Science.gov

Sample records for public dna databases

  1. Public participation in genetic databases: crossing the boundaries between biobanks and forensic DNA databases through the principle of solidarity.

    PubMed

    Machado, Helena; Silva, Susana

    2015-10-01

    The ethical aspects of biobanks and forensic DNA databases are often treated as separate issues. As a reflection of this, public participation, or the involvement of citizens in genetic databases, has been approached differently in the fields of forensics and medicine. This paper aims to cross the boundaries between medicine and forensics by exploring the flows between the ethical issues presented in the two domains and the subsequent conceptualisation of public trust and legitimisation. We propose to introduce the concept of 'solidarity', traditionally applied only to medical and research biobanks, into a consideration of public engagement in medicine and forensics. Inclusion of a solidarity-based framework, in both medical biobanks and forensic DNA databases, raises new questions that should be included in the ethical debate, in relation to both health services/medical research and activities associated with the criminal justice system. PMID:26139851

  2. Public participation in genetic databases: crossing the boundaries between biobanks and forensic DNA databases through the principle of solidarity

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Helena; Silva, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The ethical aspects of biobanks and forensic DNA databases are often treated as separate issues. As a reflection of this, public participation, or the involvement of citizens in genetic databases, has been approached differently in the fields of forensics and medicine. This paper aims to cross the boundaries between medicine and forensics by exploring the flows between the ethical issues presented in the two domains and the subsequent conceptualisation of public trust and legitimisation. We propose to introduce the concept of ‘solidarity’, traditionally applied only to medical and research biobanks, into a consideration of public engagement in medicine and forensics. Inclusion of a solidarity-based framework, in both medical biobanks and forensic DNA databases, raises new questions that should be included in the ethical debate, in relation to both health services/medical research and activities associated with the criminal justice system. PMID:26139851

  3. About DNA databasing and investigative genetic analysis of externally visible characteristics: A public survey.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Martin; Utz, Silvia

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade, DNA profiling and the use of DNA databases have become two of the most employed instruments of police investigations. This very rapid establishment of forensic genetics is yet far from being complete. In the last few years novel types of analyses have been presented to describe phenotypically a possible perpetrator. We conducted the present study among German speaking Swiss residents for two main reasons: firstly, we aimed at getting an impression of the public awareness and acceptance of the Swiss DNA database and the perception of a hypothetical DNA database containing all Swiss residents. Secondly, we wanted to get a broader picture of how people that are not working in the field of forensic genetics think about legal permission to establish phenotypic descriptions of alleged criminals by genetic means. Even though a significant number of study participants did not even know about the existence of the Swiss DNA database, its acceptance appears to be very high. Generally our results suggest that the current forensic use of DNA profiling is considered highly trustworthy. However, the acceptance of a hypothetical universal database would be only as low as about 30% among the 284 respondents to our study, mostly because people are concerned about the security of their genetic data, their privacy or a possible risk of abuse of such a database. Concerning the genetic analysis of externally visible characteristics and biogeographical ancestry, we discover a high degree of acceptance. The acceptance decreases slightly when precise characteristics are presented to the participants in detail. About half of the respondents would be in favor of the moderate use of physical traits analyses only for serious crimes threatening life, health or sexual integrity. The possible risk of discrimination and reinforcement of racism, as discussed by scholars from anthropology, bioethics, law, philosophy and sociology, is mentioned less frequently by the study participants than we would have expected. A national DNA database and the widespread use of DNA analyses for police and justice have an impact on the entire society. Therefore the concerns of lay persons from the respective population should be heard and considered. The aims of this study were to draw a broader picture of the public opinion on DNA databasing and to contribute to the debate about the possible future use of genetics to reveal phenotypic characteristics. Our data might provide an additional perspective for experts involved in regulatory or legislative processes. PMID:26004189

  4. Taxonomic Reliability of DNA Sequences in Public Sequence Databases: A Fungal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, R. Henrik; Ryberg, Martin; Kristiansson, Erik; Abarenkov, Kessy; Larsson, Karl-Henrik; Kõljalg, Urmas

    2006-01-01

    Background DNA sequences are increasingly seen as one of the primary information sources for species identification in many organism groups. Such approaches, popularly known as barcoding, are underpinned by the assumption that the reference databases used for comparison are sufficiently complete and feature correctly and informatively annotated entries. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study uses a large set of fungal DNA sequences from the inclusive International Nucleotide Sequence Database to show that the taxon sampling of fungi is far from complete, that about 20% of the entries may be incorrectly identified to species level, and that the majority of entries lack descriptive and up-to-date annotations. Conclusions The problems with taxonomic reliability and insufficient annotations in public DNA repositories form a tangible obstacle to sequence-based species identification, and it is manifest that the greatest challenges to biological barcoding will be of taxonomical, rather than technical, nature. PMID:17183689

  5. NCCDPHP PUBLICATION DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts of publications produced by the CDC's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) including journal articles, monographs, book chapters, reports, policy documents, and fact sheets. Full...

  6. Enhancing the DNA Patent Database

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, LeRoy B.

    2008-02-18

    Final Report on Award No. DE-FG0201ER63171 Principal Investigator: LeRoy B. Walters February 18, 2008 This project successfully completed its goal of surveying and reporting on the DNA patenting and licensing policies at 30 major U.S. academic institutions. The report of survey results was published in the January 2006 issue of Nature Biotechnology under the title “The Licensing of DNA Patents by US Academic Institutions: An Empirical Survey.” Lori Pressman was the lead author on this feature article. A PDF reprint of the article will be submitted to our Program Officer under separate cover. The project team has continued to update the DNA Patent Database on a weekly basis since the conclusion of the project. The database can be accessed at dnapatents.georgetown.edu. This database provides a valuable research tool for academic researchers, policymakers, and citizens. A report entitled Reaping the Benefits of Genomic and Proteomic Research: Intellectual Property Rights, Innovation, and Public Health was published in 2006 by the Committee on Intellectual Property Rights in Genomic and Protein Research and Innovation, Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy at the National Academies. The report was edited by Stephen A. Merrill and Anne-Marie Mazza. This report employed and then adapted the methodology developed by our research project and quoted our findings at several points. (The full report can be viewed online at the following URL: http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11487&page=R1). My colleagues and I are grateful for the research support of the ELSI program at the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Compressing DNA sequence databases with coil

    PubMed Central

    White, W Timothy J; Hendy, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background Publicly available DNA sequence databases such as GenBank are large, and are growing at an exponential rate. The sheer volume of data being dealt with presents serious storage and data communications problems. Currently, sequence data is usually kept in large "flat files," which are then compressed using standard Lempel-Ziv (gzip) compression – an approach which rarely achieves good compression ratios. While much research has been done on compressing individual DNA sequences, surprisingly little has focused on the compression of entire databases of such sequences. In this study we introduce the sequence database compression software coil. Results We have designed and implemented a portable software package, coil, for compressing and decompressing DNA sequence databases based on the idea of edit-tree coding. coil is geared towards achieving high compression ratios at the expense of execution time and memory usage during compression – the compression time represents a "one-off investment" whose cost is quickly amortised if the resulting compressed file is transmitted many times. Decompression requires little memory and is extremely fast. We demonstrate a 5% improvement in compression ratio over state-of-the-art general-purpose compression tools for a large GenBank database file containing Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data. Finally, coil can efficiently encode incremental additions to a sequence database. Conclusion coil presents a compelling alternative to conventional compression of flat files for the storage and distribution of DNA sequence databases having a narrow distribution of sequence lengths, such as EST data. Increasing compression levels for databases having a wide distribution of sequence lengths is a direction for future work. PMID:18489794

  8. An annotated mtDNA database.

    PubMed

    Röhl, A; Brinkmann, B; Forster, L; Forster, P

    2001-08-01

    We have compiled a database of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region, hypervariable regions 1 (HVR1) and 2 (HVR2) sequences of a total of 14,138 individuals compiled from 103 mtDNA publications before 1 January 2000, 13 data sets published in 2000 and 2001 and 2 unpublished data sets of Iraqi Kurds and Indians from Kerala. By contacting the authors and by other means, we have confirmed and corrected sequence errors, eliminated duplications and harmonised the sequence format. These changes affected all but 26 of the 116 publications. Furthermore, we have implemented a geographic information system ("mtradius") which searches for closest matches to a given mtDNA control region sequence and displays them on a geographic map. A potential application is to estimate a chance matching probability when a forensic stain and a suspect have an identical mtDNA sequence: we suggest that the geographic area with the highest frequency of closely related mtDNA sequence types may be used to define a reference population to give the suspect the maximum benefit of doubt in accordance with the ceiling principle. PMID:11599766

  9. Public database aids drug researchers

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have released ChemBank 2.0, a major upgrade to ChemBank, a publicly available database poised to enhance scientists' capabilities in drug discovery.

  10. Towards Privacy Preserving of Forensic DNA Databases 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Sanmin

    2012-02-14

    Protecting privacy of individuals is critical for forensic genetics. In a kinship/identity testing, related DNA profiles between user's query and the DNA database need to be extracted. However, unrelated profiles cannot be revealed to each other...

  11. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  12. AIDS PUBLIC INFORMATION DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The AIDS Public Information Data Set is computer software designed to run on a Microsoft Windows microcomputer, and contains information abstracted from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases reported in the United States. The data set is created by the Division of HIV/A...

  13. DNA Databases: Uses and Issues

    E-print Network

    ) Fundamentals of Forensic DNA Typing, Figure 1.3 #12;Applications for DNA Testing · Crime solving ­ matching) #12;Quality Results are Essential in Forensic DNA Testing · DNA results impact lives ­ the guilty can locations 268 exonerated as of April 19, 2011 #12;Historical Perspective on DNA Typing 1985 1990 1994 1996

  14. Forensic DNA profiling and database.

    PubMed

    Panneerchelvam, S; Norazmi, M N

    2003-07-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection. PMID:23386793

  15. Database Support for Research in Public Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, James Cory

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which databases support student and faculty research in the area of public administration. A list of journals in public administration, public policy, political science, public budgeting and finance, and other related areas was compared to the journal content list of six business databases. These databases

  16. EMPOP--a forensic mtDNA database.

    PubMed

    Parson, Walther; Dür, Arne

    2007-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA databases stand as the basis for frequency estimations of mtDNA sequences that became relevant in a case. The establishment of mtDNA databases sounds trivial; however, it has been shown in the past that this undertaking is prone to error for several reasons, particularly human error. We have established a concept for mtDNA data generation, analysis, transfer and quality control that meets forensic standards. Due to the complexity of mtDNA population data tables it is often difficult if not impossible to detect errors, especially for the untrained eye. We developed software based on quasi-median network analysis that visualizes mtDNA data tables and thus signposts sequencing, interpretation and transcription errors. The mtDNA data (N=5173; release 1) are stored and made publicly available via the Internet in the form of the EDNAP mtDNA Population Database, short EMPOP. This website also facilitates quasi-median network analysis and provides results that can be used to check the quality of mtDNA sequence data. EMPOP has been launched on 16 October 2006 and is since then available at http://www.empop.org. PMID:19083735

  17. Ethical-legal problems of DNA databases in criminal investigation

    PubMed Central

    Guillen, M.; Lareu, M. V.; Pestoni, C.; Salas, A.; Carracedo, A.

    2000-01-01

    Advances in DNA technology and the discovery of DNA polymorphisms have permitted the creation of DNA databases of individuals for the purpose of criminal investigation. Many ethical and legal problems arise in the preparation of a DNA database, and these problems are especially important when one analyses the legal regulations on the subject. In this paper three main groups of possibilities, three systems, are analysed in relation to databases. The first system is based on a general analysis of the population; the second one is based on the taking of samples for a particular list of crimes, and a third is based only on the specific analysis of each case. The advantages and disadvantages of each system are compared and controversial issues are then examined. We found the second system to be the best choice for Spain and other European countries with a similar tradition when we weighed the rights of an individual against the public's interest in the prosecution of a crime. Key Words: DNA databases • forensic genetics • ethics PMID:10951922

  18. Publications of Australian LIS Academics in Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Concepcion S.; Boell, Sebastian K.; Kennan, Mary Anne; Willard, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines aspects of journal articles published from 1967 to 2008, located in eight databases, and authored or co-authored by academics serving for at least two years in Australian LIS programs from 1959 to 2008. These aspects are: inclusion of publications in databases, publications in journals, authorship characteristics of…

  19. Online Database Searching in Smaller Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roose, Tina

    1983-01-01

    Online database searching experiences of nine Illinois public libraries--Arlington Heights, Deerfield, Elk Grove Village, Evanston, Glenview, Northbrook, Schaumburg Township, Waukegan, Wilmette--are discussed, noting search costs, user charges, popular databases, library acquisition, interaction with users, and staff training. Three sources are…

  20. The Dfam database of repetitive DNA families

    PubMed Central

    Hubley, Robert; Finn, Robert D.; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R.; Jones, Thomas A.; Bao, Weidong; Smit, Arian F.A.; Wheeler, Travis J.

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA, especially that due to transposable elements (TEs), makes up a large fraction of many genomes. Dfam is an open access database of families of repetitive DNA elements, in which each family is represented by a multiple sequence alignment and a profile hidden Markov model (HMM). The initial release of Dfam, featured in the 2013 NAR Database Issue, contained 1143 families of repetitive elements found in humans, and was used to produce more than 100 Mb of additional annotation of TE-derived regions in the human genome, with improved speed. Here, we describe recent advances, most notably expansion to 4150 total families including a comprehensive set of known repeat families from four new organisms (mouse, zebrafish, fly and nematode). We describe improvements to coverage, and to our methods for identifying and reducing false annotation. We also describe updates to the website interface. The Dfam website has moved to http://dfam.org. Seed alignments, profile HMMs, hit lists and other underlying data are available for download. PMID:26612867

  1. The Dfam database of repetitive DNA families.

    PubMed

    Hubley, Robert; Finn, Robert D; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R; Jones, Thomas A; Bao, Weidong; Smit, Arian F A; Wheeler, Travis J

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA, especially that due to transposable elements (TEs), makes up a large fraction of many genomes. Dfam is an open access database of families of repetitive DNA elements, in which each family is represented by a multiple sequence alignment and a profile hidden Markov model (HMM). The initial release of Dfam, featured in the 2013 NAR Database Issue, contained 1143 families of repetitive elements found in humans, and was used to produce more than 100 Mb of additional annotation of TE-derived regions in the human genome, with improved speed. Here, we describe recent advances, most notably expansion to 4150 total families including a comprehensive set of known repeat families from four new organisms (mouse, zebrafish, fly and nematode). We describe improvements to coverage, and to our methods for identifying and reducing false annotation. We also describe updates to the website interface. The Dfam website has moved to http://dfam.org. Seed alignments, profile HMMs, hit lists and other underlying data are available for download. PMID:26612867

  2. Public Opinion Poll Question Databases: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates five polling resource: iPOLL, Polling the Nations, Gallup Brain, Public Opinion Poll Question Database, and Polls and Surveys. Content was evaluated on disclosure standards from major polling organizations, scope on a model for public opinion polls, and presentation on a flow chart discussing search limitations and usability.

  3. DNA HYBRIDIZATION AS A SIMILARITY CRITERION FOR QUERYING DIGITAL SIGNALS STORED IN DNA DATABASES

    E-print Network

    Tsaftaris, Sotirios

    DNA HYBRIDIZATION AS A SIMILARITY CRITERION FOR QUERYING DIGITAL SIGNALS STORED IN DNA DATABASES S USA ABSTRACT We demonstrate via simulation that hybridization of DNA molecules can be used as a similarity criterion for retrieving digital signals encoded and stored in a synthesized DNA database. After

  4. 24 CFR 81.72 - Public-use database and public information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Public-use database and public information. 81.72 ...Information § 81.72 Public-use database and public information. (a) General...available for public use, a public-use database containing public data as defined...

  5. 24 CFR 81.72 - Public-use database and public information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Public-use database and public information. 81.72 ...Information § 81.72 Public-use database and public information. (a) General...available for public use, a public-use database containing public data as defined...

  6. 24 CFR 81.72 - Public-use database and public information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Public-use database and public information. 81.72 ...Information § 81.72 Public-use database and public information. (a) General...available for public use, a public-use database containing public data as defined...

  7. 24 CFR 81.72 - Public-use database and public information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Public-use database and public information. 81.72 ...Information § 81.72 Public-use database and public information. (a) General...available for public use, a public-use database containing public data as defined...

  8. 24 CFR 81.72 - Public-use database and public information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Public-use database and public information. 81.72 ...Information § 81.72 Public-use database and public information. (a) General...available for public use, a public-use database containing public data as defined...

  9. DNA algorithms of implementing biomolecular databases on a biological computer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Weng-Long; Vasilakos, Athanasios V

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, DNA algorithms are proposed to perform eight operations of relational algebra (calculus), which include Cartesian product, union, set difference, selection, projection, intersection, join, and division, on biomolecular relational databases. PMID:25343766

  10. Information Access through Electronic Databases for Rural Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canepi, Kitti

    1997-01-01

    To compile a list of recommended electronic databases for rural libraries, public library patron questions received by the Arizona State Reference Center were searched on ten databases. The results indicated Books in Print, Magazine Database, ABI/INFORM, Public Affairs Information System (PAIS), and Government Printing Office (GPO) Publications

  11. 24 CFR 81.72 - Public-use database and public information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Public-use database and public... Public-use database and public information. (a) General. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, the Secretary shall establish and make available for public use, a public-use database...

  12. 24 CFR 81.72 - Public-use database and public information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public-use database and public... Public-use database and public information. (a) General. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, the Secretary shall establish and make available for public use, a public-use database...

  13. 24 CFR 81.72 - Public-use database and public information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public-use database and public... Public-use database and public information. (a) General. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, the Secretary shall establish and make available for public use, a public-use database...

  14. 24 CFR 81.72 - Public-use database and public information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public-use database and public... Public-use database and public information. (a) General. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, the Secretary shall establish and make available for public use, a public-use database...

  15. 24 CFR 81.72 - Public-use database and public information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public-use database and public... Public-use database and public information. (a) General. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, the Secretary shall establish and make available for public use, a public-use database...

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Forensic DNA databasesEthical and legal

    E-print Network

    Noble, William Stafford

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Forensic DNA databases­Ethical and legal standards: A global review H.M. Wallace a; Human rights; Ethics; Quality assurance; Data protection Abstract Background: The Forensic Genetics to prevent miscarriages of justice; (3) ongoing debate regarding the appropriate safeguards for DNA

  17. The Availability of Faculty Publication Databases from Library Web Pages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blummer, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    Faculty publication databases or author bibliographies offer libraries an opportunity to provide services to users. Initially, these databases remained initiatives of special libraries in the health-sciences fields. Librarians used the publication information derived from these databases to compile lists for annual reports. However, the advent of…

  18. Familial Searching of Forensic DNA Databases

    E-print Network

    database to identify possible close relatives of the true offender · For no suspect cases, cold cases Pr(2 alleles) = 0 Probability of sharing alleles from a common ancestor (per locus) 1 allele shared) = 1/4 Probability of sharing alleles from a common ancestor (per locus) Single locus example F M C1 C2

  19. The Human Variome Project: ensuring the quality of DNA variant databases in inherited renal disease.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Dalgleish, Raymond; Cotton, Richard Gh; den Dunnen, Johan T; Macrae, Finlay; Povey, Sue

    2015-11-01

    A recent review identified 60 common inherited renal diseases caused by DNA variants in 132 different genes. These diseases can be diagnosed with DNA sequencing, but each gene probably also has a thousand normal variants. Many more normal variants have been characterised by individual laboratories than are reported in the literature or found in publicly accessible collections. At present, testing laboratories must assess each novel change they identify for pathogenicity, even when this has been done elsewhere previously, and the distinction between normal and disease-associated variants is particularly an issue with the recent surge in exomic sequencing and gene discovery projects. The Human Variome Project recommends the establishment of gene-specific DNA variant databases to facilitate the sharing of DNA variants and decisions about likely disease causation. Databases improve diagnostic accuracy and testing efficiency, and reduce costs. They also help with genotype-phenotype correlations and predictive algorithms. The Human Variome Project advocates databases that use standardised descriptions, are up-to-date, include clinical information and are freely available. Currently, the genes affected in the most common inherited renal diseases correspond to 350 different variant databases, many of which are incomplete or have insufficient clinical details for genotype-phenotype correlations. Assistance is needed from nephrologists to maximise the usefulness of these databases for the diagnosis and management of inherited renal disease. PMID:25384529

  20. 76 FR 1137 - Publicly Available Consumer Product Safety Information Database: Notice of Public Web Conferences

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ...Information Database: Notice of Public Web Conferences AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety...or ``we'') is announcing two Web conferences to demonstrate to interested...information database (``Database''). The Web conferences will be webcast live from...

  1. Exploration of the Chemical Space of Public Genomic Databases

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current project aims to chemically index the content of public genomic databases to make these data accessible in relation to other publicly available, chemically-indexed toxicological information.

  2. Building a Microforms Database at the New York Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Wendy

    1990-01-01

    Discusses some problems in accessing the microform collection of the Research Libraries of the New York Public Library using the library's printed and online catalogs. Creation of an in-house automated microforms database is described, including software, selection and downloading of records, updating, and searching the database. (MES)

  3. 75 FR 29155 - Publicly Available Consumer Product Safety Information Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ...The Consumer Product Safety Commission (``Commission,'' ``CPSC,'' or ``we'') is issuing a notice of proposed rulemaking that would establish a publicly available consumer product safety information database (``database''). Section 212 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (``CPSIA'') amended the Consumer Product Safety Act (``CPSA'') to require the Commission to establish and......

  4. Public database aids drug researchers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have released ChemBank 2.0, a major upgrade to ChemBank, a publicly available database poised to enhance scientists' capabilities in drug discovery.

  5. DATABASE LIKELIHOOD RATIOS AND FAMILIAL DNA KLAAS SLOOTEN AND RONALD MEESTER

    E-print Network

    Meester, Ronald

    DATABASE LIKELIHOOD RATIOS AND FAMILIAL DNA SEARCHING KLAAS SLOOTEN AND RONALD MEESTER Abstract. Familial Searching is the process of searching in a DNA database for relatives of a given individual ratio, which is in this context called a Kinship Index. Suppose that the database contains, for a given

  6. Prototype Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies: Branded Food Products Database for Public Health Proof of Concept

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Prototype Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies (Prototype FNDDS) Branded Food Products Database for Public Health is a proof of concept database. The database contains a small selection of food products which is being used to exhibit the approach for incorporation of the Branded Food ...

  7. TFBSshape: a motif database for DNA shape features of transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Zhou, Tianyin; Dror, Iris; Mathelier, Anthony; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are most commonly characterized by the nucleotide preferences at each position of the DNA target. Whereas these sequence motifs are quite accurate descriptions of DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs), proteins recognize DNA as a three-dimensional object. DNA structural features refine the description of TF binding specificities and provide mechanistic insights into protein-DNA recognition. Existing motif databases contain extensive nucleotide sequences identified in binding experiments based on their selection by a TF. To utilize DNA shape information when analysing the DNA binding specificities of TFs, we developed a new tool, the TFBSshape database (available at http://rohslab.cmb.usc.edu/TFBSshape/), for calculating DNA structural features from nucleotide sequences provided by motif databases. The TFBSshape database can be used to generate heat maps and quantitative data for DNA structural features (i.e., minor groove width, roll, propeller twist and helix twist) for 739 TF datasets from 23 different species derived from the motif databases JASPAR and UniPROBE. As demonstrated for the basic helix-loop-helix and homeodomain TF families, our TFBSshape database can be used to compare, qualitatively and quantitatively, the DNA binding specificities of closely related TFs and, thus, uncover differential DNA binding specificities that are not apparent from nucleotide sequence alone. PMID:24214955

  8. Building a Faculty Publications Database: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabaei, Sara; Schaffer, Yitzchak; McMurray, Gregory; Simon, Bashe

    2013-01-01

    This case study shares the experience of building an in-house faculty publications database that was spearheaded by the Touro College and University System library in 2010. The project began with the intention of contributing to the college by collecting the research accomplishments of our faculty and staff, thereby also increasing library…

  9. High-throughput STR analysis for DNA database using direct PCR.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jeong Eun; Park, Su Jeong; Lee, Han Chul; Kim, Se-Yong; Kim, Jong Yeol; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2013-07-01

    Since the Korean criminal DNA database was launched in 2010, we have focused on establishing an automated DNA database profiling system that analyzes short tandem repeat loci in a high-throughput and cost-effective manner. We established a DNA database profiling system without DNA purification using a direct PCR buffer system. The quality of direct PCR procedures was compared with that of conventional PCR system under their respective optimized conditions. The results revealed not only perfect concordance but also an excellent PCR success rate, good electropherogram quality, and an optimal intra/inter-loci peak height ratio. In particular, the proportion of DNA extraction required due to direct PCR failure could be minimized to <3%. In conclusion, the newly developed direct PCR system can be adopted for automated DNA database profiling systems to replace or supplement conventional PCR system in a time- and cost-saving manner. PMID:23683293

  10. A publication database for optical long baseline interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbet, Fabien; Mella, Guillaume; Lawson, Peter; Taillifet, Esther; Lafrasse, Sylvain

    2010-07-01

    Optical long baseline interferometry is a technique that has generated almost 850 refereed papers to date. The targets span a large variety of objects from planetary systems to extragalactic studies and all branches of stellar physics. We have created a database hosted by the JMMC and connected to the Optical Long Baseline Interferometry Newsletter (OLBIN) web site using MySQL and a collection of XML or PHP scripts in order to store and classify these publications. Each entry is defined by its ADS bibcode, includes basic ADS informations and metadata. The metadata are specified by tags sorted in categories: interferometric facilities, instrumentation, wavelength of operation, spectral resolution, type of measurement, target type, and paper category, for example. The whole OLBIN publication list has been processed and we present how the database is organized and can be accessed. We use this tool to generate statistical plots of interest for the community in optical long baseline interferometry.

  11. Forensic DNA databases in Western Balkan region: retrospectives, perspectives, and initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Marjanovi?, Damir; Konjhodži?, Rijad; Butorac, Sara Sanela; Drobni?, Katja; Merkaš, Siniša; Lauc, Gordan; Primorac, Damir; An?elinovi?, Šimun; Milosavljevi?, Mladen; Karan, Željko; Vidovi?, Stojko; Stojkovi?, Oliver; Pani?, Bojana; Vu?eti? Dragovi?, An?elka; Kova?evi?, Sandra; Jakovski, Zlatko; Asplen, Chris; Primorac, Dragan

    2011-01-01

    The European Network of Forensic Science Institutes (ENFSI) recommended the establishment of forensic DNA databases and specific implementation and management legislations for all EU/ENFSI members. Therefore, forensic institutions from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, and Macedonia launched a wide set of activities to support these recommendations. To assess the current state, a regional expert team completed detailed screening and investigation of the existing forensic DNA data repositories and associated legislation in these countries. The scope also included relevant concurrent projects and a wide spectrum of different activities in relation to forensics DNA use. The state of forensic DNA analysis was also determined in the neighboring Slovenia and Croatia, which already have functional national DNA databases. There is a need for a ‘regional supplement’ to the current documentation and standards pertaining to forensic application of DNA databases, which should include regional-specific preliminary aims and recommendations. PMID:21674821

  12. 76 FR 1137 - Publicly Available Consumer Product Safety Information Database: Notice of Public Web Conferences

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... site. In the Federal Register of December 9, 2010 (75 FR 76832), we published a final rule to establish... COMMISSION Publicly Available Consumer Product Safety Information Database: Notice of Public Web Conferences... Commission (``Commission,'' ``CPSC,'' or ``we'') is announcing two Web conferences to demonstrate...

  13. UniPROBE: an online database of protein binding microarray data on protein–DNA interactions

    E-print Network

    Bulyk, Martha L.

    The UniPROBE (Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation) database hosts data generated by universal protein binding microarray (PBM) technology on the in vitro DNA-binding specificities of proteins. ...

  14. The effect of wild card designations and rare alleles in forensic DNA database searches.

    PubMed

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Bright, Jo-Anne; Buckleton, John S; Curran, James M; Morling, Niels

    2015-05-01

    Forensic DNA databases are powerful tools used for the identification of persons of interest in criminal investigations. Typically, they consist of two parts: (1) a database containing DNA profiles of known individuals and (2) a database of DNA profiles associated with crime scenes. The risk of adventitious or chance matches between crimes and innocent people increases as the number of profiles within a database grows and more data is shared between various forensic DNA databases, e.g. from different jurisdictions. The DNA profiles obtained from crime scenes are often partial because crime samples may be compromised in quantity or quality. When an individual's profile cannot be resolved from a DNA mixture, ambiguity is introduced. A wild card, F, may be used in place of an allele that has dropped out or when an ambiguous profile is resolved from a DNA mixture. Variant alleles that do not correspond to any marker in the allelic ladder or appear above or below the extent of the allelic ladder range are assigned the allele designation R for rare allele. R alleles are position specific with respect to the observed/unambiguous allele. The F and R designations are made when the exact genotype has not been determined. The F and R designation are treated as wild cards for searching, which results in increased chance of adventitious matches. We investigated the probability of adventitious matches given these two types of wild cards. PMID:25576850

  15. DNA Fingerprint Database for Crapemyrtle Cultivar Identification, Hybrid Verification, and Parentage Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to create DNA fingerprints for the Razzle Dazzle® crape myrtle series using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, and compare them with the DNA fingerprints of a database made up of over 50 popular crape myrtle cultivars currently available in the trade. Data consiste...

  16. Using the ADS Database to Study Trends in Astronomical Publication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, E.; Powell, A. L.; French, J. C.; Eichhorn, G.; Kurtz, M. J.; Murray, S. S.

    1996-12-01

    The sociology of astronomical publication has traditionally been studied by looking for publication trends using every paper published in a few selected journals within a few selected years. For example, Abt (1981, PASP, 93, 269) examined the papers published in ApJ, ApJS, AJ, and PASP during the first year of each decade from 1910 to 1980. By analyzing the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) database of astronomical abstracts we can study a large number of issues in the sociology of astronomical publication while including every paper published in a number of refereed astronomy journals during the past twenty years. Although there are articles from more than a thousand journals in the ADS database, seven journals together account for the majority of refereed astronomy and astrophysics papers published in the last two decades. We will be presenting results of a study of astronomical publication trends using papers published in A&A, A&AS, AJ, ApJ, ApJS, MNRAS, and PASP between 1975 and 1995. One of the most interesting trends is the rapid decrease in the fraction of papers with only one author: A&A A&AS AJ ApJ ApJS MNRAS PASP 1975 39% 39% 49% 35% 67% 48% 54% 1985 25% 31% 25% 21% 36% 28% 35% 1995 14% 19% 14% 13% 19% 14% 28% We will also be presenting information about trends in the number of papers published, the length of papers, and the number of authors per paper, with particular emphasis on the recent phenomenon of astronomical papers with fifty or more authors.

  17. GBshape: a genome browser database for DNA shape annotations.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Tianyin; Main, Bradley J; Parker, Stephen C J; Nuzhdin, Sergey V; Tullius, Thomas D; Rohs, Remo

    2015-01-01

    Many regulatory mechanisms require a high degree of specificity in protein-DNA binding. Nucleotide sequence does not provide an answer to the question of why a protein binds only to a small subset of the many putative binding sites in the genome that share the same core motif. Whereas higher-order effects, such as chromatin accessibility, cooperativity and cofactors, have been described, DNA shape recently gained attention as another feature that fine-tunes the DNA binding specificities of some transcription factor families. Our Genome Browser for DNA shape annotations (GBshape; freely available at http://rohslab.cmb.usc.edu/GBshape/) provides minor groove width, propeller twist, roll, helix twist and hydroxyl radical cleavage predictions for the entire genomes of 94 organisms. Additional genomes can easily be added using the GBshape framework. GBshape can be used to visualize DNA shape annotations qualitatively in a genome browser track format, and to download quantitative values of DNA shape features as a function of genomic position at nucleotide resolution. As biological applications, we illustrate the periodicity of DNA shape features that are present in nucleosome-occupied sequences from human, fly and worm, and we demonstrate structural similarities between transcription start sites in the genomes of four Drosophila species. PMID:25326329

  18. The Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD): a database for DNA variations related to inherited disorders and disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Charoute, Hicham; Nahili, Halima; Abidi, Omar; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2014-03-01

    National and ethnic mutation databases provide comprehensive information about genetic variations reported in a population or an ethnic group. In this paper, we present the Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD), a catalogue of genetic data related to diseases identified in the Moroccan population. We used the PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases to identify available articles published until April 2013. The Database is designed and implemented on a three-tier model using Mysql relational database and the PHP programming language. To date, the database contains 425 mutations and 208 polymorphisms found in 301 genes and 259 diseases. Most Mendelian diseases in the Moroccan population follow autosomal recessive mode of inheritance (74.17%) and affect endocrine, nutritional and metabolic physiology. The MGDD database provides reference information for researchers, clinicians and health professionals through a user-friendly Web interface. Its content should be useful to improve researches in human molecular genetics, disease diagnoses and design of association studies. MGDD can be publicly accessed at http://mgdd.pasteur.ma. PMID:23860041

  19. DNA -- Intimate Information or Trash for Public Consumption?

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Melanie D.

    2008-01-01

    This essay discusses the increasingly popular police practice of covertly collecting DNA samples from people who inadvertently leave saliva, hair or other biological matter in public places. The essay contends that although the United States Supreme...

  20. Exploring public databases to characterize urban flood risks in Amsterdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Santiago; ten Veldhuis, Marie-claire; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Cities worldwide are challenged by increasing urban flood risks. Precise and realistic measures are required to decide upon investment to reduce their impacts. Obvious flooding factors affecting flood risk include sewer systems performance and urban topography. However, currently implemented sewer and topographic models do not provide realistic predictions of local flooding occurrence during heavy rain events. Assessing other factors such as spatially distributed rainfall and socioeconomic characteristics may help to explain probability and impacts of urban flooding. Several public databases were analyzed: complaints about flooding made by citizens, rainfall depths (15 min and 100 Ha spatio-temporal resolution), grids describing number of inhabitants, income, and housing price (1Ha and 25Ha resolution); and buildings age. Data analysis was done using Python and GIS programming, and included spatial indexing of data, cluster analysis, and multivariate regression on the complaints. Complaints were used as a proxy to characterize flooding impacts. The cluster analysis, run for all the variables except the complaints, grouped part of the grid-cells of central Amsterdam into a highly differentiated group, covering 10% of the analyzed area, and accounting for 25% of registered complaints. The configuration of the analyzed variables in central Amsterdam coincides with a high complaint count. Remaining complaints were evenly dispersed along other groups. An adjusted R2 of 0.38 in the multivariate regression suggests that explaining power can improve if additional variables are considered. While rainfall intensity explained 4% of the incidence of complaints, population density and building age significantly explained around 20% each. Data mining of public databases proved to be a valuable tool to identify factors explaining variability in occurrence of urban pluvial flooding, though additional variables must be considered to fully explain flood risk variability.

  1. Generation and analysis of a 29,745 unique Expressed Sequence Tags from the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) assembled into a publicly accessible database: the GigasDatabase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although bivalves are among the most-studied marine organisms because of their ecological role and economic importance, very little information is available on the genome sequences of oyster species. This report documents three large-scale cDNA sequencing projects for the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas initiated to provide a large number of expressed sequence tags that were subsequently compiled in a publicly accessible database. This resource allowed for the identification of a large number of transcripts and provides valuable information for ongoing investigations of tissue-specific and stimulus-dependant gene expression patterns. These data are crucial for constructing comprehensive DNA microarrays, identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites in coding regions, and for identifying genes when the entire genome sequence of C. gigas becomes available. Description In the present paper, we report the production of 40,845 high-quality ESTs that identify 29,745 unique transcribed sequences consisting of 7,940 contigs and 21,805 singletons. All of these new sequences, together with existing public sequence data, have been compiled into a publicly-available Website http://public-contigbrowser.sigenae.org:9090/Crassostrea_gigas/index.html. Approximately 43% of the unique ESTs had significant matches against the SwissProt database and 27% were annotated using Gene Ontology terms. In addition, we identified a total of 208 in silico microsatellites from the ESTs, with 173 having sufficient flanking sequence for primer design. We also identified a total of 7,530 putative in silico, single-nucleotide polymorphisms using existing and newly-generated EST resources for the Pacific oyster. Conclusion A publicly-available database has been populated with 29,745 unique sequences for the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The database provides many tools to search cleaned and assembled ESTs. The user may input and submit several filters, such as protein or nucleotide hits, to select and download relevant elements. This database constitutes one of the most developed genomic resources accessible among Lophotrochozoans, an orphan clade of bilateral animals. These data will accelerate the development of both genomics and genetics in a commercially-important species with the highest annual, commercial production of any aquatic organism. PMID:19640306

  2. Flexible and Publicly Verifiable Aggregation Query for Outsourced Databases in Cloud

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Flexible and Publicly Verifiable Aggregation Query for Outsourced Databases in Cloud Jiawei Yuan--For securing databases outsourced to the cloud, it is important to allow cloud users to verify that their queries to the cloud-hosted databases are correctly executed by the cloud. Existing solutions

  3. 75 FR 29155 - Publicly Available Consumer Product Safety Information Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ...information. Two commenters were concerned about Web-based robots spamming the database, and one suggested a security feature...numbers appearing on screen) to ensure that an automated ``robot'' is not spamming the database with bogus information....

  4. 3D-footprint: a database for the structural analysis of protein-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    3D-footprint is a living database, updated and curated on a weekly basis, which provides estimates of binding specificity for all protein-DNA complexes available at the Protein Data Bank. The web interface allows the user to: (i) browse DNA-binding proteins by keyword; (ii) find proteins that recognize a similar DNA motif and (iii) BLAST similar DNA-binding proteins, highlighting interface residues in the resulting alignments. Each complex in the database is dissected to draw interface graphs and footprint logos, and two complementary algorithms are employed to characterize binding specificity. Moreover, oligonucleotide sequences extracted from literature abstracts are reported in order to show the range of variant sites bound by each protein and other related proteins. Benchmark experiments, including comparisons with expert-curated databases RegulonDB and TRANSFAC, support the quality of structure-based estimates of specificity. The relevant content of the database is available for download as flat files and it is also possible to use the 3D-footprint pipeline to analyze protein coordinates input by the user. 3D-footprint is available at http://floresta.eead.csic.es/3dfootprint with demo buttons and a comprehensive tutorial that illustrates the main uses of this resource. PMID:19767616

  5. An Internet-Accessible DNA Sequence Database for Identifying Fusaria from Human and Animal Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because less than one-third of clinically relevant fusaria can be accurately identified to species level using phenotypic data (i.e., morphological species recognition), we constructed a three-locus DNA sequence database to facilitate molecular identification of the 69 Fusarium species associated wi...

  6. Prisoners' expectations of the national forensic DNA database: surveillance and reconfiguration of individual rights.

    PubMed

    Machado, Helena; Santos, Filipe; Silva, Susana

    2011-07-15

    In this paper we aim to discuss how Portuguese prisoners know and what they feel about surveillance mechanisms related to the inclusion and deletion of the DNA profiles of convicted criminals in the national forensic database. Through a set of interviews with individuals currently imprisoned we focus on the ways this group perceives forensic DNA technologies. While the institutional and political discourses maintain that the restricted use and application of DNA profiles within the national forensic database protects individuals' rights, the prisoners claim that police misuse of such technologies potentially makes it difficult to escape from surveillance and acts as a mean of reinforcing the stigma of delinquency. The prisoners also argue that additional intensive and extensive use of surveillance devices might be more protective of their own individual rights and might possibly increase potential for exoneration. PMID:21414735

  7. Bioethical Biobanks: Three Concerns in Designing and Using Law Enforcement DNA Identification Databases

    SciTech Connect

    D.H. Kaye

    2006-10-19

    Federal and state law enforcement authorities have amassed large collections of DNA samples and the identifying profiles derived from them. These databases help to identify the guilty and to exonerate the innocent, but as the databanks grow, so do fears about civil liberties. The research reported here discusses three legal and social policy issues that have been raised in regard to these biobanks—the choice of loci to type for identifying individuals, the indefinite retention of DNA samples, and the use of the DNA samples or the identifying profiles for research purposes. It also considers the possible value of the databases for research into the genetics of human behavior and the ethics of using them for this purpose. It rejects the broad claim that such research is inherently unethical but proposes procedures for ensuring that the value of the proposed research justifies any psychosocial or other risks to the subjects of the research.

  8. DNA banking and DNA databanking: Legal, ethical, and public policy issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R.; McEwen, J.E.; Lawyer, J.D.; Small, D.

    1997-04-30

    The purpose of this research was to provide support to enable the authors to: (1) perform legal and empirical research and critically analyze DNA banking and DNA databanking as those activities are conducted by state forensic laboratories, the military, academic researchers, and commercial enterprises; and (2) develop a broadcast quality educational videotape for viewing by the general public about DNA technology and the privacy and related issues that it raises. The grant thus had both a research and analysis component and a public education component. This report outlines the work completed under the project.

  9. angaGEDUCI: Anopheles gambiae gene expression database with integrated comparative algorithms for identifying conserved DNA motifs in promoter sequences.

    E-print Network

    Dissanayake, Sumudu N; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Ribeiro, Jose Marcos C; James, Anthony A

    2006-01-01

    DNA sequence comparison algorithms to pro- vide insight into gene expressionDNA sequence motifs After clustering genes into gene sets that show similar pat- terns of expression,gene expression database with integrated comparative algorithms for identifying conserved DNA motifs in promoter sequences

  10. angaGEDUCI: Anopheles gambiae gene expression database with integrated comparative algorithms for identifying conserved DNA motifs in promoter sequences

    E-print Network

    Dissanayake, Sumudu N; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Ribeiro, Jose C; James, Anthony A

    2006-01-01

    DNA sequence comparison algorithms to pro- vide insight into gene expressionDNA sequence motifs After clustering genes into gene sets that show similar pat- terns of expression,gene expression database with integrated comparative algorithms for identifying conserved DNA motifs in promoter sequences

  11. Creation of a New, Public Global Circuit Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, B.; Bering, E. A.; Reddell, B.; Burns, G. B.; Troshichev, O. A.; Frank-Kamenetsky, A. V.

    2004-12-01

    For over a century, atmospheric electricity data has been collected from all over the world, as well as from space. For the last thirty years, Antarctica has been the observatory site of choice for atmospheric electricity studies. The primary difficulties researchers have faced when analyzing these data are both data collection, and acquiring data collected by others in formats easily used. Recently, a project was undertaken to consolidate all these data and make them easily available to the general public in a few "universal" formats via the Internet. A poll was taken to determine what format(s) would be the best ``universal'' formats to use. It was determined ASCII and NetCDF formats would best suit likely researchers. FLATDBMS, (an old but still used format appreciated by old-timers within the community), was also considered viable enough to preserve, with translation of the floating-point format from VAX D_Float to the IEEE 754 representation. Thoth, the server housing these data, is populated with 200Gbyte drives for a total storage capacity of 3.4 TB. It is currently configured to have a total working capacity of 2.5TB, with 1.25 TB reserved for atmospheric electricity data. The URL of this database is http://globalcircuit.phys.uh.edu/. This server has been used to archive data in the above-mentioned formats. The data archived as of September 2004 are South Pole measurements taken from 1991-1993 and Vostok Station measurements taken 1998-2002. Given time and community cooperation, eventually all long term atmospheric electricity measurements that can be found and converted will be consolidated onto this website in these universal formats, ready for all researchers to utilize at a moments notice. The site is now ready to accept contributions and submissions of additional data.

  12. Development and Evaluation of a Quality-Controlled Ribosomal Sequence Database for 16S Ribosomal DNA-Based Identification of Staphylococcus Species

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Karsten; Harmsen, Dag; Mellmann, Alexander; Meier, Christian; Schumann, Peter; Peters, Georg; von Eiff, Christof

    2004-01-01

    To establish an improved ribosomal gene sequence database as part of the Ribosomal Differentiation of Microorganisms (RIDOM) project and to overcome the drawbacks of phenotypic identification systems and publicly accessible sequence databases, both strands of the 5? end of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of 81 type and reference strains comprising all validly described staphylococcal (sub)species were sequenced. Assuming a normal distribution for pairwise distances of all unique staphylococcal sequences and choosing a reporting criterion of ?98.7% similarity for a “distinct species,” a statistical error probability of 1.0% was calculated. To evaluate this database, a 16S rDNA fragment (corresponding to Escherichia coli positions 54 to 510) of 55 clinical Staphylococcus isolates (including those of the small-colony variant phenotype) were sequenced and analyzed by the RIDOM approach. Of these isolates, 54 (98.2%) had a similarity score above the proposed threshold using RIDOM; 48 (87.3%) of the sequences gave a perfect match, whereas 83.6% were found by searching National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database entries. In contrast to RIDOM, which showed four ambiguities at the species level (mainly concerning Staphylococcus intermedius versus Staphylococcus delphini), the NCBI database search yielded 18 taxon-related ambiguities and showed numerous matches exhibiting redundant or unspecified entries. Comparing molecular results with those of biochemical procedures, ID 32 Staph (bioMérieux, Marcy I'Etoile, France) and VITEK 2 (bioMérieux) failed to identify 13 (23.6%) and 19 (34.5%) isolates, respectively, due to incorrect identification and/or categorization below acceptable values. In contrast to phenotypic methods and the NCBI database, the novel high-quality RIDOM sequence database provides excellent identification of staphylococci, including rarely isolated species and phenotypic variants. PMID:15528685

  13. DSSTOX WEBSITE LAUNCH: IMPROVING PUBLIC ACCESS TO DATABASES FOR BUILDING STRUCTURE-TOXICITY PREDICTION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    DSSTox Website Launch: Improving Public Access to Databases for Building Structure-Toxicity Prediction Models
    Ann M. Richard
    US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA

    Distributed: Decentralized set of standardized, field-delimited databases,...

  14. DNA Identification of Mountain Lions Involved in Livestock Predation and Public Safety Incidents and Investigations

    E-print Network

    Ernest, Holly

    1 DNA Identification of Mountain Lions Involved in Livestock Predation and Public Safety Incidents concolor, bobcat, forensic, genetics, DNA techniques, noninvasive sampling, fecal DNA, prey swab DNA ABSTRACT Using three case studies, we demonstrated the utility of techniques to analyze DNA from trace

  15. 75 FR 76831 - Publicly Available Consumer Product Safety Information Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... available database. On May 24, 2010, we published a notice of proposed rulemaking at 75 FR 29156, which set... stakeholder input and comment, all of which were discussed in the preamble to the proposed rule at 75 FR 29156... (75 FR 29156, May 24, 2010) pertaining to each section. In addition to comments on each of...

  16. Geographical Analysis of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Japan Utilizing Publically-Accessible DPC Database

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Since the launch of the novel medical reimbursement system Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) in 2003 in Japan, inpatient data has been accumulated over time as part of a Japanese governmental nationwide database. This is partially accessible by the public, and this study examined the adequacy of this database as epidemiological research material by extracting the data relating to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) with special attention given to the limitations that this involves. Datasets after 2010 are considered suitable for analysis because of the numbers of participating hospitals and the analysis term. Extracting the data by prefecture, those with a continuously high aSAH incidence were Aomori, Iwate, Akita, Yamagata, Kochi and Kumamoto Prefectures, and those with low aSAH incidence were Kanagawa, Shiga, Kyoto, Shimane and Ehime Prefectures. Although these obtained results are informative, a publically-accessible DPC database has several limitations. Some limitations have been resolved: the analyzed term each year is now 12-months and the number of participating hospitals seems to have stabilized around 1700. However, other limitations such as masking the numbers in each hospital reporting less than 10 patients still exist, so careful and critical interpretation is necessary in utilizing a publically-accessible DPC database. Considering the potential of this database as material for epidemiological research, future analysis of the entire DPC database by qualified researchers is desirable. PMID:25811480

  17. BioQ: tracing experimental origins in public genomic databases using a novel data provenance model

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, Scott F.; Quan, Jiaxi; Jones, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Public genomic databases, which are often used to guide genetic studies of human disease, are now being applied to genomic medicine through in silico integrative genomics. These databases, however, often lack tools for systematically determining the experimental origins of the data. Results: We introduce a new data provenance model that we have implemented in a public web application, BioQ, for assessing the reliability of the data by systematically tracing its experimental origins to the original subjects and biologics. BioQ allows investigators to both visualize data provenance as well as explore individual elements of experimental process flow using precise tools for detailed data exploration and documentation. It includes a number of human genetic variation databases such as the HapMap and 1000 Genomes projects. Availability and implementation: BioQ is freely available to the public at http://bioq.saclab.net Contact: ssaccone@wustl.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22426342

  18. Efficient algorithms for the discovery of DNA oligonucleotide barcodes from sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Zahariev, M; Dahl, V; Chen, W; Lévesque, C A

    2009-05-01

    Efficient design of barcode oligonucleotides can lead to significant cost reductions in the manufacturing of DNA arrays. Previous methods are based on either a preliminary alignment, which reduces their efficiency for intron-rich regions, or on a brute force approach, not feasible for large-scale problems or on data structures with very poor performance in the worst case. One of the algorithms we propose uses 'oligonucleotide sorting' for the discovery of oligonucleotide barcodes of given sizes, with good asymptotic performance. Specific barcode oligonucleotides with at least one base difference from other sequences in a database are found for each individual sequence. With another algorithm, specific oligonucleotides can also be found for groups or clades in the database, which have 100% homology for all oligonucleotide sequences within the group or clade while having differences with the rest of the data. By re-organizing the sequences/groups in the database, oligonucleotides for different hierarchical levels can be found. The oligonucleotides or polymorphism locations identified as species or clade specific by the new algorithm are refined and screened further for hybridization thermodynamic properties with third party software. PMID:21564965

  19. The 2008 Public Release of the International Multi-tokamak Confinement Profile Database

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, C M; Walters, M; Budny, R. V.; Murakami, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    This paper documents the public release PR08 of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) profile database, which should be of particular interest to the magnetic confinement fusion community. Data from a wide variety of interesting discharges from many of the world's leading tokamak experiments are now made available in PR08, which also includes predictive simulations of an initial set of operating scenarios for ITER. In this paper we describe the discharges that have been included and the tools that are available to the reader who is interested in accessing and working with the data. Most discharge descriptions refer to more detailed previous publications. In addition, we review physics analyses that have already made use of the profile database discharges. Public access to PR08 data is unconditional, but this paper should be cited by any publication that makes use of PR08 data.

  20. PUBLIC HEALTH AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL DATABASES FOR THE ENHANCEMENT OF MEDICAL EDUCATION

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Qazi Mohammad Sajid; Siddiqui, Mughees Uddin; Alzohairy, Mohammad Abdulrahman; Al Karaawi, Mohammed Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The collaboration of public health education and information technology has made patient care safer and more reliable than before. Nurses and doctors use handheld computers to record a patient's medical history and check that they are administering the correct treatment. Fortunately Public Health Informatics (PHI) is the intersecting point of technology and public health. Therefore, the inclusion of online medical and epidemiology databases in the course curriculum of budding medical professionals and postgraduate students would be beneficial in enhancing the quality of health care, extensive epidemiological research, health education, health policies, health planning and consumer satisfaction as well. The purpose of this article is to discuss and provide introduction of various databases which have huge information and it could be used to enhance the public health education. PMID:26392847

  1. ArrayExpress—a public database of microarray experiments and gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, H.; Kapushesky, M.; Shojatalab, M.; Abeygunawardena, N.; Coulson, R.; Farne, A.; Holloway, E.; Kolesnykov, N.; Lilja, P.; Lukk, M.; Mani, R.; Rayner, T.; Sharma, A.; William, E.; Sarkans, U.; Brazma, A.

    2007-01-01

    ArrayExpress is a public database for high throughput functional genomics data. ArrayExpress consists of two parts—the ArrayExpress Repository, which is a MIAME supportive public archive of microarray data, and the ArrayExpress Data Warehouse, which is a database of gene expression profiles selected from the repository and consistently re-annotated. Archived experiments can be queried by experiment attributes, such as keywords, species, array platform, authors, journals or accession numbers. Gene expression profiles can be queried by gene names and properties, such as Gene Ontology terms and gene expression profiles can be visualized. ArrayExpress is a rapidly growing database, currently it contains data from >50?000 hybridizations and >1?500?000 individual expression profiles. ArrayExpress supports community standards, including MIAME, MAGE-ML and more recently the proposal for a spreadsheet based data exchange format: MAGE-TAB. Availability: . PMID:17132828

  2. Towards a public analysis database for LHC new physics searches using MadAnalysis 5

    E-print Network

    B. Dumont; B. Fuks; S. Kraml; S. Bein; G. Chalons; E. Conte; S. Kulkarni; D. Sengupta; C. Wymant

    2015-01-27

    We present the implementation, in the MadAnalysis 5 framework, of several ATLAS and CMS searches for supersymmetry in data recorded during the first run of the LHC. We provide extensive details on the validation of our implementations and propose to create a public analysis database within this framework.

  3. HEDS - EPA DATABASE SYSTEM FOR PUBLIC ACCESS TO HUMAN EXPOSURE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human Exposure Database System (HEDS) is an Internet-based system developed to provide public access to human-exposure-related data from studies conducted by EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). HEDS was designed to work with the EPA Office of Research and Devel...

  4. Governing Software: Networks, Databases and Algorithmic Power in the Digital Governance of Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the emergence of "digital governance" in public education in England. Drawing on and combining concepts from software studies, policy and political studies, it identifies some specific approaches to digital governance facilitated by network-based communications and database-driven information processing software…

  5. 75 FR 41180 - Notice of Order: Revisions to Enterprise Public Use Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... matrices as set forth in HUD's October 4, 2004 Final Order. See 69 FR 59476. The PUDB matrices are data... Notice of Order: Revisions to Enterprise Public Use Database AGENCY: Federal Housing Finance Agency. ACTION: Notice of order. SUMMARY: Section 1323(a)(1) of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial...

  6. 76 FR 77533 - Notice of Order: Revisions to Enterprise Public Use Database Incorporating High-Cost Single...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... September 28, 2011 at 76 FR 60031, regarding FHFA's adoption of an Order revising FHFA's Public Use Database... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY Notice of Order: Revisions to Enterprise Public Use Database Incorporating High-Cost...

  7. 76 FR 77533 - Notice of Order: Revisions to Enterprise Public Use Database Incorporating High-Cost Single...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...2011-N-13] Notice of Order: Revisions to Enterprise Public Use Database Incorporating High-Cost Single-Family Securitized Loan...FHFA's adoption of an Order revising FHFA's Public Use Database matrices to include certain data fields for high-cost...

  8. Information Technologies in Public Health Management: A Database on Biocides to Improve Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Roman, C; Scripcariu, L; Diaconescu, RM; Grigoriu, A

    2012-01-01

    Background Biocides for prolonging the shelf life of a large variety of materials have been extensively used over the last decades. It has estimated that the worldwide biocide consumption to be about 12.4 billion dollars in 2011, and is expected to increase in 2012. As biocides are substances we get in contact with in our everyday lives, access to this type of information is of paramount importance in order to ensure an appropriate living environment. Consequently, a database where information may be quickly processed, sorted, and easily accessed, according to different search criteria, is the most desirable solution. The main aim of this work was to design and implement a relational database with complete information about biocides used in public health management to improve the quality of life. Methods: Design and implementation of a relational database for biocides, by using the software “phpMyAdmin”. Results: A database, which allows for an efficient collection, storage, and management of information including chemical properties and applications of a large quantity of biocides, as well as its adequate dissemination into the public health environment. Conclusion: The information contained in the database herein presented promotes an adequate use of biocides, by means of information technologies, which in consequence may help achieve important improvement in our quality of life. PMID:23113190

  9. Similarity landscapes: An improved method for scientific visualization of information from protein and DNA database searches

    SciTech Connect

    Dogget, N.; Myers, G.; Wills, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have used computer simulations and examination of a variety of databases to answer questions about a wide range of evolutionary questions. The authors have found that there is a clear distinction in the evolution of HIV-1 and HIV-2, with the former and more virulent virus evolving more rapidly at a functional level. The authors have discovered highly non-random patterns in the evolution of HIV-1 that can be attributed to a variety of selective pressures. In the course of examination of microsatellite DNA (short repeat regions) in microorganisms, the authors have found clear differences between prokaryotes and eukaryotes in their distribution, differences that can be tied to different selective pressures. They have developed a new method (topiary pruning) for enhancing the phylogenetic information contained in DNA sequences. Most recently, the authors have discovered effects in complex rainforest ecosystems that indicate strong frequency-dependent interactions between host species and their parasites, leading to the maintenance of ecosystem variability.

  10. A Two-locus DNA Sequence Database for Typing Plant and Human Pathogens Within the Fusarium oxysporum Species Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We constructed a two-locus database, comprising partial translation elongation factor (EF-1alpha) gene sequences and nearly full-length sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA) for 850 isolates spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex ...

  11. MitoAge: a database for comparative analysis of mitochondrial DNA, with a special focus on animal longevity

    PubMed Central

    Toren, Dmitri; Barzilay, Thomer; Tacutu, Robi; Lehmann, Gilad; Muradian, Khachik K.; Fraifeld, Vadim E.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the only organelles in the animal cells that have their own genome. Due to a key role in energy production, generation of damaging factors (ROS, heat), and apoptosis, mitochondria and mtDNA in particular have long been considered one of the major players in the mechanisms of aging, longevity and age-related diseases. The rapidly increasing number of species with fully sequenced mtDNA, together with accumulated data on longevity records, provides a new fascinating basis for comparative analysis of the links between mtDNA features and animal longevity. To facilitate such analyses and to support the scientific community in carrying these out, we developed the MitoAge database containing calculated mtDNA compositional features of the entire mitochondrial genome, mtDNA coding (tRNA, rRNA, protein-coding genes) and non-coding (D-loop) regions, and codon usage/amino acids frequency for each protein-coding gene. MitoAge includes 922 species with fully sequenced mtDNA and maximum lifespan records. The database is available through the MitoAge website (www.mitoage.org or www.mitoage.info), which provides the necessary tools for searching, browsing, comparing and downloading the data sets of interest for selected taxonomic groups across the Kingdom Animalia. The MitoAge website assists in statistical analysis of different features of the mtDNA and their correlative links to longevity. PMID:26590258

  12. MitoAge: a database for comparative analysis of mitochondrial DNA, with a special focus on animal longevity.

    PubMed

    Toren, Dmitri; Barzilay, Thomer; Tacutu, Robi; Lehmann, Gilad; Muradian, Khachik K; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the only organelles in the animal cells that have their own genome. Due to a key role in energy production, generation of damaging factors (ROS, heat), and apoptosis, mitochondria and mtDNA in particular have long been considered one of the major players in the mechanisms of aging, longevity and age-related diseases. The rapidly increasing number of species with fully sequenced mtDNA, together with accumulated data on longevity records, provides a new fascinating basis for comparative analysis of the links between mtDNA features and animal longevity. To facilitate such analyses and to support the scientific community in carrying these out, we developed the MitoAge database containing calculated mtDNA compositional features of the entire mitochondrial genome, mtDNA coding (tRNA, rRNA, protein-coding genes) and non-coding (D-loop) regions, and codon usage/amino acids frequency for each protein-coding gene. MitoAge includes 922 species with fully sequenced mtDNA and maximum lifespan records. The database is available through the MitoAge website (www.mitoage.org or www.mitoage.info), which provides the necessary tools for searching, browsing, comparing and downloading the data sets of interest for selected taxonomic groups across the Kingdom Animalia. The MitoAge website assists in statistical analysis of different features of the mtDNA and their correlative links to longevity. PMID:26590258

  13. DNA banking and DNA databanking: Legal, ethical, and public policy issues. Progress report, [April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R.; McEwen, J.E.; Small, D.

    1994-02-18

    The purpose of the grant was to provide support to enable us to: (1) perform legal and empirical research and critically analyze DNA banking and DNA databanking as those activities are conducted by state forensic laboratories, the military, academic researchers, and commercial enterprises; and (2) develop a broadcast quality educational videotape for viewing by the general public about DNA technology and the privacy and related issues that it raises. The grant thus has both a research and analysis component and a public education component. This report outlines the work completed since the inception of the project and describes the activities still in progress.

  14. Public Perceptions and Expectations of the Forensic Use of DNA: Results of a Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Cate

    2009-01-01

    The forensic use of Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) is demonstrating significant success as a crime-solving tool. However, numerous concerns have been raised regarding the potential for DNA use to contravene cultural, ethical, and legal codes. In this article the expectations and level of knowledge of the New Zealand public of the DNA data-bank and…

  15. Assessment of Residential History Generation Using a Public-Record Database

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David C.; Wang, Aobo

    2015-01-01

    In studies of disease with potential environmental risk factors, residential location is often used as a surrogate for unknown environmental exposures or as a basis for assigning environmental exposures. These studies most typically use the residential location at the time of diagnosis due to ease of collection. However, previous residential locations may be more useful for risk analysis because of population mobility and disease latency. When residential histories have not been collected in a study, it may be possible to generate them through public-record databases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of a public-records database from LexisNexis to provide residential histories for subjects in a geographically diverse cohort study. We calculated 11 performance metrics comparing study-collected addresses and two address retrieval services from LexisNexis. We found 77% and 90% match rates for city and state and 72% and 87% detailed address match rates with the basic and enhanced services, respectively. The enhanced LexisNexis service covered 86% of the time at residential addresses recorded in the study. The mean match rate for detailed address matches varied spatially over states. The results suggest that public record databases can be useful for reconstructing residential histories for subjects in epidemiologic studies. PMID:26393626

  16. Familial searching: a specialist forensic DNA profiling service utilising the National DNA Database to identify unknown offenders via their relatives--the UK experience.

    PubMed

    Maguire, C N; McCallum, L A; Storey, C; Whitaker, J P

    2014-01-01

    The National DNA Database (NDNAD) of England and Wales was established on April 10th 1995. The NDNAD is governed by a variety of legislative instruments that mean that DNA samples can be taken if an individual is arrested and detained in a police station. The biological samples and the DNA profiles derived from them can be used for purposes related to the prevention and detection of crime, the investigation of an offence and for the conduct of a prosecution. Following the South East Asian Tsunami of December 2004, the legislation was amended to allow the use of the NDNAD to assist in the identification of a deceased person or of a body part where death has occurred from natural causes or from a natural disaster. The UK NDNAD now contains the DNA profiles of approximately 6 million individuals representing 9.6% of the UK population. As the science of DNA profiling advanced, the National DNA Database provided a potential resource for increased intelligence beyond the direct matching for which it was originally created. The familial searching service offered to the police by several UK forensic science providers exploits the size and geographic coverage of the NDNAD and the fact that close relatives of an offender may share a significant proportion of that offender's DNA profile and will often reside in close geographic proximity to him or her. Between 2002 and 2011 Forensic Science Service Ltd. (FSS) provided familial search services to support 188 police investigations, 70 of which are still active cases. This technique, which may be used in serious crime cases or in 'cold case' reviews when there are few or no investigative leads, has led to the identification of 41 perpetrators or suspects. In this paper we discuss the processes, utility, and governance of the familial search service in which the NDNAD is searched for close genetic relatives of an offender who has left DNA evidence at a crime scene, but whose DNA profile is not represented within the NDNAD. We discuss the scientific basis of the familial search approach, other DNA-based methods for eliminating individuals from the candidate lists generated by these NDNAD searches, the value of filtering these lists by age, ethnic appearance and geography and the governance required by the NDNAD Strategy Board when a police force commissions a familial search. We present the FSS data in relation to the utility of the familial searching service and demonstrate the power of the technique by reference to casework examples. We comment on the uptake of familial searching of DNA databases in the USA, the Netherlands, Australia, and New Zealand. Finally, following the adverse ruling by the European Court of Human Rights against the UK in regard to the S & Marper cases and the consequent introduction of the Protection of Freedoms Act (2012), we discuss the impact that changes to regulations concerning the storage of DNA samples will have on the continuing provision of familial searching of the National DNA Database in England and Wales. PMID:24315582

  17. MethBank: a database integrating next-generation sequencing single-base-resolution DNA methylation programming data

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Dong; Sun, Shixiang; Li, Rujiao; Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation plays crucial roles during embryonic development. Here we present MethBank (http://dnamethylome.org), a DNA methylome programming database that integrates the genome-wide single-base nucleotide methylomes of gametes and early embryos in different model organisms. Unlike extant relevant databases, MethBank incorporates the whole-genome single-base-resolution methylomes of gametes and early embryos at multiple different developmental stages in zebrafish and mouse. MethBank allows users to retrieve methylation levels, differentially methylated regions, CpG islands, gene expression profiles and genetic polymorphisms for a specific gene or genomic region. Moreover, it offers a methylome browser that is capable of visualizing high-resolution DNA methylation profiles as well as other related data in an interactive manner and thus is of great helpfulness for users to investigate methylation patterns and changes of gametes and early embryos at different developmental stages. Ongoing efforts are focused on incorporation of methylomes and related data from other organisms. Together, MethBank features integration and visualization of high-resolution DNA methylation data as well as other related data, enabling identification of potential DNA methylation signatures in different developmental stages and accordingly providing an important resource for the epigenetic and developmental studies. PMID:25294826

  18. Novel statistical tools for management of public databases facilitate community-wide replicability and control of false discovery.

    PubMed

    Rosset, Saharon; Aharoni, Ehud; Neuvirth, Hani

    2014-07-01

    Issues of publication bias, lack of replicability, and false discovery have long plagued the genetics community. Proper utilization of public and shared data resources presents an opportunity to ameliorate these problems. We present an approach to public database management that we term Quality Preserving Database (QPD). It enables perpetual use of the database for testing statistical hypotheses while controlling false discovery and avoiding publication bias on the one hand, and maintaining testing power on the other hand. We demonstrate it on a use case of a replication server for GWAS findings, underlining its practical utility. We argue that a shift to using QPD in managing current and future biological databases will significantly enhance the community's ability to make efficient and statistically sound use of the available data resources. PMID:24706571

  19. SBMDb: first whole genome putative microsatellite DNA marker database of sugarbeet for bioenergy and industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Iquebal, Mir Asif; Jaiswal, Sarika; Angadi, U B; Sablok, Gaurav; Arora, Vasu; Kumar, Sunil; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    DNA marker plays important role as valuable tools to increase crop productivity by finding plausible answers to genetic variations and linking the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) of beneficial trait. Prior approaches in development of Short Tandem Repeats (STR) markers were time consuming and inefficient. Recent methods invoking the development of STR markers using whole genomic or transcriptomics data has gained wide importance with immense potential in developing breeding and cultivator improvement approaches. Availability of whole genome sequences and in silico approaches has revolutionized bulk marker discovery. We report world's first sugarbeet whole genome marker discovery having 145?K markers along with 5?K functional domain markers unified in common platform using MySQL, Apache and PHP in SBMDb. Embedded markers and corresponding location information can be selected for desired chromosome, location/interval and primers can be generated using Primer3 core, integrated at backend. Our analyses revealed abundance of 'mono' repeat (76.82%) over 'di' repeats (13.68%). Highest density (671.05 markers/Mb) was found in chromosome 1 and lowest density (341.27 markers/Mb) in chromosome 6. Current investigation of sugarbeet genome marker density has direct implications in increasing mapping marker density. This will enable present linkage map having marker distance of ?2?cM, i.e. from 200 to 2.6?Kb, thus facilitating QTL/gene mapping. We also report e-PCR-based detection of 2027 polymorphic markers in panel of five genotypes. These markers can be used for DUS test of variety identification and MAS/GAS in variety improvement program. The present database presents wide source of potential markers for developing and implementing new approaches for molecular breeding required to accelerate industrious use of this crop, especially for sugar, health care products, medicines and color dye. Identified markers will also help in improvement of bioenergy trait of bioethanol and biogas production along with reaping advantage of crop efficiency in terms of low water and carbon footprint especially in era of climate change.Database URL: http://webapp.cabgrid.res.in/sbmdb/. PMID:26647370

  20. SBMDb: first whole genome putative microsatellite DNA marker database of sugarbeet for bioenergy and industrial applications

    PubMed Central

    Iquebal, Mir Asif; Jaiswal, Sarika; Angadi, U.B.; Sablok, Gaurav; Arora, Vasu; Kumar, Sunil; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    DNA marker plays important role as valuable tools to increase crop productivity by finding plausible answers to genetic variations and linking the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) of beneficial trait. Prior approaches in development of Short Tandem Repeats (STR) markers were time consuming and inefficient. Recent methods invoking the development of STR markers using whole genomic or transcriptomics data has gained wide importance with immense potential in developing breeding and cultivator improvement approaches. Availability of whole genome sequences and in silico approaches has revolutionized bulk marker discovery. We report world’s first sugarbeet whole genome marker discovery having 145?K markers along with 5?K functional domain markers unified in common platform using MySQL, Apache and PHP in SBMDb. Embedded markers and corresponding location information can be selected for desired chromosome, location/interval and primers can be generated using Primer3 core, integrated at backend. Our analyses revealed abundance of ‘mono’ repeat (76.82%) over ‘di’ repeats (13.68%). Highest density (671.05 markers/Mb) was found in chromosome 1 and lowest density (341.27 markers/Mb) in chromosome 6. Current investigation of sugarbeet genome marker density has direct implications in increasing mapping marker density. This will enable present linkage map having marker distance of ?2?cM, i.e. from 200 to 2.6?Kb, thus facilitating QTL/gene mapping. We also report e-PCR-based detection of 2027 polymorphic markers in panel of five genotypes. These markers can be used for DUS test of variety identification and MAS/GAS in variety improvement program. The present database presents wide source of potential markers for developing and implementing new approaches for molecular breeding required to accelerate industrious use of this crop, especially for sugar, health care products, medicines and color dye. Identified markers will also help in improvement of bioenergy trait of bioethanol and biogas production along with reaping advantage of crop efficiency in terms of low water and carbon footprint especially in era of climate change. Database URL: http://webapp.cabgrid.res.in/sbmdb/ PMID:26647370

  1. A spatial national health facility database for public health sector planning in Kenya in 2008

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Abdisalan M; Alegana, Victor A; Gething, Peter W; Snow, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Background Efforts to tackle the enormous burden of ill-health in low-income countries are hampered by weak health information infrastructures that do not support appropriate planning and resource allocation. For health information systems to function well, a reliable inventory of health service providers is critical. The spatial referencing of service providers to allow their representation in a geographic information system is vital if the full planning potential of such data is to be realized. Methods A disparate series of contemporary lists of health service providers were used to update a public health facility database of Kenya last compiled in 2003. These new lists were derived primarily through the national distribution of antimalarial and antiretroviral commodities since 2006. A combination of methods, including global positioning systems, was used to map service providers. These spatially-referenced data were combined with high-resolution population maps to analyze disparity in geographic access to public health care. Findings The updated 2008 database contained 5,334 public health facilities (67% ministry of health; 28% mission and nongovernmental organizations; 2% local authorities; and 3% employers and other ministries). This represented an overall increase of 1,862 facilities compared to 2003. Most of the additional facilities belonged to the ministry of health (79%) and the majority were dispensaries (91%). 93% of the health facilities were spatially referenced, 38% using global positioning systems compared to 21% in 2003. 89% of the population was within 5 km Euclidean distance to a public health facility in 2008 compared to 71% in 2003. Over 80% of the population outside 5 km of public health service providers was in the sparsely settled pastoralist areas of the country. Conclusion We have shown that, with concerted effort, a relatively complete inventory of mapped health services is possible with enormous potential for improving planning. Expansion in public health care in Kenya has resulted in significant increases in geographic access although several areas of the country need further improvements. This information is key to future planning and with this paper we have released the digital spatial database in the public domain to assist the Kenyan Government and its partners in the health sector. PMID:19267903

  2. UniPROBE, update 2011: expanded content and search tools in the online database of protein-binding microarray data on protein–DNA interactions

    E-print Network

    Bulyk, Martha L.

    The Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide-Binding Evaluation (UniPROBE) database is a centralized repository of information on the DNA-binding preferences of proteins as determined by universal protein-binding microarray ...

  3. The Government Finance Database: A Common Resource for Quantitative Research in Public Financial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Kawika; Hand, Michael L.; Thompson, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative public financial management research focused on local governments is limited by the absence of a common database for empirical analysis. While the U.S. Census Bureau distributes government finance data that some scholars have utilized, the arduous process of collecting, interpreting, and organizing the data has led its adoption to be prohibitive and inconsistent. In this article we offer a single, coherent resource that contains all of the government financial data from 1967-2012, uses easy to understand natural-language variable names, and will be extended when new data is available. PMID:26107821

  4. The Government Finance Database: A Common Resource for Quantitative Research in Public Financial Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Kawika; Hand, Michael L; Thompson, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative public financial management research focused on local governments is limited by the absence of a common database for empirical analysis. While the U.S. Census Bureau distributes government finance data that some scholars have utilized, the arduous process of collecting, interpreting, and organizing the data has led its adoption to be prohibitive and inconsistent. In this article we offer a single, coherent resource that contains all of the government financial data from 1967-2012, uses easy to understand natural-language variable names, and will be extended when new data is available. PMID:26107821

  5. A two-locus DNA sequence database for identifying host-specific pathogens and phylogenetic diversity within the Fusarium oxysporum species complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An electronically portable two-locus DNA sequence database, comprising partial sequences of the translation elongation factor gene (EF-1a, 634 bp alignment) and nearly complete sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA, 2220 bp alignment) for 850 isolates spanning the phy...

  6. GABI-Kat SimpleSearch: an Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA mutant database with detailed information for confirmed insertions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Rosso, Mario G; Viehoever, Prisca; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis approaches, especially by T-DNA, play important roles in gene function studies of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. GABI-Kat SimpleSearch (http://www.GABI-Kat.de) is a Flanking Sequence Tag (FST)-based database for T-DNA insertion mutants generated by the GABI-Kat project. Currently, the database contains >108,000 mapped FSTs from approximately 64,000 lines which cover 64% of all annotated A.thaliana protein-coding genes. The web interface allows searching for relevant insertions by gene code, keyword, line identifier, GenBank accession number of the FST, and also by BLAST. A graphic display of the genome region around the gene or the FST assists users to select insertion lines of their interests. About 3500 insertions were confirmed in the offspring of the plant from which the original FST was generated, and the seeds of these lines are available from the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre. The database now also contains additional information such as segregation data, gene-specific primers and confirmation sequences. This information not only helps users to evaluate the usefulness of the mutant lines, but also covers a big part of the molecular characterization of the insertion alleles. PMID:17062622

  7. GABI-Kat SimpleSearch: an Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA mutant database with detailed information for confirmed insertions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Rosso, Mario G.; Viehoever, Prisca; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis approaches, especially by T-DNA, play important roles in gene function studies of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. GABI-Kat SimpleSearch () is a Flanking Sequence Tag (FST)-based database for T-DNA insertion mutants generated by the GABI-Kat project. Currently, the database contains >108 000 mapped FSTs from ?64 000 lines which cover 64% of all annotated A.thaliana protein-coding genes. The web interface allows searching for relevant insertions by gene code, keyword, line identifier, GenBank accession number of the FST, and also by BLAST. A graphic display of the genome region around the gene or the FST assists users to select insertion lines of their interests. About 3500 insertions were confirmed in the offspring of the plant from which the original FST was generated, and the seeds of these lines are available from the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre. The database now also contains additional information such as segregation data, gene-specific primers and confirmation sequences. This information not only helps users to evaluate the usefulness of the mutant lines, but also covers a big part of the molecular characterization of the insertion alleles. PMID:17062622

  8. DNA DNA DNA (d)DNA DNA DNA

    E-print Network

    Hagiya, Masami

    DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA [ 2008] (d)DNA DNA DNA DNA 2 3 DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA (a) (c) (b) (d) #12;DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA (b) DNA [Tanaka et al.2008] DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA #12;iGEM MIT MIT

  9. Documentation for the U.S. Geological Survey Public-Supply Database (PSDB): a database of permitted public-supply wells, surface-water intakes, and systems in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Curtis V.; Maupin, Molly A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the PSDB and explain the methods used to populate and update the data from the SDWIS, State datasets, and map and geospatial imagery. This report describes 3 data tables and 11 domain tables, including field contents, data sources, and relations between tables. Although the PSDB database is not available to the general public, this information should be useful for others who are developing other database systems to store and analyze public-supply system and facility data.

  10. Covariation of the Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes with Country Characteristics Available in Public Databases

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Valencia, Paula Andrea; Bougnères, Pierre; Valleron, Alain-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) in children varies dramatically between countries. Part of the explanation must be sought in environmental factors. Increasingly, public databases provide information on country-to-country environmental differences. Methods Information on the incidence of T1D and country characteristics were searched for in the 194 World Health Organization (WHO) member countries. T1D incidence was extracted from a systematic literature review of all papers published between 1975 and 2014, including the 2013 update from the International Diabetes Federation. The information on country characteristics was searched in public databases. We considered all indicators with a plausible relation with T1D and those previously reported as correlated with T1D, and for which there was less than 5% missing values. This yielded 77 indicators. Four domains were explored: Climate and environment, Demography, Economy, and Health Conditions. Bonferroni correction to correct false discovery rate (FDR) was used in bivariate analyses. Stepwise multiple regressions, served to identify independent predictors of the geographical variation of T1D. Findings T1D incidence was estimated for 80 WHO countries. Forty-one significant correlations between T1D and the selected indicators were found. Stepwise Multiple Linear Regressions performed in the four explored domains indicated that the percentages of variance explained by the indicators were respectively 35% for Climate and environment, 33% for Demography, 45% for Economy, and 46% for Health conditions, and 51% in the Final model, where all variables selected by domain were considered. Significant environmental predictors of the country-to-country variation of T1D incidence included UV radiation, number of mobile cellular subscriptions in the country, health expenditure per capita, hepatitis B immunization and mean body mass index (BMI). Conclusions The increasing availability of public databases providing information in all global environmental domains should allow new analyses to identify further geographical, behavioral, social and economic factors, or indicators that point to latent causal factors of T1D. PMID:25706995

  11. The TTSMI database: a catalog of triplex target DNA sites associated with genes and regulatory elements in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Chew, Chee Siang; Yong, Tai Pang; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Thammasorn, Wimada; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    A triplex target DNA site (TTS), a stretch of DNA that is composed of polypurines, is able to form a triple-helix (triplex) structure with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and is able to influence the site-specific modulation of gene expression and/or the modification of genomic DNA. The co-localization of a genomic TTS with gene regulatory signals and functional genome structures suggests that TFOs could potentially be exploited in antigene strategies for the therapy of cancers and other genetic diseases. Here, we present the TTS Mapping and Integration (TTSMI; http://ttsmi.bii.a-star.edu.sg) database, which provides a catalog of unique TTS locations in the human genome and tools for analyzing the co-localization of TTSs with genomic regulatory sequences and signals that were identified using next-generation sequencing techniques and/or predicted by computational models. TTSMI was designed as a user-friendly tool that facilitates (i) fast searching/filtering of TTSs using several search terms and criteria associated with sequence stability and specificity, (ii) interactive filtering of TTSs that co-localize with gene regulatory signals and non-B DNA structures, (iii) exploration of dynamic combinations of the biological signals of specific TTSs and (iv) visualization of a TTS simultaneously with diverse annotation tracks via the UCSC genome browser. PMID:25324314

  12. Leading-edge forensic DNA analyses and the necessity of including crime scene investigators, police officers and technicians in a DNA elimination database.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Martine; Rogic, Anita; Bourgoin, Sarah; Jolicoeur, Christine; Séguin, Diane

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, sophisticated technology has significantly increased the sensitivity and analytical power of genetic analyses so that very little starting material may now produce viable genetic profiles. This sensitivity however, has also increased the risk of detecting unknown genetic profiles assumed to be that of the perpetrator, yet originate from extraneous sources such as from crime scene workers. These contaminants may mislead investigations, keeping criminal cases active and unresolved for long spans of time. Voluntary submission of DNA samples from crime scene workers is fairly low, therefore we have created a promotional method for our staff elimination database that has resulted in a significant increase in voluntary samples since 2011. Our database enforces privacy safeguards and allows for optional anonymity to all staff members. We also offer information sessions at various police precincts to advise crime scene workers of the importance and success of our staff elimination database. This study, a pioneer in its field, has obtained 327 voluntary submissions from crime scene workers to date, of which 46 individual profiles (14%) have been matched to 58 criminal cases. By implementing our methods and respect for individual privacy, forensic laboratories everywhere may see similar growth and success in explaining unidentified genetic profiles in stagnate criminal cases. PMID:26117338

  13. [Clinical data mining by exploring public MIMIC-II intensive care database].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Zhengbo; Wang, Weidong; Pan, Liang; Chai, Xiaoke

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces a free and publicly open ICU database: multi-parameter intelligent monitoring in intensive care II: MIMIC-II, which has been built up and maintained by the laboratory of computational physiology at the Massachusetts Institute Technology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Philips Healthcare over the past decade. This paper briefly introduces its infrastructure, implementation and applications in clinical studies. Clinical study pertaining to circadian variation in heart rate and blood pressure during sepsis is shown as a typical example of research performed with MIMIC-II. In this study, it was found there was significant difference in circadian variation in both heart rate and blood pressure between survival and non-survival groups in septic patients. This study tackled several important techniques necessary for the investigation of the circadian rhythm. PMID:25980124

  14. GABI-Kat SimpleSearch: new features of the Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA mutant database

    PubMed Central

    Kleinboelting, Nils; Huep, Gunnar; Kloetgen, Andreas; Viehoever, Prisca; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    T-DNA insertion mutants are very valuable for reverse genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. Several projects have generated large sequence-indexed collections of T-DNA insertion lines, of which GABI-Kat is the second largest resource worldwide. User access to the collection and its Flanking Sequence Tags (FSTs) is provided by the front end SimpleSearch (http://www.GABI-Kat.de). Several significant improvements have been implemented recently. The database now relies on the TAIRv10 genome sequence and annotation dataset. All FSTs have been newly mapped using an optimized procedure that leads to improved accuracy of insertion site predictions. A fraction of the collection with weak FST yield was re-analysed by generating new FSTs. Along with newly found predictions for older sequences about 20?000 new FSTs were included in the database. Information about groups of FSTs pointing to the same insertion site that is found in several lines but is real only in a single line are included, and many problematic FST-to-line links have been corrected using new wet-lab data. SimpleSearch currently contains data from ?71?000 lines with predicted insertions covering 62.5% of the 27?206 nuclear protein coding genes, and offers insertion allele-specific data from 9545 confirmed lines that are available from the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre. PMID:22080561

  15. GABI-Kat SimpleSearch: new features of the Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA mutant database.

    PubMed

    Kleinboelting, Nils; Huep, Gunnar; Kloetgen, Andreas; Viehoever, Prisca; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    T-DNA insertion mutants are very valuable for reverse genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. Several projects have generated large sequence-indexed collections of T-DNA insertion lines, of which GABI-Kat is the second largest resource worldwide. User access to the collection and its Flanking Sequence Tags (FSTs) is provided by the front end SimpleSearch (http://www.GABI-Kat.de). Several significant improvements have been implemented recently. The database now relies on the TAIRv10 genome sequence and annotation dataset. All FSTs have been newly mapped using an optimized procedure that leads to improved accuracy of insertion site predictions. A fraction of the collection with weak FST yield was re-analysed by generating new FSTs. Along with newly found predictions for older sequences about 20,000 new FSTs were included in the database. Information about groups of FSTs pointing to the same insertion site that is found in several lines but is real only in a single line are included, and many problematic FST-to-line links have been corrected using new wet-lab data. SimpleSearch currently contains data from ~71,000 lines with predicted insertions covering 62.5% of the 27,206 nuclear protein coding genes, and offers insertion allele-specific data from 9545 confirmed lines that are available from the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre. PMID:22080561

  16. Identification and correction of abnormal, incomplete and mispredicted proteins in public databases

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Alinda; Hegyi, Hédi; Farkas, Krisztina; Tordai, Hedvig; Kozma, Evelin; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite significant improvements in computational annotation of genomes, sequences of abnormal, incomplete or incorrectly predicted genes and proteins remain abundant in public databases. Since the majority of incomplete, abnormal or mispredicted entries are not annotated as such, these errors seriously affect the reliability of these databases. Here we describe the MisPred approach that may provide an efficient means for the quality control of databases. The current version of the MisPred approach uses five distinct routines for identifying abnormal, incomplete or mispredicted entries based on the principle that a sequence is likely to be incorrect if some of its features conflict with our current knowledge about protein-coding genes and proteins: (i) conflict between the predicted subcellular localization of proteins and the absence of the corresponding sequence signals; (ii) presence of extracellular and cytoplasmic domains and the absence of transmembrane segments; (iii) co-occurrence of extracellular and nuclear domains; (iv) violation of domain integrity; (v) chimeras encoded by two or more genes located on different chromosomes. Results Analyses of predicted EnsEMBL protein sequences of nine deuterostome (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Monodelphis domestica, Gallus gallus, Xenopus tropicalis, Fugu rubripes, Danio rerio and Ciona intestinalis) and two protostome species (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) have revealed that the absence of expected signal peptides and violation of domain integrity account for the majority of mispredictions. Analyses of sequences predicted by NCBI's GNOMON annotation pipeline show that the rates of mispredictions are comparable to those of EnsEMBL. Interestingly, even the manually curated UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot dataset is contaminated with mispredicted or abnormal proteins, although to a much lesser extent than UniProtKB/TrEMBL or the EnsEMBL or GNOMON-predicted entries. Conclusion MisPred works efficiently in identifying errors in predictions generated by the most reliable gene prediction tools such as the EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON pipelines and also guides the correction of errors. We suggest that application of the MisPred approach will significantly improve the quality of gene predictions and the associated databases. PMID:18752676

  17. Contamination of cDNA libraries and expressed sequence-tags databases

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, M.; Allikmets, R.

    1995-11-01

    Partially sequenced cDNAs, or expressed sequence tags (ESTs), are claimed to represent an efficient strategy for characterizing an organism`s genes. By necessity, these sequences are incompletely characterized, and examples of contamination of cDNA libraries with sequences from other species have been described. It has been suggested that a Human T-cell cDNA library (Clontech HL1963g) is contaminated by sequences from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and an unknown bacterium. We are characterizing human ESTs that represent new members of the ATP-binding cassette transporter super-family. In examining human ESTs generated from the T-cell library, we have encountered one gene that was in fact a yeast sequence (Genbank Z15214 = SSH2 locus) and several genes that do not hybridize to human DNA or RNA. PCR primers from these sequences failed to amplify a product from human, yeast, or Escherichia coli DNA but did produce a product from a Clontech kidney cDNA library (HL1123a). To determine the source of the contamination, we amplified a conserved segment of the 16S rDNA (following a suggestion from Dr. C. Savakis) from the kidney library. The sequence of this product was nearly identical to that of the bacterium Leuconostoc lactis (300 of 304 bp). Leuconostoc species are commonly found in dairy products, fruits, vegetables, and wine and are nonpathogenic to humans. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Complementary Value of Databases for Discovery of Scholarly Literature: A User Survey of Online Searching for Publications in Art History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemeth, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Discovery of academic literature through Web search engines challenges the traditional role of specialized research databases. Creation of literature outside academic presses and peer-reviewed publications expands the content for scholarly research within a particular field. The resulting body of literature raises the question of whether scholars…

  19. Discovery of possible gene relationships through the application of self-organizing maps to DNA microarray databases.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Alvarez, Rocio; Chavoya, Arturo; Mendez-Vazquez, Andres

    2014-01-01

    DNA microarrays and cell cycle synchronization experiments have made possible the study of the mechanisms of cell cycle regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneously monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes at specific time points. On the other hand, pattern recognition techniques can contribute to the analysis of such massive measurements, providing a model of gene expression level evolution through the cell cycle process. In this paper, we propose the use of one of such techniques--an unsupervised artificial neural network called a Self-Organizing Map (SOM)-which has been successfully applied to processes involving very noisy signals, classifying and organizing them, and assisting in the discovery of behavior patterns without requiring prior knowledge about the process under analysis. As a test bed for the use of SOMs in finding possible relationships among genes and their possible contribution in some biological processes, we selected 282 S. cerevisiae genes that have been shown through biological experiments to have an activity during the cell cycle. The expression level of these genes was analyzed in five of the most cited time series DNA microarray databases used in the study of the cell cycle of this organism. With the use of SOM, it was possible to find clusters of genes with similar behavior in the five databases along two cell cycles. This result suggested that some of these genes might be biologically related or might have a regulatory relationship, as was corroborated by comparing some of the clusters obtained with SOMs against a previously reported regulatory network that was generated using biological knowledge, such as protein-protein interactions, gene expression levels, metabolism dynamics, promoter binding, and modification, regulation and transport of proteins. The methodology described in this paper could be applied to the study of gene relationships of other biological processes in different organisms. PMID:24699245

  20. CMD: A Cotton Microsatellite Database Resource for Gossypium Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cotton Microsatellite Database (CMD) is a curated and integrated web-based database providing centralized access to all publicly available cotton microsatellite markers (SSRs) (http://www.cottonssr.org). At present it contains DNA sequence, SSR marker, mapping and similarity data for nine cotton...

  1. BindingDB in 2015: A public database for medicinal chemistry, computational chemistry and systems pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Michael K; Liu, Tiqing; Baitaluk, Michael; Nicola, George; Hwang, Linda; Chong, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    BindingDB, www.bindingdb.org, is a publicly accessible database of experimental protein-small molecule interaction data. Its collection of over a million data entries derives primarily from scientific articles and, increasingly, US patents. BindingDB provides many ways to browse and search for data of interest, including an advanced search tool, which can cross searches of multiple query types, including text, chemical structure, protein sequence and numerical affinities. The PDB and PubMed provide links to data in BindingDB, and vice versa; and BindingDB provides links to pathway information, the ZINC catalog of available compounds, and other resources. The BindingDB website offers specialized tools that take advantage of its large data collection, including ones to generate hypotheses for the protein targets bound by a bioactive compound, and for the compounds bound by a new protein of known sequence; and virtual compound screening by maximal chemical similarity, binary kernel discrimination, and support vector machine methods. Specialized data sets are also available, such as binding data for hundreds of congeneric series of ligands, drawn from BindingDB and organized for use in validating drug design methods. BindingDB offers several forms of programmatic access, and comes with extensive background material and documentation. Here, we provide the first update of BindingDB since 2007, focusing on new and unique features and highlighting directions of importance to the field as a whole. PMID:26481362

  2. Contextual models of clinical publications for enhancing retrieval from full-text databases.

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, G. P.; Shortliffe, E. H.

    1995-01-01

    Conventional methods for retrieving information from the medical literature are imprecise and inefficient. Information retrieval systems employ unmanageable indexing vocabularies or use full-text representations that overwhelm the user with irrelevant information. This paper describes a document representation designed to improve the precision of searching in textual databases without significantly compromising recall. The representation augments simple text word representations with contextual models that reflect recurring semantic themes in clinical publications. Using this representation, a searcher may indicate both the terms of interest and the contexts in which they should occur. The contexts limit the potential interpretations of text words, and thus form the basis for more precise searching. In this paper, we discuss the shortcomings of traditional retrieval systems and describe our context-based representation. Improved retrieval performance with contextual models is illustrated by example, and a more extensive study is proposed. We present an evaluation of the contextual models as an indexing scheme, using a variation of the traditional inter-indexer consistency experiments, and we demonstrate that contextual indexing is reproducible by minimally trained physicians and medical students. PMID:8563412

  3. BindingDB in 2015: A public database for medicinal chemistry, computational chemistry and systems pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, Michael K.; Liu, Tiqing; Baitaluk, Michael; Nicola, George; Hwang, Linda; Chong, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    BindingDB, www.bindingdb.org, is a publicly accessible database of experimental protein-small molecule interaction data. Its collection of over a million data entries derives primarily from scientific articles and, increasingly, US patents. BindingDB provides many ways to browse and search for data of interest, including an advanced search tool, which can cross searches of multiple query types, including text, chemical structure, protein sequence and numerical affinities. The PDB and PubMed provide links to data in BindingDB, and vice versa; and BindingDB provides links to pathway information, the ZINC catalog of available compounds, and other resources. The BindingDB website offers specialized tools that take advantage of its large data collection, including ones to generate hypotheses for the protein targets bound by a bioactive compound, and for the compounds bound by a new protein of known sequence; and virtual compound screening by maximal chemical similarity, binary kernel discrimination, and support vector machine methods. Specialized data sets are also available, such as binding data for hundreds of congeneric series of ligands, drawn from BindingDB and organized for use in validating drug design methods. BindingDB offers several forms of programmatic access, and comes with extensive background material and documentation. Here, we provide the first update of BindingDB since 2007, focusing on new and unique features and highlighting directions of importance to the field as a whole. PMID:26481362

  4. Potential translational targets revealed by linking mouse grooming behavioral phenotypes to gene expression using public databases

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Andrew; Kyzar, Evan; Cachat, Jonathan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; O’Leary, Timothy P.; Tabakoff, Boris; Brown, Richard E.; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    Rodent self-grooming is an important, evolutionarily conserved behavior, highly sensitive to pharmacological and genetic manipulations. Mice with aberrant grooming phenotypes are currently used to model various human disorders. Therefore, it is critical to understand the biology of grooming behavior, and to assess its translational validity to humans. The present in-silico study used publicly available gene expression and behavioral data obtained from several inbred mouse strains in the open-field, light-dark box, elevated plus- and elevated zero-maze tests. As grooming duration differed between strains, our analysis revealed several candidate genes with significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and grooming duration. The Allen Brain Atlas, STRING, GoMiner and Mouse Genome Informatics databases were used to functionally map and analyze these candidate mouse genes against their human orthologs, assessing the strain ranking of their expression and the regional distribution of expression in the mouse brain. This allowed us to identify an interconnected network of candidate genes (which have expression levels that correlate with grooming behavior), display altered patterns of expression in key brain areas related to grooming, and underlie important functions in the brain. Collectively, our results demonstrate the utility of large-scale, high-throughput data-mining and in-silico modeling for linking genomic and behavioral data, as well as their potential to identify novel neural targets for complex neurobehavioral phenotypes, including grooming. PMID:23123364

  5. Construction of a public CHO cell line transcript database using versatile bioinformatics analysis pipelines.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Oliver; Becker, Jennifer; Brinkrolf, Karina; Timmermann, Christina; Borth, Nicole; Pühler, Alfred; Noll, Thomas; Goesmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines represent the most commonly used mammalian expression system for the production of therapeutic proteins. In this context, detailed knowledge of the CHO cell transcriptome might help to improve biotechnological processes conducted by specific cell lines. Nevertheless, very few assembled cDNA sequences of CHO cells were publicly released until recently, which puts a severe limitation on biotechnological research. Two extended annotation systems and web-based tools, one for browsing eukaryotic genomes (GenDBE) and one for viewing eukaryotic transcriptomes (SAMS), were established as the first step towards a publicly usable CHO cell genome/transcriptome analysis platform. This is complemented by the development of a new strategy to assemble the ca. 100 million reads, sequenced from a broad range of diverse transcripts, to a high quality CHO cell transcript set. The cDNA libraries were constructed from different CHO cell lines grown under various culture conditions and sequenced using Roche/454 and Illumina sequencing technologies in addition to sequencing reads from a previous study. Two pipelines to extend and improve the CHO cell line transcripts were established. First, de novo assemblies were carried out with the Trinity and Oases assemblers, using varying k-mer sizes. The resulting contigs were screened for potential CDS using ESTScan. Redundant contigs were filtered out using cd-hit-est. The remaining CDS contigs were re-assembled with CAP3. Second, a reference-based assembly with the TopHat/Cufflinks pipeline was performed, using the recently published draft genome sequence of CHO-K1 as reference. Additionally, the de novo contigs were mapped to the reference genome using GMAP and merged with the Cufflinks assembly using the cuffmerge software. With this approach 28,874 transcripts located on 16,492 gene loci could be assembled. Combining the results of both approaches, 65,561 transcripts were identified for CHO cell lines, which could be clustered by sequence identity into 17,598 gene clusters. PMID:24427317

  6. PreDREM: a database of predicted DNA regulatory motifs from 349 human cell and tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    PreDREM is a database of DNA regulatory motifs and motifs modules predicted from DNase I hypersensitive sites in 349 human cell and tissue samples. It contains 845–1325 predicted motifs in each sample, which result in a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. In comparison with seven large collections of known motifs, more than 84% of the 2684 predicted motifs are similar to the known motifs, and 54–76% of the known motifs are similar to the predicted motifs. PreDREM also stores 43 663–20 13 288 motif modules in each sample, which provide the cofactor motifs of each predicted motif. Compared with motifs of known interacting transcription factor (TF) pairs in eight resources, on average, 84% of motif pairs corresponding to known interacting TF pairs are included in the predicted motif modules. Through its web interface, PreDREM allows users to browse motif information by tissues, datasets, individual non-redundant motifs, etc. Users can also search motifs, motif modules, instances of motifs and motif modules in given genomic regions, tissue or cell types a motif occurs, etc. PreDREM thus provides a useful resource for the understanding of cell- and tissue-specific gene regulation in the human genome. Database URL: http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/. PMID:25725063

  7. Database on natural polymorphisms and resistance-related non-synonymous mutations in thymidine kinase and DNA polymerase genes of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Sauerbrei, Andreas; Bohn-Wippert, Kathrin; Kaspar, Marisa; Krumbholz, Andi; Karrasch, Matthias; Zell, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The use of genotypic resistance testing of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) is increasing because the rapid availability of results significantly improves the treatment of severe infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. However, an essential precondition is a broad knowledge of natural polymorphisms and resistance-associated mutations in the thymidine kinase (TK) and DNA polymerase (pol) genes, of which the DNA polymerase (Pol) enzyme is targeted by the highly effective antiviral drugs in clinical use. Thus, this review presents a database of all non-synonymous mutations of TK and DNA pol genes of HSV-1 and HSV-2 whose association with resistance or natural gene polymorphism has been clarified by phenotypic and/or functional assays. In addition, the laboratory methods for verifying natural polymorphisms or resistance mutations are summarized. This database can help considerably to facilitate the interpretation of genotypic resistance findings in clinical HSV-1 and HSV-2 strains. PMID:26433780

  8. Errors in the interpretation of copy number variations due to the use of public databases as a reference.

    PubMed

    Bastida-Lertxundi, Nerea; López-López, Elixabet; Piñán, M Angeles; Puiggros, Anna; Navajas, Aurora; Solé, Francesc; García-Orad, Africa

    2014-04-01

    The identification of new cryptic deletions and duplications can be used to improve prognostic classification in cancer. To obtain accurate results, it is necessary to discriminate between somatic alterations in the tumor cell and germline polymorphisms. For this purpose, copy number variation (CNV) public databases have been used as a reference. Nevertheless, the use of these databases may lead to erroneous results. Our main goal was to explore the limitations of the use of CNV databases, such as the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV), as the reference. To that end, we used pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as a model. We analyzed the genome-wide copy number profile of 23 ALL patients and conducted a comparison of the results obtained using the DGV with those obtained using the normal sample from the patient as the reference. Using only the DGV, 19% of alterations and 41% of polymorphisms were erroneously catalogued. Our results support the hypothesis that with the use of databases such as the DGV as the reference, a high percentage of the variations can be erroneously classified. PMID:24767712

  9. Database and online map service on unstable rock slopes in Norway - From data perpetuation to public information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppikofer, Thierry; Nordahl, Bobo; Bunkholt, Halvor; Nicolaisen, Magnus; Jarna, Alexandra; Iversen, Sverre; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Böhme, Martina; Yugsi Molina, Freddy X.

    2015-11-01

    The unstable rock slope database is developed and maintained by the Geological Survey of Norway as part of the systematic mapping of unstable rock slopes in Norway. This mapping aims to detect catastrophic rock slope failures before they occur. More than 250 unstable slopes with post-glacial deformation are detected up to now. The main aims of the unstable rock slope database are (1) to serve as a national archive for unstable rock slopes in Norway; (2) to serve for data collection and storage during field mapping; (3) to provide decision-makers with hazard zones and other necessary information on unstable rock slopes for land-use planning and mitigation; and (4) to inform the public through an online map service. The database is organized hierarchically with a main point for each unstable rock slope to which several feature classes and tables are linked. This main point feature class includes several general attributes of the unstable rock slopes, such as site name, general and geological descriptions, executed works, recommendations, technical parameters (volume, lithology, mechanism and others), displacement rates, possible consequences, as well as hazard and risk classification. Feature classes and tables linked to the main feature class include different scenarios of an unstable rock slope, field observation points, sampling points for dating, displacement measurement stations, lineaments, unstable areas, run-out areas, areas affected by secondary effects, along with tables for hazard and risk classification and URL links to further documentation and references. The database on unstable rock slopes in Norway will be publicly consultable through an online map service. Factsheets with key information on unstable rock slopes can be automatically generated and downloaded for each site. Areas of possible rock avalanche run-out and their secondary effects displayed in the online map service, along with hazard and risk assessments, will become important tools for land-use planning. The present database will further evolve in the coming years as the systematic mapping progresses and as available techniques and tools evolve.

  10. 'Ancient' DNA in the resting egg bank of a microcrustacean can serve as a palaeolimnological database.

    PubMed Central

    Limburg, Petra A; Weider, Lawrence J

    2002-01-01

    Recent work on the diapausing egg banks of zooplankton, such as Daphnia (Crustacea: Anomopoda), indicates that these eggs can remain viable for decades while, theoretically, DNA can remain intact for even longer periods (i.e. centuries or millennia). We isolated diapausing eggs of Daphnia from a 30 m long sediment core taken from a hypereutrophic, northern German lake (Belauer See), with some eggs found in dated core material as old as 4500 years. Using microsatellite markers, we analysed the genetic structure of the resting eggs dated as old as ca. 200 years, and found that, although levels of heterozygosity remained remarkably stable, significant genetic differentiation (Nei's D = 0.36; F(ST) = 0.15) between recent and 'ancient' resting eggs (including allele frequency shifts and private alleles) was detected. These shifts represent either species-level changes in this complex (i.e. species-specific characters of ephippia are not always robust), or intraspecific shifts in genetic variation, or a combination of both. This study demonstrates that the egg banks of aquatic zooplankton can serve as repositories of both genetic (intrapopulational) and ecological (interspecific) information. The use of molecular markers, such as microsatellites, on diapausing egg/seed banks may open new avenues of enquiry related to tracking the long-term genetic (and/or species) shifts that are associated with long-term environmental changes. PMID:11839197

  11. Development of Energy Consumption Database Management System of Existing Large Public Buildings 

    E-print Network

    Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01

    The statistic data of energy consumption are the base of analyzing energy consumption. The scientific management method of energy consumption data and the development of database management system plays an important role in building energy...

  12. Technical Report CNDS20021 Johns Hopkins University, http://www.cnds.jhu.edu/publications Practical WideArea Database Replication 1

    E-print Network

    Amir, Yair

    ://www.cnds.jhu.edu/publications Practical Wide­Area Database Replication 1 Yair Amir * , Claudiu Danilov * , Michal Miskin­Amir + , Jonathan of a wide and local area database replication system. The architecture provides peer replication, supporting, computer crashes and recoveries, and message omissions are all handled. Using a generic replication engine

  13. UniPROBE, update 2015: new tools and content for the online database of protein-binding microarray data on protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Hume, Maxwell A; Barrera, Luis A; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Bulyk, Martha L

    2015-01-01

    The Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation (UniPROBE) serves as a convenient source of information on published data generated using universal protein-binding microarray (PBM) technology, which provides in vitro data about the relative DNA-binding preferences of transcription factors for all possible sequence variants of a length k ('k-mers'). The database displays important information about the proteins and displays their DNA-binding specificity data in terms of k-mers, position weight matrices and graphical sequence logos. This update to the database documents the growth of UniPROBE since the last update 4 years ago, and introduces a variety of new features and tools, including a new streamlined pipeline that facilitates data deposition by universal PBM data generators in the research community, a tool that generates putative nonbinding (i.e. negative control) DNA sequences for one or more proteins and novel motifs obtained by analyzing the PBM data using the BEEML-PBM algorithm for motif inference. The UniPROBE database is available at http://uniprobe.org. PMID:25378322

  14. DISTRIBUTED STRUCTURE-SEARCHABLE TOXICITY (DSSTOX) DATABASE NETWORK: MAKING PUBLIC TOXICITY DATA RESOURCES MORE ACCESSIBLE AND USABLE FOR DATA EXPLORATION AND SAR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory


    Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) Database Network: Making Public Toxicity Data Resources More Accessible and U sable for Data Exploration and SAR Development

    Many sources of public toxicity data are not currently linked to chemical structure, are not ...

  15. Comparative Study of Seven Commercial Kits for Human DNA Extraction from Urine Samples Suitable for DNA Biomarker-Based Public Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    El Bali, Latifa; Diman, Aurélie; Bernard, Alfred; Roosens, Nancy H. C.; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Human genomic DNA extracted from urine could be an interesting tool for large-scale public health studies involving characterization of genetic variations or DNA biomarkers as a result of the simple and noninvasive collection method. These studies, involving many samples, require a rapid, easy, and standardized extraction protocol. Moreover, for practicability, there is a necessity to collect urine at a moment different from the first void and to store it appropriately until analysis. The present study compared seven commercial kits to select the most appropriate urinary human DNA extraction procedure for epidemiological studies. DNA yield has been determined using different quantification methods: two classical, i.e., NanoDrop and PicoGreen, and two species-specific real-time quantitative (q)PCR assays, as DNA extracted from urine contains, besides human, microbial DNA also, which largely contributes to the total DNA yield. In addition, the kits giving a good yield were also tested for the presence of PCR inhibitors. Further comparisons were performed regarding the sampling time and the storage conditions. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, an important gene related to smoking has been genotyped using the developed tools. We could select one well-performing kit for the human DNA extraction from urine suitable for molecular diagnostic real-time qPCR-based assays targeting genetic variations, applicable to large-scale studies. In addition, successful genotyping was possible using DNA extracted from urine stored at ?20°C for several months, and an acceptable yield could also be obtained from urine collected at different moments during the day, which is particularly important for public health studies. PMID:25365790

  16. DNA barcoding for plants.

    PubMed

    de Vere, Natasha; Rich, Tim C G; Trinder, Sarah A; Long, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding uses specific regions of DNA in order to identify species. Initiatives are taking place around the world to generate DNA barcodes for all groups of living organisms and to make these data publically available in order to help understand, conserve, and utilize the world's biodiversity. For land plants the core DNA barcode markers are two sections of coding regions within the chloroplast, part of the genes, rbcL and matK. In order to create high quality databases, each plant that is DNA barcoded needs to have a herbarium voucher that accompanies the rbcL and matK DNA sequences. The quality of the DNA sequences, the primers used, and trace files should also be accessible to users of the data. Multiple individuals should be DNA barcoded for each species in order to check for errors and allow for intraspecific variation. The world's herbaria provide a rich resource of already preserved and identified material and these can be used for DNA barcoding as well as by collecting fresh samples from the wild. These protocols describe the whole DNA barcoding process, from the collection of plant material from the wild or from the herbarium, how to extract and amplify the DNA, and how to check the quality of the data after sequencing. PMID:25373752

  17. Automatic detection of lung nodules in computed tomography images: training and validation of algorithms using public research databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarlinghi, Niccolò

    2013-09-01

    Lung cancer is one of the main public health issues in developed countries. Lung cancer typically manifests itself as non-calcified pulmonary nodules that can be detected reading lung Computed Tomography (CT) images. To assist radiologists in reading images, researchers started, a decade ago, the development of Computer Aided Detection (CAD) methods capable of detecting lung nodules. In this work, a CAD composed of two CAD subprocedures is presented: , devoted to the identification of parenchymal nodules, and , devoted to the identification of the nodules attached to the pleura surface. Both CADs are an upgrade of two methods previously presented as Voxel Based Neural Approach CAD . The novelty of this paper consists in the massive training using the public research Lung International Database Consortium (LIDC) database and on the implementation of new features for classification with respect to the original VBNA method. Finally, the proposed CAD is blindly validated on the ANODE09 dataset. The result of the validation is a score of 0.393, which corresponds to the average sensitivity of the CAD computed at seven predefined false positive rates: 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, 4, and 8 FP/CT.

  18. Production of Arrayed and Rearrayed cDNA Libraries for Public Use

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, K

    2005-08-29

    Researchers studying genes and their protein products need an easily available source for that gene. The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is an important source of such genes in the form of arrayed cDNA libraries. The arrayed clones and associated data are available to the public, free of restriction. Libraries are transformed and titered into 384-well master plates, from which 2-8 copies are made. One copy plate is stored by LLNL while others are sent to sequencing groups, plate distributors, and to the group which contributed the library. Clones found to be unique and/or full-length are rearrayed and also made publicly available. Bioinformatics tools supporting the use of I.M.A.G.E. clones are accessible via the World Wide Web.

  19. BrassicaTED - a public database for utilization of miniature transposable elements in Brassica species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MITE, TRIM and SINEs are miniature form transposable elements (mTEs) that are ubiquitous and dispersed throughout entire plant genomes. Tens of thousands of members cause insertion polymorphism at both the inter- and intra- species level. Therefore, mTEs are valuable targets and resources for development of markers that can be utilized for breeding, genetic diversity and genome evolution studies. Taking advantage of the completely sequenced genomes of Brassica rapa and B. oleracea, characterization of mTEs and building a curated database are prerequisite to extending their utilization for genomics and applied fields in Brassica crops. Findings We have developed BrassicaTED as a unique web portal containing detailed characterization information for mTEs of Brassica species. At present, BrassicaTED has datasets for 41 mTE families, including 5894 and 6026 members from 20 MITE families, 1393 and 1639 members from 5 TRIM families, 1270 and 2364 members from 16 SINE families in B. rapa and B. oleracea, respectively. BrassicaTED offers different sections to browse structural and positional characteristics for every mTE family. In addition, we have added data on 289 MITE insertion polymorphisms from a survey of seven Brassica relatives. Genes with internal mTE insertions are shown with detailed gene annotation and microarray-based comparative gene expression data in comparison with their paralogs in the triplicated B. rapa genome. This database also includes a novel tool, K BLAST (Karyotype BLAST), for clear visualization of the locations for each member in the B. rapa and B. oleracea pseudo-genome sequences. Conclusions BrassicaTED is a newly developed database of information regarding the characteristics and potential utility of mTEs including MITE, TRIM and SINEs in B. rapa and B. oleracea. The database will promote the development of desirable mTE-based markers, which can be utilized for genomics and breeding in Brassica species. BrassicaTED will be a valuable repository for scientists and breeders, promoting efficient research on Brassica species. BrassicaTED can be accessed at http://im-crop.snu.ac.kr/BrassicaTED/index.php. PMID:24948109

  20. Seabird databases and the new paradigm for scientific publication and attribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    For more than 300 years, the peer-reviewed journal article has been the principal medium for packaging and delivering scientific data. With new tools for managing digital data, a new paradigm is emerging—one that demands open and direct access to data and that enables and rewards a broad-based approach to scientific questions. Ground-breaking papers in the future will increasingly be those that creatively mine and synthesize vast stores of data available on the Internet. This is especially true for conservation science, in which essential data can be readily captured in standard record formats. For seabird professionals, a number of globally shared databases are in the offing, or should be. These databases will capture the salient results of inventories and monitoring, pelagic surveys, diet studies, and telemetry. A number of real or perceived barriers to data sharing exist, but none is insurmountable. Our discipline should take an important stride now by adopting a specially designed markup language for annotating and sharing seabird data.

  1. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  2. Lung Image Databases-2

    Cancer.gov

    Lung Image Database Consortium’s Normalized Relational Database • De-identified (anonymized) CT datasets • Publicly accessible • Web search tools • Cases from search results can be downloaded – ftp or DICOM De-identified CT datasets Digital Imaging and

  3. Does language matter? A case study of epidemiological and public health journals, databases and professional education in French, German and Italian

    PubMed Central

    Baussano, Iacopo; Brzoska, Patrick; Fedeli, Ugo; Larouche, Claudia; Razum, Oliver; Fung, Isaac C-H

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiology and public health are usually context-specific. Journals published in different languages and countries play a role both as sources of data and as channels through which evidence is incorporated into local public health practice. Databases in these languages facilitate access to relevant journals, and professional education in these languages facilitates the growth of native expertise in epidemiology and public health. However, as English has become the lingua franca of scientific communication in the era of globalisation, many journals published in non-English languages face the difficult dilemma of either switching to English and competing internationally, or sticking to the native tongue and having a restricted circulation among a local readership. This paper discusses the historical development of epidemiology and the current scene of epidemiological and public health journals, databases and professional education in three Western European languages: French, German and Italian, and examines the dynamics and struggles they have today. PMID:18826570

  4. The DNA Binding Properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad51 (Received for publication, June 12, 1998, and in revised form, November 16, 1998)

    E-print Network

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    The DNA Binding Properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad51 Protein* (Received for publication Rad51 protein is the para- digm for eukaryotic ATP-dependent DNA strand ex- change proteins. To explain some of the unique charac- teristics of DNA strand exchange promoted by Rad51 protein, when

  5. The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Object Survey Public Database Development Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Brian; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Putnam, Lowell

    2014-11-01

    The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Object Survey (MANOS) began in August 2013 as a multi-year physical characterization survey that was awarded large survey status by NOAO. MANOS will target several hundred mission-accessible NEOs across visible and near-infrared wavelengths, ultimately providing a comprehensive catalog of physical properties (astrometry, light curves, spectra). The MANOS project will provide a resource that not only helps to manage our survey in a fully transparent, publicly accessible forum, but will also help to coordinate minor planet characterization efforts and target prioritization across multiple research groups. Working towards that goal, we are developing a portal for rapid, up to date, public dissemination of our data. Migrating the Lowell Astorb dataset to a SQL framework is a major step towards the modernization of the system and will make capable up-to-date deployment of data. This will further allow us to develop utilities of various complexity, such as a deltaV calculator, minor planet finder charts, and sophisticated ephemeri generation functions. We present the state of this effort and a preliminary timeline for functionality.

  6. Creating a data exchange strategy for radiotherapy research: towards federated databases and anonymised public datasets.

    PubMed

    Skripcak, Tomas; Belka, Claus; Bosch, Walter; Brink, Carsten; Brunner, Thomas; Budach, Volker; Büttner, Daniel; Debus, Jürgen; Dekker, Andre; Grau, Cai; Gulliford, Sarah; Hurkmans, Coen; Just, Uwe; Krause, Mechthild; Lambin, Philippe; Langendijk, Johannes A; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lühr, Armin; Maingon, Philippe; Masucci, Michele; Niyazi, Maximilian; Poortmans, Philip; Simon, Monique; Schmidberger, Heinz; Spezi, Emiliano; Stuschke, Martin; Valentini, Vincenzo; Verheij, Marcel; Whitfield, Gillian; Zackrisson, Björn; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Disconnected cancer research data management and lack of information exchange about planned and ongoing research are complicating the utilisation of internationally collected medical information for improving cancer patient care. Rapidly collecting/pooling data can accelerate translational research in radiation therapy and oncology. The exchange of study data is one of the fundamental principles behind data aggregation and data mining. The possibilities of reproducing the original study results, performing further analyses on existing research data to generate new hypotheses or developing computational models to support medical decisions (e.g. risk/benefit analysis of treatment options) represent just a fraction of the potential benefits of medical data-pooling. Distributed machine learning and knowledge exchange from federated databases can be considered as one beyond other attractive approaches for knowledge generation within "Big Data". Data interoperability between research institutions should be the major concern behind a wider collaboration. Information captured in electronic patient records (EPRs) and study case report forms (eCRFs), linked together with medical imaging and treatment planning data, are deemed to be fundamental elements for large multi-centre studies in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. To fully utilise the captured medical information, the study data have to be more than just an electronic version of a traditional (un-modifiable) paper CRF. Challenges that have to be addressed are data interoperability, utilisation of standards, data quality and privacy concerns, data ownership, rights to publish, data pooling architecture and storage. This paper discusses a framework for conceptual packages of ideas focused on a strategic development for international research data exchange in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. PMID:25458128

  7. Creating a data exchange strategy for radiotherapy research: Towards federated databases and anonymised public datasets

    PubMed Central

    Skripcak, Tomas; Belka, Claus; Bosch, Walter; Brink, Carsten; Brunner, Thomas; Budach, Volker; Büttner, Daniel; Debus, Jürgen; Dekker, Andre; Grau, Cai; Gulliford, Sarah; Hurkmans, Coen; Just, Uwe; Krause, Mechthild; Lambin, Philippe; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lühr, Armin; Maingon, Philippe; Masucci, Michele; Niyazi, Maximilian; Poortmans, Philip; Simon, Monique; Schmidberger, Heinz; Spezi, Emiliano; Stuschke, Martin; Valentini, Vincenzo; Verheij, Marcel; Whitfield, Gillian; Zackrisson, Björn; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Disconnected cancer research data management and lack of information exchange about planned and ongoing research are complicating the utilisation of internationally collected medical information for improving cancer patient care. Rapidly collecting/pooling data can accelerate translational research in radiation therapy and oncology. The exchange of study data is one of the fundamental principles behind data aggregation and data mining. The possibilities of reproducing the original study results, performing further analyses on existing research data to generate new hypotheses or developing computational models to support medical decisions (e.g. risk/benefit analysis of treatment options) represent just a fraction of the potential benefits of medical data-pooling. Distributed machine learning and knowledge exchange from federated databases can be considered as one beyond other attractive approaches for knowledge generation within “Big Data”. Data interoperability between research institutions should be the major concern behind a wider collaboration. Information captured in electronic patient records (EPRs) and study case report forms (eCRFs), linked together with medical imaging and treatment planning data, are deemed to be fundamental elements for large multi-centre studies in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. To fully utilise the captured medical information, the study data have to be more than just an electronic version of a traditional (un-modifiable) paper CRF. Challenges that have to be addressed are data interoperability, utilisation of standards, data quality and privacy concerns, data ownership, rights to publish, data pooling architecture and storage. This paper discusses a framework for conceptual packages of ideas focused on a strategic development for international research data exchange in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. PMID:25458128

  8. Ku Binds Telomeric DNA in Vitro* (Received for publication, March 26, 1999, and in revised form, May 12, 1999)

    E-print Network

    de Lange, Titia

    Ku Binds Telomeric DNA in Vitro* (Received for publication, March 26, 1999, and in revised form. Recently Ku has been shown to be a likely component of the telomeric complex in yeast, suggesting the possibility of a similar role for Ku at mammalian telomeres. However, long single- stranded G-rich overhangs

  9. Genome databases

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  10. Exploration of preterm birth rates using the public health exposome database and computational analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Kershenbaum, Anne D; Langston, Michael A; Levine, Robert S; Saxton, Arnold M; Oyana, Tonny J; Kilbourne, Barbara J; Rogers, Gary L; Gittner, Lisaann S; Baktash, Suzanne H; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Juarez, Paul D

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in informatics technology has made it possible to integrate, manipulate, and analyze variables from a wide range of scientific disciplines allowing for the examination of complex social problems such as health disparities. This study used 589 county-level variables to identify and compare geographical variation of high and low preterm birth rates. Data were collected from a number of publically available sources, bringing together natality outcomes with attributes of the natural, built, social, and policy environments. Singleton early premature county birth rate, in counties with population size over 100,000 persons provided the dependent variable. Graph theoretical techniques were used to identify a wide range of predictor variables from various domains, including black proportion, obesity and diabetes, sexually transmitted infection rates, mother's age, income, marriage rates, pollution and temperature among others. Dense subgraphs (paracliques) representing groups of highly correlated variables were resolved into latent factors, which were then used to build a regression model explaining prematurity (R-squared = 76.7%). Two lists of counties with large positive and large negative residuals, indicating unusual prematurity rates given their circumstances, may serve as a starting point for ways to intervene and reduce health disparities for preterm births. PMID:25464130

  11. Exploration of Preterm Birth Rates Using the Public Health Exposome Database and Computational Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kershenbaum, Anne D.; Langston, Michael A.; Levine, Robert S.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Oyana, Tonny J.; Kilbourne, Barbara J.; Rogers, Gary L.; Gittner, Lisaann S.; Baktash, Suzanne H.; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Juarez, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in informatics technology has made it possible to integrate, manipulate, and analyze variables from a wide range of scientific disciplines allowing for the examination of complex social problems such as health disparities. This study used 589 county-level variables to identify and compare geographical variation of high and low preterm birth rates. Data were collected from a number of publically available sources, bringing together natality outcomes with attributes of the natural, built, social, and policy environments. Singleton early premature county birth rate, in counties with population size over 100,000 persons provided the dependent variable. Graph theoretical techniques were used to identify a wide range of predictor variables from various domains, including black proportion, obesity and diabetes, sexually transmitted infection rates, mother’s age, income, marriage rates, pollution and temperature among others. Dense subgraphs (paracliques) representing groups of highly correlated variables were resolved into latent factors, which were then used to build a regression model explaining prematurity (R-squared = 76.7%). Two lists of counties with large positive and large negative residuals, indicating unusual prematurity rates given their circumstances, may serve as a starting point for ways to intervene and reduce health disparities for preterm births. PMID:25464130

  12. Non-B DB v2.0: a database of predicted non-B DNA-forming motifs and its associated tools.

    PubMed

    Cer, Regina Z; Donohue, Duncan E; Mudunuri, Uma S; Temiz, Nuri A; Loss, Michael A; Starner, Nathan J; Halusa, Goran N; Volfovsky, Natalia; Yi, Ming; Luke, Brian T; Bacolla, Albino; Collins, Jack R; Stephens, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    The non-B DB, available at http://nonb.abcc.ncifcrf.gov, catalogs predicted non-B DNA-forming sequence motifs, including Z-DNA, G-quadruplex, A-phased repeats, inverted repeats, mirror repeats, direct repeats and their corresponding subsets: cruciforms, triplexes and slipped structures, in several genomes. Version 2.0 of the database revises and re-implements the motif discovery algorithms to better align with accepted definitions and thresholds for motifs, expands the non-B DNA-forming motifs coverage by including short tandem repeats and adds key visualization tools to compare motif locations relative to other genomic annotations. Non-B DB v2.0 extends the ability for comparative genomics by including re-annotation of the five organisms reported in non-B DB v1.0, human, chimpanzee, dog, macaque and mouse, and adds seven additional organisms: orangutan, rat, cow, pig, horse, platypus and Arabidopsis thaliana. Additionally, the non-B DB v2.0 provides an overall improved graphical user interface and faster query performance. PMID:23125372

  13. Development of a DNA microarray to detect antimicrobial resistance genes identified in the national center for biotechnology information database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High density genotyping techniques are needed for investigating antimicrobial resistance especially in the case of multi-drug resistant (MDR) isolates. To achieve this all antimicrobial resistance genes in the NCBI Genbank database were identified by key word searches of sequence annotations and the...

  14. Drinking Water Treatability Database (Database)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking Water Treatability Database (TDB) will provide data taken from the literature on the control of contaminants in drinking water, and will be housed on an interactive, publicly-available USEPA web site. It can be used for identifying effective treatment processes, rec...

  15. De-identifying a public use microdata file from the Canadian national discharge abstract database

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) collects hospital discharge abstract data (DAD) from Canadian provinces and territories. There are many demands for the disclosure of this data for research and analysis to inform policy making. To expedite the disclosure of data for some of these purposes, the construction of a DAD public use microdata file (PUMF) was considered. Such purposes include: confirming some published results, providing broader feedback to CIHI to improve data quality, training students and fellows, providing an easily accessible data set for researchers to prepare for analyses on the full DAD data set, and serve as a large health data set for computer scientists and statisticians to evaluate analysis and data mining techniques. The objective of this study was to measure the probability of re-identification for records in a PUMF, and to de-identify a national DAD PUMF consisting of 10% of records. Methods Plausible attacks on a PUMF were evaluated. Based on these attacks, the 2008-2009 national DAD was de-identified. A new algorithm was developed to minimize the amount of suppression while maximizing the precision of the data. The acceptable threshold for the probability of correct re-identification of a record was set at between 0.04 and 0.05. Information loss was measured in terms of the extent of suppression and entropy. Results Two different PUMF files were produced, one with geographic information, and one with no geographic information but more clinical information. At a threshold of 0.05, the maximum proportion of records with the diagnosis code suppressed was 20%, but these suppressions represented only 8-9% of all values in the DAD. Our suppression algorithm has less information loss than a more traditional approach to suppression. Smaller regions, patients with longer stays, and age groups that are infrequently admitted to hospitals tend to be the ones with the highest rates of suppression. Conclusions The strategies we used to maximize data utility and minimize information loss can result in a PUMF that would be useful for the specific purposes noted earlier. However, to create a more detailed file with less information loss suitable for more complex health services research, the risk would need to be mitigated by requiring the data recipient to commit to a data sharing agreement. PMID:21861894

  16. Morchella MLST database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Welcome to the Morchella MLST database. This dedicated database was set up at the CBS-KNAW Biodiversity Center by Vincent Robert in February 2012, using BioloMICS software (Robert et al., 2011), to facilitate DNA sequence-based identifications of Morchella species via the Internet. The current datab...

  17. Aviation Safety Issues Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.

    2009-01-01

    The aviation safety issues database was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues database is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the database. This broader interest was the genesis to making the database publically accessible and writing this report.

  18. Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care Ii (Mimic-Ii): A Public-Access Intensive Care Unit Database

    E-print Network

    Saeed, Mohammed

    Objective: We sought to develop an intensive care unit research database applying automated techniques to aggregate high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic data from a large, diverse population of adult intensive care ...

  19. Contamination of sequence databases with adaptor sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Takeo; Sanders, A.R.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.

    1997-02-01

    Because of the exponential increase in the amount of DNA sequences being added to the public databases on a daily basis, it has become imperative to identify sources of contamination rapidly. Previously, contaminations of sequence databases have been reported to alert the scientific community to the problem. These contaminations can be divided into two categories. The first category comprises host sequences that have been difficult for submitters to manage or control. Examples include anomalous sequences derived from Escherichia coli, which are inserted into the chromosomes (and plasmids) of the bacterial hosts. Insertion sequences are highly mobile and are capable of transposing themselves into plasmids during cloning manipulation. Another example of the first category is the infection with yeast genomic DNA or with bacterial DNA of some commercially available cDNA libraries from Clontech. The second category of database contamination is due to the inadvertent inclusion of nonhost sequences. This category includes incorporation of cloning-vector sequences and multicloning sites in the database submission. M13-derived artifacts have been common, since M13-based vectors have been widely used for subcloning DNA fragments. Recognizing this problem, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) started to screen, in April 1994, all sequences directly submitted to GenBank, against a set of vector data retrieved from GenBank by use of key-word searches, such as {open_quotes}vector.{close_quotes} In this report, we present evidence for another sequence artifact that is widespread but that, to our knowledge, has not yet been reported. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  20. The creation of a public database of precision phantoms to facilitate the evaluation and standardization of advanced visualization and quantification software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Joseph J.; Saenz, Naomi J.; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2009-02-01

    In order to validate CT imaging as a biomarker, it is important to ascertain the variability and artifacts associated with various forms of advanced visualization and quantification software. The purpose of the paper is to describe the rationale behind the creation of a free, public resource that contains phantom datasets for CT designed to facilitate testing, development and standardization of advanced visualization and quantification software. For our research, three phantoms were scanned at multiple kVp and mAs settings utilizing a 64-channel MDCT scanner at a collimation of 0.75 mm. Images were reconstructed at a slice thickness of 0.75 mm and archived in DICOM format. The phantoms consisted of precision spheres, balls of different materials and sizes, and slabs of Last-A-Foam(R) at varying densities. The database of scans is stored in an archive utilizing software developed for the National Cancer Imaging Archive and is publically available. The scans were completed successfully and the datasets are available for free and unrestricted download. The CT images can be accessed in DICOM format via http or FTP or utilizing caGRID. A DICOM database of phantom data was successfully created and made available to the public. We anticipate that this database will be useful as a reference for physicists for quality control purposes, for developers of advanced visualization and quantification software, and for others who need to test the performance of their systems against a known "gold" standard. We plan to add more phantom images in the future and expand to other imaging modalities.

  1. Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 147 Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

  2. Cardiac CT and MRI for congenital heart disease in Asian countries: recent trends in publication based on a scientific database.

    PubMed

    Tsai, I-Chen; Goo, Hyun Woo

    2013-06-01

    In the past 12 years, during the process of imaging congenital heart disease (CHD), Asian doctors have not only made every effort to adhere to established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols as in Western countries, but also have developed Computed tomography (CT) as an alternative problem-solving technique. Databases have shown that Asian doctors were more inclined to utilize CT than MRI in evaluating CHD. Articles in the literature focusing on CT have been cited more frequently than articles on MRI. Additionally, several repeatedly cited CT articles have become seminal papers in this field. The database reflects a trend suggesting that Asian doctors actively adapt to new techniques and flexibly develop unique strategies to overcome limitations caused by the relatively limited resources often available to them. PMID:23344910

  3. Current research status, databases and application of single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Javed, R; Mukesh

    2010-07-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent form of DNA variation in the genome. SNPs are genetic markers which are bi-allelic in nature and grow at a very fast rate. Current genomic databases contain information on several million SNPs. More than 6 million SNPs have been identified and the information is publicly available through the efforts of the SNP Consortium and others data bases. The NCBI plays a major role in facillating the identification and cataloging of SNPs through creation and maintenance of the public SNP database (dbSNP) by the biomedical community worldwide and stimulate many areas of biological research including the identification of the genetic components of disease. In this review article, we are compiling the existing SNP databases, research status and their application. PMID:21717869

  4. 76 FR 53912 - FDA's Public Database of Products With Orphan-Drug Designation: Replacing Non-Informative Code...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ...Designation: Replacing Non-Informative Code Names With Descriptive Identifiers AGENCY: Food...it has replaced non- informative code names with descriptive identifiers on its public...publishing a drug's generic or trade name upon orphan designation. Where a...

  5. The Hawaiian Algal Database: a laboratory LIMS and online resource for biodiversity data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Norman; Sherwood, Alison R; Kurihara, Akira; Conklin, Kimberly Y; Sauvage, Thomas; Presting, Gernot G

    2009-01-01

    Background Organization and presentation of biodiversity data is greatly facilitated by databases that are specially designed to allow easy data entry and organized data display. Such databases also have the capacity to serve as Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS). The Hawaiian Algal Database was designed to showcase specimens collected from the Hawaiian Archipelago, enabling users around the world to compare their specimens with our photographs and DNA sequence data, and to provide lab personnel with an organizational tool for storing various biodiversity data types. Description We describe the Hawaiian Algal Database, a comprehensive and searchable database containing photographs and micrographs, geo-referenced collecting information, taxonomic checklists and standardized DNA sequence data. All data for individual samples are linked through unique accession numbers. Users can search online for sample information by accession number, numerous levels of taxonomy, or collection site. At the present time the database contains data representing over 2,000 samples of marine, freshwater and terrestrial algae from the Hawaiian Archipelago. These samples are primarily red algae, although other taxa are being added. Conclusion The Hawaiian Algal Database is a digital repository for Hawaiian algal samples and acts as a LIMS for the laboratory. Users can make use of the online search tool to view and download specimen photographs and micrographs, DNA sequences and relevant habitat data, including georeferenced collecting locations. It is publicly available at . PMID:19728892

  6. 76 FR 53912 - FDA's Public Database of Products With Orphan-Drug Designation: Replacing Non-Informative Code...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ...: Replacing Non-Informative Code Names With Descriptive Identifiers AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS..., is announcing that it has replaced non- informative code names with descriptive identifiers on its... provides public notice by publishing a drug's generic or trade name upon orphan designation. Where...

  7. The PNNL Quantitative Infrared Database for Gas-Phase Sensing: A Spectral Library for Environmental, Hazmat and Public Safety Standoff Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Sharpe, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) continues to expand its library of quantitative infrared reference spectra for remote sensing. The gas-phase data are recorded at 0.1 cm-1 resolution, with nitrogen pressure broadening to one atmosphere to emulate spectra recorded in the field. It is planned that the PNNL library will consist of approximately 500 vapor-phase spectra associated with DOE’s environmental, energy, and public safety missions. At present, the database is comprised of approximately 300 infrared spectra, many of which represent highly reactive or toxic species. For the 298 K data, each reported spectrum is in fact a composite spectrum generated by a Beer’s law plot (at each wavelength) to typically 12 measured spectra. Recent additions to the database include the vapors of several semi-volatile and non-volatile liquids using an improved dissemination technique for vaporizing the liquid into the nitrogen carrier gas. Experimental and analytical methods are used to remove several known and new artifacts associated with FTIR gas-phase spectroscopy. Details concerning sample preparation and composite spectrum generation are discussed.

  8. The PNNL quantitative infrared database for gas-phase sensing: a spectral library for environmental, hazmat, and public safety standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Sharpe, Steven W.

    2004-03-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) continues to expand its library of quantitative infrared reference spectra for remote sensing. The gas-phase data are recorded at 0.1 cm-1 resolution, with nitrogen pressure broadening to one atmosphere to emulate spectra recorded in the field. It is planned that the PNNL library will consist of approximately 500 vapor-phase spectra associated with the U.S. Department of Energy"s environmental, energy, and public safety missions. At present, the database is comprised of approximately 300 infrared spectra, many of which represent highly reactive or toxic species. For the 298 K data, each reported spectrum is in fact a composite spectrum generated by a Beer"s law plot (at each wavelength) to typically 12 measured spectra. Recent additions to the database include the vapors of several semi-volatile and non-volatile liquids using an improved dissemination technique for vaporizing the liquid into the nitrogen carrier gas. Experimental and analytical methods are used to remove several known and new artifacts associated with FTIR gas-phase spectroscopy. Details concerning sample preparation and composite spectrum generation are discussed.

  9. The PNNL Quantitative Infrared Database for Gas-Phase Sensing: A spectral Library for Environmental, Hazmat, and Public Safety Standoff Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Arthur J. Sedlacek III, Richard Colton, Tuan Vo-Dinh

    2004-03-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) continues to expand its library of quantitative infrared reference spectra for remote sensing. The gas-phase data are recorded at 0.1 cm-1 resolution, with nitrogen pressure broadening to one atmosphere to emulate spectra recorded in the field. It is planned that the PNNL library will consist of approximately 500 vapor-phase spectra associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's environmental, energy, and public safety missions. At present, the database is comprised of approximately 300 infrared spectra, many of which represent highly reactive or toxic species. For the 298 K data, each reported spectrum is in fact a composite spectrum generated by a Beer's law plot (at each wavelength) to typically 12 measured spectra. Recent additions to the database include the vapors of several semi-volatile and non-volatile liquids using an improved dissemination technique for vaporizing the liquid into the nitrogen carrier gas. Experimental and analytical methods are used to remove several known and new artifacts associated with FTIR gas-phase spectroscopy. Details concerning sample preparation and composite spectrum generation are discussed.

  10. International Society of Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM)-ITS reference DNA barcoding database--the quality controlled standard tool for routine identification of human and animal pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Irinyi, Laszlo; Serena, Carolina; Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Arabatzis, Michael; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Vu, Duong; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Arthur, Ian; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Giraldo, Alejandra; da Cunha, Keith Cassia; Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Hendrickx, Marijke; Nishikaku, Angela Satie; de Azevedo Melo, Analy Salles; Merseguel, Karina Bellinghausen; Khan, Aziza; Parente Rocha, Juliana Alves; Sampaio, Paula; da Silva Briones, Marcelo Ribeiro; e Ferreira, Renata Carmona; de Medeiros Muniz, Mauro; Castañón-Olivares, Laura Rosio; Estrada-Barcenas, Daniel; Cassagne, Carole; Mary, Charles; Duan, Shu Yao; Kong, Fanrong; Sun, Annie Ying; Zeng, Xianyu; Zhao, Zuotao; Gantois, Nausicaa; Botterel, Françoise; Robbertse, Barbara; Schoch, Conrad; Gams, Walter; Ellis, David; Halliday, Catriona; Chen, Sharon; Sorrell, Tania C; Piarroux, Renaud; Colombo, Arnaldo L; Pais, Célia; de Hoog, Sybren; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Toriello, Conchita; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria; Delhaes, Laurence; Stubbe, Dirk; Dromer, Françoise; Ranque, Stéphane; Guarro, Josep; Cano-Lira, Jose F; Robert, Vincent; Velegraki, Aristea; Meyer, Wieland

    2015-05-01

    Human and animal fungal pathogens are a growing threat worldwide leading to emerging infections and creating new risks for established ones. There is a growing need for a rapid and accurate identification of pathogens to enable early diagnosis and targeted antifungal therapy. Morphological and biochemical identification methods are time-consuming and require trained experts. Alternatively, molecular methods, such as DNA barcoding, a powerful and easy tool for rapid monophasic identification, offer a practical approach for species identification and less demanding in terms of taxonomical expertise. However, its wide-spread use is still limited by a lack of quality-controlled reference databases and the evolving recognition and definition of new fungal species/complexes. An international consortium of medical mycology laboratories was formed aiming to establish a quality controlled ITS database under the umbrella of the ISHAM working group on "DNA barcoding of human and animal pathogenic fungi." A new database, containing 2800 ITS sequences representing 421 fungal species, providing the medical community with a freely accessible tool at http://www.isham.org/ and http://its.mycologylab.org/ to rapidly and reliably identify most agents of mycoses, was established. The generated sequences included in the new database were used to evaluate the variation and overall utility of the ITS region for the identification of pathogenic fungi at intra-and interspecies level. The average intraspecies variation ranged from 0 to 2.25%. This highlighted selected pathogenic fungal species, such as the dermatophytes and emerging yeast, for which additional molecular methods/genetic markers are required for their reliable identification from clinical and veterinary specimens. PMID:25802363

  11. HS3D, A Dataset of Homo Sapiens Splice Regions, and its Extraction Procedure from a Major Public Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollastro, Pasquale; Rampone, Salvatore

    The aim of this work is to describe a cleaning procedure of GenBank data, producing material to train and to assess the prediction accuracy of computational approaches for gene characterization. A procedure (GenBank2HS3D) has been defined, producing a dataset (HS3D - Homo Sapiens Splice Sites Dataset) of Homo Sapiens Splice regions extracted from GenBank (Rel.123 at this time). It selects, from the complete GenBank Primate Division, entries of Human Nuclear DNA according with several assessed criteria; then it extracts exons and introns from these entries (actually 4523 + 3802). Donor and acceptor sites are then extracted as windows of 140 nucleotides around each splice site (3799 + 3799). After discarding windows not including canonical GT-AG junctions (65 + 74), including insufficient data (not enough material for a 140 nucleotide window) (686 + 589), including not AGCT bases (29 + 30), and redundant (218 + 226), the remaining windows (2796 + 2880) are reported in the dataset. Finally, windows of false splice sites are selected by searching canonical GT-AG pairs in not splicing positions (271 937 + 332 296). The false sites in a range +/- 60 from a true splice site are marked as proximal. HS3D, release 1.2 at this time, is available at the Web server of the University of Sannio: http://www.sci.unisannio.it/docenti/rampone/.

  12. Overview of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project: Results from the pilot phase with 35 collaborating laboratories and multiple analytical groups, generating a core dataset of 3020 proteins and a publicly-available database

    SciTech Connect

    Omenn, Gilbert; States, David J.; Adamski, Marcin; Blackwell, Thomas W.; Menon, Rajasree; Hermjakob, Henning; Apweiler, Rolf; Haab, Brian B.; Simpson, Richard; Eddes, James; Kapp, Eugene; Moritz, Rod; Chan, Daniel W.; Rai, Alex J.; Admon, Arie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hancock, William S.; Hefta, Stanley A.; Meyer, Helmut; Paik, Young-Ki; Yoo, Jong-Shin; Ping, Peipei; Pounds, Joel G.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Qian, Xiaohong; Wang, Rong; Wasinger, Valerie; Wu, Chi Yue; Zhao, Xiaohang; Zeng, Rong; Archakov, Alexander; Tsugita, Akira; Beer, Ilan; Pandey, Akhilesh; Pisano, Michael; Andrews, Philip; Tammen, Harald; Speicher, David W.; Hanash, Samir M.

    2005-08-13

    HUPO initiated the Plasma Proteome Project (PPP) in 2002. Its pilot phase has (1) evaluated advantages and limitations of many depletion, fractionation, and MS technology platforms; (2) compared PPP reference specimens of human serum and EDTA, heparin, and citrate-anticoagulated plasma; and (3) created a publicly-available knowledge base (www.bioinformatics. med.umich.edu/hupo/ppp; www.ebi.ac.uk/pride). Thirty-five participating laboratories in 13 countries submitted datasets. Working groups addressed (a) specimen stability and protein concentrations; (b) protein identifications from 18 MS/MS datasets; (c) independent analyses from raw MS-MS spectra; (d) search engine performance, subproteome analyses, and biological insights; (e) antibody arrays; and (f) direct MS/SELDI analyses. MS-MS datasets had 15 710 different International Protein Index (IPI) protein IDs; our integration algorithm applied to multiple matches of peptide sequences yielded 9504 IPI proteins identified with one or more peptides and 3020 proteins identified with two or more peptides (the Core Dataset). These proteins have been characterized with Gene Ontology, InterPro, Novartis Atlas, OMIM, and immunoassay based concentration determinations. The database permits examination of many other subsets, such as 1274 proteins identified with three or more peptides. Reverse protein to DNA matching identified proteins for 118 previously unidentified ORFs. We recommend use of plasma instead of serum, with EDTA (or citrate) for anticoagulation. To improve resolution, sensitivity and reproducibility of peptide identifications and protein matches, we recommend combinations of depletion, fractionation, and MS/MS technologies, with explicit criteria for evaluation of spectra, use of search algorithms, and integration of homologous protein matches. This Special Issue of PROTEOMICS presents papers integral to the collaborative analysis plus many reports of supplementary work on various aspects of the PPP workplan. These PPP results on complexity, dynamic range, incomplete sampling, false-positive matches, and integration of diverse datasets for plasma and serum proteins lay a foundation for development and validation of circulating protein biomarkers in health and disease.

  13. Publications

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI database that contains summaries of the latest cancer information. Summaries cover treatment, screening, prevention, genetics, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Also includes a searchable listing of cancer clinical trials.

  14. DNA data bank of Japan (DDBJ) progress report.

    PubMed

    Mashima, Jun; Kodama, Yuichi; Kosuge, Takehide; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Katayama, Toshiaki; Nagasaki, Hideki; Okuda, Yoshihiro; Kaminuma, Eli; Ogasawara, Osamu; Okubo, Kousaku; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The DNA Data Bank of Japan Center (DDBJ Center; http://www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp) maintains and provides public archival, retrieval and analytical services for biological information. The contents of the DDBJ databases are shared with the US National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) within the framework of the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Since 2013, the DDBJ Center has been operating the Japanese Genotype-phenotype Archive (JGA) in collaboration with the National Bioscience Database Center (NBDC) in Japan. In addition, the DDBJ Center develops semantic web technologies for data integration and sharing in collaboration with the Database Center for Life Science (DBCLS) in Japan. This paper briefly reports on the activities of the DDBJ Center over the past year including submissions to databases and improvements in our services for data retrieval, analysis, and integration. PMID:26578571

  15. DNA data bank of Japan (DDBJ) progress report

    PubMed Central

    Mashima, Jun; Kodama, Yuichi; Kosuge, Takehide; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Katayama, Toshiaki; Nagasaki, Hideki; Okuda, Yoshihiro; Kaminuma, Eli; Ogasawara, Osamu; Okubo, Kousaku; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The DNA Data Bank of Japan Center (DDBJ Center; http://www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp) maintains and provides public archival, retrieval and analytical services for biological information. The contents of the DDBJ databases are shared with the US National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) within the framework of the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Since 2013, the DDBJ Center has been operating the Japanese Genotype-phenotype Archive (JGA) in collaboration with the National Bioscience Database Center (NBDC) in Japan. In addition, the DDBJ Center develops semantic web technologies for data integration and sharing in collaboration with the Database Center for Life Science (DBCLS) in Japan. This paper briefly reports on the activities of the DDBJ Center over the past year including submissions to databases and improvements in our services for data retrieval, analysis, and integration. PMID:26578571

  16. DATABASE AUTHENTICATION BY DISTORTION FREE WATERMARKING

    E-print Network

    Cortesi, Tino

    DATABASE AUTHENTICATION BY DISTORTION FREE WATERMARKING Sukriti Bhattacharya and Agostino Cortesi@dsi.unive.it, cortesi@unive.it Keywords: Database watermarking, ZAW, Public key watermark, Abstract interpretation the verification of integrity of the relational databases by using a public zero distortion authentication

  17. DSSTOX STRUCTURE-SEARCHABLE PUBLIC TOXICITY DATABASE NETWORK: CURRENT PROGRESS AND NEW INITIATIVES TO IMPROVE CHEMO-BIOINFORMATICS CAPABILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA DSSTox website (http://www/epa.gov/nheerl/dsstox) publishes standardized, structure-annotated toxicity databases, covering a broad range of toxicity disciplines. Each DSSTox database features documentation written in collaboration with the source authors and toxicity expe...

  18. Curated Databases 

    E-print Network

    Buneman, Peter; Cheney, James; Wang-Chiew Tan; Stijn Vansummeren

    2011-01-28

    Curated databases are databases that are populated and updated with a great deal of human e?ort. Most reference works that one traditionally found on the reference shelves of libraries – dictionaries, encyclopedias, ...

  19. FACILITY DATABASE

    Cancer.gov

    LASP Administrative Use Only Data Entry Start Date _______________ July 2007 LASP FACILTY Database Form 1.000 FACILITY DATABASE Principal Investigator – Data Entry Requirements This form is used to identify the level of data that each investigator

  20. Biofuel Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    Biofuel Database (Web, free access)   This database brings together structural, biological, and thermodynamic data for enzymes that are either in current use or are being considered for use in the production of biofuels.

  1. Publicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Joan

    Publicity for preschool cooperatives is described. Publicity helps produce financial support for preschool cooperatives. It may take the form of posters, brochures, newsletters, open house, newspaper coverage, and radio and television. Word of mouth and general good will in the community are the best avenues of publicity that a cooperative nursery…

  2. JICST Factual Database(1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Shinji

    The outline of JICST factual database (JOIS-F), which JICST has started from January, 1988, and its online service are described in this paper. First, the author mentions the circumstances from 1973, when its planning was started, to the present, and its relation to "Project by Special Coordination Founds for Promoting Science and Technology". Secondly, databases, which are now under development aiming to start its services from fiscal 1988 or fiscal 1989, of DNA, metallic material intensity, crystal structure, chemical substance regulations, and so forth, are described. Lastly, its online service is briefly explained.

  3. The Diatom EST Database

    PubMed Central

    Maheswari, Uma; Montsant, Anton; Goll, Johannes; Krishnasamy, S.; Rajyashri, K. R.; Patell, Villoo Morawala; Bowler, Chris

    2005-01-01

    The Diatom EST database provides integrated access to expressed sequence tag (EST) data from two eukaryotic microalgae of the class Bacillariophyceae, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. The database currently contains sequences of close to 30?000 ESTs organized into PtDB, the P.tricornutum EST database, and TpDB, the T.pseudonana EST database. The EST sequences were clustered and assembled into a non-redundant set for each organism, and these non-redundant sequences were then subjected to automated annotation using similarity searches against protein and domain databases. EST sequences, clusters of contiguous sequences, their annotation and analysis with reference to the publicly available databases, and a codon usage table derived from a subset of sequences from PtDB and TpDB can all be accessed in the Diatom EST Database. The underlying RDBMS enables queries over the raw and annotated EST data and retrieval of information through a user-friendly web interface, with options to perform keyword and BLAST searches. The EST data can also be retrieved based on Pfam domains, Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Gene Ontologies (GO) assigned to them by similarity searches. The Database is available at http://avesthagen.sznbowler.com. PMID:15608213

  4. Database Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  5. Annual Review of Database Development: 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basch, Reva

    1992-01-01

    Reviews recent trends in databases and online systems. Topics discussed include new access points for established databases; acquisitions, consolidations, and competition between vendors; European coverage; international services; online reference materials, including telephone directories; political and legal materials and public records;…

  6. USDA NATIONAL NUTRIENT DATABASE FOR STANDARD REFERENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR) is the major source of food composition data in the United States. It provides the foundation for most food composition databases in the public and private sectors.

  7. A practical tool for public health surveillance: Semi-automated coding of short injury narratives from large administrative databases using Naïve Bayes algorithms.

    PubMed

    Marucci-Wellman, Helen R; Lehto, Mark R; Corns, Helen L

    2015-11-01

    Public health surveillance programs in the U.S. are undergoing landmark changes with the availability of electronic health records and advancements in information technology. Injury narratives gathered from hospital records, workers compensation claims or national surveys can be very useful for identifying antecedents to injury or emerging risks. However, classifying narratives manually can become prohibitive for large datasets. The purpose of this study was to develop a human-machine system that could be relatively easily tailored to routinely and accurately classify injury narratives from large administrative databases such as workers compensation. We used a semi-automated approach based on two Naïve Bayesian algorithms to classify 15,000 workers compensation narratives into two-digit Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) event (leading to injury) codes. Narratives were filtered out for manual review if the algorithms disagreed or made weak predictions. This approach resulted in an overall accuracy of 87%, with consistently high positive predictive values across all two-digit BLS event categories including the very small categories (e.g., exposure to noise, needle sticks). The Naïve Bayes algorithms were able to identify and accurately machine code most narratives leaving only 32% (4853) for manual review. This strategy substantially reduces the need for resources compared with manual review alone. PMID:26412196

  8. Method and system for normalizing biometric variations to authenticate users from a public database and that ensures individual biometric data privacy

    DOEpatents

    Strait, Robert S. (Oakland, CA); Pearson, Peter K. (Livermore, CA); Sengupta, Sailes K. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A password system comprises a set of codewords spaced apart from one another by a Hamming distance (HD) that exceeds twice the variability that can be projected for a series of biometric measurements for a particular individual and that is less than the HD that can be encountered between two individuals. To enroll an individual, a biometric measurement is taken and exclusive-ORed with a random codeword to produce a "reference value." To verify the individual later, a biometric measurement is taken and exclusive-ORed with the reference value to reproduce the original random codeword or its approximation. If the reproduced value is not a codeword, the nearest codeword to it is found, and the bits that were corrected to produce the codeword to it is found, and the bits that were corrected to produce the codeword are also toggled in the biometric measurement taken and the codeword generated during enrollment. The correction scheme can be implemented by any conventional error correction code such as Reed-Muller code R(m,n). In the implementation using a hand geometry device an R(2,5) code has been used in this invention. Such codeword and biometric measurement can then be used to see if the individual is an authorized user. Conventional Diffie-Hellman public key encryption schemes and hashing procedures can then be used to secure the communications lines carrying the biometric information and to secure the database of authorized users.

  9. Method and system for normalizing biometric variations to authenticate users from a public database and that ensures individual biometric data privacy

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, R.S.; Pearson, P.K.; Sengupta, S.K.

    2000-03-14

    A password system comprises a set of codewords spaced apart from one another by a Hamming distance (HD) that exceeds twice the variability that can be projected for a series of biometric measurements for a particular individual and that is less than the HD that can be encountered between two individuals. To enroll an individual, a biometric measurement is taken and exclusive-ORed with a random codeword to produce a reference value. To verify the individual later, a biometric measurement is taken and exclusive-ORed with the reference value to reproduce the original random codeword or its approximation. If the reproduced value is not a codeword, the nearest codeword to it is found, and the bits that were corrected to produce the codeword to it is found, and the bits that were corrected to produce the codeword are also toggled in the biometric measurement taken and the codeword generated during enrollment. The correction scheme can be implemented by any conventional error correction code such as Reed-Muller code R(m,n). In the implementation using a hand geometry device an R(2,5) code has been used in this invention. Such codeword and biometric measurement can then be used to see if the individual is an authorized user. Conventional Diffie-Hellman public key encryption schemes and hashing procedures can then be used to secure the communications lines carrying the biometric information and to secure the database of authorized users.

  10. Computational tools and resources for metabolism-related property predictions. 1. Overview of publicly available (free and commercial) databases and software

    PubMed Central

    Peach, Megan L; Zakharov, Alexey V; Liu, Ruifeng; Pugliese, Angelo; Tawa, Gregory; Wallqvist, Anders; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism has been identified as a defining factor in drug development success or failure because of its impact on many aspects of drug pharmacology, including bioavailability, half-life and toxicity. In this article, we provide an outline and descriptions of the resources for metabolism-related property predictions that are currently either freely or commercially available to the public. These resources include databases with data on, and software for prediction of, several end points: metabolite formation, sites of metabolic transformation, binding to metabolizing enzymes and metabolic stability. We attempt to place each tool in historical context and describe, wherever possible, the data it was based on. For predictions of interactions with metabolizing enzymes, we show a typical set of results for a small test set of compounds. Our aim is to give a clear overview of the areas and aspects of metabolism prediction in which the currently available resources are useful and accurate, and the areas in which they are inadequate or missing entirely. PMID:23088273

  11. Fit-for-purpose curated database application in mass spectrometry-based targeted protein identification and validation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry (MS) is a very sensitive and specific method for protein identification, biomarker discovery, and biomarker validation. Protein identification is commonly carried out by comparing MS data with public databases. However, with the development of high throughput and accurate genomic sequencing technology, public databases are being overwhelmed with new entries from different species every day. The application of these databases can also be problematic due to factors such as size, specificity, and unharmonized annotation of the molecules of interest. Current databases representing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based searches focus on enzyme digestion patterns and sequence information and consequently, important functional information can be missed within the search output. Protein variants displaying similar sequence homology can interfere with database identification when only certain homologues are examined. In addition, recombinant DNA technology can result in products that may not be accurately annotated in public databases. Curated databases, which focus on the molecule of interest with clearer functional annotation and sequence information, are necessary for accurate protein identification and validation. Here, four cases of curated database application have been explored and summarized. Findings The four presented curated databases were constructed with clear goals regarding application and have proven very useful for targeted protein identification and biomarker application in different fields. They include a sheeppox virus database created for accurate identification of proteins with strong antigenicity, a custom database containing clearly annotated protein variants such as tau transcript variant 2 for accurate biomarker identification, a sheep-hamster chimeric prion protein (PrP) database constructed for assay development of prion diseases, and a custom Escherichia coli (E. coli) flagella (H antigen) database produced for MS-H, a new H-typing technique. Clearly annotating the proteins of interest was essential for highly accurate, specific, and sensitive sequence identification, and searching against public databases resulted in inaccurate identification of the sequence of interest, while combining the curated database with a public database reduced both the confidence and sequence coverage of the protein search. Conclusion Curated protein sequence databases incorporating clear annotations are very useful for accurate protein identification and fit-for-purpose application through MS-based biomarker validation. PMID:25011440

  12. National Ambient Radiation Database

    SciTech Connect

    Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

  13. Addition of a breeding database in the Genome Database for Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kate; Jung, Sook; Lee, Taein; Brutcher, Lisa; Cho, Ilhyung; Peace, Cameron; Main, Dorrie

    2013-01-01

    Breeding programs produce large datasets that require efficient management systems to keep track of performance, pedigree, geographical and image-based data. With the development of DNA-based screening technologies, more breeding programs perform genotyping in addition to phenotyping for performance evaluation. The integration of breeding data with other genomic and genetic data is instrumental for the refinement of marker-assisted breeding tools, enhances genetic understanding of important crop traits and maximizes access and utility by crop breeders and allied scientists. Development of new infrastructure in the Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR) was designed and implemented to enable secure and efficient storage, management and analysis of large datasets from the Washington State University apple breeding program and subsequently expanded to fit datasets from other Rosaceae breeders. The infrastructure was built using the software Chado and Drupal, making use of the Natural Diversity module to accommodate large-scale phenotypic and genotypic data. Breeders can search accessions within the GDR to identify individuals with specific trait combinations. Results from Search by Parentage lists individuals with parents in common and results from Individual Variety pages link to all data available on each chosen individual including pedigree, phenotypic and genotypic information. Genotypic data are searchable by markers and alleles; results are linked to other pages in the GDR to enable the user to access tools such as GBrowse and CMap. This breeding database provides users with the opportunity to search datasets in a fully targeted manner and retrieve and compare performance data from multiple selections, years and sites, and to output the data needed for variety release publications and patent applications. The breeding database facilitates efficient program management. Storing publicly available breeding data in a database together with genomic and genetic data will further accelerate the cross-utilization of diverse data types by researchers from various disciplines. Database URL: http://www.rosaceae.org/breeders_toolbox. PMID:24247530

  14. The EUVE satellite survey database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, N.; Chen, T.; Hawkins, I.; Fruscione, A.

    1993-01-01

    The EUVE survey database contains fundamental science data for 9000 potential source locations (pigeonholes) in the sky. The first release of the Bright Source List is now available to the public through an interface with the NASA Astrophysical Data System. We describe the database schema design and the EUVE source categorization algorithm that compares sources to the ROSAT Wide Field Camera source list.

  15. Fun Databases: My Top Ten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Mick

    1992-01-01

    Provides reviews of 10 online databases: Consumer Reports; Public Opinion Online; Encyclopedia of Associations; Official Airline Guide Adventure Atlas and Events Calendar; CENDATA; Hollywood Hotline; Fearless Taster; Soap Opera Summaries; and Human Sexuality. (LRW)

  16. Progress towards a Spacecraft-Associated Microbial Meta-database (SAMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Keagy, Laura; Nava, Argelia; Zerehi, Farah

    The microbial inventories within the assembly facilities for spacecraft represent the primary pool of forward contaminants that may compromise life-detection missions. Accordingly, we are constructing a meta-database of these microorganisms for the purpose of building a bioinformatic resource for planetary protection and astrobiology-related endeavors. Using student-led efforts, the meta-database is being constructed from literature reports and is inclusive of both isolated microorganisms and those solely detected through DNA-based techniques. The Spacecraft-Associated Microbial Meta-database (SAMM) currently includes over 800 entries that are organized using 32 meta-tags involving taxonomy, location of isolation (facility and component), category of characterization (culture and/or genetic), types of characterizations (e.g., culture, 16s rDNA, phylochip, FAME, and DNA hybridization), growth conditions, Gram stain, and general physiological traits (e.g., sporulation, extremotolerance, and respiration properties). Interrogations on the database show that the cleanrooms at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are ~ 2-fold greater in diversity in bacterial genera when compared to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and that bacteria related to water, plant, and human environments are more often associated with the KSC-specific genera. These results are parallel to those reported in the literature, and hence serve as benchmarks demonstrating the bioinformatic potential of this meta-database. The ultimate plans for SAMM include public availability, expansion through crowdsourcing efforts, and potential use as a companion resource to the culture collections assembled by DSMZ and JPL.

  17. Public Databases Supporting Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major goal of the emerging field of computational toxicology is the development of screening-level models that predict potential toxicity of chemicals from a combination of mechanistic in vitro assay data and chemical structure descriptors. In order to build these models, resea...

  18. Glycoproteomic and glycomic databases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation serves critical roles in the cellular and biological processes of many organisms. Aberrant glycosylation has been associated with many illnesses such as hereditary and chronic diseases like cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and immunological disorders. Emerging mass spectrometry (MS) technologies that enable the high-throughput identification of glycoproteins and glycans have accelerated the analysis and made possible the creation of dynamic and expanding databases. Although glycosylation-related databases have been established by many laboratories and institutions, they are not yet widely known in the community. Our study reviews 15 different publicly available databases and identifies their key elements so that users can identify the most applicable platform for their analytical needs. These databases include biological information on the experimentally identified glycans and glycopeptides from various cells and organisms such as human, rat, mouse, fly and zebrafish. The features of these databases - 7 for glycoproteomic data, 6 for glycomic data, and 2 for glycan binding proteins are summarized including the enrichment techniques that are used for glycoproteome and glycan identification. Furthermore databases such as Unipep, GlycoFly, GlycoFish recently established by our group are introduced. The unique features of each database, such as the analytical methods used and bioinformatical tools available are summarized. This information will be a valuable resource for the glycobiology community as it presents the analytical methods and glycosylation related databases together in one compendium. It will also represent a step towards the desired long term goal of integrating the different databases of glycosylation in order to characterize and categorize glycoproteins and glycans better for biomedical research. PMID:24725457

  19. Glycoproteomic and glycomic databases.

    PubMed

    Baycin Hizal, Deniz; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joseph; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; Krag, Sharon S; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation serves critical roles in the cellular and biological processes of many organisms. Aberrant glycosylation has been associated with many illnesses such as hereditary and chronic diseases like cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and immunological disorders. Emerging mass spectrometry (MS) technologies that enable the high-throughput identification of glycoproteins and glycans have accelerated the analysis and made possible the creation of dynamic and expanding databases. Although glycosylation-related databases have been established by many laboratories and institutions, they are not yet widely known in the community. Our study reviews 15 different publicly available databases and identifies their key elements so that users can identify the most applicable platform for their analytical needs. These databases include biological information on the experimentally identified glycans and glycopeptides from various cells and organisms such as human, rat, mouse, fly and zebrafish. The features of these databases - 7 for glycoproteomic data, 6 for glycomic data, and 2 for glycan binding proteins are summarized including the enrichment techniques that are used for glycoproteome and glycan identification. Furthermore databases such as Unipep, GlycoFly, GlycoFish recently established by our group are introduced. The unique features of each database, such as the analytical methods used and bioinformatical tools available are summarized. This information will be a valuable resource for the glycobiology community as it presents the analytical methods and glycosylation related databases together in one compendium. It will also represent a step towards the desired long term goal of integrating the different databases of glycosylation in order to characterize and categorize glycoproteins and glycans better for biomedical research. PMID:24725457

  20. NIOSHTIC DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NIOSHTIC Database is a bibliographic database of literature in the field of occupational safety and health. English language technical journals provide approximately 35 percent of the additions to NIOSHTIC? annually. Retrospective information, some of which is from the 19th centu...

  1. Database Manager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    It is normal practice today for organizations to store large quantities of records of related information as computer-based files or databases. Purposeful information is retrieved by performing queries on the data sets. The purpose of DATABASE MANAGER is to communicate to students the method by which the computer performs these queries. This…

  2. Databases and software for the analysis of mutations in the human p53 gene, the human hprt gene and the lacZ gene in transgenic rodents.

    PubMed

    Cariello, N F; Douglas, G R; Soussi, T

    1996-01-01

    We have created databases and software applications for the analysis of DNA mutations in the human p53 gene, the human hprt gene and the rodent transgenic lacZ locus. The databases themselves are stand-alone dBase files and the software for analysis of the databases runs on IBM- compatible computers. The software created for these databases permits filtering, ordering, report generation and display of information in the database. In addition, a significant number of routines have been developed for the analysis of single base substitutions. One method of obtaining the databases and software is via the World Wide Web (WWW). Open home page http://sunsite.unc.edu/dnam/mainpage.ht ml with a WWW browser. Alternatively, the databases and programs are available via public ftp from anonymous@sunsite.unc.edu. There is no password required to enter the system. The databases and software are found in subdirectory pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations. Two other programs are available at the WWW site, a program for comparison of mutational spectra and a program for entry of mutational data into a relational database. PMID:8594557

  3. The Future of Forensic DNA

    E-print Network

    besides STRs for identity testing? ­ Phenotyping capabilities? ­ Next-generation DNA sequencing? #12;NIST ­ Expanded use of databases (e.g., familial searching) ­ Rapid DNA testing · More distant future ­ LociThe Future of Forensic DNA John M. Butler, PhD National Institute of Standards and Technology

  4. ECOTOX database; new additions and future direction

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ECOTOXicology database (ECOTOX) is a comprehensive, publicly available knowledgebase developed and maintained by ORD/NHEERL. It is used for environmental toxicity data on aquatic life, terrestrial plants and wildlife. Publications are identified for potential applicability af...

  5. Annual Review of Database Developments 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basch, Reva

    1991-01-01

    Review of developments in databases highlights a new emphasis on accessibility. Topics discussed include the internationalization of databases; databases that deal with finance, drugs, and toxic waste; access to public records, both personal and corporate; media online; reducing large files of data to smaller, more manageable files; and…

  6. COXPRESdb in 2015: coexpression database for animal species by DNA-microarray and RNAseq-based expression data with multiple quality assessment systems

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Yasunobu; Aoki, Yuichi; Obayashi, Takeshi; Tadaka, Shu; Ito, Satoshi; Narise, Takafumi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    The COXPRESdb (http://coxpresdb.jp) provides gene coexpression relationships for animal species. Here, we report the updates of the database, mainly focusing on the following two points. For the first point, we added RNAseq-based gene coexpression data for three species (human, mouse and fly), and largely increased the number of microarray experiments to nine species. The increase of the number of expression data with multiple platforms could enhance the reliability of coexpression data. For the second point, we refined the data assessment procedures, for each coexpressed gene list and for the total performance of a platform. The assessment of coexpressed gene list now uses more reasonable P-values derived from platform-specific null distribution. These developments greatly reduced pseudo-predictions for directly associated genes, thus expanding the reliability of coexpression data to design new experiments and to discuss experimental results. PMID:25392420

  7. The Porcelain Crab Transcriptome and PCAD, the Porcelain Crab Microarray and Sequence Database

    SciTech Connect

    Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Wang, Mei; Lindquist, Erika; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Teranishi, Kristen S.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wong, Mike; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2010-01-27

    Background: With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Methodology/Principal Findings: A set of ~;;30K unique sequences (UniSeqs) representing ~;;19K clusters were generated from ~;;98K high quality ESTs from a set of tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66percent of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD), a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases.Conclusions/Significance: The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the transcriptome as can reasonably be captured in EST library sequencing approaches, and thus represent a rich resource for studies of environmental genomics.

  8. The Porcelain Crab Transcriptome and PCAD, the Porcelain Crab Microarray and Sequence Database

    PubMed Central

    Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Wang, Mei; Lindquist, Erika; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Teranishi, Kristen S.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wong, Mike; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2010-01-01

    Background With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Methodology/Principal Findings A set of ?30K unique sequences (UniSeqs) representing ?19K clusters were generated from ?98K high quality ESTs from a set of tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66% of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD), a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases. Conclusions/Significance The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the transcriptome as can reasonably be captured in EST library sequencing approaches, and thus represent a rich resource for studies of environmental genomics. PMID:20174471

  9. BIOMARKERS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This database was developed by assembling and evaluating the literature relevant to human biomarkers. It catalogues and evaluates the usefulness of biomarkers of exposure, susceptibility and effect which may be relevant for a longitudinal cohort study. In addition to describing ...

  10. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1992-04-30

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air- conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R- 125, R-134a, R-141b, R142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-290 (propane), R-717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses polyalkylene glycol (PAG), ester, and other lubricants. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits.

  11. The Molecular Biology Database Collection: 2005 update

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.

    2005-01-01

    The Nucleic Acids Research Molecular Biology Database Collection is a public online resource that lists the databases described in this and previous issues of Nucleic Acids Research together with other databases of value to the biologist and available throughout the world. All databases included in this Collection are freely available to the public. The 2005 update includes 719 databases, 171 more than the 2004 one. The databases are organized in a hierarchical classification that simplifies the process of finding the right database for any given task. The growing number of databases related to immunology, plant and organelle research have been accommodated by separating them into three new categories. The database summaries provide brief descriptions of the databases, contact details, appropriate references and acknowledgements. The online summaries also serve as a venue for the maintainers of each database to introduce database updates and other improvements in the scope and tools. These updates are particularly important for those databases that have not been described in print in the recent past. The database list and summaries are available online at the Nucleic Acids Research web site, http://nar.oupjournals.org/. PMID:15608247

  12. Quality control of EUVE databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, L. M.; Drake, J.

    1992-01-01

    The publicly accessible databases for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer include: the EUVE Archive mailserver; the CEA ftp site; the EUVE Guest Observer Mailserver; and the Astronomical Data System node. The EUVE Performance Assurance team is responsible for verifying that these public EUVE databases are working properly, and that the public availability of EUVE data contained therein does not infringe any data rights which may have been assigned. In this poster, we describe the Quality Assurance (QA) procedures we have developed from the approach of QA as a service organization, thus reflecting the overall EUVE philosophy of Quality Assurance integrated into normal operating procedures, rather than imposed as an external, post facto, control mechanism.

  13. The Hawaiian Freshwater Algal Database (HfwADB): a laboratory LIMS and online biodiversity resource

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biodiversity databases serve the important role of highlighting species-level diversity from defined geographical regions. Databases that are specially designed to accommodate the types of data gathered during regional surveys are valuable in allowing full data access and display to researchers not directly involved with the project, while serving as a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS). The Hawaiian Freshwater Algal Database, or HfwADB, was modified from the Hawaiian Algal Database to showcase non-marine algal specimens collected from the Hawaiian Archipelago by accommodating the additional level of organization required for samples including multiple species. Description The Hawaiian Freshwater Algal Database is a comprehensive and searchable database containing photographs and micrographs of samples and collection sites, geo-referenced collecting information, taxonomic data and standardized DNA sequence data. All data for individual samples are linked through unique 10-digit accession numbers (“Isolate Accession”), the first five of which correspond to the collection site (“Environmental Accession”). Users can search online for sample information by accession number, various levels of taxonomy, habitat or collection site. HfwADB is hosted at the University of Hawaii, and was made publicly accessible in October 2011. At the present time the database houses data for over 2,825 samples of non-marine algae from 1,786 collection sites from the Hawaiian Archipelago. These samples include cyanobacteria, red and green algae and diatoms, as well as lesser representation from some other algal lineages. Conclusions HfwADB is a digital repository that acts as a Laboratory Information Management System for Hawaiian non-marine algal data. Users can interact with the repository through the web to view relevant habitat data (including geo-referenced collection locations) and download images of collection sites, specimen photographs and micrographs, and DNA sequences. It is publicly available at http://algae.manoa.hawaii.edu/hfwadb/. PMID:23095476

  14. Databases and software for the analysis of mutations in the human p53 gene, human hprt gene and both the lacI and lacZ gene in transgenic rodents.

    PubMed

    Cariello, N F; Douglas, G R; Gorelick, N J; Hart, D W; Wilson, J D; Soussi, T

    1998-01-01

    We have created databases and software applications for the analysis of DNA mutations at the human p53 gene, the human hprt gene and both the rodent transgenic lacI and lacZ loci. The databases themselves are stand-alone dBASE files and the software for analysis of the databases runs on IBM-compatible computers with Microsoft Windows. Each database has a separate software analysis program. The software created for these databases permit the filtering, ordering, report generation and display of information in the database. In addition, a significant number of routines have been developed for the analysis of single base substitutions. One method of obtaining the databases and software is via the World Wide Web. Open the following home page with a Web Browser: http://sunsite.unc.edu/dnam/mainpage. html . Alternatively, the databases and programs are available via public FTP from: anonymous@sunsite.unc.edu. There is no password required to enter the system. The databases and software are found beneath the subdirectory: pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations. Two other programs are available at the site, a program for comparison of mutational spectra and a program for entry of mutational data into a relational database. PMID:9399835

  15. Databases and software for the analysis of mutations in the human p53 gene, the human hprt gene and both the lacI and lacZ gene in transgenic rodents.

    PubMed

    Cariello, N F; Douglas, G R; Dycaico, M J; Gorelick, N J; Provost, G S; Soussi, T

    1997-01-01

    We have created databases and software applications for the analysis of DNA mutations at the humanp53gene, the humanhprtgene and both the rodent transgeniclacIandlacZlocus. The databases themselves are stand-alone dBASE files and the software for analysis of the databases runs on IBM-compatible computers. Each database has a separate software analysis program. The software created for these databases permit the filtering, ordering, report generation and display of information in the database. In addition, a significant number of routines have been developed for the analysis of single base substitutions. One method of obtaining the databases and software is via the World Wide Web (WWW). Open the following home page with a Web Browser: http://sunsite.unc.edu/dnam/mainpage.ht ml . Alternatively, the databases and programs are available via public FTP from: anonymous@sunsite.unc.edu . There is no password required to enter the system. The databases and software are found beneath the subdirectory: pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations. Two other programs are available at the site-a program for comparison of mutational spectra and a program for entry of mutational data into a relational database. PMID:9016522

  16. FishTraits Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angermeier, Paul L.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.

    2009-01-01

    The need for integrated and widely accessible sources of species traits data to facilitate studies of ecology, conservation, and management has motivated development of traits databases for various taxa. In spite of the increasing number of traits-based analyses of freshwater fishes in the United States, no consolidated database of traits of this group exists publicly, and much useful information on these species is documented only in obscure sources. The largely inaccessible and unconsolidated traits information makes large-scale analysis involving many fishes and/or traits particularly challenging. FishTraits is a database of >100 traits for 809 (731 native and 78 exotic) fish species found in freshwaters of the conterminous United States, including 37 native families and 145 native genera. The database contains information on four major categories of traits: (1) trophic ecology, (2) body size and reproductive ecology (life history), (3) habitat associations, and (4) salinity and temperature tolerances. Information on geographic distribution and conservation status is also included. Together, we refer to the traits, distribution, and conservation status information as attributes. Descriptions of attributes are available here. Many sources were consulted to compile attributes, including state and regional species accounts and other databases.

  17. Generation and Analysis of a Large-Scale Expressed Sequence Tag Database from a Full-Length Enriched cDNA Library of Developing Leaves of Gossypium hirsutum L

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chaoyou; Fan, Shuli; Song, Meizhen; Yu, Shuxun

    2013-01-01

    Background Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is one of the world’s most economically-important crops. However, its entire genome has not been sequenced, and limited resources are available in GenBank for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying leaf development and senescence. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, 9,874 high-quality ESTs were generated from a normalized, full-length cDNA library derived from pooled RNA isolated from throughout leaf development during the plant blooming stage. After clustering and assembly of these ESTs, 5,191 unique sequences, representative 1,652 contigs and 3,539 singletons, were obtained. The average unique sequence length was 682 bp. Annotation of these unique sequences revealed that 84.4% showed significant homology to sequences in the NCBI non-redundant protein database, and 57.3% had significant hits to known proteins in the Swiss-Prot database. Comparative analysis indicated that our library added 2,400 ESTs and 991 unique sequences to those known for cotton. The unigenes were functionally characterized by gene ontology annotation. We identified 1,339 and 200 unigenes as potential leaf senescence-related genes and transcription factors, respectively. Moreover, nine genes related to leaf senescence and eleven MYB transcription factors were randomly selected for quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), which revealed that these genes were regulated differentially during senescence. The qRT-PCR for three GhYLSs revealed that these genes express express preferentially in senescent leaves. Conclusions/Significance These EST resources will provide valuable sequence information for gene expression profiling analyses and functional genomics studies to elucidate their roles, as well as for studying the mechanisms of leaf development and senescence in cotton and discovering candidate genes related to important agronomic traits of cotton. These data will also facilitate future whole-genome sequence assembly and annotation in G. hirsutum and comparative genomics among Gossypium species. PMID:24146870

  18. Molecular Identification and Databases in Fusarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA sequence-based methods for identifying pathogenic and mycotoxigenic Fusarium isolates have become the gold standard worldwide. Moreover, fusarial DNA sequence data are increasing rapidly in several web-accessible databases for comparative purposes. Unfortunately, the use of Basic Alignment Sea...

  19. Experiment Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschoren, Joaquin; Blockeel, Hendrik

    Next to running machine learning algorithms based on inductive queries, much can be learned by immediately querying the combined results of many prior studies. Indeed, all around the globe, thousands of machine learning experiments are being executed on a daily basis, generating a constant stream of empirical information on machine learning techniques. While the information contained in these experiments might have many uses beyond their original intent, results are typically described very concisely in papers and discarded afterwards. If we properly store and organize these results in central databases, they can be immediately reused for further analysis, thus boosting future research. In this chapter, we propose the use of experiment databases: databases designed to collect all the necessary details of these experiments, and to intelligently organize them in online repositories to enable fast and thorough analysis of a myriad of collected results. They constitute an additional, queriable source of empirical meta-data based on principled descriptions of algorithm executions, without reimplementing the algorithms in an inductive database. As such, they engender a very dynamic, collaborative approach to experimentation, in which experiments can be freely shared, linked together, and immediately reused by researchers all over the world. They can be set up for personal use, to share results within a lab or to create open, community-wide repositories. Here, we provide a high-level overview of their design, and use an existing experiment database to answer various interesting research questions about machine learning algorithms and to verify a number of recent studies.

  20. Solubility Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 106 IUPAC-NIST Solubility Database (Web, free access)   These solubilities are compiled from 18 volumes (Click here for List) of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry(IUPAC)-NIST Solubility Data Series. The database includes liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-liquid systems. Typical solvents and solutes include water, seawater, heavy water, inorganic compounds, and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters and nitrogen compounds. There are over 67,500 solubility measurements and over 1800 references.

  1. FishMicrosat: a microsatellite database of commercially important fishes and shellfishes of the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microsatellite DNA is one of many powerful genetic markers used for the construction of genetic linkage maps and the study of population genetics. The biological databases in public domain hold vast numbers of microsatellite sequences for many organisms including fishes. The microsatellite data available in these data sources were extracted and managed into a database that facilitates sequences analysis and browsing relevant information. The system also helps to design primer sequences for flanking regions of repeat loci for PCR identification of polymorphism within populations. Description FishMicrosat is a database of microsatellite sequences of fishes and shellfishes that includes important aquaculture species such as Lates calcarifer, Ctenopharyngodon idella, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, Penaeus monodon, Labeo rohita, Oreochromis niloticus, Fenneropenaeus indicus and Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The database contains 4398 microsatellite sequences of 41 species belonging to 15 families from the Indian subcontinent. GenBank of NCBI was used as a prime data source for developing the database. The database presents information about simple and compound microsatellites, their clusters and locus orientation within sequences. The database has been integrated with different tools in a web interface such as primer designing, locus finding, mapping repeats, detecting similarities among sequences across species, and searching using motifs and keywords. In addition, the database has the ability to browse information on the top 10 families and the top 10 species, through record overview. Conclusions FishMicrosat database is a useful resource for fish and shellfish microsatellite analyses and locus identification across species, which has important applications in population genetics, evolutionary studies and genetic relatedness among species. The database can be expanded further to include the microsatellite data of fishes and shellfishes from other regions and available information on genome sequencing project of species of aquaculture importance. PMID:24047532

  2. FACILITY DATABASE

    Cancer.gov

    LASP Administrative Use Only Data Entry Start Date _______________Investigator Data RequirementsJuly 2007 LASP FACILTY Database Form 1.000This form is used to identify the level of data that each investigator [and his/her staff] will require for entry

  3. FlyVar: a database for genetic variation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Jiang, Lichun; Chen, Yong; Haelterman, Nele A.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    FlyVar is a publicly and freely available platform that addresses the increasing need of next generation sequencing data analysis in the Drosophila research community. It is composed of three parts. First, a database that contains 5.94 million DNA polymorphisms found in Drosophila melanogaster derived from whole genome shotgun sequencing of 612 genomes of D. melanogaster. In addition, a list of 1094 dispensable genes has been identified. Second, a graphical user interface (GUI) has been implemented to allow easy and flexible queries of the database. Third, a set of interactive online tools enables filtering and annotation of genomic sequences obtained from individual D. melanogaster strains to identify candidate mutations. FlyVar permits the analysis of next generation sequencing data without the need of extensive computational training or resources. Database URL: www.iipl.fudan.edu.cn/FlyVar. PMID:26289428

  4. Database of recent tsunami deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a database of sedimentary characteristics of tsunami deposits derived from published accounts of tsunami deposit investigations conducted shortly after the occurrence of a tsunami. The database contains 228 entries, each entry containing data from up to 71 categories. It includes data from 51 publications covering 15 tsunamis distributed between 16 countries. The database encompasses a wide range of depositional settings including tropical islands, beaches, coastal plains, river banks, agricultural fields, and urban environments. It includes data from both local tsunamis and teletsunamis. The data are valuable for interpreting prehistorical, historical, and modern tsunami deposits, and for the development of criteria to identify tsunami deposits in the geologic record.

  5. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  6. Introduction to Database Database Systems Lecture 1

    E-print Network

    Alechina, Natasha

    Introduction to Database Systems Database Systems Lecture 1 Natasha Alechina www.cs.nott.ac.uk/~nza/G51DBS #12;In this Lecture · Course Information · Databases and Database Systems · Some History questions · Format similar to previous years. #12;Textbook · Recommended textbooks: · `Database Systems

  7. The AMMA database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloche, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Fleury, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim

    2010-05-01

    The AMMA project includes aircraft, ground-based and ocean measurements, an intensive use of satellite data and diverse modelling studies. Therefore, the AMMA database aims at storing a great amount and a large variety of data, and at providing the data as rapidly and safely as possible to the AMMA research community. In order to stimulate the exchange of information and collaboration between researchers from different disciplines or using different tools, the database provides a detailed description of the products and uses standardized formats. The AMMA database contains: - AMMA field campaigns datasets; - historical data in West Africa from 1850 (operational networks and previous scientific programs); - satellite products from past and future satellites, (re-)mapped on a regular latitude/longitude grid and stored in NetCDF format (CF Convention); - model outputs from atmosphere or ocean operational (re-)analysis and forecasts, and from research simulations. The outputs are processed as the satellite products are. Before accessing the data, any user has to sign the AMMA data and publication policy. This chart only covers the use of data in the framework of scientific objectives and categorically excludes the redistribution of data to third parties and the usage for commercial applications. Some collaboration between data producers and users, and the mention of the AMMA project in any publication is also required. The AMMA database and the associated on-line tools have been fully developed and are managed by two teams in France (IPSL Database Centre, Paris and OMP, Toulouse). Users can access data of both data centres using an unique web portal. This website is composed of different modules : - Registration: forms to register, read and sign the data use chart when an user visits for the first time - Data access interface: friendly tool allowing to build a data extraction request by selecting various criteria like location, time, parameters... The request can concern local, satellite and model data. - Documentation: catalogue of all the available data and their metadata. These tools have been developed using standard and free languages and softwares: - Linux system with an Apache web server and a Tomcat application server; - J2EE tools : JSF and Struts frameworks, hibernate; - relational database management systems: PostgreSQL and MySQL; - OpenLDAP directory. In order to facilitate the access to the data by African scientists, the complete system has been mirrored at AGHRYMET Regional Centre in Niamey and is operational there since January 2009. Users can now access metadata and request data through one or the other of two equivalent portals: http://database.amma-international.org or http://amma.agrhymet.ne/amma-data.

  8. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  9. The urologic epithelial stem cell database (UESC) – a web tool for cell type-specific gene expression and immunohistochemistry images of the prostate and bladder

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Laura E; Deutsch, Eric W; Campbell, David S; Korb, Martin; True, Lawrence D; Liu, Alvin Y

    2007-01-01

    Background Public databases are crucial for analysis of high-dimensional gene and protein expression data. The Urologic Epithelial Stem Cells (UESC) database is a public database that contains gene and protein information for the major cell types of the prostate, prostate cancer cell lines, and a cancer cell type isolated from a primary tumor. Similarly, such information is available for urinary bladder cell types. Description Two major data types were archived in the database, protein abundance localization data from immunohistochemistry images, and transcript abundance data principally from DNA microarray analysis. Data results were organized in modules that were made to operate independently but built upon a core functionality. Gene array data and immunostaining images for human and mouse prostate and bladder were made available for interrogation. Data analysis capabilities include: (1) CD (cluster designation) cell surface protein data. For each cluster designation molecule, a data summary allows easy retrieval of images (at multiple magnifications). (2) Microarray data. Single gene or batch search can be initiated with Affymetrix Probeset ID, Gene Name, or Accession Number together with options of coalescing probesets and/or replicates. Conclusion Databases are invaluable for biomedical research, and their utility depends on data quality and user friendliness. UESC provides for database queries and tools to examine cell type-specific gene expression (normal vs. cancer), whereas most other databases contain only whole tissue expression datasets. The UESC database provides a valuable tool in the analysis of differential gene expression in prostate cancer genes in cancer progression. PMID:18072977

  10. Database systems for knowledge-based discovery.

    PubMed

    Jagarlapudi, Sarma A R P; Kishan, K V Radha

    2009-01-01

    Several database systems have been developed to provide valuable information from the bench chemist to biologist, medical practitioner to pharmaceutical scientist in a structured format. The advent of information technology and computational power enhanced the ability to access large volumes of data in the form of a database where one could do compilation, searching, archiving, analysis, and finally knowledge derivation. Although, data are of variable types the tools used for database creation, searching and retrieval are similar. GVK BIO has been developing databases from publicly available scientific literature in specific areas like medicinal chemistry, clinical research, and mechanism-based toxicity so that the structured databases containing vast data could be used in several areas of research. These databases were classified as reference centric or compound centric depending on the way the database systems were designed. Integration of these databases with knowledge derivation tools would enhance the value of these systems toward better drug design and discovery. PMID:19727614

  11. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1992-11-09

    The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air- conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R- 717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents on compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. A computerized version is available that includes retrieval software.

  12. DNA Sequencing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley (Cambridge, MA); Richardson, Charles C. (Chestnut Hill, MA)

    1992-01-01

    An automated DNA sequencing apparatus having a reactor for providing at least two series of DNA products formed from a single primer and a DNA strand, each DNA product of a series differing in molecular weight and having a chain terminating agent at one end; separating means for separating the DNA products to form a series bands, the intensity of substantially all nearby bands in a different series being different, band reading means for determining the position an This invention was made with government support including a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, contract number AI-06045. The U.S. government has certain rights in the invention.

  13. Physiological Parameters Database for PBPK Modeling (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA released for public comment a physiological parameters database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence. It also contains similar data for an...

  14. Open Geoscience Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashev, A.

    2012-04-01

    Currently there is an enormous amount of various geoscience databases. Unfortunately the only users of the majority of the databases are their elaborators. There are several reasons for that: incompaitability, specificity of tasks and objects and so on. However the main obstacles for wide usage of geoscience databases are complexity for elaborators and complication for users. The complexity of architecture leads to high costs that block the public access. The complication prevents users from understanding when and how to use the database. Only databases, associated with GoogleMaps don't have these drawbacks, but they could be hardly named "geoscience" Nevertheless, open and simple geoscience database is necessary at least for educational purposes (see our abstract for ESSI20/EOS12). We developed a database and web interface to work with them and now it is accessible at maps.sch192.ru. In this database a result is a value of a parameter (no matter which) in a station with a certain position, associated with metadata: the date when the result was obtained; the type of a station (lake, soil etc); the contributor that sent the result. Each contributor has its own profile, that allows to estimate the reliability of the data. The results can be represented on GoogleMaps space image as a point in a certain position, coloured according to the value of the parameter. There are default colour scales and each registered user can create the own scale. The results can be also extracted in *.csv file. For both types of representation one could select the data by date, object type, parameter type, area and contributor. The data are uploaded in *.csv format: Name of the station; Lattitude(dd.dddddd); Longitude(ddd.dddddd); Station type; Parameter type; Parameter value; Date(yyyy-mm-dd). The contributor is recognised while entering. This is the minimal set of features that is required to connect a value of a parameter with a position and see the results. All the complicated data treatment could be conducted in other programs after extraction the filtered data into *.csv file. It makes the database understandable for non-experts. The database employs open data format (*.csv) and wide spread tools: PHP as the program language, MySQL as database management system, JavaScript for interaction with GoogleMaps and JQueryUI for create user interface. The database is multilingual: there are association tables, which connect with elements of the database. In total the development required about 150 hours. The database still has several problems. The main problem is the reliability of the data. Actually it needs an expert system for estimation the reliability, but the elaboration of such a system would take more resources than the database itself. The second problem is the problem of stream selection - how to select the stations that are connected with each other (for example, belong to one water stream) and indicate their sequence. Currently the interface is English and Russian. However it can be easily translated to your language. But some problems we decided. For example problem "the problem of the same station" (sometimes the distance between stations is smaller, than the error of position): when you adding new station to the database our application automatically find station near this place. Also we decided problem of object and parameter type (how to regard "EC" and "electrical conductivity" as the same parameter). This problem has been solved using "associative tables". If you would like to see the interface on your language, just contact us. We should send you the list of terms and phrases for translation on your language. The main advantage of the database is that it is totally open: everybody can see, extract the data from the database and use them for non-commercial purposes with no charge. Registered users can contribute to the database without getting paid. We hope, that it will be widely used first of all for education purposes, but professional scientists could use it also.

  15. 45 CFR 1356.80 - Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. 1356.80 Section 1356.80 Public...Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§ 1356.81 through...

  16. 45 CFR 1356.80 - Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. 1356.80 Section 1356.80 Public...Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§ 1356.81 through...

  17. 45 CFR 1356.80 - Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. 1356.80 Section 1356.80 Public...Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§ 1356.81 through...

  18. 45 CFR 1356.80 - Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. 1356.80 Section 1356.80 Public...Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§ 1356.81 through...

  19. 45 CFR 1356.80 - Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. 1356.80 Section 1356.80 Public...Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§ 1356.81 through...

  20. DNA Barcoding for Species Assignment: The Case of Mediterranean Marine Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Monica; Dimech, Mark; Arculeo, Marco; Biondo, Girolama; Martins, Rogelia; Carneiro, Miguel; Carvalho, Gary Robert; Brutto, Sabrina Lo; Costa, Filipe O.

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding enhances the prospects for species-level identifications globally using a standardized and authenticated DNA-based approach. Reference libraries comprising validated DNA barcodes (COI) constitute robust datasets for testing query sequences, providing considerable utility to identify marine fish and other organisms. Here we test the feasibility of using DNA barcoding to assign species to tissue samples from fish collected in the central Mediterranean Sea, a major contributor to the European marine ichthyofaunal diversity. Methodology/Principal Findings A dataset of 1278 DNA barcodes, representing 218 marine fish species, was used to test the utility of DNA barcodes to assign species from query sequences. We tested query sequences against 1) a reference library of ranked DNA barcodes from the neighbouring North East Atlantic, and 2) the public databases BOLD and GenBank. In the first case, a reference library comprising DNA barcodes with reliability grades for 146 fish species was used as diagnostic dataset to screen 486 query DNA sequences from fish specimens collected in the central basin of the Mediterranean Sea. Of all query sequences suitable for comparisons 98% were unambiguously confirmed through complete match with reference DNA barcodes. In the second case, it was possible to assign species to 83% (BOLD-IDS) and 72% (GenBank) of the sequences from the Mediterranean. Relatively high intraspecific genetic distances were found in 7 species (2.2%–18.74%), most of them of high commercial relevance, suggesting possible cryptic species. Conclusion/Significance We emphasize the discriminatory power of COI barcodes and their application to cases requiring species level resolution starting from query sequences. Results highlight the value of public reference libraries of reliability grade-annotated DNA barcodes, to identify species from different geographical origins. The ability to assign species with high precision from DNA samples of disparate quality and origin has major utility in several fields, from fisheries and conservation programs to control of fish products authenticity. PMID:25222272

  1. Information storage in DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, C.

    1983-01-01

    We seek to describe a starting point for modeling the evolution of DNA sequences within the framework of cellular automata by discussing the current understanding of genetic information storage in DNA sequences. This includes alternately viewing the role of DNA in living organisms as a simple scheme and as a complex scheme; a presentation of the extent of experimentally determined DNA sequence data present in the Los Alamos Nucleic Acid Database; and finally, a brief review of strategies for identifying and classifying patterns in DNA sequences.

  2. Atomic Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Claudio

    2000-10-01

    Atomic and molecular data are required in a variety of fields ranging from the traditional astronomy, atmospherics and fusion research to fast growing technologies such as lasers, lighting, low-temperature plasmas, plasma assisted etching and radiotherapy. In this context, there are some research groups, both theoretical and experimental, scattered round the world that attend to most of this data demand, but the implementation of atomic databases has grown independently out of sheer necessity. In some cases the latter has been associated with the data production process or with data centers involved in data collection and evaluation; but sometimes it has been the result of individual initiatives that have been quite successful. In any case, the development and maintenance of atomic databases call for a number of skills and an entrepreneurial spirit that are not usually associated with most physics researchers. In the present report we present some of the highlights in this area in the past five years and discuss what we think are some of the main issues that have to be addressed.

  3. Health service use in families where children enter public care: a nested case control study using the General Practice Research Database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background At least 3% of children spend some of their childhood in public care and, as a group, have poor outcomes across a range of education, employment, health and social care outcomes. Research, using social care or government datasets, has identified a number of risk factors associated with children entering public care but the utility of risk factors in clinical practice is not established. This paper uses routine primary health care data to see if risk factors for children entering public care can be identified in clinical practice. Methods A nested case control methodology using routine primary care data from the United Kingdom. Health service use data were extracted for the 12 months before the case child entered public care and compared with 12 months of data for four control mother child pairs per case pair, matched on the age and sex of the child and the general practice. Exposures of interest were developed from a systematic review of the literature on risk factors associated with children entering public care. Results Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate the combined effect of more than one exposure of interest. Maternal mental illness (OR 2.51, 95% CI 1.55-4.05), maternal age at birth of the child, socio-economic status (5th quintile vs. 1st quintile OR 7.14, 95% CI 2.92-17.4), maternal drug use (OR 28.8, 95% CI 2.29-363), non attendance at appointments (OR 2.42, 95% CI 1.42-4.14), child mental illness (OR 2.65, 95% CI 1.42-4.96) and child admission to hospital (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.21-9.02) were all significantly associated with children entering public care. Maternal use of primary care contraception services was negatively associated with children entering public care (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.31-0.87). Conclusions Differences in health service use can be identified from routine primary care data in mother child pairs where children enter public care after controlling for maternal age and socio-economic status. The interaction between different risk factors needs testing in a cumulative risk model using longitudinal datasets. PMID:22424404

  4. RiboaptDB: A Comprehensive Database of Ribozymes and Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Thodima, Venkata; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Deng, Youping

    2006-01-01

    Background Catalytic RNA molecules are called ribozymes. The aptamers are DNA or RNA molecules that have been selected from vast populations of random sequences, through a combinatorial approach known as SELEX. The selected oligo-nucleotide sequences (~200 bp in length) have the ability to recognize a broad range of specific ligands by forming binding pockets. These novel aptamer sequences can bind to nucleic acids, proteins or small organic and inorganic chemical compounds and have many potential uses in medicine and technology. Results The comprehensive sequence information on aptamers and ribozymes that have been generated by in vitro selection methods are included in this RiboaptDB database. Such types of unnatural data generated by in vitro methods are not available in the public 'natural' sequence databases such as GenBank and EMBL. The amount of sequence data generated by in vitro selection experiments has been accumulating exponentially. There are 370 artificial ribozyme sequences and 3842 aptamer sequences in the total 4212 sequences from 423 citations in this RiboaptDB. We included general search feature, and individual feature wise search, user submission form for new data through online and also local BLAST search. Conclusion This database, besides serving as a storehouse of sequences that may have diagnostic or therapeutic utility in medicine, provides valuable information for computational and theoretical biologists. The RiboaptDB is extremely useful for garnering information about in vitro selection experiments as a whole and for better understanding the distribution of functional nucleic acids in sequence space. The database is updated regularly and is publicly available at . PMID:17118149

  5. 24 CFR 902.24 - Database adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Database adjustment. 902.24 Section 902.24 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED... PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM Physical Condition Indicator § 902.24 Database adjustment....

  6. Correlates of Access to Business Research Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, John C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines potential correlates of business research database access through academic libraries serving top business programs in the United States. Results indicate that greater access to research databases is related to enrollment in graduate business programs, but not to overall enrollment or status as a public or private institution.…

  7. 24 CFR 902.24 - Database adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Database adjustment. 902.24 Section 902.24 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED... PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM Physical Condition Indicator § 902.24 Database adjustment....

  8. 24 CFR 902.24 - Database adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Database adjustment. 902.24 Section 902.24 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED... PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM Physical Condition Indicator § 902.24 Database adjustment....

  9. 24 CFR 902.24 - Database adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Database adjustment. 902.24 Section 902.24 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED... PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM Physical Condition Indicator § 902.24 Database adjustment....

  10. SPODOBASE : an EST database for the lepidopteran crop pest Spodoptera

    PubMed Central

    Nègre, Vincent; Hôtelier, Thierry; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie; Gimenez, Sylvie; Cousserans, François; Mita, Kazuei; Sabau, Xavier; Rocher, Janick; López-Ferber, Miguel; d'Alençon, Emmanuelle; Audant, Pascaline; Sabourault, Cécile; Bidegainberry, Vincent; Hilliou, Frédérique; Fournier, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Background The Lepidoptera Spodoptera frugiperda is a pest which causes widespread economic damage on a variety of crop plants. It is also well known through its famous Sf9 cell line which is used for numerous heterologous protein productions. Species of the Spodoptera genus are used as model for pesticide resistance and to study virus host interactions. A genomic approach is now a critical step for further new developments in biology and pathology of these insects, and the results of ESTs sequencing efforts need to be structured into databases providing an integrated set of tools and informations. Description The ESTs from five independent cDNA libraries, prepared from three different S. frugiperda tissues (hemocytes, midgut and fat body) and from the Sf9 cell line, are deposited in the database. These tissues were chosen because of their importance in biological processes such as immune response, development and plant/insect interaction. So far, the SPODOBASE contains 29,325 ESTs, which are cleaned and clustered into non-redundant sets (2294 clusters and 6103 singletons). The SPODOBASE is constructed in such a way that other ESTs from S. frugiperda or other species may be added. User can retrieve information using text searches, pre-formatted queries, query assistant or blast searches. Annotation is provided against NCBI, UNIPROT or Bombyx mori ESTs databases, and with GO-Slim vocabulary. Conclusion The SPODOBASE database provides integrated access to expressed sequence tags (EST) from the lepidopteran insect Spodoptera frugiperda. It is a publicly available structured database with insect pest sequences which will allow identification of a number of genes and comprehensive cloning of gene families of interest for scientific community. SPODOBASE is available from URL: PMID:16796757

  11. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, J.M.

    1993-04-30

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R-717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  12. ARTI refrigerant database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1997-02-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alterative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on various refrigerants. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  13. ARTI refrigerant database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufactures and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on many refrigerants including propane, ammonia, water, carbon dioxide, propylene, ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  14. Curcumin Resource Database

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Chetia, Hasnahana; Sharma, Swagata; Kabiraj, Debajyoti; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Bora, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is one of the most intensively studied diarylheptanoid, Curcuma longa being its principal producer. This apart, a class of promising curcumin analogs has been generated in laboratories, aptly named as Curcuminoids which are showing huge potential in the fields of medicine, food technology, etc. The lack of a universal source of data on curcumin as well as curcuminoids has been felt by the curcumin research community for long. Hence, in an attempt to address this stumbling block, we have developed Curcumin Resource Database (CRDB) that aims to perform as a gateway-cum-repository to access all relevant data and related information on curcumin and its analogs. Currently, this database encompasses 1186 curcumin analogs, 195 molecular targets, 9075 peer reviewed publications, 489 patents and 176 varieties of C. longa obtained by extensive data mining and careful curation from numerous sources. Each data entry is identified by a unique CRDB ID (identifier). Furnished with a user-friendly web interface and in-built search engine, CRDB provides well-curated and cross-referenced information that are hyperlinked with external sources. CRDB is expected to be highly useful to the researchers working on structure as well as ligand-based molecular design of curcumin analogs. Database URL: http://www.crdb.in PMID:26220923

  15. ARTI refrigerant database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1996-04-15

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on refrigerants. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates. Citations in this report are divided into the following topics: thermophysical properties; materials compatibility; lubricants and tribology; application data; safety; test and analysis methods; impacts; regulatory actions; substitute refrigerants; identification; absorption and adsorption; research programs; and miscellaneous documents. Information is also presented on ordering instructions for the computerized version.

  16. MitoZoa 2.0: a database resource and search tools for comparative and evolutionary analyses of mitochondrial genomes in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    D'Onorio de Meo, Paolo; D'Antonio, Mattia; Griggio, Francesca; Lupi, Renato; Borsani, Massimiliano; Pavesi, Giulio; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Gissi, Carmela

    2012-01-01

    The MITOchondrial genome database of metaZOAns (MitoZoa) is a public resource for comparative analyses of metazoan mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) at both the sequence and genomic organizational levels. The main characteristics of the MitoZoa database are the careful revision of mtDNA entry annotations and the possibility of retrieving gene order and non-coding region (NCR) data in appropriate formats. The MitoZoa retrieval system enables basic and complex queries at various taxonomic levels using different search menus. MitoZoa 2.0 has been enhanced in several aspects, including: a re-annotation pipeline to check the correctness of protein-coding gene predictions; a standardized annotation of introns and of precursor ORFs whose functionality is post-transcriptionally recovered by RNA editing or programmed translational frameshifting; updates of taxon-related fields and a BLAST sequence similarity search tool. Database novelties and the definition of standard mtDNA annotation rules, together with the user-friendly retrieval system and the BLAST service, make MitoZoa a valuable resource for comparative and evolutionary analyses as well as a reference database to assist in the annotation of novel mtDNA sequences. MitoZoa is freely accessible at http://www.caspur.it/mitozoa. PMID:22123747

  17. Stackfile Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deVarvalho, Robert; Desai, Shailen D.; Haines, Bruce J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Gilmer, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This software provides storage retrieval and analysis functionality for managing satellite altimetry data. It improves the efficiency and analysis capabilities of existing database software with improved flexibility and documentation. It offers flexibility in the type of data that can be stored. There is efficient retrieval either across the spatial domain or the time domain. Built-in analysis tools are provided for frequently performed altimetry tasks. This software package is used for storing and manipulating satellite measurement data. It was developed with a focus on handling the requirements of repeat-track altimetry missions such as Topex and Jason. It was, however, designed to work with a wide variety of satellite measurement data [e.g., Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment -- GRACE). The software consists of several command-line tools for importing, retrieving, and analyzing satellite measurement data.

  18. Databases of the marine metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database. PMID:26518717

  19. Trends in performance indicators of neuroimaging anatomy research publications: a bibliometric study of major neuroradiology journal output over four decades based on web of science database.

    PubMed

    Wing, Louise; Massoud, Tarik F

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative, qualitative, and innovative application of bibliometric research performance indicators to anatomy and radiology research and education can enhance cross-fertilization between the two disciplines. We aim to use these indicators to identify long-term trends in dissemination of publications in neuroimaging anatomy (including both productivity and citation rates), which has subjectively waned in prestige during recent years. We examined publications over the last 40 years in two neuroradiological journals, AJNR and Neuroradiology, and selected and categorized all neuroimaging anatomy research articles according to theme and type. We studied trends in their citation activity over time, and mathematically analyzed these trends for 1977, 1987, and 1997 publications. We created a novel metric, "citation half-life at 10 years postpublication" (CHL-10), and used this to examine trends in the skew of citation numbers for anatomy articles each year. We identified 367 anatomy articles amongst a total of 18,110 in these journals: 74.2% were original articles, with study of normal anatomy being the commonest theme (46.7%). We recorded a mean of 18.03 citations for each anatomy article, 35% higher than for general neuroradiology articles. Graphs summarizing the rise (upslope) in citation rates after publication revealed similar trends spanning two decades. CHL-10 trends demonstrated that more recently published anatomy articles were likely to take longer to reach peak citation rate. Bibliometric analysis suggests that anatomical research in neuroradiology is not languishing. This novel analytical approach can be applied to other aspects of neuroimaging research, and within other subspecialties in radiology and anatomy, and also to foster anatomical education. PMID:24431001

  20. Reviewing population studies for forensic purposes: Dog mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The identification of dog hair through mtDNA analysis has become increasingly important in the last 15 years, as it can provide associative evidence connecting victims and suspects. The evidential value of an mtDNA match between dog hair and its potential donor is determined by the random match probability of the haplotype. This probability is based on the haplotype’s population frequency estimate. Consequently, implementing a population study representative of the population relevant to the forensic case is vital to the correct evaluation of the evidence. This paper reviews numerous published dog mtDNA studies and shows that many of these studies vary widely in sampling strategies and data quality. Therefore, several features influencing the representativeness of a population sample are discussed. Moreover, recommendations are provided on how to set up a dog mtDNA population study and how to decide whether or not to include published data. This review emphasizes the need for improved dog mtDNA population data for forensic purposes, including targeting the entire mitochondrial genome. In particular, the creation of a publicly available database of qualitative dog mtDNA population studies would improve the genetic analysis of dog traces in forensic casework. PMID:24453568

  1. Mouse Resource Browser--a database of mouse databases.

    PubMed

    Zouberakis, Michael; Chandras, Christina; Swertz, Morris; Smedley, Damian; Gruenberger, Michael; Bard, Jonathan; Schughart, Klaus; Rosenthal, Nadia; Hancock, John M; Schofield, Paul N; Kollias, George; Aidinis, Vassilis

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory mouse has become the organism of choice for discovering gene function and unravelling pathogenetic mechanisms of human diseases through the application of various functional genomic approaches. The resulting deluge of data has led to the deployment of numerous online resources and the concomitant need for formalized experimental descriptions, data standardization, database interoperability and integration, a need that has yet to be met. We present here the Mouse Resource Browser (MRB), a database of mouse databases that indexes 217 publicly available mouse resources under 22 categories and uses a standardised database description framework (the CASIMIR DDF) to provide information on their controlled vocabularies (ontologies and minimum information standards), and technical information on programmatic access and data availability. Focusing on interoperability and integration, MRB offers automatic generation of downloadable and re-distributable SOAP application-programming interfaces for resources that provide direct database access. MRB aims to provide useful information to both bench scientists, who can easily navigate and find all mouse related resources in one place, and bioinformaticians, who will be provided with interoperable resources containing data which can be mined and integrated. Database URL: http://bioit.fleming.gr/mrb. PMID:20627861

  2. Nanotechnology with DNA DNA Nanodevices

    E-print Network

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    Nanotechnology with DNA DNA Nanodevices Friedrich C. Simmel* and Wendy U. Dittmer A DNA actuator. Introduction.............285 2. Overview: DNA Nanotechnology.......285 3. Prototypes of Nanomechanical DNA overview of DNA nanotechnology as a whole is given. The most important properties of DNA molecules

  3. HAPLOFIND: a new method for high-throughput mtDNA haplogroup assignment.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Dario; Sevini, Federica; Castellani, Gastone; Lomartire, Laura; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-09-01

    Deep sequencing technologies are completely revolutionizing the approach to DNA analysis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) studies entered in the "postgenomic era": the burst in sequenced samples observed in nuclear genomics is expected also in mitochondria, a trend that can already be detected checking complete mtDNA sequences database submission rate. Tools for the analysis of these data are available, but they fail in throughput or in easiness of use. We present here a new pipeline based on previous algorithms, inherited from the "nuclear genomic toolbox," combined with a newly developed algorithm capable of efficiently and easily classify new mtDNA sequences according to PhyloTree nomenclature. Detected mutations are also annotated using data collected from publicly available databases. Thanks to the analysis of all freely available sequences with known haplogroup obtained from GenBank, we were able to produce a PhyloTree-based weighted tree, taking into account each haplogroup pattern conservation. The combination of a highly efficient aligner, coupled with our algorithm and massive usage of asynchronous parallel processing, allowed us to build a high-throughput pipeline for the analysis of mtDNA sequences that can be quickly updated to follow the ever-changing nomenclature. HaploFind is freely accessible at the following Web address: https://haplofind.unibo.it. PMID:23696374

  4. Overlap in Bibliographic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, William W.; Wilson, Concepcion S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the topic of Fuzzy Set Theory to determine the overlap of coverage in bibliographic databases. Highlights include examples of comparisons of database coverage; frequency distribution of the degree of overlap; records with maximum overlap; records unique to one database; intra-database duplicates; and overlap in the top ten databases.…

  5. CD-ROM-aided Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    CD-ROM has rapidly evolved as a new information medium with large capacity, In the U.S. it is predicted that it will become two hundred billion yen market in three years, and thus CD-ROM is strategic target of database industry. Here in Japan the movement toward its commercialization has been active since this year. Shall CD-ROM bussiness ever conquer information market as an on-disk database or electronic publication? Referring to some cases of the applications in the U.S. the author views marketability and the future trend of this new optical disk medium.

  6. Quantifying the Consistency of Scientific Databases

    PubMed Central

    Šubelj, Lovro; Bajec, Marko; Mileva Boshkoska, Biljana; Kastrin, Andrej; Levnaji?, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Science is a social process with far-reaching impact on our modern society. In recent years, for the first time we are able to scientifically study the science itself. This is enabled by massive amounts of data on scientific publications that is increasingly becoming available. The data is contained in several databases such as Web of Science or PubMed, maintained by various public and private entities. Unfortunately, these databases are not always consistent, which considerably hinders this study. Relying on the powerful framework of complex networks, we conduct a systematic analysis of the consistency among six major scientific databases. We found that identifying a single "best" database is far from easy. Nevertheless, our results indicate appreciable differences in mutual consistency of different databases, which we interpret as recipes for future bibliometric studies. PMID:25984946

  7. DNA microarray (spot) .

    E-print Network

    1. DNA microarray DNA (spot) . DNA probe , probe (hybridization) . DNA microarray cDNA oligonucleotide oligonucleotide cDNA probe . oligonucleotide microarray , DNA , probe . oligonucleotide microarray probe

  8. 42 CFR 455.436 - Federal database checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Federal database checks. 455.436 Section 455.436....436 Federal database checks. The State Medicaid agency must do all of the following: (a) Confirm the... databases. (b) Check the Social Security Administration's Death Master File, the National Plan and...

  9. 40 CFR 1400.13 - Read-only database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Read-only database. 1400.13 Section... INFORMATION Other Provisions § 1400.13 Read-only database. The Administrator is authorized to establish... public off-site consequence analysis information by means of a central database under the control of...

  10. 40 CFR 1400.13 - Read-only database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Read-only database. 1400.13 Section... INFORMATION Other Provisions § 1400.13 Read-only database. The Administrator is authorized to establish... public off-site consequence analysis information by means of a central database under the control of...

  11. 42 CFR 455.436 - Federal database checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal database checks. 455.436 Section 455.436....436 Federal database checks. The State Medicaid agency must do all of the following: (a) Confirm the... databases. (b) Check the Social Security Administration's Death Master File, the National Plan and...

  12. 42 CFR 455.436 - Federal database checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Federal database checks. 455.436 Section 455.436....436 Federal database checks. The State Medicaid agency must do all of the following: (a) Confirm the... databases. (b) Check the Social Security Administration's Death Master File, the National Plan and...

  13. 40 CFR 1400.13 - Read-only database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Read-only database. 1400.13 Section... INFORMATION Other Provisions § 1400.13 Read-only database. The Administrator is authorized to establish... public off-site consequence analysis information by means of a central database under the control of...

  14. DNA Profiling of Convicted Offender Samples for the Combined DNA Index System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Julie T

    2011-01-01

    The cornerstone of forensic chemistry is that a perpetrator inevitably leaves trace evidence at a crime scene. One important type of evidence is DNA, which has been instrumental in both the implication and exoneration of thousands of suspects in a wide range of crimes. The Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), a network of DNA databases, provides…

  15. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The National Residential Efficiency Measures Database is a publicly available, centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and costs for the U.S. building industry. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy, NREL developed this tool to help users determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for improving energy efficiency of existing homes. Software developers who require residential retrofit performance and cost data for applications that evaluate residential efficiency measures are the primary audience for this database. In addition, home performance contractors and manufacturers of residential materials and equipment may find this information useful. The database offers the following types of retrofit measures: 1) Appliances, 2) Domestic Hot Water, 3) Enclosure, 4) Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), 5) Lighting, 6) Miscellaneous.

  16. LOTUS-DB: an integrative and interactive database for Nelumbo nucifera study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Deng, Jiao; Damaris, Rebecca Njeri; Yang, Mei; Xu, Liming; Yang, Pingfang

    2015-01-01

    Besides its important significance in plant taxonomy and phylogeny, sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) might also hold the key to the secrets of aging, which attracts crescent attentions from researchers all over the world. The genetic or molecular studies on this species depend on its genome information. In 2013, two publications reported the sequencing of its full genome, based on which we constructed a database named as LOTUS-DB. It will provide comprehensive information on the annotation, gene function and expression for the sacred lotus. The information will facilitate users to efficiently query and browse genes, graphically visualize genome and download a variety of complex data information on genome DNA, coding sequence (CDS), transcripts or peptide sequences, promoters and markers. It will accelerate researches on gene cloning, functional identification of sacred lotus, and hence promote the studies on this species and plant genomics as well. Database URL: http://lotus-db.wbgcas.cn. PMID:25819075

  17. Fusarium identification databases, present and future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA-sequence based identification of fungi is now in wide practice. For a community molecular identification tool to be effective, it must be based on an appropriately informative locus or set of loci, technology that is broadly available, and most importantly, connected to a definitive database. ...

  18. Safeguarding forensic DNA reference samples with nullomer barcodes.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Jayita; Davis, Michael C; Andersen, Tim; Alileche, Abdelkrim; Hampikian, Greg

    2013-07-01

    Unintended transfer of biological material containing DNA is a concern to all laboratories conducting PCR analysis. While forensic laboratories have protocols in place to reduce the possibility of contaminating casework samples, there is no way to detect when a reference sample is mislabeled as evidence, or contaminates a forensic sample. Thus there is public concern regarding the safeguarding of DNA submitted to crime labs. We demonstrate a method of introducing an internal amplification control to reference samples, in the form of a nullomer barcode which is based upon sequences absent or rare from publically accessible DNA databases. The detection of this barcode would indicate that the source of analyzed DNA was from a reference sample provided by an individual, and not from an evidence sample. We demonstrate that the nullomers can be added directly to collection devices (FTA paper) to allow tagging during the process of sample collection. We show that such nullomer oligonucleotides can be added to existing forensic typing and quantification kits, without affecting genotyping or quantification results. Finally, we show that even when diluted a million-fold and spilled on a knife, the nullomer tags can be clearly detected. These tags support the National Research Council of the National Academy recommendation that "Quality control procedures should be designed to identify mistakes, fraud, and bias" in forensic science (National Academy of Sciences, 2009). PMID:23756524

  19. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2015 update

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Armstrong, Joel; Barber, Galt P.; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Fujita, Pauline A.; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Harte, Rachel A.; Heitner, Steve; Hickey, Glenn; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Hubley, Robert; Karolchik, Donna; Learned, Katrina; Lee, Brian T.; Li, Chin H.; Miga, Karen H.; Nguyen, Ngan; Paten, Benedict; Raney, Brian J.; Smit, Arian F. A.; Speir, Matthew L.; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M.; Kent, W. James

    2015-01-01

    Launched in 2001 to showcase the draft human genome assembly, the UCSC Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and associated tools continue to grow, providing a comprehensive resource of genome assemblies and annotations to scientists and students worldwide. Highlights of the past year include the release of a browser for the first new human genome reference assembly in 4 years in December 2013 (GRCh38, UCSC hg38), a watershed comparative genomics annotation (100-species multiple alignment and conservation) and a novel distribution mechanism for the browser (GBiB: Genome Browser in a Box). We created browsers for new species (Chinese hamster, elephant shark, minke whale), ‘mined the web’ for DNA sequences and expanded the browser display with stacked color graphs and region highlighting. As our user community increasingly adopts the UCSC track hub and assembly hub representations for sharing large-scale genomic annotation data sets and genome sequencing projects, our menu of public data hubs has tripled. PMID:25428374

  20. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Kate R; Armstrong, Joel; Barber, Galt P; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Dreszer, Timothy R; Fujita, Pauline A; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Harte, Rachel A; Heitner, Steve; Hickey, Glenn; Hinrichs, Angie S; Hubley, Robert; Karolchik, Donna; Learned, Katrina; Lee, Brian T; Li, Chin H; Miga, Karen H; Nguyen, Ngan; Paten, Benedict; Raney, Brian J; Smit, Arian F A; Speir, Matthew L; Zweig, Ann S; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2015-01-01

    Launched in 2001 to showcase the draft human genome assembly, the UCSC Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and associated tools continue to grow, providing a comprehensive resource of genome assemblies and annotations to scientists and students worldwide. Highlights of the past year include the release of a browser for the first new human genome reference assembly in 4 years in December 2013 (GRCh38, UCSC hg38), a watershed comparative genomics annotation (100-species multiple alignment and conservation) and a novel distribution mechanism for the browser (GBiB: Genome Browser in a Box). We created browsers for new species (Chinese hamster, elephant shark, minke whale), 'mined the web' for DNA sequences and expanded the browser display with stacked color graphs and region highlighting. As our user community increasingly adopts the UCSC track hub and assembly hub representations for sharing large-scale genomic annotation data sets and genome sequencing projects, our menu of public data hubs has tripled. PMID:25428374

  1. Village Green Project: Web-accessible Database

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this web-accessible database is for the public to be able to view instantaneous readings from a solar-powered air monitoring station located in a public location (prototype pilot test is outside of a library in Durham County, NC). The data are wirelessly transmitte...

  2. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) Physics Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    A username and password are required to access and search the entire database. However, the Overview page provides links to detailed data pages for each of the experiments available for public access. There are many experiments with data that the public can freely access.

  3. Curcumin Resource Database.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Chetia, Hasnahana; Sharma, Swagata; Kabiraj, Debajyoti; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Bora, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is one of the most intensively studied diarylheptanoid, Curcuma longa being its principal producer. This apart, a class of promising curcumin analogs has been generated in laboratories, aptly named as Curcuminoids which are showing huge potential in the fields of medicine, food technology, etc. The lack of a universal source of data on curcumin as well as curcuminoids has been felt by the curcumin research community for long. Hence, in an attempt to address this stumbling block, we have developed Curcumin Resource Database (CRDB) that aims to perform as a gateway-cum-repository to access all relevant data and related information on curcumin and its analogs. Currently, this database encompasses 1186 curcumin analogs, 195 molecular targets, 9075 peer reviewed publications, 489 patents and 176 varieties of C. longa obtained by extensive data mining and careful curation from numerous sources. Each data entry is identified by a unique CRDB ID (identifier). Furnished with a user-friendly web interface and in-built search engine, CRDB provides well-curated and cross-referenced information that are hyperlinked with external sources. CRDB is expected to be highly useful to the researchers working on structure as well as ligand-based molecular design of curcumin analogs. PMID:26220923

  4. LMSD: LIPID MAPS structure database

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Manish; Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Brown, Alex; Dennis, Edward A.; Glass, Christopher K.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Murphy, Robert C.; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Russell, David W.; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2007-01-01

    The LIPID MAPS Structure Database (LMSD) is a relational database encompassing structures and annotations of biologically relevant lipids. Structures of lipids in the database come from four sources: (i) LIPID MAPS Consortium's core laboratories and partners; (ii) lipids identified by LIPID MAPS experiments; (iii) computationally generated structures for appropriate lipid classes; (iv) biologically relevant lipids manually curated from LIPID BANK, LIPIDAT and other public sources. All the lipid structures in LMSD are drawn in a consistent fashion. In addition to a classification-based retrieval of lipids, users can search LMSD using either text-based or structure-based search options. The text-based search implementation supports data retrieval by any combination of these data fields: LIPID MAPS ID, systematic or common name, mass, formula, category, main class, and subclass data fields. The structure-based search, in conjunction with optional data fields, provides the capability to perform a substructure search or exact match for the structure drawn by the user. Search results, in addition to structure and annotations, also include relevant links to external databases. The LMSD is publicly available at PMID:17098933

  5. Interactive bibliographical database on color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caivano, Jose L.

    2002-06-01

    The paper describes the methodology and results of a project under development, aimed at the elaboration of an interactive bibliographical database on color in all fields of application: philosophy, psychology, semiotics, education, anthropology, physical and natural sciences, biology, medicine, technology, industry, architecture and design, arts, linguistics, geography, history. The project is initially based upon an already developed bibliography, published in different journals, updated in various opportunities, and now available at the Internet, with more than 2,000 entries. The interactive database will amplify that bibliography, incorporating hyperlinks and contents (indexes, abstracts, keywords, introductions, or eventually the complete document), and devising mechanisms for information retrieval. The sources to be included are: books, doctoral dissertations, multimedia publications, reference works. The main arrangement will be chronological, but the design of the database will allow rearrangements or selections by different fields: subject, Decimal Classification System, author, language, country, publisher, etc. A further project is to develop another database, including color-specialized journals or newsletters, and articles on color published in international journals, arranged in this case by journal name and date of publication, but allowing also rearrangements or selections by author, subject and keywords.

  6. Curation accuracy of model organism databases.

    PubMed

    Keseler, Ingrid M; Skrzypek, Marek; Weerasinghe, Deepika; Chen, Albert Y; Fulcher, Carol; Li, Gene-Wei; Lemmer, Kimberly C; Mladinich, Katherine M; Chow, Edmond D; Sherlock, Gavin; Karp, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Manual extraction of information from the biomedical literature-or biocuration-is the central methodology used to construct many biological databases. For example, the UniProt protein database, the EcoCyc Escherichia coli database and the Candida Genome Database (CGD) are all based on biocuration. Biological databases are used extensively by life science researchers, as online encyclopedias, as aids in the interpretation of new experimental data and as golden standards for the development of new bioinformatics algorithms. Although manual curation has been assumed to be highly accurate, we are aware of only one previous study of biocuration accuracy. We assessed the accuracy of EcoCyc and CGD by manually selecting curated assertions within randomly chosen EcoCyc and CGD gene pages and by then validating that the data found in the referenced publications supported those assertions. A database assertion is considered to be in error if that assertion could not be found in the publication cited for that assertion. We identified 10 errors in the 633 facts that we validated across the two databases, for an overall error rate of 1.58%, and individual error rates of 1.82% for CGD and 1.40% for EcoCyc. These data suggest that manual curation of the experimental literature by Ph.D-level scientists is highly accurate. Database URL: http://ecocyc.org/, http://www.candidagenome.org// PMID:24923819

  7. Databases: Beyond the Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Robert

    This presented paper offers an elementary description of database characteristics and then provides a survey of databases that may be useful to the teacher and researcher in Slavic and East European languages and literatures. The survey focuses on commercial databases that are available, usable, and needed. Individual databases discussed include:…

  8. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  9. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  10. DNA Computing Hamiltonian path

    E-print Network

    Hagiya, Masami

    2014 DNA DNA #12;DNA Computing · Feynman · Adleman · DNASIMD · ... · · · · · DNADNA #12;DNA · DNA · · · · DNA · · #12;2000 2005 2010 1995 Hamiltonian path DNA tweezers DNA tile DNA origami DNA box Sierpinski DNA tile self assembly DNA logic gates Whiplash PCR DNA automaton DNA spider MAYA

  11. 16 CFR 1102.28 - Publication of reports of harm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Procedural Requirements § 1102...the requirements for publication in the Database. The Commission will publish reports...requirements of § 1102.10(d) in the Database beyond the 10-business-day time...

  12. 16 CFR 1102.28 - Publication of reports of harm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Procedural Requirements § 1102...the requirements for publication in the Database. The Commission will publish reports...requirements of § 1102.10(d) in the Database beyond the 10-business-day time...

  13. 16 CFR 1102.28 - Publication of reports of harm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Procedural Requirements § 1102...the requirements for publication in the Database. The Commission will publish reports...requirements of § 1102.10(d) in the Database beyond the 10-business-day time...

  14. Improving Access to E-Journals and Databases at the MIT Libraries: Building a Database-Backed Web Site Called "Vera"

    E-print Network

    Hennig, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    The MIT Libraries provide access to databases and electronic journals via the online catalog and the web. The Vera database was created in order to improve public access to a growing number of resources listed on web pages ...

  15. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    E-print Network

    Vogt, D A B R

    2005-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and ...

  16. A High Energy Nuclear Database Proposal

    E-print Network

    Brown, D A; Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interace. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from the Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for intertial confinement fusion and target a...

  17. The PEP-2 project-wide database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A.; Calish, S.; Crane, G.; MacGregor, I.; Meyer, S.; Wong, J.; Weinstein, A.

    1995-05-01

    The PEP-2 Project Database is a tool for monitoring the technical and documentation aspects of this accelerator construction. It holds the PEP-2 design specifications, fabrication and installation data in one integrated system. Key pieces of the database include the machine parameter list, magnet and vacuum fabrication data. CAD drawings, publications and documentation, survey and alignment data and property control. The database can be extended to contain information required for the operations phase of the accelerator and detector. Features such as viewing CAD drawing graphics from the database will be implemented in the future. This central Oracle database on a UNIX server is built using ORACLE Case tools. Users at the three collaborating laboratories (SLAC, LBL, LLNL) can access the data remotely, using various desktop computer platforms and graphical interfaces.

  18. Challenges in the association of human single nucleotide polymorphism mentions with unique database identifiers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most information on genomic variations and their associations with phenotypes are covered exclusively in scientific publications rather than in structured databases. These texts commonly describe variations using natural language; database identifiers are seldom mentioned. This complicates the retrieval of variations, associated articles, as well as information extraction, e. g. the search for biological implications. To overcome these challenges, procedures to map textual mentions of variations to database identifiers need to be developed. Results This article describes a workflow for normalization of variation mentions, i.e. the association of them to unique database identifiers. Common pitfalls in the interpretation of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mentions are highlighted and discussed. The developed normalization procedure achieves a precision of 98.1 % and a recall of 67.5% for unambiguous association of variation mentions with dbSNP identifiers on a text corpus based on 296 MEDLINE abstracts containing 527 mentions of SNPs. The annotated corpus is freely available at http://www.scai.fraunhofer.de/snp-normalization-corpus.html. Conclusions Comparable approaches usually focus on variations mentioned on the protein sequence and neglect problems for other SNP mentions. The results presented here indicate that normalizing SNPs described on DNA level is more difficult than the normalization of SNPs described on protein level. The challenges associated with normalization are exemplified with ambiguities and errors, which occur in this corpus. PMID:21992066

  19. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be considered as COAs. As manufacturing of such media produces inevitable errors, we use the locations and count of these errors as a “fingerprint” for each optical disc: its optical DNA. The “fingerprint” is signed using publisher’s private-key and the resulting signature is stored onto the optical medium using a post-production process. Standard DVD players with altered firmware that includes publisher’s public-key, should be able to verify the authenticity of DVDs protected with optical DNA. Our key finding is that for the proposed protocol, only DVDs with exceptional wear-and-tear characteristics would result in an inexpensive and viable anti-counterfeiting technology.

  20. Geminivirus database (GVDB): first database of family Geminiviridae and its genera Begomovirus.

    PubMed

    Prajapat, Rajneesh; Marwal, Avinash; Shaikh, Zuber; Gaur, Rajarshi Kumar

    2012-07-15

    Geminivirus Database (GVDB) is an online interactive database of Geminiviridae family. GVDB comprises of partial and complete nucleotide sequences along with duly annotated expressed genes of isolated Begomovirus species. The in silico homology modeling, docking and recombination results obtained for different begomoviral sequences are also mentioned. This database is endowed with comprehensive information about Geminivirus members which grounds infection in various plants species in India assorting from crops, ornamentals plants and common weeds. The home page of this database offers various links associated with current research projects and also the publications related to molecular and in silico study of Begomovirus infection. The main feature of GVDB includes flexible database designs based on platform of PHP allows easy retrieval of the information. The database is made available at www.wikigeminivirus.org. PMID:24171254

  1. Research Station New Publications

    E-print Network

    Publications . . . . . . . 8 Fire Effects Information Database . . . . . 10 Science Program Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 New innovative science programs direct us on our path toward excellence in developing Our New Science Research Programs (page 11) The

  2. 32 CFR 338.1 - Ordering DNA issuances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ordering DNA issuances. 338.1 Section 338.1... DOD INFORMATION AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY (DNA) INSTRUCTIONS AND CHANGES THERETO § 338.1 Ordering DNA issuances. (a) The DNA issuances published in the DNA indexes are...

  3. 32 CFR 338.1 - Ordering DNA issuances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ordering DNA issuances. 338.1 Section 338.1... DOD INFORMATION AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY (DNA) INSTRUCTIONS AND CHANGES THERETO § 338.1 Ordering DNA issuances. (a) The DNA issuances published in the DNA indexes are...

  4. 32 CFR 338.1 - Ordering DNA issuances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ordering DNA issuances. 338.1 Section 338.1... DOD INFORMATION AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY (DNA) INSTRUCTIONS AND CHANGES THERETO § 338.1 Ordering DNA issuances. (a) The DNA issuances published in the DNA indexes are...

  5. 32 CFR 338.1 - Ordering DNA issuances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ordering DNA issuances. 338.1 Section 338.1... DOD INFORMATION AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY (DNA) INSTRUCTIONS AND CHANGES THERETO § 338.1 Ordering DNA issuances. (a) The DNA issuances published in the DNA indexes are...

  6. 32 CFR 338.1 - Ordering DNA issuances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ordering DNA issuances. 338.1 Section 338.1... DOD INFORMATION AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY (DNA) INSTRUCTIONS AND CHANGES THERETO § 338.1 Ordering DNA issuances. (a) The DNA issuances published in the DNA indexes are...

  7. DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.C.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a method for determining the nucleotide base sequence of a DNA molecule. It comprises: providing the DNA molecule annealed with a primer molecule able to hybridize to the DNA molecule; incubating the annealed molecules in a vessel containing four different deoxynucleoside triphosphates, a processive DNA polymerase, wherein the polymerase is able to remain bound for at least 500 bases to the DNA molecule in an environmental condition used in the extension reaction of a DNA sequencing reaction, the polymerase having less than 500 units of exonuclease activity per mg of the polymerase, and one of four DNA synthesis terminating agents which terminate DNA synthesis at a specific nucleotide base, wherein each the agent terminates DNA synthesis at a different nucleotide base, and separating the DNA products of the incubating reaction according to their size, whereby at least a part of the nucleotide base sequence of the DNA molecule can be determined.

  8. PRIDE: the proteomics identifications database.

    PubMed

    Martens, Lennart; Hermjakob, Henning; Jones, Philip; Adamski, Marcin; Taylor, Chris; States, David; Gevaert, Kris; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Apweiler, Rolf

    2005-08-01

    The advent of high-throughput proteomics has enabled the identification of ever increasing numbers of proteins. Correspondingly, the number of publications centered on these protein identifications has increased dramatically. With the first results of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project being analyzed and many other large-scale proteomics projects about to disseminate their data, this trend is not likely to flatten out any time soon. However, the publication mechanism of these identified proteins has lagged behind in technical terms. Often very long lists of identifications are either published directly with the article, resulting in both a voluminous and rather tedious read, or are included on the publisher's website as supplementary information. In either case, these lists are typically only provided as portable document format documents with a custom-made layout, making it practically impossible for computer programs to interpret them, let alone efficiently query them. Here we propose the proteomics identifications (PRIDE) database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride) as a means to finally turn publicly available data into publicly accessible data. PRIDE offers a web-based query interface, a user-friendly data upload facility, and a documented application programming interface for direct computational access. The complete PRIDE database, source code, data, and support tools are freely available for web access or download and local installation. PMID:16041671

  9. Nucleosome DNA Bendability Matrix (C. elegans) http://www.jbsdonline.com

    E-print Network

    Barash, Danny

    signal extraction procedure is applied to database of 146 base nucleosome core DNA sequences from C. Very large databases of nucleosome DNA fragments and of full 146 base long nucleosome core DNA of Functional Genomics and Proteomics Faculty of Science Masaryk University, Kamenice 5 Brno CZ-62500, Czech

  10. DNA sequence evolution through Integral Value Transformations.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sk Sarif; Choudhury, Pabitra Pal; Guha, Ranita; Chakraborty, Shantanav; Goswami, Arunava

    2012-06-01

    In deciphering the DNA structures, evolutions and functions, Cellular Automata (CA) plays a significant role. DNA can be thought as a one-dimensional multi-state CA, more precisely four states of CA namely A, T, C, and G which can be taken as numerals 0, 1, 2 and 3. Earlier, Sirakoulis et al. (2003) reported the DNA structure, evolution and function through quaternary logic one dimensional CA and the authors have found the simulation results of the DNA evolutions with the help of only four linear CA rules. The DNA sequences which are produced through the CA evolutions, however, are seen by us not to exist in the established databases of various genomes although the initial seed (initial global state of CA) was taken from the database. This problem motivated us to study the DNA evolutions from more fundamental point of view. Parallel to CA paradigm we have devised an enriched set of discrete transformations which have been named as Integral Value Transformations (IVT). Interestingly, on applying the IVT systematically, we have been able to show that each of the DNA sequence at various discrete time instances in IVT evolutions can be directly mapped to a specific DNA sequence existing in the database. This has been possible through our efforts of getting quantitative mathematical parameters of the DNA sequences involving fractals. Thus we have at our disposal some transformational mechanism between one DNA to another. PMID:22843235

  11. 16 CFR 1102.28 - Publication of reports of harm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE (Eff. Jan. 10, 2011) Procedural..., the Commission will publish reports of harm that meet the requirements for publication in the Database...(d) in the Database beyond the 10-business-day time frame set forth in paragraph (a) of this...

  12. An occurence records database of French Guiana harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones)

    PubMed Central

    Solbès, Pierre; Grosso, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This dataset provides information on specimens of harvestmen (Arthropoda, Arachnida, Opiliones) collected in French Guiana. Field collections have been initiated in 2012 within the framework of the CEnter for the Study of Biodiversity in Amazonia (CEBA: www.labex-ceba.fr/en/). This dataset is a work in progress.  Occurrences are recorded in an online database stored at the EDB laboratory after each collecting trip and the dataset is updated on a monthly basis. Voucher specimens and associated DNA are also stored at the EDB laboratory until deposition in natural history Museums. The latest version of the dataset is publicly and freely accessible through our Integrated Publication Toolkit at http://130.120.204.55:8080/ipt/resource.do?r=harvestmen_of_french_guiana or through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility data portal at http://www.gbif.org/dataset/3c9e2297-bf20-4827-928e-7c7eefd9432c. PMID:25589875

  13. Which specimens from a museum collection will yield DNA barcodes? A time series study of spiders in alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeremy A.; Beentjes, Kevin K.; van Helsdingen, Peter; IJland, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We report initial results from an ongoing effort to build a library of DNA barcode sequences for Dutch spiders and investigate the utility of museum collections as a source of specimens for barcoding spiders. Source material for the library comes from a combination of specimens freshly collected in the field specifically for this project and museum specimens collected in the past. For the museum specimens, we focus on 31 species that have been frequently collected over the past several decades. A series of progressively older specimens representing these 31 species were selected for DNA barcoding. Based on the pattern of sequencing successes and failures, we find that smaller-bodied species expire before larger-bodied species as tissue sources for single-PCR standard DNA barcoding. Body size and age of oldest successful DNA barcode are significantly correlated after factoring out phylogenetic effects using independent contrasts analysis. We found some evidence that extracted DNA concentration is correlated with body size and inversely correlated with time since collection, but these relationships are neither strong nor consistent. DNA was extracted from all specimens using standard destructive techniques involving the removal and grinding of tissue. A subset of specimens was selected to evaluate nondestructive extraction. Nondestructive extractions significantly extended the DNA barcoding shelf life of museum specimens, especially small-bodied species, and yielded higher DNA concentrations compared to destructive extractions. All primary data are publically available through a Dryad archive and the Barcode of Life database. PMID:24453561

  14. 16 CFR 1102.30 - Publication of manufacturer comments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...REGULATIONS PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Procedural Requirements § 1102.30 Publication of manufacturer...1102.24, and 1102.26, the Commission will publish in the Database manufacturer comments submitted in response to a report of...

  15. 16 CFR 1102.30 - Publication of manufacturer comments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...REGULATIONS PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Procedural Requirements § 1102.30 Publication of manufacturer...1102.24, and 1102.26, the Commission will publish in the Database manufacturer comments submitted in response to a report of...

  16. 16 CFR 1102.30 - Publication of manufacturer comments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...REGULATIONS PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Procedural Requirements § 1102.30 Publication of manufacturer...1102.24, and 1102.26, the Commission will publish in the Database manufacturer comments submitted in response to a report of...

  17. Human genotype-phenotype databases: aims, challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Anthony J; Robinson, Peter N

    2015-12-01

    Genotype-phenotype databases provide information about genetic variation, its consequences and its mechanisms of action for research and health care purposes. Existing databases vary greatly in type, areas of focus and modes of operation. Despite ever larger and more intricate datasets - made possible by advances in DNA sequencing, omics methods and phenotyping technologies - steady progress is being made towards integrating these databases rather than using them as separate entities. The consequential shift in focus from single-gene variants towards large gene panels, exomes, whole genomes and myriad observable characteristics creates new challenges and opportunities in database design, interpretation of variant pathogenicity and modes of data representation and use. PMID:26553330

  18. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  19. Search the PAQ Database

    Cancer.gov

    Use this interface to search through all the physical activity-related questions in our database. See below for some tips on how to search. If you have any comments concerning this database, please e-mail David Berrigan.

  20. The EMIME Bilingual Database 

    E-print Network

    Wester, Mirjam

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the collection of a bilingual database of Finnish/English and German/English data. In addition, the accents of the talkers in the database have been rated. English, German and Finnish listeners assessed ...

  1. ECOTOX DATABASE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ECOTOXicology database is a source for locating single chemical toxicity data for aquatic life, terrestrial plants and wildlife. ECOTOX integrates three toxicology effects databases: AQUIRE (aquatic life), PHYTOTOX (terrestrial plants), and TERRETOX (terrestrial wildlife). Th...

  2. THE ECOTOX DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The database provides chemical-specific toxicity information for aquatic life, terrestrial plants, and terrestrial wildlife. ECOTOX is a comprehensive ecotoxicology database and is therefore essential for providing and suppoirting high quality models needed to estimate population...

  3. Structural Ceramics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  4. Genome analysis of DNA repair genes in the alpha proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Marques, Regina CP; Menck, Carlos FM

    2007-01-01

    Background The integrity of DNA molecules is fundamental for maintaining life. The DNA repair proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to tolerate them. DNA repair genes are best known from the gamma-proteobacterium Escherichia coli, which is the most understood bacterial model. However, genome sequencing raises questions regarding uniformity and ubiquity of these DNA repair genes and pathways, reinforcing the need for identifying genes and proteins, which may respond to DNA damage in other bacteria. Results In this study, we employed a bioinformatic approach, to analyse and describe the open reading frames potentially related to DNA repair from the genome of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This was performed by comparison with known DNA repair related genes found in public databases. As expected, although C. crescentus and E. coli bacteria belong to separate phylogenetic groups, many of their DNA repair genes are very similar. However, some important DNA repair genes are absent in the C. crescentus genome and other interesting functionally related gene duplications are present, which do not occur in E. coli. These include DNA ligases, exonuclease III (xthA), endonuclease III (nth), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (ada gene), photolyase-like genes, and uracil-DNA-glycosylases. On the other hand, the genes imuA and imuB, which are involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis, have recently been described in C. crescentus, but are absent in E. coli. Particularly interesting are the potential atypical phylogeny of one of the photolyase genes in alpha-proteobacteria, indicating an origin by horizontal transfer, and the duplication of the Ada orthologs, which have diverse structural configurations, including one that is still unique for C. crescentus. Conclusion The absence and the presence of certain genes are discussed and predictions are made considering the particular aspects of the C. crescentus among other known DNA repair pathways. The observed differences enlarge what is known for DNA repair in the Bacterial world, and provide a useful framework for further experimental studies in this organism. PMID:17352799

  5. DNA fingerprinting in forensics: past, present, future

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting, one of the great discoveries of the late 20th century, has revolutionized forensic investigations. This review briefly recapitulates 30 years of progress in forensic DNA analysis which helps to convict criminals, exonerate the wrongly accused, and identify victims of crime, disasters, and war. Current standard methods based on short tandem repeats (STRs) as well as lineage markers (Y chromosome, mitochondrial DNA) are covered and applications are illustrated by casework examples. Benefits and risks of expanding forensic DNA databases are discussed and we ask what the future holds for forensic DNA fingerprinting. PMID:24245688

  6. USER'S GUIDE DATABASE SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Budny, Robert

    USER'S GUIDE TO THE MINGL DATABASE SYSTEM FOR TFTR Version 4.1 R. M. Wieland Plasma Physics blank] #12;1 Abstract The MINGL database system is an integrated set of tools which is used to collect relational databases. A flexible software tool set makes it easy to browse, select, compare and display

  7. Database Encryption Luc Bouganim

    E-print Network

    Database Encryption Luc Bouganim INRIA Rocquencourt Le Chesnay, FRANCE Luc.Bouganim@inria.fr Yanli GUO INRIA Rocquencourt Le Chesnay, FRANCE yanli.guo@inria.fr Related concepts and keywords Database security, Data confidentiality, Hardware Security Module Definition Database encryption refers to the use

  8. Mission and Assets Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, John; Zendejas, Silvino; Gutheinz, Sandy; Borden, Chester; Wang, Yeou-Fang

    2009-01-01

    Mission and Assets Database (MADB) Version 1.0 is an SQL database system with a Web user interface to centralize information. The database stores flight project support resource requirements, view periods, antenna information, schedule, and forecast results for use in mid-range and long-term planning of Deep Space Network (DSN) assets.

  9. Plant and Crop Databases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Databases have become an integral part of all aspects of biological research, including basic and applied plant biology. The importance of databases continues to increase as the volume of data from direct and indirect genomics approaches expands. What is not always obvious to users of databases is t...

  10. DHQ Database Revision History

    Cancer.gov

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database. The contents of the current database are listed in Nutrient and Dietary Constituents and Pyramid Food Groups.

  11. An Introduction to Database Structure and Database Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detweiler, Karen

    1984-01-01

    Enumerates principal management objectives of database management systems (data independence, quality, security, multiuser access, central control) and criteria for comparison (response time, size, flexibility, other features). Conventional database management systems, relational databases, and database machines used for backend processing are…

  12. GOLD: The Genomes Online Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Liolios, Dinos; Chen, Amy; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Philip; Markowitz, Victor; Bernal, Alex

    Since its inception in 1997, GOLD has continuously monitored genome sequencing projects worldwide and has provided the community with a unique centralized resource that integrates diverse information related to Archaea, Bacteria, Eukaryotic and more recently Metagenomic sequencing projects. As of September 2007, GOLD recorded 639 completed genome projects. These projects have their complete sequence deposited into the public archival sequence databases such as GenBank EMBL,and DDBJ. From the total of 639 complete and published genome projects as of 9/2007, 527 were bacterial, 47 were archaeal and 65 were eukaryotic. In addition to the complete projects, there were 2158 ongoing sequencing projects. 1328 of those were bacterial, 59 archaeal and 771 eukaryotic projects. Two types of metadata are provided by GOLD: (i) project metadata and (ii) organism/environment metadata. GOLD CARD pages for every project are available from the link of every GOLD_STAMP ID. The information in every one of these pages is organized into three tables: (a) Organism information, (b) Genome project information and (c) External links. [The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: Status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata, Konstantinos Liolios, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Nektarios Tavernarakis and Nikos C. Kyrpides, Nucleic Acids Research Advance Access published online on November 2, 2007, Nucleic Acids Research, doi:10.1093/nar/gkm884]

    The basic tables in the GOLD database that can be browsed or searched include the following information:

    • Gold Stamp ID
    • Organism name
    • Domain
    • Links to information sources
    • Size and link to a map, when available
    • Chromosome number, Plas number, and GC content
    • A link for downloading the actual genome data
    • Institution that did the sequencing
    • Funding source
    • Database where information resides
    • Publication status and information

    (Specialized Interface)

  13. Testing Database-Centric Applications For Causes of Database Deadlocks

    E-print Network

    Grechanik, Mark

    Testing Database-Centric Applications For Causes of Database Deadlocks Mark Grechanik, B. M. Mainul--Many organizations deploy applications that use databases by sending Structured Query Language (SQL) state- ments the same databases concurrently, database deadlocks routinely occur in these databases. Testing

  14. Database Description with SDM: A Semantic Database Model

    E-print Network

    McLeod, Dennis

    Database Description with SDM: A Semantic Database Model MICHAEL HAMMER Massachusetts Institute of Technology and DENNIS McLEOD University of Southern California SDM is a high-level semantics-based database description and structuring formalism (database model) for databases. This database model is designed

  15. Database tool ASGARD: an open-access database of

    E-print Network

    Alwes, Frederike

    Database tool ASGARD: an open-access database of annotated transcriptomes for emerging model database, the Assembled Searchable Giant Arthropod Read Database (ASGARD). This database is a repository include search term auto-completion sug- gestions based on database content, the ability to download

  16. DENdb: database of integrated human enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Haitham; Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers are cis-acting DNA regulatory regions that play a key role in distal control of transcriptional activities. Identification of enhancers, coupled with a comprehensive functional analysis of their properties, could improve our understanding of complex gene transcription mechanisms and gene regulation processes in general. We developed DENdb, a centralized on-line repository of predicted enhancers derived from multiple human cell-lines. DENdb integrates enhancers predicted by five different methods generating an enriched catalogue of putative enhancers for each of the analysed cell-lines. DENdb provides information about the overlap of enhancers with DNase I hypersensitive regions, ChIP-seq regions of a number of transcription factors and transcription factor binding motifs, means to explore enhancer interactions with DNA using several chromatin interaction assays and enhancer neighbouring genes. DENdb is designed as a relational database that facilitates fast and efficient searching, browsing and visualization of information. Database URL: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dendb/ PMID:26342387

  17. PDS: A Performance Database Server

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berry, Michael W.; Dongarra, Jack J.; Larose, Brian H.; Letsche, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    The process of gathering, archiving, and distributing computer benchmark data is a cumbersome task usually performed by computer users and vendors with little coordination. Most important, there is no publicly available central depository of performance data for all ranges of machines from personal computers to supercomputers. We present an Internet-accessible performance database server (PDS) that can be used to extract current benchmark data and literature. As an extension to the X-Windows-based user interface (Xnetlib) to the Netlib archival system, PDS provides an on-line catalog of public domain computer benchmarks such as the LINPACK benchmark, Perfect benchmarks, and the NAS parallelmore »benchmarks. PDS does not reformat or present the benchmark data in any way that conflicts with the original methodology of any particular benchmark; it is thereby devoid of any subjective interpretations of machine performance. We believe that all branches (research laboratories, academia, and industry) of the general computing community can use this facility to archive performance metrics and make them readily available to the public. PDS can provide a more manageable approach to the development and support of a large dynamic database of published performance metrics.« less

  18. TCM Database@Taiwan: The World's Largest Traditional Chinese Medicine Database for Drug Screening In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advancing computational technologies have greatly speeded up the development of computer-aided drug design (CADD). Recently, pharmaceutical companies have increasingly shifted their attentions toward traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for novel lead compounds. Despite the growing number of studies on TCM, there is no free 3D small molecular structure database of TCM available for virtual screening or molecular simulation. To address this shortcoming, we have constructed TCM Database@Taiwan (http://tcm.cmu.edu.tw/) based on information collected from Chinese medical texts and scientific publications. TCM Database@Taiwan is currently the world's largest non-commercial TCM database. This web-based database contains more than 20,000 pure compounds isolated from 453 TCM ingredients. Both cdx (2D) and Tripos mol2 (3D) formats of each pure compound in the database are available for download and virtual screening. The TCM database includes both simple and advanced web-based query options that can specify search clauses, such as molecular properties, substructures, TCM ingredients, and TCM classification, based on intended drug actions. The TCM database can be easily accessed by all researchers conducting CADD. Over the last eight years, numerous volunteers have devoted their time to analyze TCM ingredients from Chinese medical texts as well as to construct structure files for each isolated compound. We believe that TCM Database@Taiwan will be a milestone on the path towards modernizing traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:21253603

  19. TaxMan: a taxonomic database manager

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Martin; Blaxter, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic analysis of large, multiple-gene datasets, assembled from public sequence databases, is rapidly becoming a popular way to approach difficult phylogenetic problems. Supermatrices (concatenated multiple sequence alignments of multiple genes) can yield more phylogenetic signal than individual genes. However, manually assembling such datasets for a large taxonomic group is time-consuming and error-prone. Additionally, sequence curation, alignment and assessment of the results of phylogenetic analysis are made particularly difficult by the potential for a given gene in a given species to be unrepresented, or to be represented by multiple or partial sequences. We have developed a software package, TaxMan, that largely automates the processes of sequence acquisition, consensus building, alignment and taxon selection to facilitate this type of phylogenetic study. Results TaxMan uses freely available tools to allow rapid assembly, storage and analysis of large, aligned DNA and protein sequence datasets for user-defined sets of species and genes. The user provides GenBank format files and a list of gene names and synonyms for the loci to analyse. Sequences are extracted from the GenBank files on the basis of annotation and sequence similarity. Consensus sequences are built automatically. Alignment is carried out (where possible, at the protein level) and aligned sequences are stored in a database. TaxMan can automatically determine the best subset of taxa to examine phylogeny at a given taxonomic level. By using the stored aligned sequences, large concatenated multiple sequence alignments can be generated rapidly for a subset and output in analysis-ready file formats. Trees resulting from phylogenetic analysis can be stored and compared with a reference taxonomy. Conclusion TaxMan allows rapid automated assembly of a multigene datasets of aligned sequences for large taxonomic groups. By extracting sequences on the basis of both annotation and BLAST similarity, it ensures that all available sequence data can be brought to bear on a phylogenetic problem, but remains fast enough to cope with many thousands of records. By automatically assisting in the selection of the best subset of taxa to address a particular phylogenetic problem, TaxMan greatly speeds up the process of generating multiple sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. Our results indicate that an automated phylogenetic workbench can be a useful tool when correctly guided by user knowledge. PMID:17176465

  20. Integrating data from heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms.

    PubMed

    Valente, Eduardo; Rocha, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays are one of the most used technologies for gene expression measurement. However, there are several distinct microarray platforms, from different manufacturers, each with its own measurement protocol, resulting in data that can hardly be compared or directly integrated. Data integration from multiple sources aims to improve the assertiveness of statistical tests, reducing the data dimensionality problem. The integration of heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms comprehends a set of tasks that range from the re-annotation of the features used on gene expression, to data normalization and batch effect elimination. In this work, a complete methodology for gene expression data integration and application is proposed, which comprehends a transcript-based re-annotation process and several methods for batch effect attenuation. The integrated data will be used to select the best feature set and learning algorithm for a brain tumor classification case study. The integration will consider data from heterogeneous Agilent and Affymetrix platforms, collected from public gene expression databases, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus. PMID:26673932

  1. Comprehensive Thematic T-matrix Reference Database: a 2013-2014 Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.; Wriedt, Thomas; Videen, Gorden

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the sixth update to the comprehensive thematic database of peer-reviewedT-matrix publications initiated by us in 2004 and includes relevant publications that have appeared since 2013. It also lists several earlier publications not incorporated in the original database and previous updates.

  2. SENTRA, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, M.; Romine, M. F.; Maltsev, N.; Mathematics and Computer Science; PNNL

    2000-01-01

    SENTRA, available via URL http://wit.mcs.anl.gov/WIT2/Sentra/, is a database of proteins associated with microbial signal transduction. The database currently includes the classical two-component signal transduction pathway proteins and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, but will be expanded to also include other classes of signal transduction systems that are modulated by phosphorylation or methylation reactions. Although the majority of database entries are from prokaryotic systems, eukaroytic proteins with bacterial-like signal transduction domains are also included. Currently SENTRA contains signal transduction proteins in 34 complete and almost completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, as well as sequences from 243 organisms available in public databases (SWISS-PROT and EMBL). The analysis was carried out within the framework of the WIT2 system, which is designed and implemented to support genetic sequence analysis and comparative analysis of sequenced genomes.

  3. The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Barbe, Alain; Benner, D. Chris; Bernath, Peter F.; Birk, Manfred; Boudon, V.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Champion, J.-P.; Chance, Kelly V.; Coudert, L. H.; Sung, K.; Toth, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2008 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The new edition is the first official public release since the 2004 edition, although a number of crucial updates had been made available online since 2004. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative-transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are not resolved; individual line parameters and absorption cross sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols, tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for forty-two molecules including many of their isotopologues.

  4. Using the Proteomics Identifications Database (PRIDE).

    PubMed

    Martens, Lennart; Jones, Phil; Côté, Richard

    2008-03-01

    The Proteomics Identifications Database (PRIDE) is a public data repository designed to store, disseminate, and analyze mass spectrometry based proteomics datasets. The PRIDE database can accommodate any level of detailed metadata about the submitted results, which can be queried, explored, viewed, or downloaded via the PRIDE Web interface. The PRIDE database also provides a simple, yet powerful, access control mechanism that fully supports confidential peer-reviewing of data related to a manuscript, ensuring that these results remain invisible to the general public while allowing referees and journal editors anonymized access to the data. This unit describes in detail the functionality that PRIDE provides with regards to searching, viewing, and comparing the available data, as well as different options for submitting data to PRIDE. PMID:18428683

  5. PubChem Substance and Compound databases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunghwan; Thiessen, Paul A.; Bolton, Evan E.; Chen, Jie; Fu, Gang; Gindulyte, Asta; Han, Lianyi; He, Jane; He, Siqian; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Wang, Jiyao; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Jian; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    PubChem (https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) is a public repository for information on chemical substances and their biological activities, launched in 2004 as a component of the Molecular Libraries Roadmap Initiatives of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). For the past 11 years, PubChem has grown to a sizable system, serving as a chemical information resource for the scientific research community. PubChem consists of three inter-linked databases, Substance, Compound and BioAssay. The Substance database contains chemical information deposited by individual data contributors to PubChem, and the Compound database stores unique chemical structures extracted from the Substance database. Biological activity data of chemical substances tested in assay experiments are contained in the BioAssay database. This paper provides an overview of the PubChem Substance and Compound databases, including data sources and contents, data organization, data submission using PubChem Upload, chemical structure standardization, web-based interfaces for textual and non-textual searches, and programmatic access. It also gives a brief description of PubChem3D, a resource derived from theoretical three-dimensional structures of compounds in PubChem, as well as PubChemRDF, Resource Description Framework (RDF)-formatted PubChem data for data sharing, analysis and integration with information contained in other databases. PMID:26400175

  6. STRBase and Information Resources on Forensic DNA

    E-print Network

    of the technique · DNA is often referred to as the "gold standard" in forensic science because of the scientific Journal of Forensic Sciences DNA publications vs total articles 0 3 0 6 9 11 14 15 18 26 34 35 43 44 43 51/backissu.htm Forensic Science Publications #12;Applied Genetics >9,000 references gathered and cataloged in Reference

  7. wDBTF: an integrated database resource for studying wheat transcription factor families

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression by interacting with promoters of their target genes and are classified into families based on their DNA-binding domains. Genes coding for TFs have been identified in the sequences of model plant genomes. The rice (Oryza sativa spp. japonica) genome contains 2,384 TF gene models, which represent the mRNA transcript of a locus, classed into 63 families. Results We have created an extensive list of wheat (Triticum aestivum L) TF sequences based on sequence homology with rice TFs identified and classified in the Database of Rice Transcription Factors (DRTF). We have identified 7,112 wheat sequences (contigs and singletons) from a dataset of 1,033,960 expressed sequence tag and mRNA (ET) sequences available. This number is about three times the number of TFs in rice so proportionally is very similar if allowance is made for the hexaploidy of wheat. Of these sequences 3,820 encode gene products with a DNA-binding domain and thus were confirmed as potential regulators. These 3,820 sequences were classified into 40 families and 84 subfamilies and some members defined orphan families. The results were compiled in the Database of Wheat Transcription Factor (wDBTF), an inventory available on the web http://wwwappli.nantes.inra.fr:8180/wDBFT/. For each accession, a link to its library source and its Affymetrix identification number is provided. The positions of Pfam (protein family database) motifs were given when known. Conclusions wDBTF collates 3,820 wheat TF sequences validated by the presence of a DNA-binding domain out of 7,112 potential TF sequences identified from publicly available gene expression data. We also incorporated in silico expression data on these TFs into the database. Thus this database provides a major resource for systematic studies of TF families and their expression in wheat as illustrated here in a study of DOF family members expressed during seed development. PMID:20298594

  8. The Drinking Water Treatability Database (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking Water Treatability Database (TDB) will provide data taken from the literature on the control of contaminants in drinking water, and will be housed on an interactive, publicly-available USEPA web site. It can be used for identifying effective treatment processes, recogni...

  9. THE DRINKING WATER TREATABILITY DATABASE (Slides)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Drinking Water Treatability Database (TDB) assembles referenced data on the control of contaminants in drinking water, housed on an interactive, publicly-available, USEPA web site (www.epa.gov/tdb). The TDB is of use to drinking water utilities, treatment process design engin...

  10. THE DRINKING WATER TREATABILITY DATABASE (Conference Paper)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Drinking Water Treatability Database (TDB) assembles referenced data on the control of contaminants in drinking water, housed on an interactive, publicly-available, USEPA web site (www.epa.gov/tdb). The TDB is of use to drinking water utilities, treatment process design engin...

  11. Plant databases and data analysis tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is anticipated that the coming years will see the generation of large datasets including diagnostic markers in several plant species with emphasis on crop plants. To use these datasets effectively in any plant breeding program, it is essential to have the information available via public database...

  12. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  13. DNA Copyright

    E-print Network

    Torrance, Andrew W.

    2011-01-01

    of architecture and computer software. Sequences of DNA should also be acknowledged as eligible for copyright protection. Unaltered genomic DNA sequences would seem poor candidates for copyright protection. The case is stronger for copyright protection...

  14. Future database machine architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, D.K.

    1984-09-01

    There are many software database management systems available on many general-purpose computers ranging from micros to super-mainframes. Database machines as backend computers can offload the database management work from the mainframe so that we can retain the same mainframe longer. However, the database backend must also demonstrate lower cost, higher performance, and newer functionality. Some of the fundamental architecture issues in the design of high-performance and great-capacity database machines are addressed. Solutions towards resolving these design issues are articulated. This article is written for the New York University's Symposium in New Directions of Database Systems on the basis of a lecture given at Microelectronic and Computer Technology, Inc.

  15. Toward unification of taxonomy databases in a distributed computer environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kitakami, Hajime; Tateno, Yoshio; Gojobori, Takashi

    1994-12-31

    All the taxonomy databases constructed with the DNA databases of the international DNA data banks are powerful electronic dictionaries which aid in biological research by computer. The taxonomy databases are, however not consistently unified with a relational format. If we can achieve consistent unification of the taxonomy databases, it will be useful in comparing many research results, and investigating future research directions from existent research results. In particular, it will be useful in comparing relationships between phylogenetic trees inferred from molecular data and those constructed from morphological data. The goal of the present study is to unify the existent taxonomy databases and eliminate inconsistencies (errors) that are present in them. Inconsistencies occur particularly in the restructuring of the existent taxonomy databases, since classification rules for constructing the taxonomy have rapidly changed with biological advancements. A repair system is needed to remove inconsistencies in each data bank and mismatches among data banks. This paper describes a new methodology for removing both inconsistencies and mismatches from the databases on a distributed computer environment. The methodology is implemented in a relational database management system, SYBASE.

  16. DNA Banking

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-11-01

    The author is involved in the ethical, legal, and social issues of banking of DNA and data from DNA analysis. In his attempt to determine the extent of DNA banking in the U.S., the author surveyed some commercial companies performing DNA banking services. This article summarizes the results of that survey, with special emphasis on the procedures the companies use to protect the privacy of individuals. 4 refs.

  17. PhytoREF: a reference database of the plastidial 16S rRNA gene of photosynthetic eukaryotes with curated taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Decelle, Johan; Romac, Sarah; Stern, Rowena F; Bendif, El Mahdi; Zingone, Adriana; Audic, Stéphane; Guiry, Michael D; Guillou, Laure; Tessier, Désiré; Le Gall, Florence; Gourvil, Priscillia; Dos Santos, Adriana L; Probert, Ian; Vaulot, Daniel; de Vargas, Colomban; Christen, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Photosynthetic eukaryotes have a critical role as the main producers in most ecosystems of the biosphere. The ongoing environmental metabarcoding revolution opens the perspective for holistic ecosystems biological studies of these organisms, in particular the unicellular microalgae that often lack distinctive morphological characters and have complex life cycles. To interpret environmental sequences, metabarcoding necessarily relies on taxonomically curated databases containing reference sequences of the targeted gene (or barcode) from identified organisms. To date, no such reference framework exists for photosynthetic eukaryotes. In this study, we built the PhytoREF database that contains 6490 plastidial 16S rDNA reference sequences that originate from a large diversity of eukaryotes representing all known major photosynthetic lineages. We compiled 3333 amplicon sequences available from public databases and 879 sequences extracted from plastidial genomes, and generated 411 novel sequences from cultured marine microalgal strains belonging to different eukaryotic lineages. A total of 1867 environmental Sanger 16S rDNA sequences were also included in the database. Stringent quality filtering and a phylogeny-based taxonomic classification were applied for each 16S rDNA sequence. The database mainly focuses on marine microalgae, but sequences from land plants (representing half of the PhytoREF sequences) and freshwater taxa were also included to broaden the applicability of PhytoREF to different aquatic and terrestrial habitats. PhytoREF, accessible via a web interface (http://phytoref.fr), is a new resource in molecular ecology to foster the discovery, assessment and monitoring of the diversity of photosynthetic eukaryotes using high-throughput sequencing. PMID:25740460

  18. 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

  19. ITS-90 Thermocouple Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 60 NIST ITS-90 Thermocouple Database (Web, free access)   Web version of Standard Reference Database 60 and NIST Monograph 175. The database gives temperature -- electromotive force (emf) reference functions and tables for the letter-designated thermocouple types B, E, J, K, N, R, S and T. These reference functions have been adopted as standards by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

  20. The Vocational Guidance Research Database: A Scientometric Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores-Buils, Raquel; Gil-Beltran, Jose Manuel; Caballer-Miedes, Antonio; Martinez-Martinez, Miguel Angel

    2012-01-01

    The scientometric study of scientific output through publications in specialized journals cannot be undertaken exclusively with the databases available today. For this reason, the objective of this article is to introduce the "Base de Datos de Investigacion en Orientacion Vocacional" [Vocational Guidance Research Database], based on the use of…

  1. 42 CFR 455.436 - Federal database checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal database checks. 455.436 Section 455.436....436 Federal database checks. The State Medicaid agency must do all of the following: (a) Confirm the... interest or who is an agent or managing employee of the provider through routine checks of...

  2. Online Information. Selected Databases at the New York State Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Library, Albany. Database Services.

    This brochure describes the online information services at the New York State Library, which has online access to over 250 databases covering a broad range of subject areas, including current events, law, science, medicine, public affairs, grants, business, computer technology, education, social welfare, and humanities. Many of these databases are…

  3. Hungry for Nutrient Data? Navigating the USDA Nutrient Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR) is the major source of food composition data in the United States, providing the foundation for most food composition databases in the public and private sectors. Most nutrition professionals are familiar with the basics of the SR onlin...

  4. Databases for Microbiologists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Databases play an increasingly important role in biology. They archive, store, maintain, and share information on genes, genomes, expression data, protein sequences and structures, metabolites and reactions, interactions, and pathways. All these data are critically important to microbiologists. Furthermore, microbiology has its own databases that deal with model microorganisms, microbial diversity, physiology, and pathogenesis. Thousands of biological databases are currently available, and it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with their development. The purpose of this minireview is to provide a brief survey of current databases that are of interest to microbiologists. PMID:26013493

  5. Ballistic fingerprinting databases.

    PubMed

    De Kinder, J

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses a number of questions regarding the setting up of ballistic fingerprinting databases, consisting of ammunition components fired by all the firearms held in legal possession. These questions can be classified into three categories--the efficiency of the database, forensic issues, and practical issues to be dealt with. The current New York State legislation is used as an illustration of the choices to be made when setting up a ballistic fingerprinting database. Three important arguments are formulated against the installation of a ballistic fingerprinting database. PMID:12632935

  6. Veterans Administration Databases

    Cancer.gov

    The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides database and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.

  7. A catalog of new eclipsing binaries in the Kepler database

    E-print Network

    Kotson, Michael Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, we present a catalog of binary stars discovered in the publicly available Kepler database, none of which were included in previous such catalogs published by the Kepler science team. A brief review of other ...

  8. The peptaibiotics database--a comprehensive online resource.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Nora K N; Stoppacher, Norbert; Zeilinger, Susanne; Degenkolb, Thomas; Brückner, Hans; Schuhmacher, Rainer

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we present the 'Peptaibiotics Database' (PDB), a comprehensive online resource, which intends to cover all Aib-containing non-ribosomal fungal peptides currently described in scientific literature. This database shall extend and update the recently published 'Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database' and currently consists of 1,297 peptaibiotic sequences. In a literature survey, a total of 235 peptaibiotic sequences published between January 2013 and June 2014 have been compiled, and added to the list of 1,062 peptides in the recently published 'Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database'. The presented database is intended as a public resource freely accessible to the scientific community at peptaibiotics-database.boku.ac.at. The search options of the previously published repository and the presentation of sequence motif searches have been extended significantly. All of the available search options can be combined to create complex database queries. As a public repository, the presented database enables the easy upload of new peptaibiotic sequences or the correction of existing informations. In addition, an administrative interface for maintenance of the content of the database has been implemented, and the design of the database can be easily extended to store additional information to accommodate future needs of the 'peptaibiomics community'. PMID:26010663

  9. DNA demethylation by DNA repair

    E-print Network

    Gehring, Mary

    Active DNA demethylation underlies key facets of reproduction in flowering plants and mammals and serves a general genome housekeeping function in plants. A family of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases catalyzes plant ...

  10. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley (Cambridge, MA); Richardson, Charles C. (Chestnut Hill, MA)

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  11. Pfam: the protein families database.

    PubMed

    Finn, Robert D; Bateman, Alex; Clements, Jody; Coggill, Penelope; Eberhardt, Ruth Y; Eddy, Sean R; Heger, Andreas; Hetherington, Kirstie; Holm, Liisa; Mistry, Jaina; Sonnhammer, Erik L L; Tate, John; Punta, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pfam, available via servers in the UK (http://pfam.sanger.ac.uk/) and the USA (http://pfam.janelia.org/), is a widely used database of protein families, containing 14 831 manually curated entries in the current release, version 27.0. Since the last update article 2 years ago, we have generated 1182 new families and maintained sequence coverage of the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) at nearly 80%, despite a 50% increase in the size of the underlying sequence database. Since our 2012 article describing Pfam, we have also undertaken a comprehensive review of the features that are provided by Pfam over and above the basic family data. For each feature, we determined the relevance, computational burden, usage statistics and the functionality of the feature in a website context. As a consequence of this review, we have removed some features, enhanced others and developed new ones to meet the changing demands of computational biology. Here, we describe the changes to Pfam content. Notably, we now provide family alignments based on four different representative proteome sequence data sets and a new interactive DNA search interface. We also discuss the mapping between Pfam and known 3D structures. PMID:24288371

  12. Pfam: the protein families database

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Robert D.; Bateman, Alex; Clements, Jody; Coggill, Penelope; Eberhardt, Ruth Y.; Eddy, Sean R.; Heger, Andreas; Hetherington, Kirstie; Holm, Liisa; Mistry, Jaina; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Tate, John; Punta, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pfam, available via servers in the UK (http://pfam.sanger.ac.uk/) and the USA (http://pfam.janelia.org/), is a widely used database of protein families, containing 14 831 manually curated entries in the current release, version 27.0. Since the last update article 2 years ago, we have generated 1182 new families and maintained sequence coverage of the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) at nearly 80%, despite a 50% increase in the size of the underlying sequence database. Since our 2012 article describing Pfam, we have also undertaken a comprehensive review of the features that are provided by Pfam over and above the basic family data. For each feature, we determined the relevance, computational burden, usage statistics and the functionality of the feature in a website context. As a consequence of this review, we have removed some features, enhanced others and developed new ones to meet the changing demands of computational biology. Here, we describe the changes to Pfam content. Notably, we now provide family alignments based on four different representative proteome sequence data sets and a new interactive DNA search interface. We also discuss the mapping between Pfam and known 3D structures. PMID:24288371

  13. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry

    SciTech Connect

    David Roberts

    2012-01-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop a publicly available database of energy retrofit measures containing performance characteristics and cost estimates for nearly 3,000 measures.

  14. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late Pleistocene landforms observed near the fault trace.

  15. Recent updates and developments to plant genome size databases

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sònia; Leitch, Ilia J.; Anadon-Rosell, Alba; Canela, Miguel Á.; Gálvez, Francisco; Garnatje, Teresa; Gras, Airy; Hidalgo, Oriane; Johnston, Emmeline; Mas de Xaxars, Gemma; Pellicer, Jaume; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Vallès, Joan; Vitales, Daniel; Bennett, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Two plant genome size databases have been recently updated and/or extended: the Plant DNA C-values database (http://data.kew.org/cvalues), and GSAD, the Genome Size in Asteraceae database (http://www.asteraceaegenomesize.com). While the first provides information on nuclear DNA contents across land plants and some algal groups, the second is focused on one of the largest and most economically important angiosperm families, Asteraceae. Genome size data have numerous applications: they can be used in comparative studies on genome evolution, or as a tool to appraise the cost of whole-genome sequencing programs. The growing interest in genome size and increasing rate of data accumulation has necessitated the continued update of these databases. Currently, the Plant DNA C-values database (Release 6.0, Dec. 2012) contains data for 8510 species, while GSAD has 1219 species (Release 2.0, June 2013), representing increases of 17 and 51%, respectively, in the number of species with genome size data, compared with previous releases. Here we provide overviews of the most recent releases of each database, and outline new features of GSAD. The latter include (i) a tool to visually compare genome size data between species, (ii) the option to export data and (iii) a webpage containing information about flow cytometry protocols. PMID:24288377

  16. DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.C.

    1990-10-09

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA. It comprises providing the strand hybridized with a primer able to hybridize to the strand, to give an hybridized mixture, incubating the hybridized mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and a first chain terminating agent, wherein the DNA polymerase causes the primer to be elongated to form a first series of first DNA products differing in the length of the elongated primer, each the first DNA product having a the chain terminating agent at its elongated end. The number of molecules of each the first DNA products is approximately the same for substantially all DNA products differing in length by no more than 20 bases, and providing a second chain terminating agent in the hybridized mixture at a concentration different from the first chain terminating agent.

  17. Corruption of genomic databases with anomalous sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Lamperti, E D; Kittelberger, J M; Smith, T F; Villa-Komaroff, L

    1992-01-01

    We describe evidence that DNA sequences from vectors used for cloning and sequencing have been incorporated accidentally into eukaryotic entries in the GenBank database. These incorporations were not restricted to one type of vector or to a single mechanism. Many minor instances may have been the result of simple editing errors, but some entries contained large blocks of vector sequence that had been incorporated by contamination or other accidents during cloning. Some cases involved unusual rearrangements and areas of vector distant from the normal insertion sites. Matches to vector were found in 0.23% of 20,000 sequences analyzed in GenBank Release 63. Although the possibility of anomalous sequence incorporation has been recognized since the inception of GenBank and should be easy to avoid, recent evidence suggests that this problem is increasing more quickly than the database itself. The presence of anomalous sequence may have serious consequences for the interpretation and use of database entries, and will have an impact on issues of database management. The incorporated vector fragments described here may also be useful for a crude estimate of the fidelity of sequence information in the database. In alignments with well-defined ends, the matching sequences showed 96.8% identity to vector; when poorer matches with arbitrary limits were included, the aggregate identity to vector sequence was 94.8%. PMID:1614861

  18. The World Bacterial Biogeography and Biodiversity through Databases: A Case Study of NCBI Nucleotide Database and GBIF Database

    PubMed Central

    James, Phillip; Nateche, Farida; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.; Hacène, Hocine

    2013-01-01

    Databases are an essential tool and resource within the field of bioinformatics. The primary aim of this study was to generate an overview of global bacterial biodiversity and biogeography using available data from the two largest public online databases, NCBI Nucleotide and GBIF. The secondary aim was to highlight the contribution each geographic area has to each database. The basis for data analysis of this study was the metadata provided by both databases, mainly, the taxonomy and the geographical area origin of isolation of the microorganism (record). These were directly obtained from GBIF through the online interface, while E-utilities and Python were used in combination with a programmatic web service access to obtain data from the NCBI Nucleotide Database. Results indicate that the American continent, and more specifically the USA, is the top contributor, while Africa and Antarctica are less well represented. This highlights the imbalance of exploration within these areas rather than any reduction in biodiversity. This study describes a novel approach to generating global scale patterns of bacterial biodiversity and biogeography and indicates that the Proteobacteria are the most abundant and widely distributed phylum within both databases. PMID:24228241

  19. The world bacterial biogeography and biodiversity through databases: a case study of NCBI Nucleotide Database and GBIF Database.

    PubMed

    Selama, Okba; James, Phillip; Nateche, Farida; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Hacène, Hocine

    2013-01-01

    Databases are an essential tool and resource within the field of bioinformatics. The primary aim of this study was to generate an overview of global bacterial biodiversity and biogeography using available data from the two largest public online databases, NCBI Nucleotide and GBIF. The secondary aim was to highlight the contribution each geographic area has to each database. The basis for data analysis of this study was the metadata provided by both databases, mainly, the taxonomy and the geographical area origin of isolation of the microorganism (record). These were directly obtained from GBIF through the online interface, while E-utilities and Python were used in combination with a programmatic web service access to obtain data from the NCBI Nucleotide Database. Results indicate that the American continent, and more specifically the USA, is the top contributor, while Africa and Antarctica are less well represented. This highlights the imbalance of exploration within these areas rather than any reduction in biodiversity. This study describes a novel approach to generating global scale patterns of bacterial biodiversity and biogeography and indicates that the Proteobacteria are the most abundant and widely distributed phylum within both databases. PMID:24228241

  20. Knowledge Discovery in Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, M. Jay

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) revolves around the investigation and creation of knowledge, processes, algorithms, and mechanisms for retrieving knowledge from data collections. The article is an introductory overview of KDD. The rationale and environment of its development and applications are discussed. Issues related to database design…

  1. Database in Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Julia

    1986-01-01

    Describes a specialist bibliographic database of literature in the field of artificial intelligence created by the Turing Institute (Glasgow, Scotland) using the BRS/Search information retrieval software. The subscription method for end-users--i.e., annual fee entitles user to unlimited access to database, document provision, and printed awareness…

  2. Database Gathers Oceanographic History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Eric

    2007-07-01

    Project OceanograFacts, developed by NortekUSA, seeks input for its database of significant oceanographic events. This database aims to assemble at least 365 significant oceanographic events, one for each day of the year. Each event must be documented to be linked to a specific date.

  3. HIV Structural Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  4. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  5. Database Reviews: Legal Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiser, Virginia

    Detailed reviews of two legal information databases--"Laborlaw I" and "Legal Resource Index"--are presented in this paper. Each database review begins with a bibliographic entry listing the title; producer; vendor; cost per hour contact time; offline print cost per citation; time period covered; frequency of updates; and size of file. A detailed…

  6. Pharmacoepidemiology and Healthcare Databases

    Cancer.gov

    These databases can be used to access national and international data that can help answer some of the outstanding questions of cancer-related outcomes (positive or negative) associated with pharmaceuticals. Some of the databases are linked to a table of pharmacoepidemiology data elements, which provides a snapshot of the material contained therein.

  7. Local Databases and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, David

    1991-01-01

    Discusses local database development and training experiences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign libraries. Topics discussed include when to automate; available resources; microcomputers versus mainframes or minicomputers; software; database design factors; test versions; and training. Examples of sample records, help screens,…

  8. A Quality System Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, William H.; Turner, Anne M.; Gifford, Luther; Stites, William

    2010-01-01

    A quality system database (QSD), and software to administer the database, were developed to support recording of administrative nonconformance activities that involve requirements for documentation of corrective and/or preventive actions, which can include ISO 9000 internal quality audits and customer complaints.

  9. Steam Properties Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 10 NIST/ASME Steam Properties Database (PC database for purchase)   Based upon the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) 1995 formulation for the thermodynamic properties of water and the most recent IAPWS formulations for transport and other properties, this updated version provides water properties over a wide range of conditions according to the accepted international standards.

  10. BioImaging Database

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-10-25

    The Biolmaging Database (BID) is a relational database developed to store the data and meta-data for the 3D gene expression in early Drosophila embryo development on a cellular level. The schema was written to be used with the MySQL DBMS but with minor modifications can be used on any SQL compliant relational DBMS.

  11. The intelligent database machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    The IDM data base was compared with the data base crack to determine whether IDM 500 would better serve the needs of the MSFC data base management system than Oracle. The two were compared and the performance of the IDM was studied. Implementations that work best on which database are implicated. The choice is left to the database administrator.

  12. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  13. Database Searching by Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Stephen E.

    Managers and executives need the easy and quick access to business and management information that online databases can provide, but many have difficulty articulating their search needs to an intermediary. One possible solution would be to encourage managers and their immediate support staff members to search textual databases directly as they now…

  14. Using Data Mining and OLAP to Discover Patterns in a Database of Patients with Y-Chromosome Deletions

    E-print Network

    Dzeroski, Saso

    Using Data Mining and OLAP to Discover Patterns in a Database of Patients with Y-Chromosome presents a database of published Y chromosome deletions and the results of analyzing the database with data assisted reproduction techniques to the offspring. Over 150 Y chromosome specific DNA markers have been

  15. 32 CFR 338.1 - Ordering DNA issuances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ordering DNA issuances. 338.1 Section 338.1 ...AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY (DNA) INSTRUCTIONS AND CHANGES THERETO § 338.1 Ordering DNA issuances. (a) The DNA issuances...

  16. 32 CFR 338.1 - Ordering DNA issuances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ordering DNA issuances. 338.1 Section 338.1 ...AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY (DNA) INSTRUCTIONS AND CHANGES THERETO § 338.1 Ordering DNA issuances. (a) The DNA issuances...

  17. 32 CFR 338.1 - Ordering DNA issuances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ordering DNA issuances. 338.1 Section 338.1 ...AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY (DNA) INSTRUCTIONS AND CHANGES THERETO § 338.1 Ordering DNA issuances. (a) The DNA issuances...

  18. 32 CFR 338.1 - Ordering DNA issuances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ordering DNA issuances. 338.1 Section 338.1 ...AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY (DNA) INSTRUCTIONS AND CHANGES THERETO § 338.1 Ordering DNA issuances. (a) The DNA issuances...

  19. 32 CFR 338.1 - Ordering DNA issuances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ordering DNA issuances. 338.1 Section 338.1 ...AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY (DNA) INSTRUCTIONS AND CHANGES THERETO § 338.1 Ordering DNA issuances. (a) The DNA issuances...

  20. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  1. Simple re-instantiation of small databases using cloud computing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Small bioinformatics databases, unlike institutionally funded large databases, are vulnerable to discontinuation and many reported in publications are no longer accessible. This leads to irreproducible scientific work and redundant effort, impeding the pace of scientific progress. Results We describe a Web-accessible system, available online at http://biodb100.apbionet.org, for archival and future on demand re-instantiation of small databases within minutes. Depositors can rebuild their databases by downloading a Linux live operating system (http://www.bioslax.com), preinstalled with bioinformatics and UNIX tools. The database and its dependencies can be compressed into an ".lzm" file for deposition. End-users can search for archived databases and activate them on dynamically re-instantiated BioSlax instances, run as virtual machines over the two popular full virtualization standard cloud-computing platforms, Xen Hypervisor or vSphere. The system is adaptable to increasing demand for disk storage or computational load and allows database developers to use the re-instantiated databases for integration and development of new databases. Conclusions Herein, we demonstrate that a relatively inexpensive solution can be implemented for archival of bioinformatics databases and their rapid re-instantiation should the live databases disappear. PMID:24564380

  2. Database constraints applied to metabolic pathway reconstruction tools.

    PubMed

    Vilaplana, Jordi; Solsona, Francesc; Teixido, Ivan; Usié, Anabel; Karathia, Hiren; Alves, Rui; Mateo, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Our group developed two biological applications, Biblio-MetReS and Homol-MetReS, accessing the same database of organisms with annotated genes. Biblio-MetReS is a data-mining application that facilitates the reconstruction of molecular networks based on automated text-mining analysis of published scientific literature. Homol-MetReS allows functional (re)annotation of proteomes, to properly identify both the individual proteins involved in the process(es) of interest and their function. It also enables the sets of proteins involved in the process(es) in different organisms to be compared directly. The efficiency of these biological applications is directly related to the design of the shared database. We classified and analyzed the different kinds of access to the database. Based on this study, we tried to adjust and tune the configurable parameters of the database server to reach the best performance of the communication data link to/from the database system. Different database technologies were analyzed. We started the study with a public relational SQL database, MySQL. Then, the same database was implemented by a MapReduce-based database named HBase. The results indicated that the standard configuration of MySQL gives an acceptable performance for low or medium size databases. Nevertheless, tuning database parameters can greatly improve the performance and lead to very competitive runtimes. PMID:25202745

  3. Database Constraints Applied to Metabolic Pathway Reconstruction Tools

    PubMed Central

    Vilaplana, Jordi; Solsona, Francesc; Teixido, Ivan; Usié, Anabel; Karathia, Hiren; Alves, Rui; Mateo, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Our group developed two biological applications, Biblio-MetReS and Homol-MetReS, accessing the same database of organisms with annotated genes. Biblio-MetReS is a data-mining application that facilitates the reconstruction of molecular networks based on automated text-mining analysis of published scientific literature. Homol-MetReS allows functional (re)annotation of proteomes, to properly identify both the individual proteins involved in the process(es) of interest and their function. It also enables the sets of proteins involved in the process(es) in different organisms to be compared directly. The efficiency of these biological applications is directly related to the design of the shared database. We classified and analyzed the different kinds of access to the database. Based on this study, we tried to adjust and tune the configurable parameters of the database server to reach the best performance of the communication data link to/from the database system. Different database technologies were analyzed. We started the study with a public relational SQL database, MySQL. Then, the same database was implemented by a MapReduce-based database named HBase. The results indicated that the standard configuration of MySQL gives an acceptable performance for low or medium size databases. Nevertheless, tuning database parameters can greatly improve the performance and lead to very competitive runtimes. PMID:25202745

  4. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    E-print Network

    David A. Brown Ramona Vogt

    2005-04-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  5. A High Energy Nuclear Database Proposal

    E-print Network

    David A. Brown; Ramona Vogt

    2005-10-13

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interace. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from the Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for intertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  6. Database of Mechanical Properties of Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delbrey, Jerry

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the approach followed to develop a database for mechanical properties of textile composites. The data in this database is assembled from NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) programs and from data in the public domain. This database meets the data documentation requirements of MIL-HDBK-17, Section 8.1.2, which describes in detail the type and amount of information needed to completely document composite material properties. The database focuses on mechanical properties of textile composite. Properties are available for a range of parameters such as direction, fiber architecture, materials, environmental condition, and failure mode. The composite materials in the database contain innovative textile architectures such as the braided, woven, and knitted materials evaluated under the NASA ACT programs. In summary, the database contains results for approximately 3500 coupon level tests, for ten different fiber/resin combinations, and seven different textile architectures. It also includes a limited amount of prepreg tape composites data from ACT programs where side-by-side comparisons were made.

  7. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This catalog lists 190 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into the NASA scientific and technical information database during accession year 1989. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  8. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This catalog lists 458 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information database during accession year 1991 through 1992. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  9. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of Special Publications, Reference Publications, Conference Publications, and Technical Papers, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This catalog lists 239 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered in the NASA scientific and technical information database during accession year 1987. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  10. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1987-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This catalog lists 783 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into NASA Scientific and Technical Information Database during the year's 1987 through 1990. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  11. 48 CFR 504.602-71 - Federal Procurement Data System-Public access to data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...System—Public access to data. (a) The FPDS database . The General Services Administration awarded...operation of the Federal Procurement Data System (FPDS) database. That database includes information reported by departments...

  12. 48 CFR 504.602-71 - Federal Procurement Data System-Public access to data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...System—Public access to data. (a) The FPDS database . The General Services Administration awarded...operation of the Federal Procurement Data System (FPDS) database. That database includes information reported by departments...

  13. NASA aerospace database subject scope: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Outlined here is the subject scope of the NASA Aerospace Database, a publicly available subset of the NASA Scientific and Technical (STI) Database. Topics of interest to NASA are outlined and placed within the framework of the following broad aerospace subject categories: aeronautics, astronautics, chemistry and materials, engineering, geosciences, life sciences, mathematical and computer sciences, physics, social sciences, space sciences, and general. A brief discussion of the subject scope is given for each broad area, followed by a similar explanation of each of the narrower subject fields that follow. The subject category code is listed for each entry.

  14. Enchytraeus albidus Microarray: Enrichment, Design, Annotation and Database (EnchyBASE)

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Sara C.; Arrais, Joel; Lopes, Pedro; Vandenbrouck, Tine; De Coen, Wim; Roelofs, Dick; Soares, Amadeu M. V. M.; Amorim, Mónica J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta) is an ecologically relevant species used as standard test organisms for risk assessment. Effects of stressors in this species are commonly determined at the population level using reproduction and survival as endpoints. The assessment of transcriptomic responses can be very useful e.g. to understand underlying mechanisms of toxicity with gene expression fingerprinting. In the present paper the following is being addressed: 1) development of suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries enriched for differentially expressed genes after metal and pesticide exposures; 2) sequencing and characterization of all generated cDNA inserts; 3) development of a publicly available genomic database on E. albidus. A total of 2100 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were isolated, sequenced and assembled into 1124 clusters (947 singletons and 177 contigs). From these sequences, 41% matched known proteins in GenBank (BLASTX, e-value?10-5) and 37% had at least one Gene Ontology (GO) term assigned. In total, 5.5% of the sequences were assigned to a metabolic pathway, based on KEGG. With this new sequencing information, an Agilent custom oligonucleotide microarray was designed, representing a potential tool for transcriptomic studies. EnchyBASE (http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/enchybase/) was developed as a web freely available database containing genomic information on E. albidus and will be further extended in the near future for other enchytraeid species. The database so far includes all ESTs generated for E. albidus from three cDNA libraries. This information can be downloaded and applied in functional genomics and transcription studies. PMID:22558086

  15. Space medicine research publications: 1983-1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solberg, J. L.; Pleasant, L. G.

    1984-01-01

    A list of publications supported by the Space Medicine Program, Office of Space Science and Applications is given. Included are publications entered into the Life Sciences Bibliographic Database by The George Washington University as of October 1, 1984.

  16. Identification and Re-Evaluation of Freshwater Catfishes through DNA Barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Maloyjo J.; Laskar, Boni A.; Dhar, Bishal; Ghosh, Sankar K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Catfishes are globally demanded as human food, angling sport and aquariums keeping thus are highly exploited all over the world. North-East India possess high abundance of catfishes and are equally exploited through decades. The strategies for conservation necessitate understanding the actual species composition, which is hampered due to sporadic descriptions of the species through traditional taxonomy. Therefore, actual catfish diversity in this region is important to be studied through the combined approach of morphological and molecular technique of DNA barcoding. Methodology/Principal Findings Altogether 75 native catfish specimens were collected from across the North-East India and their morphological features were compared with the taxonomic keys. The detailed taxonomic study identified 25 species belonging to 17 genera and 9 families. The cytochrome oxidase c subunit-I gene fragment were then sequenced from the samples in accordance with the standard DNA barcoding protocols. The sequences were compared with public databases, viz., GenBank and BOLD. Sequences developed in the current study and from databases of the same and related taxa were analyzed to calculate the congeneric and conspecific genetic divergences using Kimura 2-parameter distance model, and a Neighbor Joining tree was created using software MEGA5.1. The DNA barcoding approach delineated 21 distinct species showing 4.33 folds of difference between the nearest congeners. Four species, viz., Amblyceps apangi, Glyptothorax telchitta, G. trilineatus and Erethistes pusillus, showed high conspecific divergence; hence their identification through molecular approach remained inconclusive. On the other hand, the database sequences for three species, viz., Mystus horai, Bagarius yarrelli and Clarias batrachus, appeared mislabeled. Conclusion The efficiency of DNA barcoding was reaffirmed from its success by easily identifying the major share (84%) of the studied catfish into 21 distinct species. The study contributed 27 new barcodes for 7 species and confirmed the range expansion of 2 important species in NE India. PMID:23166801

  17. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    SciTech Connect

    GRAMS, W.H.

    2000-12-28

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from the results of the hazard evaluations, and (2) Hazard Topography Database: Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

  18. The NCBI Taxonomy database.

    PubMed

    Federhen, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The NCBI Taxonomy database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/taxonomy) is the standard nomenclature and classification repository for the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC), comprising the GenBank, ENA (EMBL) and DDBJ databases. It includes organism names and taxonomic lineages for each of the sequences represented in the INSDC's nucleotide and protein sequence databases. The taxonomy database is manually curated by a small group of scientists at the NCBI who use the current taxonomic literature to maintain a phylogenetic taxonomy for the source organisms represented in the sequence databases. The taxonomy database is a central organizing hub for many of the resources at the NCBI, and provides a means for clustering elements within other domains of NCBI web site, for internal linking between domains of the Entrez system and for linking out to taxon-specific external resources on the web. Our primary purpose is to index the domain of sequences as conveniently as possible for our user community. PMID:22139910

  19. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    SciTech Connect

    GAULT, G.W.

    1999-10-13

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved TWRS Authorization Basis (AB). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the TWRS FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The TWRS Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The database supports the preparation of Chapters 3,4, and 5 of the TWRS FSAR and the USQ process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Evaluation Database--Data from the results of the hazard evaluations; and (2) Hazard Topography Database--Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

  20. The NCBI Taxonomy database

    PubMed Central

    Federhen, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The NCBI Taxonomy database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/taxonomy) is the standard nomenclature and classification repository for the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC), comprising the GenBank, ENA (EMBL) and DDBJ databases. It includes organism names and taxonomic lineages for each of the sequences represented in the INSDC’s nucleotide and protein sequence databases. The taxonomy database is manually curated by a small group of scientists at the NCBI who use the current taxonomic literature to maintain a phylogenetic taxonomy for the source organisms represented in the sequence databases. The taxonomy database is a central organizing hub for many of the resources at the NCBI, and provides a means for clustering elements within other domains of NCBI web site, for internal linking between domains of the Entrez system and for linking out to taxon-specific external resources on the web. Our primary purpose is to index the domain of sequences as conveniently as possible for our user community. PMID:22139910

  1. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  2. Database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-01-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  3. 2058 Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from a human fetal lung cDNA library

    SciTech Connect

    Kazunori, Sudo |; Katsuya Chinen; Yusuke Nakamura

    1994-11-15

    ESTs (expressed sequence tags) provide complementary resources for structural and functional analyses of the human genome. The authors have performed single-pass sequencing of 2058 randomly selected, directionally cloned cDNAs isolated from a fetal-lung cDNA library constructed with oligo (dT) primers. Computer analyses of the 5{prime}-end sequences revealed that 60.4% of the clones were considered to be identical to previously reported human genes or ESTs; 9.0% of them showed significant homology to known genes in human, other mammals, or lower organisms; 30.6% showed no homology to any genes or DNA sequences in the public database. These data and reagents will be useful for future investigations of gene expression during prenatal development of human lung. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Hybrid Terrain Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Trey

    2006-01-01

    A prototype hybrid terrain database is being developed in conjunction with other databases and with hardware and software that constitute subsystems of aerospace cockpit display systems (known in the art as synthetic vision systems) that generate images to increase pilots' situation awareness and eliminate poor visibility as a cause of aviation accidents. The basic idea is to provide a clear view of the world around an aircraft by displaying computer-generated imagery derived from an onboard database of terrain, obstacle, and airport information.

  5. JICST Factual Database(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Kazuki; Abe, Atsushi

    This paper describes the system outline, characteristics and use of JICST Thermophysical and Thermochemical Properties Database of which service was started as one part of JICST Factual Database System. This system enables to store data of more than 60 kinds of physical or chemical thermal properties. It covers elements, pure substances of inorganic and low molecular organic compounds, and two or three component systems of these compounds. The system is designed to enable to deal with floating decimal point numerical data identifying significant figures, to provide versatile searching supports, and to link its searching to other databases. The actual use examples and some points to be careful are also described.

  6. International Comparisions Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    International Comparisions Database (Web, free access)   The International Comparisons Database (ICDB) serves the U.S. and the Inter-American System of Metrology (SIM) with information based on Appendices B (International Comparisons), C (Calibration and Measurement Capabilities) and D (List of Participating Countries) of the Comit? International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA). The official source of the data is The BIPM key comparison database. The ICDB provides access to results of comparisons of measurements and standards organized by the consultative committees of the CIPM and the Regional Metrology Organizations.

  7. Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 31 NIST/ACerS Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database (PC database for purchase)   The Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database contains commentaries and more than 21,000 diagrams for non-organic systems, including those published in all 21 hard-copy volumes produced as part of the ACerS-NIST Phase Equilibria Diagrams Program (formerly titled Phase Diagrams for Ceramists): Volumes I through XIV (blue books); Annuals 91, 92, 93; High Tc Superconductors I & II; Zirconium & Zirconia Systems; and Electronic Ceramics I. Materials covered include oxides as well as non-oxide systems such as chalcogenides and pnictides, phosphates, salt systems, and mixed systems of these classes.

  8. 45 CFR 1356.80 - Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E § 1356.80 Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§ 1356.81 through 1356.86 of this part...

  9. A High-Resolution Spontaneous 3D Dynamic Facial Expression Database

    E-print Network

    Cohn, Jeffrey F.

    A High-Resolution Spontaneous 3D Dynamic Facial Expression Database Xing Zhang1 , Lijun Yin1 to address. Most publically available databases are limited to 2D static images or video of posed facial video archives are needed. We present a newly developed 3D video database of spontaneous facial

  10. 32 CFR 105.15 - Defense Sexual Assault Incident Database (DSAID).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Defense Sexual Assault Incident Database (DSAID... Sexual Assault Incident Database (DSAID). (a) Purpose. (1) In accordance with section 563 of Public Law... activities. It shall serve as a centralized, case-level database for the collection and maintenance...

  11. 45 CFR 1356.80 - Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E § 1356.80 Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§ 1356.81 through 1356.86 of this part...

  12. 45 CFR 1356.80 - Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E § 1356.80 Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§ 1356.81 through 1356.86 of this part...

  13. Scientific Communication of Geochemical Data and the Use of Computer Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Bas, M. J.; Durham, J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a scheme in the United Kingdom that coordinates geochemistry publications with a computerized geochemistry database. The database comprises not only data published in the journals but also the remainder of the pertinent data set. The discussion covers the database design; collection, storage and retrieval of data; and plans for future…

  14. Release of ToxCastDB and ExpoCastDB databases

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has released two databases - the Toxicity Forecaster database (ToxCastDB) and a database of chemical exposure studies (ExpoCastDB) - that scientists and the public can use to access chemical toxicity and exposure data. ToxCastDB users can search and download data from over 50...

  15. 45 CFR 1356.80 - Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E § 1356.80 Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§ 1356.81 through 1356.86 of this part...

  16. 45 CFR 1356.80 - Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E § 1356.80 Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database. The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§ 1356.81 through 1356.86 of this part...

  17. 32 CFR 105.15 - Defense Sexual Assault Incident Database (DSAID).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Defense Sexual Assault Incident Database (DSAID... Sexual Assault Incident Database (DSAID). (a) Purpose. (1) In accordance with section 563 of Public Law... activities. It shall serve as a centralized, case-level database for the collection and maintenance...

  18. Ancient and modern environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mikkel Winther; Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Ermini, Luca; Sarkissian, Clio Der; Haile, James; Hellstrom, Micaela; Spens, Johan; Thomsen, Philip Francis; Bohmann, Kristine; Cappellini, Enrico; Schnell, Ida Bærholm; Wales, Nathan A; Carøe, Christian; Campos, Paula F; Schmidt, Astrid M Z; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Hansen, Anders J; Orlando, Ludovic; Willerslev, Eske

    2015-01-19

    DNA obtained from environmental samples such as sediments, ice or water (environmental DNA, eDNA), represents an important source of information on past and present biodiversity. It has revealed an ancient forest in Greenland, extended by several thousand years the survival dates for mainland woolly mammoth in Alaska, and pushed back the dates for spruce survival in Scandinavian ice-free refugia during the last glaciation. More recently, eDNA was used to uncover the past 50 000 years of vegetation history in the Arctic, revealing massive vegetation turnover at the Pleistocene/Holocene transition, with implications for the extinction of megafauna. Furthermore, eDNA can reflect the biodiversity of extant flora and fauna, both qualitatively and quantitatively, allowing detection of rare species. As such, trace studies of plant and vertebrate DNA in the environment have revolutionized our knowledge of biogeography. However, the approach remains marred by biases related to DNA behaviour in environmental settings, incomplete reference databases and false positive results due to contamination. We provide a review of the field. PMID:25487334

  19. New primers for DNA barcoding of digeneans and cestodes (Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Van Steenkiste, Niels; Locke, Sean A; Castelin, Magalie; Marcogliese, David J; Abbott, Cathryn L

    2015-07-01

    Digeneans and cestodes are species-rich taxa and can seriously impact human health, fisheries, aqua- and agriculture, and wildlife conservation and management. DNA barcoding using the COI Folmer region could be applied for species detection and identification, but both 'universal' and taxon-specific COI primers fail to amplify in many flatworm taxa. We found that high levels of nucleotide variation at priming sites made it unrealistic to design primers targeting all flatworms. We developed new degenerate primers that enabled acquisition of the COI barcode region from 100% of specimens tested (n = 46), representing 23 families of digeneans and 6 orders of cestodes. This high success rate represents an improvement over existing methods. Primers and methods provided here are critical pieces towards redressing the current paucity of COI barcodes for these taxa in public databases. PMID:25490869

  20. Experimental database of E110 claddings exposed to accident conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Feró, Erzsébet; Gy?ri, Csaba; Matus, Lajos; Vasáros, László; Hózer, Zoltán; Windberg, Péter; Maróti, László; Horváth, Márta; Nagy, Imre; Pintér-Csordás, Anna; Novotny, Tamás

    2010-02-01

    An experimental database of E110 alloy has been developed on the basis of about 600 separate and combined effect tests of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute. It contains the data of oxidation, ballooning, tensile and compression tests, the results of post-test investigations, photos, figures, information concerning the test conditions and the corresponding English-language publications. The aim of this database is to give adequate information on the E110 cladding behaviour (oxidation, hydrogen uptake, mechanical performance) under accident conditions and to provide valuable experimental data for model development and code validation. This database is a part of the International Fuel Performance Experimental Database. It is accessible on-line, via the internet. This paper gives an overview of the experiments, the test facilities and conditions involved in the database. It presents the most important results and consequences and introduces the directory structure of the database.

  1. 16 CFR 1102.28 - Publication of reports of harm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Procedural Requirements § 1102.28... publish reports of harm that meet the requirements for publication in the Database. The Commission will... Commission may publish a report of harm that meets the requirements of § 1102.10(d) in the Database...

  2. 16 CFR 1102.28 - Publication of reports of harm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Procedural Requirements § 1102.28... publish reports of harm that meet the requirements for publication in the Database. The Commission will... Commission may publish a report of harm that meets the requirements of § 1102.10(d) in the Database...

  3. 16 CFR 1102.28 - Publication of reports of harm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Procedural Requirements § 1102.28... publish reports of harm that meet the requirements for publication in the Database. The Commission will... Commission may publish a report of harm that meets the requirements of § 1102.10(d) in the Database...

  4. THE CTEPP DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CTEPP (Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants) database contains a wealth of data on children's aggregate exposures to pollutants in their everyday surroundings. Chemical analysis data for the environmental media and ques...

  5. PDQ® - NCI's Comprehensive Database

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI database that contains the latest information about cancer treatment, screening, prevention, genetics, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine, plus drug information and a dictionary of cancer terms.

  6. Plant Pathway Databases.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Pankaj; Usadel, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Pathway databases provide information about the role of chemicals, genes, and gene products in the form of protein or RNA, their interactions leading to the formulation of metabolic, transport, regulatory, and signaling reactions. The reactions can then be tethered by the principle of inputs and outputs of one or more reaction to create pathways. This chapter provides a list of various online databases that carry information about plant pathways and provides a brief overview of how to use the pathway databases such as WikiPathways Plants Portal, MapMan and the cereal crop pathway databases like RiceCyc and MaizeCyc, that were developed using the Pathway Tools software. PMID:26519401

  7. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1994-05-27

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  8. Chemical Kinetics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemical Kinetics Database includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The database is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these. In addition, the bibliography can be searched by author name or combination of names. The database contains in excess of 38,000 separate reaction records for over 11,700 distinct reactant pairs. These data have been abstracted from over 12,000 papers with literature coverage through early 2000.

  9. Nuclear Science References Database

    E-print Network

    B. Pritychenko; E. B?ták; B. Singh; J. Totans

    2014-07-08

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr and the International Atomic Energy Agency http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr.

  10. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  11. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase-out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  12. Database computing in HEP

    SciTech Connect

    Day, C.T.; Loken, S.; MacFarlane, J.F. ); May, E.; Lifka, D.; Lusk, E.; Price, L.E. ); Baden, A. . Dept. of Physics); Grossman, R.; Qin, X. . Dept. of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science); Cormell, L.; Leibold, P.; Liu, D

    1992-01-01

    The major SSC experiments are expected to produce up to 1 Petabyte of data per year each. Once the primary reconstruction is completed by farms of inexpensive processors. I/O becomes a major factor in further analysis of the data. We believe that the application of database techniques can significantly reduce the I/O performed in these analyses. We present examples of such I/O reductions in prototype based on relational and object-oriented databases of CDF data samples.

  13. Carbon Capture and Storage Database (CCS) from DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    NETL's Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Database includes active, proposed, canceled, and terminated CCS projects worldwide. Information in the database regarding technologies being developed for capture, evaluation of sites for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, estimation of project costs, and anticipated dates of completion is sourced from publically available information. The CCS Database provides the public with information regarding efforts by various industries, public groups, and governments towards development and eventual deployment of CCS technology. The database contains more than 260 CCS projects worldwide in more than 30 countries across 6 continents. Access to the database requires use of Google Earth, as the NETL CCS database is a layer in Google Earth. Or, users can download a copy of the database in MS-Excel directly from the NETL website.

  14. The AGN Black Hole Mass Database

    E-print Network

    Bentz, Misty C

    2014-01-01

    The AGN Black Hole Mass Database is a compilation of all published spectroscopic reverberation-mapping studies of active galaxies. We have created a public web interface, where users may get the most up-to-date black hole masses from reverberation mapping for any particular active galactic nucleus (AGN), as well as obtain the individual measurements upon which the masses are based and the appropriate references. While the database currently focuses on the measurements necessary for black hole mass determinations, we also plan to expand it in the future to include additional useful information, such as host-galaxy characteristics. New reverberation mapping results will also be incorporated into the database as they are published in peer-refereed journals.

  15. Dynameomics: A comprehensive database of protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    van der Kamp, Marc W.; Schaeffer, Richard D.; Jonsson, Amanda L.; Scouras, Alexander D.; Simms, Andrew; Toofanny, Rudesh D.; Benson, Noah C.; Anderson, Peter C.; Merkley, Eric D.; Rysavy, Steve; Bromley, Denny; Beck, David A. C.; Daggett, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Summary The dynamic behavior of proteins is important for an understanding of their function and folding. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of the native state and unfolding pathways of over 1000 proteins, representing the majority of folds in globular proteins. These data are stored and organized using an innovative database approach, which can be mined to obtain both general and specific information about the dynamics and folding/unfolding of proteins, relevant subsets thereof, and individual proteins. Here we describe the project in general terms and the type of information contained in the database. Then we provide examples of mining the database for information relevant to protein folding, structure building, the effect of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and drug design. The native state simulation data and corresponding analyses for the 100 most populated metafolds, together with related resources, are publicly accessible through www.dynameomics.org. PMID:20399180

  16. Dynameomics: a comprehensive database of protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    van der Kamp, Marc W; Schaeffer, R Dustin; Jonsson, Amanda L; Scouras, Alexander D; Simms, Andrew M; Toofanny, Rudesh D; Benson, Noah C; Anderson, Peter C; Merkley, Eric D; Rysavy, Steven; Bromley, Dennis; Beck, David A C; Daggett, Valerie

    2010-03-14

    The dynamic behavior of proteins is important for an understanding of their function and folding. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of the native state and unfolding pathways of over 2000 protein/peptide systems (approximately 11,000 independent simulations) representing the majority of folds in globular proteins. These data are stored and organized using an innovative database approach, which can be mined to obtain both general and specific information about the dynamics and folding/unfolding of proteins, relevant subsets thereof, and individual proteins. Here we describe the project in general terms and the type of information contained in the database. Then we provide examples of mining the database for information relevant to protein folding, structure building, the effect of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and drug design. The native state simulation data and corresponding analyses for the 100 most populated metafolds, together with related resources, are publicly accessible through http://www.dynameomics.org. PMID:20399180

  17. Crude Oil Analysis Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shay, Johanna Y.

    The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

  18. Drinking Water Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, ShaTerea R.

    2004-01-01

    This summer I had the opportunity to work in the Environmental Management Office (EMO) under the Chemical Sampling and Analysis Team or CS&AT. This team s mission is to support Glenn Research Center (GRC) and EM0 by providing chemical sampling and analysis services and expert consulting. Services include sampling and chemical analysis of water, soil, fbels, oils, paint, insulation materials, etc. One of this team s major projects is the Drinking Water Project. This is a project that is done on Glenn s water coolers and ten percent of its sink every two years. For the past two summers an intern had been putting together a database for this team to record the test they had perform. She had successfully created a database but hadn't worked out all the quirks. So this summer William Wilder (an intern from Cleveland State University) and I worked together to perfect her database. We began be finding out exactly what every member of the team thought about the database and what they would change if any. After collecting this data we both had to take some courses in Microsoft Access in order to fix the problems. Next we began looking at what exactly how the database worked from the outside inward. Then we began trying to change the database but we quickly found out that this would be virtually impossible.

  19. DNA ALTERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exposure of an organism to genotoxic chemicals may induce a cascade of genetic events. nitially, structural alterations to DNA are formed. ext, the DNA damage is processed and subsequently expressed in mutant gene products. inally, diseases result from the genetic damage. he ...

  20. DNA Pendant

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-11-14

    Broadcast Transcript: It's a symbol of commitment. It's a memento mori. It's the DNA pendant offered by Japan's Eiwa Industry and it's two, two, two things in one. Using genetic extraction, Eiwa removes the DNA from, say, a strand of hair or a...

  1. The GLIMS Glacier Database: a spatio-temporal database

    E-print Network

    Raup, Bruce H.

    The GLIMS Glacier Database: a spatio-temporal database implemented using Open Source tools Bruce countries #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;System components PostgreSQL (relational database) PostGIS (geospatial) GDAL (Geospatial Data Abstraction Library) Perl, PHP, Shapelib, ... #12;GLIMS Glacier Database System

  2. MPW : the metabolic pathways database.

    SciTech Connect

    Selkov, E., Jr.; Grechkin, Y.; Mikhailova, N.; Selkov, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Russian Academy of Sciences

    1998-01-01

    The Metabolic Pathways Database (MPW) (www.biobase.com/emphome.html/homepage. html.pags/pathways.html) a derivative of EMP (www.biobase.com/EMP) plays a fundamental role in the technology of metabolic reconstructions from sequenced genomes under the PUMA (www.mcs.anl.gov/home/compbio/PUMA/Production/ ReconstructedMetabolism/reconstruction.html), WIT (www.mcs.anl.gov/home/compbio/WIT/wit.html ) and WIT2 (beauty.isdn.msc.anl.gov/WIT2.pub/CGI/user.cgi) systems. In October 1997, it included some 2800 pathway diagrams covering primary and secondary metabolism, membrane transport, signal transduction pathways, intracellular traffic, translation and transcription. In the current public release of MPW (beauty.isdn.mcs.anl.gov/MPW), the encoding is based on the logical structure of the pathways and is represented by the objects commonly used in electronic circuit design. This facilitates drawing and editing the diagrams and makes possible automation of the basic simulation operations such as deriving stoichiometric matrices, rate laws, and, ultimately, dynamic models of metabolic pathways. Individual pathway diagrams, automatically derived from the original ASCII records, are stored as SGML instances supplemented by relational indices. An auxiliary database of compound names and structures, encoded in the SMILES format, is maintained to unambiguously connect the pathways to the chemical structures of their intermediates.

  3. ITS2 Database V: Twice as Much.

    PubMed

    Ankenbrand, Markus J; Keller, Alexander; Wolf, Matthias; Schultz, Jörg; Förster, Frank

    2015-11-01

    The internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) is a well-established marker for phylogenetic analyses in eukaryotes. A reliable resource for reference sequences and their secondary structures is the ITS2 database (http://its2.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de/). However, the database was last updated in 2011. Here, we present a major update of the underlying data almost doubling the number of entities. This increases the number of taxa represented within all major eukaryotic clades. Moreover, additional data has been added to underrepresented groups and some new groups have been added. The broader coverage across the tree of life improves phylogenetic analyses and the capability of ITS2 as a DNA barcode. PMID:26248563

  4. Catalog of databases and reports

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.

    1997-04-01

    This catalog provides information about the many reports and materials made available by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Global Change Research Program (GCRP) and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The catalog is divided into nine sections plus the author and title indexes: Section A--US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Research Plans and Summaries; Section B--US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Technical Reports; Section C--US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Reports; Section D--Other US Department of Energy Reports; Section E--CDIAC Reports; Section F--CDIAC Numeric Data and Computer Model Distribution; Section G--Other Databases Distributed by CDIAC; Section H--US Department of Agriculture Reports on Response of Vegetation to Carbon Dioxide; and Section I--Other Publications.

  5. Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database is divided into six files, each corresponding to approximately 16 years of simulation. The files are text files with data in columnar format. The 424MB zipped file containing six data files can be downloaded by the public. The files simulate 10-minute maximum loads for the NREL 5MW wind turbine. The details of the loads simulations can be found in the paper: “Decades of Wind Turbine Loads Simulations”, M. Barone, J. Paquette, B. Resor, and L. Manuel, AIAA2012-1288 (3.69MB PDF). Note that the site-average wind speed is 10 m/s (class I-B), not the 8.5 m/s reported in the paper.

  6. DNA barcoding of medicinal plant material for identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of the increasing demand for herbal remedies and for authentication of the source material, it is vital to provide a single database containing information about authentic plant materials and their potential adulterants. The database should provide DNA barcodes for data retrieval and similar...

  7. A database of charged cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, D.; Melot, F.; Taillet, R.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: This paper gives a description of a new online database and associated online tools (data selection, data export, plots, etc.) for charged cosmic-ray measurements. The experimental setups (type, flight dates, techniques) from which the data originate are included in the database, along with the references to all relevant publications. Methods: The database relies on the MySQL5 engine. The web pages and queries are based on PHP, AJAX and the jquery, jquery.cluetip, jquery-ui, and table-sorter third-party libraries. Results: In this first release, we restrict ourselves to Galactic cosmic rays with Z ? 30 and a kinetic energy per nucleon up to a few tens of TeV/n. This corresponds to more than 200 different sub-experiments (i.e., different experiments, or data from the same experiment flying at different times) in as many publications. Conclusions: We set up a cosmic-ray database (CRDB) and provide tools to sort and visualise the data. New data can be submitted, providing the community with a collaborative tool to archive past and future cosmic-ray measurements. http://lpsc.in2p3.fr/crdb; Contact: crdatabase@lpsc.in2p3.fr

  8. Using the Structure-Function Linkage Database to Characterize Functional Domains in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Shoshana; Babbitt, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The Structure-Function Linkage Database (SFLD; http://sfld.rbvi.ucsf.edu/) is a web-accessible database designed to link enzyme sequence, structure and functional information. This unit describes the protocol by which a user may query the database to predict the function of uncharacterized enzymes and to correct misannotated functional assignments. It is especially useful in helping a user discriminate functional capabilities of a sequence that is only distantly related to characterized sequences in publicly available databases. PMID:25501940

  9. Great Basin paleontological database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, N.; Blodgett, R.B.; Hofstra, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has constructed a paleontological database for the Great Basin physiographic province that can be served over the World Wide Web for data entry, queries, displays, and retrievals. It is similar to the web-database solution that we constructed for Alaskan paleontological data (www.alaskafossil.org). The first phase of this effort was to compile a paleontological bibliography for Nevada and portions of adjacent states in the Great Basin that has recently been completed. In addition, we are also compiling paleontological reports (Known as E&R reports) of the U.S. Geological Survey, which are another extensive source of l,egacy data for this region. Initial population of the database benefited from a recently published conodont data set and is otherwise focused on Devonian and Mississippian localities because strata of this age host important sedimentary exhalative (sedex) Au, Zn, and barite resources and enormons Carlin-type An deposits. In addition, these strata are the most important petroleum source rocks in the region, and record the transition from extension to contraction associated with the Antler orogeny, the Alamo meteorite impact, and biotic crises associated with global oceanic anoxic events. The finished product will provide an invaluable tool for future geologic mapping, paleontological research, and mineral resource investigations in the Great Basin, making paleontological data acquired over nearly the past 150 yr readily available over the World Wide Web. A description of the structure of the database and the web interface developed for this effort are provided herein. This database is being used ws a model for a National Paleontological Database (which we am currently developing for the U.S. Geological Survey) as well as for other paleontological databases now being developed in other parts of the globe. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  10. Development of a bird banding recapture database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tautin, J.; Doherty, P.F., Jr.; Metras, L.

    2001-01-01

    Recaptures (and resightings) constitute the vast majority of post-release data from banded or otherwise marked nongame birds. A powerful suite of contemporary analytical models is available for using recapture data to estimate population size, survival rates and other parameters, and many banders collect recapture data for their project specific needs. However, despite widely recognized, broader programmatic needs for more and better data, banders' recapture data are not centrally reposited and made available for use by others. To address this need, the US Bird Banding Laboratory, the Canadian Bird Banding Office and the Georgia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit are developing a bird banding recapture database. In this poster we discuss the critical steps in developing the database, including: determining exactly which recapture data should be included; developing a standard record format and structure for the database; developing electronic means for collecting, vetting and disseminating the data; and most importantly, developing metadata descriptions and individual data set profiles to facilitate the user's selection of appropriate analytical models. We provide examples of individual data sets to be included in the database, and we assess the feasibility of developing a prescribed program for obtaining recapture data from banders who do not presently collect them. It is expected that the recapture database eventually will contain millions of records made available publicly for a variety of avian research and management purposes

  11. Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies

    E-print Network

    Riera, Jesús Bisbal

    Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies Jes´us Bisbal, Jane Grimson Department of Computer there is a need to prototype the database which the applications will use when in operation. A prototype database can be built by sampling data from an existing database. Including relevant semantic information when

  12. 16 CFR 1102.30 - Publication of manufacturer comments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ACT REGULATIONS PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE (Eff. Jan. 10, 2011....24, and 1102.26, the Commission will publish in the Database manufacturer comments submitted...

  13. 16 CFR 1102.30 - Publication of manufacturer comments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...REGULATIONS PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE (Eff. Jan. 10, 2011) Procedural Requirements § 1102...1102.24, and 1102.26, the Commission will publish in the Database manufacturer comments submitted in response to a report of...

  14. An online database of nuclear electromagnetic moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertzimekis, T. J.; Stamou, K.; Psaltis, A.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of nuclear magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments are considered quite important for the understanding of nuclear structure both near and far from the valley of stability. The recent advent of radioactive beams has resulted in a plethora of new, continuously flowing, experimental data on nuclear structure - including nuclear moments - which hinders the information management. A new, dedicated, public and user friendly online database

  15. BioWarehouse: a bioinformatics database warehouse toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas J; Pouliot, Yannick; Wagner, Valerie; Gupta, Priyanka; Stringer-Calvert, David WJ; Tenenbaum, Jessica D; Karp, Peter D

    2006-01-01

    Background This article addresses the problem of interoperation of heterogeneous bioinformatics databases. Results We introduce BioWarehouse, an open source toolkit for constructing bioinformatics database warehouses using the MySQL and Oracle relational database managers. BioWarehouse integrates its component databases into a common representational framework within a single database management system, thus enabling multi-database queries using the Structured Query Language (SQL) but also facilitating a variety of database integration tasks such as comparative analysis and data mining. BioWarehouse currently supports the integration of a pathway-centric set of databases including ENZYME, KEGG, and BioCyc, and in addition the UniProt, GenBank, NCBI Taxonomy, and CMR databases, and the Gene Ontology. Loader tools, written in the C and JAVA languages, parse and load these databases into a relational database schema. The loaders also apply a degree of semantic normalization to their respective source data, decreasing semantic heterogeneity. The schema supports the following bioinformatics datatypes: chemical compounds, biochemical reactions, metabolic pathways, proteins, genes, nucleic acid sequences, features on protein and nucleic-acid sequences, organisms, organism taxonomies, and controlled vocabularies. As an application example, we applied BioWarehouse to determine the fraction of biochemically characterized enzyme activities for which no sequences exist in the public sequence databases. The answer is that no sequence exists for 36% of enzyme activities for which EC numbers have been assigned. These gaps in sequence data significantly limit the accuracy of genome annotation and metabolic pathway prediction, and are a barrier for metabolic engineering. Complex queries of this type provide examples of the value of the data warehousing approach to bioinformatics research. Conclusion BioWarehouse embodies significant progress on the database integration problem for bioinformatics. PMID:16556315

  16. DataBase on Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar Aparicio, R.; Gomez, D.; Coterillo Coz, I.; Wojcik, D.

    2012-12-01

    At CERN a number of key database applications are running on user-managed MySQL database services. The database on demand project was born out of an idea to provide the CERN user community with an environment to develop and run database services outside of the actual centralised Oracle based database services. The Database on Demand (DBoD) empowers the user to perform certain actions that had been traditionally done by database administrators, DBA's, providing an enterprise platform for database applications. It also allows the CERN user community to run different database engines, e.g. presently open community version of MySQL and single instance Oracle database server. This article describes a technology approach to face this challenge, a service level agreement, the SLA that the project provides, and an evolution of possible scenarios.

  17. Nonhuman DNA.

    PubMed

    Graham, Eleanor A M

    2005-06-01

    DNA has now been used to aid criminal investigation for more than 20 years. The vast majority of this evidence has been produced by profiling of human genetic material. However, DNA profiling technology is not restricted to the human genome. Regions of genetic material displaying similar characteristics to markers used for forensic purposes in the human genome have been identified in many other animal species. Although nonhuman DNA profiling has been used for a small number of forensic investigations, the full potential of this evidence type has yet to be realized. PMID:25869954

  18. NASA Records Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Lunsford, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Records Database, comprising a Web-based application program and a database, is used to administer an archive of paper records at Stennis Space Center. The system begins with an electronic form, into which a user enters information about records that the user is sending to the archive. The form is smart : it provides instructions for entering information correctly and prompts the user to enter all required information. Once complete, the form is digitally signed and submitted to the database. The system determines which storage locations are not in use, assigns the user s boxes of records to some of them, and enters these assignments in the database. Thereafter, the software tracks the boxes and can be used to locate them. By use of search capabilities of the software, specific records can be sought by box storage locations, accession numbers, record dates, submitting organizations, or details of the records themselves. Boxes can be marked with such statuses as checked out, lost, transferred, and destroyed. The system can generate reports showing boxes awaiting destruction or transfer. When boxes are transferred to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), the system can automatically fill out NARA records-transfer forms. Currently, several other NASA Centers are considering deploying the NASA Records Database to help automate their records archives.

  19. Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James I.; Christiansen, Eric I.; Lear, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    With three flights remaining on the manifest, the shuttle impact hypervelocity database has over 2800 entries. The data is currently divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the database provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. The paper will provide details and insights on the contents of the database including examples of descriptive statistics using the impact data. A discussion of post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will be presented. Future work to be discussed will be possible enhancements to the database structure and availability of the data for other researchers. A related database of ISS returned surfaces that are under development will also be introduced.

  20. Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    With three missions outstanding, the Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database has nearly 3000 entries. The data is divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the database provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. Details and insights on the contents of the database including examples of descriptive statistics will be provided. Post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will also be discussed. Potential enhancements to the database structure and availability of the data for other researchers will be addressed in the Future Work section. A related database of returned surfaces from the International Space Station will also be introduced.

  1. ADANS database specification

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-16

    The purpose of the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Deployment Analysis System (ADANS) Database Specification (DS) is to describe the database organization and storage allocation and to provide the detailed data model of the physical design and information necessary for the construction of the parts of the database (e.g., tables, indexes, rules, defaults). The DS includes entity relationship diagrams, table and field definitions, reports on other database objects, and a description of the ADANS data dictionary. ADANS is the automated system used by Headquarters AMC and the Tanker Airlift Control Center (TACC) for airlift planning and scheduling of peacetime and contingency operations as well as for deliberate planning. ADANS also supports planning and scheduling of Air Refueling Events by the TACC and the unit-level tanker schedulers. ADANS receives input in the form of movement requirements and air refueling requests. It provides a suite of tools for planners to manipulate these requirements/requests against mobility assets and to develop, analyze, and distribute schedules. Analysis tools are provided for assessing the products of the scheduling subsystems, and editing capabilities support the refinement of schedules. A reporting capability provides formatted screen, print, and/or file outputs of various standard reports. An interface subsystem handles message traffic to and from external systems. The database is an integral part of the functionality summarized above.

  2. Using the Reactome Database

    PubMed Central

    Haw, Robin

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the bioinformatics community in creating pathway databases. The Reactome project (a collaboration between the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York University Medical Center and the European Bioinformatics Institute) is one such pathway database and collects structured information on all the biological pathways and processes in the human. It is an expert-authored and peer-reviewed, curated collection of well-documented molecular reactions that span the gamut from simple intermediate metabolism to signaling pathways and complex cellular events. This information is supplemented with likely orthologous molecular reactions in mouse, rat, zebrafish, worm and other model organisms. This unit describes how to use the Reactome database to learn the steps of a biological pathway; navigate and browse through the Reactome database; identify the pathways in which a molecule of interest is involved; use the Pathway and Expression analysis tools to search the database for and visualize possible connections within user-supplied experimental data set and Reactome pathways; and the Species Comparison tool to compare human and model organism pathways. PMID:22700314

  3. 75 FR 13286 - Notice of Public Information Collection Being Reviewed by the Federal Communications Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ...FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Notice of Public Information Collection...by the Federal Communications Commission For...Commission and the public use the database...activities. Federal Communications Commission....

  4. The LHCb configuration database

    E-print Network

    Abadie, Lana; Gaspar, Clara; Jacobsson, Richard; Jost, Beat; Neufeld, Niko

    2005-01-01

    The Experiment Control System (ECS) will handle the monitoring, configuration and operation of all the LHCb experimental equipment. All parameters required to configure electronics equipment under the control of the ECS will reside in a configuration database. The database will contain two kinds of information: 1.\tConfiguration properties about devices such as hardware addresses, geographical location, and operational parameters associated with particular running modes (dynamic properties). 2.\tConnectivity between devices : this consists of describing the output and input connections of a device (static properties). The representation of these data using tables must be complete so that it can provide all the required information to the ECS and must cater for all the subsystems. The design should also guarantee a fast response time, even if a query results in a large volume of data being loaded from the database into the ECS. To fulfil these constraints, we apply the following methodology: Determine from the d...

  5. Developmental Biology and Databases

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Systems biology has undergone an explosive growth in recent times. The staggering amount of expression data that can now be obtained from microarray chip analysis and high-throughput in situ screens has lent itself to the creation of large, terabyte-capacity databases in which to house gene expression patterns. Furthermore, innovative methods can be used to interrogate these databases and to link genomic information to functional information of embryonic cells, tissues and organs. These formidable advancements have led to the development of a whole host of online resources that have allowed biologists to probe the mysteries of growth and form with renewed zeal. This review seeks to highlight general features of these databases, and to identify the methods by which expression data can be retrieved. PMID:19279703

  6. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  7. The DIPPR® databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, G. H.

    1996-01-01

    The Design Institute for Physical Property Data® (DIPPR), one of the Sponsored Research groups of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), has been in existence for 15 years and has supported a total of 14 projects, some completed, some ongoing. Four of these projects are “database” projects for which the primary product is a database of carefully evaluated property data. These projects are Data Compilation; Evaluated Data on Mixtures; Environmental, Safety, and Health Data Compilation; and Difusivities and Thermal Properties of Polymer Solutions. This paper lists the existing DIPPR projects; discusses DIPPR's structure and modes of dissemination of results; describes DIPPR's supporters and its unique characteristics; and finally, discusses the origin, nature, and content of the four database projects.

  8. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: revised and extended guidelines for mitochondrial DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Parson, W; Gusmão, L; Hares, D R; Irwin, J A; Mayr, W R; Morling, N; Pokorak, E; Prinz, M; Salas, A; Schneider, P M; Parsons, T J

    2014-11-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the question of human identification. Previous recommendations published in 2000 addressed the analysis and interpretation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in forensic casework. While the foundations set forth in the earlier recommendations still apply, new approaches to the quality control, alignment and nomenclature of mitochondrial sequences, as well as the establishment of mtDNA reference population databases, have been developed. Here, we describe these developments and discuss their application to both mtDNA casework and mtDNA reference population databasing applications. While the generation of mtDNA for forensic casework has always been guided by specific standards, it is now well-established that data of the same quality are required for the mtDNA reference population data used to assess the statistical weight of the evidence. As a result, we introduce guidelines regarding sequence generation, as well as quality control measures based on the known worldwide mtDNA phylogeny, that can be applied to ensure the highest quality population data possible. For both casework and reference population databasing applications, the alignment and nomenclature of haplotypes is revised here and the phylogenetic alignment proffered as acceptable standard. In addition, the interpretation of heteroplasmy in the forensic context is updated, and the utility of alignment-free database searches for unbiased probability estimates is highlighted. Finally, we discuss statistical issues and define minimal standards for mtDNA database searches. PMID:25117402

  9. Flybrain neuron database: a comprehensive database system of the Drosophila brain neurons.

    PubMed

    Shinomiya, Kazunori; Matsuda, Keiji; Oishi, Takao; Otsuna, Hideo; Ito, Kei

    2011-04-01

    The long history of neuroscience has accumulated information about numerous types of neurons in the brain of various organisms. Because such neurons have been reported in diverse publications without controlled format, it is not easy to keep track of all the known neurons in a particular nervous system. To address this issue we constructed an online database called Flybrain Neuron Database (Flybrain NDB), which serves as a platform to collect and provide information about all the types of neurons published so far in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster. Projection patterns of the identified neurons in diverse areas of the brain were recorded in a unified format, with text-based descriptions as well as images and movies wherever possible. In some cases projection sites and the distribution of the post- and presynaptic sites were determined with greater detail than described in the original publication. Information about the labeling patterns of various antibodies and expression driver strains to visualize identified neurons are provided as a separate sub-database. We also implemented a novel visualization tool with which users can interactively examine three-dimensional reconstruction of the confocal serial section images with desired viewing angles and cross sections. Comprehensive collection and versatile search function of the anatomical information reported in diverse publications make it possible to analyze possible connectivity between different brain regions. We analyzed the preferential connectivity among optic lobe layers and the plausible olfactory sensory map in the lateral horn to show the usefulness of such a database. PMID:21280038

  10. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  11. Seaweed metabolite database (SWMD): A database of natural compounds from marine algae

    PubMed Central

    Davis, G Dicky John; Vasanthi, A Hannah Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The cataloguing of marine chemicals is a fundamental aspect for bioprospecting. This has applications in the development of drugs from marine sources. A publicly accessible database that provides comprehensive information about these compounds is therefore helpful. The Seaweed Metabolite Database (SWMD) is designed to provide information about the known compounds and their biological activity described in the literature. Geographical origin of the seaweed, extraction method and the chemical descriptors of each the compounds are recorded to enable effective chemo-informatics analysis. Crosslinks to other databases are also introduced to facilitate the access of information about 3D Structure by X-ray and NMR activity, drug properties and related literature for each compound. This database currently contains entries for 517 compounds encompassing 25 descriptive fields mostly from the Red algae of the genus Laurencia (Ceramiales, Rhodomelaceae). The customized search engine of this database will enable wildcard querying, which includes Accession Number, Compound type, Seaweed Binomial name, IUPAC name, SMILES notation or InChI. Availability The database is available for free at http://www.swmd.co.in PMID:21423723

  12. Database Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1981 Wayne Erickson founded Microrim, Inc, a company originally focused on marketing a microcomputer version of RIM (Relational Information Manager). Dennis Comfort joined the firm and is now vice president, development. The team developed an advanced spinoff from the NASA system they had originally created, a microcomputer database management system known as R:BASE 4000. Microrim added many enhancements and developed a series of R:BASE products for various environments. R:BASE is now the second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software in the world.

  13. The CHIANTI atomic database

    E-print Network

    Young, Peter R; Landi, Enrico; Del Zanna, Giulio; Mason, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The CHIANTI atomic database was first released in 1996 and has had a huge impact on the analysis and modeling of emissions from astrophysical plasmas. The database has continued to be updated, with version 8 released in 2015. Atomic data for modeling the emissivities of 246 ions and neutrals are contained in CHIANTI, together with data for deriving the ionization fractions of all elements up to zinc. The different types of atomic data are summarized here and their formats discussed. Statistics on the impact of CHIANTI to the astrophysical community are given and examples of the diverse range of applications are presented.

  14. DNA Adductomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the 32P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC–MSn), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC–MSn instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology. PMID:24437709

  15. Unravelling DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Rs; Danilowicz, C.

    2004-04-01

    The forces involved in the biology of life are carefully balanced between stopping thermal fluctuations ripping our DNA apart and having bonds weak enough to allow enzymes to function. The application of recently developed techniques for measuring piconewton forces and imaging at the nanometre scale on a molecule-by-molecule basis has dramatically increased the impact of single-molecule biophysics. This article describes the most commonly used techniques for imaging and manipulating single biomolecules. Using these techniques, the mechanical properties of DNA can be investigated, for example through measurements of the forces required to stretch and unzip the DNA double helix. These properties determine the ease with which DNA can be folded into the cell nucleus and the size and complexity of the accompanying cellular machinery. Part of this cellular machinery is enzymes, which manipulate, repair and transcribe the DNA helix. Enzymatic function is increasingly being investigated at the single molecule level to give better understanding of the forces and processes involved in the genetic cycle. One of the challenges is to transfer this understanding of single molecules into living systems. Already there have been some notable successes, such as the development of techniques for gene expression through the application of mechanical forces to cells, and the imaging and control of viral infection of a cell. This understanding and control of DNA has also been used to design molecules, which can self-assemble into a range of structures.

  16. DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics

    E-print Network

    DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics Soo­Yong Shin 1 , Eun Jeong the complexity of DNA computing. The complexity of any computational algorithm is typically measured in terms of time and space. In DNA computing, the time complexity can be measured by the total reaction time

  17. DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics

    E-print Network

    DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics Soo-Yong Shin1 , Eun Jeong of DNA computing. The complexity of any computational algorithm is typically measured in terms of time and space. In DNA computing, the time complexity can be measured by the total reaction time

  18. Publicity and public relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fosha, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses approaches to using publicity and public relations to meet the goals of the NASA Space Grant College. Methods universities and colleges can use to publicize space activities are presented.

  19. National Spill Test Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sheesley, David [Western Research Institute

    Western Research Institute established, and ACRC continues to maintain, the National Spill Technology database to provide support to the Liquified Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (now called the National HAZMAT Spill Center) as directed by Congress in Section 118(n) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The Albany County Research Corporation (ACRC) was established to make publicly funded data developed from research projects available to benefit public safety. The founders since 1987 have been investigating the behavior of toxic chemicals that are deliberately or accidentally spilled, educating emergency response organizations, and maintaining funding to conduct the research at the DOEÆs HAZMAT Spill Center (HSC) located on the Nevada Test Site. ACRC also supports DOE in collaborative research and development efforts mandated by Congress in the Clean Air Act Amendments. The data files are results of spill tests conducted at various times by the Silicones Environmental Health and Safety Council (SEHSC) and DOE, ANSUL, Dow Chemical, the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) and DOE, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), OSHA, and DOT; DuPont, and the Western Research Institute (WRI), Desert Research Institute (DRI), and EPA. Each test data page contains one executable file for each test in the test series as well as a file named DOC.EXE that contains information documenting the test series. These executable files are actually self-extracting zip files that, when executed, create one or more comma separated value (CSV) text files containing the actual test data or other test information.

  20. A high-throughput distributed DNA

    E-print Network

    Weller, Jennifer Walsh

    of software objects, implemented in CORBATM (Common Object Request Broker ArchitectureTM ). In this paper we discuss the architecture of the pipeline, the database support, types of DNA sequence analysis used of royalty provided that (1) each reproduction is done without alteration and (2) the Journal reference