Science.gov

Sample records for pu u-oxide fuel

  1. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240} PU core : a cylindrical assemby with mixed (PU, U)-oxide fuel and a central high {sup 240} PU zone.

    SciTech Connect

    Lell, R. M.; Schaefer, R. W.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

    2007-10-01

    Over a period of 30 years more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. The term 'benchmark' in a ZPR program connotes a particularly simple loading aimed at gaining basic reactor physics insight, as opposed to studying a reactor design. In fact, the ZPR-6/7 Benchmark Assembly (Reference 1) had a very simple core unit cell assembled from plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U3O8, and plutonium. The ZPR-6/7 core cell-average composition is typical of the interior region of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) of the era. It was one part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program,a which provided integral experiments characterizing the important features of demonstration

  2. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.

    SciTech Connect

    Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-23

    ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium

  3. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu fuel form activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL fuel form activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  4. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL Fuel Form Activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  5. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL Fuel Form Activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  6. Performance of Cladding on MOX Fuel with Low 240Pu/239Pu Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Kevin; Blanpain, Patrick; Morris, Robert Noel

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of its surplus plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. As part of fuel qualification, four lead assemblies were manufactured and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod average burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg heavy metal. This was the world s first commercial irradiation of MOX fuel with a 240Pu/239Pu ratio less than 0.10. Five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This paper discusses the results of those examinations with emphasis on cladding performance. Exams relevant to the cladding included visual and eddy current exams, profilometry, microscopy, hydrogen analysis, gallium analysis, and mechanical testing. There was no discernible effect of the type of MOX fuel on the performance of the cladding.

  7. Thermal Analysis of ZPPR High Pu Content Stored Fuel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Pope, Chad L.; Andrus, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) operated from April 18, 1969, until 1990. ZPPR operated at low power for testing nuclear reactor designs. This paper examines the temperature of Pu content ZPPR fuel while it is in storage. Heat is generated in the fuel due to Pu and Am decay and is a concern for possible cladding damage. Damage to the cladding could lead to fuel hydriding and oxidizing. A series of computer simulations were made to determine the range of temperatures potentially occuring in the ZPPR fuel. The maximum calculated fuel temperature is 292°C (558°F). Conservative assumptions in themore » model intentionally overestimate temperatures. The stored fuel temperatures are dependent on the distribution of fuel in the surrounding storage compartments, the heat generation rate of the fuel, and the orientation of fuel. Direct fuel temperatures could not be measured but storage bin doors, storage sleeve doors, and storage canister temperatures were measured. Comparison of these three temperatures to the calculations indicates that the temperatures calculated with conservative assumptions are, as expected, higher than the actual temperatures. The maximum calculated fuel temperature with the most conservative assumptions is significantly below the fuel failure criterion of 600°C (1,112°F).« less

  8. Bulk characterization of (U, Pu) mixed carbide fuel for distribution of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, K. V. Vrinda Khan, K. B.; Biju, K.; Kumar, Arun

    2015-06-24

    Homogeneous distribution of plutonium in (U, Pu) mixed fuels is important from fuel performance as well as reprocessing point of view. Radiation imaging and assay techniques are employed for the detection of Pu rich agglomerates in the fuel. A simulation study of radiation transport was carried out to analyse the technique of autoradiography so as to estimate the minimum detectability of Pu agglomerates in MC fuel with nominal PuC content of 70% using Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Modeling of constituent redistribution in U Pu Zr metallic fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hayes, S. L.; Hofman, G. L.; Yacout, A. M.

    2006-12-01

    A computer model was developed to analyze constituent redistribution in U-Pu-Zr metallic nuclear fuels. Diffusion and thermochemical properties were parametrically determined to fit the postirradiation data from a fuel test performed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The computer model was used to estimate redistribution profiles of fuels proposed for the conceptual designs of small modular fast reactors. The model results showed that the level of redistribution of the fuel constituents of the designs was similar to the measured data from EBR-II.

  10. Shippingport LWBR (Th/U Oxide) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    L. L. Taylor; H. H. Loo

    1999-09-01

    Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into eight characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments, and total fuel and fissile mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) fuels incorporate more of the conventional materials (zirconium cladding/heavy metal oxides) and fabrication details (rods and spacers) that make them comparable to a typical commercial fuel assembly. The LWBR seed/blanket configuration tested a light-water breeder concept with Th-232/U-233 binary fuel matrix. Reactor design used several assembly configurations at different locations within the same core . The seed assemblies contain the greatest fissile mass per (displaced) unit volume, but the blanket assemblies actually contain more fissile mass in a larger volume; the atom-densities are comparable.

  11. Method of removing Pu(IV) polymer from nuclear fuel reclaiming liquid

    DOEpatents

    Tallent, Othar K.; Mailen, James C.; Bell, Jimmy T.; Arwood, Phillip C.

    1982-01-01

    A Pu(IV) polymer not extractable from a nuclear fuel reclaiming solution by conventional processes is electrolytically converted to Pu.sup.3+ and PuO.sub.2.sup.2+ ions which are subsequently converted to Pu.sup.4+ ions extractable by the conventional processes.

  12. /sup 238/Pu fuel processes. Quarterly report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Folger, R.L.

    1981-09-01

    Recent process development work indicates that the atmosphere (cover gas) in which /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ granules are sintered is a critical parameter in the production of General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fuel forms. An acceptable feed material for the direct fabrication of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel was produced in the SRP HB-Line using a Pu(III) oxalate direct-strike precipitation technique that was developed at SRL.

  13. Gamma densitometer for measuring Pu density in fuel tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel-gamma-densitometer (FGD) has been developed to examine nondestructively the uniformity of plutonium in aluminum-clad fuel tubes at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The monitoring technique is ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy with a lead-collimated Ge(Li) detector. Plutonium density is correlated with the measured intensity of the 208 keV ..gamma..-ray from /sup 237/U (7d) of the /sup 241/Pu (15y) decay chain. The FGD measures the plutonium density within 0.125- or 0.25-inch-diameter areas of the 0.133- to 0.183-inch-thick tube walls. Each measurement yields a density ratio that relates the plutonium density of the measured area to the plutonium density in normal regions of the tube. The technique was used to appraise a series of fuel tubes to be irradated in an SRP reactor. High-density plutonium areas were initially identified by x-ray methods and then examined quantitatively with the FGD. The FGD reliably tested fuel tubes and yielded density ratios over a range of 0.0 to 2.5. FGD measurements examined (1) nonuniform plutonium densities or hot spots, (2) uniform high-density patches, and (3) plutonium density distribution in thin cladding regions. Measurements for tubes with known plutonium density agreed with predictions to within 2%. Attenuation measurements of the 208-keV ..gamma..-ray passage through the tube walls agreed to within 2 to 3% of calculated predictions. Collimator leakage measurements agreed with model calculations that predicted less than a 1.5% effect on plutonium density ratios. Finally, FGD measurements correlated well with x-ray transmission and fluoroscopic measurements. The data analysis for density ratios involved a small correction of about 10% for ..gamma..-shielding within the fuel tube. For hot spot examinations, limited information for this correction dictated a density ratio uncertainty of 3 to 5%.

  14. Irradiation performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel under Pressurized Water Reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, B.; Lemehov, S.; Wéber, M.; Parthoens, Y.; Gysemans, M.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the in-pile safety performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel pins under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions. Both sol-gel and SOLMAS produced (Th,Pu)O2 fuels at enrichments of 7.9% and 12.8% in Pu/HM have been irradiated at SCK·CEN. The irradiation has been performed under PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 °C) in a dedicated loop of the BR-2 reactor. The loop is instrumented with flow and temperature monitors at inlet and outlet, which allow for an accurate measurement of the deposited enthalpy.

  15. New concept of designing Pu and MA containing fuel for fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, A. M.; Konovalov, I. I.; Vatulin, A. V.; Glagovsky, E. M.

    2009-03-01

    New type of metal base fuel element is suggested for fast reactors. Basic approach to fuel element development - separated operations of fabricating uranium meat fuel element and introducing into it Pu or MA dioxides powder, that results in minimizing dust forming operations in fuel element fabrication. According to new fuel element design a framework fuel element having a porous uranium alloy meat is filled with standard PuO 2 powder of <50 μm fractions prepared by pyrochemical or other methods. In this way a high uranium content fuel meat metallurgically bonded to cladding forms a heat conducting framework, pores of which contain PuO 2 powder. Framework fuel element having porous meat is fabricated by capillary impregnation method with the use of Zr eutectic matrix alloys, which provides metallurgical bond between fuel and cladding and protects it from interaction. As compared to MOX fuel the new one features high thermal conductivity, higher uranium content, hence, high conversion ratio does not interact with fuel cladding and is more environmentally clean. Its principle advantage is a simple production process that is easily realized remotely, feasibility of involving high background Pu and MA isotopes into closed nuclear fuel cycle at the minimal influence on environment.

  16. TEM identification of subsurface phases in ternary U-Pu-Zr fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Papesch, Cynthia A.; Cole, James I.

    2016-05-01

    Phases and microstructure in as-cast, annealed at 850 °C, and subsequently cooled U-23Pu-9Zr fuel were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. SEM examination shows formation of three phases in the alloy that were identified in TEM using selective area diffraction pattern analysis: α-Zr globular and elongated δ-UZr2 inclusions and a thick oxide layer formed on top of β-Pu phase, which has been initially assumed to be ζ-(U, Pu). However, further examination of the cross-sectional TEM specimens identified the matrix phases as δ-UZr2, β-Pu, and (U, Zr)ht. Two types of inclusions were observed in the immediate vicinity of the specimen surface and they were consistent with α-Zr and ζ-(U, Pu).

  17. Melting behavior of MgO-based inert matrix fuels containing (Pu,Am)O 2-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Shuhei; Sato, Isamu; Tanaka, Kosuke; Hirosawa, Takashi; Osaka, Masahiko

    2010-05-01

    The melting behavior of MgO-based inert matrix fuels containing (Pu,Am)O 2-x ((Pu,Am)O 2-x-MgO fuels) was experimentally investigated. Heat-treatment tests were carried out at 2173 K, 2373 K and 2573 K each. The fuel melted at about 2573 K in the eutectic reaction of the Pu-Am-Mg-O system. The (Pu,Am)O 2-x grains, MgO grains and pores grew with increasing temperature. In addition, Am-rich oxide phases were formed in the (Pu,Am)O 2-x phase by heat-treatment at high temperatures. The melting behavior was compared with behaviors of PuO 2-x-MgO and AmO 2-x-MgO fuels.

  18. /sup 238/Pu fuel form processes. Bimonthly report, November-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Folger, R. L.

    1980-11-01

    Progress in the Savannah River Laboratory's /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Program is summarized. Full-scale fabrication tests continued in the Plutonium Experimental Facility (PEF) with the successful fabrication of seven additional GPHS pellets. Three pellets (GPHS Pellets 14, 15, and 16) were fabricated at off-centerline conditions to help define process limits for production of GPHS fuel pellets in the Plutonium Fuel Fabrication (PuFF) Facility. Two additional limit-test pellets (GPHS Pellets 12 and 13) previously hot pressed underwent final heat treatment. Two pellets (GPHS Pellets 17 and 18) were fabricated at centerline conditions as part of the effort to have Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) GPHS pellets impact tested at LASL. All seven pellets remained integral and demonstrated excellent dimensional stability during final heat treatment. However, the quality of those pellets fabricated at centerline conditions was superior to those that were fabricated as part of the limit tests.

  19. Stress and Diffusion in Stored Pu ZPPR Fuel from Alpha Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Charles W. Solbrig; Chad L. Pope; Jason P. Andrus

    2014-07-01

    ZPPR (Zero Power Physics Reactor) is a research reactor that has been used to investigate breeder reactor fuel designs. The reactor has been dismantled but its fuel is still stored there. Of concern are its plutonium containing metal fuel elements which are enclosed in stainless steel cladding with gas space filled with helium–argon gas and welded air tight. The fuel elements which are 5.08 cm by 0.508 cm up to 20.32 cm long (2 in × 0.2 in × 8 in) were manufactured in 1968. A few of these fuel elements have failed releasing contamination raising concern about the general state of the large number of other fuel elements. Inspection of the large number of fuel elements could lead to contamination release so analytical studies have been conducted to estimate the probability of failed fuel elements. This paper investigates the possible fuel failures due to generation of helium in the metal fuel from the decay of Pu and its possible damage to the fuel cladding from metal fuel expansion or from diffusion of helium into the fuel gas space. This paper (1) calculates the initial gas loading in a fuel element and its internal free volume after it has been brought into the atmosphere at ZPPR, (2) shows that the amount of helium generated by decay of Pu over 46 years since manufacture is significantly greater than this initial loading, (3) determines the amount of fuel swelling if the helium stays fixed in the fuel plate and estimates the amount of helium which diffuses out of the fuel plate into the fuel plenum assuming the helium does not remain fixed in the fuel plate but can diffuse to the plenum and possibly through the cladding. Since the literature is not clear as to which possibility occurs, as with Schroedinger’s cat, both possibilities are analyzed. The paper concludes that (1) if the gas generated is fixed in the fuel, then the fuel swelling it can cause would not cause any fuel failure and (2) if the helium does diffuse out of the fuel (in accordance

  20. TRISO-Fuel Element Performance Modeling for the Hybrid LIFE Engine with Pu Fuel Blanket

    SciTech Connect

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, M; Caro, A

    2010-02-18

    A TRISO-coated fuel thermo-mechanical performance study is performed for the hybrid LIFE engine to test the viability of TRISO particles to achieve ultra-high burnup of a weapons-grade Pu blanket. Our methodology includes full elastic anisotropy, time and temperature varying material properties for all TRISO layers, and a procedure to remap the elastic solutions in order to achieve fast fluences up to 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2} (E > 0.18 MeV). In order to model fast fluences in the range of {approx} 7 {approx} 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2}, for which no data exist, careful scalings and extrapolations of the known TRISO material properties are carried out under a number of potential scenarios. A number of findings can be extracted from our study. First, failure of the internal pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layer occurs within the first two months of operation. Then, the particles behave as BISO-coated particles, with the internal pressure being withstood directly by the SiC layer. Later, after 1.6 years, the remaining PyC crumbles due to void swelling and the fuel particle becomes a single-SiC-layer particle. Unrestrained by the PyC layers, and at the temperatures and fluences in the LIFE engine, the SiC layer maintains reasonably-low tensile stresses until the end-of-life. Second, the PyC creep constant, K, has a striking influence on the fuel performance of TRISO-coated particles, whose stresses scale almost inversely proportional to K. Obtaining more reliable measurements, especially at higher fluences, is an imperative for the fidelity of our models. Finally, varying the geometry of the TRISO-coated fuel particles results in little differences in the scope of fuel performance. The mechanical integrity of 2-cm graphite pebbles that act as fuel matrix has also been studied and it is concluded that they can reliable serve the entire LIFE burnup cycle without failure.

  1. Irradiation performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel under Pressurized Water Reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, B.; Lemehov, S.; Wéber, M.; Parthoens, Y.; Gysemans, M.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the in-pile safety performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel pins under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions. Both sol-gel and SOLMAS produced (Th,Pu)O2 fuels at enrichments of 7.9% and 12.8% in Pu/HM have been irradiated at SCK·CEN. The irradiation has been performed under PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 °C) in a dedicated loop of the BR-2 reactor. The loop is instrumented with flow and temperature monitors at inlet and outlet, which allow for an accurate measurement of the deposited enthalpy. Between 2004 and 2006, four fuel segments were irradiated, with on-line recording of centerline temperature and rod pressure of the two instrumented rods and intermittent non-destructive hot-cell investigations of the other two non-instrumented rods. At the end of 2006, the instrumented rods were unloaded for hot-cell investigations. The hot-cell investigations reduced uncertainties in the power history to build a reliable and consistent irradiation history which can be used to assess and validate fuel performance codes. The on-line recorded temperatures of the instrumented rods are presented in this paper and are compared to corresponding calculations on the basis of the power history. One of the non-instrumented rods was re-inserted in the reactor in 2012 and attained a peak burnup level of 37 GWd/tHM by the end of 2014. The combined data set of on-line measurements and post irradiation examinations enables further code validation. In this context, the results of the in-house MACROS code of SCK·CEN have been compared with the experimental results. The code contains dedicated (Th,Pu)O2 models for the calculation of the thermal conductivity as a function of the burnup and models that determine the radial power profile within the pellet.

  2. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi Suud, Zaki

    2015-09-30

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better.

  3. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi; Suud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better.

  4. Performance of U-Pu-Zr fuel cast into zirconium molds

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.C.; Lahm, C.E. ); Tsai, H. )

    1992-10-01

    U-3Zr and U-20.5Pu-3Zr were injection cast into Zr tubes, or sheaths, rather than into quartz molds and clad in 316SS. These elements and standard-cast U-l0Zr and U-IgPu-l0Zr elements were irradiated in EBR-II to 2 at.% and removed for interim examination. Measurements of axial growth at indicate that the Zr-sheathed elements exhibited significantly less axial elongation than the standard-cast elements (1.3 to 1.8% versus 4.9 to 8.1%). Fuel material extruded through the ends of the Zr sheaths. allowing the low-Zr fuel to contact the cladding in some cases. Transverse metallographic sections reveal cracks in the Zr sheath through which fuel extruded and contacted cladding. The sheath is not a sufficient barrier between fuel and cladding to reduce FCCI. and any adverse effects due to increased FCCI will be evident as the elements attain higher burnup.

  5. On the oxidation of (U, Pu)C fuel: Experimental and kinetic aspects, practical issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaudier, F.; Tamani, C.; Galerie, A.; Marc, Y.

    2010-11-01

    The oxidation of mixed (U, Pu) carbide fuel was studied to meet some of the general requirements applicable to the back- and front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Data are unfortunately scarce in this field. Based on an experimental study and a kinetic treatment, it was proved that the oxidation of solid or powdered mixed carbide fuel does not involve any unwanted kinetic transition and does not have the intrinsic ability to self-sustain. We never observed the formation of a protective oxide layer on the samples. The oxidation products were always low-density, finely-divided oxide powder expanding and tending to slow down the process. The low thermal activation observed demonstrates the key role of gas transport when using powders. Practical solutions have been derived from this work.

  6. High-silicon 238PuO2 fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimus, Mary Ann H.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of 238Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment-impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

  7. /sup 238/Pu fuel form processes bimonthly report, May-June 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Folger, R. L.

    1980-02-01

    Progress in the Savannah River /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Program is summarized. Full-scale fabrication tests of General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fuel forms continued in the SRL Plutonium Experimental Facility (PEF) as four additional pellets (GPHS Pellets 5-8) were hot pressed. GPHS pellets fabricated by the reference process were dimensionally and structurally stable during and after final heat treatment. Microstructural studies confirmed that centerline GPHS process conditions produce pellets with a homogeneous microstructure and a uniform density. Because of the potential for excessive metal creep in existing furnace racks, the racks were considered unacceptable for GPHS fuel production in the PuFF. To eliminate metal creep, racks containing some ceramic components were designed to operate at 1600/sup 0/C in an oxygen atmosphere for more than 100 h. The four-key variables previously identified (shard sintering temperature, hot press load, hot press temperature, and load ramp) were found to correlate with production sphere fracture tendency and bulk density.

  8. Assessing the oxygen stoichiometry during the sintering of (U, Pu)O2 fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudez, Stéphane; Léchelle, Jacques; Berzati, Ségolène; Heintz, Jean-Marc

    2015-05-01

    Diffusion phenomena occurring in ceramics such as (U, Pu)O2 during sintering are affected by the oxygen content in the atmosphere. The latter sets the nature and the concentration of point defects which govern diffusion mechanisms in the bulk of the material. The oxygen partial pressure, pO2, of the sintering gas in equilibrium with mixed oxide (MOX) pellets needs to be precisely controlled; otherwise it may induce a large dispersion in the critical parameters for fuel manufacturing (Gauche, 2013; Matzke, 1987). It is crucial to understand the relation between the sintering atmosphere and the fuel throughout the thermal cycle. In this study, the oxygen potential of the sintering gas was monitored by measuring the oxygen partial pressure (pO2) at the outlet of a dilatometer by means of a zirconia probe. Coupling the thermal cycle with an outlet gas pO2 measurement makes it possible to identify different redox phenomena. Variations in the oxygen stoichiometry can be determined during the sintering of (U, Pu)O2, as well as can its final O/M. Our results make it possible to recommend a sintering atmosphere and sintering thermal cycle in order to obtain an O/M ratio that is as close as possible to the target value.

  9. Applicability of CeO 2 as a surrogate for PuO 2 in a MOX fuel development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han Soo; Joung, Chang Yong; Lee, Byung Ho; Oh, Jae Yong; Koo, Yang Hyun; Heimgartner, Peter

    2008-08-01

    The applicability of cerium oxide, as a surrogate for plutonium oxide, was evaluated for the fabrication process of a MOX (mixed oxide) fuel pellet. Sintering behavior, pore former effect and thermal properties of the Ce-MOX were compared with those of Pu-MOX. Compacting parameters of the Pu-MOX powder were optimized by a simulation using Ce-MOX powder. Sintering behavior of Ce-MOX was very similar to that of Pu-MOX, in particular for the oxidative sintering process. The sintered density of both pellets was decreased with the same slope with an increasing DA (dicarbon amide) content. Both the Ce-MOX and Pu-MOX pellets which were fabricated by an admixing of 0.05 wt% DA and sintering in a CO 2 atmosphere had the same average grain size of 11 μm and a density of 95%T.D. The thermal conductivity of the Pu-MOX was a little higher than that of the Ce-MOX at a lower temperature but both conductivities became closer to each other above 900 K. Cerium oxide was found to be a useful surrogate to simulate the Pu behavior in the MOX fuel fabrication.

  10. /sup 238/Pu fuel form processes. Quarterly report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    j

    1982-11-01

    Progress in studies of /sup 238/Pu fuel form processes is reported. Analytical studies of weld-quench cracking in DOP-26 iridium alloy-clad vent sets in General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) showed that weld-quench cracking is much more severe in MER alloy than in LR and NR alloys. Spark source mass spectrometry indicated that areas in DOP-26 alloy with severe weld-quench cracking have high thorium inhomogeneity. Secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed differences in LR and MR alloys that may be related to their dissimilar susceptibilities for weld-quench cracking. Impact ductility tests showed that welds in DOP-26 alloy clad vent sets made using parameters similar to PuFF production welding had high elongations. Decontamination of encapsulated GPHS pellets in PuFF was demonstrated using a solution of 3.5 M HNO/sub 3/ + 6.4 M HF which is capable of reducing transferable contamination below the specified 10/sup 3/ dpm upper limit in <30 minutes at a bath temperature of 80/sup 0/C using ultrasonic cleaning. Decontamination vessels were constructed to trap and condense acid vapors during decontamination. Impact and metallographic data showed that although the micro and macrostructures between LANL and SRL pellets have large differences, the difference in impact response between these two types of pellets is not correspondingly large. Both types of pellets have impacted successfully. The micro and macrostructures of SRP pellets made with either low fired shards sintered in Ar/5%O/sub 2/ or Ar are intermediate between those of the LANL and SRL pellets. Therefore, either type of SRP pellet should impact successfully.

  11. Thermochemical Analysis of Gas-Cooled Reactor Fuels Containing Am and Pu Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemer, T.B.

    2002-09-05

    Literature values and estimated data for the thermodynamics of the actinide oxides and fission products are applied to explain the chemical behavior in gas-cooled-reactor fuels. Emphasis is placed on the Am-O-C and Pu-O-C systems and the data are used to plot the oxygen chemical potential versus temperature of solid-solid and solid-gas equilibria. These results help explain observations of vaporization in Am oxides, nitrides, and carbides and provide guidance for the ceramic processing of the fuels. The thermodynamic analysis is then extended to the fission product systems and the Si-C-O system. Existing data on oxygen release (primarily as CO) as a function of burnup in the thoria-urania fuel system is reviewed and compared to values calculated from thermodynamic data. The calculations of oxygen release are then extended to the plutonia and americia fuels. Use of ZrC not only as a particle coating that may be more resistant to corrosion by Pd and other noble-metal fission products, but also as a means to getter oxygen released by fission is discussed.

  12. TRISO-fuel element thermo-mechanical performance modeling for the hybrid LIFE engine with Pu fuel blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMange, P.; Marian, J.; Caro, M.; Caro, A.

    2010-10-01

    A TRISO-coated fuel thermo-mechanical performance study is performed for the fusion-fission hybrid Laser Inertial Fusion Engine (LIFE) to test the viability of TRISO particles to achieve ultra-high burn-up of Pu or transuranic spent nuclear fuel blankets. Our methodology includes full elastic anisotropy, time and temperature varying material properties, and multilayer capabilities. In order to achieve fast fluences up to 30 × 10 25 n m -2 ( E > 0.18 MeV), judicious extrapolations across several orders of magnitude of existing material databases have been carried out. The results of our study indicate that failure of the pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layers occurs within the first 2 years of operation. The particles then behave as a single-SiC-layer particle and the SiC layer maintains reasonably-low tensile stresses until the end-of-life. It is also found that the PyC creep constant, K, has a striking influence on the fuel performance of TRISO-coated particles, whose stresses scale almost inversely proportional to K. Conversely, varying the geometry of the TRISO-coated fuel particles results in little differences in terms of fuel performance.

  13. Improving the Assay of 239Pu in Spent and Melted Fuel Using the Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Integral Resonance Transmission Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, C. T.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Hajima, R.; Quiter, B. J.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Karwowski, H.; Rich, G.

    2015-10-01

    Non-destructive assay (NDA) of 239Pu in spent nuclear fuel is possible using the isotope-specific nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) integral resonance transmission (IRT) method. The IRT method measures the absorption of photons from a quasi-monoenergetic γ-ray beam due to all resonances in the energy width of the beam. According to calculations the IRT method could greatly improve assay times for 239Pu in nuclear fuel. To demonstrate and verify the IRT method, the IRT signature was first measured in 181Ta, whose nuclear resonant properties are similar to those of 239Pu, and then measured in 239Pu. These measurements were done using the quasi-monoenergetic beam at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS) in Durham, NC, USA. The IRT signature was observed as a decrease in scattering strength when the same isotope material was placed upstream of the scattering target. The results confirm the validity of the IRT method in both 181Ta and 239Pu.

  14. Physical characteristics of LWRs and SCLWRs loaded by ({sup 233}U-Th-{sup 238}U) oxide fuel with small additions of {sup 231}Pa

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikov, E.G.; Shmelev, A.N.; Apse, V.A.; Kulikov, G.G.

    2007-07-01

    The paper investigates the possibility and attractiveness of using (U-Th) fuel in light-water reactors (LWRs) and in light-water reactors with super-critical coolant parameters (SCLWRs). It is proposed to dilute {sup 233}U with {sup 238}U to enhance the proliferation resistance of this fissionable isotope. If is noteworthy that she idea was put forward for the first time by she well known American physicist and participant of the Manhattan Project Dr. T. Taylor. Various fuel compositions are analyzed and compared on fuel breeding, achievable values of fuel burn-up and cross-sections of parasitic neutron absorption. It is also demonstrated that small {sup 231}Pa additions (several percent) into the fuel allows: to increase fuel burn-up, to achieve more negative temperature reactivity coefficient of coolant and to enhance nonproliferation of the fuel. (authors)

  15. Full-length U-xPu-10Zr (x=0, 8, 19 wt%) Fast Reactor Fuel Test in FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Porter; H.C. Tsai

    2012-08-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor-1 (IFR-1) experiment performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was the only U-Pu-10Zr (Pu-0, 8 and 19 wt%) metallic fast reactor test with commercial-length (91.4 cm active fuel column length) conducted to date. With few remaining test reactors there is little opportunity for performing another test with a long active fuel column. The assembly was irradiated to the goal burnup of 10 at.%. The beginning of life (BOL) peak cladding temperature of the hottest pin was 608?C, cooling to 522?C at end of life (EOL). Selected fuel pins were examined non destructively using neutron radiography, precision axial gamma scanning, and both laser and spiral contact cladding profilometry. Destructive exams included plenum gas pressure, volume, and gas composition determinations on a number of pins followed by optical metallography, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and alpha and beta gamma autoradiography on a single U-19Pu-10Zr pin. The post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) showed very few differences compared to the short-pin (34.3 cm fuel column) testing performed on fuels of similar composition in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The fuel column grew axially slightly less than observed in the short pins, but with the same pattern of decreasing growth with increasing Pu content. There was a difference in the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in that the maximum cladding penetration by interdiffusion with fuel/fission products did not occur at the top of the fuel column where the cladding temperature is highest, as observed in EBR-II tests. Instead, the more exaggerated fission-rate profile of the FFTF pins resulted in a peak FCCI at ~0.7 X/L axial location along the fuel column. This resulted from a lower production of rare earth fission products higher in the fuel column as well as a much smaller delta-T between fuel center and cladding, and therefore less FCCI, despite the higher cladding temperature. This behavior could

  16. Phase Characteristics of a Number of U-Pu-Am-Np-Zr Metallic Alloys for Use as Fast Reactor Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas E. Burkes; J. Rory Kennedy; Thomas Hartmann; Cynthia A. Papesch; Denis D. Keiser, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic fuel alloys consisting of uranium, plutonium, and zirconium with minor additions of americium and neptunium are under evaluation for potential use to transmute long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes in fast reactors. A series of test designs for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) have been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), designated as the AFC-1 and AFC-2 designs. Metal fuel compositions in these designs have included varying amounts of U, Pu, Zr, and minor actinides (Am, Np). Investigations into the phase behavior and relationships based on the alloy constituents have been conducted using x-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. Results of these investigations, along with proposed relationships between observed behavior and alloy composition, are provided. In general, observed behaviors can be predicted by a ternary U-Pu-Zr phase diagram, with transition temperatures being most dependent on U content. Furthermore, the enthalpy associated with transitions is strongly dependent on the as-cast microstructural characteristics.

  17. Full-length U-xPu-10Zr (x = 0, 8, 19 wt.%) fast reactor fuel test in FFTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Tsai, Hanchung

    2012-08-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor-1 (IFR-1) experiment performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was the only U-Pu-10Zr (Pu-0, 8 and 19 wt.%) metallic fast reactor test with commercial-length (91.4-cm active fuel-column length) conducted to date. With few remaining test reactors, there is little opportunity for performing another test with a long active fuel column. The assembly was irradiated to the goal burnup of 10 at.%. The beginning-of-life (BOL) peak cladding temperature of the hottest pin was 608 °C, cooling to 522 °C at end-of-life (EOL). Selected fuel pins were examined non-destructively using neutron radiography, precision axial gamma scanning, and both laser and spiral contact cladding profilometry. Destructive exams included plenum gas pressure, volume, and gas composition determinations on a number of pins followed by optical metallography, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and alpha and beta-gamma autoradiography on a single U-19Pu-10Zr pin. The post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) showed very few differences compared to the short-pin (34.3-cm fuel column) testing performed on fuels of similar composition in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The fuel column grew axially slightly less than observed in the short pins, but with the same pattern of decreasing growth with increasing Pu content. There was a difference in the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in that the maximum cladding penetration by interdiffusion with fuel/fission products did not occur at the top of the fuel column where the cladding temperature is highest, as observed in EBR-II tests. Instead, the more exaggerated fission-rate profile of the FFTF pins resulted in a peak FCCI at ˜0.7 X/L axial location along the fuel column. This resulted from a higher production of rare-earth fission products at this location and a higher ΔT between fuel center and cladding than at core center, together providing more rare earths at the cladding and more FCCI. This behavior could

  18. Modeling of Selected Ceramic Processing Parameters Employed in the Fabrication of 238PuO 2 Fuel Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockman, R. A.; Kramer, D. P.; Barklay, C. D.; Cairns-Gallimore, D.; Brown, J. L.; Huling, J. C.; Van Pelt, C. E.

    Recent deep space missions utilize the thermal output of the radioisotope plutonium-238 as the fuel in the thermal to electrical power system. Since the application of plutonium in its elemental state has several disadvantages, the fuel employed in these deep space power systems is typically in the oxide form such as plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2). As an oxide, the processing of the plutonium dioxide into fuel pellets is performed via "classical" ceramic processing unit operations such as sieving of the powder, pressing, sintering, etc. Modeling of these unit operations can be beneficial in the understanding and control of processing parameters with the goal of further enhancing the desired characteristics of the 238PuO2 fuel pellets. A finite element model has been used to help identify the time-temperature-stress profile within a pellet during a furnace operation taking into account that 238PuO2 itself has a significant thermal output. Results of the modeling efforts will be discussed.

  19. Modeling of selected ceramic processing parameters employed in the fabrication of 238PuO2 fuel pellets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brockman, R. A.; Kramer, D. P.; Barklay, C. D.; Cairns-Gallimore, D.; Brown, J. L.; Huling, J. C.; Van Pelt, C. E.

    2011-10-01

    Recent deep space missions utilize the thermal output of the radioisotope plutonium-238 as the fuel in the thermal to electrical power system. Since the application of plutonium in its elemental state has several disadvantages, the fuel employed in these deep space power systems is typically in the oxide form such as plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2). As an oxide, the processing of the plutonium dioxide into fuel pellets is performed via ''classical'' ceramic processing unit operations such as sieving of the powder, pressing, sintering, etc. Modeling of these unit operations can be beneficial in the understanding and control of processing parameters withmore » the goal of further enhancing the desired characteristics of the 238PuO2 fuel pellets. A finite element model has been used to help identify the time-temperature-stress profile within a pellet during a furnace operation taking into account that 238PuO2 itself has a significant thermal output. The results of the modeling efforts will be discussed.« less

  20. A new fabrication route for SFR fuel using (U, Pu)O2 powder obtained by oxalic co-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudez, Stéphane; Belin, Renaud C.; Aufore, Laurence; Sornay, Philippe; Grandjean, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    The standard powder metallurgy preparation of SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) oxide fuel involves UO2 and PuO2 co-milling. An alternative route, using a solid-solution of mixed oxide obtained by oxalic co-conversion as the starting material, is presented. It was used to manufacture nuclear fuels for the "COPIX" irradiation conducted in the Phenix SFR. Two processes using co-converted powders were tested to elaborate fuel pellets: (1) the Direct Process that consists in pressing and sintering the mixed oxide with the final Pu content and (2) the Dilution Process, which involves the dilution of a high Pu content mixed oxide with UO2. After studying the structural and microstructural evolution with temperature of these innovative raw materials, the elaboration parameters were adjusted to obtain final pellets in accordance with the Phenix fuel specifications. This study demonstrates the feasibility of such new fabrication route at laboratory scale and, from a more fundamental prospect, allows a better understanding of the underlying phenomena involved during sintering.

  1. Analysis of Pu-Only Partitioning Strategies in LMFBR Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Bays; Gilles Youinou

    2013-02-01

    sold to the MOX LWRs. The third scenario considered a LMFBR fuel cycle in an expansionary mode where excess bred transuranic material is accumulated for spinning off additional LMFBR cores. In this latter scenario, no plutonium partitioning was considered. After every cycle, transuranic from both driver and blankets is sold to the MOX LWRs. The MA production from LMFBR operated in a Pu-only fuel cycle is roughly only 1% that of the transuranic production rate. This is in contrast to LWR fuel cycles where the MA content in TRU is closer to 10% or more. If such a LMFBR were operated to provide fissile material to a fleet of MOX reactors, then 1 GWe of LMFBR could support between approximately 0.11 and 0.43 GWe of LWR-MOX reactors for a LMFBR conversion ratio between 1.1 and 1.5, if the MOX reactors were operated in a once-through-then out mode. If the plutonium is continuously recycled in the MOX reactors then the support ratio is approximately 1 GWe of LMFBR for between 0.13 and 0.65 GWe of LWR-MOX reactors depending on the LMFBR conversion ratio. Also, it was found that if the LMFBR fleet were operated in a purely expansionary mode, the smallest doubling time achievable would be seven years.

  2. Burnup estimation of fuel sourcing radioactive material based on monitored Cs and Pu isotopic activity ratios in Fukushima N. P. S. accident

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, T.; Suzuki, M.; Ando, Y.

    2012-07-01

    After the severe core damage of Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Station, radioactive material leaked from the reactor buildings. As part of monitoring of radioactivity in the site, measurements of radioactivity in soils at three fixed points have been performed for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs with gamma-ray spectrometry and for Pu, Pu, and {sup 240}Pu with {alpha}-ray spectrometry. Correlations of radioactivity ratios of {sup 134}Cs to {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 238}Pu to the sum of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu with fuel burnup were studied by using theoretical burnup calculations and measurements on isotopic inventories, and compared with the Cs and Pu radioactivity rations in the soils. The comparison indicated that the burnup of the fuel sourcing the radioactivity was from 18 to 38 GWd/t, which corresponded to that of the fuel in the highest power and, therefore, the highest decay heat in operating high-burnup fueled BWR cores. (authors)

  3. Results of irradiation of (U0.55Pu0.45)N and (U0.4Pu0.6)N fuels in BOR-60 up to ˜12 at.% burn-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozkin, B. D.; Stepennova, N. M.; Fedorov, Yu. Ye.; Shishkov, M. G.; Kryukov, F. N.; Kuzmin, S. V.; Nikitin, O. N.; Belyaeva, A. V.; Zabudko, L. M.

    2013-09-01

    In the article presented are the results of post-irradiation tests of helium bonded fuel pins with mixed mononitride fuel (U0.55Pu0.45)N and (U0.4Pu0.6)N having 85% density irradiated in BOR-60 reactor. Achieved maximum burn-up was, respectively, equal to 9.4 and 12.1 at.% with max linear heat rates 41.9 and 54.5 kW/m. Maximum irradiation dose was 43 dpa. No damage of claddings made of ChS-68 steel (20% cold worked) was observed, and ductility margin existed. Maximum depth of cladding corrosion was within 15 μm. Swelling rates of (U0.4Pu0.6)N and (U0.55Pu0.45)N were, respectively, ˜1.1% and ˜0.68% per 1 at.%. Gas release rate did not exceed 19.3% and 19%. Pattern of porosity distribution in the fuel influenced fuel swelling and gas release rates. Plutonium and uranium are uniformly distributed in the fuel, local minimum values of their content being caused by pores and cracks in the pellets. The observable peaks in content distribution are probably connected with the local formation of isolated phases (e.g. Mo, Pd) while the minimum values refer to fuel pores and cracks. Xenon and cesium tend to migrate from the hot sections of fuel, and therefore their min content is observed in the central section of the fuel pellets. Phase composition of the fuel was determined with X-ray diffractometer. The X-ray patterns of metallographic specimens were obtained by the scanning method (the step was 0.02°, the step exposition was equal to 2 s). From the X-ray diffraction analysis data, it follows that the nitrides of both fuel types have the single-phase structure with an FCC lattice (see Table 6).

  4. Evaluation of Aqueous and Powder Processing Techniques for Production of Pu-238-Fueled General Purpose Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-06-01

    This report evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu-238 fueled General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG). Fabricating GPHSs with the current process has remained essentially unchanged since its development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the fields of chemistry, manufacturing, ceramics, and control systems. At the Department of Energy’s request, alternate manufacturing methods were compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product. An expert committee performed the evaluation with input from four national laboratories experienced in Pu-238 handling.

  5. Development of spent fuel reprocessing process based on selective sulfurization: Study on the Pu, Np and Am sulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirishima, Akira; Amano, Yuuki; Nihei, Toshifumi; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki; Sato, Nobuaki

    2010-03-01

    For the recovery of fissile materials from spent nuclear fuel, we have proposed a novel reprocessing process based on selective sulfurization of fission products (FPs). The key concept of this process is utilization of unique chemical property of carbon disulfide (CS2), i.e., it works as a reductant for U3O8 but works as a sulfurizing agent for minor actinides and lanthanides. Sulfurized FPs and minor actinides (MA) are highly soluble to dilute nitric acid while UO2 and PuO2 are hardly soluble, therefore, FPs and MA can be removed from Uranium and Plutonium matrix by selective dissolution. As a feasibility study of this new concept, the sulfurization behaviours of U, Pu, Np, Am and Eu are investigated in this paper by the thermodynamical calculation, phase analysis of chemical analogue elements and tracer experiments.

  6. U and Pu Gamma-Ray Measurements of Spent Fuel Using a Gamma-Ray Mirror Band-Pass Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Alameda, J.B.; Brejnholt, N.F.; Decker, T.A.; Descalle, M.A.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hill, R.M.; Kisner, R.A.; Melin, A.M.; Patton, B.W.; Ruz, J.; Soufli, R.; Pivovaroff, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report on the use of grazing incidence gamma-ray mirrors to serve as a narrow band-pass filter for advanced non-destructive analysis (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. The purpose of the mirrors is to limit the radiation reaching a HPGe detector to narrow spectral bands around characteristic emission lines from fissile isotopes in the fuel. This overcomes the normal rate issues when performing gamma-ray NDA measurements. In a proof-of-concept experiment, a set of simple flat gamma-ray mirrors were used to directly observe the atomic florescence lines from U and Pu from spent fuel pins with the detector located in a shirt-sleeve environment. The mirrors, consisting of highly polished silicon substrates deposited with WC/SiC multilayer coatings, successfully deflected the lines of interest while the intense primary radiation beam from the fuel was blocked by a lead beam stop. The gamma-ray multilayer coatings that make the mirrors work at the gamma-ray energies used here (~ 100 keV) have been experimentally tested at energies as high as 645 keV, indicating that direct observation of nuclear emission lines from 239Pu should be possible with an appropriately designed optic and shielding configuration.

  7. High-silicon {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment- impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

  8. Conceptual design for a receiving station for the nondestructive assay of PuO/sub 2/ at the fuels and materials examination facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, T.E.; Speir, L.G.; Ensslin, N.; Hsue, S.T.; Johnson, S.S.; Bourret, S.; Parker, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    We propose a conceptual design for a receiving station for input accountability measurements on PuO/sub 2/ received at the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. Nondestructive assay techniques are proposed, including neutron coincidence counting, calorimetry, and isotopic determination by gamma-ray spectroscopy, in a versatile data acquisition system to perform input accountability measurements with precisions better than 1% at throughputs of up to 2 M.T./yr of PuO/sub 2/.

  9. Oxidative dissolution of unirradiated Mimas MOX fuel (U/Pu oxides) in carbonated water under oxic and anoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odorowski, Mélina; Jégou, Christophe; De Windt, Laurent; Broudic, Véronique; Peuget, Sylvain; Magnin, Magali; Tribet, Magaly; Martin, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    Few studies exist concerning the alteration of Mimas Mixed-OXide (MOX) fuel, a mixed plutonium and uranium oxide, and data is needed to better understand its behavior under leaching, especially for radioactive waste disposal. In this study, two leaching experiments were conducted on unirradiated MOX fuel with a strong alpha activity (1.3 × 109 Bq.gMOX-1 reproducing the alpha activity of spent MOX fuel with a burnup of 47 GWd·tHM-1 after 60 years of decay), one under air (oxic conditions) for 5 months and the other under argon (anoxic conditions with [O2] < 1 ppm) for one year in carbonated water (10-2 mol L-1). For each experiment, solution samples were taken over time and Eh and pH were monitored. The uranium in solution was assayed using a kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (KPA), plutonium and americium were analyzed by a radiochemical route, and H2O2 generated by the water radiolysis was quantified by chemiluminescence. Surface characterizations were performed before and after leaching using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Probe Microanalyzer (EPMA) and Raman spectroscopy. Solubility diagrams were calculated to support data discussion. The uranium releases from MOX pellets under both oxic and anoxic conditions were similar, demonstrating the predominant effect of alpha radiolysis on the oxidative dissolution of the pellets. The uranium released was found to be mostly in solution as carbonate species according to modeling, whereas the Am and Pu released were significantly sorbed or precipitated onto the TiO2 reactor. An intermediate fraction of Am (12%) was also present as colloids. SEM and EPMA results indicated a preferential dissolution of the UO2 matrix compared to the Pu-enriched agglomerates, and Raman spectroscopy showed the Pu-enriched agglomerates were slightly oxidized during leaching. Unlike Pu-enriched zones, the UO2 grains were much more sensitive to oxidative dissolution, but the presence of carbonates did not enable observation of an

  10. Effect of oxygen potential on the sintering behavior of MgO-based heterogeneous fuels containing (Pu, Am)O 2-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Shuhei; Ishi, Yohei; Osaka, Masahiko

    2009-06-01

    The effect of oxygen potential on the sintering behavior of MgO-based heterogeneous fuels containing (Pu, Am)O 2-x was experimentally investigated. Sintering tests in various atmospheres, i.e. air, moisturized 4%H 2-Ar, and 4%H 2-Ar atmosphere, were carried out. The sintering behavior was found to be significantly affected by the oxygen potential in the sintering atmosphere. The sintered density decreased with decreasing oxygen potential. The (Pu, Am)O 2-x phase sintered in a reductive atmosphere had hypostoichiometry. The aggregates of the (Pu, Am)O 2-x phase sintered in the reductive atmosphere grew, in comparison with those in the oxidizing one. The sintering mechanism was discussed in terms of the difference in sintering behavior of (Pu, Am)O 2-x and MgO.

  11. Fully Coupled Modeling of Burnup-Dependent (U1- y , Pu y )O2- x Mixed Oxide Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Wenzhong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-03-01

    During the fast reactor nuclear fuel fission reaction, fission gases accumulate and form pores with the increase of fuel burnup, which decreases the fuel thermal conductivity, leading to overheating of the fuel element. The diffusion of plutonium and oxygen with high temperature gradient is also one of the important fuel performance concerns as it will affect the fuel material properties, power distribution, and overall performance of the fuel pin. In order to investigate these important issues, the (U1- y Pu y )O2- x fuel pellet is studied by fully coupling thermal transport, deformation, oxygen diffusion, fission gas release and swelling, and plutonium redistribution to evaluate the effects on each other with burnup-dependent models, accounting for the evolution of fuel porosity. The approach was developed using self-defined multiphysics models based on the framework of COMSOL Multiphysics to manage the nonlinearities associated with fast reactor mixed oxide fuel performance analysis. The modeling results showed a consistent fuel performance comparable with the previous results. Burnup degrades the fuel thermal conductivity, resulting in a significant fuel temperature increase. The fission gas release increased rapidly first and then steadily with the burnup increase. The fuel porosity increased dramatically at the beginning of the burnup and then kept constant as the fission gas released to the fuel free volume, causing the fuel temperature to increase. Another important finding is that the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen affects greatly not only the fuel properties, for example, thermal conductivity, but also the fuel performance, for example, temperature distribution, porosity evolution, grain size growth, fission gas release, deformation, and plutonium redistribution. Special attention needs to be paid to the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen in fuel fabrication. Plutonium content will also affect the fuel material properties and performance

  12. Imminent: Irradiation Testing of (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} Fuel - 13560

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Julian F.; Franceschini, Fausto

    2013-07-01

    Commercial-prototype thorium-plutonium oxide (Th-MOX) fuel pellets have been loaded into the material test reactor in Halden, Norway. The fuel is being operated at full power - with instrumentation - in simulated LWR / PHWR conditions and its behaviour is measured 'on-line' as it operates to high burn-up. This is a vital test on the commercialization pathway for this robust new thoria-based fuel. The performance data that is collected will support a fuel modeling effort to support its safety qualification. Several different samples of Th-MOX fuel will be tested, thereby collecting information on ceramic behaviours and their microstructure dependency. The fuel-cycle reasoning underpinning the test campaign is that commercial Th- MOX fuels are an achievable intermediate / near-term SNF management strategy that integrates well with a fast reactor future. (authors)

  13. /sup 238/Pu fuel form processes. Quarterly report, July-September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Fracture tendency of pellets after final heat treatment or vacuum outgassing during production has been reviewed. A statistical analysis of fracture tendency has revealed a cyclical trend. The period of the cycle on average is about every 50 pellets. Phosphorus is considered detrimental to the impact behavior of iridium. Tests show that phosphorus is easily picked up by PuO/sub 2/ through a variety of pathways and is difficult to remove by heating techniques such as are possible in the PuFF Facility. High-temperature impact ductility of CVS welds may be related to grain structure in the weld centerline. Heating at 1500/sup 0/C causes finely structured thorium-bearing patches on grain surfaces in welds to agglomerate into particles. Heating at 2000/sup 0/C appears to heal grain boundary cavities and pores. High-temperature creep has been identified as another mechanism for producing grain boundary cavities that cause weld-quench cracking. 17 figures, 11 tables.

  14. Modeling Constituent Redistribution in U-Pu-Zr Metallic Fuel Using the Advanced Fuel Performance Code BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Porter; Steve Hayes; Various

    2014-06-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) metallic fuels currently being tested have higher zirconium and plutonium concentrations than those tested in the past in EBR reactors. Current metal fuel performance codes have limitations and deficiencies in predicting AFC fuel performance, particularly in the modeling of constituent distribution. No fully validated code exists due to sparse data and unknown modeling parameters. Our primary objective is to develop an initial analysis tool by incorporating state-of-the-art knowledge, constitutive models and properties of AFC metal fuels into the MOOSE/BISON (1) framework in order to analyze AFC metallic fuel tests.

  15. Coprocessed nuclear fuels containing (U, Pu) values as oxides, carbides or carbonitrides

    DOEpatents

    Lloyd, Milton H.

    1983-01-01

    Method for direct coprocessing of nuclear fuels derived from a product stream of a fuels reprocessing facility containing uranium, plutonium, and fission product values comprising nitrate stabilization of said stream vacuum concentration to remove water and nitrates, neutralization to form an acid deficient feed solution for the internal gelation mode of sol-gel technology, green spherule formation, recovery and treatment for loading into a fuel element by vibra packed or pellet formation technologies.

  16. Coprocessed nuclear fuels containing (U, Pu) values as oxides, carbides or carbonitrides

    DOEpatents

    Lloyd, M.H.

    1981-01-09

    Method for direct coprocessing of nuclear fuels derived from a product stream of fuels reprocessing facility containing uranium, plutonium, and fission product values comprising nitrate stabilization of said stream vacuum concentration to remove water and nitrates, neutralization to form an acid deficient feed solution for the internal gelation mode of sol-gel technology, green spherule formation, recovery and treatment for loading into a fuel element by vibra packed or pellet formation technologies.

  17. High-silicon {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment-impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. The thermal conductivity of mixed fuel UxPu1-xO2: molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Cooper, Michael William Donald; Stanek, Christopher Richard; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar

    2015-10-16

    Mixed oxides (MOX), in the context of nuclear fuels, are a mixture of the oxides of heavy actinide elements such as uranium, plutonium and thorium. The interest in the UO2-PuO2 system arises from the fact that these oxides are used both in fast breeder reactors (FBRs) as well as in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The thermal conductivity of UO2 fuel is an important material property that affects fuel performance since it is the key parameter determining the temperature distribution in the fuel, thus governing, e.g., dimensional changes due to thermal expansion, fission gas release rates, etc. For this reason it is important to understand the thermal conductivity of MOX fuel and how it differs from UO2. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to determine quantitatively, the effect of mixing on the thermal conductivity of UxPu1-xO2, as a function of PuO2 concentrations, for a range of temperatures, 300 – 1500 K. The results will be used to develop enhanced continuum thermal conductivity models for MARMOT and BISON by INL. These models express the thermal conductivity as a function of microstructure state-variables, thus enabling thermal conductivity models with closer connection to the physical state of the fuel.

  19. LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K.; Takano, M.; Sato, S.; Shimazu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

  20. Pu-Zr alloy for high-temperature foil-type fuel

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron reflux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  1. Modeling of selected ceramic processing parameters employed in the fabrication of 238PuO2 fuel pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Brockman, R. A.; Kramer, D. P.; Barklay, C. D.; Cairns-Gallimore, D.; Brown, J. L.; Huling, J. C.; Van Pelt, C. E.

    2011-10-01

    Recent deep space missions utilize the thermal output of the radioisotope plutonium-238 as the fuel in the thermal to electrical power system. Since the application of plutonium in its elemental state has several disadvantages, the fuel employed in these deep space power systems is typically in the oxide form such as plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2). As an oxide, the processing of the plutonium dioxide into fuel pellets is performed via ''classical'' ceramic processing unit operations such as sieving of the powder, pressing, sintering, etc. Modeling of these unit operations can be beneficial in the understanding and control of processing parameters with the goal of further enhancing the desired characteristics of the 238PuO2 fuel pellets. A finite element model has been used to help identify the time-temperature-stress profile within a pellet during a furnace operation taking into account that 238PuO2 itself has a significant thermal output. The results of the modeling efforts will be discussed.

  2. Application of density functional theory in assessing properties of thoria and recycled fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szpunar, B.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2013-08-01

    The application of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) approximation to assess the mechanical and structural properties of recycled urania and thoria fuel is presented. The total energy technique based on the local density approximation plus Hubbard U as implemented in the CASTEP code is used. The calculated values of the lattice constants and mechanical moduli of ThO2 and UO2 agree with the experimental data. However only non-local hybrid functional (B3LYP) leads to a larger band gap (6.9 eV) of thoria, in better agreement with experiment (6 eV) than value (4.7 eV) calculated using the LDA + U (6 eV) scheme. The calculations are further expanded to study lattice constants of (Pu, U) oxides and U3O8 for which we currently do not have experimental data. The elastic moduli of ThO2, UO2 and (Pu, U) oxides are compared.

  3. Microstructural Changes In Thermally Cycled U-Pu-Zr-Am-Np Metallic Transmutation Fuel With 1.5% Lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn E. Janney; J. Rory Kennedy

    2008-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is developing metallic actinide-zirconium alloy fuels for the transmutation of minor actinides as part of a closed fuel cycle. The molten salt electrochemical process to be used for fuel recycle has the potential to carry over up to 2% fission product lanthanide content into the fuel fabrication process. Within the scope of the fuel irradiation testing program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), candidate metal alloy transmutation fuels containing quantities of lanthanide elements have been fabricated, characterized, and delivered to the Advanced Test Reactor for irradiation testing.

  4. Large area quantitative X-ray mapping of (U,Pu)O 2 nuclear fuel pellets using wavelength dispersive electron probe microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémier, S.; Haas, D.; Somers, J.; Walker, C. T.

    2003-04-01

    The work presented is an example of how large area compositional mapping (≥1 mm 2) can be used to provide quantitative information on element distribution and specimen homogeneity. High-resolution was accomplished by producing a collage of X-ray maps acquired using classical conditions; magnification ×400, spatial resolution 256×256 pixels. The individual images, each measuring roughly 250×250 μm, were converted to quantitative maps using the HIMAX® software package and the XMAS® matrix correction from SAMx. The quantitative gray-level large area X-ray picture was pieced together using the 'Multiple Image Alignment' function of the ANALYSIS® image processing software. This software was also used to convert the gray-level pictures to false color images. The specimens investigated were transverse sections of MOX fuel pellets. Results are presented for the distribution of Pu by area fraction and cumulative area fraction, the size distribution of regions of high Pu concentration and average separation of these regions.

  5. Determination of total Pu content in a Spent Fuel Assembly by Measuring Passive Neutron Count rate and Multiplication with the Differential Die-Away Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Henzl, Vladimir; Croft, Stephen; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2012-07-18

    A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to evaluate and develop non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA) [1]. Within this framework, we investigate by simulation a novel analytical approach based on combined information from passive measurement of the total neutron count rate of a SFA and its multiplication determined by the active interrogation using an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique (DDA). We use detailed MCNPX simulations across an extensive set of SFA characteristics to establish the approach and demonstrate its robustness. It is predicted that Pu content can be determined by the proposed method to a few %.

  6. Pyrochemical processes for the recovery of weapons grade plutonium either as a metal or as PuO{sub 2} for use in mixed oxide reactor fuel pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenares, C.A.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Bronson, M.C.

    1995-11-03

    The authors have developed two processes for the recovery of weapons grade Pu, as either Pu metal or PuO{sub 2}, that are strictly pyrochemical and do not produce any liquid waste. Large amounts of Pu metal (up to 4 kg.), in various geometric shapes, have been recovered by a hydride/dehydride/casting process (HYDEC) to produce metal ingots of any desired shape. The three processing steps are carried out in a single compact apparatus. The experimental technique and results obtained will be described. The authors have prepared PuO{sub 2} powders from weapons grade Pu by a process that hydrides the Pu metal followed by the oxidation of the hydride (HYDOX process). Experimental details of the best way to carry out this process will be presented, as well as the characterization of both hydride and oxide powders produced.

  7. A Deterministic Study of the Deficiency of the Wigner-Seitz Approximation for Pu/MOX Fuel Pins

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1999-09-27

    The Wigner-Seitz pin-cell approximation has long been applied as a modeling approximation in analysis of UO2 lattice fuel cells. In the past, this approximation has been appropriate for such fuel. However, with increasing attention drawn to mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels with significant plutonium content, it is important to understand the implications of the approximation in a uranium-plutonium matrix. The special geometric capabilities of the deterministic NEWT computer code have been used to assess the adequacy of the Wigner-Seitz cell in such an environment, as part of a larger study of computational aspects of MOX fuel modeling. Results of calculations using various approximations and boundary conditions are presented, and are validated by comparison to results obtained using KENO V.a and XSDRNPM.

  8. Thermochemical Assessment of Oxygen Gettering by SiC or ZrC in PuO2-x TRISO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2010-01-01

    Particulate nuclear fuel in a modular helium reactor is being considered for the consumption of excess plutonium and related transuranics. In particular, efforts to largely consume transuranics in a single-pass will require the fuel to undergo very high burnup. This deep burn concept will thus make the proposed plutonia TRISO fuel particularly likely to suffer kernel migration where carbon in the buffer layer and inner pyrolytic carbon layer is transported from the high temperature side of the particle to the low temperature side. This phenomenon is oberved to cause particle failure and therefore must be mitigated. The addition of SiC or ZrC in the oxide kernel or in a layer in communication with the kernel will lower the oxygen potential and therefore prevent kernel migration, and this has been demonstrated with SiC. In this work a thermochemical analysis was performed to predict oxygen potential behavior in the plutonia TRISO fuel to burnups of 50% FIMA with and without the presence of oxygen gettering SiC and ZrC. Kernel migration is believed to be controlled by CO gas transporting carbon from the hot side to the cool side, and CO pressure is governed by the oxygen potential in the presence of carbon. The gettering phases significantly reduce the oxygen potential and thus CO pressure in an otherwise PuO2-x kernel, and prevent kernel migration by limiting CO gas diffusion through the buffer layer. The reduction in CO pressure can also reduce the peak pressure within the particles by ~50%, thus reducing the likelihood of pressure-induced particle failure. A model for kernel migration was used to semi-quantitatively assess the effect of controlling oxygen potential with SiC or ZrC and did demonstrated the dramatic effect of the addition of these phases on carbon transport.

  9. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of U Oxide at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S; Chung, B W; Waddill, G D

    2010-03-02

    In our laboratory at LLNL, an effort is underway to investigate the underlying complexity of 5f electronic structure with spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using chiral photonic excitation, i.e. Fano Spectroscopy. Our previous Fano measurements with Ce indicate the efficacy of this approach and theoretical calculations and spectral simulations suggest that Fano Spectroscopy may resolve the controversy concerning Pu electronic structure and electron correlation. To this end, we have constructed and commissioned a new Fano Spectrometer, testing it with the relativistic 5d system Pt. Here, our preliminary photoelectron spectra of the UO{sub 2} system are presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to characterize a sample of UO{sub 2} grown on an underlying substrate of Uranium. Both AlK{alpha} (1487 eV) and MgK{alpha} (1254 eV) emission were utilized as the excitation. Using XPS and comparing to reference spectra, it has been shown that our sample is clearly UO{sub 2}.

  10. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative research to determine the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies: Purpose, approach, constraints, implementation, and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, S. J.; Menlove, H. O.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Schear, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy has funded a multi-lab/multi-university collaboration to quantify the plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins from them. The goal of this research effort is to quantify the capability of various non-destructive assay (NDA) technologies as well as to train a future generation of safeguards practitioners. This research is "technology driven" in the sense that we will quantify the capabilities of a wide range of safeguards technologies of interest to regulators and policy makers; a key benefit to this approach is that the techniques are being tested in a unified manner. When the results of the Monte Carlo modeling are evaluated and integrated, practical constraints are part of defining the potential context in which a given technology might be applied. This paper organizes the commercial spent fuel safeguard needs into four facility types in order to identify any constraints on the NDA system design. These four facility types are the following: future reprocessing plants, current reprocessing plants, once-through spent fuel repositories, and any other sites that store individual spent fuel assemblies (reactor sites are the most common facility type in this category). Dry storage is not of interest since individual assemblies are not accessible. This paper will overview the purpose and approach of the NGSI spent fuel effort and describe the constraints inherent in commercial fuel facilities. It will conclude by discussing implementation and calibration of measurement systems. This report will also provide some motivation for considering a couple of other safeguards concepts (base measurement and fingerprinting) that might meet the safeguards need but not require the determination of plutonium mass.

  11. Fuel/cladding compatibility in high-burnup U-19Pu-10Zr/HT9-clad fuel at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.B.; Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.

    1992-11-01

    This paper summarizes the most recent results of a continuing experimental effort to study compatibility issues of irradiated metallic fuel and cladding at elevated temperatures that may be encountered beyond those of nominal steady-state conditions.

  12. Disposition of weapon-grade plutonium with pebble bed type HTGRs using Pu burner balls and Th breeder balls

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Tokuhara, Kazumi; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    1996-08-01

    A concept of reactor system was developed with which weapons-grade plutonium could be made perfectly worthless in use for weapons. It is a pebble bed type HTGR using Pu burner ball fuels and Th breeder ball fuels. The residual amounts of {sup 239}Pu in spent Pu balls become less than 1% of the initial loading. Furthermore, a method was found that the power coefficient could be made negative by heavy Pu loading in the Pu burner ball fuels.

  13. Plutonium isotopic analysis system for plutonium samples enriched in sup 238 Pu in EP 60/61 and fuel-clad containers

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1991-07-01

    This two-part manual describes and provides instructions for installing software for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Pu-238 isotopic analysis system built for Westinghouse Hanford's Radioisotope Power Systems Facility. Part 1 contains descriptions of all the subroutines found in the main software program, WHC.ASY238. Also provided in this part are general instructions for modifying a subroutine and specific directions for relinking the WHC.ASY238 program, as well as information on the supporting program PU238.CHNG. Part 2 contains listings of the Pu-238 isotopic analysis system codes. The system uses a large (20% rel. efficiency), coaxial, n-type germanium detector (COAX). Parameter files for the detector have filenames with IS8 extensions. Spectral data files also have WH8 and I01, I02, etc. filename extensions.

  14. The crystal structure of ianthinite, [U 24+(UO 2) 4O 6(OH) 4(H 2O) 4](H 2O) 5: a possible phase for Pu 4+ incorporation during the oxidation of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Peter C.; Finch, Robert J.; Hawthorne, Frank C.; Miller, Mark L.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    1997-10-01

    Ianthinite, [U 24+(UO 2) 4O 6(OH) 4(H 2O) 4](H 2O) 5, is the only known uranyl oxide hydrate mineral that contains U 4+, and it has been proposed that ianthinite may be an important Pu 4+-bearing phase during the oxidative dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. The crystal structure of ianthinite, orthorhombic, a = 0.7178(2), b = 1.1473(2), c = 3.039(1) nm, V = 2.5027 nm 3Z = 4, space group P2 1cn, has been solved by direct methods and refined by least-squares methods to an R index of 9.7% and a wR index of 12.6% using 888 unique observed [| F| ≥ 5 σ | F|] reflections. The structure contains both U 4+. The U 6+ cations are present as roughly linear (U 6+O 2) 2+ uranyl ion (Ur) that are in turn coordinated by five O 2- and OH - located at the equatorial positions of pentagonal bipyramids. The U 4+ cations are coordinated by O 2-, OH - and H 2O in a distorted octahedral arrangement. The Ur φ5and U 4+| 6 (φ: O 2-, OH -, H 2O) polyhedra l sharing edges to for two symmetrically distinct sheets at z ≈ 0.0 and z ≈ 0.25 that are parallel to (001). The sheets have the β-U 3O 8 sheet anion-topology. There are five symmetrically distinct H 2O groips located at z ≈ 0.125 between the sheets of U φn polyhedra, and the sheets of U φn polyhedra are linked together only by hydrogen bonding to the intersheet H 2O groups. The crystal-chemical requirements of U 4+ and Pu 4+ are very similar, suggesting that extensive Pu 4+ ↔ U 4+ substitution may occur within the sheets of U φn polyhedra in trh structure of ianthinine.

  15. Adsorption behaviour of PuF6 on UO2F2 by the use of 236Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Nobuaki; Matsuda, Minoru; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki; Kirishima, Akira

    2010-03-01

    To know the behavior of plutonium in the fluoride volatility process (FLUOREX PROCESS) for the spent nuclear fuel, both UO2 and PuO2 are fluorinated by fluorine forming volatile UF6 and PuF6, respectively. Then PuF6 is separated and recovered from UF6 by using adsorption materials such as uranyl fluoride UO2F2. In this paper, adsorption behavior of PuF6on UO2F2 was examined by the use of 236Pu tracer. First, the stability of UO2F2 in F2atmosphere was analyzed by TG-DTA method showing that uranium volatilized completely over 350 °C by the formation of UF6 and the adsorption of plutonium by UO2F2 should be done at temperatures lower than 250 °C. The behavior of PtF6 as a chemical analogue of PuF6 was also conducted for comparison and it showed that the deposition of PtF4 on UO2F2 at 200 °C. When the 236Pu doped U3O8 was reacted with 10%F2-He gas, the PuF6 vaporized at ca. 600 °C. Then adsorption of 236Pu on UO2F2 was observed by α ray measurement. The adsorption mechanism of Pu on UO2F2 was discussed with experimental data and thermodynamic consideration.

  16. On the electrochemical formation of Pu-Al alloys in molten LiCl-KCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Nourry, C.; Souček, P.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2012-01-01

    Properties of Pu-Al alloys were investigated in connection with development of pyrochemical methods for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Electroseparation techniques in molten LiCl-KCl are being developed in ITU to group-selectively recover actinides from the mixture with fission products. In the process, actinides are electrochemically reduced on solid aluminium cathodes, forming solid actinide-aluminium alloys. This article is focused on electro-chemical characterisation of Pu-Al alloys in molten LiCl-KCl, on electrodeposition of Pu on solid Al electrodes and on determination of chemical composition and structure of the formed alloys. Cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry were used to study Pu-Al alloys in the temperature range 400-550 °C. Pu is reduced to metal in one reduction step Pu 3+/Pu 0 on an inert W electrode. On a reactive Al electrode, the reduction of Pu 3+ to Pu 0 occurs at a more positive potential due to formation of Pu-Al alloys. The open circuit potential technique was used to identify the alloys formed. Stable deposits were obtained by potentiostatic electrolyses of LiCl-KCl-PuCl 3 melts on Al plates. XRD and SEM-EDX analyses were used to characterise the alloys, which were composed mainly of PuAl 4 with some PuAl 3. In addition, the preparation of PuCl 3 containing salt by carbochlorination of PuO 2 is described.

  17. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Bailey, V.L.; Plymale, A.E.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2006-04-05

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by co-disposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Pu(IV)-EDTA is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds. Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) is likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions and the anaerobic biodegradation of Pu-EDTA. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV), the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA, how the Pu(III)-EDTA competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, soluble Pu(III)-EDTA under anaerobic conditions would require anaerobic degradation of the EDTA to limit Pu(III) transport. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have never been isolated. Recent results have shown that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(IV) was provided as insoluble PuO2. The highest rate of Pu(IV) reduction was with the addition of AQDS, an electron shuttle. Of the total amount of Pu solubilized (i.e., soluble through a 0.36 nm filter), approximately 70% was Pu(III). The amount of soluble Pu was between 4.8 and 3.2 micromolar at day 1 and 6, respectively, indicating rapid reduction. The micromolar Pu is significant since the drinking water limit for Pu is 10{sup -12} M. On-going experiments are investigating the influence of EDTA on the rate of Pu reduction and the stability of the formed Pu(III). We have also

  18. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2005-04-18

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH){sub 3}(s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop

  19. Pu(V) and Pu(IV) sorption to montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Zhao, Pihong; Tumey, Scott J; Powell, Brian; Kersting, Annie B

    2013-05-21

    Plutonium (Pu) adsorption to and desorption from mineral phases plays a key role in controlling the environmental mobility of Pu. Here we assess whether the adsorption behavior of Pu at concentrations used in typical laboratory studies (≥10(-10) [Pu] ≤ 10(-6) M) are representative of adsorption behavior at concentrations measured in natural subsurface waters (generally <10(-12) M). Pu(V) sorption to Na-montmorillonite was examined over a wide range of initial Pu concentrations (10(-6)-10(-16) M). Pu(V) adsorption after 30 days was linear over the wide range of concentrations studied, indicating that Pu sorption behavior from laboratory studies at higher concentrations can be extrapolated to sorption behavior at low, environmentally relevant concentrations. Pu(IV) sorption to montmorillonite was studied at initial concentrations of 10(-6)-10(-11) M and was much faster than Pu(V) sorption over the 30 day equilibration period. However, after one year of equilibration, the extent of Pu(V) adsorption was similar to that observed for Pu(IV) after 30 days. The continued uptake of Pu(V) is attributed to a slow, surface-mediated reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV). Comparison between rates of adsorption of Pu(V) to montmorillonite and a range of other minerals (hematite, goethite, magnetite, groutite, corundum, diaspore, and quartz) found that minerals containing significant Fe and Mn (hematite, goethite, magnetite, and groutite) adsorbed Pu(V) faster than those which did not, highlighting the potential importance of minerals with redox couples in increasing the rate of Pu(V) removal from solution. PMID:23614502

  20. Biotransformation of PuEDTA: Implications to Pu Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, Harvey, Jr.

    2006-06-01

    This project integrates three distinct goals to develop a fundamental understanding of the potential fate and disposition of plutonium in sediments that are co-contaminated with EDTA. The three objectives are: (1) Develop thermodynamic data for Pu-EDTA species and determine the dominant mobile form of Pu under anaerobic conditions. (2) Elucidate the mechanism and rates of Pu(IV) and Pu(IV)-EDTA reduction by metal-reducing bacteria and determine where the Pu is located (in solution, biosorbed, bioaccumulated). (3) Enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading microorganisms to investigate the anaerobic biodegradation of Pu-EDTA.

  1. Pu-239 and Pu-240 inventories and Pu-240/ Pu-239 atom ratios in the water column off Sanriku, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Aono, Tatsuo

    2013-04-01

    A magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami occurred in the Pacific Ocean off northern Honshu, Japan, on 11 March 2011 which caused severe damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. This accident has resulted in a substantial release of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and ocean, and has caused extensive contamination of the environment. However, no information is available on the amounts of radionuclides such as Pu isotopes released into the ocean at this time. Investigating the background baseline concentration and atom ratio of Pu isotopes in seawater is important for assessment of the possible contamination in the marine environment. Pu-239 (half-life: 24,100 years), Pu-240 (half-life: 6,560 years) and Pu-241 (half-life: 14.325 years) mainly have been released into the environment as the result of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. The atom ratio of Pu-240/Pu-239 is a powerful fingerprint to identify the sources of Pu in the ocean. The Pu-239 and Pu-240 inventories and Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios in seawater samples collected in the western North Pacific off Sanriku before the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant will provide useful background baseline data for understanding the process controlling Pu transport and for distinguishing additional Pu sources. Seawater samples were collected with acoustically triggered quadruple PVC sampling bottles during the KH-98-3 cruise of the R/V Hakuho-Maru. The Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios were measured with a double-focusing SF-ICP-MS, which was equipped with a guard electrode to eliminate secondary discharge in the plasma and to enhance overall sensitivity. The Pu-239 and Pu-240 concentrations were 2.07 and 1.67 mBq/m3 in the surface water, respectively, and increased with depth; a subsurface maximum was identified at 750 m depth, and the concentrations decreased with depth, then increased at the bottom layer. The total Pu-239+240 inventory in the entire water column (depth interval 0

  2. AC-3-irradiation test of sphere-pac and pellet (U,Pu)C fuel in the US Fast Flux Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bart, G.; Botta, F. B.; Hoth, C. W.; Ledergerber, G.; Mason, R. E.; Stratton, R. W.

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the AC-3 bundle experiment in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was to evaluate a fuel fabrication method by 'direct conversion' of nitrate solutions into spherical uranium-plutonium carbide particles and to compare the irradiation performance of 'sphere-pac' fuel pins prepared at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with standard pellet fuel pins fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The irradiation and post test examination results show that mixed carbide pellet fuel produced by powder methods and sphere-pac particle fuel developed by internal gelation techniques are both valuable advanced fuel candidates for liquid metal reactors. The PSI fabrication process with direct conversion of actinide nitrate solutions into various sizes of fuel spheres by internal gelation and direct filling of spheres into cladding tubes is seen as more easily transferable to remote operation, showing a significant reduction of process steps. The process is also adaptable for the fabrication of carbonitrides and nitrides (still based on a uranium matrix), as well as for actinides diluted in a (uranium-free) yttrium stabilized zirconium oxide matrix. The AC-3 fuel bundle was irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during the years 1986-1988 for 630 full power days to a peak burn up of ˜8 at.% fissile material. All of the pins, irradiated at linear powers of up to 84 kW/m, with cladding outer temperatures of 465 °C appeared to be in good condition when removed from the assembly. The rebirth of interest for fast reactor systems motivated the earlier teams to report about the excellent, still perfectly relevant results reached; this paper focusing on the sphere-pac fuel behaviour.

  3. Control of Urania Crystallite Size by HMTA-Urea Reactions in the Internal Gelation Process for Preparing (U, Pu)O2Fuel Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.

    2005-04-26

    In the development of (U,Pu)O{sub 2} kernels by the internal gelation process for the Direct Press Spheroidized process at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a novel crystal growth step was discovered that made it possible to prepare calcined porous kernels that could be used as direct-press feed for Fast Breeder Reactor pellet fabrication. High-quality pellets were prepared that were near theoretical density and that (upon examination) revealed no evidence of sphere remnants. The controlled crystal growth step involved using hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA)-urea stock solutions that were boiled for 60 min or less. Before this discovery, all the other crystal growth steps (when utilized) could reduce the tap density to only {approx}1.3 g/cm{sup 3}, which was not sufficiently low for use in ideal pellet pressing. The use of the boiled HMTA-urea solution allowed the tap density to be lowered to 0.93 g/cm{sup 3}, with the ideal density being about 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}. This report describes the development of this technology and its scaleup.

  4. A Brief Review of Past INL Work Assessing Radionuclide Content in TMI-2 Melted Fuel Debris: The Use of 144Ce as a Surrogate for Pu Accountancy

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; S. J. Thompson

    2013-09-01

    This report serves as a literature review of prior work performed at Idaho National Laboratory, and its predecessor organizations Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), studying radionuclide partitioning within the melted fuel debris of the reactor of the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant. The purpose of this review is to document prior published work that provides supporting evidence of the utility of using 144Ce as a surrogate for plutonium within melted fuel debris. When the TMI-2 accident occurred no quantitative nondestructive analysis (NDA) techniques existed that could assay plutonium in the unconventional wastes from the reactor. However, unpublished work performed at INL by D. W. Akers in the late 1980s through the 1990s demonstrated that passive gamma-ray spectrometry of 144Ce could potentially be used to develop a semi-quantitative correlation for estimating plutonium content in these materials. The fate and transport of radioisotopes in fuel from different regions of the core, including uranium, fission products, and actinides, appear to be well characterized based on the maximum temperature reached by fuel in different parts of the core and the melting point, boiling point, and volatility of those radioisotopes. Also, the chemical interactions between fuel, fuel cladding, control elements, and core structural components appears to have played a large role in determining when and how fuel relocation occurred in the core; perhaps the most important of these reaction appears to be related to the formation of mixed-material alloys, eutectics, in the fuel cladding. Because of its high melting point, low volatility, and similar chemical behavior to plutonium, the element cerium appears to have behaved similarly to plutonium during the evolution of the TMI-2 accident. Anecdotal evidence extrapolated from open-source literature strengthens this logical feasibility for

  5. 238Pu: accumulation, tissue distribution, and excretion in Mayak workers after exposure to plutonium aerosols.

    PubMed

    Suslova, Klara G; Sokolova, Alexandra B; Khokhryakov, Viktor V; Miller, Scott C

    2012-03-01

    The alpha spectrometry measurements of specific activity of 238Pu and 239Pu in urine from bioassay examinations of 1,013 workers employed at the radiochemical and plutonium production facilities of the Mayak Production Association and in autopsy specimens of lung, liver, and skeleton from 85 former nuclear workers who died between 1974-2009, are summarized.The accumulation fraction of 238Pu in the body and excreta has not changed with time in workers involved in production of weapons-grade plutonium production (e.g., the plutonium production facility and the former radiochemical facility). The accumulation fraction of 238Pu in individuals exposed to plutonium isotopes at the newer Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant ranged from 0.13% up to 27.5% based on the autopsy data. No statistically significant differences between 238Pu and 239Pu in distribution by the main organs of plutonium deposition were found in the Mayak workers. Based on the bioassay data,the fraction of 238Pu activity in urine is on average 38-69% of the total activity of 238Pu and 239Pu, which correlates with the isotopic composition in workplace air sampled at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant. In view of the higher specific activity of 238Pu, the contribution of 238Pu to the total internal dose, particularly in the skeleton and liver, might be expected to continue to increase, and continued surveillance is recommended. PMID:22420016

  6. Preliminary Simulations for Geometric Optimization of a High-Energy Delayed Gamma Spectrometer for Direct Assay of Pu in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.

    2012-06-07

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is under investigation as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative effort to develop non-destructive assay instruments for plutonium mass quantification in spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Results obtained to date indicate that individual isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray spectra can potentially be used to quantify the total fissile content and individual weight fractions of fissile and fertile nuclides present in spent fuel. Adequate assay precision for inventory analysis can be obtained using a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available detection technology. In an attempt to optimize the geometric configuration and material composition for a delayed gamma measurement on spent fuel, the current study applies MCNPX, a Monte Carlo radiation transport code, in order to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio. Results are presented for optimizing the neutron spectrum tailoring material, geometries to maximize thermal or fast fissions from a given neutron source, and detector location to allow an acceptable delayed gamma-ray signal while achieving a reasonable detector lifetime while operating in a high-energy neutron field. This work is supported in part by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  7. Pu(V) transport through Savannah River Site soils - an evaluation of a conceptual model of surface- mediated reduction to Pu (IV).

    PubMed

    Powell, Brian A; Kaplan, Daniel I; Serkiz, Steven M; Coates, John T; Fjeld, Robert A

    2014-05-01

    Over the last fifteen years the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, USA, was selected as the site of three new plutonium facilities: the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility, and the Pu Immobilization Plant. In order to assess the potential human and environmental risk associated with these recent initiatives, improved understanding of the fate and transport of Pu in the SRS subsurface environment is necessary. The hypothesis of this study was that the more mobile forms of Pu, Pu(V) and Pu(VI), would be reduced to the less mobile Pu(III/IV) oxidation states under ambient SRS subsurface conditions. Laboratory-scale dynamic flow experiments (i.e., column studies) indicated that Pu(V) was very mobile in SRS sediments. At higher pH values the mobility of Pu decreased and the fraction of Pu that became irreversibly sorbed to the sediment increased, albeit, only slightly. Conversely, these column experiments showed that Pu(IV) was essentially immobile and was largely irreversibly sorbed to the sediment. More than 100 batch sorption experiments were also conducted with four end-member sediments, i.e., sediments that include the chemical, textural, and mineralogical properties likely to exist in the SRS. These tests were conducted as a function of initial Pu oxidation state, pH, and contact time and consistently demonstrated that although Pu(V) sorbed initially quite weakly to sediments, it slowly, over the course of <33 days, sorbed very strongly to sediments, to approximately the same degree as Pu(IV). This is consistent with our hypothesis that Pu(V) is reduced to the more strongly sorbing form of Pu, Pu(IV). These studies provide important experimental support for a conceptual geochemical model for dissolved Pu in a highly weathered subsurface environment. That is that, irrespective of the initial oxidation state of the dissolved Pu introduced into a SRS sediment system, Pu(IV) controls the environmental transport

  8. Report of an investigation into deterioration of the Plutonium Fuel Form Fabrication Facility (PuFF) at the DOE Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This investigations of the Savannah River Site's Plutonium Fuel Form fabrication facility located in Building 235-F was initiated in April 1991. The purpose of the investigation was to determine whether, as has been alleged, operation of the facility's argon inert gas system was terminated with the knowledge that continued inoperability of the argon system would cause accelerated corrosion damage to the equipment in the plutonium 238 processing cells. The investigation quickly established that the decision to discontinue operation of the argon system, by not repairing it, was merely one of the measures, and not the most important one, which led to the current deteriorated state of the facility. As a result, the scope of the investigation was broadened to more identify and assess those factors which contributed to the facility's current condition. This document discusses the backgrounds, results, and recommendations of this investigation.

  9. Formation of Pu amorphous alloys or metastable structures in Pu-Fe, Pu-Ta, and Pu-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, H.F.; Echeverria, A.W.

    1985-08-20

    Sputter deposition technique was used to study the possible formation of amorphous structures in Pu-Fe, Pu-Ta, and Pu-Si systems. A triode sputtering system was used to prepare sputtered coatings: 13 to 59 at. % (a/o) Fe, 10 to 50 a/o Si, and 15 to 65 a/o Ta. Structure of the coatings was determined by x-ray diffraction techniques. The temperature stability of the obtained structures was determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The Pu-Fe and Pu-Si binary systems showed strong evidence for the formation of amorphous phases in the sputtered coatings. X-ray analyses indicated the presence of Pu6Fe in the 13 to 20 a/o Fe range of Pu-Fe alloys and no apparent crystalline phases over the entire 10 to 50 a/o Si range of Pu-Si alloys. In the Pu-Ta system, the DSC data obtained for compositions below 50 a/o Ta did not show typical crystallization exotherms. At compositions above 50 a/o Ta, a metastable bcc alpha Ta structure was observed with an expanded lattice parameter. The calculated volume expansion (2.9%) corresponds to 29 a/o of Pu in solid solution if the lattice parameter is assumed to follow Vegards Law. After storage in a nitrogen glovebox atmosphere for over two years, the Pu-Si and Pu-Ta coatings have maintained a metallic luster and have shown no visible evidence of surface oxidation.

  10. Temporal record of Pu isotopes in inter-tidal sediments from the northeastern Irish Sea.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Patric; Worsfold, Paul; Keith-Roach, Miranda; Andersen, Morten B; Kershaw, Peter; Leonard, Kins; Choi, Min-Seok; Boust, Dominique; Lesueur, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    A depth profile of (239)Pu and (240)Pu specific activities and isotope ratios was determined in an inter-tidal sediment core from the Esk Estuary in the northeastern Irish Sea. The study site has been impacted with plutonium through routine radionuclide discharges from the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant in Cumbria, NW England. A pronounced sub-surface maximum of ~10 k Bq kg(-1) was observed for (239+240)Pu, corresponding to the peak in Pu discharge from Sellafield in 1973, with a decreasing trend with depth down to ~0.04 k Bq kg(-1) in the deeper layers. The depth profile of (239+240)Pu specific activities together with results from gamma-ray spectrometry for (137)Cs and (241)Am was compared with reported releases from the Sellafield plant in order to estimate a reliable sediment chronology. The upper layers (1992 onwards) showed higher (239+240)Pu specific activities than would be expected from the direct input of annual Sellafield discharges, indicating that the main input of Pu is from the time-integrated contaminated mud patch of the northeastern Irish Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from ~0.03 in the deepest layers to >0.20 in the sub-surface layers with an activity-weighted average of 0.181. The decreasing (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio with depth reflects the changing nature of operations at the Sellafield plant from weapons-grade Pu production to reprocessing spent nuclear fuel with higher burn-up times in the late 1950s. In addition, recent annual (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in winkles collected during 2003-2008 from three stations along the Cumbrian coastline showed no significant spatial or temporal differences with an overall average of 0.204, which supports the hypothesis of diluted Pu input from the contaminated mud patch. PMID:21911246

  11. Elastic properties of Pu metal and Pu-Ga alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Klepeis, J E; Suzuki, Y; Migliori, A

    2010-01-05

    We present elastic properties, theoretical and experimental, of Pu metal and Pu-Ga ({delta}) alloys together with ab initio equilibrium equation-of-state for these systems. For the theoretical treatment we employ density-functional theory in conjunction with spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization for the metal and coherent-potential approximation for the alloys. Pu and Pu-Ga alloys are also investigated experimentally using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. We show that orbital correlations become more important proceeding from {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} plutonium, thus suggesting increasing f-electron correlation (localization). For the {delta}-Pu-Ga alloys we find a softening with larger Ga content, i.e., atomic volume, bulk modulus, and elastic constants, suggest a weakened chemical bonding with addition of Ga. Our measurements confirm qualitatively the theory but uncertainties remain when comparing the model with experiments.

  12. Pu Workshop Letter

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Schwartz, A J; Fluss, M

    2006-03-06

    In preparation for the upcoming Pu Workshop in Livermore, CA, USA, during July 14 and 15, 2006, we have begun to give some thought as to how the meeting will be structured and what will be discussed. Below, you will find our first proposal as to the agenda and contents of the meeting. From you, we need your feedback and suggestions concerning the desirability of each aspect of our proposal. Hopefully, we will be able to converge to a format that is acceptable to all parties. First, it now appears that we will be limited to three main sessions, Friday morning (July 14), Friday afternoon (July 14) and Saturday morning (July 15). The Pu Futures Meeting will conclude on Thursday, July 13. Following a social excursion, the Russian participants will be transported from Monterey Bay to their hotel in Livermore. We anticipate that the hotel will be the Residence Inn at 1000 Airway Blvd in Livermore. However, the hotel arrangements still need to be confirmed. We expect that many of our participants will begin their travels homeward in the afternoon of Saturday, July 15 and the morning of Sunday, July 16. Associated with the three main sessions, we propose that there be three main topics. Each session will have an individual focus. Because of the limited time available, we will need to make some judicious choices concerning the focus and the speakers for each session. We will also have a poster session associated with each session, to facilitate discussions, and a rotating set of Lab Tours, to maximize participation in the tour and minimize the disruption of the speaking schedule. Presently, we are planning a tour of the Dynamical Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) facilities, but this is still in a preliminary stage. We estimate that for each session and topic, there will be time for five (5) speakers. We propose that, typically, there be three (3) Russian and two (2) American speakers per session. We also propose that each session have a chair (or two chairs), who

  13. Designing Pu600 for Authentication

    SciTech Connect

    White, G

    2008-07-10

    Many recent Non-proliferation and Arms Control software projects include an authentication component. Demonstrating assurance that software and hardware performs as expected without hidden 'back-doors' is crucial to a project's success. In this context, 'authentication' is defined as determining that the system performs only its intended purpose and performs that purpose correctly and reliably over many years. Pu600 is a mature software solution for determining the presence of Pu and the ratio of Pu240 to Pu239 by analyzing the gamma ray spectra in the 600 KeV region. The project's goals are to explore hardware and software technologies which can by applied to Pu600 which ease the authentication of a complete, end-to-end solution. We will discuss alternatives and give the current status of our work.

  14. Magnetic Properties of Radiation Damage in Pu and Pu Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, S; Fluss, M J; Chung, B; Chapline, G; McElfresh, M; Jackson, D; Baclet, N; Jolly, L; Dormeval, M

    2005-03-31

    Among the many exceptional properties of Pu is its apparent lack of either local moments or cooperative magnetism. Lashley et al., have recently noted that little experimental evidence for the existence of local moments or collective magnetism has been found in over 50 years. Nevertheless the search for local moments in Pu and Pu-alloys continues, why? Plutonium's physical properties: resistance, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity, all support a system with an enhanced electron density of states. Pu sits on the edge of both magnetism and superconductivity and possesses one of the highest elemental Pauli susceptibilities, consistent with a highly correlated electron system. The low-density {delta}-Pu has eluded full first principles description and is both a challenge and an area of active investigation for theorists. The complex changes associated with the transition between the light and heavy actinides happen within the phase diagram of Pu, thus making Pu an intriguing and challenging solid-state system for continuing experimental and theoretical investigation. Recently, Griveau et al., observed the variations in the resistance and superconducting properties of Am metal as a function of pressure to 27GPa and T>0.4K. They postulate that the interesting features in the superconducting critical temperature, T{sub c}, vs. pressure, indicate a Mott-like, f-electron localization-delocalization transition as pressure drives Am towards a Pu and then a U-like structure. Hence, we posit that it would be reasonable to expect that dilating the Pu lattice will bring one to a similar transition. Experimental evidence supporting this point of view is given here.

  15. Fabrication of a 238Pu target

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Carter, D

    2010-11-16

    Precision neutron-induced reaction data are important for modeling the network of isotope production and destruction within a given diagnostic chain. This network modeling has many applications such as the design of advanced fuel cycle for reactors and the interpretation of radiochemical data related to the stockpile stewardship and nuclear forensics projects. Our current funded effort is to improve the neutron-induced reaction data on the short-lived actinides and the specific goal is to improve the neutron capture data on {sup 238}Pu with a half-life of 87.7 years. In this report, the fabrication of a {sup 238}Pu target for the proposed measurement using the DANCE array at LANL is described. The {sup 238}Pu target was fabricated from a sample enriched to 99.35%, acquired from ORNL. A total of 395 {micro}g was electroplated onto both sides of a 3 {micro}m thick Ti foil using a custom-made plating cell, shown in Fig 1. The target-material loaded Ti foil is sandwiched between two double-side aluminized mylar foils with a thickness of 1.4 {micro}m. The mylar foil is glued to a polyimide ring. This arrangement is shown partially in Fig. 2. The assembled target is then inserted into an aluminum container with a wall thickness of 0.76 mm, shown in Fig. 3. A derlin ring is used to keep the target assembly in place. The ends of this cylindrical container are vacuum-sealed by two covers with thin Kapton foils as windows for the beam entrance and exit. Shown in Fig. 4 is details of the arrangement. This target is used for phase I of the proposed measurement on {sup 238}Pu scheduled for Nov 2010 together with the DANCE array to address the safety issues raised by LANL. Shown in Fig. 5 is the preliminary results on the yield spectrum as a function of neutron incident energy with a gate on the total {gamma}-ray energy of equivalent Q value. Since no fission PPAC is employed, the distinction between the capture and fission events cannot be made, which is important for the

  16. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-10-08

    This project seeks to improve the efficiency of the plutonium anion-exchange process for purifying Pu through the development of alternate ion-exchange media. The objective of the project in FY15 was to develop and test a porous foam monolith material that could serve as a replacement for the current anion-exchange resin, Reillex® HPQ, used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for purifying Pu. The new material provides advantages in efficiency over the current resin by the elimination of diffusive mass transport through large granular resin beads. By replacing the large resin beads with a porous foam there is much more efficient contact between the Pu solution and the anion-exchange sites present on the material. Several samples of a polystyrene based foam grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) were prepared and the Pu sorption was tested in batch contact tests.

  17. Program Pu Futures 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M

    2006-06-12

    The coordination chemistry of plutonium remains relatively unexplored. Thus, the fundamental coordination chemistry of plutonium is being studied using simple multi-dentate ligands with the intention that the information gleaned from these studies may be used in the future to develop plutonium-specific sequestering agents. Towards this goal, hard Lewis-base donors are used as model ligands. Maltol, an inexpensive natural product used in the commercial food industry, is an ideal ligand because it is an all-oxygen bidentate donor, has a rigid structure, and is of small enough size to impose little steric strain, allowing the coordination preferences of plutonium to be the deciding geometric factor. Additionally, maltol is the synthetic precursor of 3,4-HOPO, a siderophore-inspired bidentate moiety tested by us previously as a possible sequestering agent for plutonium under acidic conditions. As comparisons to the plutonium structure, Ce(IV) complexes of the same and related ligands were examined as well. Cerium(IV) complexes serve as good models for plutonium(IV) structures because Ce(IV) has the same ionic radius as Pu(IV) (0.94 {angstrom}). Plutonium(IV) maltol crystals were grown out of a methanol/water solution by slow evaporation to afford red crystals that were evaluated at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Cerium(IV) complexes with maltol and bromomaltol were crystallized via slow evaporation of the mother liquor to afford tetragonal, black crystals. All three complexes crystallize in space group I4{sub 1}/a. The Ce(IV) complex is isostructural with the Pu(IV) complex, in which donating oxygens adopt a trigonal dodecahedral geometry around the metal with the maltol rings parallel to the crystallographic S{sub 4} axis and lying in a non-crystallographic mirror plane of D{sub 2d} molecular symmetry (Fig 1). The metal-oxygen bonds in both maltol complexes are equal to within 0.04 {angstrom

  18. Overview of advanced technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.B.; Foltyn, E.M.; Heslop, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has processed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel into heat sources for space and terrestrial uses for the past several decades. The 88-year half-life of {sup 238}Pu and thermal power of approximately 0.6 watts/gram make this isotope ideal for missions requiring many years of dependable service in inaccessible locations. However, the same characteristic which makes {sup 238}Pu attractive for heat source applications, the high Curie content (17 Ci/gram versus 0.06 Ci/gram for 239{sup Pu}), makes disposal of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste difficult. Specifically, the thermal load limit on drums destined for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 0.23 gram per drum for combustible waste, is impossible to meet for nearly all {sup 238}Pu-contaminated glovebox waste. Use of advanced waste treatment technologies including Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and aqueous chemical separation will eliminate the combustible matrix from {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste and recover kilogram quantities of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} from the waste stream. A conceptual design of these advanced waste treatment technologies will be presented.

  19. Overview of advanced technologies for stabilization of 238Pu-contaminated waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Kevin B.; Foltyn, Elizabeth M.; Heslop, J. Mark

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of 238Pu-contaminated waste. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has processed 238PuO2 fuel into heat sources for space and terrestrial uses for the past several decades. The 88-year half-life of 238Pu and thermal power of approximately 0.6 watts/gram make this isotope ideal for missions requiring many years of dependable service in inaccessible locations. However, the same characteristic which makes 238Pu attractive for heat source applications, the high Curie content (17 Ci/gram versus 0.06 Ci/gram for 239Pu), makes disposal of 238Pu-contaminated waste difficult. Specifically, the thermal load limit on drums destined for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 0.23 gram per drum for combustible waste, is impossible to meet for nearly all 238Pu-contaminated glovebox waste. Use of advanced waste treatment technologies including Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and aqueous chemical separation will eliminate the combustible matrix from 238Pu-contaminated waste and recover kilogram quantities of 238PuO2 from the waste stream. A conceptual design of these advanced waste treatment technologies will be presented.

  20. Eleven-year field study of Pu migration from Pu III, IV, and VI sources.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Daniel I; Demirkanli, Deniz I; Gumapas, Leo; Powell, Brian A; Fjeld, Robert A; Molz, Fred J; Serkiz, Steven M

    2006-01-15

    Understanding the processes controlling Pu mobility in the subsurface environment is important for estimating the amount of Pu waste that can be safely disposed in vadose zone burial sites. To study long-term Pu mobility, four 52-L lysimeters filled with sediment collected from the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina were amended with well-characterized solid Pu sources (PuIIICl3, PuIV(NO3)4, PuIV(C2O4)2, and PuVIO2(NO3)2) and left exposed to natural precipitation for 2-11 years. Pu oxidation state distribution in the Pu(III) and Pu(IV) lysimeters sediments (a red clayey sediment, pH = 6.3) were similar, consisting of 0% Pu(III), >92% Pu(IV), 1% Pu(V), 1% Pu(VI), and the remainder was a Pu polymer. These three lysimeters also had near identical sediment Pu concentration profiles, where >95% of the Pu remained within 1.25 cm of the source after 11 years; the other 5% of Pu moved at an overall rate of 0.9 cm yr(-1). As expected, Pu moved more rapidly through the Pu(VI) lysimeter, at an overall rate of 12.5 cm yr(-1). Solute transport modeling of the sediment Pu concentration profile data in the Pu(VI) lysimeter indicated that some transformation of Pu into a much less mobile form, presumably Pu(IV), had occurred during the course of the two-year study. This modeling also supported previous laboratory measurements showing that Pu(V) or Pu(VI) reduction was 5 orders of magnitude faster than corresponding Pu(III) or Pu(IV) oxidation. The slow oxidation rate (1 x 10(-8) hr(-1); t1/2 = 8000 yr) was not discernible from the Pu(VI) lysimeter data that reflected only two years of transport butwas readily discernible from the Pu(III) and Pu(IV) lysimeter data that reflected 11 years of transport. PMID:16468387

  1. Determination of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu) in environmental samples using radiochemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Pan, Shaoming; Roos, Per

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports an analytical method for the determination of plutonium isotopes ((238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu) in environmental samples using anion exchange chromatography in combination with extraction chromatography for chemical separation of Pu. Both radiometric methods (liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied for the measurement of plutonium isotopes. The decontamination factors for uranium were significantly improved up to 7.5 × 10(5) for 20 g soil compared to the level reported in the literature, this is critical for the measurement of plutonium isotopes using mass spectrometric technique. Although the chemical yield of Pu in the entire procedure is about 55%, the analytical results of IAEA soil 6 and IAEA-367 in this work are in a good agreement with the values reported in the literature or reference values, revealing that the developed method for plutonium determination in environmental samples is reliable. The measurement results of (239+240)Pu by alpha spectrometry agreed very well with the sum of (239)Pu and (240)Pu measured by ICP-MS. ICP-MS can not only measure (239)Pu and (240)Pu separately but also (241)Pu. However, it is impossible to measure (238)Pu using ICP-MS in environmental samples even a decontamination factor as high as 10(6) for uranium was obtained by chemical separation. PMID:24401459

  2. In situ high temperature X-Ray diffraction study of the phase equilibria in the UO2-PuO2-Pu2O3 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belin, Renaud C.; Strach, Michal; Truphémus, Thibaut; Guéneau, Christine; Richaud, Jean-Christophe; Rogez, Jacques

    2015-10-01

    The region of the U-Pu-O phase diagram delimited by the compounds UO2-PuO2-Pu2O3 is known to exhibit a miscibility gap at low temperature. Consequently, MOX fuels with a composition entering this region could decompose into two fluorite phases and thus exhibit chemical heterogeneities. The experimental data on this domain found in the literature are scarce and usually provided using DTA that is not suitable for the investigation of such decomposition phenomena. In the present work, new experimental data, i.e. crystallographic phases, lattice parameters, phase fractions and temperature of phase separation, were measured in the composition range 0.14 < Pu/(U + Pu) < 0.62 and 1.85 < O/(U + Pu) < 2 from 298 to 1750 K using a novel in situ high temperature X-ray diffraction apparatus. A very good agreement is found between the temperature of phase separation determined from our results and using the thermodynamic model of the U-Pu-O system based on the CALPHAD method. Also, the combined use of thermodynamic calculations and XRD results refinement proved helpful in the determination of the O/M ratio of the samples during cooling. The methodology used in the current work might be useful to investigate other oxides systems exhibiting a miscibility gap.

  3. Economical Production of Pu-238

    SciTech Connect

    Steven D. Howe; Douglas Crawford; Jorge Navarro; Terry Ring

    2013-02-01

    All space exploration missions traveling beyond Jupiter must use radioisotopic power sources for electrical power. The best isotope to power these sources is plutonium-238. The US supply of Pu-238 is almost exhausted and will be gone within the next decade. The Department of Energy has initiated a production program with a $10M allocation from NASA but the cost is estimated at over $100 M to get to production levels. The Center for Space Nuclear Research has conceived of a potentially better process to produce Pu-238 earlier and for significantly less cost. The new process will also produce dramatically less waste. Potentially, the front end costs could be provided by private industry such that the government only had to pay for the product produced. Under a NASA Phase I NIAC grant, the CSNR has evaluated the feasibility of using a low power, commercially available nuclear reactor to produce at least 1.5 kg of Pu-238 per year. The impact on the neutronics of the reactor have been assessed, the amount of Neptunium target material estimated, and the production rates calculated. In addition, the size of the post-irradiation processing facility has been established. In addition, a new method for fabricating the Pu-238 product into the form used for power sources has been identified to reduce the cost of the final product. In short, the concept appears to be viable, can produce the amount of Pu-238 needed to support the NASA missions, can be available within a few years, and will cost significantly less than the current DOE program.

  4. Calculated k-effectives for light water reactor typical, U + Pu nitrate solution critical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, R.T. III; Mincey, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program has as a goal the design of nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment. In order to validate computer codes used for criticality analyses in the design of such equipment, k-effectives have been calculated for several U + Pu nitrate solution critical experiments. As of January 1981, descriptions of 45 unpoisoned, U + Pu solution experiments were available in the open literature. Twelve of these experiments were performed with solutions which have physical characteristics typical of dissolved, light water reactor fuel. This paper contains a discussion of these twelve experiments, a review of the calculational procedure used to determine k-effectives, and the results of the calculations.

  5. Controls on soluble Pu concentrations in PuO2/magnetite suspensions.

    PubMed

    Felmy, Andrew R; Moore, Dean A; Pearce, Carolyn I; Conradson, Steven D; Qafoku, Odeta; Buck, Edgar C; Rosso, Kevin M; Ilton, Eugene S

    2012-11-01

    Time-dependent reduction of PuO(2)(am) was studied over a range of pH values in the presence of aqueous Fe(II) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles. At early time frames (up to 56 days) very little aqueous Pu was mobilized from PuO(2)(am), even though measured pH and redox potentials, coupled to equilibrium thermodynamic modeling, indicated the potential for significant reduction of PuO(2)(am) to relatively soluble Pu(III). Introduction of Eu(III) or Nd(III) to the suspensions as competitive cations to displace possible sorbed Pu(III) resulted in the release of significant concentrations of aqueous Pu. However, the similarity of aqueous Pu concentrations that resulted from the introduction of Eu(III)/Nd(III) to suspensions with and without magnetite indicated that the Pu was solubilized from PuO(2)(am), not from magnetite. PMID:23016948

  6. Hematological responses after inhaling {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}: An extrapolation from beagle dogs to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Welsh, C.A.; Angerstein, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The alpha emitter plutonium-238 ({sup 238}Pu), which is produced in uranium-fueled, light-water reactors, is used as a thermoelectric power source for space applications. Inhalation of a mixed oxide form of Pu is the most likely mode of exposure of workers and the general public. Occupational exposures to {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} have occurred in association with the fabrication of radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Organs and tissue at risk for deterministic and stochastic effects of {sup 238}Pu-alpha irradiation include the lung, liver, skeleton, and lymphatic tissue. Little has been reported about the effects of inhaled {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} on peripheral blood cell counts in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate hematological responses after a single inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to alpha-emitting {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} particles and to extrapolate results to humans.

  7. Distinguishing Pu Metal From Pu Oxide Using Fast Neutron Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J M; Chapline, G F; Nakae, L; Wurtz, R; Sheets, S

    2012-05-29

    We describe a method for simultaneously determining the {alpha}-ratio and k{sub eff} for fissile materials using fast neutrons. Our method is a generalization of the Hage-Cifarrelli method for determining k{sub eff} for fissile assemblies which utilizes the shape of the fast neutron spectrum. In this talk we illustrate the method using Monte Carlo simulations of the fast neutrons generated in PuO{sub 2} to calculate the fast neutron spectrum and Feynman correlations.

  8. Characterization of Pu-238 Heat Source Granule Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Paul Dean II; Sanchez, Joey Leo; Wall, Angelique Dinorah; Chavarria, Rene

    2015-02-11

    The Milliwatt Radioisotopic Themoelectric Generator (RTG) provides power for permissive-action links. Essentially these are nuclear batteries that convert thermal energy to electrical energy using a doped silicon-germanium thermopile. The thermal energy is provided by a heat source made of 238Pu, in the form of 238PuO2 granules. The granules are contained by 3 layers of encapsulation. A thin T-111 liner surrounds the 238PuO2 granules and protects the second layer (strength member) from exposure to the fuel granules. An outer layer of Hastalloy-C protects the T-111 from oxygen embrittlement. The T-111 strength member is considered the critical component in this 238PuO2 containment system. Any compromise in the strength member seen during destructive testing required by the RTG surveillance program is characterized. The T-111 strength member is characterized through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Metallography. SEM is used in the Secondary Electron mode to reveal possible grain boundary deformation and/or cracking in the region of the strength member weld. Deformation and cracking uncovered by SEM are further characterized by Metallography. Metallography sections are mounted and polished, observed using optical microscopy, then documented in the form of microphotographs. SEM mat further be used to examine polished Metallography mounts to characterize elements using the SEM mode of Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS).

  9. Oxidation of Pu-bearing solids: A process for Pu recovery from Rocky Flats incinerator ash

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    1997-07-18

    High-fired PuO{sub 2}, RFP ash heels, and synthetic RFP incinerator ash were easily soluble after oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) by heating with Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} or KO{sub 2} to 450{degrees} for two hours. This offers a route to the recovery of Pu from these and similar PuO{sub 2}-bearing solids that can be carried out in present equipment. Evidence for new compounds K{sub 2}PuO{sub 4}, K{sub 4}PuO{sub 5} and K{sub 6}PuO{sub 6} is presented. A process for recovery of Pu from RFP incinerator ash is presented.

  10. Pu isotopes in the western North Pacific Ocean before the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Zheng, J.; Aono, T.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides such as Pu-239 (half-life: 24100 yr), Pu-240 (half-life: 6560 yr) and Pu-241 (half-life: 14.325 yr) mainly have been released into the environment as the result of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. In the North Pacific Ocean, two distinct sources of Pu isotopes can be identified; i.e., the global stratospheric fallout and close-in tropospheric fallout from nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Marshall Islands. The atom ratio of Pu-240/Pu-239 is a powerful fingerprint to identify the sources of Pu in the ocean. The Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios in seawater and marine sediment samples collected in the western North Pacific before the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station will provide useful background data for understanding the process controlling Pu transport and for distinguishing future Pu sources. The atom ratios of Pu-240/Pu-239 in water columns from the Yamato and Tsushima Basins in the Japan Sea were significantly higher than the mean global fallout ratio of 0.18; however, there were no temporal variation of atom ratios during the period from 1984 to 1993 in the Japan Sea. The total Pu-239+240 inventories in the whole water columns were approximately doubled during the period from 1984 to 1993 in the two basins. The atom ratio of Pu-240/Pu-239 in surface water from Sagami Bay, western North Pacific Ocean, was 0.224 and showed no notable variation from the surface to the bottom with the mean atom ratio being 0.234. The atom ratios for the Pacific coast, near the Rokkasho nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, were approximately the same as the 0.224 ratio obtained from Sagami Bay, western North Pacific margin. The atom ratios in the surficial sediments from Sagami Bay ranged from 0.229 to 0.247. The mean atom ratio in the sediment columns in the East China Sea ranged from 0.248 for the Changjiang estuary to 0.268 for the shelf edge. The observed atom ratios were significantly higher than the mean

  11. Plutonium Immobilization Task 5.6 Metal Conversion: Milestone Report - Perform Feasibility Demonstrations on Pu-Al Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zundelevich, Y; Kerns, J; Bannochie, C

    2001-04-12

    The Plutonium Conversion Task within the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) transforms incoming plutonium (Pu) feed materials into an oxide acceptable for blending with ceramic precursors. One of the feed materials originally planned for PIP was unirradiated fuel, which consisted mainly of the Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR) fuel. Approximately 3.5 metric tons of Pu is in ZPPR fuel. The ZPPR fuel is currently stored at the Argonne National Laboratory-West as stainless steel clad metal plates and oxide pellets, with the vast majority of the Pu in the metal plates. The metal plates consist of a Pu-U-Mo alloy (containing 90% of the ZPPR plutonium metal) and a Pu-Al alloy (containing 10% of the ZPPR plutonium metal). The Department of Energy (DOE) decided that ZPPR fuel is a national asset and, therefore, not subject to disposition. This report documents work done prior to that decision. The Hydnde-Oxidation (HYDOX) Process was selected as the method for Metal Conversion in PIP because it provides a universal means for preparing oxide from all feed materials. HYDOX incorporates both the hydride process, originally developed to separate Pu from other pit materials, as well as the oxide formation step. Plutonium hydride is very reactive and is readily converted to either the nitride or the oxide. A previous feasibility study demonstrated that the Pu-U-Mo alloy could be successfully converted to oxide via the HYDOX Process. Another Metal Conversion milestone was to demonstrate the feasibility of the HYDOX Process for converting plutonium-aluminum (Pu-Al) alloy in ZPPR fuel plates to an acceptable oxide. This report documents the results of the latter feasibility study which was performed before the DOE decision to retain ZPPR fuel rather than immobilize it.

  12. Interception and retention of /sup 238/Pu deposition by orange trees

    SciTech Connect

    Pinder, J.E. III; Adriano, D.C.; Ciravolo, T.G.; Doswell, A.C.; Yehling, D.M.

    1987-06-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) transform the heat produced during the alpha decay of /sup 238/Pu into electrical energy for use by deep-space probes, such as the Voyager spacecraft, which have returned images and other data from Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. Future missions involving RTGs may be launched aboard the space shuttle, and there is a remote possibility that an explosion of liquid-hydrogen and liquid-oxygen fuel could rupture the RTGs and disperse /sup 238/Pu into the atmosphere over central Florida. Research was performed to determine the potential transport to man of atmospherically dispersed Pu via contaminated orange fruits. The results indicate that the major contamination of oranges would result from the interception and retention of /sup 238/Pu deposition by fruits. The resulting surface contamination could enter human food chains through transfer to internal tissues during peeling or in the reconstituted juices and flavorings made from orange skins. The interception of /sup 238/Pu deposition by fruits is especially important because the results indicate no measurable loss of Pu from fruit surfaces through time or with washing. Approximately 1% of the /sup 238/Pu deposited onto an orange grove would be harvested in the year following deposition.

  13. Controls on Soluble Pu Concentrations in PuO2/Magnetite Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Conradson, Steven D.; Qafoku, Odeta; Buck, Edgar C.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2012-11-06

    Time-dependent reduction of PuO2(am) was studied over a range of pH values in the presence of aqueous Fe(II) and magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. At early time frames (up to 56 days) very little aqueous Pu was mobilized from PuO2(am), even though measured pH and redox potentials, coupled to equilibrium thermodynamic modeling indicated the potential for significant reduction of PuO2(am) to relatively soluble Pu(III). Introduction of Eu(III) or Nd(III) to the suspensions as competitive cations to displace possible sorbed Pu(III) resulted in the release of significant concentrations of aqueous Pu. However, the similarity of aqueous Pu concentrations that resulted from the introduction of Eu(III)/Nd(III) to suspensions with and without magnetite indicated that the Pu was displaced from the PuO2(am), not from magnetite. The fact that soluble forms of Pu can be displaced from the surface of PuO2(am) represents a potential, but previously unidentified, source of Pu to aqueous solution or subsurface groundwaters.

  14. Characterization of Pu-238 heat source granule containment

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson Ii, P D; Thronas, D L; Romero, J P; Sandoval, F E; Neuman, A D; Duncan, W S

    2008-01-01

    The Milliwatt Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) provides power for permissive-action links. These nuclear batteries convert thermal energy to electrical energy using a doped silicon-germanium thermopile. The thermal energy is provided by a heat source made of {sup 238}Pu, in the form of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules. The granules are contained in 3 layers of encapsulation. A thin T-111 liner surrounds the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules and protects the second layer (strength member) from exposure to the fuel granules. The T-111 strength member contains the fuel under impact condition. An outer clad of Hastelloy-C protects the T-111 from oxygen embrittlement. The T-111 strength member is considered the critical component in this {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} containment system. Any compromise in the strength member is something that needs to be characterized. Consequently, the T-111 strength member is characterized upon it's decommissioning through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Metallography. SEM is used in Secondary Electron mode to reveal possible grain boundary deformation and/or cracking in the region of the strength member weld. Deformation and cracking uncovered by SEM are further characterized by Metallography. Metallography sections are mounted and polished, observed using optical microscopy, then documented in the form of photomicrographs. SEM may further be used to examine polished Metallography mounts to characterize elements using the SEM mode of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). This paper describes the characterization of the metallurgical condition of decommissioned RTG heat sources.

  15. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  16. Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

    2012-03-29

    Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

  17. Characterization of high-fired PuO/sub 2/ as a certified reference material

    SciTech Connect

    Legeled, M.A.; Cacic, C.G.; Crawford, D.W.; Spaletto, M.I.

    1984-07-01

    The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), U.S. Department of Energy, has certified a plutonium dioxide reference material, CRM 122, for plutonium assay and isotopic composition. The PuO/sub 2/ standard, one of several certified Pu reference materials currently being developed at NBL for use in instrumentation calibration and measurement control for safeguards, establishes traceability to the national measurement base. This plutonium reference material in the oxide form provides more directly demonstrable traceability than metal because it undergoes the same chemical treatment for dissolution as PuO/sub 2/ fuel materials. Various tests for achieving a constant weight and for dissolving CRM 122 high-fired PuO/sub 2/ were conducted. Results of these tests as well as the certification data generated by controlled-potential coulometry for plutonium assay and by thermal ionization mass spectrometry for isotopic composition will also be presented and discussed.

  18. Characterization and property evaluation of U-15 wt%Pu alloy for fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaity, Santu; Banerjee, Joydipta; Ravi, K.; Keswani, R.; Kutty, T. R. G.; Kumar, Arun; Prasad, G. J.

    2013-02-01

    The characterization and high temperature behaviour of U-15 wt%Pu alloy has been investigated in this study for the first time. U-15 wt%Pu alloy sample for this study was prepared by following melting and casting route. Microstructural characterization of the alloy was carried out by XRD and optical microscopy. The thermophysical properties like phase transition temperatures, coefficient of thermal expansion and hot hardness of the above alloy were determined. Eutectic temperature between T91 and U-15 wt%Pu was established. Apart from that, the fuel-cladding chemical compatibility of U-15 wt%Pu alloy with T91 grade steel was studied by diffusion couple experiment.

  19. Use of plutonium isotope activity ratios in dating recent sediments. [/sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu + /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    The majority of plutonium presently in the biosphere has come from the testing of nuclear devices. In the early 1950s, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratio of fallout debris was > 0.04; in the more extensive test series of 1961 to 1962, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratios were quite consistent at 0.02 to 0.03 and maximum fallout delivery occurred in mid-1963. A significant perturbation in Pu isotope activity ratios occurred in mid-1966 with the deposition of Pu-238 from the SNAP-9A reentry and burn-up. Recently deposited sediments have recorded these events and where accumulation rates are rapid (> 1 cm/y), changes in Pu isotope activity ratios can be used as a geochronological tool.

  20. Recovery of 238PuO2 by Molten Salt Oxidation Processing of 238PuO2 Contaminated Combustibles (Part II)

    SciTech Connect

    Remerowski, Mary Lynn; Dozhier, C.; Krenek, K.; VanPelt, C. E.; Reimus, M. A.; Spengler, D.; Matonic, J.; Garcia, L.; Rios, E.; Sandoval, F.; Herman, D.; Hart, R.; Ewing, B.; Lovato, M.; Romero, J. P.

    2005-02-06

    Pu-238 heat sources are used to fuel radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) used in space missions. The demand for this fuel is increasing, yet there are currently no domestic sources of this material. Much of the fuel is material reprocessed from other sources. One rich source of Pu-238 residual material is that from contaminated combustible materials, such as cheesecloth, ion exchange resins and plastics. From both waste minimization and production efficiency standpoints, the best solution is to recover this material. One way to accomplish separation of the organic component from these residues is a flameless oxidation process using molten salt as the matrix for the breakdown of the organic to carbon dioxide and water. The plutonium is retained in the salt, and can be recovered by dissolution of the carbonate salt in an aqueous solution, leaving the insoluble oxide behind. Further aqueous scrap recovery processing is used to purify the plutonium oxide. Recovery of the plutonium from contaminated combustibles achieves two important goals. First, it increases the inventory of Pu-238 available for heat source fabrication. Second, it is a significant waste minimization process. Because of its thermal activity (0.567 W per gram), combustibles must be packaged for disposition with much lower amounts of Pu-238 per drum than other waste types. Specifically, cheesecloth residues in the form of pyrolyzed ash (for stabilization) are being stored for eventual recovery of the plutonium.

  1. Recovery of 238PuO2 by Molten Salt Oxidation Processing of 238PuO2 Contaminated Combustibles (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remerowski, Mary Lynn; Dozhier, C.; Krenek, K.; VanPelt, C. E.; Reimus, M. A.; Spengler, D.; Matonic, J.; Garcia, L.; Rios, E.; Sandoval, F.; Herman, D.; Hart, R.; Ewing, B.; Lovato, M.; Romero, J. P.

    2005-02-01

    Pu-238 heat sources are used to fuel radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) used in space missions. The demand for this fuel is increasing, yet there are currently no domestic sources of this material. Much of the fuel is material reprocessed from other sources. One rich source of Pu-238 residual material is that from contaminated combustible materials, such as cheesecloth, ion exchange resins and plastics. From both waste minimization and production efficiency standpoints, the best solution is to recover this material. One way to accomplish separation of the organic component from these residues is a flameless oxidation process using molten salt as the matrix for the breakdown of the organic to carbon dioxide and water. The plutonium is retained in the salt, and can be recovered by dissolution of the carbonate salt in an aqueous solution, leaving the insoluble oxide behind. Further aqueous scrap recovery processing is used to purify the plutonium oxide. Recovery of the plutonium from contaminated combustibles achieves two important goals. First, it increases the inventory of Pu-238 available for heat source fabrication. Second, it is a significant waste minimization process. Because of its thermal activity (0.567 W per gram), combustibles must be packaged for disposition with much lower amounts of Pu-238 per drum than other waste types. Specifically, cheesecloth residues in the form of pyrolyzed ash (for stabilization) are being stored for eventual recovery of the plutonium.

  2. Probing the Pu4 + magnetic moment in PuF4 with 19F NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capan, Cigdem; Dempsey, Richard J.; Sinkov, Sergey; McNamara, Bruce K.; Cho, Herman

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic fields produced by Pu4 + centers have been measured by 19F NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the Pu-F electronic interactions in polycrystalline PuF4. Spectra acquired at applied fields of 2.35 and 7.05 T reveal a linear scaling of the 19F line shape. A model is presented that treats the line broadening and shifts as due to dipolar fields produced by Pu valence electrons in localized noninteracting orbitals. Alternative explanations for the observed line shape involving covalent Pu-F bonding, superexchange interactions, and electronic configurations with enhanced magnetic moments are considered.

  3. MGA Analysis on Elevated 238 Pu Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. F.; Moody, K. J.; Raschke, K. E.; Ruhter, W. D.

    2002-10-01

    Plutonium gamma-ray data analysis, in the 100-keV region, using MGA has been improved to overcome the original maximum limit of 2% 238Pu relative plutonium content in a sample in order to perform an analysis. MGA analysis results of elevated 238Pu samples are compared to the results from mass spectrometry.

  4. Design Studies of ``100% Pu'' Mox Lead Test Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-01-11

    In this document the results of neutronics studies of <<100%Pu>> MOX LTA design are presented. The parametric studies of infinite MOX-UOX grids, MOX-UOX core fragments and of VVER-1000 core with 3 MOX LTAs are performed. The neutronics parameters of MOX fueled core have been performed for the chosen design MOX LTA using the Russian 3D code BIPR-7A and 2D code PERMAK-A with the constants prepared by the cell spectrum code TVS-M.

  5. Traits of bulk Pu phases in Pb-Pu superlattice phases from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Sven P.

    2007-11-01

    Density functional theory calculations allowing spin polarization predict two phases in Pb-Pu superlattices. One phase exhibits bond lengths similar to bulk α-Pu and a degree of localization of 5f electron states corresponding to bulk β-Pu , while for the other phase, these take on values like those found in bulk δ-Pu . The superlattice geometry localizes the 5f electron states mainly in planes perpendicular to the stacking direction. The disparate volumes between phases found in bulk Pu also emerge in Pb-Pu superlattices. The structures of the two phases differ in the presence of pairing between neighboring Pu planes. The paired and unpaired phases can coexist in special cases. The simple geometry of the pairing allows for detailed calculations to explore the transition along the complete path connecting the two phases; to date, the bulk phases have evaded such an examination. In Pb-Pu superlattices, the localization of 5f electron states smoothly parallels changes in geometry, in accordance with tendencies that emerge in bulk Pu calculations. Changing the layer thicknesses affects the ordering of the energies of the two phases for stacking along the (001) and (111) directions. For stacking in the (011) direction, only one phase appears with very weakly paired Pu planes. Compared to bulk Pb and Pu, the superlattices with single-monolayer thicknesses appear energetically favorable; pilot calculations suggest that thicker layers become energetically favorable with interface alloying.

  6. Structural Investigation of (U0.7Pu0.3)O2-x Mixed Oxides.

    PubMed

    Vigier, Jean-François; Martin, Philippe M; Martel, Laura; Prieur, Damien; Scheinost, Andreas C; Somers, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Uranium-plutonium mixed oxide containing 30% of plutonium is a candidate fuel for several fast neutron and accelerator driven reactor systems. In this work, a detailed structural investigation on sol-gel synthesized stoichiometric U0.7Pu0.3O2.00 and substoichiometric U0.7Pu0.3O2-x, using X-ray diffraction (XRD), oxygen 17 magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((17)O MAS NMR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy is described. As observed by XRD, the stoichiometric U0.7Pu0.3O2.00 is monophasic with a lattice parameter in good agreement with Vegard's law, while the substoichiometric U0.7Pu0.3O2-x material is biphasic. Solid solution ideality in terms of a random distribution of metal atoms is proven for U0.7Pu0.3O2.00 with (17)O MAS NMR. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy shows the presence of plutonium(III) in U0.7Pu0.3O2-x. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy indicates a similar local structure around both cations, and comparison with XRD indicates a close similarity between uranium and plutonium local structures and the long-range ordering. PMID:25984750

  7. Characterization and testing of a {sup 238}Pu loaded ceramic waste form.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S. G.

    1998-04-24

    This paper will describe the preparation and progress of the effort at Argonne National Laboratory-West to produce ceramic waste forms loaded with {sup 238}Pu. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent of damage, if any, that alpha decay events will play over time to the ceramic waste form under development at Argonne. The ceramic waste form is glass-bonded sodalite. The sodalite is utilized to encapsulate the fission products and transuranics which are present in a chloride salt matrix which results from a spent fuel conditioning process. {sup 238}Pu possesses approximately 250 times the specific activity of {sup 239}Pu and thus allows for a much shorter time frame to address the issue. In preparation for production of {sup 238}Pu loaded waste forms {sup 239}Pu loaded samples were produced. Data is presented for samples produced with typical reactor grade plutonium. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron micrographs and durability test results will be presented. The ramifications for the production of the {sup 238}Pu loaded samples will be discussed.

  8. New measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at n_TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Guerrero, C.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Quesada, J. M.; Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Eberhardt, K.; Junghans, A.

    2016-03-01

    The use of MOX fuel (mixed-oxide fuel made of UO2 and PuO2) in nuclear reactors allows substituting a large fraction of the enriched Uranium by Plutonium reprocessed from spent fuel. With the use of such new fuel composition rich in Pu, a better knowledge of the capture and fission cross sections of the Pu isotopes becomes very important. In particular, a new series of cross section evaluations have been recently carried out jointly by the European (JEFF) and United States (ENDF) nuclear data agencies. For the case of 242Pu, the two only neutron capture time-of-flight measurements available, from 1973 and 1976, are not consistent with each other, which calls for a new time-of flight capture cross section measurement. In order to contribute to a new evaluation, we have perfomed a neutron capture cross section measurement at the n_TOF-EAR1 facility at CERN using four C6D6 detectors, using a high purity target of 95 mg. The preliminary results assessing the quality and limitations (background, statistics and γ-flash effects) of this new experimental data are presented and discussed, taking into account that the aimed accuracy of the measurement ranges between 7% and 12% depending on the neutron energy region.

  9. Preparation and characterization of (Pu, U, Np, Am, simulated FP) O2-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, K.; Kato, M.; Uno, H.; Hanari, A.; Tamura, T.; Sugata, H.; Sunaoshi, T.; Kono, S.

    2005-02-01

    The development of low decontaminated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, which contains minor actinoides (MA) and fission products (FP), is in progress to established Advanced Fast Reactor (FR) Fuel Cycle system. This paper describes the study on the sintering characteristics and the physical properties of MOX fuel containing Am, Np, and simulated FP. MOX powder containing Am, Np and simulated FP were sintered at high temperature in various oxygen partial pressure. From the result of ceramography, it is found that the grain growth rate of the pellets sintered in high oxygen partial pressure is high. From the result of EPMA analysis (Pu, Am, Ln) oxide was observed in the pellets. The melting points of the pellets with oxygen to metal (O/M) ratio of 1.95 are higher than those with O/M ratio of 1.98. This tendency is similar to that of MOX fuel containing about 30% Pu.

  10. Room-temperature electron spectroscopy of 239Pu and 240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.

    2015-06-01

    Passivated, implanted, planar silicon (PIPS) detectors have been used for the measurement of electron spectra. The commercially available PIPS detectors, available in thicknesses of 100 μm, 300 μm, and 500 μm, have an energy resolution (FWHM) of ~ 2.2 keV, which is essentially the same as that of PIN diodes. Alpha and electron spectra of mass-separated 239Pu and 240Pu sources have been measured with a 300-μm thick PIPS detector and the electron to alpha ratios for the conversion lines of the 51.62- and 45.24-keV transitions have been determined. A procedure has been developed to determine the amount of 239Pu and 240Pu in a mixed source. The α-particle emission rate of the mixed source is measured, which is the sum of individual rates. From the electron spectrum of the mixed source, measured with the same setup as the alpha spectrum, the rates of 239Pu electron lines are determined. Using the electron rate of the 239Pu line and the electron to alpha ratio measured for the pure source, the α-particle emission rate of 239Pu is determined. The difference from the total α-particle emission rate gives the α-particle emission rate of 240Pu. In addition, electron intensities and conversion coefficients of the 239Pu and 240Pu transitions have been measured.

  11. [Pu(IV) behavior in the serum].

    PubMed

    Surova, Z I

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the results of studies of the hydrolysis and polymerization of Pu(IV) in blood serum. With nitrite Pu(IV) solutions incubated with blood serum 20-34% of the nuclide were precipitated as hydroxide and 11-36% converted into polymeric forms bound by high molecular weight proteins. For citrate solutions, these values were 3.8 and 3.0%, respectively. PMID:6505160

  12. Resonant Photoemission in f Electron Systems: Pu& Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Chung, B W; Schulze, R K; Terry, J; Farr, J D; Shuh, D K; Heinzelman, K; Rotenberg, E; Waddill, G D; van der Laan, G

    2003-03-07

    Resonant photoemission in the Pu5f and Pu6p states is compared to that in the Gd4f and Gd5p states. Spectral simulations, based upon and atomic model with angular momentum coupling, are compared to the Gd and Pu results. Additional spectroscopic measurements of Pu, including core level photoemission and x-ray absorption are also presented.

  13. Synthesis of Pu-Doped Ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E. B

    1998-09-02

    Plutonium-doped zircon containing about 10 wt% Pu was synthesized in this cooperative project between Russia and the United States conducted at the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute. The sol-gel method was used for starting precursor preparation to provide complete mixing of initial components and to avoid dust formation inside the glove-box. The sol-gel process also gives interim Pu stabilization in the form of amorphous zirconium hydrosilicate (AZHS), which is a result of gel solidification. AZHS is a solid and relatively durable material that can be easy converted into crystalline zircon by pressureless sintering, thus avoiding significant radioactive contamination of laboratory equipment. A methanol-aqueous solution of tetraethoxysilane Si(OC2H5)4, Pu-nitrate, and zirconil oxynitrate was prepared in final stoichiometry of zircon (Zr,Pu)SiO4 80 wt% + zirconia (Zr,Pu)O2 20 wt%. Gelation occurred after 90 hours at room temperature. AZHS with excess of zirconia 20 wt% was obtained as an interim calcine product and then it was converted into zircon/zirconia ceramic by sintering at 1490 to 1500°C in air for different time periods. The samples obtained were studied by SRD and ESEM methods. It was found that both zircon yield and zircon cell parameters that are correlated with Pu incorporation depend on sintering time.

  14. The Spectroscopic Signature of Aging in (delta)-Pu(Ga)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S; Chung, B W

    2009-04-29

    The electronic structure of Pu is briefly discussed, with emphasis upon Aging effects. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. (See Figure 1.) From these and related measurements, the following has been determined: (1) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting is large; (2) The number of Pu5f electrons is 5; and (3) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting effect dominates 5f itineracy.

  15. Chemically selective polymer substrate based direct isotope dilution alpha spectrometry of Pu.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sumana; Pandey, Ashok K; Shah, R V; Aggarwal, S K

    2015-06-01

    Quantification of actinides in the complex environmental, biological, process and waste streams samples requires multiple steps like selective preconcentration and matrix elimination, solid source preparations generally by evaporation or electrodeposition, and finally alpha spectrometry. To minimize the sample manipulation steps, a membrane based isotope dilution alpha spectrometry method was developed for the determination of plutonium concentrations in the complex aqueous solutions. The advantages of this method are that it is Pu(IV) selective at 3M HNO3, high preconcentration factor can be achieved, and obviates the need of solid source preparation. For this, a thin phosphate-sulfate bifunctional polymer layer was anchored on the surface of microporous poly(ethersulfone) membrane by UV induced surface grafting. The thickness of the bifunctional layer on one surface of the poly(ethersulfone) membrane was optimized. The thickness, physical and chemical structures of the bifunctional layer were studied by secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM-EDS (energy-dispersive spectroscopy). The optimized membrane was used for preconcentration of Pu(IV) from aqueous solutions having 3-4M HNO3, followed by direct quantification of the preconcentrated Pu(IV) by isotope dilution alpha spectrometry using (238)Pu spike. The chemical recovery efficiency of Pu(IV) was found to be 86±3% below Pu(IV) loading capacity (1.08 μg in 2×1 cm(2)) of the membrane sample. The experiments with single representative actinides indicated that Am(III) did not sorb to significant extent (7%) but U(VI) sorbed with 78±3% efficiency from the solutions having 3M HNO3 concentration. However, Pu(IV) chemical recovery in the membrane remained unaffected from the solution containing 1:1000 wt. proportion of Pu(IV) to U(VI). Pu concentrations in the (U, Pu)C samples and in the irradiated fuel dissolver solutions were determined. The results thus obtained

  16. Development of prototype induced-fission-based Pu accountancy instrument for safeguards applications.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hee; Lee, Seung Kyu; An, Su Jung; Park, Se-Hwan; Ku, Jeong-Hoe; Menlove, Howard O; Rael, Carlos D; LaFleur, Adrienne M; Browne, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Prototype safeguards instrument for nuclear material accountancy (NMA) of uranium/transuranic (U/TRU) products that could be produced in a future advanced PWR fuel processing facility has been developed and characterized. This is a new, hybrid neutron measurement system based on fast neutron energy multiplication (FNEM) and passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) methods. The FNEM method is sensitive to the induced fission rate by fast neutrons, while the PNAR method is sensitive to the induced fission rate by thermal neutrons in the sample to be measured. The induced fission rate is proportional to the total amount of fissile material, especially plutonium (Pu), in the U/TRU product; hence, the Pu amount can be calibrated as a function of the induced fission rate, which can be measured using either the FNEM or PNAR method. In the present study, the prototype system was built using six (3)He tubes, and its performance was evaluated for various detector parameters including high-voltage (HV) plateau, efficiency profiles, dead time, and stability. The system's capability to measure the difference in the average neutron energy for the FNEM signature also was evaluated, using AmLi, PuBe, (252)Cf, as well as four Pu-oxide sources each with a different impurity (Al, F, Mg, and B) and producing (α,n) neutrons with different average energies. Future work will measure the hybrid signature (i.e., FNEM×PNAR) for a Pu source with an external interrogating neutron source after enlarging the cavity size of the prototype system to accommodate a large-size Pu source (~600g Pu). PMID:27337652

  17. Neutronics Simulations of 237Np Targets to Support Safety-Basis and 238Pu Production Assessment Efforts at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Ellis, Ronald James

    2015-01-01

    Fueled by two highly enriched uranium-bearing fuel elements surrounded by a large concentric ring of beryllium reflector, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) provides one of the highest neutron fluxes in the world and is used to produce unique isotopes like plutonium-238. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration use radioisotope thermoelectric generators powered by 238Pu for deep-space missions. As part of the US Department of Energy s task to reestablish the domestic production of 238Pu, a technology demonstration sub-project has been initiated to establish a new 238Pu supply chain. HFIR safety-basis neutronics calculations are being performed to ensure the target irradiations have no adverse impacts on reactor performance and to calculate data required as input to follow-on thermal-structural, thermal-hydraulic and radionuclide/dose analyses. Plutonium-238 production assessments are being performed to estimate the amount of 238Pu that can be produced in HFIR s permanent beryllium reflector. It is estimated that a total of 0.96 1.12 kg 238Pu (~1.28 1.49 kg PuO2 at 85% 238Pu/Pu purity) could be produced per year in HFIR s permanent beryllium reflector irradiation facilities if they are all utilized.

  18. Neutron-diffraction study of PuAs and PuSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlet, P.; Quezel, S.; Rossat-Mignod, J.; Spirlet, J. C.; Rebizant, J.; Müller, W.; Vogt, O.

    1984-12-01

    The first neutron scattering experiments on PuAs and PuSb single crystals are reported. PuAs is found to be a ferromagnet below Tc=123+/-1 K. PuSb develops below TN=85+/-1 K an incommensurate ordering and undergoes, at TIC=67 K, a first-order transition to a commensurate phase, ferromagnetic in nature. In both compounds, moments are perpendicular to the ferromagnetic (001) planes, their low-temperature value is μ=(0.75+/-0.1)μB, indicating a Γ8-type ground state within the Russell-Saunders level scheme. The magnetic phase diagram of PuSb has been determined. The incommensurate phase is suppressed by a small field of 8.5 kOe.

  19. Chemical potential of oxygen in (U, Pu) mixed oxide with Pu/(U+Pu) = 0.46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawar, Rimpi; Chandramouli, V.; Anthonysamy, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical potential of oxygen in (U,Pu) mixed oxide with Pu/(U + Pu) = 0.46 was measured for the first time using H2/H2O gas equilibration combined with solid electrolyte EMF technique at 1073, 1273 and 1473 K covering an oxygen potential range of -525 to -325 kJ mol-1. The effect of oxygen potential on the oxygen to metal ratio was determined. Increase in oxygen potential increases the O/M. In this study the minimum O/M obtained was 1.985 below which reduction was not possible. Partial molar enthalpy ΔHbar O2 and entropy ΔSbar O2 of oxygen were calculated from the oxygen potential data. The values of -752.36 kJ mol-1 and 0.25 kJ mol-1 were obtained for ΔHbar O2 and ΔSbar O2 respectively.

  20. Prompt fission γ -ray spectrum characteristics from 240Pu(sf ) and 242Pu(sf )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.; Gatera, A.; Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Moens, A.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present first results for prompt fission γ -ray spectra (PFGS) characteristics from the spontaneous fission (sf) of 240Pu and 242Pu. For 242Pu(sf ) we obtained, after proper unfolding of the detector response, an average energy per photon ɛ¯γ=(0.843 ±0.012 ) MeV, an average multiplicity M¯γ=(6.72 ±0.07 ) , and an average total γ -ray energy release per fission E¯γ ,tot = (5.66 ± 0.06) MeV. The 240Pu(sf ) emission spectrum was obtained by applying a so-called detector-response transformation function determined from the 242Pu spectrum measured in exactly the same geometry. The results are an average energy per photon ɛ¯γ=(0.80 ±0.07 ) MeV, the average multiplicity M¯γ = (8.2 ± 0.4), and an average total γ -ray energy release per fission E¯γ ,tot = (6.6 ± 0.5) MeV. The PFGS characteristics for 242Pu(sf ) are in very good agreement with those from thermal-neutron-induced fission on 241Pu and scales well with the corresponding prompt neutron multiplicity. Our results in the case of 240Pu(sf ), although drawn from a limited number of events, show a significantly enhanced average multiplicity and average total energy, but may be understood from a different fragment yield distribution in 240Pu(sf ) compared to that of 242Pu(sf ).

  1. MCSNA: Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2007-01-29

    The objective of this work is to develop and/or apply advanced diagnostics to the understanding of aging of Pu. Advanced characterization techniques such as photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectroscopy will provide fundamental data on the electronic structure of Pu phases. These data are crucial for the validation of the electronic structure methods. The fundamental goal of this project is to narrow the parameter space for the theoretical modeling of Pu aging. The short-term goal is to perform experiments to validate electronic structure calculations of Pu. The long-term goal is to determine the effects of aging upon the electronic structure of Pu. Many of the input parameters for aging models are not directly measurable. These parameters will need to be calculated or estimated. Thus a First Principles-Approach Theory is needed, but it is unclear what terms are important in the Hamiltonian. (H{Psi} = E{Psi}) Therefore, experimental data concerning the 5f electronic structure are needed, to determine which terms in the Hamiltonian are important. The data obtained in this task are crucial for reducing the uncertainty of Task LL-01-developed models and predictions. The data impact the validation of electronic structure methods, the calculation of defect properties, the evaluation of helium diffusion, and the validation of void nucleation models. The importance of these activities increases if difficulties develop with the accelerating aging alloy approach.

  2. Prevention of Pu(IV) polymerization in a PUREX-based process

    SciTech Connect

    Paviet-Hartmann, Patricia; Senentz, Gerald

    2007-07-01

    The US Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) is being designed to produce MOX fuel assemblies for use in domestic, commercial nuclear power reactors, as part of the U.S. DOE efforts to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The feed material is plutonium dioxide from surplus weapon grade plutonium. PuO{sub 2}, issued from a pit disassembly and conversion facility (PDCF), will be processed using a flowsheet derived from the La Hague reprocessing plant to remove impurities. The purified PuO{sub 2} will be blended with UO{sub 2} to form mixed oxide pellets, and loaded into fuel rods, to create MOX fuel assemblies based on the process and technology of the MELOX plant in France,. Safety studies are necessary to support the development of the design basis per regulation 10 CFR Part 70 to complete an integrated safety analysis for the MFFF facility. The formation of tetravalent plutonium polymers in certain process vessels of the aqueous polishing (AP) process has been identified as a potential hazard. Based on scientific literature, the following paper demonstrates that within the AP process units, the polymerization of Pu(IV) will not occur and/or will not create a criticality issue even where the acidity may drop below 0.5 N HNO{sub 3}. We will identify and control the conditions under which plutonium (IV) will not polymerize. (authors)

  3. Spectroscopy of Neutron-rich Pu Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, P.; Hota, S.; Lakshmi, S.; Tandel, S. K.; Harrington, T.; Jackson, E.; Moran, K.; Shirwadkar, U.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J.; Hoffman, C. R.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A.; Seweryniak, D.; Stefanescu, I.

    2011-10-28

    Spectroscopic studies of nuclei in the A{approx}250, Z{approx}100 region provide critical input to theoretical models that attempt to describe the structure and stability of the heaviest elements. We report here on new spectroscopic studies in the N = 150,151 nuclei {sup 244,245}Pu. (Z = 94). Excitations in these nuclei on the neutron-rich side of the valley of stability, accessed via inelastic and transfer reactions, complement fusion-evaporation studies of Z{>=}100 nuclei. States in {sup 244,245}Pu were populated using {sup 47}Ti and {sup 208}Pb beams incident on a {sup 244}Pu target, with delayed and prompt gamma rays detected by the Gammasphere array. The new results are discussed in the context of emerging systematics of one- and two-quasiparticle excitations in N{>=}150 nuclei.

  4. Presence of plutonium isotopes, 239Pu and 240Pu, in soils from Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, E.; García-León, M.; Peruchena, J. I.; Cereceda, F.; Vidal, V.; Pinilla, E.; Miró, C.

    2011-12-01

    Plutonium is present in every environmental compartment, due to a variety of nuclear activities. The Southern Hemisphere has received about 20% of the global 239Pu and 240Pu environmental inventory, with an important contribution of the so-called tropospheric fallout from both the atmospheric nuclear tests performed in the French Polynesia and in Australia by France and United Kingdom, respectively. In this work we provide new data on the impact of these tests to South America through the study of 239Pu and 240Pu in soils from different areas of Northern, Central and Southern Chile. The obtained results point out to the presence of debris from the French tests in the 20-40° Southern latitude range, with 240Pu/ 239Pu atomic ratios quite heterogeneous and ranging from 0.02 to 0.23. They are significantly different from the expected one for the global fallout in the Southern Hemisphere for the 30-53°S latitude range (0.185 ± 0.047), but they follow the same trend as the reported values by the Department of Energy of United States for other points with similar latitudes. The 239 + 240Pu activity inventories show as well a wider variability range in that latitude range, in agreement with the expected heterogeneity of the contamination.

  5. Neutron Capture Cross Section of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, S.; Arnold, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Ullmann, J. L.; Chyzh, A.; Henderson, R.; Kwan, E.; Wu, C. Y.

    2014-09-01

    The 239Pu(n,γ) cross section has been measured over the energy range 10 eV - 10 keV using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) as part of a campaign to produce precision (n,γ) measurements on 239Pu in the keV region. Fission coincidences were measured with a PPAC and used to characterize the prompt fission γ-ray spectrum in this region. The resulting spectra will be used to better characterize the fission component of another experiment with a thicker target to extend the (n,γ) cross section measurement well into the keV region.

  6. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian, Waris, Abdul; Ismail, Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by convertion rasio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loding scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  7. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian,; Waris, Abdul; Ismail; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2014-09-30

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by conversion ratio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loading scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  8. Nitrate anion exchange in 238Pu aqueous scrap recovery operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansoy-Hjelvik, M. E.; Silver, G. L.; Reimus, M. A. H.; Ramsey, K. B.

    1999-01-01

    Strong base, nitrate anion exchange (IX) is crucial to the purification of 238Pu solution feedstocks with gross levels of impurities. This paper discusses the work involved in bench scale experiments to optimize the nitrate anion exchange process. In particular, results are presented of experiments conducted to a) demonstrate that high levels of impurities can be separated from 238Pu solutions via nitrate anion exchange and, b) work out chemical pretreatment methodology to adjust and maintain 238Pu in the IV oxidation state to optimize the Pu(IV)-hexanitrato anionic complex sorption to Reillex-HPQ resin. Additional experiments performed to determine the best chemical treatment methodology to enhance recovery of sorbed Pu from the resin and VIS-NIR absorption studies to determine the steady state equilibrium of Pu(IV), Pu(III), and Pu(VI) in nitric acid are discussed.

  9. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Moore, K T; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Butterfield, M T; Teslich, Jr., N E; Bliss, R A; Morton, S A; Yu, S W; Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; der Laan, G v; Kutepov, A L

    2005-10-13

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy [1], x-ray absorption spectroscopy [1,2,3,4], electron energy loss spectroscopy [2,3,4], Fano Effect measurements [5], and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy [6], including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples. [2,3,6

  10. Statistical properties of 243Pu, and 242Pu(n ,γ ) cross section calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laplace, T. A.; Zeiser, F.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Goldblum, B. L.; Siem, S.; Garotte, F. L. Bello; Brown, J. A.; Campo, L. Crespo; Eriksen, T. K.; Giacoppo, F.; Görgen, A.; Hadyńska-KlÈ©k, K.; Henderson, R. A.; Klintefjord, M.; Lebois, M.; Renstrøm, T.; Rose, S. J.; Sahin, E.; Tornyi, T. G.; Tveten, G. M.; Voinov, A.; Wiedeking, M.; Wilson, J. N.; Younes, W.

    2016-01-01

    The level density and γ -ray strength function (γ SF ) of 243Pu have been measured in the quasicontinuum using the Oslo method. Excited states in 243Pu were populated using the 242Pu(d ,p ) reaction. The level density closely follows the constant-temperature level density formula for excitation energies above the pairing gap. The γ SF displays a double-humped resonance at low energy as also seen in previous investigations of actinide isotopes. The structure is interpreted as the scissors resonance and has a centroid of ωSR=2.42 (5 ) MeV and a total strength of BSR=10.1 (15 ) μN2 , which is in excellent agreement with sum-rule estimates. The measured level density and γ SF were used to calculate the 242Pu(n ,γ ) cross section in a neutron energy range for which there were previously no measured data.

  11. Investigation of single crystal zircon, (Zr,Pu)SiO4 doped with Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanchar, J. M.; Burakov, B. E.; Anderson, E. B.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.

    2003-04-01

    Zircon-based ceramics are under consideration as durable waste forms for immobilization of weapons grade plutonium and other actinide elements. Samples of polycrystalline zircon doped with 238Pu and 239Pu have been obtained in previous studies. These materials, however, are difficult to use for precise measurement of the leach-rate of Pu, and to accurately determine the level of Pu doping that can be attained in zircon, (Zr,Pu)SiO_4. Single crystals of 238Pu doped zircon (ranging from 0.3 to 3.5 mm in size) were successfully grown for the first time ever using a Li-Mo flux synthesis method. The incorporation of Pu ranged from 1.9 to 4.7 wt. % el. (with approximately 81 wt.% of 238Pu isotope) based on electron microprobe analysis. The zircon crystals were pinkish-brown when they were crystallized, and then over a period of five months changed to a brown color. After fourteen months the crystals turned to a brown-gray color. The zircon crystals glow in the dark probably from alpha particle induced luminescence. The intensity of the cathodoluminescence (CL) emission in the Pu doped crystals is correlated with the Pu content, and the CL emission showed no change 141 days after the initial CL measurements were made. Single crystal X-ray diffraction results obtained 141 days after synthesis indicate unit cell parameters (in angstroms): a = 6.6267(15), c = 5.9992(10) and a cell volume of 263.41(10). When the zircon crystals were grown, they were free of cracks. Over the course of five months cracks appeared throughout the crystals, and after fourteen months the cracks became much more abundant. The zircon crystals were transparent upon crystallization, and even with numerous cracks throughout the crystals remain transparent. Radiation damage calculations indicate that after only a short period of time, six months, these zircon crystals had already accumulated significant alpha-induced radiation damage (˜2.5 x1014 alpha-decay events per milligram). After five years they

  12. A Neutronic Analysis of TRU Recycling in PWRs Loaded with MOX-UE Fuel (MOX with U-235 Enriched U Support)

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; S. Bays

    2009-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study dealing with the homogeneous recycling of either Pu or Pu+Np or Pu+Np+Am or Pu+Np+Am+Cm in PWRs using MOX-UE fuel, i.e. standard MOX fuel with a U235 enriched uranium support instead of the standard tail uranium (0.25%) for standard MOX fuel. This approach allows to multirecycle Pu or TRU (Pu+MA) as long as U235 is available, by keeping the Pu or TRU content in the fuel constant and at a value ensuring a negative moderator void coefficient (i.e. the loss of the coolant brings imperatively the reactor to a subcritical state). Once this value is determined, the U235 enrichment of the MOX-UE fuel is adjusted in order to reach the target burnup (51 GWd/t in this study).

  13. Spectroscopic Signature of Aging in (delta)-Pu(Ga)

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, B W; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Fluss, M J; Haslam, J J; Blobaum, K M; Tobin, J G

    2005-04-15

    Resonant Photoemission, a variant of Photoelectron Spectroscopy, has been demonstrated to have sensitivity to aging of Pu samples. The spectroscopic results are correlated with resistivity measurements and are shown to be the fingerprint of mesoscopic or nanoscale internal damage in the Pu physical structure. This means that a spectroscopic signature of internal damage due to aging in Pu has been established.

  14. Prediction of thermodynamic property of Pu-zircon and Pu-pyrochlore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hulfang; Wang, Yifeng

    2000-07-01

    Due to its high durability, zircon is often present as a heavy mineral in natural environments and is the oldest mineral that has been dated on the earth. There are four zircon structure phases of M4+SiO4 occurring in nature: zircon (ZrSiO4), hafnon (HfSiO4), thorite (ThSiO4), and coffinite (USiO4). These phases may form solid solution. Recent interest in zircon minerals stems from the study of highly durable radioactive waste forms. Crystalline phases of M4+SiO4 with zircon structure have been proposed as a durable ceramic waste form for immobilizing actinides such as Pu, Np, and U. To predict the behavior of zircon-based waste forms in a geologic repository environment as well as to optimize the fabrication of those waste forms, the thermodynamic and kinetic properties for zircon mineral phases have to be determined. In this paper, we use a linear free energy relationship to predict the Gibbs free energies of formation of Pu-bearing phases (Xu et al., 1999). The calculated results show that the PuSiO4 phase with zircon structure is unstable with respect to oxides of PuO2 and quartz. However, the PuSiO4 phase will be stable with respect to oxides of PuO2 and silica glass at low temperature.

  15. Transport of 137Cs and 239,240Pu with ice-rafted debris in the Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Reimnitz, E.; Beals, D.M.; Pochkowski, J.M.; Winn, W.G.; Rigor, I.

    1998-01-01

    Ice rafting is the dominant mechanism responsible for the transport of fine-grained sediments from coastal zones to the deep Arctic Basin. Therefore, the drift of ice-rafted debris (IRD) could be a significant transport mechanism from the shelf to the deep basin for radionuclides originating from nuclear fuel cycle activities and released to coastal Arctic regions of the former Soviet Union. In this study, 28 samples of IRD collected from the Arctic ice pack during expeditions in 1989-95 were analyzed for 137Cs by gamma spectrometry and for 239Pu and 240Pu by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. 137Cs concentrations in the IRD ranged from less than 0.2 to 78 Bq??kg-1 (dry weight basis). The two samples with the highest 137Cs concentrations were collected in the vicinity of Franz Josef Land, and their backward trajectories suggest origins in the Kara Sea. Among the lowest 137Cs values are seven measured on sediments entrained on the North American shelf in 1989 and 1995, and sampled on the shelf less than six months later. Concentrations of 239Pu + 240Pu ranged from about 0.02 to 1.8 Bq??kg-1. The two highest values came from samples collected in the central Canada Basin and near Spitsbergen; calculated backward trajectories suggest at least 14 years of circulation in the Canada Basin in the former case, and an origin near Severnaya Zemlya (at the Kara Sea/Laptev Sea boundary) in the latter case. While most of the IRD samples showed 240Pu/239Pu ratios near the mean global fallout value of 0.185, five of the samples had lower ratios, in the 0.119 to 0.166 range, indicative of mixtures of Pu from fallout and from the reprocessing of weapons-grade Pu. The backward trajectories of these five samples suggest origins in the Kara Sea or near Severnaya Zemlya.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Shackleford, M.H.

    1958-12-16

    A fuel element possessing good stability and heat conducting properties is described. The fuel element comprises an outer tube formed of material selected from the group consisting of stainhess steel, V, Ti. Mo. or Zr, a fuel tube concentrically fitting within the outer tube and containing an oxide of an isotope selected from the group consisting of U/sup 235/, U/sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/, and a hollow, porous core concentrically fitting within the fuel tube and formed of an oxide of an element selected from the group consisting of Mg, Be, and Zr.

  17. Pu speciation in actual and simulated aged wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S; Conradson, Steven D

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Pu L{sub II/III} edge was used to determine the speciation of this element in (1) Hanford Z-9 Pu crib samples, (2) deteriorated waste resins from a chloride process ion-exchange purification line, and (3) the sediments from two Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Liter Scale simulant brine systems. The Pu speciation in all of these samples except one is within the range previously displayed by PuO{sub 2+x-2y}(OH){sub y}{center_dot}zH{sub 2}O compounds, which is expected based on the putative thermodynamic stability of this system for Pu equilibrated with excess H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} under environmental conditions. The primary exception was a near neutral brine experiment that displayed evidence for partial substitution of the normal O-based ligands with Cl{sup -} and a concomitant expansion of the Pu-Pu distance relative to the much more highly ordered Pu near neighbor shell in PuO{sub 2}. However, although the Pu speciation was not necessarily unusual, the Pu chemistry identified via the history of these samples did exhibit unexpected patterns, the most significant of which may be that the presence of the Pu(V)-oxo species may decrease rather than increase the overall solubility of these compounds. Several additional aspects of the Pu speciation have also not been previously observed in laboratory-based samples. The molecular environmental chemistry of Pu is therefore likely to be more complicated than would be predicted based solely on the behavior of PuO{sub 2} under laboratory conditions.

  18. Biokinetics of sup 237 Pu citrate and nitrate in the rat: Implications for Pu studies in man

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, R.J.; Knight, D.A.; Morgan, A. )

    1990-08-01

    Plutonium-237 decays mainly by electron capture with a half-life of 45 d. Alpha particles are emitted in only 5 x 10(-3)% of its disintegrations. This nuclide can now be produced with relatively small amounts of alpha-emitting contaminants so that, in principle, {sup 237}Pu can be used for studies of Pu biokinetics in man. However, because of its high specific activity, there was some doubt that its metabolism would be the same as that of the alpha- and beta-emitting isotopes of Pu normally encountered in the nuclear industry. In this study, the biokinetics of nearly pure, high specific activity {sup 237}Pu are compared with those of lower specific activity, impure {sup 237}Pu containing significant amounts of alpha-emitting Pu, following administration to rats by intravenous injection as the citrate. Both the distribution and excretion of the pure and impure {sup 237}Pu used in the two studies were similar and also in good agreement with the results of previously reported studies using {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu citrate, thus validating the use of {sup 237}Pu for studies of Pu metabolism in man. Data on the biokinetics of {sup 237}Pu nitrate are also included.

  19. Electrochemical behaviors of PuN and (U, Pu)N in LiCl KCl eutectic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, O.; Kato, T.; Iwai, T.; Arai, Y.; Yamashita, T.

    2005-02-01

    Electrochemical behaviors of PuN and (U, Pu)N in the LiCl KCl eutectic melts at 773 K were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical dissolution of PuN and (U, Pu)N began nearly at -0.90±0.05 and -0.95±0.05 V (vs. Ag+/Ag), respectively. The rest potentials of PuN and (U, Pu)N were observed at about 0.15 V more negative potential than that of UN, in the present experimental condition. The observed rest potentials of (U, Pu)N depended on the equilibrium potential of the Pu3+/PuN. In the cyclic voltammogram measured by use of (U, Pu)N as the working electrode, a steep rise of the positive current was observed at potentials more positive than -0.45 V in analogy with the cyclic voltammogram measured by use of UN as the working electrode. These indicate that UN and PuN in (U, Pu)N would be dissolved independently irrespective of forming the solid solution.

  20. Redox reactions of Pu(IV) and Pu(III) in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid in HNO(3) solutions.

    PubMed

    Tkac, Peter; Precek, Martin; Paulenova, Alena

    2009-12-21

    The reduction of Pu(IV) in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid (HAHA) was monitored by vis-NIR spectroscopy. All experiments were performed under low HAHA/Pu(IV) ratios, where only the Pu(IV)-monoacetohydroxamate complex and Pu uncomplexed with HAHA were present in relevant concentrations. Time dependent concentrations of all absorbing species were resolved using molar extinction coefficients for Pu(IV), Pu(III), and the Pu(AHA)(3+) complex by deconvolution of spectra. From fitting of the experimental data by rate equations integrated by a numeric method three reactions were proposed to describe a mechanism responsible for the reduction and oxidation of plutonium in the presence of HAHA and HNO(3). Decomposition of Pu(AHA)(3+) follows a second order reaction mechanism with respect to its own concentration and leads to the formation of Pu(III). At low HAHA concentrations, a two-electron reduction of uncomplexed Pu(IV) with HAHA also occurs. Formed Pu(III) is unstable and slowly reoxidizes back to Pu(IV), which, at the point when all HAHA is decomposed, can be catalyzed by the presence of nitrous acid. PMID:19904974

  1. PROPERTIES AND BEHAVIOR OF 238PU RELEVANT TO DECONTAMINATION OF BUILDING 235-F

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Kane, M.

    2009-11-24

    This report was prepared to document the physical, chemical and radiological properties of plutonium oxide materials that were processed in the Plutonium Fuel Form Facility (PuFF) in building 235-F at the Savannah River Plant (now known as the Savannah River Site) in the late 1970s and early 1980s. An understanding of these properties is needed to support current project planning for the safe and effective decontamination and deactivation (D&D) of PuFF. The PuFF mission was production of heat sources to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in space craft. The specification for the PuO{sub 2} used to fabricate the heat sources required that the isotopic content of the plutonium be 83 {+-} 1% Pu-238 due to its high decay heat of 0.57 W/g. The high specific activity of Pu-238 (17.1 Ci/g) due to alpha decay makes this material very difficult to manage. The production process produced micron-sized particles which proved difficult to contain during operations, creating personnel contamination concerns and resulting in the expenditure of significant resources to decontaminate spaces after loss of material containment. This report examines high {sup 238}Pu-content material properties relevant to the D&D of PuFF. These relevant properties are those that contribute to the mobility of the material. Physical properties which produce or maintain small particle size work to increase particle mobility. Early workers with {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} felt that, unlike most small particles, Pu-238 oxide particles would not naturally agglomerate to form larger, less mobile particles. It was thought that the heat generated by the particles would prevent water molecules from binding to the particle surface. Particles covered with bound water tend to agglomerate more easily. However, it is now understood that the self-heating effect is not sufficient to prevent adsorption of water on particle surfaces and thus would not prevent agglomeration of particles. Operational

  2. Preliminary studies of Pu measurement by AMS using PuF4-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W. E.; Dai, X.; Priest, N. D.; Kramer-Tremblay, S.; Eliades, J.; Litherland, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Using targets made with PbF2 matrices, Cs+ sputter sources have been found to yield element-specific patterns of molecular fluoride anions that may be used to enhance the mass spectrometry of certain elements. While the patterns are found similar for all lanthanides and the heavier actinides, substantial differences are found for the lighter actinides. In the case of Pu and U, of all their fluoride anions, PuF4- and UF5- are produced with the highest yield. Mass spectrometry of Pu using PuF4- can provide a partial chemical separation in the ion source, as the yield of UF4- is two orders of magnitude lower than that of the UF5-. This, in turn, reduces scattering of U ions when measuring Pu in the high-energy components of the AMS system. This instrumental reduction of U is advantageous in cases that require rapid Pu analyses as it simplifies the chemistry of Pu/U separation and other steps in the sample processing. In this procedure, Pu can be co-precipitated with another element as a fluoride, which is then mixed with a sufficient amount of PbF2 powder to form a sputter target. A series of tests were carried out and NdF3 was identified as one such suitable carrier. Measurements of Pu+3 at ∼0.85 MV terminal voltage showed that the 239,240,241,242Pu isotopes can be detected with a manageably low background, high efficiency and a 1 fg detection limit. Preliminary tests were carried out using the existing IsoTrace AMS system, modified only by the addition of electronic controls to automatically adjust the terminal voltage and all high-energy electric analyzers, along with the injection magnet bouncer. However, both the injection and detection systems were not designed for this task, so considerable room is available for reducing the detection limit into the ag range with modern AMS systems - such as the one being commissioned at University of Ottawa.

  3. Melting behavior of mixed U-Pu oxides under oxidizing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strach, Michal; Manara, Dario; Belin, Renaud C.; Rogez, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    In order to use mixed U-Pu oxide ceramics in present and future nuclear reactors, their physical and chemical properties need to be well determined. The behavior of stoichiometric (U,Pu)O2 compounds is relatively well understood, but the effects of oxygen stoichiometry on the fuel performance and stability are often still obscure. In the present work, a series of laser melting experiments were carried out to determine the impact of an oxidizing atmosphere, and in consequence the departure from a stoichiometric composition on the melting behavior of six mixed uranium plutonium oxides with Pu content ranging from 14 to 62 wt%. The starting materials were disks cut from sintered stoichiometric pellets. For each composition we have performed two laser melting experiments in pressurized air, each consisting of four shots of different duration and intensity. During the experiments we recorded the temperature at the surface of the sample with a pyrometer. Phase transitions were qualitatively identified with the help of a reflected blue laser. The observed phase transitions occur at a systematically lower temperature, the lower the Pu content of the studied sample. It is consistent with the fact that uranium dioxide is easily oxidized at elevated temperatures, forming chemical species rich in oxygen, which melt at a lower temperature and are more volatile. To our knowledge this campaign is a first attempt to quantitatively determine the effect of O/M on the melting temperature of MOX.

  4. Self-irradiation of Pu, its alloys and compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeeva, L. F.

    2000-07-01

    Self-irradiation of Pu, its alloys and compounds by products of known α-decomposition is a continuous complicated process, which includes numerous different phenomena. The accumulation of Pu decomposition products causes material structure and properties change. This problem is the subject of many works, most of them concerned with the behavior of Pu and its alloys at low (liquid He and N) temperatures. The survey is given of the results of our experiments connected with radiogenic helium behavior, crystal structure and properties of Pu metallic compounds and Pu oxide ceramics in a self-irradiation process at room temperature under isochronal heat treatments.

  5. Formation and stability of metastable structures and amorphous phases in PU-V, PU-TA, and PU-YB systems with positive heats of mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, H. F.; Zocco, T.; Massalski, T. B.; Nastasi, M.; Echeverria, A.

    1994-08-01

    The triode sputtering technique with a “split-target” arrangement was used to obtain metastable crystalline and amorphous phases in the Pu-V, Pu-Ta, and Pu-Yb systems. The proposed phase diagrams for these systems all exhibit liquid immiscibility. The heats of mixing are estimated to be highly positive, and the atomic radii of the component atoms differ by at least 10 pct. Extended amorphous and body-centered cubic (bcc) solid-solution regions were observed in the Pu-V and Pu-Ta systems. The corresponding lattice parameters appear to follow in each case an assumed Vegard’s Law extension. In the Pu-Yb system, no amorphous phase was obtained, but an extended face-centered cubic (fcc) solid-solution region (24 to 78 at. pct Yb) was observed with a large positive deviation of the lattice parameter (˜9 pct at 40 at. pct Yb) from a linear Vegard’s Law between the pure fcc components. The observed ranges of amorphous and metastable solid-solution phases have been interpreted in terms of predicated heats of formation for these phases using Miedema’s thermodynamic approximations that include chemical, elastic, and structural contributions. The effect of the high deposition rates on the formation of amorphous and metastable phases has also been considered. Thermal annealing of Pu-Ta amorphous alloys brings about a rapid diffusion of Pu to the free surface of the amorphous phase without crystallization of the remaining Ta-rich amorphous phase. Microhardness measurements indicate that amorphous Pu-V and Pu-Ta alloys are softer than the crystalline bcc solid-solution alloys in the same composition range. Several similarities in the formation of mixed phase regions (amorphous and solid solutions), microhardness, and resistance to decomposition on heating were noted between the Pu-Ta and Pu-V systems and the Cu-W system studied previously.

  6. Search for higher oxides of Pu: A photoemission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouder, T.; Seibert, A.; Havela, L.; Rebizant, J.

    2007-07-01

    After decades of believing in a very stable PuO 2, suitable for final storage of nuclear waste, the existence of a higher oxide, PuO 2+ x, was recently claimed. This would have far reaching consequences on the strategies of storage of Pu-based waste. Its formation therefore has been discussed controversially for several years. In this work, existence and stability of the higher oxide, PuO 2+ x, has been probed by photoelectron spectroscopy study of PuO 2 exposed to atomic oxygen. The validity of this approach is first tested on UO 2, which oxidizes readily to UO 3. Under the same reaction conditions, PuO 2 is only covered by a chemisorbed layer of oxygen, which desorbs at elevated temperature. The study excludes the stability of any higher binary Pu oxide as a bulk species.

  7. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Douglas C.; Porter, Douglas L.; Hayes, Steven L.; Hill, Robert N.

    1999-01-01

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both.

  8. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, D.C.; Porter, D.L.; Hayes, S.L.; Hill, R.N.

    1999-03-23

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both. 7 figs.

  9. PuPO4(cr, hyd.) Solubility Product and Pu3+ Complexes With Phosphate and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Dhanpat; Moore, Dean A.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bolton, Harvey

    2010-06-15

    To determine the solubility product of PuPO4(cr, hyd.) and the complexation constants of Pu(III) with phosphate and EDTA, the solubility of PuPO4(cr, hyd.) was investigated as a function of: 1) time and pH varying from 1.0 to 12.0 and at a fixed 0.00032 M phosphate concentration; 2) NaH2PO4 concentrations varying from 0.0001 M to 1.0 M and at a fixed pH value of 2.5; 3) time and pH varying from 1.3 to 13.0 at fixed concentrations of 0.00032 M phosphate and 0.0004 M or 0.002 M Na2H2EDTA; and 4) Na2H2EDTA concentrations varying from 0.00005 M to 0.0256 M at a fixed 0.00032 M phosphate concentration and at pH values of approximately 3.5, 10.6, and 12.6. A combination of solvent extraction and spectrophotometric techniques confirmed that the use of hydroquinone and Na2S2O4 helped maintain Pu as Pu(III). The solubility data were interpreted using Pitzer and SIT models, and both provided similar values for the solubility product of PuPO4(cr, hyd.) and for the formation constant of PuEDTA-. The log10 of the solubility product of PuPO4(cr, hyd.) (PuPO4(cr, hyd.) = Pu3+ + PO4 ) was determined to be –(24.42 ± 0.38). Pitzer modeling showed that phosphate interactions with Pu3+ were extremely weak and did not require any phosphate complexes (e.g., PuPO4(aq), PuH2PO42+, Pu(H2PO4)2+, Pu(H2PO4)3(aq), and Pu(H2PO4)4-), as proposed in existing literature, to explain the experimental data. SIT modeling, however, required the inclusion of PuH2PO42+ to explain the data in high NaH2PO4 concentrations; this illustrates the differences one can expect when using these two chemical models to interpret the data. As the Pu(III)-EDTA species, only PuEDTA- was needed to interpret the experimental data in a large range in pH values (1.3–12.9) and EDTA concentrations (0.00005–0.256 M). Calculations based on density functional theory support the existence of PuEDTA- (with prospective stoichiometry as Pu(OH2)3EDTA-) as the chemically and structurally stable species. The log10 of the

  10. Investigating Pu and U isotopic compositions in sediments: a case study in Lake Obuchi, Rokkasho Village, Japan using sector-field ICP-MS and ICP-QMS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2005-08-01

    The objectives of the present work were to study isotope ratios and the inventory of plutonium and uranium isotope compositions in sediments from Lake Obuchi, which is in the vicinity of several nuclear fuel facilities in Rokkasho, Japan. Pu and its isotopes were determined using sector-field ICP-MS and U and its isotopes were determined with ICP-QMS after separation and purification with a combination of ion-exchange and extraction chromatography. The observed (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio (0.186 +/- 0.016) was similar to that of global fallout, indicating that the possible early tropospheric fallout Pu did not deliver Pu from the Pacific Proving Ground to areas above 40 degrees N. The previously reported higher Pu inventory in the deep water area of Lake Obuchi could be attributed to the lateral transportation of Pu deposited in the shallow area which resulted from the migration of deposited global fallout Pu from the land into the lake by river runoff and from the Pacific Ocean by tide movement and sea water scavenging, as well as from direct soil input by winds. The (235)U/(238)U atom ratios ranged from 0.00723 to 0.00732, indicating the natural origin of U in the sediments. The average (234)U/(238)U activity ratio of 1.11 in a sediment core indicated a significant sea water U contribution. No evidence was found for the release of U containing wastes from the nearby nuclear facilities. These results will serve as a reference baseline on the levels of Pu and U in the studied site so that any further contamination from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, the radioactive waste disposal and storage facilities, and the uranium enrichment plant can be identified, and the impact of future release can be rapidly assessed. PMID:16049580

  11. Parametric Studies on Plutonium Transmutation Using Uranium-Free Fuels in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shelley, Afroza; Akie, Hiroshi; Takano, Hideki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2000-08-15

    To compare the once-through use of U-free fuels for plutonium burnup in light water reactors (LWRs), plutonium transmutation, minor actinide (MA) and long-life fission product (LLFP) buildup and radiotoxicity hazards were compared for PuO{sub 2} + ZrO{sub 2} (rock-like oxide: ROX) and PuO{sub 2} + ThO{sub 2} (thorium oxide: TOX) fuels, loaded in a soft-to-hard neutron spectrum LWR core (a moderator-to-fuel volume ratio V{sub m}/V{sub f} is from 0.5 to 3.0). For better understanding and proper improvement of the reactivity coefficient problem of ROX, the fuel temperature coefficient, the void coefficient, and the delayed neutron fraction were also studied. A mixed-oxide (MOX)-fueled LWR was considered for reference purposes.From the result of the cell burnup calculation, ROX fuel transmutes 90% of net initially loaded weapons-grade Pu, and 2.5% of initially loaded Pu is converted to MAs when V{sub m}/V{sub f} is 2.0 and discharge burnup in effective full-power days is equivalent to that of 33 GWd/t in MOX fuel. Reactor-grade Pu-based ROX fuel transmutes 80% of net initially loaded Pu, and 6.7% of initially loaded Pu converts to MAs with the same condition as the weapons-grade Pu ROX fuel. TOX fuel also has a good Pu transmutation capability, but the {sup 233}U production amount is approximately a half of the fissile Pu transmutation amount. The MA production amount in TOX fuel is lower than that in MOX and ROX fuels. The LLFP production amount in ROX fuel is lower than that in MOX and TOX fuels. The radiotoxicity hazard of ROX spent fuel is lower compared to that in TOX and MOX spent fuels.The thermal neutron energy region is important in ROX fuel for fuel temperature coefficient and void coefficient problems. From these calculations, 15 to 20% {sup 232}Th-added ROX fuel seems the best to use as a once-through Pu-burning fuel compared to TOX and MOX fuels in conventional LWRs, because of its higher Pu transmutation, lower radiotoxicity hazard.

  12. Nevada test site fallout atom ratios: /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.G.; Barr, D.W.

    1984-02-01

    The exposure of the population in Utah to external gamma radiation from the fallout from nuclear weapons tests carried out between 1951 and 1958 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been reconstructed from recent measurements of /sup 137/Cs and plutonium in soil. The fraction of /sup 137/Cs in the fallout from NTS events was calculated from the total plutonium and the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratios measured in the soil, using the values of 0.180 +- 0.006 and 0.032 +- 0.003 for that ratio in global fallout and NTS fallout, respectively. The total population exposure from NTS events was then calculated on the basis of exposure rates resulting from short-lived radionuclides associated with the /sup 137/Cs at the time of deposition. While the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratio is constant in global fallout, this ratio varies greatly in the fallout from individual events. While the composition of fallout on Utah from NTS events is rather uniform, the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project is currently reconstructing radiation exposures for locations close to NTS where the fallout may be predominantly from one event. Therefore, the authors compiled the pertinent ratios in order to provide information concerning the exposure resulting from any individual event. The plutonium ratios measured at 30 days postshot were compiled from unpublished values in the archives of the Nuclear Chemistry Division of LLNL and INC-11 of LANL. These ratios are pertinent to fallout data. Dates for each event were taken from a publication by the Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy. 3 references.

  13. Effect of cross-link density and hydrophilicity of PU on blood compatibility of hydrophobic PS/hydrophilic PU IPNs.

    PubMed

    Roh, H W; Song, M J; Han, D K; Lee, D S; Ahn, J H; Kim, S C

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain structure on blood compatibility, a series of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) composed of hydrophilic polyurethane (PU) and hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) was prepared. One series was prepared with varying cross-link densities of each network, the other with varying hydrophilicity of the PU component. All PU/PS IPNs exhibited microphase-separated structures that had dispersed PS domains in the continuous PU matrix. The domain size decreased with decreasing the hydrophilicity of the PU component and increasing the cross-link density of each network. As the cross-link density and hydrophobicity of the PU component was increased, an inward shift of Tgs was observed, which was due to the decrease in phase separation between the hydrophobic PS component and hydrophilic PU component. In the in vitro platelet adhesion test, as the microdomain size of PU/PS IPN surface decreased, the number of adhered platelets on the PU/PS IPN surface was reduced and deformation of the adhered platelets decreased. It could be concluded that blood compatibility of PU/PS IPN was mainly affected by the degree of mixing between PU and PS component, which was reflected by the domain size of PS rich phase. PMID:10091927

  14. Isotopic compositions of (236)U and Pu isotopes in "black substances" collected from roadsides in Fukushima prefecture: fallout from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Aya; Steier, Peter; Takahashi, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Masayoshi

    2014-04-01

    Black-colored road dusts were collected in high-radiation areas in Fukushima Prefecture. Measurement of (236)U and Pu isotopes and (134,137)Cs in samples was performed to confirm whether refractory elements, such as U and Pu, from the fuel core were discharged and to ascertain the extent of fractionation between volatile and refractory elements. The concentrations of (134,137)Cs in all samples were exceptionally high, ranging from 0.43 to 17.7 MBq/kg, respectively. (239+240)Pu was detected at low levels, ranging from 0.15 to 1.14 Bq/kg, and with high (238)Pu/(239+240)Pu activity ratios of 1.64-2.64. (236)U was successfully determined in the range of (0.28 to 6.74) × 10(-4) Bq/kg. The observed activity ratios for (236)U/(239+240)Pu were in reasonable agreement with those calculated for the fuel core inventories, indicating that trace amounts of U from the fuel cores were released together with Pu isotopes but without large fractionation. The quantities of U and (239+240)Pu emitted to the atmosphere were estimated as 3.9 × 10(6) Bq (150 g) and 2.3 × 10(9) Bq (580 mg), respectively. With regard to U, this is the first report to give a quantitative estimation of the amount discharged. Appreciable fractionation between volatile and refractory radionuclides associated with the dispersal/deposition processes with distance from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant was found. PMID:24601520

  15. Optical properties of PuO2 and α-Pu2O3 by GGA + U + QA studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu; Lu, Yong; Zhang, Ping

    2014-09-01

    By performing first-principles calculations plus quasi-annealing simulations, we systematically study the ground-state electronic and optical properties for PuO2 and α-Pu2O3. We find that α-Pu2O3 has an energy band gap of 1.38 eV. Our obtained atomic and electronic structures for the two plutonium oxides are in agreement with available experimental as well as other theoretical results. Based on the ground-state electronic structures, we systematically calculate the frequency dependent dielectric functions, as well as the optical spectra for α-Pu2O3 and PuO2. It is found that at the visible light frequency range, the adsorption coefficient of α-Pu2O3 and PuO2 are similar, but their refractive indexes differ much. This difference can be used to detect or trace the oxidation products of the plutonium surfaces.

  16. Speciation and unusual reactivity in PuO2+x.

    PubMed

    Conradson, Steven D; Begg, Bruce D; Clark, David L; Den Auwer, Christophe; Espinosa-Faller, Francisco J; Gordon, Pamela L; Hess, Nancy J; Hess, Ryan; Keogh, D Webster; Morales, Luis A; Neu, Mary P; Runde, Wolfgang; Tait, C Drew; Veirs, D Kirk; Villella, Phillip M

    2003-06-16

    Pu L(3) XAFS measurements show that the excess oxygen in single phase PuO(2+)(x)() occurs as oxo groups with Pu-O distances of 1.83-1.91 A. This distance and the energy of the edge (via comparison with a large number of related compounds) are more consistent with a Pu(IV/V) than a Pu(IV/VI) mixture. Analogous to Pu(IV) colloids, although the Pu-Pu pair distribution remains single site even when it shows substantial disorder, the Pu-O distribution can display a number of additional shells at specific distances up to 3.4 A even in high fired materials when no oxo groups are present, implying intrinsic H(+)/OH(-)(/H(2)O). The number of oxo atoms increases when samples are equilibrated with humid air at ambient temperature, indicating that the Pu reactivity in this solid system differs notably from that of isolated complexes and demonstrating the importance of nanoscale cooperative phenomena and total free energy in determining its chemical properties. PMID:12793805

  17. Electronic Structure Calculations of delta-Pu Based Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Landa, A; Soderlind, P; Ruban, A

    2003-11-13

    First-principles methods are employed to study the ground-state properties of {delta}-Pu-based alloys. The calculations show that an alloy component larger than {delta}-Pu has a stabilizing effect. Detailed calculations have been performed for the {delta}-Pu{sub 1-c}Am{sub c} system. Calculated density of Pu-Am alloys agrees well with the experimental data. The paramagnetic {yields} antiferromagnetic transition temperature (T{sub c}) of {delta}-Pu{sub 1-c}Am{sub c} alloys is calculated by a Monte-Carlo technique. By introducing Am into the system, one could lower T{sub c} from 548 K (pure Pu) to 372 K (Pu{sub 70}Am{sub 30}). We also found that, contrary to pure Pu where this transition destabilizes {delta}-phase, Pu{sub 3}Am compound remains stable in the antiferromagnetic phase that correlates with the recent discovery of a Curie-Weiss behavior of {delta}-Pu{sub 1-c}Am{sub c} at c {approx} 24 at. %.

  18. X-ray excited Auger transitions of Pu compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Art J. Grant, William K.; Stanford, Jeff A.; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.; Allen, Patrick G.; McLean, William

    2015-05-15

    X-ray excited Pu core–valence–valence and core–core–valence Auger line-shapes were used in combination with the Pu 4f photoelectron peaks to characterize differences in the oxidation state and local electronic structure for Pu compounds. The evolution of the Pu 4f core-level chemical shift as a function of sputtering depth profiling and hydrogen exposure at ambient temperature was quantified. The combination of the core–valence–valence Auger peak energies with the associated chemical shift of the Pu 4f photoelectron line defines the Auger parameter and results in a reliable method for definitively determining oxidation states independent of binding energy calibration. Results show that PuO{sub 2}, Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, PuH{sub 2.7}, and Pu have definitive Auger line-shapes. These data were used to produce a chemical state (Wagner) plot for select plutonium oxides. This Wagner plot allowed us to distinguish between the trivalent hydride and the trivalent oxide, which cannot be differentiated by the Pu 4f binding energy alone.

  19. Sintering of compacts of UN, (U,Pu)N, and PuN

    DOEpatents

    Tennery, V.J.; Godfrey, T.G.; Bomar, E.S.

    1973-10-16

    >A method is provided for preparing a densified compact of a metal nitride selected from the group consisting of UN, (U,Pu)N, and PuN which comprises heating a green compact of at least one selected nitride in the mononitride single-phase region, as displayed by a phase diagram of the mononitride of said compact, in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of nitrogen less than 760 torr. At a given temperature, this process produces a singlephase structure and a maximal sintered density as measured by mercury displacement. (Official Gazette)

  20. Materials compatibility for 238Pu-HNO3/HF solution containment: 238Pu aqueous processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimus, M. A.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, M. E.; Silver, G.; Brock, J.; Nixon, J.; Ramsey, K. B.; Moniz, P.

    2000-07-01

    The Power Source Technologies Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory is building a 238Pu Aqueous Scrap Recovery Line at the Plutonium Facility. The process line incorporates several unit operations including dissolution, filtration, ion exchange, and precipitation. During 1997-1999, studies were carried out to determine the chemistry used in the full-scale process. Other studies focussed on the engineering design of the operation. Part of the engineering design was to determine, in compatibility studies, the materials for reaction and storage vessels which will contain corrosive 238Pu-HNO3/HF solutions. The full-scale line is to be operational by the end of year 2000.

  1. Progress of nitride fuel cycle research for transmutation of minor actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Yasuo; Akabori, Mitsuo; Minato, Kazuo

    2007-07-01

    Recent progress of nitride fuel cycle research for transmutation of MA is summarized. Preparation of MA-bearing nitride pellets, such as (Np,Am)N, (Am,Pu)N and (Np,Pu,Am,Cm)N, was carried out. Irradiation behavior of U-free nitride fuel was investigated by the irradiation test of (Pu,Zr)N and PuN+TiN fuels, in which ZrN and TiN were added as a possible diluent material. Further, pyrochemical process of spent nitride fuel was developed by electrorefining in a molten chloride salt and subsequent re-nitridation of actinides in liquid Cd cathode electro-deposits. Nitride fuel cycle for transmutation of MA has been demonstrated in a laboratory scale by the experimental study with MA and Pu. (authors)

  2. Recent advances in the study of the UO2-PuO2 phase diagram at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhler, R.; Welland, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Cakir, P.; Vitova, T.; Pruessmann, T.; Pidchenko, I.; Hennig, C.; Guéneau, C.; Konings, R. J. M.; Manara, D.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, novel container-less laser heating experimental data have been published on the melting behaviour of pure PuO2 and PuO2-rich compositions in the uranium dioxide-plutonium dioxide system. Such data showed that previous data obtained by more traditional furnace heating techniques were affected by extensive interaction between the sample and its containment. It is therefore paramount to check whether data so far used by nuclear engineers for the uranium-rich side of the pseudo-binary dioxide system can be confirmed or not. In the present work, new data are presented both in the UO2-rich part of the phase diagram, most interesting for the uranium-plutonium dioxide based nuclear fuel safety, and in the PuO2 side. The new results confirm earlier furnace heating data in the uranium-dioxide rich part of the phase diagram, and more recent laser-heating data in the plutonium-dioxide side of the system. As a consequence, it is also confirmed that a minimum melting point must exist in the UO2-PuO2 system, at a composition between x(PuO2) = 0.4 and x(PuO2) = 0.7 and 2900 K ⩽ T ⩽ 3000 K. Taking into account that, especially at high temperature, oxygen chemistry has an effect on the reported phase boundary uncertainties, the current results should be projected in the ternary U-Pu-O system. This aspect has been extensively studied here by X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The current results suggest that uncertainty bands related to oxygen behaviour in the equilibria between condensed phases and gas should not significantly affect the qualitative trend of the current solid-liquid phase boundaries.

  3. A practical strategy for reducing the future security risk of United States spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Chodak, P. III; Buksa, J.J.

    1997-06-01

    Depletion calculations show that advanced oxide (AOX) fuels can be used in existing light water reactors (LWRs) to achieve and maintain virtually any desired level of US (US) reactor-grade plutonium (R-Pu) inventory. AOX fuels are composed of a neutronically inert matrix loaded with R-Pu and erbium. A 1/2 core load of 100% nonfertile, 7w% R-Pu AOX and 3.9 w% UO{sub 2} has a net total plutonium ({sup TOT}Pu) destruction rate of 310 kg/yr. The 20% residual {sup TOT}Pu in discharged AOX contains > 55% {sup 242}Pu making it unattractive for nuclear explosive use. A three-phase fuel-cycle development program sequentially loading 60 LWRs with 100% mixed oxide, 50% AOX with a nonfertile component displacing only some of the {sup 238}U, and 50% AOX, which is 100% nonfertile, could reduce the US plutonium inventory to near zero by 2050.

  4. Optimization of hybrid-type instrumentation for Pu accountancy of U/TRU ingot in pyroprocessing.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hee; Won, Byung-Hee; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Seung Kyu; Park, Se-Hwan; Park, Geun-Il; Menlove, Spencer H

    2016-02-01

    One of the final products of pyroprocessing for spent nuclear fuel recycling is a U/TRU ingot consisting of rare earth (RE), uranium (U), and transuranic (TRU) elements. The amounts of nuclear materials in a U/TRU ingot must be measured as precisely as possible in order to secure the safeguardability of a pyroprocessing facility, as it contains the most amount of Pu among spent nuclear fuels. In this paper, we propose a new nuclear material accountancy method for measurement of Pu mass in a U/TRU ingot. This is a hybrid system combining two techniques, based on measurement of neutrons from both (1) fast- and (2) thermal-neutron-induced fission events. In technique #1, the change in the average neutron energy is a signature that is determined using the so-called ring ratio method, according to which two detector rings are positioned close to and far from the sample, respectively, to measure the increase of the average neutron energy due to the increased number of fast-neutron-induced fission events and, in turn, the Pu mass in the ingot. We call this technique, fast-neutron energy multiplication (FNEM). In technique #2, which is well known as Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR), a neutron population's changes resulting from thermal-neutron-induced fission events due to the presence or absence of a cadmium (Cd) liner in the sample's cavity wall, and reflected in the Cd ratio, is the signature that is measured. In the present study, it was considered that the use of a hybrid, FNEM×PNAR technique would significantly enhance the signature of a Pu mass. Therefore, the performance of such a system was investigated for different detector parameters in order to determine the optimal geometry. The performance was additionally evaluated by MCNP6 Monte Carlo simulations for different U/TRU compositions reflecting different burnups (BU), initial enrichments (IE), and cooling times (CT) to estimate its performance in real situations. PMID:26656430

  5. Characterization of a Pu-bearing zirconolite-rich synroc

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Ebbinghaus, B.; Bakel, A.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    A titanate-based ceramic waste form, rich in phases structurally related to zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), is being developed as a possible method for immobilizing excess plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons. As part of this program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) produced several ceramics that were then characterized at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The plutonium- loaded ceramic was found to contain a Pu-Gd zirconolite phase but also contained plutonium titanates, Gd-polymignyte, and a series of other phases. In addition, much of the Pu was remained as PuO{sub 2- x}. The Pu oxidation state in the zirconolite was determined to be mainly Pu{sup 4+}, although some Pu{sub 3+} was believed to be present.

  6. Microstructural Characterization of Cast Metallic Transmutation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    J. I. Cole; D. D. Keiser; J. R. Kennedy

    2007-09-01

    As part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is participating in an international collaboration to irradiate prototypic actinide-bearing transmutation fuels in the French Phenix fast reactor (FUTURIX-FTA experiment). The INL has contributed to this experiment by fabricating and characterizing two compositions of metallic fuel; a non-fertile 48Pu-12Am-40Zr fuel and a low-fertile 35U-29Pu-4Am-2Np-30Zr fuel for insertion into the reactor. This paper highlights results of the microstructural analysis of these cast fuels, which were reasonably homogeneous in nature, but had several distinct phase constituents. Spatial variations in composition appeared to be more pronounced in the low-fertile fuel when compared to the non-fertile fuel.

  7. Iron Corrosion Observations: Pu(VI)-Fe Reduction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Donald T.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Richmann, Michael K.; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Borkowski, Marian

    2012-09-11

    Iron and Pu Reduction: (1) Very different appearances in iron reaction products were noted depending on pH, brine and initial iron phase; (2) Plutonium was associated with the Fe phases; (3) Green rust was often noted at the higher pH; (4) XANES established the green rust to be an Fe2/3 phase with a bromide center; and (5) This green rust phase was linked to Pu as Pu(IV).

  8. Ferro- and antiferro-magnetism in (Np, Pu)BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimczuk, T.; Shick, A. B.; Kozub, A. L.; Griveau, J.-C.; Colineau, E.; Falmbigl, M.; Wastin, F.; Rogl, P.

    2015-04-01

    Two new transuranium metal boron carbides, NpBC and PuBC, have been synthesized. Rietveld refinements of powder XRD patterns of {Np,Pu}BC confirmed in both cases isotypism with the structure type of UBC. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility data reveal antiferromagnetic ordering for PuBC below TN = 44 K, whereas ferromagnetic ordering was found for NpBC below TC = 61 K. Heat capacity measurements prove the bulk character of the observed magnetic transition for both compounds. The total energy electronic band structure calculations support formation of the ferromagnetic ground state for NpBC and the antiferromagnetic ground state for PuBC.

  9. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.; Powell, Brian A.

    2015-01-28

    Strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time implicates near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption–desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Moreover, following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  10. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.; Powell, Brian A.

    2015-01-28

    Strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time implicates near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption–desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Moreover, following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethitemore » was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.« less

  11. Optimization of burnable poison design for Pu incineration in fully fertile free PWR core

    SciTech Connect

    Fridman, E.; Shwageraus, E.; Galperin, A.

    2006-07-01

    The design challenges of the fertile-free based fuel (FFF) can be addressed by careful and elaborate use of burnable poisons (BP). Practical fully FFF core design for PWR reactor has been reported in the past [1]. However, the burnable poison option used in the design resulted in significant end of cycle reactivity penalty due to incomplete BP depletion. Consequently, excessive Pu loading were required to maintain the target fuel cycle length, which in turn decreased the Pu burning efficiency. A systematic evaluation of commercially available BP materials in all configurations currently used in PWRs is the main objective of this work. The BP materials considered are Boron, Gd, Er, and Hf. The BP geometries were based on Wet Annular Burnable Absorber (WABA), Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber (IFBA), and Homogeneous poison/fuel mixtures. Several most promising combinations of BP designs were selected for the full core 3D simulation. All major core performance parameters for the analyzed cases are very close to those of a standard PWR with conventional UO{sub 2} fuel including possibility of reactivity control, power peaking factors, and cycle length. The MTC of all FFF cores was found at the full power conditions at all times and very close to that of the UO{sub 2} core. The Doppler coefficient of the FFF cores is also negative but somewhat lower in magnitude compared to UO{sub 2} core. The soluble boron worth of the FFF cores was calculated to be lower than that of the UO{sub 2} core by about a factor of two, which still allows the core reactivity control with acceptable soluble boron concentrations. The main conclusion of this work is that judicial application of burnable poisons for fertile free fuel has a potential to produce a core design with performance characteristics close to those of the reference PWR core with conventional UO{sub 2} fuel. (authors)

  12. 239Pu(n,2n) 238Pu cross section inferred from IDA calculations and GEANIE measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Ormand, W E; Dietrich, F S

    2000-09-01

    This report presents the latest {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross sections inferred from calculations performed with the nuclear reaction-modeling code system, IDA, coupled with experimental measurements of partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for incident neutron energies ranging from 5.68 to 17.18 MeV. It is found that the inferred {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross section peaks at E{sub inc} {approx} 11.4 MeV with a peak value of approximately 326 mb. At E{sub inc} {approx} 14 MeV, the inferred {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross section is found to be in good agreement with previous radio-chemical measurements by Lockheed. However, the shape of the inferred {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross section differs significantly from previous evaluations of ENDL, ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI. In our calculations, direct, preequilibrium, and compound reactions are included. Also considered in the modeling are fission and {gamma}-cascade processes in addition to particle emission. The main components of physics adopted and the parameters used in our calculations are discussed. Good agreement of the inferred {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross sections derived separately from IDA and GNASH calculations is shown. The two inferences provide an estimate of variations in the deduced {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross section originating from modeling.

  13. Free energy of formation of Cs 3PuCl 6 and CsPu 2Cl 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, M. A.; Kleinschmidt, P. D.

    The free energy, enthalpy and entropy of formation of the compounds Cs 3PuCl 6 and CsPu 2Cl 7 have been determined by measuring the sublimation pressures for the reactions CsCl( s) / aiCsCl( g), {2}/{5}Cs 3PuCl 6(s) /ai {1}/{5}CsPu 2Cl 7(s) + CsCl(g) , and CsPu2Cl7( s) / ai 2 PuCl3( s) + CsCl( g). The pressures are measured using Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry over the temperature range 600 to 850 K. For the formation of Cs 3PuCl 6 from CsCl and PuCl 3, ΔG0298 = -77.3 ± 8.5 kJ/ mol, ΔH0298 = -82.1 ± 7.8 kJ/ mol, and ΔS0298 = -16.2 ± 10.9 J/ Kmol. For CsPu 2Cl 7, ΔG0298 = -39.4 ± 3.5 kJ/ mol, ΔH0298 = -40.8 ± 3.2 kJ/ mol, and ΔS0298 = -4.6 ± 4.2 J/ Kmol.

  14. Is Octavalent Pu(VIII) Possible? Mapping the Plutonium Oxyfluoride Series PuO(n)F(8-2n) (n = 0-4).

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Pyykkö, Pekka; Li, Jun

    2015-09-01

    While the oxidation state Pu(VIII) is shown to be less stable than Pu(V) in the PuO4 molecule, it is not clear if the more electronegative fluorine can help to stabilize Pu(VIII). Our calculations on PuO(n)F(8-2n) (n = 0-4) molecules notably confirm that PuO2F4 has both (1)D(4h) and (5)C(2v) minima with the oxidation states Pu(VIII) and Pu(V), respectively, with the latter having lower energy. The hybrid-DFT, CCSD(T), and CASSCF methods all give the same result. The results conform to a superoxide ligand when n ≥ 2. PuF8 in a (1)O(h) state can decompose to PuF6 and F2, and PuOF6 in a (1)C(2v) state also can break down to PuF6 and 1/2 O2. The Pu(VIII) anion PuO2F5(-) does have a D(5h) minimum, which also lies above a (5)C(2v) Pu(V) peroxide structure. However, the energy differences between the different minima are not large, indicating that metastable species with oxidation states higher than Pu(V) cannot be completely excluded. PMID:26309065

  15. PU.1 silencing leads to terminal differentiation of erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Atar, Orna; Levi, Ben-Zion . E-mail: blevi@technion.ac.il

    2005-04-22

    The transcription factor PU.1 plays a central role in development and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Evidence from PU.1 knockout mice indicates a pivotal role for PU.1 in myeloid lineage and B-lymphocyte development. In addition, PU.1 is a key player in the development of Friend erythroleukemia disease, which is characterized by proliferation and differentiation arrest of proerythrocytes. To study the role of PU.1 in erythroleukemia, we have used murine erythroleukemia cells, isolated from Friend virus-infected mice. Expression of PU.1 small interfering RNA in these cells led to significant inhibition of PU.1 levels. This was accompanied by inhibition of proliferation and restoration in the ability of the proerythroblastic cells to produce hemoglobin, i.e., reversion of the leukemic phenotype. The data suggest that overexpression of PU.1 gene is the immediate cause for maintaining the leukemic phenotype of the disease by retaining the self-renewal capacity of transformed erythroblastic cells and by blocking the terminal differentiation program towards erythrocytes.

  16. Pu-238 production at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Roggenkamp, P.L.

    1987-11-01

    Pu-238 production capability at SRP is dependent on the availability of Np-237 feed material. With continuing operation of three production reactors at SRP, production of 46 kg Pu-238 per year can be sustained. Capacity of auxiliary facilities is adequate to support the production rates.

  17. 239Pu Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra Impact on a Set of Criticality and Experimental Reactor Benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peneliau, Y.; Litaize, O.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.

    2014-04-01

    A large set of nuclear data are investigated to improve the calculation predictions of the new neutron transport simulation codes. With the next generation of nuclear power plants (GEN IV projects), one expects to reduce the calculated uncertainties which are mainly coming from nuclear data and are still very important, before taking into account integral information in the adjustment process. In France, future nuclear power plant concepts will probably use MOX fuel, either in Sodium Fast Reactors or in Gas Cooled Fast Reactors. Consequently, the knowledge of 239Pu cross sections and other nuclear data is crucial issue in order to reduce these sources of uncertainty. The Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra (PFNS) for 239Pu are part of these relevant data (an IAEA working group is even dedicated to PFNS) and the work presented here deals with this particular topic. The main international data files (i.e. JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0, BRC-2009) have been considered and compared with two different spectra, coming from the works of Maslov and Kornilov respectively. The spectra are first compared by calculating their mathematical moments in order to characterize them. Then, a reference calculation using the whole JEFF-3.1.1 evaluation file is performed and compared with another calculation performed with a new evaluation file, in which the data block containing the fission spectra (MF=5, MT=18) is replaced by the investigated spectra (one for each evaluation). A set of benchmarks is used to analyze the effects of PFNS, covering criticality cases and mock-up cases in various neutron flux spectra (thermal, intermediate, and fast flux spectra). Data coming from many ICSBEP experiments are used (PU-SOL-THERM, PU-MET-FAST, PU-MET-INTER and PU-MET-MIXED) and French mock-up experiments are also investigated (EOLE for thermal neutron flux spectrum and MASURCA for fast neutron flux spectrum). This study shows that many experiments and neutron parameters are very sensitive to

  18. STYPu fuel form activities, March 1-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The SRP portion of this report summarizes production STYPuO2 fuel forms for use in radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG's) in the Plutonium Fuel Form (PuFF) Facility at the Savannah River Plant. The PuFF Facility began producing iridium-encapsulated, 62.5-watt STYPuO2 right circular cylinders for GPHS (General Purpose Heat Source) RTG's in June 1980; this program was completed in December 1983. The PuFF Facility has been placed in a production readiness mode of operation pending funding of additional heat source programs.

  19. The environmental dependence of redox energetics of PuO2 and α-Pu2O3: A quantitative solution from DFT+U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Liu, Haifeng; Song, Haifeng; Zhang, Guangcai; Zheng, Hui; Zhao, Xiangeng; Zhang, Ping

    2012-08-01

    We report a comprehensive density functional theory (DFT)+U study of the energetics of charged and neutral oxygen defects in both PuO2 and α-Pu2O3, and present a quantitative determination of the equilibrium compositions of reduced PuO2 (PuO2 - x) as functions of environmental temperature and partial pressure of oxygen, which shows fairly agreement with corresponding high-temperature experiments. Under ambient conditions, the endothermic reduction of PuO2 to α-Pu2O3 is found to be facilitated by accompanying volume expansion of PuO2 - x and the possible migration of O-vacancy, whereas further reduction of α-Pu2O3 is predicted to be much more difficult. In contrast to the endothermic oxidation of PuO2, the oxidation of α-Pu2O3 is a stable exothermic process.

  20. Sputtering yield of Pu bombarded by fission Fragments from Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Danagoulian, Areg; Klein, Andreas; Mcneil, Wendy V; Yuan, Vincent W

    2008-01-01

    We present results on the yield of sputtering of Pu atoms from a Pu foil, bombarded by fission fragments from a {sup 252}Cf source in transmission geometry. We have found the number of Pu atoms/incoming fission fragments ejected to be 63 {+-} 1. In addition, we show measurements of the sputtering yield as a function of distance from the central axis, which can be understood as an angular distribution of the yield. The results are quite surprising in light of the fact that the Pu foil is several times the thickness of the range of fission fragment particles in Pu. This indicates that models like the binary collision model are not sufficient to explain this behavior.

  1. Fission xenon from extinct Pu-244 in 14,301.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozd, R.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Ragan, D.

    1972-01-01

    Xenon extracted in step-wise heating of lunar breccia 14,301 contains a fission-like component in excess of that attributable to uranium decay during the age of the solar system. There seems to be no adequate source for this component other than Pu-244. Verification that this component is in fact due to the spontaneous fission of extinct Pu-244 comes from the derived spectrum which is similar to that observed from artificially produced Pu-244. It thus appears that Pu-244 was extant at the time lunar crustal material cooled sufficiently to arrest the thermal diffusion of xenon. Subsequent history has apparently maintained the isotopic integrity of plutonium fission xenon. Of major importance are details of the storage itself. Either the fission component is the result of in situ fission of Pu-244 and subsequent storage in 14,301 material, or the fission xenon was stored in an intermediate reservoir before incorporation into 14,301.

  2. Laboratory studies of actinide partitioning relevant to 244Pu chronometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, T.; Heuser, W. R.; Burnett, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    Actinide partitioning and light lanthanide fractionation have been studied to gain an understanding of Pu chemistry under meteoritic and lunar conditions. The goal of the study was to identify conditions and samples from which chronological information can be retrieved. The laboratory investigations involved particle track radiography of the crystal/liquid partitioning of Th, U and Pu among diopsidic clinopyroxene, whitlockite and liquid. It is found that trivalent Pu plays an important role in partitioning for lunar and most meteoritic conditions. The use of Pu/Nd for relative age assessments is supported to some extent by the investigations; samples with unfractionated U, Th and Nd abundances (relative to average solar system values) may be suitable for Pu chronometry.

  3. DOE plutonium disposition study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document Volume 2, provides a discussion of: Plutonium Fuel Cycle; Technology Needs; Regulatory Considerations; Cost and Schedule Estimates; and Deployment Strategy.

  4. LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.

    1996-09-10

    On Sept. 10, 1996, LLNL hosted a workshop aimed at answering the question: Is it possible to carry out transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on plutonium metal in an electron microscope located outside the LLNL plutonium facility. The workshop focused on evaluation of a proposed plan for Pu microscopy both from a technical and environment, health, and safety point of view. After review and modification of the plan, workshop participants unanimously concluded that: (1) the technical plan is sound, (2) this technical plan, including a proposal for a new TEM, provides significant improvements and unique capabilities compared with the effort at LANL and is therefore complementary, (3) there is no significant environment, health, and safety obstacle to this plan.

  5. Microscopic Calculations of 240Pu Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2007-09-11

    Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations have been performed with the Gogny finite-range effective interaction for {sup 240}Pu out to scission, using a new code developed at LLNL. A first set of calculations was performed with constrained quadrupole moment along the path of most probable fission, assuming axial symmetry but allowing for the spontaneous breaking of reflection symmetry of the nucleus. At a quadrupole moment of 345 b, the nucleus was found to spontaneously scission into two fragments. A second set of calculations, with all nuclear moments up to hexadecapole constrained, was performed to approach the scission configuration in a controlled manner. Calculated energies, moments, and representative plots of the total nuclear density are shown. The present calculations serve as a proof-of-principle, a blueprint, and starting-point solutions for a planned series of more comprehensive calculations to map out a large set of scission configurations, and the associated fission-fragment properties.

  6. Preparation of Pu{sup 239} sources

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1988-08-05

    The Separations Technology Laboratory has prepared four sources to be used for calibrating a waste assay system (Passive/Active Neutron Assay) in Building 724-8G (Burial Ground). The four sources contain 0.5, 0.1, 0.05, and 0.01 grams Pu{sup 239}, respectively. The sources were prepared using aliquots from a single solution provided by the Quality Control (QC) group of Laboratories Department. The solution contained weapons-grade plutonium dissolved in nitric acid. Final solution acidity was 3M. Coulometry had been used to obtain a total plutonium content per unit volume. The weight percent of the plutonium isotopes present was obtained via mass spectrometry.

  7. Distinguishing Pu Metal from Pu Oxide and Determining alpha-ratio using Fast Neutron Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J. M.; Chapline, G. F.; Nakae, L. F.; Prasad, M. K.; Sheets, S. A.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-01-07

    We describe a new method for determining the ratio of the rate of (α, n) source neutrons to the rate of spontaneous fission neutrons, the so called α-ratio. This method is made possible by fast neutron counting with liquid scintillator detectors, which can determine the shape of the fast neutron spectrum. The method utilizes the spectral difference between fission spectrum neutrons from Pu metal and the spectrum of (α, n) neutrons from PuO2. Our method is a generalization of the Cifarelli-Hage method for determining keff for fissile assemblies, and also simultaneously determines keff along with the α-ratio.

  8. Resolving global versus local/regional Pu sources in the environment using sector ICP-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketterer, M.E.; Hafer, K.M.; Link, C.L.; Kolwaite, D.; Wilson, Jim; Mietelski, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is a versatile method for the determination of plutonium activities and isotopic compositions in samples containing this element at fallout levels. Typical detection limits for 239+240Pu are 0.1, 0.02 and 0.002 Bq kg -1Pu for samples sizes of 0.5 g, 3 g, and 50 g of soil, respectively. The application of sector ICP-MS-based Pu determinations is demonstrated in studies in sediment chronology, soil Pu inventory and depth distribution, and the provenance of global fallout versus local or regional Pu sources. A sediment core collected from Sloans Lake (Denver, Colorado, USA) exhibits very similar 137Cs and 239+240Pu activity profiles; 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios indicate possible small influences from the Nevada Test Site and/or the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. An undisturbed soil profile from Lockett Meadow (Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) exhibits an exponential decrease in 239+240Pu activity versus depth; 240Pu/239Pu in the top 3 cm is slightly lower than the global fallout range of 0.180 ?? 0.014 due to possible regional influence of Nevada Test Site fallout. The 239??240Pu inventory at Lockett Meadow is 56 ?? 4 Bq m-2, consistent with Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude fallout. Archived NdF3 sources, prepared from Polish soils, demonstrate that substantial 239+240Pu from the 1986 Chernobyl disaster has been deposited in north eastern regions of Poland; compared to global fallout, Chernobyl Pu exhibits higher abundances of 240Pu and 241Pu. The ratios 240Pu/239pu and 241Pu/239Pu co-vary and range from 0.186-0.348 and 0.0029-0.0412, respectively, in forest soils (241Pu/239Pu = 0.2407??[240Pu/239Pu] - 0.0413; r2 = 0.9924). ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry 2004.

  9. Oxidation states, geometries, and electronic structures of plutonium tetroxide PuO4 isomers: is octavalent Pu viable?

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Wen-Hua; Su, Jing; Schwarz, W H E; Li, Jun

    2013-12-16

    In neutral chemical compounds, the highest known oxidation state of all elements in the Periodic Table is +VIII. While PuO4 is viewed as an exotic Pu(+VIII) complex, we have shown here that no stable electronic homologue of octavalent RuO4 and OsO4 exists for PuO4, even though Pu has the same number of eight valence electrons as Ru and Os. Using quantum chemical approaches at the levels of quasi-relativistic DFT, MP2, CCSD(T), and CASPT2, we find the ground state of PuO4 as a quintet (5)C2v-(PuO2)(+)(O2)(-) complex with the leading valence configuration of an (f(3))plutonyl(V) unit, loosely coupled to a superoxido (π*(3))O2(-) ligand. This stable isomer is likely detectable as a transient species, while the previously suggested planar (1)D4h-Pu(VIII)O4 isomer is only metastable. Through electronic structure analyses, the bonding and the oxidation states are explained and rationalized. We have predicted the characteristics of the electronic and vibrational spectra to assist future experimental identification of (PuO2)(+)(O2)(-) by IR, UV-vis, and ionization spectroscopy. PMID:24274785

  10. Internal Corrosion Analysis of Model 9975 Packaging Containing Pu or PuO{sub 2} During Shipping and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P.

    1999-03-23

    The Materials Consultation Group of SRTC has completed an internal corrosion analysis of the Model 9975 packaging assembly containing either Pu or PuO2 for storage in K Reactor under ambient conditions for a period of 12 years. The 12-year storage period includes two years for shipping and up to ten years for storage.

  11. Fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions for /sup 242/Pu(sf), /sup 241/Pu(n/sub th/,f), and /sup 242/Pu(. gamma. ,f)

    SciTech Connect

    Thierens, H.; Jacobs, E.; D'hondt, P.; De Clercq, A.; Piessens, M.; De Frenne, D.

    1984-02-01

    Energy correlation measurements were performed for the spontaneous fission of /sup 242/Pu, the thermal-neutron-induced fission of /sup 241/Pu, and the photofission of /sup 242/Pu with 12-, 15-, 20-, and 30-MeV bremsstrahlung. The photofission cross section for /sup 242/Pu was determined up to 30 MeV. For /sup 242/Pu(sf) the overall kinetic energy distribution is strongly asymmetric and the overall mass distribution has a very high peak yield (9%). Important deviations of the average total kinetic energy release and the average light and heavy fragment masses and from the systematics of Unik et al. are also observed for this fissioning system. These effects can be explained in the framework of the static scission point model by the strong preferential formation of a shell-stabilized scission configuration with the neutron number of the heavy and light fragments in the vicinity of the spherical N = 82 neutron shell and the deformed N = 66 neutron shell, respectively. A decrease of with the average excitation energy , d/d = -0.30 +- 0.04, is observed in the photofission of /sup 242/Pu.

  12. Ostwald Ripening and Its Effect on PuO2 Particle Size in Hanford Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.

    2011-09-29

    Between 1944 and 1989, the Hanford Site produced 60 percent (54.5 metric tons) of the United States weapons plutonium and produced an additional 12.9 metric tons of fuels-grade plutonium. High activity wastes, including plutonium lost from the separations processes used to isolate the plutonium, were discharged to underground storage tanks during these operations. Plutonium in the Hanford tank farms is estimated to be {approx}700 kg but may be up to {approx}1000 kg. Despite these apparent large quantities, the average plutonium concentration in the {approx}200 million liter tank waste volume is only about 0.003 grams per liter ({approx}0.0002 wt%). The plutonium is largely associated with low solubility metal hydroxide/oxide sludges where its low concentration and intimate mixture with neutron-absorbing elements (e.g., iron) are credited in nuclear criticality safety. However, concerns have been expressed that plutonium, in the form of plutonium hydrous oxide, PuO{sub 2} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O, could undergo sufficient crystal growth through Ostwald ripening in the alkaline tank waste to potentially be separable from neutron absorbing constituents by settling or sedimentation. It was found that plutonium that entered the alkaline tank waste by precipitation through neutralization from acid solution is initially present as 2- to 3-nm (0.002- to 0.003-{mu}m) scale PuO{sub 2} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O crystallite particles and grows from that point at exceedingly slow rates, posing no risk to physical segregation. These conclusions are reached by both general considerations of Ostwald ripening and specific observations of the behaviors of PuO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O upon aging in alkaline solution.

  13. FCRD Transmutation Fuels Handbook 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Dawn Elizabeth; Papesch, Cynthia Ann

    2015-09-01

    Transmutation of minor actinides such as Np, Am, and Cm in spent nuclear fuel is of international interest because of its potential for reducing the long-term health and safety hazards caused by the radioactivity of the spent fuel. One important approach to transmutation (currently being pursued by the DOE Fuel Cycle Research & Development Advanced Fuels Campaign) involves incorporating the minor actinides into U-Pu-Zr alloys, which can be used as fuel in fast reactors. It is, therefore, important to understand the properties of U-Pu-Zr alloys, both with and without minor actinide additions. In addition to requiring extensive safety precautions, alloys containing U and Pu are difficult to study for numerous reasons, including their complex phase transformations, characteristically sluggish phase-transformation kinetics, tendency to produce experimental results that vary depending on the histories of individual samples, and sensitivity to contaminants such as oxygen in concentrations below a hundred parts per million. Many of the experimental measurements were made before 1980, and the level of documentation for experimental methods and results varies widely. It is, therefore, not surprising that little is known with certainty about U-Pu-Zr alloys, and that general acceptance of results sometimes indicates that there is only a single measurement for a particular property. This handbook summarizes currently available information about U, Pu, Zr, and alloys of two or three of these elements. It contains information about phase diagrams and related information (including phases and phase transformations); heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy; thermal expansion; and thermal conductivity and diffusivity. In addition to presenting information about materials properties, it attempts to provide information about how well the property is known and how much variation exists between measurements. Although the handbook includes some references to publications about modeling

  14. Isotopic Pu, Am and Cm signatures in environmental samples contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Sakaguchi, A; Ochiai, S; Takada, T; Hamataka, K; Murakami, T; Nagao, S

    2014-06-01

    Dust samples from the sides of roads (black substances) have been collected together with litter and soil samples at more than 100 sites contaminated heavily in the 20-km exclusion zones around Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) (Minamisoma City, and Namie, Futaba and Okuma Towns), in Iitate Village located from 25 to 45 km northwest of the plant and in southern areas from the plant. Isotopes of Pu, Am and Cm have been measured in the samples to evaluate their total releases into the environment from the FDNPP and to get the isotopic compositions among these nuclides. For black substances and litter samples, in addition to Pu isotopes, (241)Am, (242)Cm and (243,244)Cm were determined for most of samples examined, while for soil samples, only Pu isotopes were determined. The results provided a coherent data set on (239,240)Pu inventories and isotopic composition among these transuranic nuclides. When these activity ratios were compared with those for fuel core inventories in the FDNPP accident estimated by a group at JAEA, except (239,240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratios, fairly good agreements were found, indicating that transuranic nuclides, probably in the forms of fine particles, were released into the environment without their large fractionations. The obtained data may lead to more accurate information about the on-site situation (e.g., burn-up, conditions of fuel during the release phase, etc.), which would be difficult to get otherwise, and more detailed information on the dispersion and deposition processes of transuranic nuclides and the behavior of these nuclides in the environment. PMID:24531259

  15. Determination of alpha-emitting Pu isotopes in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Vioque, I; Manjón, G; García-Tenorio, R; El-Daoushy, F

    2002-04-01

    This paper presents an improved radiochemical procedure for the determination of alpha-emitting Pu isotopes in environmental samples (soils, sediments, vegetation) by alpha-particle spectrometry. Quantitative Pu recovery yields were obtained (average 60%), 0.1 mBq being the average minimum detectable activity by the complete technique. Special efforts were made to ensure the removal of traces of different natural alpha-emitting radionuclides, which can interfere with the correct determination of 239+240Pu and 238Pu concentrations. The radiochemical procedure was validated by application to reference material and by participation in intercomparison exercises. This radiochemical procedure was applied to the different layers of a high-resolution sediment core taken from a lake in Sweden. The 239+240Pu and 238Pu/239+240Pu profiles obtained in the high-resolution sediment core correctly reproduced the expected evolution of these quantities as observed historically in the atmosphere, validating the procedure for this purpose and showing the power of these radionuclides for dating purposes. PMID:12022654

  16. Attempt to detect primordial 244Pu on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachner, Johannes; Dillmann, Iris; Faestermann, Thomas; Korschinek, Gunther; Poutivtsev, Mikhail; Rugel, Georg; Lierse von Gostomski, Christoph; Türler, Andreas; Gerstmann, Udo

    2012-01-01

    With a half-life of 81.1Myr, 244Pu could be both the heaviest and the shortest-lived nuclide present on Earth as a relic of the last supernova(e) that occurred before the formation of the Solar System. Hoffman [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/234132a0 234, 132 (1971)] reported on the detection of this nuclide (1.0×10-18 g 244Pu/g) in the rare-earth mineral bastnäsite with the use of a mass spectrometer. Up to now these findings were never reassessed. We describe the search for primordial 244Pu in a sample of bastnäsite with the method of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). It was performed with a highly sensitive setup, identifying the ions by the determination of their time-of-flight and energy. Using AMS, the stripping to high charge states allows the suppression of any molecular interference. During our measurements we observed no event of 244Pu. Therefore, we can give an upper limit for the abundance of 244Pu in our sample of the mineral bastnäsite of 370 atoms per gram (1.5×10-19 g 244Pu/g). The concentration of 244Pu in our sample of bastnäsite is significantly lower than the previously determined value.

  17. Electronic structure and chemical bonding in PuO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterin, Yu. A.; Maslakov, K. I.; Teterin, A. Yu.; Ivanov, K. E.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Petrov, V. G.; Enina, D. A.; Kalmykov, St. N.

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of the x-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE) range of 0 eV-˜35 eV for plutonium dioxide (PuO2) valence electrons was done. The BEs and structure of the core electronic shells (35 eV-1250 eV BE), as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the finite fragments of the PuO2 lattice and the data of other authors, were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the outer (0 eV-˜15 eV) and the inner (˜15 eV-˜35 eV) valence molecular orbitals (OVMO and IVMO, respectively). The filled Pu 5f electronic states were shown to form in the PuO2 valence band. The Pu 6p electrons participate in the formation of both the IVMO and the OVMO (bands). The filled Pu 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to take maximum part in the IVMO formation. The MO composition and the sequence order in the BE range of 0 eV-˜35 eV in PuO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative MO scheme for PuO2, which is fundamental for understanding both the chemical bond nature in plutonium dioxide and the interpretation of other x-ray spectra of PuO2.

  18. Measurement of the 242Pu neutron capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Chyzh, A.; Dance Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Precision (n,f) and (n, γ) cross sections are important for the network calculations of the radiochemical diagnostic chain for the U.S. DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is relevant to the network calculations of Pu and Am. Additionally, new reactor concepts have catalyzed considerable interest in the measurement of improved cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on key actinides. To date, little or no experimental data has been reported on 242Pu(n, γ) for incident neutron energy below 50 keV. A new measurement of the 242Pu(n, γ) reaction was performed with the DANCE together with an improved PPAC for fission-fragment detection at LANSCE during FY14. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section spans four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ~ 30 keV. The absolute scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is set according to the measured 239Pu(n,f) resonance at 7.8 eV; the target was spiked with 239Pu for this measurement. The absolute 242Pu(n, γ) neutron capture cross section is ~ 30% higher than the cross section reported in ENDF for the 2.7 eV resonance. Latest results to be reported. Funded by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-AC52-06NA25396 (LANL). U.S. DOE/NNSA Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development. Isotopes (ORNL).

  19. Tissue, cellular, and subcellular distribution of /sup 241/Pu in the rat testes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.C.; Bowman, B.M.

    1983-05-01

    The distribution and localization of /sup 241/Pu in rat testes were determined by quantitative autoradiography. Rats were given intravenous injection of /sup 241/Pu citrate and tissues were collected 1 week later. The tissue distribution of /sup 241/Pu was determined by light microscope autoradiography. Significant concentrations of /sup 241/Pu were observed in the interstitial tissue but not in seminiferous tubules. The cellular distribution and subcellular localization of /sup 241/Pu were determined by electron microscope autoradiography. Within the interstitial tissue, /sup 241/Pu was concentrated in microphages. There was no preferential localization of /sup 241/Pu in any other interstitial tissue components. Within interstitial tissue macrophages, /sup 241/Pu was concentrated in the lysosomal system of the cell. Other organellar compartments of the cell did not preferentially incorporate /sup 241/Pu. The association of /sup 241/Pu with the macrophage lysosomal system may explain the long retention times of Pu in testes as observed in experimental studies.

  20. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  1. An Alternative Model for Electron Correlation in Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S; Tobin, J; Soderlind, P

    2007-10-23

    Using a density functional theory based approach that treats the 5f electrons relativistically, a Pu electronic structure with zero net magnetic moment is obtained, where the 5f orbital and 5f spin moments cancel each other. By combining the spin and orbital specific densities of states with state, spin and polarization specific transition moments, it is possible to reconstruct the experimentally observed photoemission spectra from Pu. Extrapolating to a spin-resolving Fano configuration, it is shown how this would resolve the extant controversy over Pu electronic structure.

  2. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. C.; Noguere, G.; de Saint Jean, C.; Kahler, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deficiency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplicity (νbar) and the prompt neutron fission spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation effort.

  3. PU IMMOBILIZATION - INDUCTION MELTING ND OFFGAS TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2006-11-28

    The Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) has been operated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to support the Pu Disposition Conceptual Design (CD-0) development effort. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the offgas sampling tests conducted in the CIM to capture and analyze the particulate and vapors emitted from lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit X with HfO{sub 2} as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and added impurities. In addition, this report describes several initial tests of the CIM for the vitrification of LaBS Frit X with HfO{sub 2}. The activities required to produce Frit X from batch chemical oxides for subsequent milling to yield glass frit of nominally 20 micron particle size are also discussed. The tests with impurities added showed that alkali salts such as NaCl and KCl were substantially emitted into the offgas system as the salt particulate, HCl, or Cl{sub 2}. Retention of Na and K in the glass were about 80 and 55%, respectively. Chloride retention was about 35%; chloride remaining in the glass was 0.29-0.37 wt%. Based on a material balance, approximately 83% of F fed was retained in the glass at about 0.09 wt % (F could not be measured directly at this concentration). Transition metals (Ni, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr) were also volatilized to varying extents. A very small amount (<0.1 g) of nickel compounds and KCl were found in crystals deposited on the melter offgas line. Overall, about 58-72% of the impurities added were volatilized. Virtually all of the particulate species were collected on the nominal 0.3 {micro}m filter. The particulate evolution rate ranged from 2-8 g/kg glass/h. The particulate was found to be as small as 0.2 {micro}m and have an approximate median size of 0.5 {micro}m. The particulate salt was also found to stick together by forming bridges between particles. Further runs without washable salts are recommended. Measurements of particle size distribution for use in

  4. The optimization of an AP1000 fuel assembly for the transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Jeremy A.

    The average nuclear power plant produces twenty metric tons of used nuclear fuel per year, containing approximately 95 wt% uranium, 1 wt% plutonium, and 4 wt% fission products and transuranic elements. Fast reactors are a preferred option for the transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides; however, an optimistic deployment time of at least 20 years indicates a need for a near-term solution. The goal of this thesis is to examine the potential of light water reactors for plutonium and minor actinides transmutation as a near-term solution. This thesis screens the available nuclear isotope database to identify potential absorbers as coatings on a transmutation fuel in a light water reactor. A spectral shift absorber coating tunes the neutron energy spectrum experienced by the underlying target fuel. Eleven different spectral shift absorbers (B4C, CdO, Dy2O3, Er 2O3, Eu2O3, Gd2O3, HfO2, In2O3, Lu2O3, Sm2O3, and TaC) have been selected for further evaluation. A model developed using the NEWT module of SCALE 6.1 code provided performance data for the burnup of the target fuel rods. Irradiation of the target fuels occurs in a Westinghouse 17x17 XL Robust Fuel Assembly over a 1400 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD) interval. The fuels evaluated in this thesis include PuO2, Pu3Si2, PuN, MOX, PuZrH, PuZrHTh, PuZrO 2, and PuUZrH. MOX (5 wt% PuO2), Pu0.31ZrH 1.6Th1.08, and PuZrO2MgO (8 wt%) are selected for detailed analysis in a multi-pin transmutation assembly. A coupled model optimized the resulting transmutation fuel elements. The optimization considered three stages of fuel assemblies containing target fuel pins. The first stage optimized four target fuel pins adjacent to the central instrumentation channel. The second stage evaluated a variety of assemblies with multiple target fuel pins and the third stage re-optimized target fuel pins in the second-stage assembly. A PuZrO2MgO (8 wt%) target fuel with a coating of Lu 2O3 resulted in the greatest reduction in curium-244

  5. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  6. Neutron Capture and Fission Measurement on ^238Pu at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, Andrii; Wu, Ching-Yen; Kwan, Elaine; Henderson, Roger; Gostic, Jolie; Couture, Aaron; Young, Hye; Ullmann, John; O'Donnell, John; Jandel, Marian; Haight, Robert; Bredeweg, Todd

    2012-10-01

    Neutron capture and fission reactions on actinides are important in nuclear engineering and physics. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Measurement, LANL) combined with PPAC (avalanche technique based fission tagging detector, LLNL) were used to study the neutron capture reactions in ^238Pu. Because of extreme spontaneous α-radioactivity in ^238Pu and associated safety issues, 3 separate experiments were performed in 2010-2012. The 1st measurement was done without fission tagging on a 396-μg thick target. The 2nd one was with PPAC on the same target. The 3rd final measurement was done on a thin target with a mass of 40 μg in order to reduce α-background load on PPAC. This was the first such measurement in a laboratory environment. The absolute ^238Pu(n,γ) cross section is presented together with the prompt γ-ray multiplicity in the ^238Pu(n,f) reaction.

  7. [ECG indices in dogs after inhalation of 239Pu].

    PubMed

    Karpova, V N

    1985-11-01

    Dogs of both sexes aged 2 to 4 were subjected to inhalation inoculation with polymer 239Pu or submicron 239PuO2 aerosols in amounts close to acute, subacute and chronically effective ones. ECG was recorded in standard, amplified and single leads (V3). All calculations were done by lead II. Signs of the right heart overburdening were noted in the presence of the P-pulmonale complex, deep S1 wave or cardiac electrical axis of SI-SII-SIII type. Signs of the right heart overburdening were revealed after inhalation of polimer 239Pu (70%). The absence of similar changes in damage caused by 239Pu could be attributed to its fast resorption from the lungs resulting in more moderate lesion of the respiratory organs. PMID:4068946

  8. Ferro- and antiferro-magnetism in (Np, Pu)BC

    SciTech Connect

    Klimczuk, T.; Kozub, A. L.; Griveau, J.-C.; Colineau, E.; Wastin, F.; Falmbigl, M.; Rogl, P.

    2015-04-01

    Two new transuranium metal boron carbides, NpBC and PuBC, have been synthesized. Rietveld refinements of powder XRD patterns of (Np,Pu)BC confirmed in both cases isotypism with the structure type of UBC. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility data reveal antiferromagnetic ordering for PuBC below T{sub N} = 44 K, whereas ferromagnetic ordering was found for NpBC below T{sub C} = 61 K. Heat capacity measurements prove the bulk character of the observed magnetic transition for both compounds. The total energy electronic band structure calculations support formation of the ferromagnetic ground state for NpBC and the antiferromagnetic ground state for PuBC.

  9. Radiation damage effects in candidate titanates for Pu disposition: Pyrochlore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.; Buck, E. C.; Icenhower, J. P.; Kozelisky, A. E.; Sell, R. L.; Elovich, R. J.; Buchmiller, W. C.

    2005-10-01

    Laboratory experiments on titanate ceramics were performed to verify whether certain assumptions are valid regarding the swelling, chemical durability, and microcracking that might occur as 239Pu decays. Titanate ceramics are the material of choice for the immobilization of surplus weapons-grade Pu. The short-lived isotope 238Pu, was incorporated into the ceramic formulation to accelerate the effects of radiation-induced damage. We report on the effects of this damage on the density (volumetric swelling <6%), crystal structure of pyrochlore-bearing specimens (amorphous after about 2 × 1018 α/g), and dissolution (no change from the fully crystalline specimen). Even though the specimens became amorphous during the tests, there was no evidence for microcracking in the photomicrographs from the scanning electron microscope. Thus, although pyrochlore is susceptible to radiation-induced damage, the material remains chemically and physically viable as a material for immobilizing surplus weapons-grade Pu.

  10. Capabilities for Testing the Electronic Configuration in Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Moore, K T; Schwartz, A J; Chung, B W; Wall, M A

    2006-11-08

    The benchmarking of theoretical modeling is crucial to the ultimate determination of the nature of the electronic structure of Pu. Examples of experimental techniques used for cross checking state of the art calculations will be given.

  11. On the electronic configuration in Pu: spectroscopy and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Moore, K T; Schwartz, A J; Chung, B W; Wall, M; Wills, J M; Eriksson, O; Haire, R; Kutepov, A L

    2006-10-11

    Photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations within the mixed-level and magnetic models, together with canonical band theory have been used to study the electron configuration in Pu. These methods suggest a 5f{sup n} configuration for Pu of 5 {le} n < 6, with n {ne} 6, contrary to what has recently been suggested in several publications. We show that the n = 6 picture is inconsistent with the usual interpretation of photoemission and x-ray absorption spectra. Instead, these spectra support the traditional conjecture of a 5f{sup 5} configuration in Pu as is obtained by density-functional theory. We further argue, based on 5f-band filling, that an n = 6 hypothesis is incompatible with the position of Pu in the actinide series and its monoclinic ground-state phase.

  12. Cermet fuel for fast reactor - Fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sudhir; Kutty, P. S.; Kutty, T. R. G.; Das, Shantanu; Dey, G. K.; Kumar, Arun

    2013-11-01

    (U, Pu)O2 ceramic fuel is the well-established fuel for the fast reactors and (U, Pu, Zr) metallic fuel is the future fuel. Both the fuels have their own merits and demerits. Optimal solution may lie in opting for a fuel which combines the favorable features of both fuel systems. The choice may be the use of cermet fuel which can be either (U, PuO2) or (Enriched U, UO2). In the present study, attempt has been made to fabricate (Natural U, UO2) cermet fuel by powder metallurgy route. Characterization of the fuel has been carried out using dilatometer, differential thermal analyzer, X-ray diffractometer, and Scanning Electron Microscope. The results show a high solidus temperature, high thermal expansion, presence of porosities, etc. in the fuel. The thermal conductivity of the fuel has also been measured. X-ray diffraction study on the fuel compact reveals presence of α U and UO2 phases in the matrix of the fuel.

  13. Probing Actinide Electronic Structure through Pu Cluster Calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryzhkov, Mickhail V.; Mirmelstein, Alexei; Yu, Sung-Woo; Chung, Brandon W.; Tobin, James G.

    2013-02-26

    The calculations for the electronic structure of clusters of plutonium have been performed, within the framework of the relativistic discrete-variational method. Moreover, these theoretical results and those calculated earlier for related systems have been compared to spectroscopic data produced in the experimental investigations of bulk systems, including photoelectron spectroscopy. Observation of the changes in the Pu electronic structure as a function of size provides powerful insight for aspects of bulk Pu electronic structure.

  14. Spatial and temporal distribution of Pu in the Northwest Pacific Ocean using modern coral archives.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Patric; Andersen, Morten B; Keith-Roach, Miranda; Worsfold, Paul; Hyeong, Kiseong; Choi, Min-Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Historical (239)Pu activity concentrations and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were determined in skeletons of dated modern corals collected from three locations (Chuuk Lagoon, Ishigaki Island and Iki Island) to identify spatial and temporal variations in Pu inputs to the Northwest Pacific Ocean. The main Pu source in the Northwest Pacific is fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing which consists of global fallout and close-in fallout from the former US Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG) in the Marshall Islands. PPG close-in fallout dominated the Pu input in the 1950s, as was observed with higher (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios (>0.30) at the Ishigaki site. Specific fallout Pu contamination from the Nagasaki atomic bomb and the Ivy Mike thermonuclear detonation at the PPG were identified at Ishigaki Island from the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios of 0.07 and 0.46, respectively. During the 1960s and 1970s, global fallout was the major Pu source to the Northwest Pacific with over 60% contribution to the total Pu. After the cessation of the atmospheric nuclear tests, the PPG again dominated the Pu input due to the continuous transport of remobilised Pu from the Marshall Islands along the North Equatorial Current and the subsequent Kuroshio Current. The Pu contributions from the PPG in recent coral bands (1984 onwards) varied over time with average estimated PPG contributions between 54% and 72% depending on location. PMID:21890207

  15. Properties measurements of (U{sub 0.7}Pu{sub 0.3})O{sub 2-x} in PO{sub 2}-controlled atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Murakami, T.; Sunaoshi, T.; Nelson, A.T.; McClellan, K.J.

    2013-07-01

    The investigation of physical properties of uranium and plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels is important for the development of fast reactor fuels. It is well known that MOX is a nonstoichiometric oxide, and the physical properties change drastically with the Oxygen-to-Metal (O/M) ratio. A control technique for O/M ratio was established for measurements of high temperature properties of uranium and plutonium mixed oxide fuels. Sintering behavior, thermal expansion and O/M change of (U{sub 0.7}Pu{sub 0.3})O{sub 2.00} and (U{sub 0.7}Pu{sub 0.3})O{sub 1.99} were investigated in PO{sub 2}-controlled atmosphere which was controlled by H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O gas system. Sintering behavior changed drastically with O/M ratio, and shrinkage of (U{sub 0.7}Pu{sub 0.3})O{sub 2.00} was faster and more advanced at lower temperatures as compared with (U{sub 0.7}Pu{sub 0.3})O{sub 1.99}. Thermal expansion was observed to be slightly increased with decreasing O/M ratio. (authors)

  16. Unusual behaviour of (Np,Pu)B2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimczuk, Tomasz; Boulet, Pascal; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Colineau, Eric; Bauer, Ernst; Falmbigl, Matthias; Rogl, Peter; Wastin, Franck

    2015-02-01

    Two transuranium metal boron carbides, NpB2C and PuB2C have been synthesized by argon arc melting. The crystal structures of the {Np,Pu}B2C compounds were determined from single-crystal X-ray data to be isotypic with the ThB2C-type (space group ?, a = 0.6532(2) nm; c = 1.0769(3) nm for NpB2C and a = 0.6509(2) nm; c = 1.0818(3) nm for PuB2C; Z = 9). Physical properties have been derived from polycrystalline bulk material in the temperature range from 2 to 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 9 T. Magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity data indicate the occurrence of antiferromagnetic ordering for NpB2C with a Neel temperature TN = 68 K. PuB2C is a Pauli paramagnet most likely due to a strong hybridization of s(p,d) electrons with the Pu-5f states. A pseudo-gap, as concluded from the Sommerfeld value and the electronic transport, is thought to be a consequence of the hybridization. The magnetic behaviour of {Np,Pu}B2C is consistent with the criterion of Hill.

  17. Unsafe coulomb excitation of {sup 240-244}Pu.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhoever, I.

    1998-12-01

    The high spin states of {sup 240}Pu and {sup 244}Pu have been investigated with GAMMASPHERE at ATLAS, using Coulomb excitation with a {sup 208}Pb beam at energies above the Coulomb barrier. Data on a transfer channel leading to {sup 242}Pu were obtained as well. In the case of {sup 244}Pu, the yrast band was extended to 34{h_bar}, revealing the completed {pi}i{sub 13/2} alignment, a ''first'' for actinide nuclei. The yrast sequence of {sup 242}Pu was also extended to higher spin and a similar backbend was delineated. In contrast, while the ground state band of {sup 240}Pu was measured up to the highest rotational frequencies ever reported in the actinide region ({approximately} 300 keV), no sign of particle alignment was observed. In this case, several observables such as the large B(E1)/B(E2) branching ratios in the negative parity band, and the vanishing energy staggering between the negative and positive parity bands suggest that the strength of octupole correlations increases with rotational frequency. These stronger correlations may well be responsible for delaying or suppressing the {pi}i{sub 13/2} particle alignment.

  18. Study of neutron-deficient isotopes of Fl in the 239Pu, 240Pu + 48Ca reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinov, A. A.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Brewer, N. T.; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Abdullin, F. Sh; Dmitriev, S. N.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Itkis, M. G.; Miernik, K.; Polyakov, A. N.; Roberto, J. B.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shumeiko, M. V.; Tsyganov, Yu S.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Sabelnikov, A. V.; Vostokin, G. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Stoyer, M. A.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2016-07-01

    The results of the experiments aimed at the synthesis of Fl isotopes in the 239Pu + 48Ca and 240Pu + 48Ca reactions are presented. The experiment was performed using the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator at the U400 cyclotron. In the 239Pu+48Ca experiment one decay of spontaneously fissioning 284Fl was detected at 245-MeV beam energy. In the 240Pu+48Ca experiment three decay chains of 285Fl were detected at 245 MeV and four decays were assigned to 284Fl at the higher 48Ca beam energy of 250 MeV. The α-decay energy of 285Fl was measured for the first time and decay properties of its descendants 281Cn, 277Ds, 273Hs, 269Sg, and 265Rf were determined more precisely. The cross section of the 239Pu(48Ca,3n)284Fl reaction was observed to be about 20 times lower than those predicted by theoretical models and 50 times less than the value measured in the 244Pu+48Ca reaction. The cross sections of the 240Pu(48Ca,4-3n)284,285Fl at both 48Ca energies are similar and exceed that observed in the reaction with lighter isotope 239Pu by a factor of 10. The decay properties of the synthesized nuclei and their production cross sections indicate rapid decrease of stability of superheavy nuclei with departing from the neutron number N=184 predicted to be the next magic number.

  19. Suitability of 239+240Pu and 137Cs as tracers for soil erosion assessment in mountain grasslands.

    PubMed

    Alewell, Christine; Meusburger, Katrin; Juretzko, Gregor; Mabit, Lionel; Ketterer, Michael E

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides have been distributed globally due to nuclear weapons testing, nuclear accidents, nuclear weapons fabrication, and nuclear fuel reprocessing. While the negative consequences of this radioactive contamination are self-evident, the ubiquitous fallout radionuclides (FRNs) distribution form the basis for the use as tracers in ecological studies, namely for soil erosion assessment. Soil erosion is a major threat to mountain ecosystems worldwide. We compare the suitability of the anthropogenic FRNs, 137Cs and 239+240Pu as soil erosion tracers in two alpine valleys of Switzerland (Urseren Valley, Canton Uri, Central Swiss Alps and Val Piora, Ticino, Southern Alps). We sampled reference and potentially erosive sites in transects along both valleys. 137Cs measurements of soil samples were performed with a Li-drifted Germanium detector and 239+240Pu with ICP-MS. Our data indicates a heterogeneous deposition of the 137Cs, since most of the fallout origins from the Chernobyl April/May 1986 accident, when large parts of the European Alps were still snow-covered. In contrast, 239+240Pu fallout originated mainly from 1950s to 1960s atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, resulting in a more homogenous distribution and thus seems to be a more suitable tracer in mountainous grasslands. Soil erosion assessment using 239+240Pu as a tracer pointed to a huge dynamic and high heterogeneity of erosive processes (between sedimentation of 1.9 and 7 t ha(-1) yr(-1) and erosion of 0.2-16.4 t ha(-1) yr(-1) in the Urseren Valley and sedimentation of 0.4-20.3 t ha(-1) yr(-1) and erosion of 0.1-16.4 t ha(-1) yr(-1) at Val Piora). Our study represents a novel and successful application of 239+240Pu as a tracer of soil erosion in a mountain environment. PMID:24374184

  20. Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-15

    This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

  1. Oxygen potential of a prototypic Mo-cermet fuel containing plutonium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Shuhei; Osaka, Masahiko; Nozaki, Takahiro; Arima, Tatsumi; Idemitsu, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    Oxygen potential of a prototypic Mo-cermet fuel containing 50 vol.% PuO2-x were investigated by the thermogravimetric analysis in the temperature range from 1273 K to 1473 K. It was shown that the oxygen potential and oxidation rate of the Mo-cermet were the same as those of pure PuO2-x below the oxygen potential of Mo/MoO2 oxidation reaction. The same features of the Mo-cermet sample containing 50 vol.% PuO2-x with those of pure PuO2-x were discussed in terms of the microstructure.

  2. Incorporation of excess weapons material into the IFR fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hannum, W.H.; Wade, D.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) provides both a diversion resistant closed fuel cycle for commercial power generation and a means of addressing safeguards concerns related to excess nuclear weapons material. Little head-end processing and handling of dismantled warhead materials is required to convert excess weapons plutonium (Pu) to IFR fuel and a modest degree of proliferation protection is available immediately by alloying weapons Pu to an IFR fuel composition. Denaturing similar to that of spent fuel is obtained by short cycle (e.g. 45 day) use in an IFR reactor, by mixing which IFR recycle fuel, or by alloying with other spent fuel constituents. Any of these permanent denaturings could be implemented as soon as an operating IFR and/or an IFR recycle capability of reasonable scale is available. The initial Pu charge generated from weapons excess Pu can then be used as a permanent denatured catalyst, enabling the IFR to efficiently and economically generate power with only a natural or depleted uranium feed. The Pu is thereafter permanently safeguarded until consumed, with essentially none going to a waste repository.

  3. Accident tolerant fuels for LWRs: A perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Terrani, K. A.; Gehin, J. C.; Ott, L. J.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-05-01

    The motivation for exploring the potential development of accident tolerant fuels in light water reactors to replace existing Zr alloy clad monolithic (U, Pu) oxide fuel is outlined. The evaluation includes a brief review of core degradation processes under design-basis and beyond-design-basis transient conditions. Three general strategies for accident tolerant fuels are being explored: modification of current state-of-the-art zirconium alloy cladding to further improve oxidation resistance (including use of coatings), replacement of Zr alloy cladding with an alternative oxidation-resistant high-performance cladding, and replacement of the monolithic ceramic oxide fuel with alternative fuel forms.

  4. Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-09-01

    This short report presents the neutronic analysis to evaluate the impact of fission product impurity on the Pu content of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) metal- and oxide- fuel fabrication. The similar work has been previously done for PWR MOX fuel [1]. The analysis will be performed based on the assumption that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate SFR fuels. Only non-gaseous FPs have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1 of Reference 1). Throughout of this report, we define the mixture of Pu and FPs as PuFP. The main objective of this analysis is to quantify the increase of the Pu content of SFR fuels necessary to maintain the same average burnup at discharge independently of the amount of FP in the Pu stream, i.e. independently of the PuFP composition. The FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

  5. Investigation of the oxidation states of Pu isotopes in a hydrochloric acid solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Kim, J Y; Kim, W H; Jung, E C; Jee, K Y

    2008-12-01

    The characteristics of the oxidation states of Pu in a hydrochloric acid solution were investigated and the results were applied to a separating of Pu isotopes from IAEA reference soils. The oxidation states of Pu(III) and Pu(IV) were prepared by adding hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium nitrite to a Pu stock solution, respectively. Also, the oxidation state of Pu(VI) was adjusted with concentrated HNO(3) and HClO(4). The stability of the various oxidation states of plutonium in a HCl solution with elapsed time after preparation were found to be in the following order: Pu(III) approximately Pu(VI)>Pu(IV)>Pu(V). The chemical recoveries of Pu(IV) in a 9M HCl solution with an anion exchange resin were similar to those of Pu(VI). This method for the determination of Pu isotopes with an anion exchange resin in a 9M HCl medium was applied to IAEA reference soils where the activity concentrations of (239,240)Pu and (238)Pu in IAEA-375 and IAEA-326 were consistent with the reference values reported by the IAEA. PMID:18674920

  6. Further evaluations of the toxicity of irradiated advanced heavy water reactor fuels.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Geoffrey W R; Priest, Nicholas D

    2014-11-01

    The neutron economy and online refueling capability of heavy water moderated reactors enable them to use many different fuel types, such as low enriched uranium, plutonium mixed with uranium, or plutonium and/or U mixed with thorium, in addition to their traditional natural uranium fuel. However, the toxicity and radiological protection methods for fuels other than natural uranium are not well established. A previous paper by the current authors compared the composition and toxicity of irradiated natural uranium to that of three potential advanced heavy water fuels not containing plutonium, and this work uses the same method to compare irradiated natural uranium to three other fuels that do contain plutonium in their initial composition. All three of the new fuels are assumed to incorporate plutonium isotopes characteristic of those that would be recovered from light water reactor fuel via reprocessing. The first fuel investigated is a homogeneous thorium-plutonium fuel designed for a once-through fuel cycle without reprocessing. The second fuel is a heterogeneous thorium-plutonium-U bundle, with graded enrichments of U in different parts of a single fuel assembly. This fuel is assumed to be part of a recycling scenario in which U from previously irradiated fuel is recovered. The third fuel is one in which plutonium and Am are mixed with natural uranium. Each of these fuels, because of the presence of plutonium in the initial composition, is determined to be considerably more radiotoxic than is standard natural uranium. Canadian nuclear safety regulations require that techniques be available for the measurement of 1 mSv of committed effective dose after exposure to irradiated fuel. For natural uranium fuel, the isotope Pu is a significant contributor to the committed effective dose after exposure, and thermal ionization mass spectrometry is sensitive enough that the amount of Pu excreted in urine is sufficient to estimate internal doses, from all isotopes, as low

  7. Ab Initio Enhanced calphad Modeling of Actinide-Rich Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane; Yang, Yong Austin

    2013-10-28

    The process of fuel recycling is central to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), where plutonium and the minor actinides (MA) Am, Np, and Cm are extracted from spent fuel and fabricated into new fuel for a fast reactor. Metallic alloys of U-Pu-Zr-MA are leading candidates for fast reactor fuels and are the current basis for fast spectrum metal fuels in a fully recycled closed fuel cycle. Safe and optimal use of these fuels will require knowledge of their multicomponent phase stability and thermodynamics (Gibbs free energies). In additional to their use as nuclear fuels, U-Pu-Zr-MA contain elements and alloy phases that pose fundamental questions about electronic structure and energetics at the forefront of modern many-body electron theory. This project will validate state-of-the-art electronic structure approaches for these alloys and use the resulting energetics to model U-Pu-Zr-MA phase stability. In order to keep the work scope practical, researchers will focus on only U-Pu-Zr-{Np,Am}, leaving Cm for later study. The overall objectives of this project are to: Provide a thermodynamic model for U-Pu-Zr-MA for improving and controlling reactor fuels; and, Develop and validate an ab initio approach for predicting actinide alloy energetics for thermodynamic modeling.

  8. Determination of plutonium content in TRR spent fuel by nondestructive neutron counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Fu; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Chiao, Ling-Huan; Yuan, Ming-Chen; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2010-07-01

    For the nuclear safeguard purpose, this work aims to nondestructively determine the plutonium content in the Taiwan Research Reactor (TRR) spent fuel rods in the storage pool before the stabilization process, which transforms the metal spent fuel rods into oxide powder. A SPent-fuel-Neutron-Counter (SPNC) system was designed and constructed to carry out underwater scan measurements of neutrons emitting from the spent fuel rod, from which the 240Pu mass in the fuel rod will be determined. The SAS2 H control module of the SCALE 5.1 code package was applied to calculate the 240Pu-to-Pu mass ratio in the TRR spent fuel rod according to the given power history. This paper presents the methodology and design of our detector system as well as the measurements of four TRR spent fuel rods in the storage pool and the comparison of the measured results with the facility declared values.

  9. Complexation Behavior of the Tri-n-butyl Phosphate Ligand with Pu(IV) and Zr(IV): A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Gopakumar, Gopinadhanpillai; Sreenivasulu, B; Suresh, A; Brahmmananda Rao, C V S; Sivaraman, N; Joseph, M; Anoop, Anakuthil

    2016-06-23

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), used as the extractant in nuclear fuel reprocessing, shows superior extraction abilities for Pu(IV) over a large number of fission products including Zr(IV). We have applied density functional theory (DFT) calculations to explain this selectivity by investigating differences in electronic structures of Pu(NO3)4·2TBP and Zr(NO3)4·2TBP complexes. On the basis of our quantum chemical calculations, we have established the lowest energy electronic states for both complexes; the quintet is the ground state for the former, whereas the latter exists in the singlet spin state. The calculated structural parameters for the optimized geometry of the plutonium complex are in agreement with the experimental results. Atoms in Molecules analysis revealed a considerable amount of ionic character to M-O{TBP} and M-O{NO3} bonds. Additionally, we have also investigated the extraction behavior of TBP for metal nitrates and have estimated the extraction energies to be -73.1 and -57.6 kcal/mol for Pu(IV) and Zr(IV), respectively. The large extraction energy of Pu(IV) system is in agreement with the observed selectivity in the extraction of Pu. PMID:27248966

  10. The depth distribution of sup 90 Sr, sup 137 Cs, and sup 239,240 Pu in soil profile samples

    SciTech Connect

    Price, K.R.

    1989-04-01

    A special study was conducted at the Hanford Site and vicinity to investigate the depth distribution of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 239,240}Pu in soil at two locations. Duplicate sets of samples were collected at each location from the soil surface to a depth of 30 cm in increments of 2.5 cm. Results from an onsite location near a retired nuclear fuel reprocessing facility were compared to results from a background location upwind and distant from the Site. The study showed that, regardless of location, the top 5 cm of soil contained 51 to 74% of the {sup 90}Sr, 99% of the {sup 137}Cs, and 96% of the {sup 239,240}Pu. Soil at the background location received radionuclides only from deposition of worldwide fallout, and averaged 1.6 pCi/cm{sup 2} of {sup 90}Sr, 3.0 pCi/cm{sup 2} of {sup 137}Cs, and 0.071 pCi/cm{sup 2} of {sup 239,240}Pu. Soil at the onsite location received radionuclides from deposition of both worldwide fallout and past operations of the retired fuel reprocessing facility and contained 4 times as much {sup 90}Sr, 5 times as much {sup 137}Cs, and 44 times as much {sup 239,240}Pu as the background location. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory is operated for the US Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute under Contract AC06-76RLO1830.) 8 refs., 2 figs.