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Sample records for ptb promotes formation

  1. Robot goniophotometry at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, M.; Maass, R.; Sauter, G.

    2015-04-01

    The total luminous flux of a light source is the complete integration of its spectral radiance distribution weighted with the photopic observer and taken over all parts of its surface and over the full solid angle of emittance. The spatial distributions are measured with various types of goniophotometers and the PTB robot goniophotometer is a new type with many unique features. It is built as an arrangement of three robots with arms of more than 6 m in length and with 7 degrees of freedom each. The extreme flexibility of the robots allows computer controlled tracks with variable radii and speeds up to 3 m and 1 m s-1, respectively. One robot aligns the light source and the two other robots move photometers and array spectrometers in their hemispheres simultaneously measuring planar illuminance and the related relative spectral distribution. The robot goniophotometer is optimized for the realisation of the luminous flux unit, the lumen and it is completely characterized in this report. The relevant properties and correction factors are explained, as well as the implementation of techniques for synchronisation and stabilisation of spatially resolved or integrated photometric and colorimetric quantities. Finally, all contributions are combined in the model of evaluation for the (total) luminous flux value and the measurement uncertainty associated with that value is evaluated in the presented uncertainty budget. The goniophotometric determination of the values for colorimetric quantities is explained for the total luminous flux and the spatially distributed radiant power.

  2. Toward Efficient Thick Active PTB7 Photovoltaic Layers Using Diphenyl Ether as a Solvent Additive.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Goh, Tenghooi; Fan, Pu; Shi, Wei; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D

    2016-06-22

    The development of thick organic photovoltaics (OPV) could increase absorption in the active layer and ease manufacturing constraints in large-scale solar panel production. However, the efficiencies of most low-bandgap OPVs decrease substantially when the active layers exceed ∼100 nm in thickness (because of low crystallinity and a short exciton diffusion length). Herein, we report the use of solvent additive diphenyl ether (DPE) that facilitates the fabrication of thick (180 nm) active layers and triples the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of conventional thienothiophene-co-benzodithiophene polymer (PTB7)-based OPVs from 1.75 to 6.19%. These results demonstrate a PCE 20% higher than those of conventional (PTB7)-based OPV devices using 1,8-diiodooctane. Morphology studies reveal that DPE promotes the formation of nanofibrillar networks and ordered packing of PTB7 in the active layer that facilitate charge transport over longer distances. We further demonstrate that DPE improves the fill factor and photocurrent collection by enhancing the overall optical absorption, reducing the series resistance, and suppressing bimolecular recombination. PMID:27253271

  3. Diversity in protein recognition by PTB domains.

    PubMed

    Forman-Kay, J D; Pawson, T

    1999-12-01

    Phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domains were originally identified as modular domains that recognize phosphorylated Asn-Pro-Xxx-p Tyr-containing proteins. Recent binding and structural studies of PTB domain complexes with target peptides have revealed a number of deviations from the previously described mode of interaction, with respect to both the sequences of possible targets and their structures within the complexes. This diversity of recognition by PTB domains extends and strengthens our general understanding of modular binding domain recognition. PMID:10607674

  4. The PTB interacting protein raver1 regulates alpha-tropomyosin alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Gromak, Natalia; Rideau, Alexis; Southby, Justine; Scadden, A D J; Gooding, Clare; Hüttelmaier, Stefan; Singer, Robert H; Smith, Christopher W J

    2003-12-01

    Regulated switching of the mutually exclusive exons 2 and 3 of alpha-tropomyosin (TM) involves repression of exon 3 in smooth muscle cells. Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) is necessary but not sufficient for regulation of TM splicing. Raver1 was identified in two-hybrid screens by its interactions with the cytoskeletal proteins actinin and vinculin, and was also found to interact with PTB. Consistent with these interactions raver1 can be localized in either the nucleus or cytoplasm. Here we show that raver1 is able to promote the smooth muscle-specific alternative splicing of TM by enhancing PTB-mediated repression of exon 3. This activity of raver1 is dependent upon characterized PTB-binding regulatory elements and upon a region of raver1 necessary for interaction with PTB. Heterologous recruitment of raver1, or just its C-terminus, induced very high levels of exon 3 skipping, bypassing the usual need for PTB binding sites downstream of exon 3. This suggests a novel mechanism for PTB-mediated splicing repression involving recruitment of raver1 as a potent splicing co-repressor. PMID:14633994

  5. INCOME INCONGRUITY, RACE AND PRETERM BIRTH (PTB)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous research using birth records has found income incongruity associated with adverse birth outcomes. The effects of negative income incongruity (reporting lower household income than the census tract median household income) on PTB (<37 weeks completed gestation) are examin...

  6. Promoting proximal formative assessment with relational discourse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Close, Hunter G.; McKagan, Sarah B.

    2012-02-01

    The practice of proximal formative assessment - the continual, responsive attention to students' developing understanding as it is expressed in real time - depends on students' sharing their ideas with instructors and on teachers' attending to them. Rogerian psychology presents an account of the conditions under which proximal formative assessment may be promoted or inhibited: (1) Normal classroom conditions, characterized by evaluation and attention to learning targets, may present threats to students' sense of their own competence and value, causing them to conceal their ideas and reducing the potential for proximal formative assessment. (2) In contrast, discourse patterns characterized by positive anticipation and attention to learner ideas increase the potential for proximal formative assessment and promote self-directed learning. We present an analysis methodology based on these principles and demonstrate its utility for understanding episodes of university physics instruction.

  7. Cu(II) Promotes Amyloid Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hangyu; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Stanciu, Lia A

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is associated with dopamine neuron death in Parkinson's disease. There is controversy in the field over the question of which species of the aggregates, fibrils or protofibrils, are toxic. Moreover, compelling evidence suggested the exposure to heavy metals to be a risk of PD. Nevertheless, the mechanism of metal ions in promoting PD remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the structural basis of Cu(II) induced aggregation of α-synuclein. Using transmission electron microscopy experiments, Cu(II) was found to promote in vitro aggregation of α-synuclein by facilitating annular protofibril formation rather than fibril formation. Furthermore, neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils accompanied by considerable decrease of β-sheet content. These results strongly support the hypothesis that annular protofibrils are the toxic species, rather than fibrils, thereby inspiring us to search novel therapeutic strategies for the suppression of the toxic annular protofibril formation. PMID:26129772

  8. Cu(II) promotes amyloid pore formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hangyu; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Stanciu, Lia A.

    2015-08-14

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is associated with dopamine neuron death in Parkinson's disease. There is controversy in the field over the question of which species of the aggregates, fibrils or protofibrils, are toxic. Moreover, compelling evidence suggested the exposure to heavy metals to be a risk of PD. Nevertheless, the mechanism of metal ions in promoting PD remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the structural basis of Cu(II) induced aggregation of α-synuclein. Using transmission electron microscopy experiments, Cu(II) was found to promote in vitro aggregation of α-synuclein by facilitating annular protofibril formation rather than fibril formation. Furthermore, neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils accompanied by considerable decrease of β-sheet content. These results strongly support the hypothesis that annular protofibrils are the toxic species, rather than fibrils, thereby inspiring us to search novel therapeutic strategies for the suppression of the toxic annular protofibril formation. - Highlights: • Cu(II) promoted the annular protofibril formation of α-synuclein in vitro. • Cu(II) postponed the in vitro fibrillization of α-synuclein. • Neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils.

  9. Recent activities at PTB nanometer comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flugge, Jens; Koning, Rainer; Bosse, Harald

    2003-11-01

    The PTB in cooperation with the Dr. Johannes Heidenhain GmbH built up a new length comparator with a measurement range of 610 mm for 1D length measurements on line scales, linear encoders and interferometers. The PTB nanometer comparator was retrofitted and now allows a stable operation of the interferometer. To investigate the actual measurement performance a few line scales and a linear encoder were measured and compared with results from other comparators. The results are discussed and recent developments at the nanometer comparator are described.

  10. Interactions between PTB RRMs induce slow motions and increase RNA binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Caroline M

    2010-01-01

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) participates in a variety of functions in eukaryotic cells, including alternative splicing, mRNA stabilization, and internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) mediated translation initiation. Its mechanism of RNA recognition is determined in part by the novel geometry of its two C-terminal RNA Recognition Motifs (RRM3 and RRM4), which interact with each other to form a stable complex (PTB1:34). This complex itself is unusual among RRMs, suggesting that it performs a specific function for the protein. In order to understand the advantage it provides to PTB, the fundamental properties of PTB1:34 are examined here as a comparative study of the complex and its two constituent RRMs. Both RRM3 and RRM4 adopt folded structures that NMR data show to be similar to their structure in PRB1:34. The RNA binding properties of the domains differ dramatically. The affinity of each separate RRM for polypyrimidine tracts is far weaker than that of PTB1:34, and simply mixing the two RRMs does not create an equivalent binding platform. 15N-NMR relaxation experiments show that PTB1:34 has slow, microsecond motions throughout both RRMs including the interdomain linker. This is in contrast to the individual domains, RRM3 and RRM4, where only a few backbone amides are flexible on this timescale. The slow backbone dynamics of PTB1:34, induced by packing of RRM3 and RRM4, could be essential for high affinity binding to a flexible polypyrimidine tract RNA and also provide entropic compensation for its own formation. PMID:20080103

  11. Structural and evolutionary division of phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Temple, Brenda; Bencharit, Sompop; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Johnson, Gary L

    2005-01-01

    Proteins encoding phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains function as adaptors or scaffolds to organize the signaling complexes involved in wide-ranging physiological processes including neural development, immunity, tissue homeostasis and cell growth. There are more than 200 proteins in eukaryotes and nearly 60 human proteins having PTB domains. Six PTB domain encoded proteins have been found to have mutations that contribute to inherited human diseases including familial stroke, hypercholesteremia, coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, demonstrating the importance of PTB scaffold proteins in organizing critical signaling complexes. PTB domains bind both peptides and headgroups of phosphatidylinositides, utilizing two distinct binding motifs to mediate spatial organization and localization within cells. The structure of PTB domains confers specificity for binding peptides having a NPXY motif with differing requirements for phosphorylation of the tyrosine within this recognition sequence. In this review, we use structural, evolutionary and functional analysis to divide PTB domains into three groups represented by phosphotyrosine-dependent Shc-like, phosphotyrosine-dependent IRS-like and phosphotyrosine-independent Dab-like PTBs, with the Dab-like PTB domains representing nearly 75% of proteins encoding PTB domains. In addition, we further define the binding characteristics of the cognate ligands for each group of PTB domains. The signaling complexes organized by PTB domain encoded proteins are largely unknown and represents an important challenge in systems biology for the future. PMID:15567406

  12. PTB binds to the 3' untranslated region of the human astrovirus type 8: a possible role in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Hernández, Wendy; Velez-Uriza, Dora; Valdés, Jesús; Vélez-Del Valle, Cristina; Salas-Benito, Juan; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca; García-Espítia, Matilde; Salas-Benito, Mariana; Vega-Almeida, Tania; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    The 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of human astroviruses (HAstV) consists of two hairpin structures (helix I and II) joined by a linker harboring a conserved PTB/hnRNP1 binding site. The identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with the 3'UTR of HAstV-8 virus will help to uncover cellular requirements for viral functions. To this end, mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking were performed with uninfected and HAstV-8-infected cell extracts and HAstV-8 3'UTR probes. Two RNA-protein complexes (CI and CII) were recruited into the 3'UTR. Complex CII formation was compromised with cold homologous RNA, and seven proteins of 35, 40, 45, 50, 52, 57/60 and 75 kDa were cross-linked to the 3'UTR. Supermobility shift assays indicated that PTB/hnRNP1 is part of this complex, and 3'UTR-crosslinked PTB/hnRNP1 was immunoprecipitated from HAstV-8 infected cell-membrane extracts. Also, immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PTB/hnRNP1 is distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of uninfected cells, but it is mainly localized perinuclearly in the cytoplasm of HAstV-8 infected cells. Furthermore, the minimal 3'UTR sequences recognized by recombinant PTB are those conforming helix I, and an intact PTB/hnRNP1-binding site. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated PTB/hnRNP1 silencing reduced synthesis viral genome and virus yield in CaCo2 cells, suggesting that PTB/hnRNP1 is required for HAstV replication. In conclusion, PTB/hnRNP1 binds to the 3'UTR HAstV-8 and is required or participates in viral replication. PMID:25406089

  13. PTB Binds to the 3’ Untranslated Region of the Human Astrovirus Type 8: A Possible Role in Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Hernández, Wendy; Velez-Uriza, Dora; Valdés, Jesús; Vélez-Del Valle, Cristina; Salas-Benito, Juan; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca; García-Espítia, Matilde; Salas-Benito, Mariana; Vega-Almeida, Tania; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    The 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of human astroviruses (HAstV) consists of two hairpin structures (helix I and II) joined by a linker harboring a conserved PTB/hnRNP1 binding site. The identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with the 3′UTR of HAstV-8 virus will help to uncover cellular requirements for viral functions. To this end, mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking were performed with uninfected and HAstV-8-infected cell extracts and HAstV-8 3′UTR probes. Two RNA-protein complexes (CI and CII) were recruited into the 3′UTR. Complex CII formation was compromised with cold homologous RNA, and seven proteins of 35, 40, 45, 50, 52, 57/60 and 75 kDa were cross-linked to the 3′UTR. Supermobility shift assays indicated that PTB/hnRNP1 is part of this complex, and 3′UTR-crosslinked PTB/hnRNP1 was immunoprecipitated from HAstV-8 infected cell-membrane extracts. Also, immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PTB/hnRNP1 is distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of uninfected cells, but it is mainly localized perinuclearly in the cytoplasm of HAstV-8 infected cells. Furthermore, the minimal 3′UTR sequences recognized by recombinant PTB are those conforming helix I, and an intact PTB/hnRNP1-binding site. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated PTB/hnRNP1 silencing reduced synthesis viral genome and virus yield in CaCo2 cells, suggesting that PTB/hnRNP1 is required for HAstV replication. In conclusion, PTB/hnRNP1 binds to the 3′UTR HAstV-8 and is required or participates in viral replication. PMID:25406089

  14. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    SciTech Connect

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S.

    2013-05-10

    Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Systeme international d'unites, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck's radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties confirmed by

  15. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S.

    2013-05-01

    Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Système international d'unités, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck's radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties confirmed by

  16. Analysis of Triplet Exciton Loss Pathways in PTB7:PC71BM Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Hannes; Heiber, Michael C.; Väth, Stefan; Kern, Julia; Deibel, Carsten; Sperlich, Andreas; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for increasing the conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics has been to increase the VOC by tuning the energy levels of donor and acceptor components. However, this opens up a new loss pathway from an interfacial charge transfer state to a triplet exciton (TE) state called electron back transfer (EBT), which is detrimental to device performance. To test this hypothesis, we study triplet formation in the high performing PTB7:PC71BM blend system and determine the impact of the morphology-optimizing additive 1,8-diiodoctane (DIO). Using photoluminescence and spin-sensitive optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements at low temperature, we find that TEs form on PC71BM via intersystem crossing from singlet excitons and on PTB7 via EBT mechanism. For DIO blends with smaller fullerene domains, an increased density of PTB7 TEs is observed. The EBT process is found to be significant only at very low temperature. At 300 K, no triplets are detected via ODMR, and electrically detected magnetic resonance on optimized solar cells indicates that TEs are only present on the fullerenes. We conclude that in PTB7:PC71BM devices, TE formation via EBT is impacted by fullerene domain size at low temperature, but at room temperature, EBT does not represent a dominant loss pathway. PMID:27380928

  17. Analysis of Triplet Exciton Loss Pathways in PTB7:PC71BM Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Hannes; Heiber, Michael C.; Väth, Stefan; Kern, Julia; Deibel, Carsten; Sperlich, Andreas; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    A strategy for increasing the conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics has been to increase the VOC by tuning the energy levels of donor and acceptor components. However, this opens up a new loss pathway from an interfacial charge transfer state to a triplet exciton (TE) state called electron back transfer (EBT), which is detrimental to device performance. To test this hypothesis, we study triplet formation in the high performing PTB7:PC71BM blend system and determine the impact of the morphology-optimizing additive 1,8-diiodoctane (DIO). Using photoluminescence and spin-sensitive optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements at low temperature, we find that TEs form on PC71BM via intersystem crossing from singlet excitons and on PTB7 via EBT mechanism. For DIO blends with smaller fullerene domains, an increased density of PTB7 TEs is observed. The EBT process is found to be significant only at very low temperature. At 300 K, no triplets are detected via ODMR, and electrically detected magnetic resonance on optimized solar cells indicates that TEs are only present on the fullerenes. We conclude that in PTB7:PC71BM devices, TE formation via EBT is impacted by fullerene domain size at low temperature, but at room temperature, EBT does not represent a dominant loss pathway.

  18. Analysis of Triplet Exciton Loss Pathways in PTB7:PC71BM Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Hannes; Heiber, Michael C; Väth, Stefan; Kern, Julia; Deibel, Carsten; Sperlich, Andreas; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for increasing the conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics has been to increase the VOC by tuning the energy levels of donor and acceptor components. However, this opens up a new loss pathway from an interfacial charge transfer state to a triplet exciton (TE) state called electron back transfer (EBT), which is detrimental to device performance. To test this hypothesis, we study triplet formation in the high performing PTB7:PC71BM blend system and determine the impact of the morphology-optimizing additive 1,8-diiodoctane (DIO). Using photoluminescence and spin-sensitive optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements at low temperature, we find that TEs form on PC71BM via intersystem crossing from singlet excitons and on PTB7 via EBT mechanism. For DIO blends with smaller fullerene domains, an increased density of PTB7 TEs is observed. The EBT process is found to be significant only at very low temperature. At 300 K, no triplets are detected via ODMR, and electrically detected magnetic resonance on optimized solar cells indicates that TEs are only present on the fullerenes. We conclude that in PTB7:PC71BM devices, TE formation via EBT is impacted by fullerene domain size at low temperature, but at room temperature, EBT does not represent a dominant loss pathway. PMID:27380928

  19. Twist1-induced invadopodia formation promotes tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.; Lwin, Thinzar M.; Chang, Andrew T.; Kim, Jihoon; Danis, Etienne; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Yang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Twist1 transcription factor is known to promote tumor metastasis and induce Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Here, we report that Twist1 is capable of promoting the formation of invadopodia, specialized membrane protrusions for extracellular matrix degradation. Twist1 induces PDGFRα expression, which in turn activates Src, to promote invadopodia formation. We show that Twist1 and PDGFRα are central mediators of invadopodia formation in response to various EMT-inducing signals. Induction of PDGFRα and invadopodia is essential for Twist1 to promote tumor metastasis. Consistent with PDGFRα being a direct transcriptional target of Twist1, coexpression of Twist1 and PDGFRα predicts poor survival in breast tumor patients. Therefore, invadopodia-mediated matrix degradation is a key function of Twist1 in promoting tumor metastasis. PMID:21397860

  20. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S; Plawsky, Joel L; Collins, Cynthia H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

  1. Update on EUV radiometry at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubis, Christian; Barboutis, Annett; Buchholz, Christian; Fischer, Andreas; Haase, Anton; Knorr, Florian; Mentzel, Heiko; Puls, Jana; Schönstedt, Anja; Sintschuk, Michael; Soltwisch, Victor; Stadelhoff, Christian; Scholze, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The development of technology infrastructure for EUV Lithography (EUVL) still requires higher levels of technology readiness in many fields. A large number of new materials will need to be introduced. For example, development of EUV compatible pellicles to adopt an approved method from optical lithography for EUVL needs completely new thin membranes which have not been available before. To support these developments, PTB with its decades of experience [1] in EUV metrology [2] provides a wide range of actinic and non actinic measurements at in-band EUV wavelengths as well as out of band. Two dedicated, complimentary EUV beamlines [3] are available for radiometric [4,5] characterizations benefiting from small divergence or from adjustable spot size respectively. The wavelength range covered reaches from below 1 nm to 45 nm [6] for the EUV beamlines [7] to longer wavelengths if in addition the VUV beamline is employed. The standard spot size is 1 mm by 1 mm with an option to go as low as 0.1 mm to 0.1 mm. A separate beamline offers an exposure setup. Exposure power levels of 20 W/cm2 have been employed in the past, lower fluencies are available by attenuation or out of focus exposure. Owing to a differential pumping stage, the sample can be held under defined gas conditions during exposure. We present an updated overview on our instrumentation and analysis capabilities for EUV metrology and provide data for illustration.

  2. Signals to promote myelin formation and repair

    PubMed Central

    Taveggia, Carla; Feltri, Maria Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    The myelin sheath wraps large axons in both the CNS and the PNS, and is a key determinant of efficient axonal function and health. Myelin is targeted in a series of diseases, notably multiple sclerosis (MS). In MS, demyelination is associated with progressive axonal damage, which determines the level of patient disability. Few treatments are available for combating myelin damage in MS and related disorders. These treatments, which largely comprise anti-inflammatory drugs, only show limited efficacy in subsets of patients. More-effective treatment of myelin disorders will probably result from early intervention with combinatorial therapies that target inflammation and other processes—for example, signaling pathways that promote remyelination. Indeed, evidence suggests that such pathways might be impaired in pathology and, hence, contribute to the failure of remyelination in such diseases. In this article, we review the molecular basis of signaling pathways that regulate myelination in the CNS and PNS with a focus on differentiation of myelinating glia. We also discuss factors such as extracellular molecules that act as modulators of these pathways. Finally, we consider the few preclinical and clinical trials of agents that augment this signaling. PMID:20404842

  3. Status of the nanometer comparator at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluegge, Jens; Koening, Rainer G.

    2001-10-01

    Due to increasing demands on the photolithography of integrated circuits and the progress of interferometric linear encoders, length measurement systems with a reproducibility under 3 nm are used in industry today, whereas the connection to the unit of length exhibits an uncertainty of about 25 nm. To resolve this problem a new one dimensional length comparator, the nanometer comparator, was developed in a cooperation between the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the Dr. Johannes Heidenhain GmbH and Werth Me#technik GmbH. The nanometer comparator will be able to perform one dimensional calibrations of photo masks, line-graduation scales, incremental linear encoders and laser interferometers in one axis up to a maximum length of 610 mm. To ensure the highest level of measurement performance, the interferometer is completely located in vacuum using metal bellows, whilst the calibration objects can be mounted under atmospheric conditions. The interferometer set-up compensates the dilatation and the bending of the granite base and minimizes the measurement circle of the comparator. This will minimize the influence of thermal and mechanical distortions. The interferometer design can be used with a heterodyne or a homodyne signal detection electronics. Due to their high power dissipation, the laser is arranged far apart from the comparator and light is fed to the interferometers by means of glass fibers. The light source is a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser frequency stabilized by an iodine absorption line. Different measuring systems for the structure localization can be attached to an universal sensor carrier on a solid bridge above the measuring carriage. Incremental reading heads and two photoelectric microscopes are now available for this purpose.

  4. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation. PMID:27392247

  5. P-selectin promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Martinod, Kimberly; Wong, Siu Ling; Cifuni, Stephen M; Schattner, Mirta; Wagner, Denisa D

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) can be released in the vasculature. In addition to trapping microbes, they promote inflammatory and thrombotic diseases. Considering that P-selectin induces prothrombotic and proinflammatory signaling, we studied the role of this selectin in NET formation. NET formation (NETosis) was induced by thrombin-activated platelets rosetting with neutrophils and was inhibited by anti-P-selectin aptamer or anti-P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) inhibitory antibody but was not induced by platelets from P-selectin(-/-) mice. Moreover, NETosis was also promoted by P-selectin-immunoglobulin fusion protein but not by control immunoglobulin. We isolated neutrophils from mice engineered to overproduce soluble P-selectin (P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) mice). Although the levels of circulating DNA and nucleosomes (indicative of spontaneous NETosis) were normal in these mice, basal neutrophil histone citrullination and presence of P-selectin on circulating neutrophils were elevated. NET formation after stimulation with platelet activating factor, ionomycin, or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was significantly enhanced, indicating that the P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) neutrophils were primed for NETosis. In summary, P-selectin, cellular or soluble, through binding to PSGL-1, promotes NETosis, suggesting that this pathway is a potential therapeutic target for NET-related diseases. PMID:25979951

  6. Arabidopsis PTB1 and PTB2 proteins negatively regulate splicing of a mini-exon splicing reporter and affect alternative splicing of endogenous genes differentially.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig G; Lewandowska, Dominika; Liney, Michele; Davidson, Diane; Chapman, Sean; Fuller, John; McNicol, Jim; Shaw, Paul; Brown, John W S

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines the function of Arabidopsis thaliana AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 as plant splicing factors. The effect on splicing of overexpression of AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 was analysed in an in vivo protoplast transient expression system with a novel mini-exon splicing reporter. A range of mutations in pyrimidine-rich sequences were compared with and without AtPTB and NpU2AF65 overexpression. Splicing analyses of constructs in protoplasts and RNA from overexpression lines used high-resolution reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 reduced inclusion/splicing of the potato invertase mini-exon splicing reporter, indicating that these proteins can repress plant intron splicing. Mutation of the polypyrimidine tract and closely associated Cytosine and Uracil-rich (CU-rich) sequences, upstream of the mini-exon, altered repression by AtPTB1 and AtPTB2. Coexpression of a plant orthologue of U2AF65 alleviated the splicing repression of AtPTB1. Mutation of a second CU-rich upstream of the mini-exon 3' splice site led to a decline in mini-exon splicing, indicating the presence of a splicing enhancer sequence. Finally, RT-PCR of AtPTB overexpression lines with c. 90 known alternative splicing (AS) events showed that AtPTBs significantly altered AS of over half the events. AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 are splicing factors that influence alternative splicing. This occurs in the potato invertase mini-exon via the polypyrimidine tract and associated pyrimidine-rich sequence. PMID:24749484

  7. Why stellar feedback promotes disc formation in simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übler, Hannah; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Aumer, Michael; Sales, Laura V.; White, Simon D. M.

    2014-09-01

    We study how feedback influences baryon infall on to galaxies using cosmological, zoom-in simulations of haloes with present mass Mvir = 6.9 × 1011 to 1.7 × 1012 M⊙. Starting at z = 4 from identical initial conditions, implementations of weak and strong stellar feedback produce bulge- and disc-dominated galaxies, respectively. Strong feedback favours disc formation: (1) because conversion of gas into stars is suppressed at early times, as required by abundance matching arguments, resulting in flat star formation histories and higher gas fractions; (2) because 50 per cent of the stars form in situ from recycled disc gas with angular momentum only weakly related to that of the z = 0 dark halo; (3) because late-time gas accretion is typically an order of magnitude stronger and has higher specific angular momentum, with recycled gas dominating over primordial infall; (4) because 25-30 per cent of the total accreted gas is ejected entirely before z ˜ 1, removing primarily low angular momentum material which enriches the nearby intergalactic medium. Most recycled gas roughly conserves its angular momentum, but material ejected for long times and to large radii can gain significant angular momentum before re-accretion. These processes lower galaxy formation efficiency in addition to promoting disc formation.

  8. Allopurinol and oxypurinol promote osteoblast differentiation and increase bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Orriss, Isabel R.; Arnett, Timothy R.; George, Jacob; Witham, Miles D.

    2016-01-01

    Allopurinol and its active metabolite, oxypurinol are widely used in the treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. They inhibit xanthine oxidase (XO) an enzyme in the purine degradation pathway that converts xanthine to uric acid. This investigation examined the effect of allopurinol and oxypurinol on bone formation, cell number and viability, gene expression and enzyme activity in differentiating and mature, bone-forming osteoblasts. Although mRNA expression remained relatively constant, XO activity decreased over time with mature osteoblasts displaying reduced levels of uric acid (20% decrease). Treatment with allopurinol and oxypurinol (0.1–1 µM) reduced XO activity by up to 30%. At these concentrations, allopurinol and oxypurinol increased bone formation by osteoblasts ~4-fold and ~3-fold, respectively. Cell number and viability were unaffected. Both drugs increased tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity up to 65%. Osteocalcin and TNAP mRNA expression was increased, 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively. Expression of NPP1, the enzyme responsible for generating the mineralisation inhibitor, pyrophosphate, was decreased 5-fold. Col1α1 mRNA expression and soluble collagen levels were unchanged. Osteoclast formation and resorptive activity were not affected by treatment with allopurinol or oxypurinol. Our data suggest that inhibition of XO activity promotes osteoblast differentiation, leading to increased bone formation in vitro. PMID:26968635

  9. Multi-protein delivery by nanodiamonds promotes bone formation.

    PubMed

    Moore, L; Gatica, M; Kim, H; Osawa, E; Ho, D

    2013-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE(®) for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  10. Multi-protein Delivery by Nanodiamonds Promotes Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L.; Gatica, M.; Kim, H.; Osawa, E.; Ho, D.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE® for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  11. Expression of perilipin 5 promotes lipid droplet formation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shirish; Schneiter, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Neutral lipids are packed into dedicated intracellular compartments termed lipid droplets (LDs). LDs are spherical structures delineated by an unusual lipid monolayer and they harbor a specific set of proteins, many of which function in lipid synthesis and lipid turnover. In mammals, LDs are covered by abundant scaffolding proteins, the perilipins (PLIN1-5). LDs in yeast are functionally similar to that of mammalian cells, but they lack the perilipins. We have previously shown that perilipins (PLIN1-3) are properly targeted to LDs when expressed in yeast and that they promote LD formation from the ER membrane enriched in neutral lipids. Here we address the question whether PLIN5 (OXPAT) has a similar function. Both human and murine PLIN5 were properly targeted to yeast LDs, but the protein localized to the cytosol and its steady-state level was reduced when expressed in yeast mutants lacking the capacity to synthesize storage lipids. When expressed in cells containing high levels of neutral lipids within the membrane of the endoplasmatic reticulum, PLIN5 promoted the formation of LDs. Interestingly, PLIN5 was properly targeted to LDs, irrespective of whether these LDs were filled with triacylglycerol or steryl esters, indicating that PLIN5 did not exhibit targeting specificity for a particular subtypes of LDs as was reported for mammalian cells. PMID:27066172

  12. Flotillin-1 promotes formation of glutamatergic synapses in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Swanwick, Catherine Croft; Shapiro, Marietta E; Vicini, Stefano; Wenthold, Robert J

    2010-11-01

    Synapse malformation underlies numerous neurodevelopmental illnesses, including autism spectrum disorders. Here we identify the lipid raft protein flotillin-1 as a promoter of glutamatergic synapse formation. We cultured neurons from the hippocampus, a brain region important for learning and memory, and examined them at two weeks in vitro, a time period rich with synapse formation. Double-label immunocytochemistry of native flot-1 with glutamatergic and GABAergic synapse markers showed that flot-1 was preferentially colocalized with the glutamatergic presynaptic marker vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), compared to the GABAergic presynaptic marker glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD-65). Triple-label immunocytochemistry of native flot-1, VGLUT1, and NR1, the obligatory subunit of NMDA receptors, indicates that Flot-1 was preferentially localized to synaptic rather than extrasynaptic NR1. Furthermore, electrophysiological results using whole-cell patch clamp showed that Flot-1 increased the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) but not miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), whereas amplitude and decay kinetics of either type of synaptic current was not affected. Corresponding immunocytochemical data confirmed that the number of glutamatergic synapses increased with flot-1 overexpression. Overall, our anatomical and physiological results show that flot-1 enhances the formation of glutamatergic synapses but not GABAergic synapses, suggesting that the role of flot-1 in neurodevelopmental disorders should be explored. PMID:20669324

  13. Promotion of follicular antrum formation by pig oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, X; Miyano, T; Kato, S

    1998-02-01

    Pig oocyte-cumulus-granulosa cell complexes (OCG complexes) from pig early antral follicles reorganise an antrum under the stimulation of FSH. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the oocytes in antrum formation. In the first experiment, oocyte-cumulus complexes were removed from pig OCG complexes, and the antrum formation of parietal granulosa cells themselves (PGs) was examined. Antrum formation by sham-operated OCG complexes (OC/G complexes), in which the connections between the oocytes-cumulus complexes and the parietal granulosa cells had been disrupted, was also examined. The complexes were cultured for 8 days in collagen gels in the presence of 10 ng/ml FSH. Antra were formed in about 60% of the intact OCG complexes and the sham-operated OCG complexes, while only 20% of the PGs formed antra. In the second experiment, oocyte-cumulus complexes in the OCG complexes were replaced by denuded oocytes (O/G complexes) or Sephadex G-25 beads (B/G complexes) similar in diameter to the oocytes, and the two types of complexes were cultured under the same conditions. The O/G complexes formed antra to a similar extent as the OC/G complexes, whereas the B/G complexes scarcely formed any antra. The histological sections showed that the granulosa cells in the OC/G and O/G complexes were in intimate contact with each other and retained a shape similar to those in the ovarian follicles, while the granulosa cells in the PGs and B/G complexes became quite irregular in shape. These results suggest that pig oocytes promote contact between the granulosa cells to induce antrum formation in a physiological manner. PMID:9652071

  14. Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes.

    PubMed

    D'souza, N A; Kawarasaki, Y; Gantz, J D; Lee, R E; Beall, B F N; Shtarkman, Y M; Koçer, Z A; Rogers, S O; Wildschutte, H; Bullerjahn, G S; McKay, R M L

    2013-08-01

    We present evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment of these non-motile phytoplankton to overlying ice, thereby maintaining a favorable position for the diatoms in the photic zone. However, it is unclear whether the diatoms themselves are responsible for ice nucleation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed associations of bacterial epiphytes with the dominant diatoms of the phytoplankton assemblage, and bacteria isolated from the phytoplankton showed elevated temperatures of crystallization (T(c)) as high as -3 °C. Ice nucleation-active bacteria were identified as belonging to the genus Pseudomonas, but we could not demonstrate that they were sufficiently abundant to incite the observed freezing. Regardless of the source of ice nucleation activity, the resulting production of frazil ice may provide a means for the diatoms to be recruited to the overlying lake ice, thereby increasing their fitness. Bacterial epiphytes are likewise expected to benefit from their association with the diatoms as recipients of organic carbon excreted by their hosts. This novel mechanism illuminates a previously undescribed stage of the life cycle of the meroplanktonic diatoms that bloom in Lake Erie and other Great Lakes during winter and offers a model relevant to aquatic ecosystems having seasonal ice cover around the world. PMID:23552624

  15. Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes

    PubMed Central

    D'souza, N A; Kawarasaki, Y; Gantz, J D; Lee, R E; Beall, B F N; Shtarkman, Y M; Koçer, Z A; Rogers, S O; Wildschutte, H; Bullerjahn, G S; McKay, R M L

    2013-01-01

    We present evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment of these non-motile phytoplankton to overlying ice, thereby maintaining a favorable position for the diatoms in the photic zone. However, it is unclear whether the diatoms themselves are responsible for ice nucleation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed associations of bacterial epiphytes with the dominant diatoms of the phytoplankton assemblage, and bacteria isolated from the phytoplankton showed elevated temperatures of crystallization (Tc) as high as −3 °C. Ice nucleation-active bacteria were identified as belonging to the genus Pseudomonas, but we could not demonstrate that they were sufficiently abundant to incite the observed freezing. Regardless of the source of ice nucleation activity, the resulting production of frazil ice may provide a means for the diatoms to be recruited to the overlying lake ice, thereby increasing their fitness. Bacterial epiphytes are likewise expected to benefit from their association with the diatoms as recipients of organic carbon excreted by their hosts. This novel mechanism illuminates a previously undescribed stage of the life cycle of the meroplanktonic diatoms that bloom in Lake Erie and other Great Lakes during winter and offers a model relevant to aquatic ecosystems having seasonal ice cover around the world. PMID:23552624

  16. Optical-Fiber Power Meter Comparison Between NIST and PTB

    PubMed Central

    Vayshenker, I.; Haars, H.; Li, X.; Lehman, J. H.; Livigni, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the results of a comparison of reference standards between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST-USA) and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB-Germany) at nominal wavelengths of 1300 nm and 1550 nm using an optical-fiber cable. Both laboratories used thermal detectors as reference standards. A novel temperature-controlled, optical-trap detector was used as a transfer standard to compare two reference standards. Measurement results showed differences of less than 1.5 × 10−3, which is within the combined uncertainty for both laboratories.

  17. Environmental stability of PTB7:PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab, Elhadi A. A.; Taleatu, Bidini; Mola, Genene T.

    2014-12-01

    The short life span of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell in an ambient laboratory condition is one of the challenges hindering the realization of organic-based devices. The presence of moisture and oxygen in conjugated polymer matrix is the major factors responsible for the degradation of organic molecules. The chemical degradation of OPV cell generally depends on the nature of the semiconductor polymer used in the preparation of the devices. However, the lifespan of unprotected OPV cells often ranges in the order of few hours in simple laboratory environment. We are reporting here the lifetime of organic photovoltaic cell in ambient laboratory condition whose active layer is composed of PTB7:PCBM blend.

  18. Alpha-toxin promotes Staphylococcus aureus mucosal biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michele J; Lin, Ying-Chi; Gillman, Aaron N; Parks, Patrick J; Schlievert, Patrick M; Peterson, Marnie L

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many diseases in humans, ranging from mild skin infections to serious, life-threatening, superantigen-mediated Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS). S. aureus may be asymptomatically carried in the anterior nares or vagina or on the skin, serving as a reservoir for infection. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis clonal type USA200 is the most widely disseminated colonizer and the leading cause of TSS. The cytolysin α-toxin (also known as α-hemolysin or Hla) is the major epithelial proinflammatory exotoxin produced by TSS S. aureus USA200 isolates. The current study aims to characterize the differences between TSS USA200 strains [high (hla(+)) and low (hla(-)) α-toxin producers] in their ability to disrupt vaginal mucosal tissue and to characterize the subsequent infection. Tissue viability post-infection and biofilm formation of TSS USA200 isolates CDC587 and MN8, which contain the α-toxin pseudogene (hla(-)), MNPE (hla(+)), and MNPE isogenic hla knockout (hlaKO), were observed via LIVE/DEAD® staining and confocal microscopy. All TSS strains grew to similar bacterial densities (1-5 × 10(8) CFU) on the mucosa and were proinflammatory over 3 days. However, MNPE formed biofilms with significant reductions in the mucosal viability whereas neither CDC587 (hla(-)), MN8 (hla(-)), nor MNPE hlaKO formed biofilms. The latter strains were also less cytotoxic than wild-type MNPE. The addition of exogenous, purified α-toxin to MNPE hlaKO restored the biofilm phenotype. We speculate that α-toxin affects S. aureus phenotypic growth on vaginal mucosa by promoting tissue disruption and biofilm formation. Further, α-toxin mutants (hla(-)) are not benign colonizers, but rather form a different type of infection, which we have termed high density pathogenic variants (HDPV). PMID:22919655

  19. Interferometry at the PTB Nanometer Comparator: design, status and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flügge, J.; Weichert, Ch.; Hu, H.; Köning, R.; Bosse, H.; Wiegmann, A.; Schulz, M.; Elster, C.; Geckeler, R. D.

    2008-10-01

    To minimize the measurement uncertainty of one dimensional length measurements on line scales, linear encoders and interferometers the PTB in cooperation with the Dr. Johannes Heidenhain GmbH had built up a new length comparator. The Nanometer Comparator [1,2] has already proven its performance during the measurements of incremental encoders and line scales with an expanded measurement uncertainty of below 5 nm [3,4,5]. Due to the introduction of double and multiple exposure in advanced lithography techniques the overlay and registration metrology requirements will drastically increase so that reference metrology tools need to be developed further to be able to follow the resulting decrease of the specifications. Therefore, the PTB further develops the new 1D vacuum comparator to add a measurement possibility for straightness and to reach a measurement accuracy in the sub nanometer range [6]. One key development will be the interferometric measurement of all six degrees of freedom of the measurement slide of the comparator. A new multi axis heterodyne interferometer electronics and optical interferometer designs minimizing nonlinearities by spatially separated beams are under development.

  20. Understanding the molecular basis of substrate binding specificity of PTB domains

    PubMed Central

    Sain, Neetu; Tiwari, Garima; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions mediated by phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains play a crucial role in various cellular processes. In order to understand the structural basis of substrate recognition by PTB domains, multiple explicit solvent atomistic simulations of 100ns duration have been carried out on 6 PTB-peptide complexes with known binding affinities. MM/PBSA binding energy values calculated from these MD trajectories and residue based statistical pair potential score show good correlation with the experimental dissociation constants. Our analysis also shows that the modeled structures of PTB domains can be used to develop less compute intensive residue level statistical pair potential based approaches for predicting interaction partners of PTB domains. PMID:27526776

  1. PTB or not to be: promiscuous, tolerant and Bizarro domains come of age.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Amjad; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2004-09-01

    PTB domains are protein modules that usually interact with the cytoplasmic tail of a wide variety of growth factor receptors. In so doing, they mediate the transduction of extracellular information to specific downstream targets within the cell that ultimately determine the fate of a number of important biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. Recent structural and functional studies of PTB domains from a variety of cellular proteins have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms of action of these important protein modules. In the present review, we provide an account of such studies and suggest that PTB domains can be subdivided into three distinct categories on the basis of their topological differences. We also discuss the various mechanisms employed by the PTB domains in recognition of a diverse set of ligands without a consensus sequence. Finally, we discuss the role of molecular plasticity as a possible determinant of functional versatility of PTB domains. PMID:15590561

  2. New PTB thermal neutron calibration facility: first results.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Reginatto, M; Wershofen, H; Wiegel, B; Zimbal, A

    2014-10-01

    A new thermal neutron calibration facility based on a moderator assembly has been set up at PTB. It consists of 16 (241)Am-Be radionuclide sources mounted in a graphite block, 1.5 m wide, 1.5 m high and 1.8 m deep. The sources are distributed to eight different positions, at a mean distance of ∼1.25 m from the front face of the moderator. The neutron field at the reference position, 30 cm in front of the moderator device and 75 cm above the floor, has been characterised using calculations, Bonner sphere measurements and gold foil activation. First results are shown. The field is highly thermalised: 99 % in terms of fluence. It is quite homogenous within a 20 cm×20 cm area, but the absolute value of the thermal neutron fluence rate is small and yields an ambient dose equivalent rate of 3 µSv h(-1). PMID:24403346

  3. Polarization resolved measurements with the new EUV ellipsometer of PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, Victor; Fischer, Andreas; Laubis, Christian; Stadelhoff, Christian; Scholze, Frank; Ullrich, Albrecht

    2015-03-01

    After having developed metrology with synchrotron radiation at the storage rings BESSY I and BESSY II for more than 25 years, particularly also for the characterization of EUV optical components and detectors, PTB extended its capabilities for EUV metrology with respect to polarization resolved measurements, particularly in the spectral region around 13.5 nm. With the development of larger numerical aperture optics for EUV and advanced illumination concepts for lithographic imaging, the polarization performance of the optical elements and EUV photomasks with respect to high-NA EUV imaging becomes ever more important. At PTB, we use monochromatized bending magnet radiation for the characterization of the optical elements because of the superior temporal stability and rapid tuneability of the wavelength. Thus the polarization of the radiation is almost linear, depending on the vertical beamline acceptance angle, and cannot be manipulated. Therefore, we decided to equip the soft X-ray beamline which delivers particularly well collimated and highly linearly polarized radiation with a sample manipulator which allows freely setting the orientation of the plane of deflection. Thus we are able to characterize samples in any orientation with respect to the linear polarized direction. We additionally can add a linear polarization analyzer working with a rotatable Brewster reflector to analyze the state of polarization of the reflected beam. We present first results on the polarization properties of EUV multilayer mirrors close to the Brewster angle where polarization selectivity up to s104 is predicted from model calculations. We also present polarization resolved measurements of the EUV diffraction of absorber line patterns at EUV photomasks.

  4. Type IV pili promote early biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Maldarelli, Grace A; Piepenbrink, Kurt H; Scott, Alison J; Freiberg, Jeffrey A; Song, Yang; Achermann, Yvonne; Ernst, Robert K; Shirtliff, Mark E; Sundberg, Eric J; Donnenberg, Michael S; von Rosenvinge, Erik C

    2016-08-01

    Increasing morbidity and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) present an enormous challenge to healthcare systems. Clostridium difficile express type IV pili (T4P), but their function remains unclear. Many chronic and recurrent bacterial infections result from biofilms, surface-associated bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular matrix. CDI may be biofilm mediated; T4P are important for biofilm formation in a number of organisms. We evaluate the role of T4P in C. difficile biofilm formation using RNA sequencing, mutagenesis and complementation of the gene encoding the major pilin pilA1, and microscopy. RNA sequencing demonstrates that, in comparison to other growth phenotypes, C. difficile growing in a biofilm has a distinct RNA expression profile, with significant differences in T4P gene expression. Microscopy of T4P-expressing and T4P-deficient strains suggests that T4P play an important role in early biofilm formation. A non-piliated pilA1 mutant forms an initial biofilm of significantly reduced mass and thickness in comparison to the wild type. Complementation of the pilA1 mutant strain leads to formation of a biofilm which resembles the wild-type biofilm. These findings suggest that T4P play an important role in early biofilm formation. Novel strategies for confronting biofilm infections are emerging; our data suggest that similar strategies should be investigated in CDI. PMID:27369898

  5. The interaction of Kinesin-1 with its adaptor protein JIP1 can be regulated via proteins binding to the JIP1-PTB domain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The regulatory mechanisms of motor protein-dependent intracellular transport are still not fully understood. The kinesin-1-binding protein, JIP1, can function as an adaptor protein that links kinesin-1 and other JIP1-binding “cargo” proteins. However, it is unknown whether these “cargo” proteins influence the JIP1–kinesin-1 binding. Results We show here that JIP1–kinesin-1 binding in Neuro2a cells was dependent on conserved amino acid residues in the JIP1-phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain, including F687. In addition, mutation of F687 severely affected the neurite tip localization of JIP1. Proteomic analysis revealed another kinesin-1 binding protein, JIP3, as a major JIP1 binding protein. The association between JIP1 and JIP3 was dependent on the F687 residue in JIP1, and this association induced the formation of a stable ternary complex with kinesin-1. On the other hand, the binding of JIP1 and JIP3 was independent of kinesin-1 binding. We also show that other PTB binding proteins can interrupt the formation of the ternary complex. Conclusions The formation of the JIP1–kinesin-1 complex depends on the protein binding-status of the JIP1 PTB domain. This may imply a regulatory mechanism of kinesin-1-dependent intracellular transport. PMID:23496950

  6. From plane to spatial angles: PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael; Osten, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Electronic autocollimators are utilised versatilely for non-contact angle measurements in applications like straightness measurements and profilometry. Yet, no calibration of the angle measurement of an autocollimator has been available when both its measurement axes are engaged. Additionally, autocollimators have been calibrated at fixed distances to the reflector, although its distance may vary during the use of an autocollimator. To extend the calibration capabilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spatial angles and variable distances, a novel calibration device has been set up: the spatial angle autocollimator calibrator (SAAC). In this paper, its concept and its mechanical realisation will be presented. The focus will be on the system's mathematical modelling and its application in spatial angle calibrations. The model considers the misalignments of the SAAC's components, including the non-orthogonalities of the measurement axes of the autocollimators and of the rotational axes of the tilting unit. It allows us to derive specific measurement procedures to determine the misalignments in situ and, in turn, to correct the measurements of the autocollimators. Finally, the realisation and the results of a traceable spatial angle calibration of an autocollimator will be presented. This is the first calibration of this type worldwide.

  7. A comparison of irradiance responsivity and thermodynamic temperature measurement between PTB and NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Yuan, Z.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, R. D.

    2013-09-11

    This paper describes a comparison between PTB and NIM in the field of absolute spectral-band radiometry and thermodynamic temperature measurement. For the comparison a NIM made interference filter radiometer with a centre wavelength of 633 nm was taken to PTB. The filter radiometer was calibrated at NIM and PTB with respect to spectral irradiance responsivity. For the integral value in the band-pass range an agreement of 0.1% was observed in both calibrations. In a next step, the 633 nm filter radiometer was used to measure the temperature of a high-temperature blackbody in comparison to an 800 nm filter radiometer of PTB in the temperature range between 1400 K and 2750 K. The thermodynamic temperature measured by the two filter radiometers agreed to within 0.2 K to 0.5 K with an estimated measurement uncertainty ranging between 0.1 K and 0.4 K (k=1)

  8. Long-term research in Inmetro on samples of quantum Hall resistance standards made by PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, H. R.; Briones, R. E. M.; Pierz, K.; Gotz, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper shows up to date results of Inmetro's investigations on aging effects of quantum Hall samples fabricated by PTB in the frame of a mutual scientific agreement established between the Brazilian and German National Metrology Institutes.

  9. Reactive oxygen species promote raft formation in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shu-Ping; Lin Feng, Ming-Hsien; Huang, Huey-Lan; Huang, Ya-Ching; Tsou, Wen-I; Lai, Ming-Zong

    2007-04-01

    Lipid rafts are involved in many cell biology events, yet the molecular mechanisms on how rafts are formed are poorly understood. In this study we probed the possible requirement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced lipid raft formation. Microscopy and biochemical analyses illustrated that blockage of ROS production, by superoxide dismutase-mimic MnTBAP, significantly reduced partitioning of LAT, phospho-LAT, and PLC-gamma in lipid rafts. Another antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) displayed a similar suppressive effect on the entry of phospho-LAT into raft microdomains. The involvement of ROS in TCR-mediated raft assembly was observed in T-cell hybridomas, T leukemia cells, and normal T cells. Removal of ROS was accompanied by an attenuated activation of LAT and PKCtheta, with reduced production of IL-2. Consistently, treating T cells with the ROS-producer tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (TBHP) greatly enhanced membrane raft formation, distribution of phospho-LAT into lipid rafts, and increased IL-2 production. Our results indicate for the first time that ROS contribute to TCR-induced membrane raft formation. PMID:17349922

  10. Solution Phase Exciton Diffusion Dynamics of a Charge-Transfer Copolymer PTB7 and a Homopolymer P3HT.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung; Rolczynski, Brian S; Xu, Tao; Yu, Luping; Chen, Lin X

    2015-06-18

    Using ultrafast polarization-controlled transient absorption (TA) measurements, dynamics of the initial exciton states were investigated on the time scale of tens of femtoseconds to about 80 ps in two different types of conjugated polymers extensively used in active layers of organic photovoltaic devices. These polymers are poly(3-fluorothienothiophenebenzodithiophene) (PTB7) and poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT), which are charge-transfer polymers and homopolymers, respectively. In PTB7, the initial excitons with excess vibrational energy display two observable ultrafast time constants, corresponding to coherent exciton diffusion before the vibrational relaxation, and followed by incoherent exciton diffusion processes to a neighboring local state after the vibrational relaxation. In contrast, P3HT shows only one exciton diffusion or conformational motion time constant of 34 ps, even though its exciton decay kinetics are multiexponential. Based on the experimental results, an exciton dynamics mechanism is conceived taking into account the excitation energy and structural dependence in coherent and incoherent exciton diffusion processes, as well as other possible deactivation processes including the formation of the pseudo-charge-transfer and charge separate states, as well as interchain exciton hopping or coherent diffusion. PMID:25620363

  11. NADPH oxidase promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation in pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Röhm, Marc; Grimm, Melissa J; D'Auria, Anthony C; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G; Segal, Brahm H; Urban, Constantin F

    2014-05-01

    NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in antimicrobial host defense and in regulating inflammation. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in generation of reactive oxidant intermediates. Aspergillus species are ubiquitous, filamentous fungi, which can cause invasive aspergillosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CGD, reflecting the critical role for NADPH oxidase in antifungal host defense. Activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils can be coupled to the release of proteins and chromatin that comingle in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which can augment extracellular antimicrobial host defense. NETosis can be driven by NADPH oxidase-dependent and -independent pathways. We therefore undertook an analysis of whether NADPH oxidase was required for NETosis in Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Oropharyngeal instillation of live Aspergillus hyphae induced neutrophilic pneumonitis in both wild-type and NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47(phox-/-)) mice which had resolved in wild-type mice by day 5 but progressed in p47(phox-/-) mice. NETs, identified by immunostaining, were observed in lungs of wild-type mice but were absent in p47(phox-/-) mice. Using bona fide NETs and nuclear chromatin decondensation as an early NETosis marker, we found that NETosis required a functional NADPH oxidase in vivo and ex vivo. In addition, NADPH oxidase increased the proportion of apoptotic neutrophils. Together, our results show that NADPH oxidase is required for pulmonary clearance of Aspergillus hyphae and generation of NETs in vivo. We speculate that dual modulation of NETosis and apoptosis by NADPH oxidase enhances antifungal host defense and promotes resolution of inflammation upon infection clearance. PMID:24549323

  12. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    SONG, JIAN; PING, LING-YAN; DUONG, DUC M.; GAO, XIAO-YAN; HE, CHUN-YAN; WEI, LEI; WU, JUN-ZHU

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native-LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL-stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label-free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native-LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native-LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation. PMID:26781977

  13. Ozone Promotes Chloropicrin Formation by Oxidizing Amines to Nitro Compounds.

    PubMed

    McCurry, Daniel L; Quay, Amanda N; Mitch, William A

    2016-02-01

    Chloropicrin formation has been associated with ozonation followed by chlorination, but the reaction pathway and precursors have been poorly characterized. Experiments with methylamine demonstrated that ozonation converts methylamine to nitromethane at ∼100% yield. Subsequent chlorination converts nitromethane to chloropicrin at ∼50% yield under the conditions evaluated. Similarly high yields from other primary amines were limited to those with functional groups on the β-carbon (e.g., the carboxylic acid in glycine) that facilitate carbon-carbon bond cleavage to release nitromethyl anion. Secondary amines featuring these reactive primary amines as functional groups (e.g., secondary N-methylamines) formed chloropicrin at high yields, likely by facile dealkylation to release the primary nitro compound. Chloropicrin yields from tertiary amines were low. Natural water experiments, including derivatization to transform primary and secondary amines to less reactive carbamate functional groups, indicated that primary and secondary amines were the dominant chloropicrin precursors during ozonation/chlorination. Ozonation followed by chlorination of the primary amine side chain of lysine demonstrated low yields (∼0.2%) of chloropicrin, but high yields (∼17%) of dichloronitrolysine, a halonitroalkane structural analogue to chloropicrin. However, chloropicrin yields increased and dichloronitrolysine yields decreased in the absence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, suggesting that future research should characterize the potential occurrence of such halonitroalkane analogues relative to natural radical scavenger (e.g., carbonate) concentrations. PMID:26752338

  14. Hypoxia promotes vasculogenic mimicry formation by the Twist1-Bmi1 connection in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Sun, Baocun; Zhao, Xiulan; Wang, Xudong; Li, Yanlei; Qiu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Tieju; Gu, Qiang; Dong, Xueyi; Zhang, Yanhui; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Nan

    2015-09-01

    Aggressive tumor cells can mimic embryonic vasculogenic networks and form vasculogenic mimicry (VM). Preliminary studies demonstrated that hypoxia can promote VM formation; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the role of the Twist1‑Bmi1 connection in hypoxia‑induced VM formation and the underlying mechanism. In the in vitro experiments, western blot analysis demonstrated that hypoxia upregulated the expression of Twist1, Bmi1, epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, stem cell markers and VM‑associated markers. The 3D culture assay showed that hypoxia promoted VM formation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. Using transfection and in vitro cell experiments, the Twist1‑Bmi1 connection was confirmed to have an important role in inducing EMT, cell stemness and VM formation. In the in vivo experiments, the murine hypoxia models were established via incomplete femoral artery ligation and the mechanism by which hypoxia promoted Twist1 and Bmi1 expression and led to VM formation was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry staining and endomucin/periodic acid Schiff double‑staining. In conclusion, hypoxia upregulate the expression of Twist1 and Bmi1, and these two proteins have an important role in inducing EMT and cancer cell stemness, which contributed to VM formation. PMID:26202447

  15. Bilateral Intercomparison of Spectral Directional Emissivity Measurement Between CENAM and PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-García, D.; Monte, C.

    2014-07-01

    Both Centro Nacional de Metrología (CENAM, Mexico) and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany) are national metrology institutes and provide the dissemination of the spectral directional emissivity as a calibration service. CENAM started this service recently. The emissivity measurement capability of PTB took part in two international comparisons performed in the past among other national institutes. The measurement instrumentation and techniques used for emissivity measurements at CENAM and PTB are both based on Fourier transform infrared spectrometers. Both setups are based on the principle of a spectral comparison of the radiances of the sample and blackbody radiator. In detail, the setups differ: CENAM has the capability of measuring the directional spectral emissivity normal to the sample surface, while PTB measures the directional spectral emissivity at angles of observation ranging from to , and provides the hemispherical spectral and total emissivity of samples as well. For this comparison, it was agreed to compare the value of the directional spectral emissivity normal to the sample surface obtained by CENAM with the one determined at an angle of by PTB. Four samples of different spectral directional emissivities were measured by the two institutes. For the samples, four copper disks with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 5 mm were used. Three of them were coated with Comex 1402470 (white), 1402471 (aluminum), and 1402474 (black) paints, respectively, and the other one with Nextel 811-21 paint. Measurements were obtained for each sample at a temperature of about C, and in the spectral range from to ( to ). The description of the experimental setups used and the comparison results are presented in this paper. It was found that the results obtained at CENAM and at PTB agree well within the declared standard uncertainties.

  16. Insight into the mechanism of Sb promoted Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} formation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Yong Zhang, Xiaokun; Zhang, Shu

    2013-08-15

    Sb-doping has been demonstrated to be a new approach to promote Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin film formation. To study the mechanism of Sb-promoted CIGS formation, we investigated the influence of Sb on the evolution of the critical intermediate Cu–Se phases, and found that Cu{sub 3}SbSe{sub 3} species was formed. Phase change of the as-prepared Cu–Se compounds at elevated temperature was determined using the differential scanning calorimetry analysis. For samples containing Sb, the melting decomposition occurred at 507.1 °C, along with aggregation of nanocrystals into a bulk, while the morphology of the sample without Sb barely changed after heating. This result suggests that the mobile Cu{sub 3}SbSe{sub 3} is likely the key intermediate responsible for Sb-promoted CIGS formation. Furthermore, we extended the scope of Sb-doping approach to solvothermal synthesis and CIGS nanocrystals were synthesized with significantly promoted kinetics in the presence of Sb. Based on these results, we propose the mechanism of Sb promoted CIGS formation. - Graphical abstract: Cu{sub 3}SbSe{sub 3} mobile phase is likely the key species to promote the formation of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}, and significantly promoting effect by Sb is also found in the synthesis of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} nanocrystals. Highlights: • In the presence of Sb, Cu{sub 3}SbSe{sub 3} is formed while synthesizing the essential intermediate Cu–Se compounds for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} materials. • Cu{sub 3}SbSe{sub 3} shows high mobility at elevated temperature. • Cu{sub 3}SbSe{sub 3} mobile phase is likely the key species to improve Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film formation. • A synthesis methodology is developed to produce Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} nanocrystals with significantly promoted reaction kinetics.

  17. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 promotes primordial follicle formation in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Prabuddha; Roy, Shyamal K

    2015-01-01

    Primordial follicles (PF) are formed when somatic cells differentiate into flattened pregranulosa cells, invaginate into the oocyte nests and encircle individual oocytes. We hypothesize that BMP2 regulates PF formation by promoting the transition of germ cells into oocytes and somatic cells into pregranulosa cells. E15 hamster ovaries were cultured for 8 days corresponding to postnatal day 8 (P8) in vivo, with or without BMP2, and the formation of PF was examined. BMP2 was expressed in the oocytes as well as ovarian somatic cells during development. BMP2 exposure for the first two days or the last two days or the entire 8 days of culture led to increase in PF formation suggesting that BMP2 affected both germ cell transition and somatic cell differentiation. Whereas an ALK2/3 inhibitor completely blocked BMP2-induced PF formation, an ALK2-specific inhibitor was partially effective, suggesting that BMP2 affected PF formation via both ALK2 and ALK3. BMP2 also reduced apoptosis in vitro. Further, more meiotic oocytes were present in BMP2 exposed ovaries. In summary, the results provide the first evidence that BMP2 regulates primordial follicle formation by promoting germ cell to oocyte transition and somatic cell to pre-granulosa cells formation and it acts via both ALK2 and ALK3. PMID:26219655

  18. Circadian glucocorticoid oscillations promote learning-dependent synapse formation and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Liston, Conor; Cichon, Joseph M; Jeanneteau, Freddy; Jia, Zhengping; Chao, Moses V; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2013-01-01

    Excessive glucocorticoid exposure during chronic stress causes synapse loss and learning impairment. Under normal physiological conditions, glucocorticoid activity oscillates in synchrony with the circadian rhythm. Whether and how endogenous glucocorticoid oscillations modulate synaptic plasticity and learning is unknown. Here we show that circadian glucocorticoid peaks promote postsynaptic dendritic spine formation in the mouse cortex after motor skill learning, whereas troughs are required for stabilizing newly formed spines that are important for long-term memory retention. Conversely, chronic and excessive exposure to glucocorticoids eliminates learning-associated new spines and disrupts previously acquired memories. Furthermore, we show that glucocorticoids promote rapid spine formation through a non-transcriptional mechanism by means of the LIM kinase–cofilin pathway and increase spine elimination through transcriptional mechanisms involving mineralocorticoid receptor activation. Together, these findings indicate that tightly regulated circadian glucocorticoid oscillations are important for learning-dependent synaptic formation and maintenance. They also delineate a new signaling mechanism underlying these effects. PMID:23624512

  19. Sleep promotes branch-specific formation of dendritic spines after learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Lai, Cora Sau Wan; Cichon, Joseph; Ma, Lei; Li, Wei; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2014-06-01

    How sleep helps learning and memory remains unknown. We report in mouse motor cortex that sleep after motor learning promotes the formation of postsynaptic dendritic spines on a subset of branches of individual layer V pyramidal neurons. New spines are formed on different sets of dendritic branches in response to different learning tasks and are protected from being eliminated when multiple tasks are learned. Neurons activated during learning of a motor task are reactivated during subsequent non-rapid eye movement sleep, and disrupting this neuronal reactivation prevents branch-specific spine formation. These findings indicate that sleep has a key role in promoting learning-dependent synapse formation and maintenance on selected dendritic branches, which contribute to memory storage. PMID:24904169

  20. Superacid-promoted ionization of alkanes without carbonium ion formation: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Dinér, Peter

    2012-10-11

    The carbonium ion has been suggested to be the intermediate in superacid-promoted reactions (SbF(5)-HF) such as hydrogen-deuterium exchange and in the electrophilic C-H cleavage into hydrogen and the carbenium ion. In this study, the superacid-promoted C-H cleavage into hydrogen and the carbenium ion was studied using density functional theory (B3LYP and M062X) and ab initio methods (MP2 and CCSD). The calculations suggest that the superacid-promoted C-H cleavage proceeds via a concerted transition state leading to hydrogen (H(2)) and the carbenium ion without the formation of the elusive carbonium ion. The reactivity for the superacid-promoted C-H cleavage decreases upon going from isobutane (tertiary) > propane (secondary) > isobutane (primary) > propane (primary) > ethane > methane. PMID:22998332

  1. Thyroid dysfunction, either hyper or hypothyroidism, promotes gallstone formation by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Xing; Zhao, Qun-Zi; Zheng, Shu; Qing, Wen-Jie; Miao, Chun-di; Sanjay, Jaiswal

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated comprehensively the effects of thyroid function on gallstone formation in a mouse model. Gonadectomized gallstone-susceptible male C57BL/6 mice were randomly distributed into three groups each of which received an intervention to induce hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or euthyroidism. After 5 weeks of feeding a lithogenic diet of 15% (w/w) butter fat, 1% (w/w) cholesterol, and 0.5% (w/w) cholic acid, mice were killed for further experiments. The incidence of cholesterol monohydrate crystal formation was 100% in mice with hyperthyroidism, 83% in hypothyroidism, and 33% in euthyroidism, the differences being statistically significant. Among the hepatic lithogenic genes, Trβ was found to be up-regulated and Rxr down-regulated in the mice with hypothyroidism. In contrast, Lxrα, Rxr, and Cyp7α1 were up-regulated and Fxr down-regulated in the mice with hyperthyroidism. In conclusion, thyroid dysfunction, either hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, promotes the formation of cholesterol gallstones in C57BL/6 mice. Gene expression differences suggest that thyroid hormone disturbance leads to gallstone formation in different ways. Hyperthyroidism induces cholesterol gallstone formation by regulating expression of the hepatic nuclear receptor genes such as Lxrα and Rxr, which are significant in cholesterol metabolism pathways. However, hypothyroidism induces cholesterol gallstone formation by promoting cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:27381728

  2. Thyroid dysfunction, either hyper or hypothyroidism, promotes gallstone formation by different mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Xing; Zhao, Qun-zi; Zheng, Shu; Qing, Wen-jie; Miao, Chun-di; Sanjay, Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated comprehensively the effects of thyroid function on gallstone formation in a mouse model. Gonadectomized gallstone-susceptible male C57BL/6 mice were randomly distributed into three groups each of which received an intervention to induce hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or euthyroidism. After 5 weeks of feeding a lithogenic diet of 15% (w/w) butter fat, 1% (w/w) cholesterol, and 0.5% (w/w) cholic acid, mice were killed for further experiments. The incidence of cholesterol monohydrate crystal formation was 100% in mice with hyperthyroidism, 83% in hypothyroidism, and 33% in euthyroidism, the differences being statistically significant. Among the hepatic lithogenic genes, Trβ was found to be up-regulated and Rxr down-regulated in the mice with hypothyroidism. In contrast, Lxrα, Rxr, and Cyp7α1 were up-regulated and Fxr down-regulated in the mice with hyperthyroidism. In conclusion, thyroid dysfunction, either hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, promotes the formation of cholesterol gallstones in C57BL/6 mice. Gene expression differences suggest that thyroid hormone disturbance leads to gallstone formation in different ways. Hyperthyroidism induces cholesterol gallstone formation by regulating expression of the hepatic nuclear receptor genes such as Lxrα and Rxr, which are significant in cholesterol metabolism pathways. However, hypothyroidism induces cholesterol gallstone formation by promoting cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:27381728

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 promotes invadopodia formation through suppression of Rho signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Invadopodia are actin-enriched membrane protrusions that are important for extracellular matrix degradation and invasive cell motility. Src homolog domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2), a non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, has been shown to play an important role in promoting cancer metastasis, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we found that depletion of SHP2 by short-hairpin RNA suppressed invadopodia formation in several cancer cell lines, particularly in the SAS head and neck squamous cell line. In contrast, overexpression of SHP2 promoted invadopodia formation in the CAL27 head and neck squamous cell line, which expresses low levels of endogenous SHP2. The depletion of SHP2 in SAS cells significantly decreased their invasive motility. The suppression of invadopodia formation by SHP2 depletion was restored by the Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme (a Rho GTPase inhibitor) or Y27632 (a specific inhibitor for Rho-associated kinase). Together, our results suggest that SHP2 may promote invadopodia formation through inhibition of Rho signaling in cancer cells. PMID:26204488

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 promotes invadopodia formation through suppression of Rho signaling.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chen

    2015-09-15

    Invadopodia are actin-enriched membrane protrusions that are important for extracellular matrix degradation and invasive cell motility. Src homolog domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2), a non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, has been shown to play an important role in promoting cancer metastasis, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we found that depletion of SHP2 by short-hairpin RNA suppressed invadopodia formation in several cancer cell lines, particularly in the SAS head and neck squamous cell line. In contrast, overexpression of SHP2 promoted invadopodia formation in the CAL27 head and neck squamous cell line, which expresses low levels of endogenous SHP2. The depletion of SHP2 in SAS cells significantly decreased their invasive motility. The suppression of invadopodia formation by SHP2 depletion was restored by the Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme (a Rho GTPase inhibitor) or Y27632 (a specific inhibitor for Rho-associated kinase). Together, our results suggest that SHP2 may promote invadopodia formation through inhibition of Rho signaling in cancer cells. PMID:26204488

  5. In Vivo Expression of the PTB-deleted Odin Mutant Results in Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunjung; Lee, Haeryung; Park, Soochul

    2015-05-01

    Odin has been implicated in the downstream signaling pathway of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the epidermal growth factor and Eph receptors. However, the physiologically relevant function of Odin needs to be further determined. In this study, we used Odin heterozygous mice to analyze the Odin expression pattern; the targeted allele contained a β-geo gene trap vector inserted into the 14th intron of the Odin gene. Interestingly, we found that Odin was exclusively expressed in ependymal cells along the brain ventricles. In particular, Odin was highly expressed in the subcommissural organ, a small ependymal glandular tissue. However, we did not observe any morphological abnormalities in the brain ventricles or ependymal cells of Odin null-mutant mice. We also generated BAC transgenic mice that expressed the PTB-deleted Odin (dPTB) after a floxed GFP-STOP cassette was excised by tissue-specific Cre expression. Strikingly, Odin-dPTB expression played a causative role in the development of the hydrocephalic phenotype, primarily in the midbrain. In addition, Odin-dPTB expression disrupted proper development of the subcommissural organ and interfered with ependymal cell maturation in the cerebral aqueduct. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that Odin plays a role in the differentiation of ependymal cells during early postnatal brain development. PMID:26018557

  6. SKAP2 Promotes Podosome Formation to Facilitate Tumor-Associated Macrophage Infiltration and Metastatic Progression.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Shimamura, Shintaro; Kuriyama, Sei; Maeda, Daichi; Goto, Akiteru; Aiba, Namiko

    2016-01-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play complex and pivotal roles during cancer progression. A subset of metastasis-associated macrophages accumulates within metastatic sites to promote the invasion and growth of tumor cells. Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein 2 (SKAP2), a substrate of Src family kinases, is highly expressed in macrophages from various tumors, but its contribution to the tumor-promoting behavior of TAMs is unknown. Here, we report that SKAP2 regulates podosome formation in macrophages to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. SKAP2 physically interacted with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and localized to podosomes, which were rarely observed in SKAP2-null macrophages. The invasion of peritoneal macrophages derived from SKAP2-null mice was significantly reduced compared with wild-type macrophages, but could be rescued by the restoration of functional SKAP2 containing an intact tyrosine phosphorylation site and the ability to interact with WASP. Furthermore, SKAP2-null mice inoculated with lung cancer cells exhibited markedly decreased lung metastases characterized by reduced macrophage infiltration compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, intravenously injected SKAP2-null macrophages failed to efficiently infiltrate established tumors and promote their growth. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel mechanism by which macrophages assemble the appropriate motile machinery to infiltrate tumors and promote disease progression, and implicate SKAP2 as an attractive candidate for therapeutically targeting TAMs. PMID:26577701

  7. Coupling of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Borukhov, Sergei; Mustaev, Arkady; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) makes extensive contacts with duplex DNA downstream of the transcription bubble in initiation and elongation complexes. We investigated the role of downstream interactions in formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex by measuring initiation activity of stable RNAP complexes with model promoter DNA fragments whose downstream ends extend from +3 to +21 relative to the transcription start site at +1. We found that DNA downstream of position +6 does not play a significant role in transcription initiation when RNAP-promoter interactions upstream of the transcription start site are strong and promoter melting region is AT-rich. Further shortening of downstream DNA dramatically reduces efficiency of transcription initiation. The boundary of minimal downstream DNA duplex needed for efficient transcription initiation shifted further away from the catalytic center upon increasing the GC content of promoter melting region or in the presence of bacterial stringent response regulators DksA and ppGpp. These results indicate that the strength of RNAP-downstream DNA interactions has to reach a certain threshold to retain the catalytically competent conformation of the initiation complex and that establishment of contacts between RNAP and downstream DNA can be coupled with promoter melting. The data further suggest that RNAP interactions with DNA immediately downstream of the transcription bubble are particularly important for initiation of transcription. We hypothesize that these active center-proximal contacts stabilize the DNA template strand in the active center cleft and/or position the RNAP clamp domain to allow RNA synthesis. PMID:25311862

  8. Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide by Water: Alkali-Promoted Synthesis of Formate

    SciTech Connect

    Hrbek, J.; Hoffmann, F.M.; Yang, Y.; Paul, J.; White, M.G.

    2010-07-15

    Conversion of carbon dioxide utilizing protons from water decomposition is likely to provide a sustainable source of fuels and chemicals in the future. We present here a time-evolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) study of the reaction of CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O in thin potassium layers. Reaction at temperatures below 200 K results in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to potassium formate. Thermal stability of the formate, together with its sequential transformation to oxalate and to carbonate, is monitored and discussed. The data of this model study suggest a dual promoter mechanism of the potassium: the activation of CO{sub 2} and the dissociation of water. Reaction at temperatures above 200 K, in contrast, is characterized by the absence of formate and the direct reaction of CO{sub 2} to oxalate, due to a drastic reduction of the sticking coefficient of water at higher temperatures.

  9. EGFR-STAT3 signaling promotes formation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianqiang; Patmore, Deanna M.; Jousma, Edwin; Eaves, David W.; Breving, Kimberly; Patel, Ami V.; Schwartz, Eric B.; Fuchs, James R.; Cripe, Timothy P.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Ratner, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) develop sporadically or in the context of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). EGFR overexpression has been implicated in MPNST formation, but its precise role and relevant signaling pathways remain unknown. We found that EGFR overexpression promotes mouse neurofibroma transformation to aggressive MPNST (GEM-PNST). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphorylated STAT3 (Tyr705) in both human MPNST and mouse GEM-PNST. A specific JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor FLLL32 delayed MPNST formation in an MPNST xenograft nude mouse model. STAT3 knockdown by shRNA prevented MPNST formation in vivo. Finally, reducing EGFR activity strongly reduced pSTAT3 in vivo. Thus, an EGFR-STAT3 pathway is necessary for MPNST transformation and establishment of MPNST xenografts growth but not for tumor maintenance. Efficacy of the FLLL32 pharmacological inhibitor in delaying MPNST growth suggests that combination therapies targeting JAK/STAT3 might be useful therapeutics. PMID:23318430

  10. EGFR-STAT3 signaling promotes formation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Patmore, D M; Jousma, E; Eaves, D W; Breving, K; Patel, A V; Schwartz, E B; Fuchs, J R; Cripe, T P; Stemmer-Rachamimov, A O; Ratner, N

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) develop sporadically or in the context of neurofibromatosis type 1. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression has been implicated in MPNST formation, but its precise role and relevant signaling pathways remain unknown. We found that EGFR overexpression promotes mouse neurofibroma transformation to aggressive MPNST (GEM-PNST). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphorylated STAT3 (Tyr705) in both human MPNST and mouse GEM-PNST. A specific JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor FLLL32 delayed MPNST formation in an MPNST xenograft nude mouse model. STAT3 knockdown by shRNA prevented MPNST formation in vivo. Finally, reducing EGFR activity strongly reduced pSTAT3 in vivo. Thus, an EGFR-STAT3 pathway is necessary for MPNST transformation and establishment of MPNST xenografts growth but not for tumor maintenance. Efficacy of the FLLL32 pharmacological inhibitor in delaying MPNST growth suggests that combination therapies targeting JAK/STAT3 might be useful therapeutics. PMID:23318430

  11. Nitrite promotes protein carbonylation and Strecker aldehyde formation in experimental fermented sausages: are both events connected?

    PubMed

    Villaverde, A; Ventanas, J; Estévez, M

    2014-12-01

    The role played by curing agents (nitrite, ascorbate) on protein oxidation and Strecker aldehyde formation is studied. To fulfill this objective, increasing concentrations of nitrite (0, 75 and 150ppm) and ascorbate (0, 250 and 500ppm) were added to sausages subjected to a 54day drying process. The concurrence of intense proteolysis, protein carbonylation and formation of Strecker aldehydes during processing of sausages suggests that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) may be implicated in the formation of Strecker aldehydes. The fact that nitrite (150ppm, ingoing amount) significantly promoted the formation of protein carbonyls at early stages of processing and the subsequent formation of Strecker aldehydes provides strength to this hypothesis. Ascorbate (125 and 250ppm) controlled the overall extent of protein carbonylation in sausages without declining the formation of Strecker aldehydes. These results may contribute to understanding the chemistry fundamentals of the positive influence of nitrite on the flavor and overall acceptability of cured muscle foods. PMID:25089792

  12. Restricted Heterochromatin Formation Links NFATc2 Repressor Activity With Growth Promotion in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    BAUMGART, SANDRA; GLESEL, ELISABETH; SINGH, GARIMA; CHEN, NAI-MING; REUTLINGER, KRISTINA; ZHANG, JINSAN; BILLADEAU, DANIEL D.; FERNANDEZ-ZAPICO, MARTIN E.; GRESS, THOMAS M.; SINGH, SHIV K.; ELLENRIEDER, VOLKER

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Transcriptional silencing of the p15INK4b tumor suppressor pathway overcomes cellular protection against unrestrained proliferation in cancer. Here we show a novel pathway involving the oncogenic transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c2 targeting a p15INK4b-mediated failsafe mechanism to promote pancreatic cancer tumor growth. METHODS Immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy were used for expression studies. Cancer growth was assessed in vitro by [3H]thymidine incorporation, colony formation assays, and in vivo using xenograft tumor models. Protein-protein interactions, promoter regulation, and local histone modifications were analyzed by immunoprecipitation, DNA pull-down, reporter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. RESULTS Our study uncovered induction of NFATc2 in late-stage pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions with increased expression in tumor cell nuclei of advanced cancers. In the nucleus, NFATc2 targets the p15INK4b promoter for inducible heterochromatin formation and silencing. NFATc2 binding to its cognate promoter site induces stepwise recruitment of the histone methyltransferase Suv39H1, causes local H3K9 trimethylation, and allows docking of heterochromatin protein HP1γ to the repressor complex. Conversely, inactivation of NFATc2 disrupts this repressor complex assembly and local heterochromatin formation, resulting in restoration of p15INK4b expression and inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Here we describe a novel mechanism for NFATc2-mediated gene regulation and identify a functional link among its repressor activity, the silencing of the suppressor pathway p15INK4b, and its pancreatic cancer growth regulatory functions. Thus, we provide evidence that inactivation of oncogenic NFATc2 might be an attractive strategy in treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22079596

  13. Lymphotoxin-Dependent B Cell-FRC Crosstalk Promotes De Novo Follicle Formation and Antibody Production following Intestinal Helminth Infection.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Lebon, Luc; Mosconi, Ilaria; Yang, Chen-Ying; Scandella, Elke; Ludewig, Burkhard; Luther, Sanjiv A; Harris, Nicola L

    2016-05-17

    Secondary lymphoid tissues provide specialized niches for the initiation of adaptive immune responses and undergo a remarkable expansion in response to inflammatory stimuli. Although the formation of B cell follicles was previously thought to be restricted to the postnatal period, we observed that the draining mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN) of helminth-infected mice form an extensive number of new, centrally located, B cell follicles in response to IL-4Rα-dependent inflammation. IL-4Rα signaling promoted LTα1β2 (lymphotoxin) expression by B cells, which then interacted with CCL19 positive stromal cells to promote lymphoid enlargement and the formation of germinal center containing B cell follicles. Importantly, de novo follicle formation functioned to promote both total and parasite-specific antibody production. These data reveal a role for type 2 inflammation in promoting stromal cell remodeling and de novo follicle formation by promoting B cell-stromal cell crosstalk. PMID:27160906

  14. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuharu; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Chou, Joshua; de Vega, Susana; Mizuniwa, Chihiro; Sekimoto, Kaori; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2014-01-01

    Teneurin-4 (Ten-4), a transmembrane protein, is highly expressed in the central nervous system; however, its cellular and molecular function in neuronal differentiation remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in neurite outgrowth. Ten-4 expression was induced during neurite outgrowth of the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro-2a. Ten-4 protein was localized at the neurite growth cones. Knockdown of Ten-4 expression in Neuro-2a cells decreased the formation of the filopodia-like protrusions and the length of individual neurites. Conversely, overexpression of Ten-4 promoted filopodia-like protrusion formation. In addition, knockdown and overexpression of Ten-4 reduced and elevated the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho-family small GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1, key molecules for the membranous protrusion formation downstream of FAK, respectively. Inhibition of the activation of FAK and neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is a downstream regulator of FAK and Cdc42, blocked protrusion formation by Ten-4 overexpression. Further, Ten-4 colocalized with phosphorylated FAK in the filopodia-like protrusion regions. Together, our findings show that Ten-4 is a novel positive regulator of cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through the FAK signaling pathway.—Suzuki, N., Numakawa, T., Chou, J., de Vega, S., Mizuniwa, C., Sekimoto, K., Adachi, N., Kunugi, H., Arikawa-Hirasawa, E., Yamada, Y., Akazawa, C. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling. PMID:24344332

  15. Proneural and Abdominal Hox Inputs Synergize to Promote Sensory Organ Formation in the Drosophila Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Gutzwiller, Lisa M.; Witt, Lorraine M.; Gresser, Amy L.; Burns, Kevin A.; Cook, Tiffany A.; Gebelein, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The atonal (ato) proneural gene specifies a stereotypic number of sensory organ precursors (SOP) within each body segment of the Drosophila ectoderm. Surprisingly, the broad expression of Ato within the ectoderm results in only a modest increase in SOP formation, suggesting many cells are incompetent to become SOPs. Here, we show that the SOP promoting activity of Ato can be greatly enhanced by three factors: the Senseless (Sens) zinc finger protein, the Abdominal-A (Abd-A) Hox factor, and the epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway. First, we show that expression of either Ato alone or with Sens induces twice as many SOPs in the abdomen as in the thorax, and do so at the expense of an abdomen-specific cell fate: the larval oenocytes. Second, we demonstrate that Ato stimulates abdominal SOP formation by synergizing with Abd-A to promote EGF ligand (Spitz) secretion and secondary SOP recruitment. However, we also found that Ato and Sens selectively enhance abdominal SOP development in a Spitz-independent manner, suggesting additional genetic interactions between this proneural pathway and Abd-A. Altogether, these experiments reveal that genetic interactions between EGF-signaling, Abd-A, and Sens enhance the SOP-promoting activity of Ato to stimulate region-specific neurogenesis in the Drosophila abdomen. PMID:20875816

  16. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  17. Two cassava promoters related to vascular expression and storage root formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Bohl-Zenger, Susanne; Puonti-Kaerlas, Johanna; Potrykus, Ingo; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2003-12-01

    Cassava ( Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage roots, organs accumulating large amounts of starch, develop from primary roots via secondary growth. The availability of promoters related to storage-root formation is a prerequisite for engineering root traits in cassava. Two cDNAs, c15 and c54, were identified from a storage-root cDNA library of cassava MCol1505 via differential screening. The transcripts of c15 and c54 were detected in storage roots but not in leaves by Northern analysis. Homology analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that C15 is likely to be related to cytochrome P450 proteins, which are involved in the oxidative degradation of various compounds, while C54 may be related to Pt2L4, a cassava glutamic acid-rich protein. The promoter regions of c15 and c54 were isolated from the corresponding clones in a cassava genomic library. A 1,465-bp promoter fragment ( p15/1.5) of c15 and a 1,081-bp promoter region ( p54/1.0) of c54 were translationally fused to the uidA reporter gene, and introduced into cassava and Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. The expression patterns of p15/1.5::uidA and p54/1.0::uidA in transgenic plants showed that both promoters are predominantly active in phloem, cambium and xylem vessels of vascular tissues from leaves, stems, and root systems. More importantly, strong beta-glucuronidase activity was also detected in the starch-rich parenchyma cells of transgenic storage roots. Our results demonstrate that the two promoters are related to vascular expression and secondary growth of storage roots in cassava. PMID:13680228

  18. Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) inhibits Hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site (HCV IRES)-mediated translation, but does not affect HCV replication.

    PubMed

    Tischendorf, J J W; Beger, C; Korf, M; Manns, M P; Krüger, M

    2004-10-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) has previously been shown to affect Hepatitis C virus (HCV) IRES-mediated translation. In the present study we investigated the functional role of PTB for HCV translation, replication and chronic HCV infection. Bicistronic HCV IRES reporter plasmids and two different subgenomic replicons (bicistronic: pHCVrep1bBB7 (s1179I); monocistronic: pFK1-389/hyg-ubi/NS3-3'/5.1) were used to analyze the effects of PTB. Following transfection of plasmids expressing PTB RNA in sense or antisense orientation, translational activity and HCV RNA were analyzed by luciferase assay, quantitative real-time RT-PCR and northern blot analysis. Additionally, in liver tissue (n = 53) intrahepatic PTB RNA levels were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Significant inhibition of HCV IRES activity up to 42.6% was observed upon PTB sense RNA expression for HCV IRES reporter plasmids, while translational activity was enhanced up to 63.8% for PTB antisense RNA expression. In the HCV replicons PTB did not affect replication and no correlation was found between intrahepatic PTB mRNA levels and serum HCV RNA or histological changes in liver tissue of HCV infected patients. Although PTB inhibits HCV IRES-mediated translation from bicistronic reporter constructs, data obtained from two subgenomic HCV replicons and liver tissue do not indicate a significant role of PTB for HCV replication and chronic HCV infection. PMID:15669107

  19. Nuclear matrix protein Matrin3 regulates alternative splicing and forms overlapping regulatory networks with PTB

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Miguel B; Attig, Jan; Bellora, Nicolás; König, Julian; Hallegger, Martina; Kayikci, Melis; Eyras, Eduardo; Ule, Jernej; Smith, Christopher WJ

    2015-01-01

    Matrin3 is an RNA- and DNA-binding nuclear matrix protein found to be associated with neural and muscular degenerative diseases. A number of possible functions of Matrin3 have been suggested, but no widespread role in RNA metabolism has yet been clearly demonstrated. We identified Matrin3 by its interaction with the second RRM domain of the splicing regulator PTB. Using a combination of RNAi knockdown, transcriptome profiling and iCLIP, we find that Matrin3 is a regulator of hundreds of alternative splicing events, principally acting as a splicing repressor with only a small proportion of targeted events being co-regulated by PTB. In contrast to other splicing regulators, Matrin3 binds to an extended region within repressed exons and flanking introns with no sharply defined peaks. The identification of this clear molecular function of Matrin3 should help to clarify the molecular pathology of ALS and other diseases caused by mutations of Matrin3. PMID:25599992

  20. Trilateral Intercomparison of Photometric Units Maintained at NIST (USA), NPL (UK), and PTB (Germany)

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoshi; Goodman, Teresa; Sauter, Georg

    1999-01-01

    A trilateral intercomparison of photometric units between NIST (USA), NPL (UK), and PTB (Germany) has been conducted to update the knowledge of the relationship between the photometric units disseminated in the three countries. The luminous intensity unit (cd), the luminous responsivity scale (A/lx), and the luminous flux unit (lm) maintained at each laboratory were compared by circulating transfer standard lamps and photometers. The results showed that the relative luminous intensity values, with respect to the average, measured by NIST, NPL, and PTB were 1.0014, 1.0021, and 0.9966; the relative inverse values of the luminous responsivity (corresponding to illuminance) were 1.0023, 1.0011, and 0.9965; the relative luminous flux values were 0.9994, 1.0034, and 0.9972, respectively. The results agreed within the stated uncertainties of the units maintained at the three laboratories.

  1. Erythropoietin promotes bone formation through EphrinB2/EphB4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Shi, C; Kim, J; Chen, Y; Ni, S; Jiang, L; Zheng, C; Li, D; Hou, J; Taichman, R S; Sun, H

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that erythropoietin (EPO) has extensive nonhematopoietic biological functions. However, little is known about how EPO regulates bone formation, although several studies suggested that EPO can affect bone homeostasis. In this study, we investigated the effects of EPO on the communication between osteoclasts and osteoblasts through the ephrinB2/EphB4 signaling pathway. We found that EPO slightly promotes osteoblastic differentiation with the increased expression of EphB4 in ST2 cells. However, EPO increased the expression of Nfatc1 and ephrinB2 but decreased the expression of Mmp9 in RAW264.7 cells, resulting in an increase of ephrinB2-expressing osteoclasts and a decrease in resorption activity. The stimulation of ephrinB2/EphB4 signaling via ephrinB2-Fc significantly promoted EPO-mediated osteoblastic differentiation in ST2 cells. EphB4 knockdown through EphB4 shRNA inhibited EPO-mediated osteoblastic phenotypes. Furthermore, in vivo assays clearly demonstrated that EPO efficiently induces new bone formation in the alveolar bone regeneration model. Taken together, these results suggest that ephrinB2/EphB4 signaling may play an important role in EPO-mediated bone formation. PMID:25586589

  2. Substrate Binding Promotes Formation of the Skp1-Cul1-Fbxl3 (SCFFbxl3) Protein Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Yumimoto, Kanae; Muneoka, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Keiichi I.

    2013-01-01

    The Skp1–Cul1–F-box protein (SCF) complex is one of the most well characterized types of ubiquitin ligase (E3), with the E3 activity of the complex being regulated in part at the level of complex formation. Fbxl3 is an F-box protein that is responsible for the ubiquitylation and consequent degradation of cryptochromes (Crys) and thus regulates oscillation of the circadian clock. Here we show that formation of the SCFFbxl3 complex is regulated by substrate binding in vivo. Fbxl3 did not associate with Skp1 and Cul1 to a substantial extent in transfected mammalian cells. Unexpectedly, however, formation of the SCFFbxl3 complex was markedly promoted by forced expression of its substrate Cry1 in these cells. A mutant form of Fbxl3 that does not bind to Cry1 was unable to form an SCF complex, suggesting that interaction of Cry1 with Fbxl3 is essential for formation of SCFFbxl3. In contrast, recombinant Fbxl3 associated with recombinant Skp1 and Cul1 in vitro even in the absence of recombinant Cry1. Domain-swap analysis revealed that the COOH-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain of Fbxl3 attenuates the interaction of Skp1, suggesting that a yet unknown protein associated with the COOH-terminal domain of Fbxl3 and inhibited SCF complex formation. Our results thus provide important insight into the regulation of both SCF ubiquitin ligase activity and circadian rhythmicity. PMID:24085301

  3. Nickel Promotes Biofilm Formation by Escherichia coli K-12 Strains That Produce Curli▿

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Claire; Briandet, Romain; Jubelin, Gregory; Lejeune, Philippe; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Rodrigue, Agnès; Dorel, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    The survival of bacteria exposed to toxic compounds is a multifactorial phenomenon, involving well-known molecular mechanisms of resistance but also less-well-understood mechanisms of tolerance that need to be clarified. In particular, the contribution of biofilm formation to survival in the presence of toxic compounds, such as nickel, was investigated in this study. We found that a subinhibitory concentration of nickel leads Escherichia coli bacteria to change their lifestyle, developing biofilm structures rather than growing as free-floating cells. Interestingly, whereas nickel and magnesium both alter the global cell surface charge, only nickel promotes biofilm formation in our system. Genetic evidence indicates that biofilm formation induced by nickel is mediated by the transcriptional induction of the adhesive curli-encoding genes. Biofilm formation induced by nickel does not rely on efflux mechanisms using the RcnA pump, as these require a higher concentration of nickel to be activated. Our results demonstrate that the nickel-induced biofilm formation in E. coli is an adaptational process, occurring through a transcriptional effect on genes coding for adherence structures. The biofilm lifestyle is obviously a selective advantage in the presence of nickel, but the means by which it improves bacterial survival needs to be investigated. PMID:19168650

  4. Providing radiometric traceability for the calibration home base of DLR by PTB

    SciTech Connect

    Taubert, D. R.; Hollandt, J.; Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Hoepe, A.; Hauer, K.-O.; Gege, P.; Schwarzmaier, T.; Lenhard, K.; Baumgartner, A.

    2013-05-10

    A dedicated calibration technique was applied for the calibration of the spectral radiance transfer standard (RASTA) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), consisting of two independent but complementing calibration procedures to provide redundancy and smallest possible calibration uncertainties. Procedure I included two calibration steps: In a first step the optical radiation source of RASTA, an FEL lamp, was calibrated in terms of its spectral irradiance E{sub {lambda}}({lambda}) in the wavelength range from 350 nm to 2400 nm using the PTB Spectral Irradiance Calibration Equipment (SPICE), while in a second step the spectral radiance factor {beta}{sub 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign }({lambda}) of the RASTA reflection standard was calibrated in a 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign -viewing geometry in the wavelength range from 350 nm to 1700 nm at the robot-based gonioreflectometer facility of PTB. The achieved relative standard uncertainties (k= 1) range from 0.6 % to 3.2 % and 0.1 % to 0.6 % respectively. Procedure II was completely independent from procedure I and allowed to cover the entire spectral range of RASTA from 350 nm to 2500 nm. In the second procedure, the 0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign -viewing geometry spectral radiance L{sub {lambda},0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign }({lambda}) of RASTA was directly calibrated at the Spectral Radiance Comparator Facility (SRCF) of PTB. The relative uncertainties for this calibration procedure range from 0.8 % in the visible up to 7.5 % at 2500 nm (k= 1). In the overlapping spectral range of both calibration procedures the calculated spectral radiance L{sub {lambda},0 Degree-Sign :45 Degree-Sign ,calc}({lambda}) from procedure I is in good agreement with the direct measurement of procedure II, i.e. well within the combined expanded uncertainties (k= 2) of both procedures.

  5. Defective autophagy in vascular smooth muscle cells accelerates senescence and promotes neointima formation and atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grootaert, Mandy OJ; da Costa Martins, Paula A; Bitsch, Nicole; Pintelon, Isabel; De Meyer, Guido RY; Martinet, Wim; Schrijvers, Dorien M

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is triggered in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of diseased arterial vessels. However, the role of VSMC autophagy in cardiovascular disease is poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effect of defective autophagy on VSMC survival and phenotype and its significance in the development of postinjury neointima formation and atherosclerosis. Tissue-specific deletion of the essential autophagy gene Atg7 in murine VSMCs (atg7−/− VSMCs) caused accumulation of SQSTM1/p62 and accelerated the development of stress-induced premature senescence as shown by cellular and nuclear hypertrophy, CDKN2A-RB-mediated G1 proliferative arrest and senescence-associated GLB1 activity. Transfection of SQSTM1-encoding plasmid DNA in Atg7+/+ VSMCs induced similar features, suggesting that accumulation of SQSTM1 promotes VSMC senescence. Interestingly, atg7−/− VSMCs were resistant to oxidative stress-induced cell death as compared to controls. This effect was attributed to nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFE2L2 resulting in upregulation of several antioxidative enzymes. In vivo, defective VSMC autophagy led to upregulation of MMP9, TGFB and CXCL12 and promoted postinjury neointima formation and diet-induced atherogenesis. Lesions of VSMC-specific atg7 knockout mice were characterized by increased total collagen deposition, nuclear hypertrophy, CDKN2A upregulation, RB hypophosphorylation, and GLB1 activity, all features typical of cellular senescence. To conclude, autophagy is crucial for VSMC function, phenotype, and survival. Defective autophagy in VSMCs accelerates senescence and promotes ligation-induced neointima formation and diet-induced atherogenesis, implying that autophagy inhibition as therapeutic strategy in the treatment of neointimal stenosis and atherosclerosis would be unfavorable. Conversely, stimulation of autophagy could be a valuable new strategy in the treatment of arterial disease. PMID:26391655

  6. Benzothiazole Amphiphiles Promote the Formation of Dendritic Spines in Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cifelli, Jessica L; Dozier, Lara; Chung, Tim S; Patrick, Gentry N; Yang, Jerry

    2016-06-01

    The majority of excitatory synapses in the brain exist on dendritic spines. Accordingly, the regulation of dendritic spine density in the hippocampus is thought to play a central role in learning and memory. The development of novel methods to control spine density could, therefore, have important implications for treatment of a host of neurodegenerative and developmental cognitive disorders. Herein, we report the design and evaluation of a new class of benzothiazole amphiphiles that exhibit a dose-dependent response leading to an increase in dendritic spine density in primary hippocampal neurons. Cell exposure studies reveal that the increase in spine density can persist for days in the presence of these compounds, but returns to normal spine density levels within 24 h when the compounds are removed, demonstrating the capability to reversibly control spinogenic activity. Time-lapse imaging of dissociated hippocampal neuronal cultures shows that these compounds promote a net increase in spine density through the formation of new spines. Biochemical studies support that promotion of spine formation by these compounds is accompanied by Ras activation. These spinogenic molecules were also capable of inhibiting a suspected mechanism for dendritic spine loss induced by Alzheimer-related aggregated amyloid-β peptides in primary neurons. Evaluation of this new group of spinogenic agents reveals that they also exhibit relatively low toxicity at concentrations displaying activity. Collectively, these results suggest that small molecules that promote spine formation could be potentially useful for ameliorating cognitive deficiencies associated with spine loss in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, and may also find use as general cognitive enhancers. PMID:27022020

  7. The organization of RNA contacts by PTB for regulation of FAS splicing

    PubMed Central

    Mickleburgh, Ian; Kafasla, Panagiota; Cherny, Dmitry; Llorian, Miriam; Curry, Stephen; Jackson, Richard J.; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional steps of gene expression are regulated by RNA binding proteins. Major progress has been made in characterizing RNA-protein interactions, from high resolution structures to transcriptome-wide profiling. Due to the inherent technical challenges, less attention has been paid to the way in which proteins with multiple RNA binding domains engage with target RNAs. We have investigated how the four RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of Polypyrimidine tract binding (PTB) protein, a major splicing regulator, interact with FAS pre-mRNA under conditions in which PTB represses FAS exon 6 splicing. A combination of tethered hydroxyl radical probing, targeted inactivation of individual RRMs and single molecule analyses revealed an unequal division of labour between the four RRMs of PTB. RNA binding by RRM4 is the most important for function despite the low intrinsic binding specificity and the complete lack of effect of disrupting individual RRM4 contact points on the RNA. The ordered RRM3-4 di-domain packing provides an extended binding surface for RNA interacting at RRM4, via basic residues in the preceding linker. Our results illustrate how multiple alternative low-specificity binding configurations of RRM4 are consistent with repressor function as long as the overall ribonucleoprotein architecture provided by appropriate di-domain packing is maintained. PMID:24957602

  8. Chibby promotes ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during airway cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Cyge, Benjamin; Arashiro, Takeshi; Brechbuhl, Heather M; Chen, Xingwang; Siller, Saul S; Weiss, Matthew A; O'Connell, Christopher B; Love, Damon; Westlake, Christopher J; Reynolds, Susan D; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2014-10-13

    Airway multiciliated epithelial cells play crucial roles in the mucosal defense system, but their differentiation process remains poorly understood. Mice lacking the basal body component Chibby (Cby) exhibit impaired mucociliary transport caused by defective ciliogenesis, resulting in chronic airway infection. In this paper, using primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells, we show that Cby facilitates basal body docking to the apical cell membrane through proper formation of ciliary vesicles at the distal appendage during the early stages of ciliogenesis. Cby is recruited to the distal appendages of centrioles via physical interaction with the distal appendage protein CEP164. Cby then associates with the membrane trafficking machinery component Rabin8, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small guanosine triphosphatase Rab8, to promote recruitment of Rab8 and efficient assembly of ciliary vesicles. Thus, our study identifies Cby as a key regulator of ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during the differentiation of airway ciliated cells. PMID:25313408

  9. Antiphospholipid Antibodies Attenuate Endothelial Repair and Promote Neointima Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Victoria; Konaniah, Eddy S.; Lee, Wan‐Ru; Khadka, Sadiksha; Shen, Yu‐Min; Herz, Joachim; Salmon, Jane E.; Hui, David Y.; Shaul, Philip W.; Mineo, Chieko

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiphospholipid syndrome patients have antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) that promote thrombosis, and they have increased cardiovascular disease risk. Although the basis for the thrombosis has been well delineated, it is not known why antiphospholipid syndrome patients also have an increased prevalence of nonthrombotic vascular occlusion. The aims of this work were to determine if aPLs directly promote medial hypertrophy or neointima formation in mice and to identify the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Results Medial hypertrophy and neointima formation invoked by carotid artery endothelial denudation were evaluated in mice administered normal human IgG or aPLs. While aPLs had no effect on medial hypertrophy, they caused exaggerated neointima development. This was related to an aPL‐induced impairment in reendothelialization post denudation, and scratch assays in cell culture revealed that there are direct effects of aPLs on endothelium that retard cell migration. Further experiments showed that aPL antagonism of endothelial migration and repair is mediated by antibody recognition of β2‐glycoprotein I, apolipoprotein E receptor 2, and a decline in bioavailable NO. Consistent with these mechanisms, the adverse impacts of aPLs on reendothelialization and neointima formation were fully prevented by the NO donor molsidomine. Conclusions APLs blunt endothelial repair, and there is related aPL‐induced exaggeration in neointima formation after endothelial injury in mice. The initiating process entails NO deficiency mediated by β2‐glycoprotein I recognition by aPLs and apolipoprotein E receptor 2. The modulation of endothelial apolipoprotein E receptor 2 function or NO bioavailability may represent new interventions to prevent the nonthrombotic vascular occlusion and resulting cardiovascular disorders that afflict antiphospholipid syndrome patients. PMID:25315347

  10. Cisplatin upregulates mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase and peroxynitrite formation to promote renal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Michaela; Sola, Anna

    2009-01-15

    The mitochondria are a critical target for cisplatin-associated nephrotoxicity. Though nitric oxide formation has been implicated in the toxicity of cisplatin, this formation has not so far been related to a possible activation of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mNOS). We show here that the upregulation of oxide mNOS and peroxynitrite formation in cisplatin treatment are key events that influence the development of the harmful parameters described in cisplatin-associated kidney failure. We confirm this by isolating the mitochondrial fraction of the kidney and across different access routes such as the use of a specific inhibitor of neuronal NOS, L-NPA, a peroxynitrite scavenger, FeTMPyP, and a peroxynitrite donor, SIN-1. The in vitro studies corroborated the information obtained in the in vivo experiments. The administration of cisplatin reveals a clear upregulation in the transcription of neuronal NOS and an increase in the levels of nitrites in the mitochondrial fractions of the kidneys. The upregulated transcription directly affects the cytoskeleton structure and the apoptosis. The inhibition of neuronal NOS reduces the levels of nitrites, cell death, and cytoskeleton derangement. Peroxynitrite is involved in the mechanism promoting the NOS transcription. In addition, in controls SIN-1 imitates the effects of cisplatin. In summary, we demonstrate that upregulation of mNOS in cisplatin treatment is a key component in both the initiation and the spread of cisplatin-associated damage in the kidney. Furthermore, peroxynitrite formation is directly involved in this process.

  11. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter. PMID:26869357

  12. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter. PMID:26869357

  13. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-02-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter.

  14. Periostin promotes immunosuppressive premetastatic niche formation to facilitate breast tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Xiong, Shanshan; Mao, Yubin; Chen, Mimi; Ma, Xiaohong; Zhou, Xueliang; Ma, Zhenling; Liu, Fan; Huang, Zhengjie; Luo, Qi; Ouyang, Gaoliang

    2016-08-01

    Periostin (POSTN) is a limiting factor in the metastatic colonization of disseminated tumour cells. However, the role of POSTN in regulating the immunosuppressive function of immature myeloid cells in tumour metastasis has not been documented. Here, we demonstrate that POSTN promotes the pulmonary accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) during the early stage of breast tumour metastasis. Postn deletion decreases neutrophil and monocytic cell populations in the bone marrow of mice and suppresses the accumulation of MDSCs to premetastatic sites. We also found that POSTN-deficient MDSCs display reduced activation of ERK, AKT and STAT3 and that POSTN deficiency decreases the immunosuppressive functions of MDSCs during tumour progression. Moreover, the pro-metastatic role of POSTN is largely limited to ER-negative breast cancer patients. Lysyl oxidase contributes to POSTN-promoted premetastatic niche formation and tumour metastasis. Our findings indicate that POSTN is essential for immunosuppressive premetastatic niche formation in the lungs during breast tumour metastasis and is a potential target for the prevention and treatment of breast tumour metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27193093

  15. Ethylene promotes induction of aerenchyma formation and ethanolic fermentation in waterlogged roots of Dendranthema spp.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dongmei; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi; Jiang, Jiafu

    2013-07-01

    The role of ethylene in induction of aerenchyma formation and ethanolic fermentation in waterlogged roots of Dendranthema zawadskii and D. nankingense, two species that differ with respect to waterlogging tolerance, was examined. In the more tolerant D. zawadskii, but not in D. nankingense, ethylene accelerated programmed cell death and promoted formation of lysigenous aerenchyma, both of which were inhibited by treatment with the ethylene inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene. Waterlogged D. zawadskii roots generated a higher quantity of endogenous ethylene than did those of D. nankingense. In waterlogged D. zawadskii roots, transcription of the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) and pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) increased rapidly but transiently, whereas expression of these genes in D. nankingense increased gradually and over a longer period. In D. nankingense, waterlogging elevated both alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase activity, and the production of ethanol and acetaldehyde was increased in the presence of exogenous ethylene and inhibited by 1-methylcyclopropene. In D. zawadskii, in contrast, after a prolonged episode of waterlogging stress, exogenous supply of ethylene suppressed the production of ethanol and acetaldehyde, whereas exogenous 1-methylcyclopropene enhanced their production. In the more tolerant Dendranthema species, ethylene appeared to signal an acceleration of both waterlogging-induced programmed cell death and aerenchyma formation and to alleviate ethanolic fermentation, whereas in the more sensitive species ethylene activated fermentation and increased the release of ethanol and acetaldehyde, which are by-products probably responsible for the collapse of the waterlogging-damaged root. PMID:23645034

  16. The pluripotency factor NANOG promotes the formation of squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Palla, Adelaida R.; Piazzolla, Daniela; Alcazar, Noelia; Cañamero, Marta; Graña, Osvaldo; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Dominguez, Orlando; Dueñas, Marta; Paramio, Jesús M.; Serrano, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    NANOG is a key pluripotency factor in embryonic stem cells that is frequently expressed in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). However, a direct link between NANOG and SCCs remains to be established. Here, we show that inducible overexpression of NANOG in mouse skin epithelia favours the malignant conversion of skin papillomas induced by chemical carcinogenesis, leading to increased SCC formation. Gene expression analyses in pre-malignant skin indicate that NANOG induces genes associated to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Some of these genes are directly activated by NANOG, including EMT-associated genes Zeb1, Zeb2, Twist1, Prrx1 and miR-21. Finally, endogenous NANOG binds to the promoters of theses genes in human SCC cells and, moreover, NANOG induces EMT features in primary keratinocytes. These results provide in vivo evidence for the oncogenic role of NANOG in squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:25988972

  17. A pro-chelator triggered by hydrogen peroxide inhibits iron-promoted hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Pham, David M; Franz, Katherine J

    2006-09-27

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a new pro-chelating agent, isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide (BSIH), are presented. BSIH only weakly interacts with iron unless hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present to remove the boronic ester protecting group to reveal a phenol that is a key metal-binding group of tridentate salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH). BSIH prevents deoxyribose degradation caused by hydroxyl radicals that are generated from H2O2 and redox-active iron by sequestering Fe3+ and preventing iron-promoted hydroxyl radical formation. The rate-determining step for iron sequestration is conversion of BSIH to SIH, followed by rapid Fe3+ complexation. The pro-chelate approach of BSIH represents a promising strategy for chelating a specific pool of detrimental metal ions without disturbing healthy metal ion distribution. PMID:16984186

  18. Nitrogen-promoted formation of graphite-like aggregations in SiC during neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P. F.; Ruan, Y. F.; Huang, L.; Zhu, W.

    2012-03-15

    The undoped and nitrogen-doped SiC bulk crystals irradiated with two neutron fluences were investigated by using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy to analyze the effect of nitrogen impurity on irradiation damage. We found that the nitrogen impurity can promote the segregation of carbon atoms into graphite during heavy neutron irradiation, demonstrated by the presence of typical D and G graphite bands. Further experimental analysis indicated that the graphite-like aggregations uniformly distribute in SiC and possess much inferior thermal stability to crystalline graphite. The nucleation, namely generation of stable sp{sup 2} C=C configuration induced by nitrogen atoms, and growth during neutron irradiation can account for the formation of graphite-like aggregations.

  19. Gait, cost and time implications for changing from PTB to ICEX sockets.

    PubMed

    Datta, D; Harris, I; Heller, B; Howitt, J; Martin, R

    2004-08-01

    The ICEX system (Ossur, Iceland), allows a socket to be manufactured directly onto the stump and is thought to provide improved comfort due to better pressure distribution whilst being easier to fit and manufacture. The aims of this project were to a) compare gait performance by measuring several gait characteristics, b) compare production and fitting times, c) investigate financial implications and d) attempt to gauge the amputees' subjective opinions of socket comfort. A randomised, controlled trial was conducted on 27 trans-tibial amputees with an existing patellar tendon bearing (PTB) socket on the Endolite system (Chas A. Blatchford, UK). Twenty one (21) subjects completed the study. Of these, 10 in the control group received new PTB sockets while 11 in the experimental group received ICEX. Gait analysis wearing existing sockets was performed and kinetic data obtained from a force plate. This was repeated with the new sockets after a 6 week period of adjustment. Mann-Whitney tests were used in statistical evaluations with a significance level of 5%. Subjects were asked to score their prosthesis for comfort using the Socket Comfort Score (Hanspal et al., 2003) and the frequency of visits for socket adjustments over a three-month period post-delivery of the sockets was recorded. This study demonstrates no significant difference in any of the gait parameters measured. Though the time required to manufacture a PTB prosthesis was found to be considerably longer than the ICEX, the overall cost for producing the ICEX was significantly greater. Subjects showed only minor comfort preference for the ICEX design and there was no significant difference in the mean number of visits for socket adjustments. In view of the considerable additional cost of providing ICEX and the lack of evidence of improvement in any parameter tested, the routine provision of ICEX prostheses to unselected trans-tibial amputees cannot be recommended. PMID:15382805

  20. Monoallelic Loss of the Imprinted Gene Grb10 Promotes Tumor Formation in Irradiated Nf1+/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Huang, Brian; Braunstein, Steve; Firestone, Ari J.; Nakamura, Jean L.

    2015-01-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed from only one parental allele and heterozygous loss involving the expressed allele is sufficient to produce complete loss of protein expression. Genetic alterations are common in tumorigenesis but the role of imprinted genes in this process is not well understood. In earlier work we mutagenized mice heterozygous for the Neurofibromatosis I tumor suppressor gene (NF1) to model radiotherapy-associated second malignant neoplasms that arise in irradiated NF1 patients. Expression analysis of tumor cell lines established from our mouse models identified Grb10 expression as widely absent. Grb10 is an imprinted gene and polymorphism analysis of cell lines and primary tumors demonstrates that the expressed allele is commonly lost in diverse Nf1 mutant tumors arising in our mouse models. We performed functional studies to test whether Grb10 restoration or loss alter fundamental features of the tumor growth. Restoring Grb10 in Nf1 mutant tumors decreases proliferation, decreases soft agar colony formation and downregulates Ras signaling. Conversely, Grb10 silencing in untransformed mouse embryo fibroblasts significantly increased cell proliferation and increased Ras-GTP levels. Expression of a constitutively activated MEK rescued tumor cells from Grb10-mediated reduction in colony formation. These studies reveal that Grb10 loss can occur during in vivo tumorigenesis, with a functional consequence in untransformed primary cells. In tumors, Grb10 loss independently promotes Ras pathway hyperactivation, which promotes hyperproliferation, an early feature of tumor development. In the context of a robust Nf1 mutant mouse model of cancer this work identifies a novel role for an imprinted gene in tumorigenesis. PMID:26000738

  1. Autocrine netrin function inhibits glioma cell motility and promotes focal adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Jarjour, Andrew A; Durko, Margaret; Luk, Tamarah L; Marçal, Nathalie; Shekarabi, Masoud; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    Deregulation of mechanisms that control cell motility plays a key role in tumor progression by promoting tumor cell dissemination. Secreted netrins and their receptors, Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC), neogenin, and the UNC5 homologues, regulate cell and axon migration, cell adhesion, and tissue morphogenesis. Netrin and netrin receptor expression have previously been shown to be disrupted in invasive tumors, including glioblastoma. We determined that the human glioblastoma cell lines U87, U343, and U373 all express neogenin, UNC5 homologues, and netrin-1 or netrin-3, but only U87 cells express DCC. Using transfilter migration assays, we demonstrate DCC-dependent chemoattractant migration of U87 cells up a gradient of netrin-1. In contrast, U343 and U373 cells, which do not express DCC, were neither attracted nor repelled. Ectopic expression of DCC by U343 and U373 cells resulted in these cells becoming competent to respond to a gradient of netrin-1 as a chemoattractant, and also slowed their rate of spontaneous migration. Here, in addition to netrins' well-characterized chemotropic activity, we demonstrate an autocrine function for netrin-1 and netrin-3 in U87 and U373 cells that slows migration. We provide evidence that netrins promote the maturation of focal complexes, structures associated with cell movement, into focal adhesions. Consistent with this, netrin, DCC, and UNC5 homologues were associated with focal adhesions, but not focal complexes. Disrupting netrin or DCC function did not alter cell proliferation or survival. Our findings provide evidence that DCC can slow cell migration, and that neogenin and UNC5 homologues are not sufficient to substitute for DCC function in these cells. Furthermore, we identify a role for netrins as autocrine inhibitors of cell motility that promote focal adhesion formation. These findings suggest that disruption of netrin signalling may disable a mechanism that normally restrains inappropriate cell migration. PMID

  2. Superantigens Subvert the Neutrophil Response To Promote Abscess Formation and Enhance Staphylococcus aureus Survival In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Stacey X.; Gilmore, Kevin J.; Szabo, Peter A.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; Baroja, Miren L.; Haeryfar, S. M. Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile bacterial pathogen that produces T cell-activating toxins known as superantigens (SAgs). Although excessive immune activation by SAgs can induce a dysregulated cytokine storm as a component of what is known as toxic shock syndrome (TSS), the contribution of SAgs to the staphylococcal infection process is not well defined. Here, we evaluated the role of the bacterial superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in a bacteremia model using humanized transgenic mice expressing SAg-responsive HLA-DR4 molecules. Infection with S. aureus Newman induced SEA-dependent Vβ skewing of T cells and enhanced bacterial survival in the liver compared with infection by sea knockout strain. SEA-induced gamma interferon, interleukin-12, and chemokine responses resulted in increased infiltration of CD11b+ Ly6G+ neutrophils into the liver, promoting the formation of abscesses that contained large numbers of viable staphylococci. Hepatic abscesses occurred significantly more frequently in S. aureus Newman-infected livers than in livers infected with the Newman sea knockout strain, promoting the survival of S. aureus in vivo. This represents a novel mechanism during infection whereby S. aureus utilizes SAgs to form a specialized niche and manipulate the immune system. PMID:24914221

  3. Superantigens subvert the neutrophil response to promote abscess formation and enhance Staphylococcus aureus survival in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Stacey X; Gilmore, Kevin J; Szabo, Peter A; Zeppa, Joseph J; Baroja, Miren L; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2014-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile bacterial pathogen that produces T cell-activating toxins known as superantigens (SAgs). Although excessive immune activation by SAgs can induce a dysregulated cytokine storm as a component of what is known as toxic shock syndrome (TSS), the contribution of SAgs to the staphylococcal infection process is not well defined. Here, we evaluated the role of the bacterial superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in a bacteremia model using humanized transgenic mice expressing SAg-responsive HLA-DR4 molecules. Infection with S. aureus Newman induced SEA-dependent Vβ skewing of T cells and enhanced bacterial survival in the liver compared with infection by sea knockout strain. SEA-induced gamma interferon, interleukin-12, and chemokine responses resulted in increased infiltration of CD11b(+) Ly6G(+) neutrophils into the liver, promoting the formation of abscesses that contained large numbers of viable staphylococci. Hepatic abscesses occurred significantly more frequently in S. aureus Newman-infected livers than in livers infected with the Newman sea knockout strain, promoting the survival of S. aureus in vivo. This represents a novel mechanism during infection whereby S. aureus utilizes SAgs to form a specialized niche and manipulate the immune system. PMID:24914221

  4. Sympathetic stimulation facilitates thrombopoiesis by promoting megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shilei; Du, Changhong; Shen, Mingqiang; Zhao, Gaomei; Xu, Yang; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xinmiao; Li, Fengju; Zeng, Dongfeng; Chen, Fang; Wang, Song; Chen, Mo; Wang, Cheng; He, Ting; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Aiping; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping; Zhao, Jinghong; Wang, Junping

    2016-02-25

    The effect of sympathetic stimulation on thrombopoiesis is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that both continual noise and exhaustive exercise elevate peripheral platelet levels in normal and splenectomized mice, but not in dopamine β-hydroxylase-deficient (Dbh(-/-)) mice that lack norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Further investigation demonstrates that sympathetic stimulation via NE or EPI injection markedly promotes platelet recovery in mice with thrombocytopenia induced by 6.0 Gy of total-body irradiation and in mice that received bone marrow transplants after 10.0 Gy of lethal irradiation. Unfavorably, sympathetic stress-stimulated thrombopoiesis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by increasing both the amount and activity of platelets in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. In vitro studies reveal that both NE and EPI promote megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation (PPF) in addition to the expansion of CD34(+) cells, thereby facilitating platelet production. It is found that α2-adrenoceptor-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation is involved in NE- and EPI-induced megakaryocyte adhesion and migration, and PPF is regulated by ERK1/2 activation-mediated RhoA GTPase signaling. Our data deeply characterize the role of sympathetic stimulation in the regulation of thrombopoiesis and reevaluate its physiopathological implications. PMID:26644453

  5. Human Umbilical Tissue-Derived Cells Promote Synapse Formation and Neurite Outgrowth via Thrombospondin Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sehwon; Kim, Namsoo; Yin, Henry H.; Harris, Ian R.; Dejneka, Nadine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy demonstrates great potential for the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTCs) were previously shown to have protective and regenerative effects in animal models of stroke and retinal degeneration, but the underlying therapeutic mechanisms are unknown. Because synaptic dysfunction, synapse loss, degeneration of neuronal processes, and neuronal death are hallmarks of neurological diseases and retinal degenerations, we tested whether hUTCs contribute to tissue repair and regeneration by stimulating synapse formation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal survival. To do so, we used a purified rat retinal ganglion cell culture system and found that hUTCs secrete factors that strongly promote excitatory synaptic connectivity and enhance neuronal survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that hUTCs support neurite outgrowth under normal culture conditions and in the presence of the growth-inhibitory proteins chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, myelin basic protein, or Nogo-A (reticulon 4). Furthermore, through biochemical fractionation and pharmacology, we identified the major hUTC-secreted synaptogenic factors as the thrombospondin family proteins (TSPs), TSP1, TSP2, and TSP4. Silencing TSP expression in hUTCs, using small RNA interference, eliminated both the synaptogenic function of these cells and their ability to promote neurite outgrowth. However, the majority of the prosurvival functions of hUTC-conditioned media was spared after TSP knockdown, indicating that hUTCs secrete additional neurotrophic factors. Together, our findings demonstrate that hUTCs affect multiple aspects of neuronal health and connectivity through secreted factors, and each of these paracrine effects may individually contribute to the therapeutic function of these cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular

  6. Myeloid STAT3 promotes formation of colitis-associated colorectal cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pathria, Paulina; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Putz, Eva-Maria; Holcmann, Martin; Schlederer, Michaela; Grabner, Beatrice; Crncec, Ilija; Svinka, Jasmin; Musteanu, Monica; Hoffmann, Thomas; Filipits, Martin; Berger, Walter; Poli, Valeria; Kenner, Lukas; Bilban, Martin; Casanova, Emilio; Müller, Mathias; Strobl, Birgit; Bayer, Editha; Mohr, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika; Eferl, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells lacking STAT3 promote antitumor responses of NK and T cells but it is unknown if this crosstalk affects development of autochthonous tumors. We deleted STAT3 in murine myeloid cells (STAT3Δm) and examined the effect on the development of autochthonous colorectal cancers (CRCs). Formation of Azoxymethane/Dextransulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced CRCs was strongly suppressed in STAT3Δm mice. Gene expression profiling showed strong activation of T cells in the stroma of STAT3Δm CRCs. Moreover, STAT3Δm host mice were better able to control the growth of transplanted MC38 colorectal tumor cells which are known to be killed in a T cell-dependent manner. These data suggest that myeloid cells lacking STAT3 control formation of CRCs mainly via cross activation of T cells. Interestingly, the few CRCs that formed in STAT3Δm mice displayed enhanced stromalization but appeared normal in size indicating that they have acquired ways to escape enhanced tumor surveillance. We found that CRCs in STAT3Δm mice consistently activate STAT3 signaling which is implicated in immune evasion and might be a target to prevent tumor relapse. PMID:26137415

  7. Positive feedback regulation between IL10 and EGFR promotes lung cancer formation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Wang, Yi-Chang; Hung, Chia-Yang; Yu, Chun-Hui; Su, Wu-Chou; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2016-04-12

    The role of IL10 in the tumorigenesis of various cancer types is still controversial. Here, we found that increased IL10 levels are correlated with a poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. Moreover, IL10 levels were significantly increased in the lungs and serum of EGFRL858R- and Kras4bG12D-induced lung cancer mice, indicating that IL10 might facilitate lung cancer tumorigenesis. IL10 knockout in EGFRL858R and Kras4bG12D mice inhibited the development of lung tumors and decreased the levels of infiltrating M2 macrophages and tumor-promoting Treg lymphocytes. We also showed that EGF increases IL10 expression by enhancing IL10 mRNA stability, and IL10 subsequently activates JAK1/STAT3, Src, PI3K/Akt, and Erk signaling pathways. Interestingly, the IL10-induced recruitment of phosphorylated Src was critical for inducing EGFR through the activation of the JAK1/STAT3 pathway, suggesting that Src and JAK1 positively regulate each other to enhance STAT3 activity. Doxycycline-induced EGFRL858R mice treated with gefitinib and anti-IL10 antibodies exhibited poor tumor formation. In conclusion, IL10 and EGFR regulate each other through positive feedback, which leads to lung cancer formation. PMID:26956044

  8. Mechanisms of HsSAS-6 assembly promoting centriole formation in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Debora; Orpinell, Meritxell; Olivier, Nicolas; Wachsmuth, Malte; Mahen, Robert; Wyss, Romain; Hachet, Virginie; Ellenberg, Jan; Manley, Suliana; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    SAS-6 proteins are thought to impart the ninefold symmetry of centrioles, but the mechanisms by which their assembly occurs within cells remain elusive. In this paper, we provide evidence that the N-terminal, coiled-coil, and C-terminal domains of HsSAS-6 are each required for procentriole formation in human cells. Moreover, the coiled coil is necessary and sufficient to mediate HsSAS-6 centrosomal targeting. High-resolution imaging reveals that GFP-tagged HsSAS-6 variants localize in a torus around the base of the parental centriole before S phase, perhaps indicative of an initial loading platform. Moreover, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis demonstrates that HsSAS-6 is immobilized progressively at centrosomes during cell cycle progression. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and three-dimensional stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, we uncover that HsSAS-6 is present in the cytoplasm primarily as a homodimer and that its oligomerization into a ninefold symmetrical ring occurs at centrioles. Together, our findings lead us to propose a mechanism whereby HsSAS-6 homodimers are targeted to centrosomes where the local environment and high concentration of HsSAS-6 promote oligomerization, thus initiating procentriole formation. PMID:24590172

  9. Histone deacetylase degradation and MEF2 activation promote the formation of slow-twitch myofibers.

    PubMed

    Potthoff, Matthew J; Wu, Hai; Arnold, Michael A; Shelton, John M; Backs, Johannes; McAnally, John; Richardson, James A; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2007-09-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of heterogeneous myofibers with distinctive rates of contraction, metabolic properties, and susceptibility to fatigue. We show that class II histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins, which function as transcriptional repressors of the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factor, fail to accumulate in the soleus, a slow muscle, compared with fast muscles (e.g., white vastus lateralis). Accordingly, pharmacological blockade of proteasome function specifically increases expression of class II HDAC proteins in the soleus in vivo. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches in mice, we discovered that class II HDAC proteins suppress the formation of slow twitch, oxidative myofibers through the repression of MEF2 activity. Conversely, expression of a hyperactive form of MEF2 in skeletal muscle of transgenic mice promotes the formation of slow fibers and enhances running endurance, enabling mice to run almost twice the distance of WT littermates. Thus, the selective degradation of class II HDACs in slow skeletal muscle provides a mechanism for enhancing physical performance and resistance to fatigue by augmenting the transcriptional activity of MEF2. These findings provide what we believe are new insights into the molecular basis of skeletal muscle function and have important implications for possible therapeutic interventions into muscular diseases. PMID:17786239

  10. Histone deacetylase degradation andMEF2 activation promote the formation of slow-twitch myofibers

    PubMed Central

    Potthoff, Matthew J.; Wu, Hai; Arnold, Michael A.; Shelton, John M.; Backs, Johannes; McAnally, John; Richardson, James A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2007-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of heterogeneous myofibers with distinctive rates of contraction, metabolic properties, and susceptibility to fatigue. We show that class II histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins, which function as transcriptional repressors of the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factor, fail to accumulate in the soleus, a slow muscle, compared with fast muscles (e.g., white vastus lateralis). Accordingly, pharmacological blockade of proteasome function specifically increases expression of class II HDAC proteins in the soleus in vivo. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches in mice, we discovered that class II HDAC proteins suppress the formation of slow twitch, oxidative myofibers through the repression of MEF2 activity. Conversely, expression of a hyperactive form of MEF2 in skeletal muscle of transgenic mice promotes the formation of slow fibers and enhances running endurance, enabling mice to run almost twice the distance of WT littermates. Thus, the selective degradation of class II HDACs in slow skeletal muscle provides a mechanism for enhancing physical performance and resistance to fatigue by augmenting the transcriptional activity of MEF2. These findings provide what we believe are new insights into the molecular basis of skeletal muscle function and have important implications for possible therapeutic interventions into muscular diseases. PMID:17786239

  11. BipA Is Associated with Preventing Autoagglutination and Promoting Biofilm Formation in Bordetella holmesii

    PubMed Central

    Hiramatsu, Yukihiro; Saito, Momoko; Otsuka, Nao; Suzuki, Eri; Watanabe, Mineo; Shibayama, Keigo; Kamachi, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii causes both invasive and respiratory diseases in humans. Although the number of cases of pertussis-like respiratory illnesses due to B. holmesii infection has increased in the last decade worldwide, little is known about the virulence factors of the organism. Here, we analyzed a B. holmesii isolate that forms large aggregates and precipitates in suspension, and subsequently demonstrated that the autoagglutinating isolate is deficient in Bordetella intermediate protein A (BipA) and that this deletion is caused by a frame-shift mutation in the bipA gene. A BipA-deficient mutant generated by homologous recombination also exhibited the autoagglutination phenotype. Moreover, the BipA mutant adhered poorly to an abiotic surface and failed to form biofilms, as did two other B. holmesii autoagglutinating strains, ATCC 51541 and ATCC 700053, which exhibit transcriptional down-regulation of bipA gene expression, indicating that autoagglutination indirectly inhibits biofilm formation. In a mouse intranasal infection model, the BipA mutant showed significantly lower levels of initial lung colonization than did the parental strain (P < 0.01), suggesting that BipA might be a critical virulence factor in B. holmesii respiratory infection. Together, our findings suggest that BipA production plays an essential role in preventing autoagglutination and indirectly promoting biofilm formation by B. holmesii. PMID:27448237

  12. Sfp-type PPTase inactivation promotes bacterial biofilm formation and ability to enhance wheat drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Timmusk, Salme; Kim, Seong-Bin; Nevo, Eviatar; Abd El Daim, Islam; Ek, Bo; Bergquist, Jonas; Behers, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa is a common soil bacterium with broad range of practical applications. An important group of secondary metabolites in P. polymyxa are non-ribosomal peptide and polyketide derived metabolites (NRPs/PKs). Modular non-ribosomal peptide synthetases catalyze main steps in the biosynthesis of the complex secondary metabolites. Here we report on the inactivation of an A26 Sfp-type 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase (Sfp-type PPTase). The inactivation of the gene resulted in loss of NRPs/PKs production. In contrast to the former Bacillus spp. model the mutant strain compared to wild type showed greatly enhanced biofilm formation ability. A26Δsfp biofilm promotion is directly mediated by NRPs/PKs, as exogenous addition of the wild type metabolite extracts restores its biofilm formation level. Wheat inoculation with bacteria that had lost their Sfp-type PPTase gene resulted in two times higher plant survival and about three times increased biomass under severe drought stress compared to wild type. Challenges with P. polymyxa genetic manipulation are discussed. PMID:26052312

  13. Sfp-type PPTase inactivation promotes bacterial biofilm formation and ability to enhance wheat drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Timmusk, Salme; Kim, Seong-Bin; Nevo, Eviatar; Abd El Daim, Islam; Ek, Bo; Bergquist, Jonas; Behers, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa is a common soil bacterium with broad range of practical applications. An important group of secondary metabolites in P. polymyxa are non-ribosomal peptide and polyketide derived metabolites (NRPs/PKs). Modular non-ribosomal peptide synthetases catalyze main steps in the biosynthesis of the complex secondary metabolites. Here we report on the inactivation of an A26 Sfp-type 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase (Sfp-type PPTase). The inactivation of the gene resulted in loss of NRPs/PKs production. In contrast to the former Bacillus spp. model the mutant strain compared to wild type showed greatly enhanced biofilm formation ability. A26Δsfp biofilm promotion is directly mediated by NRPs/PKs, as exogenous addition of the wild type metabolite extracts restores its biofilm formation level. Wheat inoculation with bacteria that had lost their Sfp-type PPTase gene resulted in two times higher plant survival and about three times increased biomass under severe drought stress compared to wild type. Challenges with P. polymyxa genetic manipulation are discussed. PMID:26052312

  14. Positive feedback regulation between IL10 and EGFR promotes lung cancer formation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Wang, Yi-Chang; Hung, Chia-Yang; Yu, Chun-Hui; Su, Wu-Chou; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The role of IL10 in the tumorigenesis of various cancer types is still controversial. Here, we found that increased IL10 levels are correlated with a poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. Moreover, IL10 levels were significantly increased in the lungs and serum of EGFRL858R- and Kras4bG12D-induced lung cancer mice, indicating that IL10 might facilitate lung cancer tumorigenesis. IL10 knockout in EGFRL858R and Kras4bG12D mice inhibited the development of lung tumors and decreased the levels of infiltrating M2 macrophages and tumor-promoting Treg lymphocytes. We also showed that EGF increases IL10 expression by enhancing IL10 mRNA stability, and IL10 subsequently activates JAK1/STAT3, Src, PI3K/Akt, and Erk signaling pathways. Interestingly, the IL10-induced recruitment of phosphorylated Src was critical for inducing EGFR through the activation of the JAK1/STAT3 pathway, suggesting that Src and JAK1 positively regulate each other to enhance STAT3 activity. Doxycycline-induced EGFRL858R mice treated with gefitinib and anti-IL10 antibodies exhibited poor tumor formation. In conclusion, IL10 and EGFR regulate each other through positive feedback, which leads to lung cancer formation. PMID:26956044

  15. PROSTAGLANDIN E2 MODIFIES SMAD2 AND PROMOTES SMAD2-SMAD4 COMPLEX FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen; Chen, Chen; Sorokin, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    We report that PGE2 promotes Smad2-Smad4 complex formation and this phenomenon could be blocked by DIDS, an anion transporter inhibitor. Our data suggest that PGE2 had no effects on Smad2 phosphorylation, suggesting that PGE2-mediated Smad2-Smad4 complex formation is independent of TGF-β signaling and that PGE2 induced Smad2 modification which is different from TGF-β-mediated phosphorylation. We demonstrate that in primary human glomerular mesangial cells PGE2 caused modification of Smad2 as detected by Smad2N antibody, raised against a peptide near the N-terminus of Smad2. We hypothesize that Smad2 protein is post-translationaly modified by PGE2. Direct evidence of Smad2 modification by PGE2 was achieved by avidin pulldown assay which showed that endogenous Smad2 and recombinant Smad2 protein were attached by biotin-labeled PGE2. Taken together, our results provided evidence that post-translational modification of Smad2 could be a mechanism for the action of PGE2 in the pathogenesis of human pathologies. PMID:24613014

  16. Akt3 Deficiency in Macrophages Promotes Foam Cell Formation and Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liang; Biswas, Sudipta; Morton, Richard E.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hay, Nissim; Byzova, Tatiana; Febbraio, Maria; Podrez, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Summary Akt, a serine-threonine protein kinase, exists as three isoforms. The Akt signaling pathway controls multiple cellular functions in the cardiovascular system, and the atheroprotective endothelial cell dependent role of Akt1 has been recently demonstrated. The role of Akt3 isoform in cardiovascular pathophysiology is not known. We explored the role of Akt3 in atherosclerosis using mice with a genetic ablation of the Akt3 gene. Using hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice, we demonstrated a macrophage dependent, atheroprotective role for Akt3. In vitro experiments demonstrated differential subcellular localization of Akt1 and Akt3 in macrophages, and showed that Akt3 specifically inhibits macrophage cholesteryl ester accumulation and foam cell formation, a critical early event in atherogenesis. Mechanistically, Akt3 suppresses foam cell formation by reducing lipoprotein uptake and promoting ACAT-1 degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. These studies demonstrate the non-redundant atheroprotective role for Akt3 exerted via the previously unknown link between the Akt signaling pathway and cholesterol metabolism. PMID:22632897

  17. Detergent-Mediated Formation of β-Hematin: Heme Crystallization Promoted by Detergents Implicates Nanostructure Formation for Use as a Biological Mimic

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hemozoin is a unique biomineral that results from the sequestration of toxic free heme liberated as a consequence of hemoglobin degradation in the malaria parasite. Synthetic neutral lipid droplets (SNLDs) and phospholipids were previously shown to support the rapid formation of β-hematin, abiological hemozoin, under physiologically relevant pH and temperature, though the mechanism by which heme crystallization occurs remains unclear. Detergents are particularly interesting as a template because they are amphiphilic molecules that spontaneously organize into nanostructures and have been previously shown to mediate β-hematin formation. Here, 11 detergents were investigated to elucidate the physicochemical properties that best recapitulate crystal formation in the parasite. A strong correlation between the detergent’s molecular structure and the corresponding kinetics of β-hematin formation was observed, where higher molecular weight polar chains promoted faster reactions. The larger hydrophilic chains correlated to the detergent’s ability to rapidly sequester heme into the lipophilic core, allowing for crystal nucleation to occur. The data presented here suggest that detergent nanostructures promote β-hematin formation in a similar manner to SNLDs and phospholipids. Through understanding mediator properties that promote optimal crystal formation, we are able to establish an in vitro assay to probe this drug target pathway. PMID:27175104

  18. Vascular wall hypoxia promotes arterial thrombus formation via augmentation of vascular thrombogenicity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yunosuke; Yamashita, Atsushi; Iwakiri, Takashi; Sugita, Chihiro; Okuyama, Nozomi; Kitamura, Kazuo; Asada, Yujiro

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions represent a hypoxic milieu. However, the significance of this milieu in atherothrombosis has not been established. We aimed to assess the hypothesis that vascular wall hypoxia promotes arterial thrombus formation. We examined the relation between vascular wall hypoxia and arterial thrombus formation using a rabbit model in which arterial thrombosis was induced by 0.5 %-cholesterol diet and repeated balloon injury of femoral arteries. Vascular wall hypoxia was immunohistochemically detected by pimonidazole hydrochloride, a hypoxia marker. Rabbit neointima and THP-1 macrophages were cultured to analyse prothrombotic factor expression under hypoxic conditions (1 % O2). Prothrombotic factor expression and nuclear localisation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 were immunohistochemically assessed using human coronary atherectomy plaques. Hypoxic areas were localised in the macrophage-rich deep portion of rabbit neointima and positively correlated with the number of nuclei immunopositive for HIF-1α and NF-κB p65, and tissue factor (TF) expression. Immunopositive areas for glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and fibrin in thrombi were significantly correlated with hypoxic areas in arteries. TF and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression was increased in neointimal tissues and/or macrophages cultured under hypoxia, and both were suppressed by inhibitors of either HIF-1 or NF-κB. In human coronary plaques, the number of HIF-1α-immunopositive nuclei was positively correlated with that of NF-κB-immunopositive nuclei and TF-immunopositive and PAI-1-immunopositive area, and it was significantly higher in thrombotic plaques. Vascular wall hypoxia augments the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaque and thrombus formation on plaques via prothrombotic factor upregulation. PMID:25833755

  19. Degradation mechanism of a low band gap polymer PTB7 by oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    Recently, the PCE of OPVs is at the 10% mark by using donor materials having a low band gap, such as poly(4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophene-4,6-diyl) (PTB7) and its analogues. In spite of the significant PCE improvement, the lifetime issue still remains open problem. To solve these technical limitations fundamentally, the degradation mechanism should be understood. It can be revealed by investigating the electronic structures of polymers with controlled exposure of oxygen, moisture and light. In this study, ultraviolet, X-ray and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed with step-by-step exposure of controlled oxygen, moisture and light to investigate the degradation mechanism of each polymer film. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) were also performed to understand detailed degradation process. From the experimental results, we demonstrate that push-pull polymers are more sensitive to environmental conditions, compared with non-push-pull (conventional) polymers such as poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT). In addition, we show high photo-oxidation of PTB7 is originated from the structural reason.

  20. Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin Proteins and Flotillins Cooperate to Promote Uropod Formation in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Sibylla; Chen, Emily J. H.; Clarke, Fiona; Lyck, Ruth; Affentranger, Sarah; Burkhardt, Janis K.; Niggli, Verena

    2013-01-01

    T cell uropods are enriched in specific proteins including adhesion receptors such as P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), lipid raft-associated proteins such as flotillins and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins which associate with cholesterol-rich raft domains and anchor adhesion receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. Using dominant mutants and siRNA technology we have tested the interactions among these proteins and their role in shaping the T cell uropod. Expression of wild type (WT) ezrin-EGFP failed to affect the morphology of human T cells or chemokine-induced uropod recruitment of PSGL-1 and flotillin-1 and -2. In contrast, expression of constitutively active T567D ezrin-EGFP induced a motile, polarized phenotype in some of the transfected T cells, even in the absence of chemokine. These cells featured F-actin-rich ruffles in the front and uropod enrichment of PSGL-1 and flotillins. T567D ezrin-EGFP was itself strongly enriched in the rear of the polarized T cells. Uropod formation induced by T567D ezrin-EGFP was actin-dependent as it was attenuated by inhibition of Rho-kinase or myosin II, and abolished by disruption of actin filaments. While expression of constitutively active ezrin enhanced cell polarity, expression of a dominant-negative deletion mutant of ezrin, 1–310 ezrin-EGFP, markedly reduced uropod formation induced by the chemokine SDF-1, T cell front-tail polarity, and capping of PSGL-1 and flotillins. Transfection of T cells with WT or T567D ezrin did not affect chemokine-mediated chemotaxis whereas 1–310 ezrin significantly impaired spontaneous 2D migration and chemotaxis. siRNA-mediated downregulation of flotillins in murine T cells attenuated moesin capping and uropod formation, indicating that ERM proteins and flotillins cooperate in uropod formation. In summary, our results indicate that activated ERM proteins function together with flotillins to promote efficient chemotaxis of T cells by structuring the uropod of migrating T

  1. Using formative research to develop CHANGE!: a curriculum-based physical activity promoting intervention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low childhood physical activity levels are currently one of the most pressing public health concerns. Numerous school-based physical activity interventions have been conducted with varied success. Identifying effective child-based physical activity interventions are warranted. The purpose of this formative study was to elicit subjective views of children, their parents, and teachers about physical activity to inform the design of the CHANGE! (Children's Health, Activity, and Nutrition: Get Educated!) intervention programme. Methods Semi-structured mixed-gender interviews (group and individual) were conducted in 11 primary schools, stratified by socioeconomic status, with 60 children aged 9-10 years (24 boys, 36 girls), 33 parents (4 male, 29 female) and 10 teachers (4 male, 6 female). Questions for interviews were structured around the PRECEDE stage of the PRECEDE-PROCEDE model and addressed knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards physical activity, as well as views on barriers to participation. All data were transcribed verbatim. Pen profiles were constructed from the transcripts in a deductive manner using the Youth Physical Activity Promotion Model framework. The profiles represented analysis outcomes via a diagram of key emergent themes. Results Analyses revealed an understanding of the relationship between physical activity and health, although some children had limited understanding of what constitutes physical activity. Views elicited by children and parents were generally consistent. Fun, enjoyment and social support were important predictors of physical activity participation, though several barriers such as lack of parental support were identified across all group interviews. The perception of family invested time was positively linked to physical activity engagement. Conclusions Families have a powerful and important role in promoting health-enhancing behaviours. Involvement of parents and the whole family is a strategy that could be

  2. NMR Characterization of the Near Native and Unfolded States of the PTB Domain of Dok1: Alternate Conformations and Residual Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sebanti; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    Background Phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains are critically involved in cellular signaling and diseases. PTB domains are categorized into three distinct structural classes namely IRS-like, Shc-like and Dab-like. All PTB domains consist of a core pleckstrin homology (PH) domain with additional structural elements in Shc and Dab groups. The core PH fold of the PTB domain contains a seven stranded β-sheet and a long C-terminal helix. Principal Findings In this work, the PTB domain of Dok1 protein has been characterized, by use of NMR spectroscopy, in solutions containing sub-denaturing and denaturing concentrations of urea. We find that the Dok1 PTB domain displays, at sub-denaturing concentrations of urea, alternate conformational states for residues located in the C-terminal helix and in the β5 strand of the β-sheet region. The β5 strand of PTB domain has been found to be experiencing significant chemical shift perturbations in the presence of urea. Notably, many of these residues in the helix and in the β5 strand are also involved in ligand binding. Structural and dynamical analyses at 7 M urea showed that the PTB domain is unfolded with islands of motionally restricted regions in the polypeptide chain. Further, the C-terminal helix appears to be persisted in the unfolded state of the PTB domain. By contrast, residues encompassing β-sheets, loops, and the short N-terminal helix lack any preferred secondary structures. Moreover, these residues demonstrated an intimate contact with the denaturant. Significance This study implicates existence of alternate conformational states around the ligand binding pocket of the PTB domain either in the native or in the near native conditions. Further, the current study demonstrates that the C-terminal helical region of PTB domain may be considered as a potential site for the initiation of folding. PMID:24587391

  3. The effect of spin coating parameters on the performance of PTB7/PC71BM polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Li, Shu-guang; Zheng, Yi-fan; Yu, Jun-Sheng

    2014-09-01

    We fabricated the inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) with a structure of ITO/ZnO/PTB7:PC71BM/MoO3/Ag, and investigate the influence of spin coating on the device performance in this article. Through modifying the spin coating parameters, the high PSC performance could be obtained with VOC=0.769 (V), JSC=11.6 (mA/cm2), FF=58.8 % and PCE=5.26 %, respectively. The improvement of device performance was attributed to the enhanced absorption of active layer in the wavelength from 550 nm to 700 nm and the increased phase separation of PTB7:PC71BM.

  4. Glutamatergic synapse formation is promoted by α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Lozada, Adrian F; Wang, Xulong; Gounko, Natalia V; Massey, Kerri A; Duan, Jingjing; Liu, Zhaoping; Berg, Darwin K

    2012-05-30

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory transmitter in adult brain, acting through synapses on dendritic spines and shafts. Early in development, however, when glutamatergic synapses are only beginning to form, nicotinic cholinergic excitation is already widespread; it is mediated by acetylcholine activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) that generate waves of activity across brain regions. A major class of nAChRs contributing at this time is a species containing α7 subunits (α7-nAChRs). These receptors are highly permeable to calcium, influence a variety of calcium-dependent events, and are diversely distributed throughout the developing CNS. Here we show that α7-nAChRs unexpectedly promote formation of glutamatergic synapses during development. The dependence on α7-nAChRs becomes clear when comparing wild-type (WT) mice with mice constitutively lacking the α7-nAChR gene. Ultrastructural analysis, immunostaining, and patch-clamp recording all reveal synaptic deficits when α7-nAChR input is absent. Similarly, nicotinic activation of α7-nAChRs in WT organotypic culture, as well as cell culture, increases the number of glutamatergic synapses. RNA interference demonstrates that the α7-nAChRs must be expressed in the neuron being innervated for normal innervation to occur. Moreover, the deficits persist throughout the developmental period of major de novo synapse formation and are still fully apparent in the adult. GABAergic synapses, in contrast, are undiminished in number under such conditions. As a result, mice lacking α7-nAChRs have an altered balance in the excitatory/inhibitory input they receive. This ratio represents a fundamental feature of neural networks and shows for the first time that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic signaling plays a key role in network construction. PMID:22649244

  5. Promotion of experimental thrombus formation by the procoagulant activity of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berny-Lang, M. A.; Aslan, J. E.; Tormoen, G. W.; Patel, I. A.; Bock, P. E.; Gruber, A.; McCarty, O. J. T.

    2011-02-01

    The routine observation of tumor emboli in the peripheral blood of patients with carcinomas raises questions about the clinical relevance of these circulating tumor cells. Thrombosis is a common clinical manifestation of cancer, and circulating tumor cells may play a pathogenetic role in this process. The presence of coagulation-associated molecules on cancer cells has been described, but the mechanisms by which circulating tumor cells augment or alter coagulation remains unclear. In this study we utilized suspensions of a metastatic adenocarcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, and a non-metastatic breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, as models of circulating tumor cells to determine the thromobogenic activity of these blood-foreign cells. In human plasma, both metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and non-metastatic MCF-10A cells significantly enhanced clotting kinetics. The effect of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells on clotting times was cell number-dependent and inhibited by a neutralizing antibody to tissue factor (TF) as well as inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin. Using fluorescence microscopy, we found that both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells supported the binding of fluorescently labeled thrombin. Furthermore, in a model of thrombus formation under pressure-driven flow, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells significantly decreased the time to occlusion. Our findings indicate that the presence of breast epithelial cells in blood can stimulate coagulation in a TF-dependent manner, suggesting that tumor cells that enter the circulation may promote the formation of occlusive thrombi under shear flow conditions.

  6. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  7. Promotion of experimental thrombus formation by the procoagulant activity of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Berny-Lang, MA; Aslan, JE; Tormoen, GW; Patel, IA; Bock, PE; Gruber, A

    2011-01-01

    The routine observation of tumor emboli in the peripheral blood of patients with carcinomas raises questions about the clinical relevance of these circulating tumor cells. Thrombosis is a common clinical manifestation of cancer and circulating tumor cells may play a pathogenetic role in this process. The presence of coagulation-associated molecules on cancer cells has been described, but the mechanisms by which circulating tumor cells augment or alter coagulation remains unclear. In this study we utilized suspensions of a metastatic adenocarcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, and a non-metastatic breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, as models of circulating tumor cells to determine the thromobogenic activity of these blood-foreign cells. In human plasma, both metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and non-metastatic MCF-10A cells significantly enhanced clotting kinetics. The effect of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells on clotting times was cell number-dependent and inhibited by a neutralizing antibody to tissue factor (TF) as well as inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin. Using fluorescence microscopy, we found that both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells supported the binding of fluorescently-labeled thrombin. Furthermore, in a model of thrombus formation under pressure-driven flow, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells significantly decreased the time to occlusion. Our findings indicate that the presence of breast epithelial cells in blood can stimulate coagulation in a TF-dependent manner, suggesting that tumor cells that enter the circulation may promote the formation of occlusive thrombi under shear flow conditions. PMID:21301066

  8. Unfractionated Heparin Promotes Osteoclast Formation in Vitro by Inhibiting Osteoprotegerin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Binghan; Lu, Dan; Chen, Yuqing; Zhao, Minghui; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Heparin has been proven to enhance bone resorption and induce bone loss. Since osteoclasts play a pivotal role in bone resorption, the effect of heparin on osteoclastogenesis needs to be clarified. Since osteocytes are the key modulator during osteoclastogenesis, we evaluated heparin’s effect on osteoclastogenesis in vitro by co-culturing an osteocyte cell line (MLO-Y4) and pre-osteoclasts (RAW264.7). In this co-culture system, heparin enhanced osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption while having no influence on the production of RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand), M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor), and OPG (osteoprotegerin), which are three main regulatory factors derived from osteocytes. According to previous studies, heparin could bind specifically to OPG and inhibit its activity, so we hypothesized that this might be a possible mechanism of heparin activity. To test this hypothesis, osteoclastogenesis was induced using recombinant RANKL or MLO-Y4 supernatant. We found that heparin has no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis (contains no OPG). However, after incubation with OPG, the capacity of MLO-Y4 supernatant for supporting osteoclast formation was increased. This effect disappeared after OPG was neutralized and reappeared after OPG was replenished. These results strongly suggest that heparin promotes osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in vitro, at least partially, through inhibiting OPG activity. PMID:27110777

  9. SAMHD1 Inhibits LINE-1 Retrotransposition by Promoting Stress Granule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fengwen; Mei, Shan; Le Duff, Yann; Yin, Lijuan; Pang, Xiaojing; Cen, Shan; Jin, Qi; Liang, Chen; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    The SAM domain and HD domain containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) inhibits retroviruses, DNA viruses and long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1). Given that in dividing cells, SAMHD1 loses its antiviral function yet still potently restricts LINE-1, we propose that, instead of blocking viral DNA synthesis by virtue of its dNTP triphosphohydrolase activity, SAMHD1 may exploit a different mechanism to control LINE-1. Here, we report a new activity of SAMHD1 in promoting cellular stress granule assembly, which correlates with increased phosphorylation of eIF2α and diminished eIF4A/eIF4G interaction. This function of SAMHD1 enhances sequestration of LINE-1 RNP in stress granules and consequent blockade to LINE-1 retrotransposition. In support of this new mechanism of action, depletion of stress granule marker proteins G3BP1 or TIA1 abrogates stress granule formation and overcomes SAMHD1 inhibition of LINE-1. Together, these data reveal a new mechanism for SAMHD1 to control LINE-1 by activating cellular stress granule pathway. PMID:26134849

  10. Hedgehog induces formation of PKA-Smoothened complexes to promote Smoothened phosphorylation and pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Ma, Guoqiang; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is a secreted glycoprotein that binds its receptor Patched to activate the G protein-coupled receptor-like protein Smoothened (Smo). In Drosophila, protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates and activates Smo in cells stimulated with Hh. In unstimulated cells, PKA phosphorylates and inhibits the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci). Here, we found that in cells exposed to Hh, the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc) bound to the juxtamembrane region of the C terminus of Smo. PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Smo further enhanced its association with PKAc to form stable kinase-substrate complexes that promoted the PKA-mediated trans-phosphorylation of Smo dimers. We identified multiple basic residues in the C-terminus of Smo that were required for interaction with PKAc, Smo phosphorylation, and Hh pathway activation. Hh induced a switch from the association of PKAc with a cytosolic complex of Ci and the kinesin-like protein Costal2 (Cos2) to a membrane-bound Smo-Cos2 complex. Thus, our study uncovers a previously uncharacterized mechanism for regulation of PKA activity and demonstrates that the signal-regulated formation of kinase-substrate complexes plays a central role in Hh signal transduction. PMID:24985345

  11. Cathodes enhance Corynebacterium glutamicum growth with nitrate and promote acetate and formate production.

    PubMed

    Xafenias, Nikolaos; Kmezik, Cathleen; Mapelli, Valeria

    2016-09-01

    The industrially important Corynebacterium glutamicum can only incompletely reduce nitrate into nitrite which then accumulates and inhibits growth. Herein we report that cathodes can resolve this problem and enhance glucose fermentation and growth by promoting nitrite reduction. Cell growth was inhibited at relatively high potentials but was significant when potentials were more reductive (-1.20V with anthraquinone-2-sulfonate as redox mediator or -1.25V vs. Ag/AgCl). Under these conditions, glucose was consumed up to 6 times faster and acetate was produced at up to 11 times higher yields (up to 1.1mol/mol-glucose). Acetate concentrations are the highest reported so far for C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions, reaching values up to 5.3±0.3g/L. Herein we also demonstrate for the first time formate production (up to 3.4±0.3g/L) by C. glutamicum under strongly reducing conditions, and we attribute this to a possible mechanism of CO2 bioreduction that was electrochemically triggered. PMID:27235972

  12. A Salmonella Toxin Promotes Persister Formation through Acetylation of tRNA.

    PubMed

    Cheverton, Angela M; Gollan, Bridget; Przydacz, Michal; Wong, Chi T; Mylona, Anastasia; Hare, Stephen A; Helaine, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    The recalcitrance of many bacterial infections to antibiotic treatment is thought to be due to the presence of persisters that are non-growing, antibiotic-insensitive cells. Eventually, persisters resume growth, accounting for relapses of infection. Salmonella is an important pathogen that causes disease through its ability to survive inside macrophages. After macrophage phagocytosis, a significant proportion of the Salmonella population forms non-growing persisters through the action of toxin-antitoxin modules. Here we reveal that one such toxin, TacT, is an acetyltransferase that blocks the primary amine group of amino acids on charged tRNA molecules, thereby inhibiting translation and promoting persister formation. Furthermore, we report the crystal structure of TacT and note unique structural features, including two positively charged surface patches that are essential for toxicity. Finally, we identify a detoxifying mechanism in Salmonella wherein peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase counteracts TacT-dependent growth arrest, explaining how bacterial persisters can resume growth. PMID:27264868

  13. Differential survival of solitary and aggregated bacterial cells promotes aggregate formation on leaf surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Monier, J.-M.; Lindow, S. E.

    2003-01-01

    The survival of individual Pseudomonas syringae cells was determined on bean leaf surfaces maintained under humid conditions or periodically exposed to desiccation stress. Cells of P. syringae strain B728a harboring a GFP marker gene were visualized by epifluorescence microscopy, either directly in situ or after recovery from leaves, and dead cells were identified as those that were stained with propidium iodide in such populations. Under moist, conducive conditions on plants, the proportion of total live cells was always high, irrespective of their aggregated state. In contrast, the proportion of the total cells that remained alive on leaves that were periodically exposed to desiccation stress decreased through time and was only ≈15% after 5 days. However, the fraction of cells in large aggregates that were alive on such plants in both condition was much higher than more solitary cells. Immediately after inoculation, cells were randomly distributed over the leaf surface and no aggregates were observed. However, a very aggregated pattern of colonization was apparent within 7 days, and >90% of the living cells were located in aggregates of 100 cells or more. Our results strongly suggest that, although conducive conditions favor aggregate formation, such cells are much more capable of tolerating environmental stresses, and the preferential survival of cells in aggregates promotes a highly clustered spatial distribution of bacteria on leaf surfaces. PMID:14665692

  14. WOX2 and STIMPY-LIKE/WOX8 promote cotyledon boundary formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lie, Catharine; Kelsom, Corey; Wu, Xuelin

    2012-11-01

    One of the key events in dicot plant embryogenesis is the emergence of the two cotyledon primordia, which marks the transition from radial symmetry to bilateral symmetry. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the three CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON (CUC) genes are responsible for determining the boundary region between the cotyledons. However, the mechanisms controlling their transcription activation are not well understood. Previous studies found that several WOX family homeobox transcription factors are involved in embryo apical patterning and cotyledon development. Here we show that WOX2 and STIMPY-LIKE (STPL/WOX8) act redundantly to differentially regulate the expression of the CUC genes in promoting the establishment of the cotyledon boundary, without affecting the primary shoot meristem. Loss of both WOX2 and STPL results in reduced CUC2 and CUC3 expression in one side of the embryo, but an expansion of the CUC1 domain. Furthermore, we found that STPL is expressed in the embryo proper, and its activation is enhanced by the removal of WOX2, providing an explanation for the functional redundancy between WOX2 and STPL. Additional evidence also showed that WOX2 and STPL function independently in regulating different aspects of local auxin gradient formation during early embryogenesis. PMID:22827849

  15. Unfractionated Heparin Promotes Osteoclast Formation in Vitro by Inhibiting Osteoprotegerin Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Binghan; Lu, Dan; Chen, Yuqing; Zhao, Minghui; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Heparin has been proven to enhance bone resorption and induce bone loss. Since osteoclasts play a pivotal role in bone resorption, the effect of heparin on osteoclastogenesis needs to be clarified. Since osteocytes are the key modulator during osteoclastogenesis, we evaluated heparin's effect on osteoclastogenesis in vitro by co-culturing an osteocyte cell line (MLO-Y4) and pre-osteoclasts (RAW264.7). In this co-culture system, heparin enhanced osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption while having no influence on the production of RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand), M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor), and OPG (osteoprotegerin), which are three main regulatory factors derived from osteocytes. According to previous studies, heparin could bind specifically to OPG and inhibit its activity, so we hypothesized that this might be a possible mechanism of heparin activity. To test this hypothesis, osteoclastogenesis was induced using recombinant RANKL or MLO-Y4 supernatant. We found that heparin has no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis (contains no OPG). However, after incubation with OPG, the capacity of MLO-Y4 supernatant for supporting osteoclast formation was increased. This effect disappeared after OPG was neutralized and reappeared after OPG was replenished. These results strongly suggest that heparin promotes osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in vitro, at least partially, through inhibiting OPG activity. PMID:27110777

  16. Modulation of reactivity in the cavity of liposomes promotes the formation of peptide bonds.

    PubMed

    Grochmal, Anna; Prout, Luba; Makin-Taylor, Robert; Prohens, Rafel; Tomas, Salvador

    2015-09-30

    In living cells, reactions take place in membrane-bound compartments, often in response to changes in the environment. Learning how the reactions are influenced by this compartmentalization will help us gain an optimal understanding of living organisms at the molecular level and, at the same time, will offer vital clues on the behavior of simple compartmentalized systems, such as prebiotic precursors of cells and cell-inspired artificial systems. In this work we show that a reactive building block (an activated amino acid derivative) trapped in the cavity of a liposome is protected against hydrolysis and reacts nearly quantitatively with another building block, which is membrane-permeable and free in solution, to form the dipeptide. By contrast, when the activated amino acid is found outside the liposome, hydrolysis is the prevalent reaction, showing that the cavity of the liposomes promotes the formation of peptide bonds. We attribute this result to the large lipid concentration in small compartments from the point of view of a membrane-impermeable molecule. Based on this result, we show how the outcome of the reaction can be predicted as a function of the size of the compartment. The implications of these results on the behavior of biomolecules in cell compartments, abiogenesis, and the design of artificial cell-inspired systems are considered. PMID:26356087

  17. A Formative Experiment to Promote Disciplinary Literacy in Middle-School and Pre-Service Teacher Education through Blogging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Jamie R.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes a formative experiment that investigated how strategy instruction paired with collaborative blogging could promote disciplinary literacy among eighth-grade students in a social studies classroom and among pre-service teachers in a social studies methods course. Qualitative methods were utilized to collect and analyze…

  18. Temperature-dependence of open-complex formation at two Escherichia coli promoters with extended -10 sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, H D; Belyaeva, T A; Busby, S J; Minchin, S D

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the formation of open complexes between purified RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli and DNA fragments carrying the galP1 promoter, a promoter with an extended -10 region. Unusually, these complexes are formed readily at low temperatures. This low-temperature opening is unaffected by deletions of either upstream or downstream promoter sequences. We conclude that low-temperature open-complex formation is due to specific base sequences in and just upstream of the extended -10 region. In contrast, open complexes are not formed at low temperatures with DNA fragments carrying the E. coli cysG promoter, which also has an extended -10 region. This demonstrates that an extended -10 sequence alone is not sufficient for low-temperature opening. Additionally, we report the temperature dependence of a hybrid galP1-cysG promoter, the related galP2 and galP3 promoters and a derivative of galP1 with an improved -10 hexamer sequence. PMID:8694780

  19. Final results of bilateral comparison between NIST and PTB for flows of high pressure natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickan, B.; Toebben, H.; Johnson, A.; Kegel, T.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 NIST developed a US national flow standard to provide traceability for flow meters used for custody transfer of pipeline quality natural gas. NIST disseminates the SI unit of flow by calibrating a customer flow meter against a parallel array of turbine meter working standards, which in turn are traceable to a pressure-volume-temperature-time (PVTt) primary standard. The calibration flow range extends from 0.125 actual m3/s to 9 actual m3/s with an expanded uncertainty as low as 0.22% at high flows, and increasing to almost 0.40% at the lowest flows. Details regarding the traceability chain and uncertainty analysis are documented in prior publications. The current manuscript verifies NIST's calibration uncertainty via a bilateral comparison with the German National Metrology Institute PTB. The results of the bilateral are linked to the 2006 key comparison results between three EURAMET national metrology institutes (i.e., PTB, VSL and LNE). Linkage is accomplished in spite of using a different transfer standard in the bilateral versus the key comparison. A mathematical proof is included that demonstrates that the relative difference between a laboratory's measured flow and the key comparison reference value is independent of the transfer package for most flow measurement applications. The bilateral results demonstrate that NIST's natural gas flow measurements are within their specified uncertainties and are equivalent to those of the EURAMET National Metrology Institutes. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Precise time and frequency intercomparison between NPL, India and PTB, Federal Republic of Germany via satellite symphonie-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, B. S.; Banerjee, P.; Sood, P. C.; Saxena, M.; Kumar, N.; Suri, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    A time and frequency intercomparison experiment conducted using Earth stations in New Delhi, India and Raisting, FRG is described. The NPL clock was placed at New Delhi Earth Station and the Raisting Clock was calibrated with PTB/Primary standard via LORAN-C and travelling clocks. The random uncertainity of time comparisons, represented by two sample Allan Variance sigma (30 seconds), was less than 10 nanoseconds. The relative frequency difference between the NPL and Raisting Clocks, SNPL, RAIS, as measured over the 44 days period was found to be -15.7 x 10 to the -13th power. The relative frequency difference between PTB Primary Standard and Raisting Clock, SPTB, RAIS, during this period, was measured to be -22.8 x 10 to the -13th power. The relative frequency difference between NPL clock and PTB Primary Standard, SNPL, PTB, thus, is +7.1 x 10 to the -13th power. The clock rate (UTC, India) of +7.1 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the -13th power, agrees well with that obtained via VLF phase measurements over one year period and with USNO travelling clock time comparisons made in September, 1980.

  1. Overexpression of AtPTPA in Arabidopsis increases protein phosphatase 2A activity by promoting holoenzyme formation and ABA negatively affects holoenzyme formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Zhu, Xunlu; Shen, Guoxin; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    AtPTPA is a critical regulator for the holoenzyme assembling of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in Arabidopsis. Characterization of AtPTPA improves our understanding of the function and regulation of PP2A in eukaryotes. Further analysis of AtPTPA-overexpressing plants indicates that AtPTPA increases PP2A activity by promoting PP2A's AC dimer formation, thereby holoenzyme assembling. Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) reduces PP2A enzyme activity by negatively affects PP2A's AC dimer formation. Therefore, AtPTPA is a positive factor that promotes PP2A holoenzyme assembly, and ABA is a negative factor that prevents PP2A holoenzyme assembly. PMID:26633567

  2. Intact fetal ovarian cord formation promotes mouse oocyte survival and development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Female reproductive potential, or the ability to propagate life, is limited in mammals with the majority of oocytes lost before birth. In mice, surviving perinatal oocytes are enclosed in ovarian follicles for subsequent oocyte development and function in the adult. Before birth, fetal germ cells of both sexes develop in clusters, or germline cysts, in the undifferentiated gonad. Upon sex determination of the fetal gonad, germ cell cysts become organized into testicular or ovarian cord-like structures and begin to interact with gonadal somatic cells. Although germline cysts and testicular cords are required for spermatogenesis, the role of cyst and ovarian cord formation in mammalian oocyte development and female fertility has not been determined. Results Here, we examine whether intact fetal ovarian germ and somatic cell cord structures are required for oocyte development using mouse gonad re-aggregation and transplantation to disrupt gonadal organization. We observed that germ cells from disrupted female gonad prior to embryonic day e13.5 completed prophase I of meiosis but did not survive following transplantation. Furthermore, re-aggregated ovaries from e13.5 to e15.5 developed with a reduced number of oocytes. Oocyte loss occurred before follicle formation and was associated with an absence of ovarian cord structure and ovary disorganization. However, disrupted ovaries from e16.5 or later were resistant to the re-aggregation impairment and supported robust oocyte survival and development in follicles. Conclusions Thus, we demonstrate a critical window of oocyte development from e13.5 to e16.5 in the intact fetal mouse ovary, corresponding to the establishment of ovarian cord structure, which promotes oocyte interaction with neighboring ovarian somatic granulosa cells before birth and imparts oocytes with competence to survive and develop in follicles. Because germline cyst and ovarian cord structures are conserved in the human fetal ovary, the

  3. Heat and Radiofrequency Plasma Glow Discharge Pretreatment of a Titanium Alloy Promote Bone Formation and Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Daniel E.; Rapuano, Bruce E.; Vyas, Parth; Lane, Joseph M.; Meyers, Kathleen; Wright, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic and dental implants manifest increased failure rates when inserted into low density bone. We determined whether chemical pretreatments of a titanium alloy implant material stimulated new bone formation to increase osseointegration in vivo in trabecular bone using a rat model. Titanium alloy rods were untreated or pretreated with heat (600°C) or radiofrequency plasma glow discharge (RFGD). The rods were then coated with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (1 nM) or left uncoated and surgically implanted into the rat femoral medullary cavity. Animals were euthanized 3 or 6 weeks later, and femurs were removed for analysis. The number of trabeculae in contact with the implant surface, surface contact between trabeculae and the implant, and the length and area of bone attached to the implant were measured by histomorphometry. Implant shear strength was measured by a pull-out test. Both pretreatments and fibronectin enhanced the number of trabeculae bonding with the implant and trabeculae-to-implant surface contact, with greater effects of fibronectin observed with pretreated compared to untreated implants. RFGD pretreatment modestly increased implant shear strength, which was highly correlated (r2 = 0.87 – 0.99) with measures of trabecular bonding for untreated and RFGD-pretreated implants. In contrast, heat pretreatment increased shear strength 3 to 5-fold for both uncoated and fibronectin-coated implants at 3 and 6 weeks, suggesting a more rapid increase in implant-femur bonding compared to the other groups. In summary, our findings suggest that the heat and RFGD pretreatments can promote the osseointegration of a titanium alloy implant material. PMID:23649564

  4. Anti-ulcer drugs promote IgE formation toward dietary antigens in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Untersmayr, Eva; Bakos, Noémi; Schöll, Isabella; Kundi, Michael; Roth-Walter, Franziska; Szalai, Krisztina; Riemer, Angelika B; Ankersmit, Hendrik J; Scheiner, Otto; Boltz-Nitulescu, George; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2005-04-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that anti-ulcer drugs, such as H2-receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors, promote the development of immediate type food allergy toward digestion-labile proteins in mice. The aim of this study was to examine the allergological relevance of these findings in humans. In an observational cohort study, we screened 152 adult patients from a gastroenterological outpatient clinic with negative case histories for atopy or allergy, who were medicated with H2-receptor blockers or proton pump inhibitors for 3 months. IgE reactivities to food allergens before and after 3 months of anti-acid treatment were compared serologically. Ten percent of the patients showed a boost of preexisting IgE antibodies and 15% de novo IgE formation toward numerous digestion-labile dietary compounds, like milk, potato, celery, carrots, apple, orange, wheat, and rye flour. Thus, the relative risk to develop food-specific IgE after anti-acid therapy was 10.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.44-76.48). The long-term effect was evaluated 5 months after therapy. Food-specific IgE could still be measured in 6% of the patients, as well as significantly elevated serum concentrations of ST2, a Th2-specific marker. An unspecific boost during the pollen season could be excluded, as 50 untreated control patients revealed no changes in their IgE pattern. In line with our previous animal experiments, our data strongly suggest that anti-ulcer treatment primes the development of IgE toward dietary compounds in long-term acid-suppressed patients. PMID:15671152

  5. Study on the Promotion of Bacterial Biofilm Formation by a Salmonella Conjugative Plasmid and the Underlying Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Li; Zhou, Min; You, Lixiang; Zhao, Qing; Li, Yuanyuan; Niu, Hua; Wu, Shuyan; Huang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the pRST98 plasmid, originally isolated from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), on biofilm (BF) formation, we carried out in vitro experiments using S. Typhi, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). We further explored the effects of pRST98 in vivo by establishing two animal models, a tumor-bearing mouse model and a mouse urethral catheter model. Moreover, we examined the relationship between the quorum-sensing (QS) system and pRST98-mediated BF formation. These studies showed that pRST98 enhanced BF formation in different bacteria in vitro. In both animal models, pRST98 promoted BF formation and caused more severe pathological changes. It was previously reported that Salmonella senses exogenous N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) through the regulatory protein SdiA and regulates the expression of genes including the virulence gene rck, which is located on the virulence plasmid of some serotypes of Salmonella. In this study, we confirmed the locus of the rck gene on pRST98 and found that AHLs increased rck expression in pRST98-carrying strains, thereby enhancing bacterial adherence, serum resistance and bacterial BF formation. In conclusion, the Salmonella conjugative plasmid pRST98 promotes bacterial BF formation both in vitro and in vivo, and the mechanism may relate to the AHL-SdiA-Rck signaling pathway. PMID:25299072

  6. Visible-light-promoted iminyl radical formation from vinyl azides: synthesis of 6-(fluoro)alkylated phenanthridines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyang; Yu, Shouyun

    2016-09-18

    An efficient strategy assisted by visible-light-promoted iminyl radical formation has been developed for the synthesis of 6-(fluoro)alkylated phenanthridine derivatives. In the reactions, addition of alkyl and trifluoromethyl radicals onto vinyl azides gives iminyl radicals, which then undergo intramolecular homolytic aromatic substitution leading to phenanthridines. These reactions can be carried out under mild conditions with high chemical yields and broad substrate scope. PMID:27530901

  7. Requirement of kinesin-mediated membrane transport of WAVE2 along microtubules for lamellipodia formation promoted by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Suzuki, Katsuo

    2008-07-01

    Lamellipodia formation necessary for epithelial cell migration and invasion is accomplished by rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton at the leading edge through membrane transport of WAVE2. However, how WAVE2 is transported to the cell periphery where lamellipodia are formed remains to be established. We report here that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promoted lamellipodia formation and intracellular transport of WAVE2 to the cell periphery, depending on Rac1 activity, in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Immunoblot analyses indicating the coimmunoprecipitation of WAVE2 with kinesin heavy chain KIF5B, one of the motor proteins, and IQGAP1 suggest that KIF5B and IQGAP1 formed a complex with WAVE2 in serum-starved cells and increased in their amount after HGF stimulation. Both downregulation of KIF5B by the small interfering RNA and depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole abrogated the HGF-induced lamellipodia formation and WAVE2 transport. Therefore, we propose here that the promotion of lamellipodia formation by HGF in MDA-MB-231 cells is Rac1-dependent and requires KIF5B-mediated transport of WAVE2 and IQGAP1 to the cell periphery along microtubules. PMID:18514191

  8. Acute tissue injury activates satellite cells and promotes sarcoma formation via the HGF/c-MET signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Van Mater, David; Añó, Leonor; Blum, Jordan M.; Webster, Micah T.; Huang, WeiQiao; Williams, Nerissa; Ma, Yan; Cardona, Diana M.; Fan, Chen-Min; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Some patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) report a history of injury at the site of their tumor. While this phenomenon is widely reported, there are relatively few experimental systems that have directly assessed the role of injury in sarcoma formation. We recently described a mouse model of STS whereby p53 is deleted and oncogenic Kras is activated in muscle satellite cells via a Pax7CreER driver following intraperitoneal injection with tamoxifen. Here, we report that after systemic injection of tamoxifen, the vast majority of Pax7-expressing cells remain quiescent despite mutation of p53 and Kras. The fate of these muscle progenitors is dramatically altered by tissue injury, which leads to faster kinetics of sarcoma formation. In adult muscle, quiescent satellite cells will transition into an active state in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). We show that modulating satellite cell quiescence via intramuscular (IM) injection of HGF increases the penetrance of sarcoma formation at the site of injection, which is dependent on its cognate receptor c-MET. Unexpectedly, the tumor promoting effect of tissue injury also requires c-Met. These results reveal a mechanism by which HGF/c-MET signaling promotes tumor formation after tissue injury in a mouse model of primary STS, and they may explain why some patients develop a STS at the site of injury. PMID:25503558

  9. Response Gene to Complement 32 Promotes Vascular Lesion Formation through Stimulation of Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Ning; Shi, Ning; Xie, Wei-bing; Guo, Xia; Chen, Shi-You

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study are to determine the role of response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) in vascular lesion formation after experimental angioplasty and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Results Using a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model, we documented for the first time that neointima formation was closely associated with a significantly increased expression of RGC-32 protein. shRNA Knockdown of RGC-32 via adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene delivery dramatically inhibited the lesion formation by 62% as compared to control groups 14 days after injury. Conversely, RGC-32 overexpression significantly promoted the neointima formation by 33%. Gain and loss of function studies in primary culture of rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) indicated that RGC-32 is essential for both the proliferation and migration of RASMCs. RGC-32 induced RASMC proliferation by enhancing p34CDC2 activity. RGC-32 stimulated the migration of RASMC via inducing focal adhesion contact and stress fiber formation. These effects were caused by the enhanced ROKα activity due to RGC-32-induced downregulation of Rad GTPase. Conclusions RGC-32 plays an important role in vascular lesion formation following vascular injury. Increased RGC-32 expression in vascular injury appears to be a novel mechanism underlying the migration and proliferation of vascular SMCs. Therefore, targeting RGC-32 is a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of vascular remodeling in proliferative vascular diseases. PMID:21636805

  10. Initiation and promotion in cancer formation: the importance of studies on intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Potter, V R

    1980-01-01

    Three major theories of cancer--somatic mutation, virus causation, and faulty differentiation--are proposed to involve alterations in DNA structure. Each results finally in terms of failures in the normal intercellular communication that involves feedback between differentiated cells acting on less differentiated cells still capable of proliferation. The historical background of the latter idea is traced to Osgood, Weiss and Kavanau, and to Iversen. The historical background of concepts of initiation and promotion are traced to Berenblum and Mottram and the Boutwell concept of promotion as gene activation is cited. It is proposed that gene activation by promoters is a valid concept and that it results from the blocking of the normal intercellular communication postulated by Osgood and others. The problem of explaining the low probability of cancer following initiators or promoters acting alone is cited as a problem in basic science. A hypothesis to solve the problem is proposed: Cancer results from two of more relevant mutations: promoters enhance proliferation of cells with one relevant mutation, thereby increasing the probability of obtaining a cell with two relevant mutations. A new scheme of five stages of hepatocarcinogenesis is proposed in terms of the hypothesis and available data. PMID:7013284

  11. Nanoscale Morphology of PTB7 Based Organic Photovoltaics as a Function of Fullerene Size.

    PubMed

    Roehling, John D; Baran, Derya; Sit, Joseph; Kassar, Thaer; Ameri, Tayebeh; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J; Moulé, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency polymer:fullerene photovoltaic device layers self-assemble with hierarchical features from ångströms to 100's of nanometers. The feature size, shape, composition, orientation, and order all contribute to device efficiency and are simultaneously difficult to study due to poor contrast between carbon based materials. This study seeks to increase device efficiency and simplify morphology measurements by replacing the typical fullerene acceptor with endohedral fullerene Lu3N@PC80BEH. The metal atoms give excellent scattering contrast for electron beam and x-ray experiments. Additionally, Lu3N@PC80BEH has a lower electron affinity than standard fullerenes, which can raise the open circuit voltage of photovoltaic devices. Electron microscopy techniques are used to produce a detailed account of morphology evolution in mixtures of Lu3N@PC80BEH with the record breaking donor polymer, PTB7 and coated using solvent mixtures. We demonstrate that common solvent additives like 1,8-diiodooctane or chloronapthalene do not improve the morphology of endohedral fullerene devices as expected. The poor device performance is attributed to the lack of mutual miscibility between this particular polymer:fullerene combination and to co-crystallization of Lu3N@PC80BEH with 1,8-diiodooctane. This negative result explains why solvent additives mixtures are not necessarily a morphology cure-all. PMID:27498880

  12. Nanoscale Morphology of PTB7 Based Organic Photovoltaics as a Function of Fullerene Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehling, John D.; Baran, Derya; Sit, Joseph; Kassar, Thaer; Ameri, Tayebeh; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J.; Moulé, Adam J.

    2016-08-01

    High efficiency polymer:fullerene photovoltaic device layers self-assemble with hierarchical features from ångströms to 100’s of nanometers. The feature size, shape, composition, orientation, and order all contribute to device efficiency and are simultaneously difficult to study due to poor contrast between carbon based materials. This study seeks to increase device efficiency and simplify morphology measurements by replacing the typical fullerene acceptor with endohedral fullerene Lu3N@PC80BEH. The metal atoms give excellent scattering contrast for electron beam and x-ray experiments. Additionally, Lu3N@PC80BEH has a lower electron affinity than standard fullerenes, which can raise the open circuit voltage of photovoltaic devices. Electron microscopy techniques are used to produce a detailed account of morphology evolution in mixtures of Lu3N@PC80BEH with the record breaking donor polymer, PTB7 and coated using solvent mixtures. We demonstrate that common solvent additives like 1,8-diiodooctane or chloronapthalene do not improve the morphology of endohedral fullerene devices as expected. The poor device performance is attributed to the lack of mutual miscibility between this particular polymer:fullerene combination and to co-crystallization of Lu3N@PC80BEH with 1,8-diiodooctane. This negative result explains why solvent additives mixtures are not necessarily a morphology cure-all.

  13. Nanoscale Morphology of PTB7 Based Organic Photovoltaics as a Function of Fullerene Size

    PubMed Central

    Roehling, John D.; Baran, Derya; Sit, Joseph; Kassar, Thaer; Ameri, Tayebeh; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J.; Moulé, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency polymer:fullerene photovoltaic device layers self-assemble with hierarchical features from ångströms to 100’s of nanometers. The feature size, shape, composition, orientation, and order all contribute to device efficiency and are simultaneously difficult to study due to poor contrast between carbon based materials. This study seeks to increase device efficiency and simplify morphology measurements by replacing the typical fullerene acceptor with endohedral fullerene Lu3N@PC80BEH. The metal atoms give excellent scattering contrast for electron beam and x-ray experiments. Additionally, Lu3N@PC80BEH has a lower electron affinity than standard fullerenes, which can raise the open circuit voltage of photovoltaic devices. Electron microscopy techniques are used to produce a detailed account of morphology evolution in mixtures of Lu3N@PC80BEH with the record breaking donor polymer, PTB7 and coated using solvent mixtures. We demonstrate that common solvent additives like 1,8-diiodooctane or chloronapthalene do not improve the morphology of endohedral fullerene devices as expected. The poor device performance is attributed to the lack of mutual miscibility between this particular polymer:fullerene combination and to co-crystallization of Lu3N@PC80BEH with 1,8-diiodooctane. This negative result explains why solvent additives mixtures are not necessarily a morphology cure-all. PMID:27498880

  14. Interfacial energy level alignments between low-band-gap polymer PTB7 and indium zinc oxide anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongguen; Lee, Jeihyun; Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Seo, Ki-Won; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Kim, Han-Ki; Choi, Min-Jun; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Yi, Yeonjin

    2015-09-01

    The interfacial energy level alignments between poly(thieno[3,4-b]-thiophene)-co-benzodithiophene (PTB7) and indium zinc oxide (IZO) were investigated. In situ ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements were conducted with the step-by-step deposition of PTB7 on IZO substrate. All spectral changes were analyzed between each deposition step, and interfacial energy level alignments were estimated. The hole barrier of standard ultraviolet-ozone treated IZO is 0.58 eV, which is lower than the value of 1.09 eV obtained for bare IZO. The effect of barrier reduction on the hole transport was also confirmed with electrical measurements of hole-dominated devices.

  15. Synthetic studies toward halichlorine: complex azaspirocycle formation with use of an NBS-promoted semipinacol reaction.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Paul B; Dake, Gregory R

    2008-06-01

    The investigations of a synthetic route incorporating a NBS-promoted semipinacol rearrangement to the 6-azaspiro[4.5]decane fragment within halichlorine ( 1) are presented. A convergent approach was pursued, utilizing two chiral, enantiomerically enriched building blocks, 2-trimethylstannyl piperidene 10 and substituted cyclobutanone 19. Noteworthy synthetic operations in this study include the following: (a) a highly diastereoselective NBS-promoted semipinacol reaction that established four stereogenic centers in ketone 25 and (b) the use of a N- p-toluenesulfonyl-2-iodo-2-piperidene as a precursor to a basic organometallic reagent, which was critical to the success of the coupling of fragments 10 and 19. PMID:18444680

  16. Alpha-Glucosidase Promotes Hemozoin Formation in a Blood-Sucking Bug: An Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Mury, Flávia Borges; da Silva, José Roberto; Ferreira, Ligia Souza; dos Santos Ferreira, Beatriz; de Souza-Filho, Gonçalo Apolinário; de Souza-Neto, Jayme Augusto; Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; Silva, Carlos Peres; do Nascimento, Viviane Veiga; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares; Berbert-Molina, Marília Amorim; Dansa-Petretski, Marilvia

    2009-01-01

    Background Hematophagous insects digest large amounts of host hemoglobin and release heme inside their guts. In Rhodnius prolixus, hemoglobin-derived heme is detoxified by biomineralization, forming hemozoin (Hz). Recently, the involvement of the R. prolixus perimicrovillar membranes in Hz formation was demonstrated. Methodology/Principal Findings Hz formation activity of an α-glucosidase was investigated. Hz formation was inhibited by specific α-glucosidase inhibitors. Moreover, Hz formation was sensitive to inhibition by Diethypyrocarbonate, suggesting a critical role of histidine residues in enzyme activity. Additionally, a polyclonal antibody raised against a phytophagous insect α-glucosidase was able to inhibit Hz formation. The α-glucosidase inhibitors have had no effects when used 10 h after the start of reaction, suggesting that α-glucosidase should act in the nucleation step of Hz formation. Hz formation was seen to be dependent on the substrate-binding site of enzyme, in a way that maltose, an enzyme substrate, blocks such activity. dsRNA, constructed using the sequence of α-glucosidase gene, was injected into R. prolixus females' hemocoel. Gene silencing was accomplished by reduction of both α-glucosidase and Hz formation activities. Insects were fed on plasma or hemin-enriched plasma and gene expression and activity of α-glucosidase were higher in the plasma plus hemin-fed insects. The deduced amino acid sequence of α-glucosidase shows a high similarity to the insect α-glucosidases, with critical histidine and aspartic residues conserved among the enzymes. Conclusions/Significance Herein the Hz formation is shown to be associated to an α-glucosidase, the biochemical marker from Hemipteran perimicrovillar membranes. Usually, these enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of glycosidic bond. The results strongly suggest that α-glucosidase is responsible for Hz nucleation in the R. prolixus midgut, indicating that the plasticity of this enzyme may play

  17. Comparison of the NIST and PTB Air-Kerma Standards for Low-Energy X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Michelle; Bueermann, Ludwig

    2009-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the air-kerma standards for low-energy x rays at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The comparison involved a series of measurements at the PTB and the NIST using the air-kerma standards and two NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber standards. Results are presented for the reference radiation beam qualities in the range from 25 kV to 50 kV for low energy x rays, including the techniques used for mammography dose traceability. The tungsten generated reference radiation qualities, between 25 kV and 50 kV used for this comparison, are new to NIST; therefore this comparison will serve as the preliminary comparison for NIST and a verification of the primary standard correction factors. The mammography comparison will repeat two previously unpublished comparisons between PTB and NIST. The results show the standards to be in reasonable agreement within the standard uncertainty of the comparison of about 0.4 %.

  18. Glycosaminoglycans promote fibril formation by amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chains through a transient interaction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Douglas J.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid formation occurs when a precursor protein misfolds and aggregates, forming a fibril nucleus that serves as a template for fibril growth. Glycosaminoglycans are highly charged polymers known to associate with tissue amyloid deposits that have been shown to accelerate amyloidogenesis in vitro. We studied two immunoglobulin light chain variable domains from light chain amyloidosis patients with 90% sequence identity, analyzing their fibril formation kinetics and binding properties with different glycosaminoglycan molecules. We find that the less amyloidogenic of the proteins shows a weak dependence on glycosaminoglycan size and charge, while the more amyloidogenic protein responds only minimally to changes in the glycosaminoglycan. These glycosaminoglycan effects on fibril formation do not depend on a stable interaction between the two species but still show characteristic traits of an interaction-dependent mechanism. We propose that transient, predominantly electrostatic interactions between glycosaminoglycans and the precursor proteins mediate the acceleration of fibril formation in vitro. PMID:21640469

  19. The "Balance Intervention" for Promoting Caloric Compensatory Behaviours in Response to Overeating: A Formative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wammes, Birgitte; Breedveld, Boudewijn; Kremers, Stef; Brug, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    To help people prevent weight gain, the Netherlands Nutrition Centre initiated the "balance intervention", which promotes moderation of food intake and/or increased physical activity in response to occasions of overeating. The aim of this study was to determine whether intervention materials were appreciated, encouraged information seeking and…

  20. A Vygotskian Approach to Promote and Formatively Assess Academic Concept Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edens, Kellah; Shields, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Promoting students' conceptual understanding and academic language development is a primary goal of instructors in all subject areas. These goals, however, are sometimes hindered by the way students' learning is assessed. In many college-level courses, knowledge-level tests that assess concrete thinking associated with superficial approaches to…

  1. Surfactant process for promoting gas hydrate formation and application of the same

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Rudy E.; Zhong, Yu

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of storing gas using gas hydrates comprising forming gas hydrates in the presence of a water-surfactant solution that comprises water and surfactant. The addition of minor amounts of surfactant increases the gas hydrate formation rate, increases packing density of the solid hydrate mass and simplifies the formation-storage-decomposition process of gas hydrates. The minor amounts of surfactant also enhance the potential of gas hydrates for industrial storage applications.

  2. Overexpression of FGF9 in prostate epithelial cells augments reactive stroma formation and promotes prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanqing; Jin, Chengliu; Hamana, Tomoaki; Liu, Junchen; Wang, Cong; An, Lei; McKeehan, Wallace L; Wang, Fen

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality of prostate cancer (PCa). Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) has been reported to promote PCa bone metastasis. However, the mechanism by which overexpression of FGF9 promotes PCa progression and metastasis is still unknown. Herein, we report that transgenic mice forced to express FGF9 in prostate epithelial cells (F9TG) developed high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in an expression level- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, FGF9/TRAMP bigenic mice (F9TRAMP) grew advanced PCa earlier and had higher frequencies of metastasis than TRAMP littermates. We observed tumor microenvironmental changes including hypercellularity and hyperproliferation in the stromal compartment of F9TG and F9TRAMP mice. Expression of TGFβ1, a key signaling molecule overexpressed in reactive stroma, was increased in F9TG and F9TRAMP prostates. Both in vivo and in vitro data indicated that FGF9 promoted TGFβ1 expression via increasing cJun-mediated signaling. Moreover, in silico analyses showed that the expression level of FGF9 was positively associated with expression of TGFβ1 and its downstream signaling molecules in human prostate cancers. Collectively, our data demonstrated that overexpressing FGF9 in PCa cells augmented the formation of reactive stroma and promoted PCa initiation and progression. PMID:26157349

  3. A Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor complex promotes formation of lateral filopodia and blood vessel lumen morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sabu; Scarcia, Margherita; Bagshaw, Richard D.; McMahon, Kathryn; Grant, Gary; Harvey, Tracey; Yeo, Maggie; Esteves, Filomena O.G.; Thygesen, Helene H.; Jones, Pamela F.; Speirs, Valerie; Hanby, Andrew M.; Selby, Peter J.; Lorger, Mihaela; Dear, T. Neil; Pawson, Tony; Marshall, Christopher J.; Mavria, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    During angiogenesis, Rho-GTPases influence endothelial cell migration and cell–cell adhesion; however it is not known whether they control formation of vessel lumens, which are essential for blood flow. Here, using an organotypic system that recapitulates distinct stages of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, we show that lumen formation requires early cytoskeletal remodelling and lateral cell–cell contacts, mediated through the RAC1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) DOCK4 (dedicator of cytokinesis 4). DOCK4 signalling is necessary for lateral filopodial protrusions and tubule remodelling prior to lumen formation, whereas proximal, tip filopodia persist in the absence of DOCK4. VEGF-dependent Rac activation via DOCK4 is necessary for CDC42 activation to signal filopodia formation and depends on the activation of RHOG through the RHOG GEF, SGEF. VEGF promotes interaction of DOCK4 with the CDC42 GEF DOCK9. These studies identify a novel Rho-family GTPase activation cascade for the formation of endothelial cell filopodial protrusions necessary for tubule remodelling, thereby influencing subsequent stages of lumen morphogenesis. PMID:26129894

  4. Sam37 is crucial for formation of the mitochondrial TOM–SAM supercomplex, thereby promoting β-barrel biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Ellenrieder, Lars; Qiu, Jian; Bohnert, Maria; Zufall, Nicole; van der Laan, Martin; Becker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins requires two preprotein translocases, the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM and SAM form a supercomplex that promotes transfer of β-barrel precursors. The SAM core complex contains the channel protein Sam50, which cooperates with Sam35 in precursor recognition, and the peripheral membrane protein Sam37. The molecular function of Sam37 has been unknown. We report that Sam37 is crucial for formation of the TOM–SAM supercomplex. Sam37 interacts with the receptor domain of Tom22 on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane and links TOM and SAM complexes. Sam37 thus promotes efficient transfer of β-barrel precursors to the SAM complex. We conclude that Sam37 functions as a coupling factor of the translocase supercomplex of the mitochondrial outer membrane. PMID:26416958

  5. The C-terminus of nucleolin promotes the formation of the c-MYC G-quadruplex and inhibits c-MYC promoter activity.

    PubMed

    González, Verónica; Hurley, Laurence H

    2010-11-16

    Nucleolin, the most abundant nucleolar phosphoprotein of eukaryotic cells, is known primarily for its role in ribosome biogenesis and cell proliferation. It is, however, a multifunctional protein that, depending on the cellular context, can drive either cell proliferation or apoptosis. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that nucleolin can function as a repressor of c-MYC transcription by binding to and stabilizing the formation of a G-quadruplex structure in a region of the c-MYC promoter responsible for controlling 85-90% of c-MYC's transcriptional activity. In this study, we investigate the structural elements of nucleolin that are required for c-MYC repression. The effect of nucleolin deletion mutants on the formation and stability of the c-MYC G-quadruplex, as well as c-MYC transcriptional activity, was assessed by circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, thermal stability, and in vitro transcription. Here we report that nucleolin's RNA binding domains 3 and 4, as well as the arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) domain, are required to repress c-MYC transcription. PMID:20932061

  6. Layered double hydroxide formation in Bayer liquor and its promotional effect on oxalate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Perrotta, A.J.; Williams, F.

    1996-10-01

    Enhancing the precipitation of sodium oxalate from Bayer process liquor to improve the quality of alumina product remains an important objective for Bayer refining. The formation of layered double hydroxides by the reaction of alkaline earth oxides, such as lime and magnesia, with Bayer liquor gives a crystal structure which is capable of intercalating anions, both inorganic and organic, within its structure. Both lime and magnesia, with long contact times in Bayer liquor, show layered double hydroxide formation. This layered double hydroxide formation is accompanied with a decrease in the sodium oxalate content in the liquor from about 3 g/L to below 1 g/L. Short contact times lead to a destabilization of the liquor which facilitates sodium oxalate precipitation. Additional work on magnesium hydroxide shows, in comparison to lime and magnesia, much less layered double hydroxide formation with equivalent residence time in the liquor. Destabilization of the liquor also occurs, giving enhanced oxalate precipitation with less alumina being consumed in agreement with lower layered double hydroxide formation. Thermal regeneration of these structures, followed by in-situ recrystallization in Bayer liquor, also gives enhanced oxalate precipitation, suggesting that there is an opportunity for a regenerable oxalate reduction system. The implementation of these experiments and other related technology into the plant has resulted in the Purox Process for enhancing the precipitation of sodium oxalate from Bayer liquor.

  7. Oxygen promotes biofilm formation of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 through a diguanylate cyclase and an adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yin, Hao; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Zhou, Xian-Xuan; Zhao, Li-Ping; Tian, Li-Jiao; Han, Jun-Cheng; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Although oxygen has been reported to regulate biofilm formation by several Shewanella species, the exact regulatory mechanism mostly remains unclear. Here, we identify a direct oxygen-sensing diguanylate cyclase (DosD) and reveal its regulatory role in biofilm formation by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 under aerobic conditions. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that the activity of DosD culminates to synthesis of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) in the presence of oxygen. DosD regulates the transcription of bpfA operon which encodes seven proteins including a large repetitive adhesin BpfA and its cognate type I secretion system (TISS). Regulation of DosD in aerobic biofilms is heavily dependent on an adhesin BpfA and the TISS. This study offers an insight into the molecular mechanism of oxygen-stimulated biofilm formation by S. putrefaciens CN32. PMID:23736081

  8. Internalized Tau sensitizes cells to stress by promoting formation and stability of stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Cecilia A.; Yan, Xu; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are membrane-less RNA- and RNA-binding protein-containing complexes that are transiently assembled in stressful conditions to promote cell survival. Several stress granule-associated RNA-binding proteins have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, a close link was recently identified between the stress granule core-nucleating protein TIA-1 and Tau. Tau is a central pathological protein in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies, and misfolded, aggregated Tau is capable of propagating pathology via cell-to-cell transmission. Here we show that following internalization hyperphosphorylated extracellular Tau associates with stress granules in a TIA-1 dependent manner. Cytosolic Tau normally only weakly interacts with TIA-1 but mutations mimicking abnormal phosphorylation promote this interaction. We show that internalized Tau significantly delays normal clearance of stress granules in the recipient cells sensitizing them to secondary stress. These results suggest that secreted Tau species may have properties, likely related to its hyperphosphorylation and oligomerization, which promote pathological association of internalized Tau with stress granules altering their dynamics and reducing cell viability. We suggest that stress granules and TIA-1 play a central role in the cell-to-cell transmission of Tau pathology. PMID:27460788

  9. HIV-1 Tat protein promotes formation of more-processive elongation complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, R A; Sharp, P A

    1991-01-01

    The Tat protein of HIV-1 trans-activates transcription in vitro in a cell-free extract of HeLa nuclei. Quantitative analysis of the efficiency of elongation revealed that a majority of the elongation complexes generated by the HIV-1 promoter were not highly processive and terminated within the first 500 nucleotides. Tat trans-activation of transcription from the HIV-1 promoter resulted from an increase in processive character of the elongation complexes. More specifically, the analysis suggests that there exist two classes of elongation complexes initiating from the HIV promoter: a less-processive form and a more-processive form. Addition of purified Tat protein was found to increase the abundance of the more-processive class of elongation complex. The purine nucleoside analog, 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) inhibits transcription in this reaction by decreasing the efficiency of elongation. Surprisingly, stimulation of transcription elongation by Tat was preferentially inhibited by the addition of DRB. Images PMID:1756726

  10. Erythorbic acid promoted formation of CdS QDs in a tube-in-tube micro-channel reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yan; Tan, Jiawei; Wang, Jiexin; Chen, Jianfeng; Sun, Baochang; Shao, Lei

    2014-12-15

    Erythorbic acid assistant synthesis of CdS quantum dots (QDs) was conducted by homogeneous mixing of two continuous liquids in a high-throughput microporous tube-in-tube micro-channel reactor (MTMCR) at room temperature. The effects of the micropore size of the MTMCR, liquid flow rate, mixing time and reactant concentration on the size and size distribution of CdS QDs were investigated. It was found that the size and size distribution of CdS QDs could be tuned in the MTMCR. A combination of erythorbic acid promoted formation technique with the MTMCR may be a promising pathway for controllable mass production of QDs.

  11. Frequency Comparison of [Formula: see text] Ion Optical Clocks at PTB and NPL via GPS PPP.

    PubMed

    Leute, J; Huntemann, N; Lipphardt, B; Tamm, Christian; Nisbet-Jones, P B R; King, S A; Godun, R M; Jones, J M; Margolis, H S; Whibberley, P B; Wallin, A; Merimaa, M; Gill, P; Peik, E

    2016-07-01

    We used precise point positioning, a well-established GPS carrier-phase frequency transfer method to perform a direct remote comparison of two optical frequency standards based on single laser-cooled [Formula: see text] ions operated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), U.K. and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany. At both institutes, an active hydrogen maser serves as a flywheel oscillator which is connected to a GPS receiver as an external frequency reference and compared simultaneously to a realization of the unperturbed frequency of the (2)S1/2(F=0)-(2)D3/2(F=2) electric quadrupole transition in [Formula: see text] via an optical femtosecond frequency comb. To profit from long coherent GPS-link measurements, we extrapolate the fractional frequency difference over the various data gaps in the optical clock to maser comparisons which introduces maser noise to the frequency comparison but improves the uncertainty from the GPS-link instability. We determined the total statistical uncertainty consisting of the GPS-link uncertainty and the extrapolation uncertainties for several extrapolation schemes. Using the extrapolation scheme with the smallest combined uncertainty, we find a fractional frequency difference [Formula: see text] of -1.3×10(-15) with a combined uncertainty of 1.2×10(-15) for a total measurement time of 67 h. This result is consistent with an agreement of the frequencies realized by both optical clocks and with recent absolute frequency measurements against caesium fountain clocks within the corresponding uncertainties. PMID:26863657

  12. Tumor Exosomal RNAs Promote Lung Pre-metastatic Niche Formation by Activating Alveolar Epithelial TLR3 to Recruit Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfang; Gu, Yan; Han, Yanmei; Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Zhengping; Zhang, Xiang; Huang, Bo; Xu, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Jianming; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-08-01

    The pre-metastatic niche educated by primary tumor-derived elements contributes to cancer metastasis. However, the role of host stromal cells in metastatic niche formation and organ-specific metastatic tropism is not clearly defined. Here, we demonstrate that lung epithelial cells are critical for initiating neutrophil recruitment and lung metastatic niche formation by sensing tumor exosomal RNAs via Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). TLR3-deficient mice show reduced lung metastasis in the spontaneous metastatic models. Mechanistically, primary tumor-derived exosomal RNAs, which are enriched in small nuclear RNAs, activate TLR3 in lung epithelial cells, consequently inducing chemokine secretion in the lung and promoting neutrophil recruitment. Identification of metastatic axis of tumor exosomal RNAs and host lung epithelial cell TLR3 activation provides potential targets to control cancer metastasis to the lung. PMID:27505671

  13. Down-regulation of MUC1 in cancer cells inhibits cell migration by promoting E-cadherin/catenin complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhenglong; Wong, Sandy; Borrelli, Alexander; Chung, Maureen A.

    2007-10-26

    MUC1, a tumor associated glycoprotein, is over-expressed in most cancers and can promote proliferation and metastasis. The objective of this research was to study the role of MUC1 in cancer metastasis and its potential mechanism. Pancreatic (PANC1) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells with stable 'knockdown' of MUC1 expression were created using RNA interference. {beta}-Catenin and E-cadherin protein expression were upregulated in PANC1 and MCF-7 cells with decreased MUC1 expression. Downregulation of MUC1 expression also induced {beta}-catenin relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, increased E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex formation and E-cadherin membrane localization in PANC1 cells. PANC1 cells with 'knockdown' MUC1 expression had decreased in vitro cell invasion. This study suggested that MUC1 may affect cancer cell migration by increasing E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex formation and restoring E-cadherin membrane localization.

  14. Promoting Prospective Elementary Teachers' Learning to Use Formative Assessment for Life Science Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabel, Jaime L.; Forbes, Cory T.; Zangori, Laura

    2015-06-01

    To support elementary students' learning of core, standards-based life science concepts highlighted in the Next Generation Science Standards, prospective elementary teachers should develop an understanding of life science concepts and learn to apply their content knowledge in instructional practice to craft elementary science learning environments grounded in students' thinking. To do so, teachers must learn to use high-leverage instructional practices, such as formative assessment, to engage students in scientific practices and connect instruction to students' ideas. However, teachers may not understand formative assessment or possess sufficient science content knowledge to effectively engage in related instructional practices. To address these needs, we developed and conducted research within an innovative course for preservice elementary teachers built upon two pillars—life science concepts and formative assessment. An embedded mixed methods study was used to evaluate the effect of the intervention on preservice teachers' (n = 49) content knowledge and ability to engage in formative assessment practices for science. Findings showed that increased life content knowledge over the semester helped preservice teachers engage more productively in anticipating and evaluating students' ideas, but not in identifying effective instructional strategies to respond to those ideas.

  15. Endothelial progenitor cells promote tumor growth and progression by enhancing new vessel formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Huan-Qiu; Li, Ji; Liu, Xiao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth and progression require new blood vessel formation to deliver nutrients and oxygen for further cell proliferation and to create a neovascular network exit for tumor cell metastasis. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cell population that circulates in the peripheral circulation and homes to the tumor bed to participate in new blood vessel formation. In addition to structural support to nascent vessels, these cells can also regulate the angiogenic process by paracrine secretion of a number of proangiogenic growth factors and cytokines, thus playing a crucial role in tumor neovascularization and development. Inhibition of EPC-mediated new vessel formation may be a promising therapeutic strategy in tumor treatment. EPC-mediated neovascularization is a complex process that includes multiple steps and requires a series of cytokines and modulators, thus understanding the underlying mechanisms may provide anti-neovasculogenesis targets that may be blocked for the prevention of tumor development. The present review stresses the process and contribution of EPCs to the formation of new blood vessels in solid tumors, in an attempt to gain an improved understanding of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms involved, and to provide a potential effective therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:27446353

  16. Local antigen in nonlymphoid tissue promotes resident memory CD8+ T cell formation during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahsin N; Mooster, Jana L; Kilgore, Augustus M; Osborn, Jossef F; Nolz, Jeffrey C

    2016-05-30

    Tissue-resident memory (Trm) CD8(+) T cells are functionally distinct from their circulating counterparts and are potent mediators of host protection against reinfection. Whether local recognition of antigen in nonlymphoid tissues during infection can impact the formation of Trm populations remains unresolved. Using skin infections with vaccinia virus (VacV)-expressing model antigens, we found that local antigen recognition had a profound impact on Trm formation. Activated CD8(+) T cells trafficked to VacV-infected skin in an inflammation-dependent, but antigen-independent, manner. However, after viral clearance, there was a subsequent ∼50-fold increase in Trm formation when antigen was present in the tissue microenvironment. Secondary antigen stimulation in nonlymphoid tissue caused CD8(+) T cells to rapidly express CD69 and be retained at the site of infection. Finally, Trm CD8(+) T cells that formed during VacV infection in an antigen-dependent manner became potent stimulators of localized antigen-specific inflammatory responses in the skin. Thus, our studies indicate that the presence of antigen in the nonlymphoid tissue microenvironment plays a critical role in the formation of functional Trm CD8(+) T cell populations, a finding with relevance for both vaccine design and prevention of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27217536

  17. Using Common Formative Assessments to Promote Student Achievement: A Case Study of Practice, Leadership, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Patricia T. C.

    2012-01-01

    It is the moral responsibility of educators to work diligently to provide every student with rich, challenging coursework in efforts to prepare them for post high school careers and education. The use of common formative assessments provides teachers with the valuable, timely information they need to make instructional decisions that will better…

  18. Identification of Genes That Promote or Inhibit Olfactory Memory Formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Walkinshaw, Erica; Gai, Yunchao; Farkas, Caitlin; Richter, Daniel; Nicholas, Eric; Keleman, Krystyna; Davis, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster and other organisms have been pursued to filter the genome for genetic functions important for memory formation. Such screens have employed primarily chemical or transposon-mediated mutagenesis and have identified numerous mutants including classical memory mutants, dunce and rutabaga. Here, we report the results of a large screen using panneuronal RNAi expression to identify additional genes critical for memory formation. We identified >500 genes that compromise memory when inhibited (low hits), either by disrupting the development and normal function of the adult animal or by participating in the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying memory formation. We also identified >40 genes that enhance memory when inhibited (high hits). The dunce gene was identified as one of the low hits and further experiments were performed to map the effects of the dunce RNAi to the α/β and γ mushroom body neurons. Additional behavioral experiments suggest that dunce knockdown in the mushroom body neurons impairs memory without significantly affecting acquisition. We also characterized one high hit, sickie, to show that RNAi knockdown of this gene enhances memory through effects in dopaminergic neurons without apparent effects on acquisition. These studies further our understanding of two genes involved in memory formation, provide a valuable list of genes that impair memory that may be important for understanding the neurophysiology of memory or neurodevelopmental disorders, and offer a new resource of memory suppressor genes that will aid in understanding restraint mechanisms employed by the brain to optimize resources. PMID:25644700

  19. The CUC1 and CUC2 genes promote carpel margin meristem formation during Arabidopsis gynoecium development

    PubMed Central

    Kamiuchi, Yuri; Yamamoto, Kayo; Furutani, Masahiko; Tasaka, Masao; Aida, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Carpel margin meristems (CMMs), a pair of meristematic tissues present along the margins of two fused carpel primordia of Arabidopsis thaliana, are essential for the formation of ovules and the septum, two major internal structures of the gynoecium. Although a number of regulatory factors involved in shoot meristem activity are known to be required for the formation of these gynoecial structures, their direct roles in CMM development have yet to be addressed. Here we show that the CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON genes CUC1 and CUC2, which are essential for shoot meristem initiation, are also required for formation and stable positioning of the CMMs. Early in CMM formation, CUC1 and CUC2 are also required for expression of the SHOOT MERISTEMLESS gene, a central regulator for stem cell maintenance in the shoot meristem. Moreover, plants carrying miR164-resistant forms of CUC1 and CUC2 resulted in extra CMM activity with altered positioning. Our results thus demonstrate that the two regulatory proteins controlling shoot meristem activity also play critical roles in elaboration of the female reproductive organ through the control of meristematic activity. PMID:24817871

  20. An Undergraduate Study of Two Transcription Factors that Promote Lateral Root Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O. R.; Birnbaum, Kenneth D.; Brenner, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a lab that enables students to test the role of genes involved in the regulation of lateral roots growth in the model plant "Arabidopsis thaliana." Here, students design an experiment that follows the effects of the hormone auxin on the stimulation of genes involved in the formation of lateral root initials. These genes, known…

  1. Embedded Formative Assessment and Classroom Process Quality: How Do They Interact in Promoting Science Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decristan, Jasmin; Klieme, Eckhard; Kunter, Mareike; Hochweber, Jan; Büttner, Gerhard; Fauth, Benjamin; Hondrich, A. Lena; Rieser, Svenja; Hertel, Silke; Hardy, Ilonca

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the interplay between curriculum-embedded formative assessment--a well-known teaching practice--and general features of classroom process quality (i.e., cognitive activation, supportive climate, classroom management) and their combined effect on elementary school students' understanding of the scientific concepts of…

  2. A Needs Assessment, Development, and Formative Evaluation of a Health Promotion Smartphone Application for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tiffany; Chandler, Laura; Mouttapa, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately half of college students who completed the National College Health Assessment 2013 indicated a greater need for health-related information. University-based smartphone applications may help students better access this information. Purpose: This study describes the needs assessment, development, and formative evaluation of…

  3. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) Asef2 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation via Rac Activation and Spinophilin-dependent Targeting*

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. Corey; Robinson, Cristina M.; Shi, Mingjian; Webb, Donna J.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are actin-rich protrusions that establish excitatory synaptic contacts with surrounding neurons. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is critical for the development and plasticity of dendritic spines, which is the basis for learning and memory. Rho family GTPases are emerging as important modulators of spines and synapses, predominantly through their ability to regulate actin dynamics. Much less is known, however, about the function of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which activate these GTPases, in spine and synapse development. In this study we show that the Rho family GEF Asef2 is found at synaptic sites, where it promotes dendritic spine and synapse formation. Knockdown of endogenous Asef2 with shRNAs impairs spine and synapse formation, whereas exogenous expression of Asef2 causes an increase in spine and synapse density. This effect of Asef2 on spines and synapses is abrogated by expression of GEF activity-deficient Asef2 mutants or by knockdown of Rac, suggesting that Asef2-Rac signaling mediates spine development. Because Asef2 interacts with the F-actin-binding protein spinophilin, which localizes to spines, we investigated the role of spinophilin in Asef2-promoted spine formation. Spinophilin recruits Asef2 to spines, and knockdown of spinophilin hinders spine and synapse formation in Asef2-expressing neurons. Furthermore, inhibition of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) activity blocks spinophilin-mediated localization of Asef2 to spines. These results collectively point to spinophilin-Asef2-Rac signaling as a novel mechanism for the development of dendritic spines and synapses. PMID:25750125

  4. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-01

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  5. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: insights from lattice and all-atom models.

    PubMed

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  6. Oxidized LDL signals through Rho-GTPase to induce endothelial cell stiffening and promote capillary formation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myung-Jin; Zhang, Chongxu; LeMaster, Elizabeth; Adamos, Crystal; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Bogachkov, Yedida; Kohler, Erin E; Baruah, Jugajyoti; Fang, Yun; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Wary, Kishore K; Levitan, Irena

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial biomechanics is emerging as a key factor in endothelial function. Here, we address the mechanisms of endothelial stiffening induced by oxidized LDL (oxLDL) and investigate the role of oxLDL in lumen formation. We show that oxLDL-induced endothelial stiffening is mediated by CD36-dependent activation of RhoA and its downstream target, Rho kinase (ROCK), via inhibition of myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) and myosin light-chain (MLC)2 phosphorylation. The LC-MS/MS analysis identifies 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as the major oxysterol in oxLDL. Similarly to oxLDL, 7KC induces RhoA activation, MLCP inhibition, and MLC2 phosphorylation resulting in endothelial stiffening. OxLDL also facilitates formation of endothelial branching networks in 3D collagen gels in vitro and induces increased formation of functional blood vessels in a Matrigel plug assay in vivo. Both effects are RhoA and ROCK dependent. An increase in lumen formation was also observed in response to pre-exposing the cells to 7KC, an oxysterol that induces endothelial stiffening, but not to 5α,6α epoxide that does not affect endothelial stiffness. Importantly, loading cells with cholesterol prevented oxLDL-induced RhoA activation and the downstream signaling cascade, and reversed oxLDL-induced lumen formation. In summary, we show that oxLDL-induced endothelial stiffening is mediated by the CD36/RhoA/ROCK/MLCP/MLC2 pathway and is associated with increased endothelial angiogenic activity. PMID:26989083

  7. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    SciTech Connect

    Kouza, Maksim Kolinski, Andrzej; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  8. Biofuel-Promoted Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxin/furan Formation in an Iron-Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filter.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Rey, Maria Dolores; Zennegg, Markus; Haag, Regula; Wichser, Adrian; Schmid, Peter; Seiler, Cornelia; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Mohn, Joachim; Bürki, Samuel; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Iron-catalyzed diesel particle filters (DPFs) are widely used for particle abatement. Active catalyst particles, so-called fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs), are formed in situ, in the engine, when combusting precursors, which were premixed with the fuel. The obtained iron oxide particles catalyze soot oxidation in filters. Iron-catalyzed DPFs are considered as safe with respect to their potential to form polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). We reported that a bimetallic potassium/iron FBC supported an intense PCDD/F formation in a DPF. Here, we discuss the impact of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biofuel on PCDD/F emissions. The iron-catalyzed DPF indeed supported a PCDD/F formation with biofuel but remained inactive with petroleum-derived diesel fuel. PCDD/F emissions (I-TEQ) increased 23-fold when comparing biofuel and diesel data. Emissions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the most toxic congener [toxicity equivalence factor (TEF) = 1.0], increased 90-fold, and those of 2,3,7,8-TCDF (TEF = 0.1) increased 170-fold. Congener patterns also changed, indicating a preferential formation of tetra- and penta-chlorodibenzofurans. Thus, an inactive iron-catalyzed DPF becomes active, supporting a PCDD/F formation, when operated with biofuel containing impurities of potassium. Alkali metals are inherent constituents of biofuels. According to the current European Union (EU) legislation, levels of 5 μg/g are accepted. We conclude that risks for a secondary PCDD/F formation in iron-catalyzed DPFs increase when combusting potassium-containing biofuels. PMID:26176879

  9. Convergence of bone morphogenetic protein and laminin-1 signaling pathways promotes proliferation and colony formation by fetal mouse pancreatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Fangxu . E-mail: jiang@wehi.edu.au; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), members of the transforming growth factor superfamily, together with the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin-1 (Ln-1), promote proliferation of fetal pancreatic cells and formation of colonies containing peripheral insulin-positive cells. Here, we further investigate the cross-talk between BMP and Ln-1 signals. By RT-PCR, receptors for BMP (BMPR) (excepting BMPR-1B) and Ln-1 were expressed in the fetal pancreas between E13.5 and E17.5. Specific blocking antibodies to BMP-4 and -6 and selective BMP antagonists partially inhibited colony formation by fetal pancreas cells. Colony formation induced by BMP-6 and Ln-1 was completely abolished in a dose-dependent manner by blocking Ln-1 binding to its {alpha}{sub 6} integrin and {alpha}-dystroglycan receptors or by blocking the Ln-1 signaling molecules, phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (P13K) and MAP kinase kinase-1. These results demonstrate a convergence of BMP and Ln-1 signaling through P13K and MAP kinase pathways to induce proliferation and colony formation in E15.5 fetal mouse pancreatic cells.

  10. Adhesion- and Degranulation-Promoting Adapter Protein Promotes CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Resident Memory Formation and Function during an Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Fiege, Jessica K; Beura, Lalit K; Burbach, Brandon J; Shimizu, Yoji

    2016-09-15

    During acute infections, naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells are activated and differentiate into effector T cells, most of which undergo contraction after pathogen clearance. A small population of CD8 T cells persists as memory to protect against future infections. We investigated the role of adhesion- and degranulation-promoting adapter protein (ADAP) in promoting CD8 T cell responses to a systemic infection. Naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells lacking ADAP exhibited a modest expansion defect early after Listeria monocytogenes or vesicular stomatitis virus infection but comparable cytolytic function at the peak of response. However, reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient CD8 T cells were present in the spleen after the peak of the response. ADAP deficiency resulted in a greater frequency of CD127(+) CD8 memory precursors in secondary lymphoid organs during the contraction phase. Reduced numbers of ADAP-deficient killer cell lectin-like receptor G1(-) CD8 resident memory T (TRM) cell precursors were present in a variety of nonlymphoid tissues at the peak of the immune response, and consequently the total numbers of ADAP-deficient TRM cells were reduced at memory time points. TRM cells that did form in the absence of ADAP were defective in effector molecule expression. ADAP-deficient TRM cells exhibited impaired effector function after Ag rechallenge, correlating with defects in their ability to form T cell-APC conjugates. However, ADAP-deficient TRM cells responded to TGF-β signals and recruited circulating memory CD8 T cells. Thus, ADAP regulates CD8 T cell differentiation events following acute pathogen challenge that are critical for the formation and selected functions of TRM cells in nonlymphoid tissues. PMID:27521337

  11. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors, pentoxifylline and rolipram, increase bone mass mainly by promoting bone formation in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, T; Kobayashi, S; Ebara, S; Yoshimura, Y; Horiuchi, H; Tsutsumimoto, T; Wakabayashi, S; Takaoka, K

    2000-12-01

    The administration of either Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine derivative and an inhibitor of cyclic AMP (c-AMP) phosphodiesterases (PDEs), or Rolipram, an inhibitor specific to type-4 PDE (PDE4) in normal mice, significantly increased both cortical and cancellous bone mass. Vertebrae and tibiae from mice treated with PTX or Rolipram were analyzed by means of bone densitometry and histomorphometry. The results revealed that both PTX and Rolipram increased bone mass in normal mice mainly through the acceleration of bone formation. These findings suggest that both PTX and Rolipram can enhance physiological bone formation and thereby increase bone mass in normal mice. The possibility that these agents may be of value for the treatment of osteoporosis is discussed. PMID:11113392

  12. Casein Kinase 1 and Phosphorylation of Cohesin Subunit Rec11 (SA3) Promote Meiotic Recombination through Linear Element Formation

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Naina; Cipak, Lubos; Polakova, Silvia; Hyppa, Randy W.; Cipakova, Ingrid; Anrather, Dorothea; Karvaiova, Lucia; Mechtler, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Proper meiotic chromosome segregation, essential for sexual reproduction, requires timely formation and removal of sister chromatid cohesion and crossing-over between homologs. Early in meiosis cohesins hold sisters together and also promote formation of DNA double-strand breaks, obligate precursors to crossovers. Later, cohesin cleavage allows chromosome segregation. We show that in fission yeast redundant casein kinase 1 homologs, Hhp1 and Hhp2, previously shown to regulate segregation via phosphorylation of the Rec8 cohesin subunit, are also required for high-level meiotic DNA breakage and recombination. Unexpectedly, these kinases also mediate phosphorylation of a different meiosis-specific cohesin subunit Rec11. This phosphorylation in turn leads to loading of linear element proteins Rec10 and Rec27, related to synaptonemal complex proteins of other species, and thereby promotes DNA breakage and recombination. Our results provide novel insights into the regulation of chromosomal features required for crossing-over and successful reproduction. The mammalian functional homolog of Rec11 (STAG3) is also phosphorylated during meiosis and appears to be required for fertility, indicating wide conservation of the meiotic events reported here. PMID:25993311

  13. rBPI21 interacts with negative membranes endothermically promoting the formation of rigid multilamellar structures.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Marco M; Bianconi, M Lucia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Santiago, Patrícia S; Tabak, Marcel; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Itri, Rosangela; Santos, Nuno C

    2013-11-01

    rBPI21 belongs to the antimicrobial peptide and protein (AMP) family. It has high affinity for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), acting mainly against Gram-negative bacteria. This work intends to elucidate the mechanism of action of rBPI21 at the membrane level. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we observed that rBPI21 interaction occurs only with negatively charged membranes (mimicking bacterial membranes) and is entropically driven. Differential scanning calorimetry shows that membrane interaction with rBPI21 is followed by an increase of rigidity on negatively charged membrane, which is corroborated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Additionally, SAXS data reveal that rBPI21 promotes the multilamellarization of negatively charged membranes. The results support the proposed model for rBPI21 action: first it may interact with LPS at the bacterial surface. This entropic interaction could cause the release of ions that maintain the packed structure of LPS, ensuring peptide penetration. Then, rBPI21 may interact with the negatively charged leaflets of the outer and inner membranes, promoting the interaction between the two bacterial membranes, ultimately leading to cell death. PMID:23792068

  14. Institute of social justice and medicine: developing a think tank to promote policy formation.

    PubMed

    Boozary, Andrew; Dugani, Sagar B

    2011-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) defines health as a "resource for everyday living, not the objective of living"; however, worldwide, there remains an unmistakable inequity in level of health and access to healthcare. The WHO has published documents on financing health systems towards universal health coverage [1], promoting healthy life [2], improving performance of health systems [3], and enriching humanity [4], highlighting our shared responsibility towards improving both national and global health and access to healthcare. These documents also recognize that, despite our local and regional priorities, there is a global desire to develop international strategies to improve healthcare. [1] WHO Report. Health systems financing and the path to universal coverage. 2010. http://www.who.int/bulletin/health_financing/en/index.html [2] WHO Report. Reducing risks, promoting healthy life. 2002. http://www.who.int/whr/2002/en/index.html [3] WHO Bulletin. Health systems: improving performance. 2000. http://www.who.int/whr/2000/en/index.html [4] WHO Bulletin. Conquering suffering, enriching humanity 1997. http://www.who.int/whr/1997/en/index.html. PMID:21968266

  15. Translation suppression promotes stress granule formation and cell survival in response to cold shock

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Sarah; Cherkasova, Valeria; Bankhead, Peter; Bukau, Bernd; Stoecklin, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Cells respond to different types of stress by inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequent assembly of stress granules (SGs), cytoplasmic aggregates that contain stalled translation preinitiation complexes. Global translation is regulated through the translation initiation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) and the mTOR pathway. Here we identify cold shock as a novel trigger of SG assembly in yeast and mammals. Whereas cold shock–induced SGs take hours to form, they dissolve within minutes when cells are returned to optimal growth temperatures. Cold shock causes eIF2α phosphorylation through the kinase PERK in mammalian cells, yet this pathway is not alone responsible for translation arrest and SG formation. In addition, cold shock leads to reduced mitochondrial function, energy depletion, concomitant activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Compound C, a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK, prevents the formation of SGs and strongly reduces cellular survival in a translation-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that cells actively suppress protein synthesis by parallel pathways, which induce SG formation and ensure cellular survival during hypothermia. PMID:22875991

  16. Wave energy focusing to subsurface poroelastic formations to promote oil mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karve, Pranav M.; Kallivokas, Loukas F.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss an inverse source formulation aimed at focusing wave energy produced by ground surface sources to target subsurface poroelastic formations. The intent of the focusing is to facilitate or enhance the mobility of oil entrapped within the target formation. The underlying forward wave propagation problem is cast in two spatial dimensions for a heterogeneous poroelastic target embedded within a heterogeneous elastic semi-infinite host. The semi-infiniteness of the elastic host is simulated by augmenting the (finite) computational domain with a buffer of perfectly matched layers. The inverse source algorithm is based on a systematic framework of partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization. It is demonstrated, via numerical experiments, that the algorithm is capable of converging to the spatial and temporal characteristics of surface loads that maximize energy delivery to the target formation. Consequently, the methodology is well-suited for designing field implementations that could meet a desired oil mobility threshold. Even though the methodology, and the results presented herein are in two dimensions, extensions to three dimensions are straightforward.

  17. Bovine binder-of-sperm protein BSP1 promotes protrusion and nanotube formation from liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, Michel; Courtemanche, Lesley; Karlsson, Goeran; Edwards, Katarina; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Manjunath, Puttaswamy

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Binder-of-sperm protein 1 (BSP1) modifies the morphology of lipidic vesicles inducing bead necklace-like and thread-like structures. {yields} In the presence of multilamellar liposomes, BSP1 leads to the formation of long nanotubes. {yields} The insertion of BSP1 in the external lipid leaflet of membranes induces local changes in bilayer curvature. -- Abstract: Binder-of-sperm (BSP) proteins interact with sperm membranes and are proposed to extract selectively phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol from these. This change in lipid composition is a key step in sperm capacitation. The present work demonstrates that the interactions between the protein BSP1 and model membranes composed with phosphatidylcholine lead to drastic changes in the morphology of the lipidic self-assemblies. Using cryo-electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, we show that, in the presence of the protein, the lipid vesicles elongate, and form bead necklace-like structures that evolve toward small vesicles or thread-like structures. In the presence of multilamellar vesicles, where a large reservoir of lipid is available, the presence of BSP proteins lead to the formation of long nanotubes. Long spiral-like threads, associated with lipid/protein complexes, are also observed. The local curvature of lipid membranes induced by the BSP proteins may be involved in lipid domain formation and the extraction of some lipids during the sperm maturation process.

  18. Calcium Promotes the Formation of Syntaxin 1 Mesoscale Domains through Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate*

    PubMed Central

    Platen, Mitja; Junius, Meike; Diederichsen, Ulf; Schaap, Iwan A. T.; Honigmann, Alf; Jahn, Reinhard; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) is a minor component of total plasma membrane lipids, but it has a substantial role in the regulation of many cellular functions, including exo- and endocytosis. Recently, it was shown that PI(4,5)P2 and syntaxin 1, a SNARE protein that catalyzes regulated exocytosis, form domains in the plasma membrane that constitute recognition sites for vesicle docking. Also, calcium was shown to promote syntaxin 1 clustering in the plasma membrane, but the molecular mechanism was unknown. Here, using a combination of superresolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy, FRET, and atomic force microscopy, we show that Ca2+ acts as a charge bridge that specifically and reversibly connects multiple syntaxin 1/PI(4,5)P2 complexes into larger mesoscale domains. This transient reorganization of the plasma membrane by physiological Ca2+ concentrations is likely to be important for Ca2+-regulated secretion. PMID:26884341

  19. Condensin II Promotes the Formation of Chromosome Territories by Inducing Axial Compaction of Polyploid Interphase Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christopher R.; Hartl, Tom A.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The eukaryotic nucleus is both spatially and functionally partitioned. This organization contributes to the maintenance, expression, and transmission of genetic information. Though our ability to probe the physical structure of the genome within the nucleus has improved substantially in recent years, relatively little is known about the factors that regulate its organization or the mechanisms through which specific organizational states are achieved. Here, we show that Drosophila melanogaster Condensin II induces axial compaction of interphase chromosomes, globally disrupts interchromosomal interactions, and promotes the dispersal of peri-centric heterochromatin. These Condensin II activities compartmentalize the nucleus into discrete chromosome territories and indicate commonalities in the mechanisms that regulate the spatial structure of the genome during mitosis and interphase. PMID:22956908

  20. Dithiothreitol causes HIV-1 integrase dimer dissociation while agents interacting with the integrase dimer interface promote dimer formation.

    PubMed

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S; Hung, Magdeleine; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Novikov, Nikolai; Mukund, Susmith; Brendza, Katherine M; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Jin, Debi; Liu, Xiaohong; Mitchell, Michael; Sakowicz, Roman; Geleziunas, Romas

    2011-03-15

    We have developed a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay that detects the formation of HIV-1 integrase (IN) dimers. The assay utilizes IN monomers that express two different epitope tags that are recognized by their respective antibodies, coupled to distinct fluorophores. Surprisingly, we found that dithiothreitol (DTT), a reducing agent essential for in vitro enzymatic activity of IN, weakened the interaction between IN monomers. This effect of DTT on IN is dependent on its thiol groups, since the related chemical threitol, which contains hydroxyls in place of thiols, had no effect on IN dimer formation. By studying mutants of IN, we determined that cysteines in IN appear to be dispensable for the dimer dissociation effect of DTT. Peptides derived from the IN binding domain (IBD) of lens epithelium derived growth factor/transcriptional coactivator p75 (LEDGF), a cellular cofactor that interacts with the IN dimer interface, were tested in this IN dimerization assay. These peptides, which compete with LEDGF for binding to IN, displayed an intriguing equilibrium binding dose-response curve characterized by a plateau rising to a peak, then descending to a second plateau. Mathematical modeling of this binding system revealed that these LEDGF-derived peptides promote IN dimerization and block subunit exchange between IN dimers. This dose-response behavior was also observed with a small molecule that interacts with the IN dimer interface and inhibits LEDGF binding to IN. In conclusion, this novel IN dimerization assay revealed that peptide and small molecule inhibitors of the IN-LEDGF interaction also stabilize IN dimers and promote their formation. PMID:21222490

  1. Natural products for treatment of osteoporosis: The effects and mechanisms on promoting osteoblast-mediated bone formation.

    PubMed

    An, Jing; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Cuicui; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Lingling; Chen, Bo

    2016-02-15

    Osteoporosis is a systemic metabolic bone disease characterized by a reduction in bone mass, bone quality, and microarchitectural deterioration. An imbalance in bone remodeling that is caused by more osteoclast-mediated bone resorption than osteoblast-mediated bone formation results in such pathologic bone disorder. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) have long been used to prevent and treat osteoporosis and have received extensive attentions and researches at home and abroad, because they have fewer adverse reactions and are more suitable for long-term use compared with chemically synthesized medicines. Here, we put the emphasis on osteoblasts, summarized the detailed research progress on the active compounds derived from TCM with potential anti-osteoporosis effects and their molecular mechanisms on promoting osteoblast-mediated bone formation. It could be concluded that TCM with kidney-tonifying, spleen-tonifying, and stasis-removing effects all have the potential effects on treating osteoporosis. The active ingredients derived from TCM that possess effects on promoting osteoblasts proliferation and differentiation include flavonoids, glycosides, coumarins, terpenoids (sesquiterpenoids, monoterpenoids, diterpenoids), phenolic acids, phenols and others (tetrameric stilbene, anthraquinones, diarylheptanoids). And it was confirmed that the bone formation effect induced by the above natural products was regulated by the expressions of bone specific matrix proteins (ALP, BSP, OCN, OPN, COL I), transcription factor (Runx2, Cbfa1, Osx), signal pathways (MAPK, BMP), local factors (ROS, NO), OPG/RANKL system of osteoblasts and estrogen-like biological activities. All the studies provided theoretical basis for clinical application, as well as new drug research and development on treating osteoporosis. PMID:26796578

  2. An Exploration of Teachers' Narratives: What Are the Facilitators and Constraints Which Promote or Inhibit "Good" Formative Assessment Practices in Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sach, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This paper set out to explore teachers' narratives in order to understand some of the facilitators and constraints which promote or inhibit good formative assessment practices in schools. A "responsive interview" approach was used to probe a small sample of lower and middle school teachers' perceptions of formative assessment.…

  3. Syndapin promotes pseudocleavage furrow formation by actin organization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Sherlekar, Aparna; Rikhy, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Coordinated membrane and cytoskeletal remodeling activities are required for membrane extension in processes such as cytokinesis and syncytial nuclear division cycles in Drosophila. Pseudocleavage furrow membranes in the syncytial Drosophila blastoderm embryo show rapid extension and retraction regulated by actin-remodeling proteins. The F-BAR domain protein Syndapin (Synd) is involved in membrane tubulation, endocytosis, and, uniquely, in F-actin stability. Here we report a role for Synd in actin-regulated pseudocleavage furrow formation. Synd localized to these furrows, and its loss resulted in short, disorganized furrows. Synd presence was important for the recruitment of the septin Peanut and distribution of Diaphanous and F-actin at furrows. Synd and Peanut were both absent in furrow-initiation mutants of RhoGEF2 and Diaphanous and in furrow-progression mutants of Anillin. Synd overexpression in rhogef2 mutants reversed its furrow-extension phenotypes, Peanut and Diaphanous recruitment, and F-actin organization. We conclude that Synd plays an important role in pseudocleavage furrow extension, and this role is also likely to be crucial in cleavage furrow formation during cell division. PMID:27146115

  4. ProSAP1 and membrane nanodomain-associated syndapin I promote postsynapse formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Katharina; Seemann, Eric; Liebmann, Lutz; Ahuja, Rashmi; Koch, Dennis; Westermann, Martin; Hübner, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Insights into mechanisms coordinating membrane remodeling, local actin nucleation, and postsynaptic scaffolding during postsynapse formation are important for understanding vertebrate brain function. Gene knockout and RNAi in individual neurons reveal that the F-BAR protein syndapin I is a crucial postsynaptic coordinator in formation of excitatory synapses. Syndapin I deficiency caused significant reductions of synapse and dendritic spine densities. These syndapin I functions reflected direct, SH3 domain–mediated associations and functional interactions with ProSAP1/Shank2. They furthermore required F-BAR domain-mediated membrane binding. Ultra-high-resolution imaging of specifically membrane-associated, endogenous syndapin I at membranes of freeze-fractured neurons revealed that membrane-bound syndapin I preferentially occurred in spines and formed clusters at distinct postsynaptic membrane subareas. Postsynaptic syndapin I deficiency led to reduced frequencies of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, i.e., to defects in synaptic transmission phenocopying ProSAP1/Shank2 knockout, and impairments in proper synaptic ProSAP1/Shank2 distribution. Syndapin I–enriched membrane nanodomains thus seem to be important spatial cues and organizing platforms, shaping dendritic membrane areas into synaptic compartments. PMID:24751538

  5. Syndapin promotes pseudocleavage furrow formation by actin organization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Sherlekar, Aparna; Rikhy, Richa

    2016-07-01

    Coordinated membrane and cytoskeletal remodeling activities are required for membrane extension in processes such as cytokinesis and syncytial nuclear division cycles in Drosophila Pseudocleavage furrow membranes in the syncytial Drosophila blastoderm embryo show rapid extension and retraction regulated by actin-remodeling proteins. The F-BAR domain protein Syndapin (Synd) is involved in membrane tubulation, endocytosis, and, uniquely, in F-actin stability. Here we report a role for Synd in actin-regulated pseudocleavage furrow formation. Synd localized to these furrows, and its loss resulted in short, disorganized furrows. Synd presence was important for the recruitment of the septin Peanut and distribution of Diaphanous and F-actin at furrows. Synd and Peanut were both absent in furrow-initiation mutants of RhoGEF2 and Diaphanous and in furrow-progression mutants of Anillin. Synd overexpression in rhogef2 mutants reversed its furrow-extension phenotypes, Peanut and Diaphanous recruitment, and F-actin organization. We conclude that Synd plays an important role in pseudocleavage furrow extension, and this role is also likely to be crucial in cleavage furrow formation during cell division. PMID:27146115

  6. GSI promotes vincristine-induced apoptosis by enhancing multi-polar spindle formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akannsha; Zapata, Mariana C; Choi, Yong Sung; Yoon, Sun-Ok

    2014-01-01

    Gamma secretase inhibitors (GSI), cell-permeable small-molecule inhibitors of gamma secretase activity, had been originally developed for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. In recent years, it has been exploited in cancer research to inhibit Notch signaling that is aberrantly activated in various cancers. We previously found that GSI could synergize with anti-microtubule agent, vincristine (VCR) in a Notch-independent manner. Here, we delineate the underlying cell cycle-related mechanism using HeLa cells, which have strong mitotic checkpoints. GSI enhanced VCR-induced cell death, although GSI alone did not affect cell viability at all. GSI augmented VCR-induced mitotic arrest in a dose-dependent manner, which was preceded by apoptotic cell death, as shown by an increase in Annexin V-positive and caspase-positive cell population. Furthermore, GSI amplified multi-polar spindle formation triggered by VCR. Altogether, we show the evidence that GSI enhances VCR-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells via multi-polar mitotic spindle formation, independent of Notch signaling. These data suggest that one or more GS substrates, yet to be identified, in a post-GS processed form, may play a role in maintaining functional centrosomes/mitotic spindles. More significantly, the synergistic effect of GSI in combination with VCR could be exploited in clinical setting to improve the efficacy of VCR. PMID:24200971

  7. Beta-catenin and BMP-2 synergize to promote osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation.

    PubMed

    Mbalaviele, Gabriel; Sheikh, Sharmin; Stains, Joseph P; Salazar, Valerie S; Cheng, Su-Li; Chen, Di; Civitelli, Roberto

    2005-02-01

    Mutations of critical components of the Wnt pathway profoundly affect skeletal development and maintenance, probably via modulation of beta-catenin signaling. We tested the hypothesis that beta-catenin is involved in mesenchymal lineage allocation to osteogenic cells using a beta-catenin mutant with constitutive transcriptional activity (DeltaN151). Although this stable beta-catenin had no effects by itself on osteogenic differentiation of multipotent embryonic cell lines, it synergized with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) resulting in dramatic stimulation of alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin gene expression, and matrix mineralization. Likewise, DeltaN151 and BMP-2 synergistically stimulated new bone formation after subperiosteal injection in mouse calvaria in vivo. Conversely, DeltaN151 prevented adipogenic differentiation from pre-adipocytic or uncommitted mesenchymal cells in vitro. Intriguingly, the synergism with BMP-2 on gene transcription occurred without altering expression of Cbfa1/Runx2, suggesting actions independent or downstream of this osteoblast-specific transcription factor. Thus, beta-catenin directs osteogenic lineage allocation by enhancing mesenchymal cell responsiveness to osteogenic factors, such as BMP-2, in part via Tcf/Lef dependent mechanisms. In vivo, this synergism leads to increased new bone formation. PMID:15526274

  8. Endogenous cannabinoid receptor CB1 activation promotes vascular smooth-muscle cell proliferation and neointima formation

    PubMed Central

    Molica, Filippo; Burger, Fabienne; Thomas, Aurélien; Staub, Christian; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Pelli, Graziano; Zimmer, Andreas; Cravatt, Benjamin; Matter, Christian M.; Pacher, Pal; Steffens, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty is frequently used in patients with severe arterial narrowing due to atherosclerosis. However, it induces severe arterial injury and an inflammatory response leading to restenosis. Here, we studied a potential activation of the endocannabinoid system and the effect of FA amide hydrolase (FAAH) deficiency, the major enzyme responsible for endocannabinoid anandamide degradation, in arterial injury. We performed carotid balloon injury in atherosclerosis-prone apoE knockout (apoE−/−) and apoE−/−FAAH−/− mice. Anandamide levels were systemically elevated in apoE−/− mice after balloon injury. ApoE−/−FAAH−/− mice had significantly higher baseline anandamide levels and enhanced neointima formation compared with apoE−/− controls. The latter effect was inhibited by treatment with CB1 antagonist AM281. Similarly, apoE−/− mice treated with AM281 had reduced neointimal areas, reduced lesional vascular smooth-muscle cell (SMC) content, and proliferating cell counts. The lesional macrophage content was unchanged. In vitro proliferation rates were significantly reduced in CB1−/− SMCs or when treating apoE−/− or apoE−/−FAAH−/− SMCs with AM281. Macrophage in vitro adhesion and migration were marginally affected by CB1 deficiency. Reendothelialization was not inhibited by treatment with AM281. In conclusion, endogenous CB1 activation contributes to vascular SMC proliferation and neointima formation in response to arterial injury. PMID:23479425

  9. Telomeres and centromeres have interchangeable roles in promoting meiotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Alex; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Tomita, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres and centromeres have traditionally been considered to perform distinct roles. During meiotic prophase, in a conserved chromosomal configuration called the bouquet, telomeres gather to the nuclear membrane (NM), often near centrosomes. We found previously that upon disruption of the fission yeast bouquet, centrosomes failed to insert into the NM at meiosis I and nucleate bipolar spindles. Hence, the trans-NM association of telomeres with centrosomes during prophase is crucial for efficient spindle formation. Nonetheless, in approximately half of bouquet-deficient meiocytes, spindles form properly. Here, we show that bouquet-deficient cells can successfully undergo meiosis using centromere–centrosome contact instead of telomere–centrosome contact to generate spindle formation. Accordingly, forced association between centromeres and centrosomes fully rescued the spindle defects incurred by bouquet disruption. Telomeres and centromeres both stimulate focal accumulation of the SUN domain protein Sad1 beneath the centrosome, suggesting a molecular underpinning for their shared spindle-generating ability. Our observations demonstrate an unanticipated level of interchangeability between the two most prominent chromosomal landmarks. PMID:25688135

  10. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Carrolo, Margarida; Frias, Maria João; Pinto, Francisco Rodrigues; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mário

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages) residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population. PMID:21187931

  11. microRNAs That Promote or Inhibit Memory Formation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Busto, Germain U.; Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Fulga, Tudor A.; Van Vactor, David; Davis, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Prior studies have shown that they regulate numerous physiological processes critical for normal development, cellular growth control, and organismal behavior. Here, we systematically surveyed 134 different miRNAs for roles in olfactory learning and memory formation using “sponge” technology to titrate their activity broadly in the Drosophila melanogaster central nervous system. We identified at least five different miRNAs involved in memory formation or retention from this large screen, including miR-9c, miR-31a, miR-305, miR-974, and miR-980. Surprisingly, the titration of some miRNAs increased memory, while the titration of others decreased memory. We performed more detailed experiments on two miRNAs, miR-974 and miR-31a, by mapping their roles to subpopulations of brain neurons and testing the functional involvement in memory of potential mRNA targets through bioinformatics and a RNA interference knockdown approach. This screen offers an important first step toward the comprehensive identification of all miRNAs and their potential targets that serve in gene regulatory networks important for normal learning and memory. PMID:26088433

  12. Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) promotes the adhesion of marine bacteria and algae and enhances following biofilm formation in artificial seawater.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jinpeng; Abdoli, Leila; Li, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Adhesion of microorganisms in the marine environment is essential for initiation and following development of biofouling. A variety of factors play roles in regulating the adhesion. Here we report the influence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in artificial seawater on attachment and colonization of Bacillus sp., Chlorella and Phaeodactylum tricornutum on silicon wafer. Extra addition of the typical divalent cations in culturing solution gives rise to significantly enhanced adhesion of the microorganisms. Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) affect the adhesion of Bacillus sp. presumably by regulating aggregation and formation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The ions alter quantity and types of the proteins in EPS, in turn affecting subsequent adhesion. However, it is noted that Mg(2+) promotes adhesion of Chlorella likely by regulating EPS formation and polysaccharide synthesis. Ca(2+) plays an important role in protein expression to enhance the adhesion of Chlorella. For Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Ca(2+) expedites protein synthesis for enhanced adhesion. The results shed some light on effective ways of utilizing divalent cations to mediate formation of biofilms on the marine structures for desired performances. PMID:27362920

  13. The matrix protein CCN1 (CYR61) promotes proliferation, migration and tube formation of endothelial progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yang; Gao Yu; Wang, Hong; Huang Lan Qin Jun; Guo Ruiwei; Song Mingbao; Yu Shiyong; Chen Jianfei; Cui Bin; Gao Pan

    2008-10-15

    Neovascularization and re-endothelialization relies on circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but their recruitment and angiogenic roles are subjected to regulation by the vascular microenvironment, which remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of mature ECs and matrix protein CCN1 on the properties of EPCs. In a coculture system, effects of ECs on proliferation, migration and participation in tube-like formation of EPCs were evaluated, and functional assays were employed to identify the exact role of CCN1 in EPCs vitality and function. We demonstrated that ECs, as an indispensable part of the cellular milieu, significantly promoted the proliferation, migration and tube formation activities of EPCs, and more importantly, CCN1 was potentially involved in such effects of ECs. Expression of CCN1 in EPCs was significantly increased by serum, VEGF, ECs-cocultivation and ECs conditioned medium. Moreover, Ad-CCN1-mediated overexpression of CCN1 directly enhanced migration and tube formation of EPCs, whereas silencing of endogenous CCN1 in EPCs inhibits cell functions. Furthermore, CCN1 induced the expressions of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP-1 and VEGF, suggesting a complex interaction between those proangiogenic factors. Our data suggest that matrix protein CCN1 may play an important role in microenvironment-mediated biological properties of EPCs.

  14. Lysine 63-linked ubiquitination promotes the formation and autophagic clearance of protein inclusions associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeanne M M; Wong, Esther S P; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Pletnikova, Olga; Ko, Han Seok; Tay, Shiam-Peng; Ho, Michelle W L; Troncoso, Juan; Gygi, Steven P; Lee, Michael K; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2008-02-01

    Although ubiquitin-enriched protein inclusions represent an almost invariant feature of neurodegenerative diseases, the mechanism underlying their biogenesis remains unclear. In particular, whether the topology of ubiquitin linkages influences the dynamics of inclusions is not well explored. Here, we report that lysine 48 (K48)- and lysine 63 (K63)-linked polyubiquitination, as well as monoubiquitin modification contribute to the biogenesis of inclusions. K63-linked polyubiquitin is the most consistent enhancer of inclusions formation. Under basal conditions, ectopic expression of K63 mutant ubiquitin in cultured cells promotes the accumulation of proteins and the formation of intracellular inclusions in the apparent absence of proteasome impairment. When co-expressed with disease-associated tau and SOD1 mutants, K63 ubiquitin mutant facilitates the formation of tau- and SOD-1-positive inclusions. Moreover, K63-linked ubiquitination was found to selectively facilitate the clearance of inclusions via autophagy. These data indicate that K63-linked ubiquitin chains may represent a common denominator underlying inclusions biogenesis, as well as a general cellular strategy for defining cargo destined for the autophagic system. Collectively, our results provide a novel mechanistic route that underlies the life cycle of an inclusion body. Harnessing this pathway may offer innovative approaches in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17981811

  15. Tau and spectraplakins promote synapse formation and maintenance through Jun kinase and neuronal trafficking.

    PubMed

    Voelzmann, Andre; Okenve-Ramos, Pilar; Qu, Yue; Chojnowska-Monga, Monika; Del Caño-Espinel, Manuela; Prokop, Andreas; Sanchez-Soriano, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating synapse numbers during development and ageing are essential for normal brain function and closely linked to brain disorders including dementias. Using Drosophila, we demonstrate roles of the microtubule-associated protein Tau in regulating synapse numbers, thus unravelling an important cellular requirement of normal Tau. In this context, we find that Tau displays a strong functional overlap with microtubule-binding spectraplakins, establishing new links between two different neurodegenerative factors. Tau and the spectraplakin Short Stop act upstream of a three-step regulatory cascade ensuring adequate delivery of synaptic proteins. This cascade involves microtubule stability as the initial trigger, JNK signalling as the central mediator, and kinesin-3 mediated axonal transport as the key effector. This cascade acts during development (synapse formation) and ageing (synapse maintenance) alike. Therefore, our findings suggest novel explanations for intellectual disability in Tau deficient individuals, as well as early synapse loss in dementias including Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27501441

  16. Silk matrices promote formation of insulin-secreting islet-like clusters.

    PubMed

    Shalaly, Nancy Dekki; Ria, Massimiliano; Johansson, Ulrika; Åvall, Karin; Berggren, Per-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2016-06-01

    Ex vivo expansion of endocrine cells constitutes an interesting alternative to be able to match the unmet need of transplantable pancreatic islets. However, endocrine cells become fragile once removed from their extracellular matrix (ECM) and typically become senescent and loose insulin expression during conventional 2D culture. Herein we develop a protocol where 3D silk matrices functionalized with ECM-derived motifs are used for generation of insulin-secreting islet-like clusters from mouse and human primary cells. The obtained clusters were shown to attain an islet-like spheroid shape and to maintain functional insulin release upon glucose stimulation in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo imaging of transplanted murine clusters showed engraftment with increasing vessel formation during time. There was no sign of cell death and the clusters maintained or increased in size throughout the period, thus suggesting a suitable cluster size for transplantation. PMID:26986856

  17. TPPP/p25 promotes tubulin assemblies and blocks mitotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tirián, L.; Hlavanda, E.; Oláh, J.; Horváth, I.; Orosz, F.; Szabó, B.; Kovács, J.; Szabad, J.; Ovádi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we isolated from bovine brain a protein, TPPP/p25 and identified as p25, a brain-specific protein that induced aberrant tubulin assemblies. The primary sequence of this protein differs from that of other proteins identified so far; however, it shows high homology with p25-like hypothetical proteins sought via blast. Here, we characterized the binding of TPPP/p25 to tubulin by means of surface plasmon resonance; the kinetic parameters are as follows: kon, 2.4 × 104 M–1·s–1; koff, 5.4 × 10–3 s–1; and Kd, 2.3 × 10–7 M. This protein at substoichometric concentration promotes the polymerization of tubulin into double-walled tubules and polymorphic aggregates or bundles paclitaxel-stabilized microtubules as judged by quantitative data of electron and atomic force microscopies. Injection of bovine TPPP/p25 into cleavage Drosophila embryos expressing tubulin–GFP fusion protein reveals that TPPP/p25 inhibits mitotic spindle assembly and nuclear envelope breakdown without affecting other cellular events like centrosome replication and separation, microtubule nucleation by the centrosomes, and nuclear growth. GTP counteracts TPPP/p25 both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:14623963

  18. Smad4 loss promotes lung cancer formation but increases sensitivity to DNA topoisomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Haeger, S M; Thompson, J J; Kalra, S; Cleaver, T G; Merrick, D; Wang, X-J; Malkoski, S P

    2016-02-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a common malignancy with a poor prognosis. Despite progress targeting oncogenic drivers, there are no therapies targeting tumor-suppressor loss. Smad4 is an established tumor suppressor in pancreatic and colon cancer; however, the consequences of Smad4 loss in lung cancer are largely unknown. We evaluated Smad4 expression in human NSCLC samples and examined Smad4 alterations in large NSCLC data sets and found that reduced Smad4 expression is common in human NSCLC and occurs through a variety of mechanisms, including mutation, homozygous deletion and heterozygous loss. We modeled Smad4 loss in lung cancer by deleting Smad4 in airway epithelial cells and found that Smad4 deletion both initiates and promotes lung tumor development. Interestingly, both Smad4(-/-) mouse tumors and human NSCLC samples with reduced Smad4 expression demonstrated increased DNA damage, whereas Smad4 knockdown in lung cancer cells reduced DNA repair and increased apoptosis after DNA damage. In addition, Smad4-deficient NSCLC cells demonstrated increased sensitivity to both chemotherapeutics that inhibit DNA topoisomerase and drugs that block double-strand DNA break repair by non-homologous end joining. In sum, these studies establish Smad4 as a lung tumor suppressor and suggest that the defective DNA repair phenotype of Smad4-deficient tumors can be exploited by specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:25893305

  19. Calcium carbonate hybrid coating promotes the formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Marcos Antônio E.; Ruiz, Gilia C. M.; Faria, Amanda N.; Zancanela, Daniela C.; Pereira, Lourivaldo S.; Ciancaglini, Pietro; Ramos, Ana P.

    2016-05-01

    CaCO3 particles dispersed in liquid media have proven to be good inductors of hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. However, the use of CaCO3 deposited as thin films for this propose is unknown. Here, we report the growth of CaCO3 continuous films on Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) modified titanium surfaces and its use as HAp growth inductor. The Ti surfaces were modified with two, four, and six layers of dihexadecylphosphate (DHP)-LB films containing Ca2+, exposed to CO2 (g) for 12 h. The modified surfaces were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 36 h and submitted to bioactivity studies. This procedure originates bioactive coatings composed by non-stoichiometric HAp as evidenced by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of the CaCO3 film as pre-coating diminished the time necessary to growth continuous and homogeneous HAp films using a biomimetic approach. The surface properties of the films regarding their roughness, composition, charge, wettability, and surface free energy (γs) were accessed. The presence of HAp increased the wettability and γs of the surfaces. The coatings are not toxic for osteoblasts as observed for cell viability assays obtained after 7 and 14 days of culture. Moreover, the CaCO3 thin films promote the recovery of the osteoblasts viability more than the Ti surfaces themselves.

  20. Attenuation of AMPK signaling by ROQUIN promotes T follicular helper cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Ramiscal, Roybel R; Parish, Ian A; Lee-Young, Robert S; Babon, Jeffrey J; Blagih, Julianna; Pratama, Alvin; Martin, Jaime; Hawley, Naomi; Cappello, Jean Y; Nieto, Pablo F; Ellyard, Julia I; Kershaw, Nadia J; Sweet, Rebecca A; Goodnow, Christopher C; Jones, Russell G; Febbraio, Mark A; Vinuesa, Carola G; Athanasopoulos, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh) are critical for the longevity and quality of antibody-mediated protection against infection. Yet few signaling pathways have been identified to be unique solely to Tfh development. ROQUIN is a post-transcriptional repressor of T cells, acting through its ROQ domain to destabilize mRNA targets important for Th1, Th17, and Tfh biology. Here, we report that ROQUIN has a paradoxical function on Tfh differentiation mediated by its RING domain: mice with a T cell-specific deletion of the ROQUIN RING domain have unchanged Th1, Th2, Th17, and Tregs during a T-dependent response but show a profoundly defective antigen-specific Tfh compartment. ROQUIN RING signaling directly antagonized the catalytic α1 subunit of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a central stress-responsive regulator of cellular metabolism and mTOR signaling, which is known to facilitate T-dependent humoral immunity. We therefore unexpectedly uncover a ROQUIN–AMPK metabolic signaling nexus essential for selectively promoting Tfh responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08698.001 PMID:26496200

  1. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO₂ nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO₂-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants. PMID:26927080

  2. Pyruvate kinase M2 activators promote tetramer formation and suppress tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Yu, Yimin; Israelsen, William J.; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Boxer, Matthew B.; Hong, Bum Soo; Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Svetoslav; Shen, Min; Jha, Abhishek; Yang, Hua; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Metallo, Christian M.; Fiske, Brian P.; Courtney, Kevin D.; Malstrom, Scott; Khan, Tahsin M.; Kung, Charles; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Walsh, Martin J.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Leister, William; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Yen, Katharine E.; Kunii, Kaiko; Davidson, Shawn M.; Christofk, Heather R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Harris, Marian H.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Salituro, Francesco G.; Jin, Shengfang; Dang, Lenny; Auld, Douglas S.; Park, Hee-Won; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2012-08-26

    Cancer cells engage in a metabolic program to enhance biosynthesis and support cell proliferation. The regulatory properties of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) influence altered glucose metabolism in cancer. The interaction of PKM2 with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins inhibits enzyme activity and increases the availability of glycolytic metabolites to support cell proliferation. This suggests that high pyruvate kinase activity may suppress tumor growth. We show that expression of PKM1, the pyruvate kinase isoform with high constitutive activity, or exposure to published small-molecule PKM2 activators inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. Structural studies reveal that small-molecule activators bind PKM2 at the subunit interaction interface, a site that is distinct from that of the endogenous activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). However, unlike FBP, binding of activators to PKM2 promotes a constitutively active enzyme state that is resistant to inhibition by tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. This data supports the notion that small-molecule activation of PKM2 can interfere with anabolic metabolism.

  3. Pyruvate kinase M2 activators promote tetramer formation and suppress tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Yu, Yimin; Israelsen, William J.; Jiang, Jian-kang; Boxer, Matthew B.; Hong, Bum Soo; Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Svetoslav; Shen, Min; Jha, Abhishek; Yang, Hua; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Metallo, Christian M.; Fiske, Brian P.; Courtney, Kevin D.; Malstrom, Scott; Khan, Tahsin M.; Kung, Charles; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Walsh, Martin J.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Leister, William; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Yen, Katharine E.; Kunii, Kaiko; Davidson, Shawn M.; Christofk, Heather R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Harris, Marian H.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Salituro, Francesco G.; Jin, Shengfang; Dang, Lenny; Auld, Douglas S.; Park, Hee-Won; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells engage in a metabolic program to enhance biosynthesis and support cell proliferation. The regulatory properties of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) influence altered glucose metabolism in cancer. PKM2 interaction with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins inhibits enzyme activity and increases availability of glycolytic metabolites to support cell proliferation. This suggests that high pyruvate kinase activity may suppress tumor growth. We show that expression of PKM1, the pyruvate kinase isoform with high constitutive activity, or exposure to published small molecule PKM2 activators inhibit growth of xenograft tumors. Structural studies reveal that small molecule activators bind PKM2 at the subunit interaction interface, a site distinct from that of the endogenous activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). However, unlike FBP, binding of activators to PKM2 promotes a constitutively active enzyme state that is resistant to inhibition by tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. These data support the notion that small molecule activation of PKM2 can interfere with anabolic metabolism. PMID:22922757

  4. NR4A1 promotes PDGF-BB-induced cell colony formation in soft agar.

    PubMed

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth. PMID:25269081

  5. NR4A1 Promotes PDGF-BB-Induced Cell Colony Formation in Soft Agar

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth. PMID:25269081

  6. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO2 nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO2-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants. PMID:26927080

  7. In vivo phosphorylation of CFTR promotes formation of a nucleotide-binding domain heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Mense, Martin; Vergani, Paola; White, Dennis M; Altberg, Gal; Nairn, Angus C; Gadsby, David C

    2006-01-01

    The human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a chloride channel, whose dysfunction causes cystic fibrosis. To gain structural insight into the dynamic interaction between CFTR's nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) proposed to underlie channel gating, we introduced target cysteines into the NBDs, expressed the channels in Xenopus oocytes, and used in vivo sulfhydryl-specific crosslinking to directly examine the cysteines' proximity. We tested five cysteine pairs, each comprising one introduced cysteine in the NH2-terminal NBD1 and another in the COOH-terminal NBD2. Identification of crosslinked product was facilitated by co-expression of NH2-terminal and COOH-terminal CFTR half channels each containing one NBD. The COOH-terminal half channel lacked all native cysteines. None of CFTR's 18 native cysteines was found essential for wild type-like, phosphorylation- and ATP-dependent, channel gating. The observed crosslinks demonstrate that NBD1 and NBD2 interact in a head-to-tail configuration analogous to that in homodimeric crystal structures of nucleotide-bound prokaryotic NBDs. CFTR phosphorylation by PKA strongly promoted both crosslinking and opening of the split channels, firmly linking head-to-tail NBD1–NBD2 association to channel opening. PMID:17036051

  8. The 'balance intervention' for promoting caloric compensatory behaviours in response to overeating: a formative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wammes, Birgitte; Breedveld, Boudewijn; Kremers, Stef; Brug, Johannes

    2006-08-01

    To help people prevent weight gain, the Netherlands Nutrition Centre initiated the 'balance intervention', which promotes moderation of food intake and/or increased physical activity in response to occasions of overeating. The aim of this study was to determine whether intervention materials were appreciated, encouraged information seeking and increased motivation and caloric compensatory behaviours. A three-group randomized trial with pre-intervention measures (n = 963, response 86%) and post-intervention measures (n = 857) using electronic questionnaires was conducted among participants aged 25-40 years, recruited from an Internet research panel. The first group received a printed brochure and electronic newsletters (print group), the second group was exposed to radio advertisements (radio group) and the third group was the control group. Multiple regression analyses were used to investigate the impact of the materials on self-reported prevalence of overeating, attitudes, perceived behavioural control, intentions and compensatory behaviours. At follow-up, we found significantly more positive attitudes, intentions and dietary action in the print and radio groups. However, participants who received the radio advertisement had a significantly lower perceived behavioural control. No effects were found on the prevalence of overeating. The results indicate that the intervention materials have potential for increasing people's attitudes, motivation and self-reported behaviour actions, with a possible negative side-effect on perceived behavioural control. PMID:16606638

  9. Hypoxia regulates SOX2 expression to promote prostate cancer cell invasion and sphere formation

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyung-Mi; Dai, Yao; Vieweg, Johannes; Siemann, Dietmar W

    2016-01-01

    SOX2 is an embryonic stem cell marker that in prostate cancer has been associated not only with tumorigenesis but also metastasis. Furthermore hypoxia in primary tumors has been linked to poor prognosis and outcomes in this disease. The goal of the present study was to investigate the impact of hypoxia on SOX2 expression and metastasis-associated functions in prostate cancer cells. A tissue microarray of 80 samples from prostate cancer patients or healthy controls was employed to examine the expression of HIF-1α and its correlation with SOX2. The role of SOX2 and HIF-1/2α in the regulation of cell invasion and sphere formation capacity under hypoxic conditions was investigated in vitro using short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown in three human prostate cancer cell lines. HIF-1α expression was significantly elevated in malignant prostate tissue compared to benign or normal tissue, and in tumor samples its expression was highly correlated with SOX2. In prostate cancer cells, acute and chronic exposures to hypoxia that resulted in elevated expression levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α, respectively, also induced SOX2. Genetic depletion of SOX2 attenuated hypoxia-induced cell functions. Knockdown of HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α, decreased acute hypoxia-mediated cell invasion and SOX2 up-regulation, whereas only HIF-2α gene silencing reduced sphere formation capacity and chronic hypoxia-mediated SOX2 up-regulation. Enhanced SOX2 expression and HIF-1α or HIF-2α associated phenotypes are dependent on the time duration of exposure to hypoxia. The present results indicate that SOX2 may be a key mediator of hypoxia-induced metastasis-associated functions and hence may serve as a potential target for therapeutic interventions for metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:27294000

  10. Cleavage of Human Transferrin by Porphyromonas gingivalis Gingipains Promotes Growth and Formation of Hydroxyl Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Véronique; Britigan, Bradley; Nakayama, Koji; Grenier, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium associated with active lesions of chronic periodontitis, produces several proteinases which are presumably involved in host colonization, perturbation of the immune system, and tissue destruction. The aims of this study were to investigate the degradation of human transferrin by gingipain cysteine proteinases of P. gingivalis and to demonstrate the production of toxic hydroxyl radicals (HO·) catalyzed by the iron-containing transferrin fragments generated or by release of iron itself. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting showed that preparations of Arg- and Lys-gingipains of P. gingivalis cleave transferrin (iron-free and iron-saturated forms) into fragments of various sizes. Interestingly, gingival crevicular fluid samples from diseased periodontal sites but not samples from healthy periodontal sites contained fragments of transferrin. By using 55Fe-transferrin, it was found that degradation by P. gingivalis gingipains resulted in the production of free iron, as well as iron bound to lower-molecular-mass fragments. Subsequent to the degradation of transferrin, bacterial cells assimilated intracellularly the radiolabeled iron. Growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, but not growth of an Arg-gingipain- and Lys-gingipain-deficient mutant, was possible in a chemically defined medium containing 30% iron-saturated transferrin as the only source of iron and peptides, suggesting that gingipains play a critical role in the acquisition of essential growth nutrients. Finally, the transferrin degradation products generated by Arg-gingipains A and B were capable of catalyzing the formation of HO·, as determined by a hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system and spin trapping-electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry. Our study indicates that P. gingivalis gingipains degrade human transferrin, providing sources of iron and peptides. The iron-containing transferrin fragments or the

  11. Surfactant tuning of hydrophilicity of porous degradable copolymer scaffolds promotes cellular proliferation and enhances bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohammed A; Leknes, Knut N; Sun, Yang; Lie, Stein A; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Poly(l-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (poly(LLA-co-CL)) has been blended with Tween 80 to tune the material properties and optimize cell-material interactions. Accordingly, the aims of this study were fourfold: to evaluate the effect of low concentrations of Tween 80 on the surface microstructure of 3D poly(LLA-co-CL) porous scaffolds: to determine the effect of different concentrations of Tween 80 on proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro under dynamic cell culture at 7 and 21 days; to assess the influence of Tween 80 on the degradation rate of poly(LLA-co-CL) at 7 and 21 days; and in a subcutaneous rat model, to evaluate the effect on bone formation of porous scaffolds modified with 3% Tween 80 at 2 and 8 weeks. Blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly(LLA-co-CL) improves the surface wettability (p < 0.001). Poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 shows significantly increased cellular proliferation at days 7 and 21 (p < 0.001). Moreover, the presence of Tween 80 facilitates the degradation of poly(LLA-co-CL). Two weeks post-implantation, the poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds exhibit significant mRNA expression of Runx2 (p = 0.004). After 8 weeks, poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds show significantly increased de novo bone formation, demonstrated by μ-CT (p = 0.0133) and confirmed histologically. It can be concluded that blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly (LLA-co-CL) improves the hydrophilicity and osteogenic potential of the scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2049-2059, 2016. PMID:27086867

  12. Complementary expression of optomotor-blind and the Iroquois complex promotes fold formation to separate wing notum and hinge territories.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Li, Lingyun; Lu, Juan; Liu, Suning; Shen, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Animal morphogenesis requires folds or clefts to separate populations of cells which are often associated with different cell affinities. In the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, the regional expression of the Iroquois complex (Iro-C) in the notum leads to the formation of the hinge/notum (H/N) fold that separates the wing hinge and notum territories. Although Decapentaplegic (Dpp) signaling has been revealed as essential for the hinge/notum subdivision through the restriction of Iro-C toward the notum region, the mechanism by which the H/N border develops into a fold is unknown. Here, we report that a Dpp target gene, optomotor-blind (omb), mediates the role of Dpp signaling in Iro-C inhibition. omb is complementarily expressed on the dorsal hinge side, abutting the Iro-C domain along the H/N border. Ectopic omb expression inhibits Iro-C in the notum territory, independent of known Iro-C regulators Msh and Stat92E. Uniform manipulation of either omb or Iro-C genes spanning the presumptive H/N border significantly suppresses H/N fold formation via inhibition of the apical microtubule enrichment. Ectopically sharp border or discontinuity in level of Iro-C or Omb is enough to generate ectopic fold formation. These results reveal that omb and Iro-C not only are complementarily expressed but also cooperate to promote H/N fold formation. Our data help to understand how Dpp signaling is interpreted region-specifically during tissue subdivision. PMID:27212024

  13. Urocortin 2 But Not Urocortin 3 Promotes the Synaptic Formation in Hipppocampal Neurons via Induction of NGF Production by Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, You; Zhang, Yan-Min; Ni, Xin

    2016-03-01

    CRH family peptides play differential role during various physiological and pathophysiological responses, such as stress. Urocortins (UCNs) have been implicated to play complementary or contrasting actions for the effects of CRH during stress. It has been shown that activation of CRH receptor type 1 (CRHR1) results in decreased synapse formation in hippocampus. We therefore explored the effect of UCN2 and UCN3, the exclusive CRHR2 agonists, on synaptic formation in hippocampus. In hippocampal slices cultures, UCN2 but not UCN3 treatment increased the levels of presynaptic protein synapsinI and postsynaptic protein postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95), which was reversed by CRHR2 antagonist astressin 2B. In isolated hippocampal neurons, however, UCN2 decreased the numbers of synapsinI- and PSD95-labeled terminals/clusters via CRHR2. Treatment of hippocampal neurons with the media of UCN2-treated astrocytes led to an increase in synapsinI- and PSD95-labeled terminals. In neuron-astrocyte cocultures, UCN2 also enhanced the numbers and level of synapsinI- and PSD95-labeled terminals. These effects did not occur if glial cells were transfected with CRHR2 small interfering RNA. UCN2 but not UCN3 treatment induced nerve growth factor (NGF) production in astrocytes via CRHR2. The effects of the media of UCN2-treated glial cells on synapse formation in hippocampal neurons were prevented by administration of NGF receptor antagonists. Our data indicate that UCN2 promotes synapse formation in hippocampus via induction of NGF secretion from astrocytes. CRHR2 in glial cells mediates the stimulatory effects of CRH. Glia-neuron communication is critical for neuronal circuits remodeling and synaptic plasticity in response to neurohormones or neuromodulators. PMID:26713785

  14. Vascular niche promotes hematopoietic multipotent progenitor formation from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Jennifer L.; Butler, Jason M.; Chan, Yan-Yi; Chandrasekaran, Devikha; Poulos, Michael G.; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel J.; Elemento, Olivier; Wood, Brent L.; Adair, Jennifer E.; Rafii, Shahin; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an alternative hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) source for treating hematopoietic disease. The limited engraftment of human PSC–derived (hPSC-derived) multipotent progenitor cells (MPP) has hampered the clinical application of these cells and suggests that MPP require additional cues for definitive hematopoiesis. We hypothesized that the presence of a vascular niche that produces Notch ligands jagged-1 (JAG1) and delta-like ligand-4 (DLL4) drives definitive hematopoiesis. We differentiated hes2 human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and Macaca nemestrina–induced PSC (iPSC) line-7 with cytokines in the presence or absence of endothelial cells (ECs) that express JAG1 and DLL4. Cells cocultured with ECs generated substantially more CD34+CD45+ hematopoietic progenitors compared with cells cocultured without ECs or with ECs lacking JAG1 or DLL4. EC-induced cells exhibited Notch activation and expressed HSC-specific Notch targets RUNX1 and GATA2. EC-induced PSC-MPP engrafted at a markedly higher level in NOD/SCID/IL-2 receptor γ chain–null (NSG) mice compared with cytokine-induced cells, and low-dose chemotherapy-based selection further increased engraftment. Long-term engraftment and the myeloid-to-lymphoid ratio achieved with vascular niche induction were similar to levels achieved for cord blood–derived MPP and up to 20-fold higher than those achieved with hPSC-derived MPP engraftment. Our findings indicate that endothelial Notch ligands promote PSC-definitive hematopoiesis and production of long-term engrafting CD34+ cells, suggesting these ligands are critical for HSC emergence. PMID:25664855

  15. Mesenchymal Wnt Signaling Promotes Formation of Sternum and Thoracic Body Wall

    PubMed Central

    Snowball, John; Ambalavanan, Manoj; Cornett, Bridget; Lang, Richard; Whitsett, Jeff; Sinner, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Midline defects account for approximately 5% of congenital abnormalities observed at birth. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of the ventral body wall are not well understood. Recent studies linked mutations in Porcupine—an O-acetyl transferase mediating Wnt ligand acylation—with defects in the thoracic body wall. We hypothesized that anomalous Wnt signaling is involved in the pathogenesis of defective closure of the thoracic body wall. We generated a mouse model wherein Wntless (Wls), which encodes a cargo receptor mediating secretion of Wnt ligands, was conditionally deleted from the developing mesenchyme using Dermo1Cre mice. Wlsf/f;Dermo1Cre/+ embryos died during mid-gestation. At E13.5, skeletal defects were observed in the forelimbs, jaw, and rib cage. At E14.5, midline defects in the thoracic body wall began to emerge: the sternum failed to fuse and the heart protruded through the body wall at the midline (ectopia cordis). To determine the molecular mechanism underlying the phenotype observed in Wlsf/f;Dermo1Cre/+ embryos, we tested whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling was operative in developing the embryonic ventral body wall using Axin2LacZ and BatGal reporter mice. While Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity was observed at the midline of the ventral body wall before sternal fusion, this pattern of activity was altered and scattered throughout the body wall after mesenchymal deletion of Wls. Mesenchymal cell migration was disrupted in Wlsf/f;Dermo1Cre/+ thoracic body wall partially due to anomalous non-canonical Wnt signaling as determined by in vitro assays. Deletion of Lrp5 and Lrp6 receptors, which mediate Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the mesenchyme, partially recapitulated the phenotype observed in the chest midline of Wlsf/f;Dermo1Cre/+ embryos supporting a role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity in the normal formation of the ventral body wall mesenchyme. We conclude that Wls-mediated secretion of Wnt ligands from the

  16. SOXC Transcription Factors Induce Cartilage Growth Plate Formation in Mouse Embryos by Promoting Noncanonical WNT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kenji; Bhattaram, Pallavi; Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo; Gadi, Abhilash; Lefebvre, Véronique

    2015-09-01

    Growth plates are specialized cartilage structures that ensure the elongation of most skeletal primordia during vertebrate development. They are made by chondrocytes that proliferate in longitudinal columns and then progress in a staggered manner towards prehypertrophic, hypertrophic and terminal maturation. Complex molecular networks control the formation and activity of growth plates, but remain incompletely understood. We investigated here the importance of the SoxC genes, which encode the SOX4, SOX11 and SOX12 transcription factors, in growth plates. We show that the three genes are expressed robustly in perichondrocytes and weakly in growth plate chondrocytes. SoxC(Prx1Cre) mice, which deleted SoxC genes in limb bud skeletogenic mesenchyme, were born with tiny appendicular cartilage primordia because of failure to form growth plates. In contrast, SoxC(Col2Cre) and SoxC(ATC) mice, which deleted SoxC genes primarily in chondrocytes, were born with mild dwarfism and fair growth plates. Chondrocytes in the latter mutants matured normally, but formed irregular columns, proliferated slowly and died ectopically. Asymmetric distribution of VANGL2 was defective in both SoxC(Prx1Cre) and SoxC(ATC) chondrocytes, indicating impairment of planar cell polarity, a noncanonical WNT signaling pathway that controls growth plate chondrocyte alignment, proliferation and survival. Accordingly, SoxC genes were necessary in perichondrocytes for expression of Wnt5a, which encodes a noncanonical WNT ligand required for growth plate formation, and in chondrocytes and perichondrocytes for expression of Fzd3 and Csnk1e, which encode a WNT receptor and casein kinase-1 subunit mediating planar cell polarity, respectively. Reflecting the differential strengths of the SOXC protein transactivation domains, SOX11 was more powerful than SOX4, and SOX12 interfered with the activity of SOX4 and SOX11. Altogether, these findings provide novel insights into the molecular regulation of skeletal

  17. Thickness-controllable electrospun fibers promote tubular structure formation by endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jong Kyu; Bang, Ju Yup; Xu, Guan; Lee, Jun-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Ho-Jun; Kim, Han Seong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the thickness of an electrospun nanofibrous scaffold by altering its pore size has been shown to regulate cell behaviors such as cell infiltration into a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold. This is of great importance when manufacturing tissue-engineering scaffolds using an electrospinning process. In this study, we report the development of a novel process whereby additional aluminum foil layers were applied to the accumulated electrospun fibers of an existing aluminum foil collector, effectively reducing the incidence of charge buildup. Using this process, we fabricated an electrospun scaffold with a large pore (pore size >40 μm) while simultaneously controlling the thickness. We demonstrate that the large pore size triggered rapid infiltration (160 μm in 4 hours of cell culture) of individual endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and rapid cell colonization after seeding EPC spheroids. We confirmed that the 3D, but not two-dimensional, scaffold structures regulated tubular structure formation by the EPCs. Thus, incorporation of stem cells into a highly porous 3D scaffold with tunable thickness has implications for the regeneration of vascularized thick tissues and cardiac patch development. PMID:25709441

  18. Thickness-controllable electrospun fibers promote tubular structure formation by endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jong Kyu; Bang, Ju Yup; Xu, Guan; Lee, Jun-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Ho-Jun; Kim, Han Seong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the thickness of an electrospun nanofibrous scaffold by altering its pore size has been shown to regulate cell behaviors such as cell infiltration into a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold. This is of great importance when manufacturing tissue-engineering scaffolds using an electrospinning process. In this study, we report the development of a novel process whereby additional aluminum foil layers were applied to the accumulated electrospun fibers of an existing aluminum foil collector, effectively reducing the incidence of charge buildup. Using this process, we fabricated an electrospun scaffold with a large pore (pore size >40 μm) while simultaneously controlling the thickness. We demonstrate that the large pore size triggered rapid infiltration (160 μm in 4 hours of cell culture) of individual endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and rapid cell colonization after seeding EPC spheroids. We confirmed that the 3D, but not two-dimensional, scaffold structures regulated tubular structure formation by the EPCs. Thus, incorporation of stem cells into a highly porous 3D scaffold with tunable thickness has implications for the regeneration of vascularized thick tissues and cardiac patch development. PMID:25709441

  19. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca(2+)- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  20. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca2+ channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca2+- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  1. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  2. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gα(o) signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gα(o) subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  3. TSC1 Promotes B Cell Maturation but Is Dispensable for Germinal Center Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Carico, Zachary; Hopper, Kristen; Shin, Jinwook; Deng, Xuming; Qiu, Yirong; Unniraman, Shyam; Kelsoe, Garnett; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1), a tumor suppressor that acts by inhibiting mTOR signaling, plays an important role in the immune system. We report here that TSC1 differentially regulates mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2/Akt signaling in B cells. TSC1 deficiency results in the accumulation of transitional-1 (T1) B cells and progressive losses of B cells as they mature beyond the T1 stage. Moreover, TSC1KO mice exhibit a mild defect in the serum antibody responses or rate of Ig class-switch recombination after immunization with a T-cell-dependent antigen. In contrast to a previous report, we demonstrate that both constitutive Peyer’s patch germinal centers (GCs) and immunization-induced splenic GCs are unimpaired in TSC1-deficient (TSC1KO) mice and that the ratio of GC B cells to total B cells is comparable in WT and TSC1KO mice. Together, our data demonstrate that TSC1 plays important roles for B cell development, but it is dispensable for GC formation and serum antibody responses. PMID:26000908

  4. Tau and spectraplakins promote synapse formation and maintenance through Jun kinase and neuronal trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Voelzmann, Andre; Okenve-Ramos, Pilar; Qu, Yue; Chojnowska-Monga, Monika; del Caño-Espinel, Manuela; Prokop, Andreas; Sanchez-Soriano, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating synapse numbers during development and ageing are essential for normal brain function and closely linked to brain disorders including dementias. Using Drosophila, we demonstrate roles of the microtubule-associated protein Tau in regulating synapse numbers, thus unravelling an important cellular requirement of normal Tau. In this context, we find that Tau displays a strong functional overlap with microtubule-binding spectraplakins, establishing new links between two different neurodegenerative factors. Tau and the spectraplakin Short Stop act upstream of a three-step regulatory cascade ensuring adequate delivery of synaptic proteins. This cascade involves microtubule stability as the initial trigger, JNK signalling as the central mediator, and kinesin-3 mediated axonal transport as the key effector. This cascade acts during development (synapse formation) and ageing (synapse maintenance) alike. Therefore, our findings suggest novel explanations for intellectual disability in Tau deficient individuals, as well as early synapse loss in dementias including Alzheimer’s disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14694.001 PMID:27501441

  5. Prenatal secondhand cigarette smoke promotes Th2 polarization and impairs goblet cell differentiation and airway mucus formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi P; Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Peña-Philippides, Juan C; Rir-Sima-ah, Jules; Mishra, Neerad C; Wilder, Julie A; Langley, Raymond J; Smith, Kevin R; Sopori, Mohan L

    2011-11-01

    Parental, particularly maternal, smoking increases the risk for childhood allergic asthma and infection. Similarly, in a murine allergic asthma model, prenatal plus early postnatal exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke (SS) exacerbates airways hyperreactivity and Th2 responses in the lung. However, the mechanism and contribution of prenatal versus early postnatal SS exposure on allergic asthma remain unresolved. To identify the effects of prenatal and/or early postnatal SS on allergic asthma, BALB/c dams and their offspring were exposed gestationally and/or 8-10 wk postbirth to filtered air or SS. Prenatal, but not postnatal, SS strongly increased methacholine and allergen (Aspergillus)-induced airway resistance, Th2 cytokine levels, and atopy and activated the Th2-polarizing pathway GATA3/Lck/ERK1/2/STAT6. Either prenatal and/or early postnatal SS downregulated the Th1-specific transcription factor T-bet and, surprisingly, despite high levels of IL-4/IL-13, dramatically blocked the allergen-induced mucous cell metaplasia, airway mucus formation, and the expression of mucus-related genes/proteins: Muc5ac, γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors, and SAM pointed domain-containing Ets-like factor. Given that SS/nicotine exposure of normal adult mice promotes mucus formation, the results suggested that fetal and neonatal lung are highly sensitive to cigarette smoke. Thus, although the gestational SS promotes Th2 polarization/allergic asthma, it may also impair and/or delay the development of fetal and neonatal lung, affecting mucociliary clearance and Th1 responses. Together, this may explain the increased susceptibility of children from smoking parents to allergic asthma and childhood respiratory infections. PMID:21930963

  6. Monitoring DNA triplex formation using multicolor fluorescence and application to insulin-like growth factor I promoter downregulation.

    PubMed

    Hégarat, Nadia; Novopashina, Darya; Fokina, Alesya A; Boutorine, Alexandre S; Venyaminova, Alya G; Praseuth, Danièle; François, Jean-Christophe

    2014-03-01

    Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) signaling is a promising antitumor strategy and nucleic acid-based approaches have been investigated to target genes in the pathway. Here, we sought to modulate IGF-I transcriptional activity using triple helix formation. The IGF-I P1 promoter contains a purine/pyrimidine (R/Y) sequence that is pivotal for transcription as determined by deletion analysis and can be targeted with a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO). We designed modified purine- and pyrimidine-rich TFOs to bind to the R/Y sequence. To monitor TFO binding, we developed a fluorescence-based gel-retardation assay that allowed independent detection of each strand in three-stranded complexes using end-labeling with Alexa 488, cyanine (Cy)3 and Cy5 fluorochromes. We characterized TFOs for their ability to inhibit restriction enzyme activity, compete with DNA-binding proteins and inhibit IGF-I transcription in reporter assays. TFOs containing modified nucleobases, 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine and 5-propynyl-2'-deoxyuridine, specifically inhibited restriction enzyme cleavage and formed triplexes on the P1 promoter fragment. In cells, deletion of the R/Y-rich sequence led to 48% transcriptional inhibition of a reporter gene. Transfection with TFOs inhibited reporter gene activity to a similar extent, whereas transcription from a mutant construct with an interrupted R/Y region was unaffected, strongly suggesting the involvement of triplex formation in the inhibitory mechanisms. Our results indicate that nuclease-resistant TFOs will likely inhibit endogenous IGF-I gene function in cells. PMID:24423253

  7. Silicon Promotes Exodermal Casparian Band Formation in Si-Accumulating and Si-Excluding Species by Forming Phenol Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichs, Martin; Specht, André; Waßmann, Friedrich; Schreiber, Lukas; Schenk, Manfred K.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of Silicon (Si) on Casparian band (CB) development, chemical composition of the exodermal CB and Si deposition across the root in the Si accumulators rice and maize and the Si non-accumulator onion. Plants were cultivated in nutrient solution with and without Si supply. The CB development was determined in stained root cross-sections. The outer part of the roots containing the exodermis was isolated after enzymatic treatment. The exodermal suberin was transesterified with MeOH/BF3 and the chemical composition was measured using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) was used to determine the Si deposition across root cross sections. Si promoted CB formation in the roots of Si-accumulator and Si non-accumulator species. The exodermal suberin was decreased in rice and maize due to decreased amounts of aromatic suberin fractions. Si did not affect the concentration of lignin and lignin-like polymers in the outer part of rice, maize and onion roots. The highest Si depositions were found in the tissues containing CB. These data along with literature were used to suggest a mechanism how Si promotes the CB development by forming complexes with phenols. PMID:26383862

  8. Gastric LTi cells promote lymphoid follicle formation but are limited by IRAK-M and do not alter microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Shiu, J; Piazuelo, M B; Ding, H; Czinn, S J; Drakes, M L; Banerjee, A; Basappa, N; Kobayashi, K S; Fricke, W F; Blanchard, T G

    2015-09-01

    Lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells are activated by accessory cell IL-23, and promote lymphoid tissue genesis and antibacterial peptide production by the mucosal epithelium. We investigated the role of LTi cells in the gastric mucosa in the context of microbial infection. Mice deficient in IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, were investigated for increased LTi cell activity, and antibody mediated LTi cell depletion was used to analyze LTi cell dependent antimicrobial activity. H. pylori infected IRAK-M deficient mice developed increased gastric IL-17 and lymphoid follicles compared to wild type mice. LTi cells were present in naive and infected mice, with increased numbers in IRAK-M deficient mice by two weeks. Helicobacter and Candida infection of LTi cell depleted rag1(-/-) mice demonstrated LTi-dependent increases in calprotectin but not RegIII proteins. However, pathogen and commensal microbiota populations remained unchanged in the presence or absence of LTi cell function. These data demonstrate LTi cells are present in the stomach and promote lymphoid follicle formation in response to infection, but are limited by IRAK-M expression. Additionally, LTi cell mediated antimicrobial peptide production at the gastric epithelium is less efficacious at protecting against microbial pathogens than has been reported for other tissues. PMID:25603827

  9. Polygonatum sibiricum polysaccharide inhibits osteoporosis by promoting osteoblast formation and blocking osteoclastogenesis through Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Du, Li; Nong, Meng-Ni; Zhao, Jin-Min; Peng, Xiao-Ming; Zong, Shao-Hui; Zeng, Gao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by a balance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. Osteoporosis occurs when osteoclast activity surpasses osteoblast activity. Our previous studies showed the plant-derived natural polysaccharide (Polygonatum sibiricum polysaccharide or PSP) had significant anti-ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis effects in vivo, but the mechanisms of PSP’s anti-osteoporosis effect remains unclear. In this study, we assessed PSP’s effect on the generation of osteoblast and osteoclast in vitro. This study showed that PSP promoted the osteogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) without affecting BMPs signaling pathway. This effect was due to the increased nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, resulting in a higher expression of osteoblast-related genes. Furthermore, the study showed PSP could inhibit the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and exert prophylatic protection against LPS-induced osteolysis in vivo. This effect was also related to the increased nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, resulting in the decreased expression of osteoclast-related genes. In conclusion, our results showed that PSP effectively promoted the osteogenic differentiation of mouse BMSCs and suppressed osteoclastogenesis; therefore, it could be used to treat osteoporosis. PMID:27554324

  10. Pyrrolidine and Piperidine Formation Via Copper(II) Carboxylate Promoted Intramolecular Carboamination of Unactivated Olefins: Diastereoselectivity and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Eric S.; Fuller, Peter H.; Kasi, Dhanalakshmi; Chemler, Sherry R.

    2008-01-01

    An expanded substrate scope and in depth analysis of the reaction mechanism of the copper(II) carboxylate promoted intramolecular carboamination of unactivated alkenes is described. This method provides access to N-functionalized pyrrolidines and piperidines. Both aromatic and aliphatic γ- and δ-alkenyl N-arylsulfonamides undergo the oxidative cyclization reaction efficiently. N-Benzoyl-2-allylaniline also underwent the oxidative cyclization. The terminal olefin substrates examined were more reactive than those with internal olefins, and the latter terminated in elimination rather than carbon-carbon bond formation. The efficiency of the reaction was enhanced by the use of more organic soluble copper(II) carboxylate salts, copper(II) neodecanoate in particular. The reaction times were reduced by the use of microwave heating. High levels of diastereoselectivity were observed in the synthesis of 2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidines, wherein the cis substitution pattern predominates. The mechanism of the reaction is discussed in the context of the observed reactivity and in comparison to analogous reactions promoted by other reagents and conditions. Our evidence supports a mechanism wherein the N-C bond is formed via intramolecular syn aminocupration and the C-C bond is formed via intramolecular addition of a primary carbon radical to an aromatic ring. PMID:17428100