious agent. Thus, a thorough knowledge of the microorganisms aboard spacecraft is essential in mitigating infectious disease risk to the crew. While stringent steps are taken to minimize the transfer of potential pathogens to spacecraft, several medically significant organisms have been isolated from both the Mir and International Space Station (ISS). Historically, the method for isolation and identification of microorganisms from spacecraft environmental samples depended upon their growth on culture media. Unfortunately, only a fraction of the organisms may grow on a culture medium, potentially omitting those microorganisms whose nutritional and physical requirements for growth are not met. Thus, several pathogens may not have been detected, such as Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaire s disease. We hypothesize that environmental analysis using non-culture-based technologies will reveal microorganisms, allergens, and microbial toxins not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. The development of techniques for this flight experiment, operationally named SWAB, has already provided advances in NASA laboratory processes and beneficial information toward human health risk assessment. The translation of 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing for the identification of bacteria from the SWAB experiment to nominal operations has increased bacterial speciation of environmental isolates from previous flights three fold compared to previous conventional methodology. The incorporation of molecular-based DNA fingerprinting using repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) into the capabilities of the laboratory has provided a methodology to track microorganisms between crewmembers and their environment. Both 16S ribosomal DNA

  4. Apparatus and process for determining the susceptibility of microorganisms to antibiotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sandra F. (Inventor); Fadler, Norman L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process for determining the susceptibility of microorganisms to antibiotics involves introducing a diluted specimen into discrete quantities of a selective culture medium which favors a specific microorganism in that the microorganism is sustained by the medium and when so sustained will change the optical characteristics of the medium. Only the specific microorganism will alter the optical characteristics. Some of the discrete quantities are blended with known antibiotics, while at least one is not. If the specimen contains the microorganisms favored by the selective medium, the optical characteristics of the discrete quantity of pure selective medium, that is the one without antibiotics, will change. If the antibiotics in any of the other discrete quantities are ineffective against the favored microorganisms, the optical characteristics of those quantities will likewise change. No change in the optical characteristics of a discrete quantity indicates that the favored microorganism is susceptible to the antibiotic in the quantity.

  5. Antibacterial Effect of Copper on Microorganisms Isolated from Bovine Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Jara, Angelica; Cordero, Ninoska; Aguirre, Juan; Troncoso, Miriam; Figueroa, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial properties of copper have been recognized for several years; applying these properties to the prevention of diseases such as bovine mastitis is a new area of research. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vitro the antimicrobial activity of copper on bacteria isolated from subclinical and clinical mastitis milk samples from two regions in Chile. A total of 327 microorganisms were recovered between March and September 2013, with different prevalence by sample origin (25 and 75% from the central and southern regions of Chile, respectively). In the central region, Escherichia coli and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS) were the most frequently detected in clinical mastitis cases (33%), while in the southern region S. uberis, S. aureus, and CNS were detected with frequencies of 22, 21, and 18%, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility studies revealed that 34% of isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics and the resistance profile was different between bacterial species and origins of isolation of the bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration of copper (MIC-Cu) was evaluated in all the isolates; results revealed that a concentration as low as 250 ppm copper was able to inhibit the great majority of microorganisms analyzed (65% of isolates). The remaining isolates showed a MIC-Cu between 375 and 700 ppm copper, and no growth was observed at 1000 ppm. A linear relationship was found between the logarithm of viable bacteria number and time of contact with copper. With the application of the same concentration of copper (250 ppm), CNS showed the highest tolerance to copper, followed by S. uberis and S. aureus; the least resistant was E. coli. Based on these in vitro results, copper preparations could represent a good alternative to dipping solutions, aimed at preventing the presence and multiplication of potentially pathogenic microorganisms involved in bovine mastitis disease. PMID:27199953

  6. Lipid biomarker analysis for the quantitative analysis of airborne microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Macnaughton, S.J.; Jenkins, T.L.; Cormier, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    There is an ever increasing concern regarding the presence of airborne microbial contaminants within indoor air environments. Exposure to such biocontaminants can give rise to large numbers of different health effects including infectious diseases, allergenic responses and respiratory problems, Biocontaminants typically round in indoor air environments include bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa and dust mites. Mycotoxins, endotoxins, pollens and residues of organisms are also known to cause adverse health effects. A quantitative detection/identification technique independent of culturability that assays both culturable and non culturable biomass including endotoxin is critical in defining risks from indoor air biocontamination. Traditionally, methods employed for the monitoring of microorganism numbers in indoor air environments involve classical culture based techniques and/or direct microscopic counting. It has been repeatedly documented that viable microorganism counts only account for between 0.1-10% of the total community detectable by direct counting. The classic viable microbiologic approach doe`s not provide accurate estimates of microbial fragments or other indoor air components that can act as antigens and induce or potentiate allergic responses. Although bioaerosol samplers are designed to damage the microbes as little as possible, microbial stress has been shown to result from air sampling, aerosolization and microbial collection. Higher collection efficiency results in greater cell damage while less cell damage often results in lower collection efficiency. Filtration can collect particulates at almost 100% efficiency, but captured microorganisms may become dehydrated and damaged resulting in non-culturability, however, the lipid biomarker assays described herein do not rely on cell culture. Lipids are components that are universally distributed throughout cells providing a means to assess independent of culturability.

  7. Characteristics of Glacier Ecosystem and Glaciological Importance of Glacier Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohshima, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Takeuchi, N.; Segawa, T.; Uetake, J.

    2004-12-01

    Biological activity on glaciers has been believed to be extremely limited. However, we found various biotic communities specialized to the glacier environment in various part of the world, such as Himalaya, Patagonia and Alaska. Some of these glacier hosted biotic communities including various cold-tolerant insects, annelids and copepods that were living in the glacier by feeding on algae and bacteria growing in the snow and ice. Thus, the glaciers are simple and relatively closed ecosystems sustained by the primary production in the snow and ice. Since these microorganisms growing on the glacier surface are stored in the glacial strata every year, ice-core samples contain many layers with these microorganisms. Recently, it was shown that the snow algae in the ice-core are useful for ice core dating and could be new environmental signals for the studies on past_@environment using ice cores. These microorganisms in the ice core will be important especially in the studies of ice core from the glaciers of warmer regions, in which chemical and isotopic contents are often heavily disturbed by melt water percolation. Blooms of algae and bacteria on the glacier can reduce the surface albedo and significantly affect the glacier melting. For example, the surface albedo of some Himalayan glaciers was significantly reduced by a large amount of dark-colored biogenic material (cryoconite) derived from snow algae and bacteria. It increased the melting rates of the surfaces by as much as three-fold. Thus, it was suggested that the microbial activity on the glacier could affect the mass balance and fluctuation of the glaciers.

  8. Enhanced Characterization of Microorganisms in the Spacecraft Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Patricia; Stetzenbach, Linda D.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft such as the International Space Station (ISS) and the space shuttles are enclosed environments where crewmembers may spend long periods of time. Currently, crewmembers spend approximately a period of 6 months in the ISS. It is known that these prolonged stays in space may result in weakening of the immune system. Therefore, exposure to opportunistic pathogens or high concentrations of environmental microorganisms may compromise the health of the crew. The detection of biocontaminants in spacecraft environments utilizes culture-based methodology, omitting greater than 90% of all microorganisms including pathogens such as Legionella and Cryptosporidium. Culturable bacteria and fungi have been the only allergens studied; the more potent allergens, such as those from dust mites, have never been tested for in spacecraft environments. In addition, no attempts have been made to monitor microbial toxins in spacecrafts. The present study utilized quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) as a novel approach for monitoring microorganisms in the spacecraft environment. QPCR is a molecular biology technique that does not rely on the physiological state of the organisms for identification, thereby enabling detection of both culturable and non-culturable organisms. In this project, specific molecular primers and probes were utilized for the detection and quantitation of two fungi of concern in indoor environments, Aspergillus fumigatus and Stachybotrys chartarum. These organisms were selected because of the availability of PCR primers and probes, and to establish the sample processing and analysis methodology that may be employed with additional organisms. Purification methods and QPCR assays were optimized for the detection of these organisms in air, surface, and water; and sample processing and analysis protocols were developed. Preliminary validation of these protocols was conducted in the laboratory with air, surface, and water samples seeded with known

  9. Free tropospheric transport of microorganisms from Asia to North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D. Smith; Dan Jaffe; Michele Birmele; Griffin, Dale W.; Andrew Schuerger; Hee, J.; Michael Roberts

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms are abundant in the troposphere and can be transported vast distances on prevailing winds. This study measures the abundance and diversity of airborne bacteria and fungi sampled at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (located 2.7 km above sea level in North America) where incoming free tropospheric air routinely arrives from distant sources across the Pacific Ocean, including Asia. Overall deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) concentrations for microorganisms in the free troposphere, derived from quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays, averaged 4.94 × 10(-5) ng DNA m(-3) for bacteria and 4.77 × 10(-3) ng DNA m(-3) for fungi. Aerosols occasionally corresponded with microbial abundance, most often in the springtime. Viable cells were recovered from 27.4 % of bacterial and 47.6 % of fungal samples (N = 124), with 49 different species identified by ribosomal DNA gene sequencing. The number of microbial isolates rose significantly above baseline values on 22-23 April 2011 and 13-15 May 2011. Both events were analyzed in detail, revealing distinct free tropospheric chemistries (e.g., low water vapor, high aerosols, carbon monoxide, and ozone) useful for ruling out boundary layer contamination. Kinematic back trajectory modeling suggested air from these events probably originated near China or Japan. Even after traveling for 10 days across the Pacific Ocean in the free troposphere, diverse and viable microbial populations, including presumptive plant pathogens Alternaria infectoria and Chaetomium globosum, were detected in Asian air samples. Establishing a connection between the intercontinental transport of microorganisms and specific diseases in North America will require follow-up investigations on both sides of the Pacific Ocean.

  10. Hydrocarbon degradation potential of salt marsh plant-microorganisms associations.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Mucha, Ana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2011-07-01

    Estuaries are often considered sinks for contaminants and the cleanup of salt marshes, sensitive ecosystems with a major ecological role, should be carried out by means of least intrusive approaches, such as bioremediation. This study was designed to evaluate the influence of plant-microorganisms associations on petroleum hydrocarbons fate in salt marshes of a temperate estuary (Lima River, NW Portugal). Sediments un-colonized and colonized (rhizosediments) by different plants (Juncus maritimus, Phragmites australis, Triglochin striata and Spartina patens) were sampled in four sites of the lower and middle estuary for hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms (HD), total cell counts (TCC) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) assessment. In general, TPHs, HD and TCC were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in rhizosediments than in un-colonized sediments. Also recorded were differences on the abundance of hydrocarbon degraders among the rhizosediment of the different plants collected at the same site (J. maritimus < P. australis < T. striata), with statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) between J. maritimus and T. striata. Moreover, strong positive correlations-0.81 and 0.84 (P < 0.05), between biotic (HD) and abiotic (organic matter content) parameters and TPHs concentrations were also found. Our data clearly suggest that salt marsh plants can influence the microbial community, by fostering the development of hydrocarbon-degrading microbial populations in its rhizosphere, an effect observed for all plants. This effect, combined with the plant capability to retain hydrocarbons around the roots, points out that salt marsh plant-microorganisms associations may actively contribute to hydrocarbon removal and degradation in estuarine environments. PMID:21188477

  11. Free tropospheric transport of microorganisms from Asia to North America.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Jaffe, Daniel A; Birmele, Michele N; Griffin, Dale W; Schuerger, Andrew C; Hee, Jonathan; Roberts, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    Microorganisms are abundant in the troposphere and can be transported vast distances on prevailing winds. This study measures the abundance and diversity of airborne bacteria and fungi sampled at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (located 2.7 km above sea level in North America) where incoming free tropospheric air routinely arrives from distant sources across the Pacific Ocean, including Asia. Overall deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) concentrations for microorganisms in the free troposphere, derived from quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays, averaged 4.94 × 10(-5) ng DNA m(-3) for bacteria and 4.77 × 10(-3) ng DNA m(-3) for fungi. Aerosols occasionally corresponded with microbial abundance, most often in the springtime. Viable cells were recovered from 27.4 % of bacterial and 47.6 % of fungal samples (N = 124), with 49 different species identified by ribosomal DNA gene sequencing. The number of microbial isolates rose significantly above baseline values on 22-23 April 2011 and 13-15 May 2011. Both events were analyzed in detail, revealing distinct free tropospheric chemistries (e.g., low water vapor, high aerosols, carbon monoxide, and ozone) useful for ruling out boundary layer contamination. Kinematic back trajectory modeling suggested air from these events probably originated near China or Japan. Even after traveling for 10 days across the Pacific Ocean in the free troposphere, diverse and viable microbial populations, including presumptive plant pathogens Alternaria infectoria and Chaetomium globosum, were detected in Asian air samples. Establishing a connection between the intercontinental transport of microorganisms and specific diseases in North America will require follow-up investigations on both sides of the Pacific Ocean. PMID:22760734

  12. Microprinting of liver micro-organ for drug metabolism study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Robert C; Emami, Kamal; Jeevarajan, Antony; Wu, Honglu; Sun, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In their normal in vivo matrix milieu, tissues assume complex well-organized 3D architectures. Therefore, a primary aim in the tissue engineering design process is to fabricate an optimal analog of the in vivo scenario, in which the precise configuration and composition of cells and bioactive matrix components can establish the well-defined biomimetic microenvironments that promote cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. With the advent and refinements in microfabricated systems which can present physical and chemical cues to cells in a controllable and reproducible fashion unrealizable with conventional tissue culture, high-fidelity, high-throughput in vitro models are achieved. The convergence of solid freeform fabrication (SFF) technologies, namely microprinting, along with microfabrication techniques, a 3D microprinted micro-organ, can serve as an in vitro platform for cell culture, drug screening, or to elicit further biological insights. This chapter firstly details the principles, methods, and applications that undergird the fabrication process development and adaptation of microfluidic devices for the creation of a drug screening model. This model involves the combinatorial setup of an automated syringe-based, layered direct cell writing microprinting process with soft lithographic micropatterning techniques to fabricate a microscale in vitro device housing a chamber of microprinted 3D micro-organ that biomimics the cell's natural microenvironment for enhanced performance and functionality. In order to assess the structural formability and biological feasibility of such a micro-organ, 3D cell-encapsulated hydrogel-based tissue constructs are microprinted reproducibly in defined design patterns and biologically characterized for both viability and cell-specific function. Another key facet of the in vivo microenvironment that is recapitulated with the in vitro system is the necessary dynamic perfusion of the 3D microscale liver analog with cells probed for

  13. Antibacterial Effect of Copper on Microorganisms Isolated from Bovine Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Jara, Angelica; Cordero, Ninoska; Aguirre, Juan; Troncoso, Miriam; Figueroa, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial properties of copper have been recognized for several years; applying these properties to the prevention of diseases such as bovine mastitis is a new area of research. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vitro the antimicrobial activity of copper on bacteria isolated from subclinical and clinical mastitis milk samples from two regions in Chile. A total of 327 microorganisms were recovered between March and September 2013, with different prevalence by sample origin (25 and 75% from the central and southern regions of Chile, respectively). In the central region, Escherichia coli and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS) were the most frequently detected in clinical mastitis cases (33%), while in the southern region S. uberis, S. aureus, and CNS were detected with frequencies of 22, 21, and 18%, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility studies revealed that 34% of isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics and the resistance profile was different between bacterial species and origins of isolation of the bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration of copper (MIC-Cu) was evaluated in all the isolates; results revealed that a concentration as low as 250 ppm copper was able to inhibit the great majority of microorganisms analyzed (65% of isolates). The remaining isolates showed a MIC-Cu between 375 and 700 ppm copper, and no growth was observed at 1000 ppm. A linear relationship was found between the logarithm of viable bacteria number and time of contact with copper. With the application of the same concentration of copper (250 ppm), CNS showed the highest tolerance to copper, followed by S. uberis and S. aureus; the least resistant was E. coli. Based on these in vitro results, copper preparations could represent a good alternative to dipping solutions, aimed at preventing the presence and multiplication of potentially pathogenic microorganisms involved in bovine mastitis disease. PMID:27199953

  14. Analysis of bioremediation of pesticides by soil microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruml, Tomas; Klotz, Dietmar; Tykva, Richard

    1995-10-01

    The application of new pesticides requires careful monitoring of their distribution in the environment. The effect of the soil microflora on the stability of the [14C]- labelled juvenoid hormone analogue W-328 was estimated. The micro-organisms from two different soil samples were isolated and tested for their ability to decompose W-328. One bacterial strain, yeast and mold isolates, exhibited the degradation activity. The growth characteristics such as pH and temperature optima were determined. The degradation products were estimated using HPLC.

  15. Exposure to airborne microorganisms and endotoxin in herb processing plants.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, J; Krysińska-Traczyk, E; Skórska, C; Sitkowska, J; Prazmo, Z; Golec, M

    2001-01-01

    Microbiological air sampling was performed in two herb processing plants located in eastern Poland. Air samples for determination of the levels of bacteria, fungi, dust and endotoxin were collected at 14 sites during cleaning, cutting, grinding, sieving, sorting and packing of 11 kinds of herbs (nettle, caraway, birch, celandine, marjoram, mint, peppermint, sage, St. John's wort, calamus, yarrow), used for production of medications, cosmetics and spices. It was found that processing of herbs was associated with a very high pollution of the air with bacteria, fungi, dust and endotoxin. The numbers of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) in the air of herb processing plants ranged within 40.6-627.4 x 10(3) cfu/m3 (mean +/- S.D = 231.4 +/- 181.0 x 10(3) cfu/m3). The greatest concentrations were noted at the initial stages of production cycle, during cleaning, cutting and grinding of herbs. The numbers of airborne microorganisms were also significantly (p<0.0001) related to the kind of processed herb, being the greatest at processing marjoram, nettle, yarrow and mint. The values of the respirable fraction of airborne microflora in the examined facilities varied within a fairly wide range and were between 14.7-67.7%. The dominant microorganisms in the air of herb processing plants were mesophilic bacteria, among which endospore-forming bacilli (Bacillus spp.) and actinomycetes of the species Streptomyces albus were most numerous. Among Gram-negative bacteria, the most common was endotoxin-producing species Alcaligenes faecalis. Altogether, 37 species or genera of bacteria and 23 species or genera of fungi were identified in the air of herb processing plants, of these, 11 and 10 species or genera respectively were reported as having allergenic and/or immunotoxic properties. The concentrations of dust and bacterial endotoxin in the air of herb processing plants were large with extremely high levels at some sampling sites. The concentrations of airborne dust ranged within 3

  16. Early concepts of the role of microorganisms in hydrogeology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Back, William

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogeologists and geochemists have made great progress in the past few decades in understanding the water/rock interaction that are major controls on the chemical character of ground water. We also recognize that, for many reactions, we do not understand the specific mechanisms generating these reactions, such as those involved in the generation of gases, dissolution of some minerals, and some aspects of isotopic fractionation. Additional understanding will be gained only by study of the interaction of organic material, minerals, and microorganisms in the water and in the pore space of the aquifer material.

  17. Volcanism and soil mercury on Mars - Consequences for terrestrial microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, B. Z.; Siegel, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    An earth-Mars depletion formula proposed by Anders and Owen for volatiles is used to calculate a range of putative Hg levels for Martian volcanic soils based upon analyzed samples from Hawaii. The range is about 50-150 microgram per kg. When applied either in conventional or special media (e.g., basalt powder), these levels of Hg are effective inhibitors of the growth of earth microorganisms. Taken together with other hostile chemical and physical factors, volcanic toxicants would appear to provide a further deterrent to the accidental establishment of terrestrial microbiota on Mars.

  18. DNA fingerprinting of medically important microorganisms by use of PCR.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, A

    1994-01-01

    Selected segments of any DNA molecule can be amplified exponentially by PCR. This technique provides a powerful tool to detect and identify minimal numbers of microorganisms. PCR is applicable both in diagnosis and in epidemiology. By amplification of hypervariable DNA domains, differences can be detected even among closely related strains. PCR fingerprinting is a valuable tool for medical microbiologists, epidemiologists, and microbial taxonomists. The current state of PCR-mediated genotyping is reviewed, and a comparison with conventional molecular typing methods is included. Because of its speed and versatility, PCR fingerprinting will play an important role in microbial genetics, epidemiology, and systematics. Images PMID:8055466

  19. Degradation of 4,5-dichloroguaiacol by soil microorganisms.

    PubMed

    González, B; Brezny, R; Herrera, M; Joyce, T W

    1995-09-01

    No microorganisms could be isolated from chemostats or from a soil column fed with 4,5-dichloroguaiacol as the only carbon source. If guaiacol was added to chemostats with 4,5-dichloroguaiacol, either soil microbial consortia or guaiacol-degrading bacteria could dechlorinate the 4,5-dichloroguaiacol provided it was <0.2MM. A microbial consortium from farm soil removed 4,5-dichloroguaiacol under aerobic or anoxic conditions, with or without chlorolignin. Dichlorocatechol was the only 4,5-dichloroguaiacol-derived metabolite detected. In aerobic incubations, 4,5-dichlorocatechol was further degraded whereas under anoxic conditions it accumulated. PMID:24414909

  20. Isolation of Microorganisms Able To Metabolize Purified Natural Rubber

    PubMed Central

    Heisey, R. M.; Papadatos, S.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria able to grow on purified natural rubber in the absence of other organic carbon sources were isolated from soil. Ten isolates reduced the weight of vulcanized rubber from latex gloves by >10% in 6 weeks. Scanning electron microscopy clearly revealed the ability of the microorganisms to colonize, penetrate, and dramatically alter the physical structure of the rubber. The rubber-metabolizing bacteria were identified on the basis of fatty acid profiles and cell wall characteristics. Seven isolates were strains of Streptomyces, two were strains of Amycolatopsis, and one was a strain of Nocardia. PMID:16535106