Science.gov

Sample records for puerto rico fault

  1. Researchers investigate submarine faults north of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, N.; Mann, P.; Dolan, J.

    A 23-day marine geophysical expedition in the summer of 1996 revealed a previously unidentified strike-slip fault zone within 60-100 km of the densely populated northern coast of Puerto Rico. The purpose of the expedition, which was held aboard the U.S. research vessel Maurice Ewing, was to map the northeastern portion of the North America Caribbean plate boundary.The 3000-km-long North America-Caribbean plate boundary stretches from Guatemala to the Lesser Antilles arc. The dominantly left-lateral strike-slip boundary accommodates slow (1-2.6 cm/yr) eastward motion of the Caribbean plate relative to North America. Distributed interplate motion in the region generates large earthquakes (Figure 1, inset). In 1976, an M 7.5 left-lateral, strike-slip earthquake in Guatemala killed approximately 23,000 people and left a quarter of the nation's population homeless.

  2. Reconnaissance study of late quaternary faulting along cerro GoDen fault zone, western Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.S.; Hippolyte, J.-C.; Grindlay, N.R.; Abrams, L.J.; Lao-Davila, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Cerro GoDen fault zone is associated with a curvilinear, continuous, and prominent topographic lineament in western Puerto Rico. The fault varies in strike from northwest to west. In its westernmost section, the fault is ???500 m south of an abrupt, curvilinear mountain front separating the 270- to 361-m-high La CaDena De San Francisco range from the Rio A??asco alluvial valley. The Quaternary fault of the A??asco Valley is in alignment with the bedrock fault mapped by D. McIntyre (1971) in the Central La Plata quadrangle sheet east of A??asco Valley. Previous workers have postulated that the Cerro GoDen fault zone continues southeast from the A??asco Valley and merges with the Great Southern Puerto Rico fault zone of south-central Puerto Rico. West of the A??asco Valley, the fault continues offshore into the Mona Passage (Caribbean Sea) where it is characterized by offsets of seafloor sediments estimated to be of late Quaternary age. Using both 1:18,500 scale air photographs taken in 1936 and 1:40,000 scale photographs taken by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1986, we iDentified geomorphic features suggestive of Quaternary fault movement in the A??asco Valley, including aligned and Deflected drainages, apparently offset terrace risers, and mountain-facing scarps. Many of these features suggest right-lateral displacement. Mapping of Paleogene bedrock units in the uplifted La CaDena range adjacent to the Cerro GoDen fault zone reveals the main tectonic events that have culminated in late Quaternary normal-oblique displacement across the Cerro GoDen fault. Cretaceous to Eocene rocks of the La CaDena range exhibit large folds with wavelengths of several kms. The orientation of folds and analysis of fault striations within the folds indicate that the folds formed by northeast-southwest shorTening in present-day geographic coordinates. The age of Deformation is well constrained as late Eocene-early Oligocene by an angular unconformity separating folDed, Deep-marine middle Eocene rocks from transgressive, shallow-marine rocks of middle-upper Oligocene age. Rocks of middle Oligocene-early Pliocene age above unconformity are gently folDed about the roughly east-west-trending Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands arch, which is well expressed in the geomorphology of western Puerto Rico. Arching appears ongoing because onshore and offshore late Quaternary oblique-slip faults closely parallel the complexly Deformed crest of the arch and appear to be related to exTensional strains focused in the crest of the arch. We estimate ???4 km of vertical throw on the Cerro GoDen fault based on the position of the carbonate cap north of the fault in the La CaDena De San Francisco and its position south of the fault inferred from seismic reflection data in Mayaguez Bay. Based on these observations, our interpretation of the kinematics and history of the Cerro GoDen fault zone incluDes two major phases of motion: (1) Eocene northeast-southwest shorTening possibly accompanied by left-lateral shearing as Determined by previous workers on the Great Southern Puerto Rico fault zone; and (2) post-early Pliocene regional arching of Puerto Rico accompanied by normal offset and right-lateral shear along faults flanking the crest of the arch. The second phase of Deformation accompanied east-west opening of the Mona rift and is inferred to continue to the present day. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  3. Paleoseismic study of the South Lajas fault: First documentation of an onshore Holocene fault in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, C.S.; Mann, P.

    2005-01-01

    The island of Puerto Rico is located within the complex boundary between the North America and Caribbean plates. The relative motion along this boundary is dominantly left-lateral strike slip, but compression and extension are locally significant. Although tectonic models proposed for the region suggest the presence of onshore active faults in Puerto Rico, no faults with Holocene displacement have been documented on the island before this study. Current seismic hazard assessments primarily consider only the impact of distant, offshore seismic sources because onshore fault hazard is unknown. Our mapping and trenching studies demonstrate Holocene surface rupture on a previously undocumented fault in southwestern Puerto Rico. We excavated a trench across a scarp near the southern edge of the Lajas Valley that exposed a narrow fault zone disrupting alluvial deposits. Structural relations indicate valley-side-down fault slip, with a component of strike-slip motion. Radiocarbon analyses of organic material collected from the sediments suggest that the most recent surface rupture occurred during the past 5000 yr, but no minimum age has yet been established. This fault may be part of a larger fault zone that extends from the western end of the Lajas Valley toward Ponce, the second largest city in Puerto Rico. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  4. Further Evidence for Medieval Faulting along the Puerto Rico Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, B. F.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Fuentes, Z.; Halley, R. B.; Spiske, M.; Tuttle, M. P.; Wei, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Has the Antilles Subduction Zone produced thrust or outer-rise earthquakes east of Hispaniola? An affirmative answer is suggested by tiered evidence for overwash 120 km south of the Puerto Rico Trench. The evidence comes from Anegada, British Virgin Islands, 200 km east-northeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico. PREVIOUS FINDINGS* suggested that a medieval overwash event had greater geologic effects at Anegada than did a Lisbon(?) event, and that both events outrank recent storms. The medieval overwash, in AD 1200-1450, dislodged brain corals from a reef, moved them as much as 500 m across a shallow subtidal flat, and scattered them as solitary boulders as much as 1000 m inland. Gentler overwash in 1650-1800, called Lisbon(?) because it may represent the 1755 tsunami, laid down a sheet of sand and island-derived shells as much as 1500 m from the north shore. A recent hurricane of category 4 left no durable geologic record other than sandy fans within 40 m of the south shore. NEW FINDINGS reinforce the ranking medieval > Lisbon(?) > storm: (1) The medieval event washed ashore marine shells that the Lisbon(?) event did not. An articulated marine bivalve (Codakia orbicularis), probably deposited live, is part of an overwash fan 400 m inland from Windlass Bight. The shell dates to the same time window as the medieval coral boulders. Additional articulated Codakia shells and a conch shell adjoin the buried base of one of these coral boulders 1500 m south of the fringing reef from which the coral was probably derived. (2) Lisbon(?) overwash used breaches that the medieval event had cut through beach ridges of the north shore. The re-use is marked by sand: on the muddy floor of a partly filled breach, on an organic soil in another such breach, and on a pre-existing fan south of an area of beach-ridge dissection. The buried organic soil, inset into a old breach, is 500 m inland from an area, near Cow Wreck High Point, where young beach ridges may have been breached for the first time during the Lisbon(?) event. (3) A storm berm of coral rubble lies seaward of a field of coral boulders that marks the medieval overwash. The berm rises as much as 3 m above fair-weather high tides along Anegada's north shore at Soldier Wash, a sand-free stretch of coast 100 m from the fringing reef. The berm consists of imbricated, well-rounded fragments 15-30 cm in diameter on average. This rubble differs in preservation, size, and distribution from the brain-coral heads 1 m in diameter that the medieval overwash scattered hundreds of meters inland from Soldier Wash. *REFERENCES link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11069-010-9622-6; 2012 fall AGU abs OS32A-05 T41A-2562, and T41A-2566.

  5. Gravity Modeling of the Cerro Goden fault zone, NW Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, G. A.; Keranen, K. M.; Asencio, E.

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 M7.0 Haiti earthquake served as a reminder of potential earthquake hazards on upper-crustal fault systems along the northern boundary of the Carribean plate. In this study we modeled the structure of the Cerro Goden and subparallel fault zones in northwestern Puerto Rico, which cross through densely populated areas, using existing and newly collected gravity data. The fault zone had previously been mapped at the surface, but the details of the fault zone in the subsurface and the detailed structure remain poorly constrained. We used our gravity data to extend surface geologic models to greater depth. Specifically, we modeled and interpreted a north-to-south 2-D model perpendicular to the Cerro Goden fault zone. We used horizontal derivative and residual anomaly maps to emphasize edges of subsurface bodies and shallow structures of interest. Our preliminary 2D model constrains the width and depth extent of serpentinite bodies along the fault zones, the relationship of the faults with the Cerro Goden anticline in central Puerto Rico, and confirms the steep NE dip of the faults extrapolated from surface data. Additional data will be collected in the future across the Cerro Goden fault zone to laterally extend our models of subsurface structural features.

  6. Collisional zones in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao Davila, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Collisional events along the North American-Caribbean plate boundary are complex and not completely understood. Structures and metamorphism in rocks exposed in Cuba, Hispaniola, and Puerto Rico suggest that the margin has undergone at least three main contractional events in the Early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous, and in the Late Eocene. The Eocene event is more evident in the transpressional structures preserved in Eocene rocks and may be related to the oblique collision of the northern margin of the Caribbean Plate with continental crust of the Bahamas in the North American Plate. In Puerto Rico, the Late Eocene collisional event is best exposed in the Northern Puerto Rico Fault Zone (NPRFZ) and the Southern Puerto Rico Fault Zone (SPRFZ). These fault zones show transpression in Eocene rocks that suggest contraction and left-lateral shear. The NPRFZ is the boundary between the Northeast and Southwest blocks. Its main fault is the Cerro Mula Fault, a WNW-ESE striking left-lateral fault. The SPRFZ separates the Central and Southwest blocks and strikes NW-SE in the western part of the island. The origin and extent of the Early Cretaceous and Late Cretaceous events are less clear. Recent structural and stratigraphic studies in the Southwest block of Puerto Rico suggest that deformation of Late Cretaceous folded and faulted sedimentary and volcanic rocks, and thrust emplacement of mantle rocks (serpentinized-peridotite) onto the crust are related to Maastrichtian to Paleocene contraction along the plate boundary. In Puerto Rico, there is no metamorphism associated to this event. This deformation constitutes a Late Cretaceous collisional event that is also recognized in Hispaniola and Cuba. Late Cretaceous-Paleocene serpentinite emplacement is attributed to the collision of the subduction zone with the hypothesized Caribeana submerged platform to the north. In Puerto Rico there is a volcanic hiatus in Early Paleocene that may be related to the proposed collision. Reactivation of these structures occurred during Late Eocene-Early Oligocene. The Early Cretaceous tectonic event in Puerto Rico is deduced from stratigraphic relationships of the serpentinite and Late Cretaceous rocks. Early contraction in Cuba and Hispaniola may be related to increased convergence along a subduction zone. However, the characteristics of the tectonic event are not understood. In spite of the temporal similarities of deformation in the northern Caribbean, there are noted differences in the type of deformation that may be related to variations in shape and orientation of pre-existing zones of weaknesses and geographic locations along the Caribbean-North American plate boundary.

  7. A Newly Recognized, 460 km Long and Arcuate, Right-Lateral Strike-Slip Fault Traversing Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, P.; Mann, P.

    2014-12-01

    We use 830 km of seismic reflection lines and 94,000 km2 of high-resolution multibeam bathymetry to identify a 460-km-long and semi-arcuate strike-slip fault that can be traced to the southwest from the Mona rift west of Puerto, across the onland area of south-central Puerto Rico (Cerro Goden and Great Southern Puerto Rico fault zones), across the Whiting basin southeast of Puerto Rico, across the Virgin Islands basin and to the northeast along the Anegada Passage and Tortola ridge. On multibeam and seismic reflection data the fault is active based on a continuous seafloor scarp ranging in height from 10 to 40 m. Seismic profiles show that the fault is alternatively downthrown to the north and south typical of strike-slip faults. The sense of most recent strike-slip offset on the fault is right-lateral based on offsets at 4 localities that range from 1.5 to3.5 km. Shallow earthquake swarms are associated with the fault trace in the Virgin Islands area but large segments of the fault are aseismic and appear locked. We propose that this fault system forms the southern boundary of an actively CCW-rotating Puerto Rico microplate that is driven by oblique, left-lateral shear of the North America-Caribbean plate boundary. The northern edge of the microplate is inferred to follow left-lateral faults known in the Puerto Rico trench (Bunce and Bowin fault zones) that close the loop around the crudely circular microplate in the area of the Mona rift. We have modeled these boundaries of the rotating block using the Defnode method of finite elements constrained by GPS and earthquake slip vectors.

  8. PUERTO RICO AND THE PUERTO RICANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STERNAU, HERBERT

    PUERTO RICO WAS DISCOVERED BY CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS IN 1493. THE PROCESS OF COLONIZATION BEGAN IN 1508, WITH THE ARRIVAL OF PONCE DE LEON AND HIS SPANISH SOLDIERS. PUERTO RICO WAS GOVERNED BY SPAIN FOR ABOUT 400 YEARS, AND THE GREAT MASS OF PEOPLE REMAINED POVERTY-STRICKEN, UNDERNOURISHED, AND ILLITERATE. THE ISLAND WAS CEDED TO THE UNITED STATES…

  9. The northwest trending north Boquerón Bay-Punta Montalva Fault Zone; A through going active fault system in southwestern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roig‐Silva, Coral Marie; Asencio, Eugenio; Joyce, James

    2013-01-01

    The North Boquerón Bay–Punta Montalva fault zone has been mapped crossing the Lajas Valley in southwest Puerto Rico. Identification of the fault was based upon detailed analysis of geophysical data, satellite images, and field mapping. The fault zone consists of a series of Cretaceous bedrock faults that reactivated and deformed Miocene limestone and Quaternary alluvial fan sediments. The fault zone is seismically active (local magnitude greater than 5.0) with numerous locally felt earthquakes. Focal mechanism solutions suggest strain partitioning with predominantly east–west left-lateral displacements with small normal faults striking mostly toward the northeast. Northeast-trending fractures and normal faults can be found in intermittent streams that cut through the Quaternary alluvial fan deposits along the southern margin of the Lajas Valley, an east–west-trending 30-km-long fault-controlled depression. Areas of preferred erosion within the alluvial fan trend toward the west-northwest parallel to the onland projection of the North Boquerón Bay fault. The North Boquerón Bay fault aligns with the Punta Montalva fault southeast of the Lajas Valley. Both faults show strong southward tilting of Miocene strata. On the western end, the Northern Boquerón Bay fault is covered with flat-lying Holocene sediments, whereas at the southern end the Punta Montalva fault shows left-lateral displacement of stream drainage on the order of a few hundred meters.

  10. Mangos of Puerto Rico, country contribution: Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: The book chapter presents a review of the historical importance of mango in Puerto Rico; geographical distribution; statistical data including total and seasonal production, main cultivars and their descriptors; cultural practices (i.e. propagation, fertilization, pruning); pests...

  11. HINTS Puerto Rico: Final Report

    Cancer.gov

    This final report describes HINTS implementation in Puerto Rico. The report addresses sampling; staffing, training and management of data collection; calling protocol; findings from the CATI Operations, and sample weights.

  12. The Struggle for Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez-Cardona, Victor; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Since the 1940's, Operation Bootstrap, an economic development program, has changed Puerto Rico from an undeveloped country to one with increasing energy demands, decreasing natural resources, and alarming environmental degredation. The Puerto Rican government is presently supporting high-energy industrial facilities without regard to…

  13. The Puerto Rico Photonics Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Jonathan S.

    2014-07-01

    We have founded the Puerto Rico Photonics Institute (PRPI) in the Barceloneta, Puerto Rico campus of the Universidad Metropolitana. PRPI is established to provide opportunities in education, training and research and is unique in Puerto Rico. There are two initial focus areas of research and education: aerospace photonics and remote sensing. In particular, we will conduct studies and research and development in two particular fields: laser gyroscopes and similar technologies, and atmospheric remote sensing. PRPI has established local collaborations with the Arecibo Observatory and Honeywell Aerospace. Outside of Puerto Rico, PRPI collaborators include the University of Central Florida (CREOL), University of Arizona (OSC), University of Dayton (UD), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Scientific Solutions, Inc. (SSI), Atmospheric and Space Technology Research Associates (ASTRA), and the MIT Draper Laboratory. These organizations will help PRPI to: 1) establish its curriculum, provide research opportunities for PRPI students, 2) participate in faculty exchange programs, and 3) build its own research and development programs. PRPI will have educational and training programs for both Associate and Masters degrees, as well as a Certificate in Optics and Photonics for undergraduate science and engineering majors and professional engineers. PRPI is supported by UMET's parent institution, the Ana G. Mendez University System (SUAGM), the Puerto Rico Science, Technology and Research Trust (PRST), and the Puerto Rico Industrial Development Company (PRIDCO).

  14. Tina Visita a Puerto Rico (Tina Visits Puerto Rico).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadilla de Ruibal, Carmen Alicia

    This series of five children's readers is designed to be used by Spanish-speaking children in a bilingual elementary school setting. The story is about an anthropomorphic salamandar who leaves New York to visit Puerto Rico. The plane trip and her visits to several specific towns are chronicled in the readers. A preface to the teacher is included.

  15. 40 CFR 81.355 - Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puerto Rico. 81.355 Section 81.355 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.355 Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico—SO2 Designated area...

  16. 40 CFR 81.355 - Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puerto Rico. 81.355 Section 81.355 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.355 Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico—SO2 Designated area...

  17. The Puerto Rico Healthcare Crisis.

    PubMed

    Roman, Jesse

    2015-12-01

    The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is an organized nonincorporated territory of the United States with a population of more than 3.5 million U.S. citizens. The island has been the focus of much recent attention due to the recent default on its debt (estimated at more than $70 billion), high poverty rates, and increasing unemployment. Less attention, however, has been given to the island's healthcare system, which many believe is on the verge of collapsing. Healthcare makes up 20% of the Puerto Rican economy, and this crisis affects reimbursement rates for physicians while promoting the disintegration of the island's healthcare infrastructure. A major contributor relates to a disparity in federal funding provided to support the island's healthcare system when compared with that provided to the states in the mainland and Hawaii. Puerto Rico receives less federal funding for healthcare than the other 50 states and the District of Columbia even though it pays its share of social security and Medicare taxes. To make matters worse, the U.S. Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services is planning soon to implement another 11% cut in Medical Advantage reimbursements. This disparity in support for healthcare is considered responsible for ∼$25 billion of Puerto Rico's total debt. The impact of these events on the health of Puerto Ricans in the island cannot be entirely predicted, but the loss of healthcare providers and diminished access to care are a certainty, and quality care will suffer, leading to serious implications for those with chronic medical disorders including respiratory disease. PMID:26551268

  18. Karst Map of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleman-Gonzalez, Wilma B., (compiler)

    2010-01-01

    This map is a digital compilation, combining the mapping of earlier geologists. Their work, cited on the map, contains more detailed descriptions of karst areas and landforms in Puerto Rico. This map is the basis for the Puerto Rico part of a new national karst map currently being compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey. In addition, this product is a standalone, citable source of digital karst data for Puerto Rico. Nearly 25 percent of the United States is underlain by karst terrain, and a large part of that area is undergoing urban and industrial development. Accurate delineations of karstic rocks are needed at scales suitable for national, State, and local maps. The data on this map contribute to a better understanding of subsidence hazards, groundwater contamination potential, and cave resources as well as serve as a guide to topical research on karst. Because the karst data were digitized from maps having a different scale and projection from those on the base map used for this publication, some karst features may not coincide perfectly with physiographic features portrayed on the base map.

  19. The Case for the Independence of Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisman, Robert

    1977-01-01

    This address supports the anti-colonial resolution on Puerto Rico. It raises several issues on the colonial situation of Puerto Rico from the vantage point of citizens of the United States whose government colonialized Puerto Rico. (Author/AM)

  20. Manatee Mortality in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Mignucci-Giannoni; Montoya-Ospina; Jimnez-Marrero; Rodr&guez-Lpez; Williams; Bonde

    2000-02-01

    / The most pressing problem in the effective management of the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) in Puerto Rico is mortality due to human activities. We assessed 90 cases of manatee strandings in Puerto Rico based on historical data and a coordinated carcass salvage effort from 1990 through 1995. We determined patterns of mortality, including type of event, condition of carcasses, spatial and temporal distribution, gender, size/age class, and the cause of death. The spatial distribution of stranding events was not uniform, with the north, northeast, and south coasts having the highest numbers. Six clusters representing the highest incidence included the areas of Fajardo and Ceiba, Baha de Jobos, Toa Baja, Guayanilla, Cabo Rojo, and Rio Grande to Luquillo. The number of reported cases has increased at an average rate of 9.6%/yr since 1990. The seasonality of stranding events showed a bimodal pattern, from February through April and in August and September. Most identified causes of death were due to human interaction, especially captures and watercraft collisions. Natural causes usually involved dependent calves. From 1990 through 1995, most deaths were attributed to watercraft collisions. A reduction in anthropogenic mortality of this endangered species can be accomplished only through education and a proactive management and conservation plan that includes law enforcement, mortality assessment, scientific research, rescue and rehabilitation, and inter- and intraagency cooperation. PMID:10594192

  1. Manatee mortality in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mignucci-Giannoni, A. A.; Montoya-Ospina, R. A.; Jimenez-Marrero, N. M.; Rodriguez-Lopez, M.; Williams, E.H., Jr.; Bonde, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    The most pressing problem in the effective management of the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) in Puerto Rico is mortality due to human activities. We assessed 90 cases of manatee strandings in Puerto Rico based on historical data and a coordinated carcass salvage effort from 1990 through 1995. We determined patterns of mortality, including type of event, condition of carcasses, spatial and temporal distribution, gender, size/age class, and the cause of death. The spatial distribution of stranding events was not uniform, with the north, northeast, and south coasts having the highest numbers. Six clusters representing the highest incidence included the areas of Fajardo and Ceiba, Bahia de Jobos, Toa Baja, Guayanilla, Cabo Rojo, and Rio Grande to Luquillo. The number of reported cases has increased at an average rate of 9.6%/yr since 1990. The seasonality of stranding events showed a bimodal pattern, from February through April and in August and September. Most identified causes of death were due to human interaction, especially captures and watercraft collisions. Natural causes usually involved dependent calves. From 1990 through 1995, most deaths were attributed to watercraft collisions. A reduction in anthropogenic mortality of this endangered species can be accomplished only through education and a proactive management and conservation plan that includes law enforcement, mortality assessment, scientific research, rescue and rehabilitation, and inter- and intraagency cooperation.

  2. Tectonic and Climatic Controls on Landscape Development of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, R. D.; Salas, M.; Colon, A.

    2007-12-01

    The northeastern Caribbean island of Puerto Rico is an exhumed Cenozoic island arc situated between the inactive Muertos trench to the south and the highly oblique Puerto Rican Trench to the north that forms the left- lateral strike-slip plate margin with North America. The rectangular island's long axis of 175 km parallels the east trending strike of the trenches with a near constant width of between 50 and 60 km. Puerto Rico receives the NE trade winds and has a tropical monsoonal climate. Puerto Rico has a distinct midline asymmetry with north draining watershed about twice the length and five times as large as south draining watershed. This midline asymmetry is more pronounced along the islands eastern third than the central or western thirds. River outlet spacing, mountain front sinuosity, and comparative hypsometry display similar east to west variability consistent with greater denudation in the eastern parts of the island. The southwestern fifth of the island is underlain by serpentinized ocean crust that forms the large diapiric Monte del Estado uplift. Active diapirism is indicated by highly asymmetric watersheds of the surrounding rivers and tributaries. Stream length gradient index calculated from 1:20,000 scale map data and compared to fault locations show little correlation suggesting that active faults does not significantly control Puerto Rico's landscape. Quantified morphologic data from the eastern two-thirds of Puerto Rico are consistent with a landscape developed in response to the precipitation derived from NE trade winds while serpentinite diapirism dominates the western third of the island. Individual active faults of Puerto Rico do not control the landscape development.

  3. New seismic study begins in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarr, A.C.

    1974-01-01

    A new seismological project is now underway in Puerto Rico to provide information needed for accurate assessment of the island's seismic hazard. The project should also help to increase understanding of the tectonics and geologic evolution of the Caribbean region. The Puerto Rico Seismic Program is being conducted by the Geological Survey with support provided by the Puerto Rico Water Resources Authority, an agency responsible for generation and distribution of electric power throughout the Commonwealth. The Program will include the installation of a network of high quality seismograph stations to monitor seismic activity on and around Puerto Rico. These stations will be distributed across the island to record the seismicity as uniformly as possible. The detection and accurate location of small earthquakes, as well as moderate magnitude shocks, will aid in mapping active seismic zones and in compiling frequency of occurrence statistics which ultimately wil be useful in seismic risk-zoning of hte island. 

  4. Collisional zones in Puerto Rico and the northern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laó-Dávila, Daniel A.

    2014-10-01

    Puerto Rico is an amalgamation of island arc terranes that has recorded the deformational and tectonic history of the North American-Caribbean Plate boundary. Four collisional zones indicate the contractional events that have occurred at the plate boundary. Metamorphism and deformation of Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous oceanic lithosphere during the Early Cretaceous indicate the earliest collisional event. Then, an ophiolitic mélange, mostly comprised of blocks of the metamorphosed oceanic lithosphere, was formed and emplaced in the backarc region during the Turonian-Coniacian deformational event. A possible collision with a buoyant block in the North American Plate caused late Maastrichtian-early Paleocene contraction that created fold-and-thrust belts and the remobilization and uplift of serpentinite bodies in the Southwest Block. Late Eocene-early Oligocene transpression was localized along the Southern and Northern Puerto Rico fault zones, which occur north and south of large granodiorite intrusions in the strong Central Block. The deformation was accommodated in pure shear domains of fold-and-thrust belts and conjugate strike-slip faults, and simple shear domains of large mostly left-lateral faults. In addition, it reactivated faults in the weak Southwest Block. This island-wide transpression is the result of a Greater Antilles arc and continental North American collision. The kinematic model of the structures described in Puerto Rico correlate with some structures in Hispaniola and Cuba, and shows how the northern boundary of the Caribbean Plate was shortened by collisions with continental lithosphere of the North American Plate throughout its history. The tectonic evolution of the Greater Antilles shows a history of collisions, in which the latest collision accretes Cuba to the North American Plate, reorganizes the plate boundary, and deforms with transpression Hispaniola and Puerto Rico. The latest collision in Puerto Rico shows the case in which an arc collides obliquely with buoyant crust producing left-lateral transpression and converges obliquely with dense oceanic lithosphere.

  5. Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Martínez-Cruzado, J. A.; Martínez-Pagan, J.; Santana-Torres, E. X.; Torres-O, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network is currently in charge of the operation of: (i) free-field (ff) strong motion stations, (ii) instrumented structures (STR) (Dams, Bridges, Buildings), and (iii) the data acquisition/monitoring and analysis of earthquakes considered strong from the point of view of their intensity and magnitude. All these instruments are deployed in the Puerto Rico Island (PRI), US-, and British-Virgin Islands (BVI), and Dominican Republic (DR). The Puerto Rico Island and the Caribbean region have high potential to be affected by earthquakes that could be catastrophic for the area. The Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network (actually Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program, PRSMP) has grown since 1970's from 7 ff strong motion stations and one instrumented building with analog accelerographs to 111 ff strong motion stations and 16 instrumented buildings with digital accelerographs: PRI: 88 ff, 16 STR., DR: 13 ff, BVI: 5 ff, 2 STR collecting data via IP (internet), DU (telephone), and stand alone stations The current stage of the PRSMP seismic network, the analysis of moderate earthquakes that were recorded and/or occurred on the island, results of the intensity distribution of selected earthquakes, as well as results of dynamic parameter identification of some of the instrumented structures are here presented.

  6. QUANTIFYING SEDIMENT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE GUNICA BAY PUERTO RICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The island of Puerto Rico faces considerable challenges regarding sustainable land use and effects of land use on adjacent freshwater and marine ecosystem services. In watersheds feeding Gunica Bay (southwestern Puerto Rico), increased soil erosion and sediment loading to strea...

  7. MISR Browse Images: Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRiDE)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-02

    MISR Browse Images: Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRiDE) These MISR Browse images ... overview of the region observed during the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRiDE) field campaign. PRiDE was a study of the radiative, ...

  8. 33 CFR 80.738 - Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands. 80.738 Section 80.738 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands § 80.738 Puerto Rico...

  9. 33 CFR 80.738 - Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands § 80.738 Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands. (a) Except inside lines specifically described in this section, the 72 COLREGS...

  10. 33 CFR 80.738 - Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands § 80.738 Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands. (a) Except inside lines specifically described in this section, the 72 COLREGS...

  11. 33 CFR 80.738 - Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands § 80.738 Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands. (a) Except inside lines specifically described in this section, the 72 COLREGS...

  12. 33 CFR 80.738 - Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands § 80.738 Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands. (a) Except inside lines specifically described in this section, the 72 COLREGS...

  13. Datos Historicos de Puerto Rico (Historical Facts on Puerto Rico). Preliminary Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Board of Education, IL. Dept. of Curriculum.

    A volume of information about Puerto Rican history and culture is designed for use by teachers in the bilingual education program of the Chicago public schools to support cultural awareness among native Spanish-speaking students. Six chapters outline important information concerning: the history of Puerto Rico, some aspects of the life of the…

  14. 40 CFR 131.40 - Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.40 Puerto Rico (a) Use designations for marine waters...) Water quality standard variances. (1) The Regional Administrator, EPA Region 2, is authorized to...

  15. 40 CFR 131.40 - Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.40 Puerto Rico (a) Use designations for marine waters...) Water quality standard variances. (1) The Regional Administrator, EPA Region 2, is authorized to...

  16. Assistive Technology Developments in Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lizama, Mauricio A.; Mendez, Hector L.

    Recent efforts to develop Spanish-based adaptations for alternate computer input devices are considered, as are their implications for Hispanics with disabilities and for the development of language sensitive devices worldwide. Emphasis is placed on the particular need to develop low-cost high technology devices for Puerto Rico and Latin America…

  17. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Puerto Rico Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Puerto Rico state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law student, or…

  18. Photovoltaics on Landfills in Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for a feasibility study of m0treAlables on several brownfield sites. The EPA defines a brownfield as 'a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.' All of the brownfields in this study are landfill sites. Citizens of Puerto Rico, city planners, and site managers are interested in redevelopment uses for landfills in Puerto Rico, which are particularly well suited for solar photovoltaic (PV) installation. The purpose of this report is to assess the landfills with the highest potential for possible solar PV installation and estimate cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed-tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed-tilt). Each option represents a standalone system that can be sized to use an entire available site area. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. The feasibility of PV systems installed on landfills is highly impacted by the available area for an array, solar resource, operating status, landfill cap status, distance to transmission lines, and distance to major roads. All of the landfills in Puerto Rico were screened according to these criteria in order to determine the sites with the greatest potential. Eight landfills were chosen for site visits based on the screening criteria and location. Because of time constraints and the fact that Puerto Rico is a relatively large island, the eight landfills for this visit were all located in the eastern half of the island. The findings from this report can be applied to landfills in the western half of the island. The economics of a potential PV system on landfills in Puerto Rico depend greatly on the cost of electricity. Currently, PREPA has an average electric rate of $0.119/kWh. Based on past electric rate increases in Puerto Rico and other islands in the Caribbean, this rate could increase to $0.15/kWh or higher in a relatively short amount of time. In the coming years, increasing electrical rates and increased necessity for clean power will continue to improve the feasibility of implementing solar PV systems at these sites.

  19. Engineering ethics in Puerto Rico: issues and narratives.

    PubMed

    Frey, William J; O'Neill-Carrillo, Efraín

    2008-09-01

    This essay discusses engineering ethics in Puerto Rico by examining the impact of the Colegio de Ingenieros y Agrimensores de Puerto Rico (CIAPR) and by outlining the constellation of problems and issues identified in workshops and retreats held with Puerto Rican engineers. Three cases developed and discussed in these workshops will help outline movements in engineering ethics beyond the compliance perspective of the CIAPR. These include the Town Z case, Copper Mining in Puerto Rico, and a hypothetical case researched by UPRM students on laptop disposal. The last section outlines four future challenges in engineering ethics pertinent to the Puerto Rican situation. PMID:18427954

  20. Machismo y educacion en Puerto Rico [Machismo and Education in Puerto Rico].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pico, Isabel

    This book is the result of a study that investigated the influence of "machismo" (a set of attitudes, beliefs, and behavior that perpetuates the myth of male superiority) in elementary education. The study included (1) a content analysis of textbooks used in Spanish and social studies classes in public and private schools in Puerto Rico and in…

  1. Vertical motions of the Puerto Rico Trench and Puerto Rico and their cause

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.

    2005-01-01

    The Puerto Rico trench exhibits great water depth, an extremely low gravity anomaly, and a tilted carbonate platform between (reconstructed) elevations of +1300 m and -4000 m. I argue that these features are manifestations of large vertical movements of a segment of the Puerto Rico trench, its forearc, and the island of Puerto Rico that took place 3.3 m.y. ago over a time period as short as 14-40 kyr. I explain these vertical movements by a sudden increase in the slab's descent angle that caused the trench to subside and the island to rise. The increased dip could have been caused by shearing or even by a complete tear of the descending North American slab, although the exact nature of this deformation is unknown. The rapid (14-40 kyr) and uniform tilt along a 250 km long section of the trench is compatible with scales of mantle flow and plate bending. The proposed shear zone or tear is inferred from seismic, morphological, and gravity observations to start at the trench at 64.5??W and trend southwestwardly toward eastern Puerto Rico. The tensile stresses necessary to deform or tear the slab could have been generated by increased curvature of the trench following a counterclockwise rotation of the upper plate and by the subduction of a large seamount.

  2. Vertical motions of the Puerto Rico Trench and Puerto Rico and their cause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brink, Uri

    2005-06-01

    The Puerto Rico trench exhibits great water depth, an extremely low gravity anomaly, and a tilted carbonate platform between (reconstructed) elevations of +1300 m and -4000 m. I argue that these features are manifestations of large vertical movements of a segment of the Puerto Rico trench, its forearc, and the island of Puerto Rico that took place 3.3 m.y. ago over a time period as short as 14-40 kyr. I explain these vertical movements by a sudden increase in the slab's descent angle that caused the trench to subside and the island to rise. The increased dip could have been caused by shearing or even by a complete tear of the descending North American slab, although the exact nature of this deformation is unknown. The rapid (14-40 kyr) and uniform tilt along a 250 km long section of the trench is compatible with scales of mantle flow and plate bending. The proposed shear zone or tear is inferred from seismic, morphological, and gravity observations to start at the trench at 64.5°W and trend southwestwardly toward eastern Puerto Rico. The tensile stresses necessary to deform or tear the slab could have been generated by increased curvature of the trench following a counterclockwise rotation of the upper plate and by the subduction of a large seamount.

  3. Morphotectonics of the Southern Puerto Rico Offshore Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja Bruna, J.; Carbó-Gorosabel, A.; Llanes Estrada, P.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Munoz Martin, A.; Fuertes Ortega, R.; Druet, M.; Gómez, M.; Martin Davila, J. M.; Pazos, A.; Catalan, M.

    2012-12-01

    The southern insular slope of Puerto Rico is characterized by active tectonics, sedimentary and slope failure processes related to the southward thrusting of the island arc over the Caribbean plate's interior. The east-west trending Muertos fold-and-thrust belt and the Investigator fault zone are the main structural and morphological features along the insular slope. It was suggested that these tectonic features accommodate a highly oblique motion between the Caribbean plate's interior and the North American plate. New systematic multibeam bathymetry data and seismic reflection profiles have allowed us to improve the knowledge of the complex morphologic and structural fabric of this zone of active deformation. We divided the region into morphotectonic slope provinces on the basis of morphological, structural and sedimentological criteria. The lower slope province is occupied by the east-west trending Muertos fold-and-thrust belt. Seismic data image pelagic, hemipelagic and turbiditic sediments of the Venezuelan basin and Muertos Trough basin being partially offscraped and accreted forming a sequence of numerous imbricate thrust slices verging southwards. The surface expression of the imbricate structure is a highly steeped slope characterized by an alternation of narrow troughs and elongate anticline ridges oriented sub-parallel to the deformation front. The upper slope province is occupied by the Investigator fault zone, a broad zone of deformation composed of two straight strands that form narrow E-W trending valleys in the insular slope. Submarine canyons carve through the narrow E-W trending valleys or terminate in them but show no evidence for lateral offsets, indicating an absence of recent strike-slip motion. The seafloor expression of the Investigator fault zone suggests a sub-vertical fault plane accommodating a small amount of N-S extension. This fault zone terminates eastward in Whiting basin and disappears westwards beneath the thick slope deposits on a bathymetric high, named Jaguey Spur. The top and northern sides of Jaguey Spur are deformed by recent extensional fault activity that could have contributed to slope instability observed in a wide area to the north and south of the spur. Much of the seismic activity in the Puerto Rico area is shallow and takes place in the vicinity of the southern Puerto Rico offshore margin. The study of the active deformation zones on the margin and its possible relation with the nucleation zones of shallow intra-arc earthquakes will help to assess the seismic hazard in the region.

  4. 76 FR 63939 - Puerto Rico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Puerto Rico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4017-DR), dated August 27, 2011, and... Miller, Office of Response and Recovery, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C Street,...

  5. 76 FR 47220 - Puerto Rico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Puerto Rico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4004-DR), dated July 14, 2011, and... Miller, Office of Response and Recovery, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C Street,...

  6. Puerto Rico Nursing Career Cooperative Demonstration Program. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey.

    The Puerto Rico Nursing Career Cooperative Demonstration Project and Associate Nursing Program provided education and onsite occupational training laboratory to upgrade the education of 20 licensed practical nurses (LPNs) from 1989-90. The nurses were upgraded to associate nurses in an 18-month period at the Technological Institute of Puerto Rico.…

  7. 76 FR 70467 - Puerto Rico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Puerto Rico; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4040-DR), dated October 18, 2011... dated October 18, 2011, the President issued a major disaster declaration under the authority of...

  8. Predictors of Adolescent Drug Behavior: The Case of Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robles, Rafaela R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reports data from a psychosocial study of drug behavior among secondary school students in Puerto Rico. Concludes that although Puerto Rico and the U.S. differ in culture and lifestyle, both cultures provide similar sociocultural inducements for adolescent drug use. (Author/GC)

  9. The Education Industry in Puerto Rico. An Economic Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Terry W.

    The policy of the Fair Labor Standards Act is to eventually establish the same minimum wage standards in Puerto Rico as in the 50 states. Pursuant to this policy, this report was prepared for Industry Committee No. 129-A for the Education Industry in Puerto Rico. It contains economic and other data pertinent to the committee's duties. The minimum…

  10. Estimated Water Use in Puerto Rico, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molina-Rivera, Wanda L.; Gómez-Gómez, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Water-use data were compiled for the 78 municipios of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for 2005. Five offstream categories were considered: public-supply water withdrawals and deliveries, domestic self-supplied water use, industrial self-supplied ground-water withdrawals, crop irrigation water use, and thermoelectric power freshwater use. One water-use category also was considered: power-generation instream water use (thermoelectric-saline withdrawals and hydroelectric power). Freshwater withdrawals and deliveries for offstream use from surface- and ground-water sources in Puerto Rico were estimated at 712 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). The largest amount of freshwater withdrawn was by public-supply water facilities and was estimated at 652 Mgal/d. The public-supply domestic water use was estimated at 347 Mgal/d. Fresh surface- and ground-water withdrawals by domestic self-supplied users were estimated at 2.1 Mgal/d and the industrial self-supplied withdrawals were estimated at 9.4 Mgal/d. Withdrawals for crop irrigation purposes were estimated at 45.2 Mgal/d, or approximately 6.3 percent of all offstream freshwater withdrawals. Instream freshwater withdrawals by hydroelectric facilities were estimated at 568 Mgal/d and saline instream surface-water withdrawals for cooling purposes by thermoelectric-power facilities was estimated at 2,288 Mgal/d.

  11. 78 FR 20887 - Approval of Subzone Status; Pepsi Cola Puerto Rico Distributing, LLC, Toa Baja, Puerto Rico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ..., including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 74170, 12/13/2012). The FTZ staff..., Puerto Rico On December 7, 2012, the Executive Secretary of the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board docketed an application submitted by the Puerto Rico Industrial Development Company, grantee of FTZ...

  12. Kinematic analysis of serpentinite structures and the manifestation of transpression in southwestern Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laó-Dávila, Daniel A.; Anderson, Thomas H.

    2009-12-01

    Faults and shear zones recorded in the Monte del Estado and Río Guanajibo serpentinite masses in southwestern Puerto Rico show previously unrecognized southwestward tectonic transport. The orientations of planar and linear structures and the sense of slip along faults and shear zones determined by offset rock layers, drag folds in foliations, and steps in slickensided surfaces and/or S-C fabrics from 1846 shear planes studied at more than 300 stations reveal two predominant groups of faults: 1) northwesterly-striking thrust faults and easterly-striking left-lateral faults and, 2) northwesterly-striking right-lateral faults and easterly-striking thrust faults. Shortening and extension (P and T) axes calculated for geographic domains within the serpentinite reveal early north-trending shortening followed by southwestward-directed movement during which older structures were re-activated. The SW-directed shortening is attributed to transpression that accompanied Late Eocene left-lateral shearing of the serpentinite. A third, younger, group comprising fewer faults consists of northwesterly-striking left-lateral faults and north-directed thrusts that also may be related to the latest transpressional deformation within Puerto Rico. Deformational events in Puerto Rico correlate to tectonic events along the Caribbean-North American plate boundary.

  13. Late Quaternary seismic stratigraphy and structure of the western insular shelf margin of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzlik, M.; Mann, P.; Abrams, L.; Grindlay, N.

    2005-12-01

    725 km of high-resolution seismic data were collected over the insular shelf of western Puerto Rico to better understand its late Quaternary depositional and structural history. Due to low tectonic uplift rates of onshore areas in this region, well dated late Quaternary sediments and corals have only been identified in a few scattered onland localities around Puerto Rico. Seismic data from the Rio Anasco delta area of western Puerto Rico reveals four main units with characteristic stratal reflection terminations that total about 25 m in thickness. Because of a lack of well information, age estimates of these late Quaternary units are based on correlations with sea level curves derived from dated coral samples from Puerto Rico, St. Croix, and Antigua. Units include: Unit 1 - a gently folded and faulted basal section correlated to the Oliogene-early Pliocene? carbonate shelf of Puerto Rico; deeper penetration, industry MCS lines show that these rocks are deformed in a broad EW-trenching arch; Unit 2 - chaotic channel fill deposits in incisions related to the lowstand equivalent of the Rio Anasco likely formed during the Last Glacial Maximum about 25-15 ka; Unit 3 - roughly stratified deposits onlapping the top of Unit 2; these are interpreted as an estuarine facies deposited during Holocene sea level transgression; Unit 4 - highly stratified deposits related to progradation of the Anasco delta during sea level rise. The base of unit 4 is a downlap surface interpreted as a maximum flooding surface likely formed about 6 ka. East-northeast-striking faults are observed breaking the younger late Quaternary units in three separate zones off the west coast of Puerto Rico. Onland continuations of these faults have not been identified likely due to cultural overprint of natural scarps on late Quaternary floodplains.

  14. Officials Report First Zika Death in Puerto Rico

    MedlinePlus

    ... April 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first known Zika virus-linked death in Puerto Rico was announced Friday ... acute illness with rash or fever. While the Zika virus poses little health risk to most people, it ...

  15. Particulate Air Contamination in Puerto Rico: A Student Involvement Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Richard R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a research project undertaken by physics undergraduate students to monitor particulate air contamination in Ponce, Puerto Rico, and to determine the meteorological factors which contribute to it. (GA)

  16. Diversity of Papaya ringspot virus isolates in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) devastates papaya production worldwide. In Puerto Rico, papaya fields can be completely infected with PRSV within a year of planting. Information about the diversity of the Puerto Rican PRSV population is relevant in order to establish a control strategy in the island. T...

  17. [Induced abortion in Puerto Rico 1985].

    PubMed

    Pacheco Acosta, E

    1990-04-01

    This retrospective study analyzes the sociodemographic and fertility characteristics of a sample of 5368 women undergoing abortion at a private clinic in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 1985. Although induced abortion is a controversial phenomenon in Puerto Rico, there is as yet little knowledge of the characteristics of women who seek abortions. The 5358 study women ranged in age from 12-48 years and averaged 26. 63% were aged 20-29 years. 40% were single, 43% were currently married, 16% were divorced, and 1% were widows. Women who has never married were 23.7 years old on average and ever-married women were 27.8 years old on average. 46.7% were economically active, 28.1% were housewives, 22.7% were students, and 2.5% were unemployed. The women had had an average of 2.9 pregnancies each. 6 women had been pregnant 12-15 times including the current pregnancy. 50.7% of the women were in the 3rd or higher order pregnancy, 20.8% were in their 2nd pregnancy, and 28.5% were in their 1st pregnancy. Ever-married subjects had an average of 3.5 pregnancies vs. 2.0 for single subjects. The average numbers of pregnancies were 2.9 for both economically active and inactive women. 40.9% had abortions without ever having children, 45.1% had had 1 or 2 children, and 13.9% had had 3 children or more. 74.2% of the single women and 19.2% of the ever-married women had abortions before ever having children. The average numbers of living children were .46 for single women, 1.64 for ever-married women, 1.1 for economically active women, 1.24 for inactive women, and 1.17 for the entire sample. The average numbers of prior induced abortions were .45 for single women, .72 for ever-married women, .71 for economically active women, .53 for inactive women, and .61 for the entire sample. 63.1% were undergoing their 1st abortion, 22.6% had had 1 previous abortion, and 14.2% had had more than 1. 17 women had had 6 ore more previous abortions. 65.5% of the women had used contraception. 78.1% of the abortions were performed at 8 weeks gestation or earlier, and 90.7% were done in the 1st trimester. Complications occurred in 35 of the 5368 procedures (.7%). These findings, which are not necessarily representative of induced abortion in Puerto Rico, suggest that both single and ever-married women resort to abortion. Single women tend to terminate their 1st pregnancies while ever-married women terminate pregnancies exceeding their desired number of children. PMID:2270261

  18. Puerto Rico and the Puerto Ricans: A Teaching and Resource Unit for Upper Level Spanish Students or Social Studies Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrero, Milagros

    The subject of this teaching and resource unit for Spanish students or social studies classes is Puerto Rico and the Puerto Ricans. The unit has sections dealing with the present conditions of the Puerto Ricans, their culture, and historical perspectives. The appendixes contain: (1) Demands of the Puerto Ricans, (2) Notable Puerto Ricans, (3)…

  19. Legionella in Puerto Rico cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Negron-Alviro, A.; Perez-Suarez, I.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    Water samples from air conditioning cooling towers receiving different treatment protocols on five large municipal buildings in San Juan, Puerto Rico were assayed for various species and serogroups of Legionella spp. using direct immunofluorescence. Several water quality parameters were also measured with each sample. Guinea pigs were inoculated with water samples to confirm pathogenicity and recover viable organisms. Legionella pneumophila (1-6), L. bozemanii, L. micdadei, L. dumoffii, and L. gormanii were observed in at least one of the cooling towers. L. pneumophila was the most abundant species, reaching 10{sup 5} cells/ml, within the range that is considered potentially pathogenic to humans. A significantly higher density of L. pneumophila was observed in the cooling tower water that was not being treated with biocides. Percent respiration (INT) and total cell activity (AODC), were inversely correlated with bacterial density. This study demonstrates that Legionella spp. are present in tropical air-conditioning cooling systems, and without continuous biocide treatment may reach densities that present a health risk.

  20. Limnology of Laguna Tortuguero, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones-Marquez, Ferdinand; Fuste, Luis A.

    1978-01-01

    The principal chemical, physical and biological characteristics, and the hydrology of Laguna Tortuguero, Puerto Rico, were studied from 1974-75. The lagoon, with an area of 2.24 square kilometers and a volume of about 2.68 million cubic meters, contains about 5 percent of seawater. Drainage through a canal on the north side averages 0.64 cubic meters per second per day, flushing the lagoon about 7.5 times per year. Chloride and sodium are the principal ions in the water, ranging from 300 to 700 mg/liter and 150 to 400 mg/liter, respectively. Among the nutrients, nitrogen averages about 1.7 mg/liter, exceeding phosphorus in a weight ratio of 170:1. About 10 percent of the nitrogen and 40 percent of the phosphorus entering the lagoon is retained. The bottom sediments, with a volume of about 4.5 million cubic meters, average 0.8 and 0.014 percent nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Geology of Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, E.F.; Wicks, C.; Mylroie, J.; Troester, J.; Alexander, E.C., Jr.; Carew, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Isla de Mona is a carbonate island located in the Mona Passage 68 km west of Puerto Rico. The tectonically uplifted island is 12 km by 5 km, with an area of 55 km2, and forms a raised flat-topped platform or meseta. The meseta tilts gently to the south and is bounded by near vertical cliffs on all sides. These cliffs rise from 80 m above sea level on the north to 20 m above the sea on the southern coast. Along the southwestern and western side of the island a three- to six-meter-high Pleistocene fossil reef abuts the base of the cliff to form a narrow coastal plain. The meseta itself consists of two Mio-Pliocene carbonate units, the lower Isla de Mona Dolomite and the upper Lirio Limestone. Numerous karst features, including a series of flank margin caves primarily developed at the Lirio Limestone/Isla de Mona Dolomite contact, literally ring the periphery of the island.

  2. Hydrogeology of the karst of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giusti, Ennio V.

    1978-01-01

    About one-fifth of Puerto Rico is covered by a tropical karst formed on a series of six limestone formations ranging in age from middle-Oligocene to middle Miocene. These formations strike east to west and crop out over the north coast of the island. Structurally, the rocks form a simple wedge abutting southward against a mountain chain of volcanic origin and thickening northward to about 1,400 meters by the seashore. All stages of karstification are present: from the incipient, found at the western end of the belt to the residual, found at the eastern end. Maximum development of sinkholes occurs on the Aguada Limestone and upper part of the Aymanom Limestone. These formations have a CaCO3 content range from about 85 to 95 percent. The denudation rate of the Limestone belt through solution is computed as 0.70 mm per year with some evidence that abrasion may increase the denudation rate locally by as much as 40 percent. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Puerto Rico and Florida manatees represent genetically distinct groups

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A.; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; King, Timothy L.; Bonde, Robert K.; Gray, Brian A.; McGuire, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) populations in Florida (T. m. latirostris) and Puerto Rico (T. m. manatus) are considered distinct subspecies and are listed together as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act. Sustained management and conservation efforts for the Florida subspecies have led to the suggested reclassification of the species to a threatened or delisted status. However, the two populations are geographically distant, morphologically distinct, and habitat degradation and boat strikes continue to threaten the Puerto Rico population. Here, 15 microsatellite markers and mitochondrial control region sequences were used to determine the relatedness of the two populations and investigate the genetic diversity and phylogeographic organization of the Puerto Rico population. Highly divergent allele frequencies were identified between Florida and Puerto Rico using microsatellite (F ST = 0.16; R ST = 0.12 (P ST = 0.66; Φ ST = 0.50 (P E = 0.45; NA = 3.9), were similar, but lower than those previously identified in Florida (HE = 0.48, NA = 4.8). Within Puerto Rico, the mitochondrial genetic diversity values (π = 0.001; h = 0.49) were slightly lower than those previously reported (π = 0.002; h = 0.54) and strong phylogeographic structure was identified (F ST global = 0.82; Φ ST global = 0.78 (P < 0.001)). The genetic division with Florida, low diversity, small population size (N = 250), and distinct threats and habitat emphasize the need for separate protections in Puerto Rico. Conservation efforts including threat mitigation, migration corridors, and protection of subpopulations could lead to improved genetic variation in the endangered Puerto Rico manatee population.

  4. Low birthweight and infant mortality in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, J E; Atrash, H K; Pérez, N; Saliceti, J A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to quantify the relative contributions of maternal age, education, marital status, hospital of birth, and use of prenatal care to the high incidence of low birthweight and infant mortality in Puerto Rico. METHODS. An analysis was conducted of 257,537 live births that occurred from 1986 through 1989 among Puerto Rico residents and the 3373 corresponding infant deaths. Binomial multiple regression models were used to calculate the adjusted population attributable risks for each variable. RESULTS. Our estimates indicate that approximately 6 of every 10 infant deaths on the island are potentially preventable if low birthweight were eradicated, regardless of other associated factors. Eliminating risks associated with sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors (including hospital of birth) would potentially decrease the incidence of low birth-weight in Puerto Rico by one third. Specifically, the elimination of risks associated with the socioeconomic disadvantage of women delivering in public hospitals alone would potentially decrease Puerto Rico's low birthweight incidence by 28%, regardless of other factors considered in our study. CONCLUSIONS. Efforts to prevent low birthweight and infant mortality in Puerto Rico should focus on reducing the gap between the private and public sectors. PMID:8238681

  5. Survival of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    MARRERO, CARLOS ROMERO; ORTIZ, ANA P.; PÉREZ, CYNTHIA M.; PÉREZ, JAVIER; TORRES, ESTHER A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Blacks and Hispanics in the United States (US) have the lowest survival rates of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mainly associated to the presence of advanced disease at diagnosis when intervention is least beneficial. This study compared the survival distribution and relative survival of HCC in Puerto Rico (PR) during 1988-1992 and 1998-2002. Methods All HCC cases in the PR Central Cancer Registry database for 1988-1992 (n=306) and 1998-2002 (n=333) were identified. Patient characteristics and clinical variables were compared between study periods. Survival by age at diagnosis, sex, tumor stage and treatment was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival curves were compared using the Wilcoxon test. A Cox proportional hazards model was employed to assess the effect of period of diagnosis on survival, after adjusting for confounders. One- and three-year survival rates were also calculated. Results Patients diagnosed during 1998-2002 (median: 3.08 months, 95% CI: 2.30-4.16) had a longer observed survival than those diagnosed from 1988-1992 (median: 1.80 months, 95% CI: 1.44-2.52). A significant interaction was observed between the variables age and period of diagnosis, where only among persons aged ≥ 60 years the risk of HCC death was lower (sex-adjusted HR=O.72; 95%CI: 0.59-0.88) in patients diagnosed during 1998-2002 as compared to those diagnosed during 1988-1992. The overall one- and three-year relative survival during 1998-2002 was approximately 6% (22.4% vs.16.6%) and 2% higher (9.0% vs. 6.7%) respectively, as compared to 1988-1992. Conclusion We observed a temporal improvement in the survival of HCC in PR during the last decade. However, this survival is inferior to the one observed in the US population. Further studies are needed to identify factors that explain these disparities. PMID:19530551

  6. Structural analysis of cores and cuttings from the Toa Baja (Puerto Rico) borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Ave Lallemant, H.G. )

    1991-03-01

    Deformation structures in core samples and well cuttings from the Toa Baja borehole in Puerto Rico, obtained from depths of 580 to 2,700 meters, can be divided into two major categories: (1) structures resulting from compression and shear and (2) structures formed by extension. Generally, the first ones are older and they are somewhat more abundant at horizons where fault zones occur as deduced from dipmeter readings and televiewer log. These structures may have formed during an Eocene thrusting event, recognized regionally in Puerto Rico. The extensional structures which almost always crosscut the compressional ones are filled with zeolite, calcite, prehnite, or quartz. There is poor correspondence between the abundance of these fractures and the position of the major fault zones. The largest abundance of veins occurs between 1,700 to 2,100 meters depth. They may be related to a phase of regional extension during the Late Paleogene.

  7. 40 CFR 52.2723 - EPA-approved Puerto Rico regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EPA-approved Puerto Rico regulations. Regulation for the Control of Atmospheric Pollution Puerto Rico... Methods 9/28/95 ......do Rule 107—Air Pollution Emergencies 9/28/95 ......do Rule 108—Air...

  8. 26 CFR 1.933-1 - Exclusion of certain income from sources within Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for the following three taxable years, E continues to live and work in Puerto Rico and has a closer connection to Puerto Rico than to the United States or any foreign country. Assuming that E otherwise...

  9. 26 CFR 1.933-1 - Exclusion of certain income from sources within Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for the following three taxable years, E continues to live and work in Puerto Rico and has a closer connection to Puerto Rico than to the United States or any foreign country. Assuming that E otherwise...

  10. Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    Boyes, John D.; De Anda, Mindi Farber; Torres, Wenceslao

    1999-08-11

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The Puerto Rico facility is presently the largest operating battery storage system in the world and has successfully provided frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reseme to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. However, the facility has suffered accelerated cell failures in the past year and PREPA is committed to restoring the plant to full capacity. This represents the first repowering of a large utility battery facility. PREPA and its vendors and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation, which are summarized in this paper.

  11. [Legal secrecy: abortion in Puerto Rico from 1937 to 1970].

    PubMed

    Marchand-Arias, R E

    1998-03-01

    The essay discusses abortion in Puerto Rico from 1937 to 1970, concentrating in its legal status as well as its social practice. The research documents the contradictions between the legality of the procedure and a social practice characterized by secrecy. The essay discusses the role of the Clergy Consultation Service on Abortion in promoting the legal practice of absortion in Puerto Rico. It also discusses the ambivalent role of medical doctors who, despite being legally authorized to perform abortions to protect the life and health of women, refused to perform the procedure arguing abortion was illegal. The essay concludes with a brief discussion on perceptions of illegality regarding abortion, emphasizing the contradictions between the practice of abortion and that of sterilization in Puerto Rico. PMID:9642717

  12. Recent Advances in Dengue: Relevance to Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Noyd, David H; Sharp, Tyler M

    2015-06-01

    Dengue represents an increasingly important public health challenge in Puerto Rico, with recent epidemics in 2007, 2010, and 2012-2013. Although recent advances in dengue vaccine development offer hope for primary prevention, the role of health professionals in the diagnosis and management of dengue patients is paramount. Case definitions for dengue, dengue with warning signs, and severe dengue provide a framework to guide clinical decision-making. Furthermore, the differentiation between dengue and other acute febrile illnesses, such as leptospirosis and chikungunya, is necessary for the appropriate diagnosis and management of cases. An understanding of dengue epidemiology and surveillance in Puerto Rico provides context for clinicians in epidemic and non-epidemic periods. This review aims to improve health professionals' ability to diagnose dengue, and as highlight the relevance of recent advances in dengue prevention and management in Puerto Rico. PMID:26061055

  13. Proceedings of the 1st Puerto Rico Biobanking Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Edna; Robb, James A.; Stefanoff, Gustavo; Mellado, Robert Hunter; Coppola, Domenico; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Flores, Idhaliz

    2015-01-01

    The 1st Puerto Rico Biobanking Workshop took place on August 20th, 2014 in the Auditorium of the Comprehensive Cancer Center of the University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus in San Juan Puerto Rico. The program for this 1-day, live workshop included lectures by three biobanking experts, followed by presentations from existing biobanks in Puerto Rico and audience discussion. The need for increasing biobanking expertise in Puerto Rico stems from the fact that Hispanics in general are underrepresented in the biobanks in existence in the US, which limits the research conducted specifically to understand the molecular differences in cancer cells compared to other better studied populations. In turn, this lack of information impairs the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for our population. Dr. James Robb, M.D., F.C.A.P., consulting pathologist to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR), opened the workshop with a discussion on the basic aspects of the science of biobanking (e.g., what is a biobank; its goals and objectives; protocols and procedures) in his talk addressing the importance of banking tissues for advancing biomedical research. Next, Dr. Gustavo Stefanoff, from the Cancer Institutes Network of Latin America (RINC by its name in Spanish), explained the mission, objectives, and structure of the Network of Latin-American and Caribbean Biobanks (REBLAC by its name in Spanish), which despite limited resources and many challenges, currently accrue high quality human tissue specimens and data to support cancer research in the region. Dr. Robert Hunter-Mellado, Professor of Internal Medicine, Universidad Central del Caribe, followed with an examination of the ethical and regulatory aspects of biobanking tissues for future research, including informed consent of subjects; protection of human subjects rights; and balancing risks and benefit ratios. In the afternoon, the directors of existing biobanks in Puerto Rico (the Puerto Rico Biobank, the Comprehensive Cancer Center biobank, and an HIV-focused biobank at Universidad Central del Caribe) presented their experiences and challenges with establishing biobanks for research in Puerto Rico. In sum, this workshop presented opportunities to share knowledge in the science of biobanking, for further training, and of networking among the participants (34 from 4 different institutions), which will strengthen the collaborative links between investigators studying cancer in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the US. PMID:25626063

  14. Tectonic and Diapiric Forcing of Western Puerto Rico Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, R. D.; Macinnes, S.; Hibbert, A.

    2008-12-01

    Puerto Rico's divide bifurcates in the west into a southern higher-elevation divide and a lower-elevation northern divide. The southern divide trends along exposures of weak, low density serpentinized ocean basement of the Monte de Estado Range forming the highest elevations in western Puerto Rico. Evidence of long-term active uplift along the serpentinite-cored divide is abundant. Streams draining Monte de Estado (MdE) radiate outward from an ellipse centered on the serpentinite exposure. The Rio Anasco draining the north flank of MdE is highly asymmetric, displaying a large scale tilt to the north while the Rio Guanajibo draining its south flank is highly asymmetric with tilt to the south. Subbasins of these rivers are asymmetric, tilted away from the core of the serpentinite exposures. Hypsometric integrals of the Anasco and Guanajibo basins are higher than basins of central and eastern Puerto Rico indicating an inequilibrium condition. The concurrence of morphologic indicators of active uplift (stream patterns and basin asymmetry and hypsometry) with the distribution of topographically elevated low-density serpentinite exposures indicates that MdE is experiencing active diapiric uplift. Northwestern Puerto Rico differs morphologically from the rest of the island. Underlain by island arc crust with exposed igneous and sedimentary strata similar to that of the eastern two-thirds of the island, the Atlantic shore has sea cliffs at the base of a coastal plateau west of the Rio Manati. Rivers draining western Puerto Rico have strikingly lower ratio to valley floor widths to valley height than the rivers to the east indicating incision in response to uplift is greater to the west. Western-most rivers have closer outlet spacing, lower distances from outlets to divide and their watershed have higher hypsometric intergrals all indicating that northwest Puerto Rico is actively uplifting at a rate greater than the eastern two-thirds of the island. North and south flowing tributaries to the Rio Culibrinas display drainage asymmetry reflecting an eastward tilt to northwestern Puerto Rico. This tilt and the uplift of northwest Puerto Rico is consistent with its position on the east flank of the Mona Rift footwall uplift.

  15. Mobile Livelihoods: The Sociocultural Practices of Circular Migrations between Puerto Rico and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duany, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    Documented livelihood practices of migrants based on a recent field study of population flows between Puerto Rico and the United States, comparing characteristics of multiple movers, onetime movers, and nonmovers residing in Puerto Rico. Results suggest that circular migration does not entail major losses in human capital for Puerto Rico, but can…

  16. 7 CFR 318.13-24 - Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. 318.13-24 Section 318... Articles From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-24 Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. Sweet potatoes from... met: (a) The sweet potatoes must be certified by an inspector of Puerto Rico as having been...

  17. 7 CFR 318.13-24 - Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. 318.13-24 Section 318... Articles From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-24 Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. Sweet potatoes from... met: (a) The sweet potatoes must be certified by an inspector of Puerto Rico as having been...

  18. 40 CFR 52.2723 - EPA-approved Puerto Rico regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false EPA-approved Puerto Rico regulations... EPA-approved Puerto Rico regulations. Regulation for the Control of Atmospheric Pollution Puerto Rico regulation Commonwealth effective date EPA approval date Comments PART I, GENERAL PROVISIONS Rule 101—Title...

  19. 7 CFR 318.13-24 - Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. 318.13-24 Section 318... Articles From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-24 Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. Sweet potatoes from... met: (a) The sweet potatoes must be certified by an inspector of Puerto Rico as having been...

  20. 7 CFR 318.13-24 - Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. 318.13-24 Section 318... Articles From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-24 Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. Sweet potatoes from... met: (a) The sweet potatoes must be certified by an inspector of Puerto Rico as having been...

  1. 7 CFR 318.13-24 - Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. 318.13-24 Section 318... Articles From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-24 Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. Sweet potatoes from... met: (a) The sweet potatoes must be certified by an inspector of Puerto Rico as having been...

  2. The Future of Puerto Rico. The Latin American Project. Volume 1, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    League of United Latin American Citizens, Washington, DC.

    Puerto Rico has been enmeshed in a debate over status within versus status outside the United States since 1898. The 1952 legislation that established commonwealth status for Puerto Rico created a compact between the residents of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Congress that requires the consent of both parties to any future decisions about the political…

  3. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality......

  4. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality......

  5. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control...

  6. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control...

  7. 77 FR 48504 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Economic Value of Puerto Rico's Coral Reef...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Value of Puerto Rico's Coral Reef Ecosystems for Recreation-Tourism AGENCY: National Oceanic and... values of Puerto Rico's coral reef ecosystems. Estimates will be made for all ecosystem services for the Guanica Bay Watershed and for recreation-tourism for all of Puerto Rico's coral reef ecosystems....

  8. Three-dimensional Euler deconvolution and tectonic interpretation of marine magnetic anomaly data in the Puerto Rico Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muszala, S. P.; Grindlay, N. R.; Bird, R. T.

    1999-12-01

    During the summer of 1996 single-channel-seismic, magnetic, gravity, Hydrosweep bathymetric and HMR1 sidescan data were collected north of the island of Puerto Rico to constrain the geologic and tectonic setting of the Puerto Rico trench. Magnetic data from this cruise are merged with other available data, then processed and interpreted with the aid of the Euler deconvolution method. The area north of the island of Puerto Rico is divided into three magnetic anomaly zones. Zone 1 is dominated by northwest to southeast trending magnetic anomalies. Zone 2 consists of an east-west region of relatively low amplitude anomalies and occurs south of zone 1. Zone 3 is dominated by the highest magnetic values in the study area and the source region is roughly centered under the island of Puerto Rico. Respectively, these zones approximate three geologic provinces of the Puerto Rico trench composed of Early Cretaceous ocean crust with sedimentary cover, a blueschist belt and an Oligocene-Cretaceous island arc with a limestone cap. Also mapped are the Main Ridge fracture zone and the Fourth of July fracture zone, both on the North American plate, which correlate with the Main Ridge and Fourth of July Ridge on the Caribbean plate. The 3-D Euler deconvolution facilitates the identification of new faults as well as the mapping of known faults also evident in the seismic and bathymetric data. A model concerning the formation of the Puerto Rico trench is proposed that incorporates the existence of strike-slip faults and the fracture zones associated with the subduction of the North America Plate. Evidence from this study support a tectonic interpretation of subduction followed by more recent strike-slip faulting that is accompanied by only a minimal amount of subduction.

  9. Multibeam Mapping and Remotely Operated Vehicle Exploration of the Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, D. F.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Armstrong, R.; Chaytor, J. D.; Demopoulos, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    During October 2013, an ocean exploration project took place off the coast of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. This project, a collaborative effort between the Ocean Exploration Trust, the US Geological Survey, the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, the University of Rhode Island, and NOAA, was aimed at exploring regions of the US exclusive economic zone (EEZ) south of the Puerto Rico Trench axis, and north of Mona Island, Puerto Rico, and the US and British Virgin Islands, and portions of the Anegada Passage. The research vessel E/V Nautilus and the Hercules/Argus ROV system were used to expand the multibeam sonar bathymetric data coverage of the region, collect high definition video footage of seafloor features, and to collect biological and geological samples along selected transects. Particular areas of interest for targeted ROV dives included: the region where a large M7.2 1918 earthquake produced a tsunami that struck northwestern corner of Puerto Rico; a transect up the vertical wall of the Mona Rift (4000 to 1500 m depth); transects along the Septentrional fault system; dives in areas of suspected fluid flow through faults, fissures, and offshore Karst systems associated with the tilted carbonate platform north of Puerto Rico; dives in the Anegada Passage at the entry points for surface Atlantic waters that circulate into the Caribbean; and in regions to investigate and date sedimentary features offset by fault motion and potential tsunamigenic landslides. Biological sampling of many deep-sea benthic organisms (including deep water corals) have never been attempted before in this area. These samples are being used to understand more about the diversity, population dynamics, genetics, and habitat connectivity of these communities, and to provide an age constraint for disturbed sedimentary features. Until this cruise, the location and distribution of deep coral habitats in the US Caribbean was largely unknown. The available information on benthic communities associated with deep coral ecosystems in this region was mostly limited to taxonomic listings from incidental collections by fish traps, shrimp trawls and coral entanglement devices. We present the results of the first direct observations and sampling of these ecosystems.

  10. Community beliefs and practices about dengue in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of long-term endemicity and repeated government and private efforts, effective, sustained community participation for dengue prevention is still a challenge in Puerto Rico. This study explored differences found in interviews conducted in 2001 in attitudes toward dengue and its prevention by...

  11. Disinfection Alternatives for Small Communities in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection Alternatives for Small Communities in Puerto Rico Craig Patterson1, Graciela Ramirez Toro2, Harvey Minnigh2, Cristina Maldonado3, and Rajib Sinha4 1U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development, 2Centro de Educación, Conservación e Interpretación Ambiental (CECIA),...

  12. The Demand for Higher Education in Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jonathan

    1993-01-01

    Uses time-series data to estimate empirical enrollment functions for three Puerto Rico university systems. Measures opportunity cost and benefits to education as expected wage rates and tests a market segmentation process. Results show that the universities are not substitutes for one another. To cope with continuing revenue shortfalls,…

  13. Proceedings of Quantifying Sustainability in Puerto Rico: A Scientific Discussion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys (EPA) Office of Research and Developments (ORD) symposium/workshop entitled, Quantifying Sustainability in Puerto Rico: A Scientific Discussion, was to establish a dialogue between researchers and decision makers and fa...

  14. Spiders associated with papaya, Carica papaya L., in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main objective of this work was to study the species composition and population dynamics of spiders associated with papaya plantings in three papaya production areas: Corozal, Isabela, and Lajas, Puerto Rico. Nineteen species representing seven families and 15 genera were identified. Members of ...

  15. Public Opinion in Puerto Rico on Alcohol Control Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Eileen M.; Bernat, Debra H.; Lenk, Kathleen M.; Vazquez, Mary Jo; Wagenaar, Alexander C.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the first study to assess public opinion of alcohol policies in Puerto Rico. In 2001, a telephone survey of 514 adults on the island assessed levels of support for 20 alcohol control policies covering five domains: (a) raising alcohol taxes, (b) restricting alcohol consumption in public places, (c) punishing adult providers…

  16. Relations between Study and Employment: Music Graduates in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latorre, Ileana S.; Lorenzo, Oswaldo

    2013-01-01

    Higher education programs in Puerto Rico include undergraduate degrees in music, music education, composition, popular music, jazz and Caribbean music, and, most recently, a master’s degree in music education. However, little is known about what music graduates do after concluding college. Do they work in music-related areas? Are they satisfied…

  17. Policies for Early Childhood Music Education in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Candelas, Marta

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author, aware of the importance of music education from the earliest age, especially in the emotional, expressive, cultural, social, intellectual, and creative needs of all children, analyzes the status of music education for the young child in Puerto Rico. She examines whether and how local education policies impact the…

  18. Proceedings of Quantifying Sustainability in Puerto Rico: A Scientific Discussion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Research and Development’s (ORD) symposium/workshop entitled, “Quantifying Sustainability in Puerto Rico: A Scientific Discussion,” was to establish a dialogue between researchers and decision makers and fa...

  19. Puerto Rico Third Annual Evaluation Report, Fiscal Year 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Advisory Council on Vocational and Technical Education, San Juan.

    This document is a summary of a study conducted by the Puerto Rico Vocational Advisory Committee to determine the effectiveness of the Vocational-Technical Education (VTE) programs in that country over a 1-year period. Predicated on the philosophy that improvement in the quality of education is dependent on continuous and comprehensive evaluation,…

  20. Guanophilic fungi in three caves of southwestern Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty species of guanophilic (bat guano-loving) fungi were isolated from field-collected samples within three caves in south-western Puerto Rico; most were mitosporic fungi (23 species). The caves studied were Cueva La Tuna (Cabo Rojo), Cueva de Malano (Sistema de Los Chorros, San Germán), and Cuev...

  1. 75 FR 2165 - Puerto Rico Disaster No. PR-00007

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico dated 01/07/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident Period: 12/24/2009 through 12/25/2009. Effective Date: 01/07/2010. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 03/08/2010. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan...

  2. Technology and Ethics: Some Lessons in Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the efforts to integrate ethics across the curriculum, especially in business, science, and engineering, at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. Explains why the integration of ethics across the curriculum is better than application when teaching ethics to students. Discusses the use of participatory case studies in engineering…

  3. Sediment Loss and its Contributors in Puerto Rico Watersheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major environmental concern in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is increased sediment load to water reservoirs and ultimately to estuaries and reef areas outside the estuaries. Sediment deposition has significantly reduced the storage capacity of reservoirs, and the associated c...

  4. Quantifying Sustainability in Puerto Rico – A Scientific Discussion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation introduces the symposium and an overview of work on sustainability metrics research in Puerto Rico. The presentation starts broadly by presenting the focus of Office of Research and Development on sustainability and systems thinking and drilling down to the how ...

  5. Sediment loss and its cause in Puerto Rico watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Taguas, E. V.; Mbonimpa, E. G.; Hu, W.

    2015-09-01

    A major environmental concern in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is increased sediment load to water reservoirs, to estuaries, and finally to coral reef areas outside the estuaries. Sediment deposition has significantly reduced the storage capacity of reservoirs, and sediments, with their associated contaminants and nutrients that are adsorbed, can stress corals and negatively impact reef health. To prevent and manage sediment loss it is therefore important to understand local soil erosion and sediment transport processes. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of landscape characteristics on sediment loss. We analyzed available precipitation and sediment data collected in Puerto Rico during the past three decades, as well as information on land use, soil properties, and topography. Our partial least squares analysis was not very successful in identifying major factors associated with sediment loss due to the complexity of the study's watersheds; however, it was found that topography and rainfall factors do not play a leading role. Sediment loss from the ridge watersheds in Puerto Rico was mainly caused by interactions of development, heavy rainfall events (especially hurricanes), and steep mountainous slopes associated with the ridges. These results improve our understanding of sediment loss resulting from changes in land use/cover within a Puerto Rico watershed, and allow stakeholders to make more informed decisions about land use planning.

  6. Language and Identity in Twentieth Century Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Nancy

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the history of the language controversy in Puerto Rico from the United States takeover of the island in 1898 through the 1991 and 1993 language laws that eliminated and then restored English as an official language. The article emphasizes the shifting ways that language has served as a symbolic maker. (47 references) (Author/CK)

  7. 33 CFR 165.755 - Safety Zone; Guayanilla, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Eco-Electrica waterfront facility in Guayanilla Bay, Puerto Rico. The safety zone remains in effect until the LNG vessel is docked at the Eco-Electrica waterfront facility or south of Latitude 17°56.0′ N. (2) The waters within 150 feet of a LNG vessel when the vessel is alongside the...

  8. Food resource partitioning inb syntopic nectarivorous bats on Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    We analyzed stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) to estimate the importance of plants and insects to the diet of two nectar-feeding bats on Puerto Rico, the brown flower bat (Erophylla bombifrons) and the Greater Antillean long-tongued bat (Monophyllus redmani). Concentrations of stable ...

  9. 33 CFR 165.755 - Safety Zone; Guayanilla, Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Guayanilla, Puerto Rico. 165.755 Section 165.755 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and...

  10. Relations between Study and Employment: Music Graduates in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latorre, Ileana S.; Lorenzo, Oswaldo

    2013-01-01

    Higher education programs in Puerto Rico include undergraduate degrees in music, music education, composition, popular music, jazz and Caribbean music, and, most recently, a masters degree in music education. However, little is known about what music graduates do after concluding college. Do they work in music-related areas? Are they satisfied

  11. Public Opinion in Puerto Rico on Alcohol Control Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Eileen M.; Bernat, Debra H.; Lenk, Kathleen M.; Vazquez, Mary Jo; Wagenaar, Alexander C.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the first study to assess public opinion of alcohol policies in Puerto Rico. In 2001, a telephone survey of 514 adults on the island assessed levels of support for 20 alcohol control policies covering five domains: (a) raising alcohol taxes, (b) restricting alcohol consumption in public places, (c) punishing adult providers

  12. The distribution of pollution and environmental justice in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because few empirical studies on environmental justice and pollution distribution exit, we examine both issues in Puerto Rico. This research is part of a larger US EPA project related to sustainability issues. We use an environmental Gini coefficient with Toxic Release Inventory ...

  13. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste,…

  14. ASSESSING THE CONDITION OF THE COASTAL RESOURCES OF PUERTO RICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forty seven stations located in the coastal estuaries of Puerto Rico were sampled during the summer of 2000 using a probabilistic design. Fourteen estuaries were classified as "large" at 4.19 km2, 25 "medium" at 3.46 km2, and 8 "small" at 0.55 km2. Samples were successfully coll...

  15. B-Virus and Free-Ranging Macaques, Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kristen; González-Martínez, Janis; Kraiselburd, Edmundo; Rullán, Johnny

    2004-01-01

    In Puerto Rico, risk for transmission of B-virus from free-ranging rhesus monkeys to humans has become a serious challenge. An incident with an injured rhesus monkey, seropositive for B-virus, resulted in inappropriate administration of antiviral postexposure prophylaxis. This incident underscores the importance of education about risks associated with interactions between humans and nonhuman primates. PMID:15109420

  16. Disinfection Alternatives for Small Communities in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection Alternatives for Small Communities in Puerto Rico Craig Patterson1, Graciela Ramirez Toro2, Harvey Minnigh2, Cristina Maldonado3, and Rajib Sinha4 1U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development, 2Centro de Educacin, Conservacin e Interpretacin Ambiental (CECIA),...

  17. CRITERIA POLLUTANT AND ACID AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION STUDY - CATANO, PUERTO RICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the Catano Criteria Pollutant and Acid Aerosol Characterization study was to characterize criteria pollutant and acid aerosol concentrations in the Ward of Catano and adjacent residential areas in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. on-Governmental organizations (NG...

  18. 33 CFR 165.755 - Safety Zone; Guayanilla, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone; Guayanilla, Puerto Rico 165.755 Section 165.755 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited...

  19. 50 CFR 32.58 - Puerto Rico. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Puerto Rico. 32.58 Section 32.58 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and...

  20. 50 CFR 32.58 - Puerto Rico. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Puerto Rico. 32.58 Section 32.58 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and...

  1. 50 CFR 32.58 - Puerto Rico. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Puerto Rico. 32.58 Section 32.58 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and...

  2. 50 CFR 32.58 - Puerto Rico. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Puerto Rico. 32.58 Section 32.58 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and...

  3. 50 CFR 32.58 - Puerto Rico. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Puerto Rico. 32.58 Section 32.58 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and...

  4. Food resource partitioning inb syntopic nectarivorous bats on Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    We analyzed stable isotopes (?13C, ?15N) to estimate the importance of plants and insects to the diet of two nectar-feeding bats on Puerto Rico, the brown flower bat (Erophylla bombifrons) and the Greater Antillean long-tongued bat (Monophyllus redmani). Concentrations of stable ...

  5. Tropical cyclones and the flood hydrology of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, J.A.; Sturdevant-Rees, P.; Baeck, M.L.; Larsen, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Some of the largest unit discharge flood peaks in the stream gaging records of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have occurred in Puerto Rico. Many of these flood peaks are associated with tropical cyclones. Hurricane Georges, which passed directly over the island on 21-22 September 1998, produced record flood peaks at numerous USGS stations in Puerto Rico. The hydrology and hydrometeorology of extreme flood response in Puerto Rico are examined through analyses of rainfall, based on Weather Surveillance Radar - 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) radar reflectivity observations and USGS rain gage observations and discharge from USGS stream gaging stations. Peak rainfall accumulations of more than 700 mm occurred in the central mountain region of the island. The largest unit discharge flood peaks, however, were located in the eastern portion of the island in areas with smaller storm total rainfall accumulations but markedly larger rainfall rates at 5-60 min timescale. Orographic precipitation mechanisms played an important role in rainfall distribution over the island of Puerto Rico. Amplification of rainfall accumulations was associated with areas of upslope motion. Elevated low-level cloud water content in regions of upslope motion played an important role in the maximum rainfall accumulations in the central mountain region of Puerto Rico. The largest unit discharge flood peaks, however, were produced by a decaying eye wall mesovortex, which resulted in a 30-45 min period of extreme rainfall rates over the eastern portion of the island. This storm element was responsible for the record flood peak of the Rio Grande de Lo??iza. The role of terrain in development and evolution of the eye wall mesovortex is unclear but is of fundamental importance for assessing extreme flood response from the storm. Hydrologic response is examined through analyses of rainfall and discharge from five pairs of drainage basins, extending from east to west over the island. These analyses point to the importance of short-term rainfall rates for extreme flood response. The hydrologic response of Puerto Rico is compared with two other extreme flood environments, the central Appalachians and Edwards Plateau of Texas. These analyses suggest that the high rainfall environment of Puerto Rico is linked to the development of a hydraulically efficient drainage system. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Pharmacogenetics of healthy volunteers in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Claudio-Campos, Karla; Orengo-Mercado, Carmelo; Renta, Jessicca Y; Peguero, Muriel; García, Ricardo; Hernández, Gabriel; Corey, Susan; Cadilla, Carmen L; Duconge, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    Puerto Ricans are a unique Hispanic population with European, Native American (Taino), and higher West African ancestral contributions than other non-Caribbean Hispanics. In admixed populations, such as Puerto Ricans, genetic variants can be found at different frequencies when compared to parental populations and uniquely combined and distributed. Therefore, in this review, we aimed to collect data from studies conducted in healthy Puerto Ricans and to report the frequencies of genetic polymorphisms with major relevance in drug response. Filtering for healthy volunteers or individuals, we performed a search of pharmacogenetic studies in academic literature databases without limiting the period of the results. The search was limited to Puerto Ricans living in the island, excluding those studies performed in mainland (United States). We found that the genetic markers impacting pharmacological therapy in the areas of cardiovascular, oncology, and neurology are the most frequently investigated. Coincidently, the top causes of mortality in the island are cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke. In addition, polymorphisms in genes that encode for members of the CYP450 family (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) are also available due to their relevance in the metabolism of drugs. The complex genetic background of Puerto Ricans is responsible for the divergence in the reported allele frequencies when compared to parental populations (Africans, East Asians, and Europeans). The importance of reporting the findings of pharmacogenetic studies conducted in Puerto Ricans is to identify genetic variants with potential utility among this genetically complex population and eventually move forward the adoption of personalized medicine in the island. PMID:26501165

  7. Pharmacogenetics of healthy volunteers in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Claudio-Campos, Karla; Orengo-Mercado, Carmelo; Renta, Jessicca Y.; Peguero, Muriel; García, Ricardo; Hernández, Gabriel; Corey, Susan; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Duconge, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Puerto Ricans are a unique Hispanic population with European, Native American (Taino), and higher West African ancestral contributions than other non-Caribbean Hispanics. In admixed populations, such as Puerto Ricans, genetic variants can be found at different frequencies when compared to parental populations and uniquely combined and distributed. Therefore, in this review, we aimed to collect data from studies conducted in healthy Puerto Ricans and to report the frequencies of genetic polymorphisms with major relevance in drug response. Filtering for healthy volunteers or individuals, we performed a search of pharmacogenetic studies in academic literature databases without limiting the period of the results. The search was limited to Puerto Ricans living in the island, excluding those studies performed in mainland (United States). We found that the genetic markers impacting pharmacological therapy in the areas of cardiovascular, oncology, and neurology are the most frequently investigated. Coincidently, the top causes of mortality in the island are cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and stroke. In addition, polymorphisms in genes that encode for members of the CYP450 family (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) are also available due to their relevance in the metabolism of drugs. The complex genetic background of Puerto Ricans is responsible for the divergence in the reported allele frequencies when compared to parental populations (Africans, East Asians, and Europeans). The importance of reporting the findings of pharmacogenetic studies conducted in Puerto Ricans is to identify genetic variants with potential utility among this genetically complex population and eventually move forward the adoption of personalized medicine in the island. PMID:26501165

  8. Puerto Rico - 2002 : field studies to resolve aerosol processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Ravelo, R.

    1999-10-05

    A number of questions remain concerning homogeneous aerosol formation by natural organics interacting with anthropogenic pollutants. For example, chlorine has been proposed as a potential oxidant in the troposphere because of its very high reactivity with a wide range of organics (Finlayson-Pitts, 1993). Indeed, sea salt aerosol in the presence of ozone has been shown to produce chlorine atoms in heterogeneous photochemical reactions under laboratory conditions. Whether chlorine can initiate oxidation of natural organics such as monoterpene hydrocarbons and can generate homogeneous nucleation or condensable material that contributes to aerosol loadings needs to be assessed. The nighttime reactions of ozone and nitrate radical can also result in monoterpene reactions that contribute to aerosol mass. We are currently planning field studies in Puerto Rico to assess these aerosol issues and other atmospheric chemistry questions. Puerto Rico has a number of key features that make it very attractive for a field study of this sort. The principal feature is the island's very regular meteorology and its position in the Caribbean Sea relative to the easterly trade winds. This meteorology and the island's rectangular shape (100 x 35 miles) make it highly suitable for simplification of boundary layer conditions. In addition, the long stretch between Puerto Rico and the nearest pollution sources in Africa and southern Europe make the incoming background air relatively clean and constant. Furthermore, Puerto Rico has approximately 3.5 million people with a very well defined source region and a central area of rain forest vegetation. These features make Puerto Rico an ideal locale for assessing aerosol processes. The following sections describe specific areas of atmospheric chemistry that can be explored during the proposed field study.

  9. Life Styles of Puerto Rico's Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingfield, Roland

    A representative sampling of male Puerto Rican youths was studied in order to analyze post-counterculture attitudes toward family, society, school, drugs, use of leisure time and future aspirations. The counterculture of the 1960s is described, with the implication that changes brought about by this movement influenced current youth attitudes in…

  10. Fracture Analysis of Neogene Rocks in Puerto Rico constrains Neogene-Quaternary microplate evolution of the northeastern Caribbean plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippolyte, J. C.; Mann, P.

    2003-04-01

    The Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands (PRVI) microplate is bounded to the north and south by subduction zones, and to the east and the west by diffuse zones of extension (Mona rift) or probable transtension (Anegada Passage). Paleomagnetic data from Neogene carbonate rocks exposed in Puerto Rico record 24 degrees of counterclockwise rotation since the middle Miocene (Reid et al., 1991). Such largescale counterclockwise rotation would agree with observed Pliocene dextral transtensional movements in the Anegada passage (Jany et al., 1987; 1990; Mauffret and Jany, 1990) and would predict transpression in the area of the Mona Rift. However, recent GPS data (Jansma et al., 2000) reveal E-W extension in the Mona Passage that disagrees with the counterclockwise rotation model. We present the results of the first fault slip measurements from Mio-Pliocene carbonate rocks in Puerto Rico. In northwest Puerto Rico, fracture analysis reveals late Neogene-Quaternary normal faulting post-dating karst landforms and continuous with NS-striking normal faults bounding the eastern margin of the Mona rift. Paleostress analysis of these onshore faults well exposed in quarries and roadcuts confirms that the Mona rift is presently opening in an E-W direction. Along the southern margin of Puerto Rico, the Neogene carbonates of the Ponce formation have recorded two successive transtensional deformations: (1) a NNE-trending dextral transtension; (2) a SE-trending sinistral transtension. The latter event is closely related to WSW to SW-striking normal faults bounding the Anegada Passage. Future work on Neogene rocks exposed on the Virgin Islands flanking the Anegada Passage will determine if polyphase evolution of the Anegada Passage is consistent with (1) Miocene dextral transtension during a counterclockwise rotation of the PRVI microplate and (2) Pliocene-Quaternary E-W to NW-SE extension produced by slower eastward motion of the PRVI microplate relative to the Lesser Antilles arc and Caribbean plate.

  11. Scores on psychoticism of adolescent girls in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Porrata, J L

    1995-06-01

    This study concerns 425 Puerto Rican adolescent girls whose scores on personality factors are not consistent. When the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Junior was standardized for Puerto Rico values of factorial comparisons for the female adolescents were as low as .65 for Psychoticism. This result points to girls' confusion in showing toughness. This might be explained by high expectations but there are few opportunities for lower-class girls in a society in which women are taught to live around men and not to develop themselves as workers. PMID:7568593

  12. Peer Norms and Sharing of Injection Paraphernalia among Puerto Rican Injection Drug Users in New York and Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andia, Jonny F.; Deren, Sherry; Robles, Rafaela R.; Kang, Sung-Yeon; Colon, Hector M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the influence of peer norms on sharing of injection paraphernalia (e.g., indirect sharing behaviors, including sharing of cookers, cotton, rinse water and back/front loading) among Puerto Rican injection drug users (IDUs) in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, and East Harlem, New York City. Data were collected from 873 Puerto Rican IDUs…

  13. The Anthropology of the People of Puerto Rico. Studies of Puerto Rican Society and Culture, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Ronald J., Ed.

    This monograph contains seven papers presented at a 1977 symposium held to reevaluate the 1947 research work, "The People of Puerto Rico." (1) Sidney Mintz discusses the role of Puerto Rico in modern social science. (2) Eric Wolf, one of the authors of the 1947 work, comments retrospectively on some of the conceptual and methodological strengths…

  14. The Anthropology of the People of Puerto Rico. Studies of Puerto Rican Society and Culture, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Ronald J., Ed.

    This monograph contains seven papers presented at a 1977 symposium held to reevaluate the 1947 research work, "The People of Puerto Rico." (1) Sidney Mintz discusses the role of Puerto Rico in modern social science. (2) Eric Wolf, one of the authors of the 1947 work, comments retrospectively on some of the conceptual and methodological strengths

  15. Populations dynamics of Australorbis glabratus in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Lawrence S.; Radke, Myron G.; Ferguson, Frederick F.

    1962-01-01

    This report on the population dynamics of Australorbis glabratus in Puerto Rico is based on observations made over about two years at 50 collecting-sites in a representative range of snail habitats. In some places a marked predominance of Tropicorbis was noted. No continuous or seasonal propagation of Australorbis was apparent. Dense populations seldom prevailed for more than a few months, and in most places very low population levels occurred at irregular intervals, and colony decimations were fairly common. A variety of pressures is exerted on Australorbis in Puerto Rico by a multiplicity of natural factors; detailed knowledge of this snail's natural history in the field is necessary for effective bilharziasis control and for a full understanding of the regional epidemiology of this disease. PMID:14492504

  16. Media complementarity and health information seeking in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yan; Robinson, James D

    2014-01-01

    This investigation incorporates the Orientation1-Stimulus-Orientation2-Response model on the antecedents and outcomes of individual-level complementarity of media use in health information seeking. A secondary analysis of the Health Information National Trends Survey Puerto Rico data suggests that education and gender were positively associated with individual-level media complementarity of health information seeking, which, in turn, was positively associated with awareness of health concepts and organizations, and this awareness was positively associated with a specific health behavior: fruit and vegetable consumption. This study extends the research in media complementarity and health information use; it provides an integrative social psychological model empirically supported by the Health Information National Trends Survey Puerto Rico data. PMID:24377383

  17. Real Time Flood Alert System (RTFAS) for Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopez-Trujillo, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    The Real Time Flood Alert System is a web-based computer program, developed as a data integration tool, and designed to increase the ability of emergency managers to rapidly and accurately predict flooding conditions of streams in Puerto Rico. The system includes software and a relational database to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall, water levels in streams and reservoirs, and associated storms to determine hazardous and potential flood conditions. The computer program was developed as part of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey Caribbean Water Science Center and the Puerto Rico Emergency Management Agency, and integrates information collected and processed by these two agencies and the National Weather Service.

  18. Cenomanian (Cretaceons) Foraminifera from the Puerto Rico Trench

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, R.; Low, D.

    1964-01-01

    An assemblage of predominantly planktonic Foraminifera is discussed from rocks of Cenomanian age dredged from between 3,200 and 3,500 fm on the north slope of the Puerto Rico Trench. Thirty-three planktonic and benthonic species are described. Planomalina pulchella is new; nine species are specifically unidentifiable. Deposition is interpreted as having been at a depth of over 1,000 fm, possibly as deep as where found. ?? 1964.

  19. A proposed streamflow-data program for Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopez, Miguel A.; Fields, Fred K.

    1970-01-01

    The streamflow-data program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Puerto Rico has been one of the principal parts of an overall appraisal of the water resources of the Island since the initiation of a cooperative agreement with agencies of the Commonwealth Government in 1957. The streamflow-station network has increased in direct response to demand for data to support planning for the rapidly accelerated industrial and population growth that has occurred since.

  20. Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    BOYES, JOHN D.; DE ANA, MINDI FARBER; TORRES, WENCESLANO

    1999-09-01

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a distributed battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories has followed the progress of all stages of the project since its inception. It directly supported the critical battery room cooling system design by conducting laboratory thermal testing of a scale model of the battery under simulated operating conditions. The Puerto Rico facility is at present the largest operating battery storage system in the world and is successfully providing frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reserve to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. The owner-operator, PREPA, and the architect/engineer, vendors, and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation. In documenting these lessons, this report will help PREPA and other utilities in planning to build large energy storage systems.

  1. Epidemiological trends of suicide in Puerto Rico: 1931 to 1985.

    PubMed

    González-Manrique, M A; Rodríguez-Llauger, A

    1988-12-01

    This work fulfills the need for an historic-developmental study of suicide in Puerto Rico. Mortality trends, risk groups and other demographical data with preventive and comparative value is presented. The data for this descriptive study was mainly taken from the Puerto Rico Vital Statistics and the Forensic Institute files. Analysis was done correlating incidence, age, sex and method. Seasonal tendencies were explored. Graphs were designed to illustrate the tendencies and interrelationship of the given variables. The results show that after a decline in incidence in the first 30 years, suicide mortality has been stable for the past 25 years (9.2 x 100,000). Age, sex and method showed certain interrelationships; 1) aging is directly proportional to an increase in suicidal risk. 2) Youth suicide rates have consistently diminished. 3) Adolescents tend to choose the traditional methods in Puerto Rico, with a recent increase in firearms use. 4) At age 16, males differ from females by increasing their suicide rates, particularly by hanging. 5) Adult females show unpredictability as to their methods. Seasonal risk of suicide was found statistically significant (ANOVA) for the Christmas and summer periods and major events affecting the general public. PMID:3241866

  2. Women's employment and changing gender relations in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Warren, Alice Colón

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Helen Safa's analyses of the impact of development strategies and social policies on gender relations and women headed families in the Caribbean and Puerto Rico. The discussion focuses on findings of a research project regarding patterns of women's employment, autonomy, marital relations, family headship and poverty in Puerto Rico in the decade beginning in the year 2000, using excerpts from interviews conducted with women workers displaced from a clothing and a tuna factory between 2001 and 2002 (Colón et al. 2008), as well as data from the Public Use Sample (PUMS) of the U.S. Census Puerto Rico Community Survey 2005-2007. It is argued that women's employment has resulted in advances in women's autonomy, gender equity, and renegotiations of the provider role, but, intensified by men's unstable earnings, it has also led to the increase of female family headship even among married women. Women's education and employment have been an important means of reducing family poverty both among dual earner families and female heads. Yet, the continuing joblessness in the Island places even higher educated sectors on the verge of economic precariousness. PMID:22073439

  3. Structure and tectonics of the upper Cenozoic Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands carbonate platform as determined from seismic reflection studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gestel, Jean-Paul; Mann, Paul; Dolan, James F.; Grindlay, Nancy R.

    1998-12-01

    The Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands carbonate platform was deposited over an area of 18,000 km2 from early Oligocene to Holocene on top of an inactive and subsiding Cretaceous-earliest Oligocene island arc. Regional single-channel and multichannel seismic reflection lines presented in this study provide the first information on the regional stratigraphy and structure of this platform that has previously been known mainly from onshore stratigraphic sections of a relatively small (2250 km2) portion of the platform exposed by late Neogene tectonic uplift along the north coast of Puerto Rico. Seismic reflection lines are used to map the thickness of the carbonate platform strata and to correlate this thickness with onshore outcrop and well data from northern and southern Puerto Rico, St. Croix (U.S. Virgin Islands), and the Saba Bank. Limestone thickness variations from a little over 2 km to almost zero are used to subdivide the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands platform into five distinct carbonate provinces: (1) north Puerto Rico area including the onshore exposures; (2) Virgin Islands area; (3) St. Croix and Saba Bank area; (4) south Puerto Rico area; and (5) Mona Passage area. Carbonate thickness and structural information from each area are used to test five previously proposed models for the deformation and vertical movements of the platform. The most prominent feature of the platform in the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands area is a large, east-west trending arch. The northern limb of this arch exhibits a smoother, more uniform dip than the steeper, more abruptly faulted, southern limb. The core of the arch is responsible for the exposure of arc basement rocks on Puerto Rico. The origin of this arch, which occurs over a 300 km wide area, is best explained by north-south shortening and arching, caused by interaction at depth of subducted slabs of the North America and Caribbean plates. Other important evidence for this model can be found in the Benioff zones observed in the earthquake profiles. Loading of the Caribbean plate results in downward flexing of the North America plate and causes the 4 km subsidence of the carbonate platform north of Puerto Rico.

  4. Paleomagnetic evidence for Late Miocene counterclockwise rotation of north coast carbonate sequence, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, J.A.; Plumley, P.W. ); Schellekens, J.H. )

    1991-03-01

    A paleomagnetic study of the essentially undeformed middle Tertiary carbonate sequence along the north coast of Puerto Rico reveals statistically significant pre-Pliocene discordance of characteristic component directions against those expected from cratonic North America for much of the section. Despite generally weak to moderately weak magnetic intensities, confirmation of the magnetization as primary in origin comes from the presence of two distinct components of magnetization, intrasite bipolarity, and/or the reproducibility of measurements. The mean geographic direction for the upper Oligocene to middle Miocene strata is 335.2{degree}/32.9{degree} and the corrected mean paleomagnetic pole is 207.6{degree}/66.5{degree}, (N = 3, {alpha}95 = 4.3{degree}). This suggests a counter-clockwise (CCW) block rotation of Puerto Rico and its microplate of 24.5{degrees} ({plus minus} 5.8{degrees}) during the late Miocene. Using a width of 250 km for the Northern Caribbean Plate Boundary Zone (NCPBZ) between the North American Plate and Caribbean Plate, the mean left lateral displacement implied is 1.8 to 2.4 cm/yr, which agrees fairly well with published relative motion rates for the two plates. Average rotation rate for 50 Ma to 20 Ma was 0.7{degree}/my but perhaps as great as 4{degree}/my in the Miocene. Resolution of mean paleolatitude indicates northward motion of a degree or less during the period of rotation. Causes of this short-lived rotation may include (1) tectonic escape from the inhibiting presence of the Bahama Banks and Beata Ridge during eastward motion of Puerto Rico along the sinistral transpressive Puerto Rico Trench and Muertos Trough fault systems or (2) changes in relative plate motions of the Caribbean and North American Plate during the late Miocene.

  5. The Muertos Subduction Zone as a Major Earthquake and Tsunami Hazard for Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, W. R.

    2007-05-01

    A revised catalog of 25 years of locally recorded earthquakes located using newly developed 1-D and 3-D velocity models allows us to better understand the spatial distribution of these events and their relation to known tectonic structures. In map view, the relocated events still show a pattern generally lacking in lineations that might be related to crustal faults. However, the previous cloud of crustal events in vertical cross sections now display a clear northerly dipping seismic zone as shallow as 10 km depth along the island's south coast extending to 40 km depth along the north coast of the island. This dipping seismic zone is interpreted as the Muertos Megathrust along which buoyant Caribbean Plate is obliquely underthrust beneath Puerto Rico. 3-D velocity anomalies associated with the region of high seismicity in western Puerto Rico confirm subducted Caribbean crust and lithosphere. The dipping seismic zone is seen best in SW Puerto Rico but also extends to the easternmost part of the island. Seismicity and historic earthquakes in the Dominican Republic also indicate the presence of the Muertos Megathrust beneath the SE part o that country. A large earthquake in 1751 generated a damaging tsunami. These new data suggest a new paradigm for earthquake hazards from "crustal" or "shallow" earthquakes in Puerto Rico. That is, after removing events associated with the dipping megathrust, little "random crustal seismicity" is left in the crustal wedge above the plate interface, and the amount and location of random crustal events depends heavily upon exactly which events are chosen to be part of the megathrust seismicity.

  6. Forest resources of Puerto Rico, 1990. Forest Service Resource Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, P.A.; Weaver, P.L.; Eggen-McIntosh, S.

    1997-10-01

    The prinicipal findings of the second forest survey of Puerto Rico (1990) and changes that have occurred since the survey was established in 1980 are presented. The forest inventory estimates describe the timber resource found within the potential commercial region designated in the first survey. The timber resource addressed consists primarily of regrown areas on abandoned pastures and cropland, including coffee production areas. The status and trends of the timber resource are presented for the two Life Zones occurring in the commercial region, as well as for various forest classes, which are based on stand history and origin. Topics dicussed include forest area, timberland area, basal area, species composition, timber volume, growing-stock volume, and sawtimber volume. results of the 1990 survey are promising, showing inceases in numbers of trees across all diamater classes and substantial increases in volume. These trends offer evidence that Puerto Rico`s forests are continuing to recover following a dramatic decline of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

  7. Sedimentation Survey of Lago Guerrero, Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, March 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soler-López, Luis R.

    2009-01-01

    Lago Guerrero is located in Aguadilla, northwestern Puerto Rico (fig. 1). The reservoir has a surface area of about 32,000 square meters and is excavated in Aymamon Limestone of Miocene age. This bedrock consists of chalk interbed-ded with solution-riddled hard limestone (Monroe, 1969). The reservoir was constructed in the 1930s as part of the Isabela Hydroelectric System to regulate flows to two hydroelectric plants-Central Isabel No. 2, at an elevation of about 110 meters above mean sea level, and Central Isabel No. 3, at about 55 meters above mean sea level. Hydroelectric power generation was discontinued during the early 1960s, although the exact date is unknown (Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, written commun., 2007). The principal use of the reservoir since then has been to regulate flow to two public-supply water filtration plants and supply irrigation water for the Aguadilla area. Flow into the reservoir is derived from Lago Guajataca through a 26-kilometer-long Canal Principal de Diversion concrete canal (Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, written commun., 2001). Additional inflow occurs on an incidental basis only during intensive rainfall from the immediate drainage area. The present Lago Guerrero drainage area is undetermined, due to the irregular and complex topography of the limestone terrain and anthropogenic modifications to the stormwater drainage system. Stormwater runoff, however, is presumed to be negligible compared to the almost constant inflow to the reservoir of about 59,300 cubic meters per day from Lago Guajataca (CSA Group, 2000). On March 9, 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Caribbean Water Science Center, in cooperation with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA), conducted a bathymetric survey of Lago Guerrero to determine the storage capacity of the reservoir and sedimentation amount since a previous survey conducted on May 30, 2001. The March 2006 survey was made to develop a bathymetric map of the reservoir, establish baseline data for future reservoir capacity comparisons, and to estimate the average sedimentation rate over the preceding 5 years.

  8. Geophysical logs from the Toa Baja scientific drillhole, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.N. )

    1991-03-01

    Geophysical logs from the Toa Baja drillhole on the north central coast of Puerto Rico are used to distinguish the variation in physical properties with depth in this non-volcanic island arc massif. A marked unconformity separates shallow Oligocene to Miocene limestones with considerable permeability contrast from a deeper sequence of volcaniclastic rocks with decreasing shaliness. A volcanic sill or flow overlying a strongly mineralized zone is found to cause the impedance contrast responsible for the strong seismic reflection anomaly (bright spot) that was the exploration target.

  9. Students' Reflections on the Social, Political, and Ideological Role of English in Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clachar, Arlene

    1997-01-01

    Eight students taking English as a Second Language in a Puerto Rican university kept dialog journals in which they discussed English as a symbol of U.S. colonial domination of Puerto Rico and the erosion of Puerto Rican cultural identity, the relative importance of English and Spanish, and contradictions related to U.S. citizenship and the need…

  10. The Identity Development and Coming out Process of Gay Youth in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fankhanel, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather basic exploratory-descriptive data regarding the self-perceptions and behaviors of Puerto Rican gay youth (16 to 24 years old) during their gay identity development and coming out process. The study was conducted in Puerto Rico to eliminate ethnic minority influences that may be present in Puerto Rican gay…

  11. Standardization of the WISC-R in Puerto Rico: The Process and the Preliminary Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrans, Laura L.; And Others

    The process of adapting the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) for Puerto Rico was begun with the following objectives: (1) to review the existing Spanish translation of the WISC-R; (2) to adapt the WISC-R to Puerto Rican culture and milieu; and (3) to standardize the scale with a representative sample of Puerto Rican…

  12. Eliciting stakeholder values for coral reef management tasks in the Gunica Bay watershed, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA is developing a valuation protocol for southwest Puerto Rico that will support the US Coral Reef Task Forces (USCRTF) Partnership Initiative in the Gunica Bay/Rio Loco (GB/RL) Watershed. The GB/RL watershed is located in southwestern Puerto Rico and includes the urbaniz...

  13. 47 CFR 73.1210 - TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico...-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico. (a) For the purpose of this section, dual-language broadcasting shall be understood to mean the telecasting of a program in one language with the simultaneous...

  14. 42 CFR 412.208 - Puerto Rico rates for Federal fiscal year 1988.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rates for Federal fiscal year 1988. (a) General rule. CMS determines the Puerto Rico adjusted DRG... of payments based on DRG prospective payment rates that are additional payments to hospitals located.... For each discharge classified within a DRG, CMS establishes a Puerto Rico prospective payment rate,...

  15. 42 CFR 412.374 - Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico. 412... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals §...

  16. 42 CFR 412.204 - Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico. 412... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs for Hospitals Located in Puerto Rico § 412.204 Payment...

  17. 42 CFR 412.204 - Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico. 412... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs for Hospitals Located in Puerto Rico § 412.204 Payment...

  18. 42 CFR 412.374 - Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico. 412... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals §...

  19. 42 CFR 412.374 - Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico. 412... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals §...

  20. 42 CFR 412.204 - Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico. 412... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs for Hospitals Located in Puerto Rico § 412.204 Payment...

  1. 81 FR 21550 - Emergency Funding for Puerto Rico Department of Health, Zika Virus Outbreak

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2016-04-12

    ... of Health, Zika Virus Outbreak AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department... Puerto Rico Department of Health, Zika virus Outbreak for Infectious Diseases (ELC)--financed solely by... Department of Health (PRDOH) to combat the current outbreak of Zika virus. Project Description Puerto Rico...

  2. 42 CFR 412.204 - Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs for Hospitals Located in Puerto Rico § 412.204 Payment to... Puerto Rico that are paid under the prospective payment system are equal to the sum of— (1) 75 percent...

  3. 42 CFR 412.374 - Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals § 412.374... costs to hospitals located in Puerto Rico that are paid under the prospective payment system are...

  4. 42 CFR 412.374 - Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals § 412.374... costs to hospitals located in Puerto Rico that are paid under the prospective payment system are...

  5. 42 CFR 412.204 - Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs for Hospitals Located in Puerto Rico § 412.204 Payment to... Puerto Rico that are paid under the prospective payment system are equal to the sum of— (1) 75 percent...

  6. 76 FR 56778 - Puerto Rico; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Puerto Rico; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4017-DR), dated August... CONTACT: Peggy Miller, Office of Response and Recovery, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C...

  7. Puerto-Rico in the Whirlwind of 1898: Conflict, Continuity, and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Fernandez, Luis

    1998-01-01

    Examines the role played by Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War. Although fighting on the island lasted only 19 days, it resulted in the the United States assuming possession of Puerto Rico as a commonwealth. Discusses the ongoing effects of this on the economy, and the movement toward statehood. (MJP)

  8. 75 FR 41801 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 163 Ponce, Puerto Rico, Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... given in the Federal Register (75 FR 12730-12731, 3/17/10) and the application has been processed... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 163 Ponce, Puerto Rico, Area Pursuant to its... at the Yaucono Industrial Park (Site 12) in Ponce, Puerto Rico, within the Ponce Customs and...

  9. 75 FR 41801 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 163, Ponce, Puerto Rico, Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Penuelas, Puerto Rico, adjacent to the Ponce Customs and Border Protection port of entry (FTZ Docket 53-2009, filed 11/23/09); Whereas, notice inviting public comment was given in the Federal Register (74 FR... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 163, Ponce, Puerto Rico, Area Pursuant to...

  10. QUANTIFYING SEDIMENT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE GUÁNICA BAY PUERTO RICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The island of Puerto Rico faces considerable challenges regarding sustainable land use and effects of land use on adjacent freshwater and marine ecosystem services. In watersheds feeding Guánica Bay (southwestern Puerto Rico), increased soil erosion and sediment loading to strea...

  11. Puerto Rico's PLATO Learning Program: An Independent Evaluation of the PLATO Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillady, Lucinda; Miller, Libbie

    2004-01-01

    The Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) program has become a valuable resource in the implementation of the Puerto Rico Department of Education's educational reform process. To support the process, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico granted computerized equipment, reading and mathematics software and training designed for schools. This included reading…

  12. New genus and species of flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) from Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new genus (Borinken) and five new species (Borinken elyunque, Distigmoptera chamorrae, Kiskeya elyunque, Ulrica eltoro, and U. iviei) from Puerto Rico are described and illustrated. A key to all Caribbean Monoplatini genera, a key to all Kiskeya species and to Ulrica species of Puerto Rico are pro...

  13. 78 FR 13625 - Approval of Subzone Status; Sea World, Inc.; Guaynabo, Puerto Rico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Register inviting public comment (77 FR 75145, 12/19/2012). The FTZ staff examiner reviewed the application... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval of Subzone Status; Sea World, Inc.; Guaynabo, Puerto Rico On December... the existing activation limit of FTZ 61, on behalf of Sea World, Inc., in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico....

  14. 47 CFR 73.1210 - TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico. 73.1210 Section 73.1210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1210 TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico. (a)...

  15. New records of Bodotriidae (Crustacea: Cumacea) from Puerto Rico with descriptions of three new species.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, Iorgu; Chatterjee, Tapas; Schizas, Nikolaos V

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to describe the cumacean fauna of Puerto Rico we describe three new species of Bodotriidae, a family that has never been reported from Puerto Rico before.  While finding and describing new microcrustacean species may not be an impossible task, if there is available taxonomic expertise, the currently described species were found in large numbers within a short distance from the Marine Laboratories of the University of Puerto Rico where the local reefs have been studied for over half a century, highlighting the large gaps that exist in our estimates of Caribbean marine diversity.  The three new species, Cyclaspis gurui sp. nov., Cyclaspis mariae sp. nov. and Vaunthompsonia budaii sp. nov. are reported from a fringing reef off La Parguera, southwest coast of Puerto Rico and Vaunthompsonia cristata Bate, 1858 represents a new record for Puerto Rico from the mesophotic reefs. PMID:25544235

  16. New seafloor map of the Puerto Rico Trench helps assess earthquake and tsunami hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Danforth, William; Polloni, Christopher; Andrews, Brian D.; Llanes Estrada, Pilar; Smith, Shepard; Parker, Eugene; Uozumi, Toshihiko

    2004-01-01

    The Puerto Rico Trench, the deepest part of the Atlantic Ocean, is located where the North American (NOAM) plate is subducting under the Caribbean plate (Figure l). The trench region may pose significant seismic and tsunami hazards to Puerto Rico and the U.S.Virgin Islands, where 4 million U.S. citizens reside. Widespread damage in Puerto Rico and Hispaniola from an earthquake in 1787 was estimated to be the result of a magnitude 8 earthquake north of the islands [McCann et al., 2004]. A tsunami killed 40 people in NW Puerto Rico following a magnitude 7.3 earthquake in 1918 [Mercado and McCann, 1998]. Large landslide escarpments have been mapped on the seafloor north of Puerto Rico [Mercado et al., 2002; Schwab et al., 1991],although their ages are unknown.

  17. New seafloor map of the Puerto Rico trench helps assess earthquake and tsunami hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Uri ten; Danforth, William; Polloni, Christopher; Andrews, Brian; Llanes, Pilar; Smith, Shepard; Parker, Eugene; Uozumi, Toshihiko

    2004-09-01

    The Puerto Rico Trench, the deepest part of the Atlantic Ocean, is located where the North American (NOAM) plate is subducting under the Caribbean plate (Figure l). The trench region may pose significant seismic and tsunami hazards to Puerto Rico and the U.S.Virgin Islands, where 4 million U.S. citizens reside. Widespread damage in Puerto Rico and Hispaniola from an earthquake in 1787 was estimated to be the result of a magnitude 8 earthquake north of the islands [McCann et al., 2004]. A tsunami killed 40 people in NW Puerto Rico following a magnitude 7.3 earthquake in 1918 [Mercado and McCann, 1998]. Large landslide escarpments have been mapped on the seafloor north of Puerto Rico [Mercado et al., 2002; Schwab et al., 1991],although their ages are unknown.

  18. 78 FR 58273 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 7-Mayaguez, Puerto Rico: Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 7--Mayaguez, Puerto Rico: Notification of Proposed... Puerto Rico Industrial Development Company, grantee of FTZ 7, submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the FTZ Board on behalf of Patheon Puerto Rico, Inc. (Patheon) (formerly...

  19. Climate influence on dengue epidemics in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Jury, Mark R

    2008-10-01

    The variability of the insect-borne disease dengue in Puerto Rico was studied in relation to climatic variables in the period 1979-2005. Annual and monthly reported dengue cases were compared with precipitation and temperature data. Results show that the incidence of dengue in Puerto Rico was relatively constant over time despite global warming, possibly due to the offsetting effects of declining rainfall, improving health care and little change in population. Seasonal fluctuations of dengue were driven by rainfall increases from May to November. Year-to-year variability in dengue cases was positively related to temperature, but only weakly associated with local rainfall and an index of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Climatic conditions were mapped with respect to dengue cases and patterns in high and low years were compared. During epidemics, a low pressure system east of Florida draws warm humid air over the northwestern Caribbean. Long-term trends in past observed and future projected rainfall and temperatures were studied. Rainfall has declined slowly, but temperatures in the Caribbean are rising with the influence of global warming. Thus, dengue may increase in the future, and it will be necessary to anticipate dengue epidemics using climate forecasts, to reduce adverse health impacts. PMID:18821372

  20. Control of schistosomiasis in Guayama and Arroyo, Puerto Rico*

    PubMed Central

    Jobin, William R.; Ferguson, Frederick F.; Palmer, Juan R.

    1970-01-01

    In 1953, a programme to control schistosomiasis mansoni was started in Guayama and Arroyo, Puerto Rico, employing, first, chemical and, later, both biological and chemical methods to control Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail host of Schistosoma mansoni. Sodium pentachlorophenate was the molluscicide, and an ampullarid snail, Marisa cornuarietis, was used for biological control in ponds and reservoirs. In addition some chemotherapy was given to infected persons. The prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis was measured annually, sampling about one-third of the 6-year-old population in Guayama and Arroyo and in Caguas, an untreated area. Costs of the programme and the results are discussed in relation to similar projects in other parts of Puerto Rico. In Guayama and Arroyo the prevalence of schistosomiasis reached zero in 6-year-olds by 1966 despite the persistence of the disease in a nearby untreated area. Although this decline appeared related to the control effort, it is noted that a large decline also occurred in the untreated area, suggesting the influence of other factors such as economic development or improvements in sanitation. PMID:5309511

  1. Modelling of Rainfall Induced Landslides in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepore, C.; Arnone, E.; Sivandran, G.; Noto, L. V.; Bras, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    We performed an island-wide determination of static landslide susceptibility and hazard assessment as well as dynamic modeling of rainfall-induced shallow landslides in a particular hydrologic basin. Based on statistical analysis of past landslides, we determined that reliable prediction of the susceptibility to landslides is strongly dependent on the resolution of the digital elevation model (DEM) employed and the reliability of the rainfall data. A distributed hydrology model, Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN)-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator with VEGetation Generator for Interactive Evolution (tRIBS-VEGGIE), tRIBS-VEGGIE, has been implemented for the first time in a humid tropical environment like Puerto Rico and validated against in-situ measurements. A slope-failure module has been added to tRIBS-VEGGIE’s framework, after analyzing several failure criterions to identify the most suitable for our application; the module is used to predict the location and timing of landsliding events. The Mameyes basin, located in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in Puerto Rico, was selected for modeling based on the availability of soil, vegetation, topographical, meteorological and historic landslide data. Application of the model yields a temporal and spatial distribution of predicted rainfall-induced landslides.

  2. Atmospheric controls on Puerto Rico precipitation using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramseyer, Craig A.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The growing need for local climate change scenarios has given rise to a wide range of empirical climate downscaling techniques. One of the most critical decisions in these methodologies is the selection of appropriate predictor variables for the downscaled surface predictand. A systematic approach to selecting predictor variables should be employed to ensure that the most important variables are utilized for the study site where the climate change scenarios are being developed. Tropical study areas have been far less examined than mid- and high-latitudes in the climate downscaling literature. As a result, studies analyzing optimal predictor variables for tropics are limited. The objectives of this study include developing artificial neural networks for six sites around Puerto Rico to develop nonlinear functions between 37 atmospheric predictor variables and local rainfall. The relative importance of each predictor is analyzed to determine the most important inputs in the network. Randomized ANNs are produced to determine the statistical significance of the relative importance of each predictor variable. Lower tropospheric moisture and winds are shown to be the most important variables at all sites. Results show inter-site variability in u- and v-wind importance depending on the unique geographic situation of the site. Lower tropospheric moisture and winds are physically linked to variability in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and the strength and position of the North Atlantic High Pressure cell (NAHP). The changes forced by anthropogenic climate change in regional SSTs and the NAHP will impact rainfall variability in Puerto Rico.

  3. Potential causes for amphibian declines in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burrowes, P.A.; Joglar, R.L.; Green, David E.

    2004-01-01

    We monitored 11 populations of eight species of Eleutherodactylus in Puerto Rico from 1989 through 2001. We determined relative abundance of active frogs along transects established in the Caribbean National Forest (El Yunque), Carite Forest, San Lorenzo, and in the vicinity of San Juan. Three species (Eleutherodactylus karlschmidti, E. jasperi, and E. eneidae) are presumed to be extinct and eight populations of six different species of endemic Eleutherodactylus are significantly declining at elevations above 400 m. Of the many suspected causes of amphibian declines around the world, we focused on climate change and disease. Temperature and precipitation data from 1970a??2000 were analyzed to determine the general pattern of oscillations and deviations that could be correlated with amphibian declines. We examined a total of 106 tissues taken from museum specimens collected from 1961a??1978 and from live frogs in 2000. We found chytrid fungi in two species collected at El Yunque as early as 1976, this is the first report of chytrid fungus in the Caribbean. Analysis of weather data indicates a significant warming trend and an association between years with extended periods of drought and the decline of amphibians in Puerto Rico. The 1970's and 1990's, which represent the periods of amphibian extirpations and declines, were significantly drier than average. We suggest a possible synergistic interaction between drought and the pathological effect of the chytrid fungus on amphibian populations.

  4. Anal Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P.; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Torres-Cintrón, Mariela; Mercado-Acosta, Juan José; Suárez, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anal cancer is a rare tumor that is associated with oncogenic HPV genotypes. This study aims to compare the age-standardized rates (ASRs) of anal cancer incidence and mortality in men and women living in Puerto Rico (PR) with those of non-Hispanic whites (NHW), non-Hispanic blacks (NHB), and Hispanics (USH) living in the continental United States (US). Methods ASRs were calculated based on cancer data that came from the PR Cancer Central Registry and from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. The age-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) were estimated using Poisson regression models. Results Comparing the period of 2001 to 2004 to that of 1992 to 1996, the incidence of anal cancer increased among NHW, NHB, and PR men. In females, an increase in the incidence was observed for all racial groups except for Puerto Rican women. When evaluating findings by age groups, Puerto Rican men younger than 60 years old had a 20% higher incidence of anal cancer than did USH men of the same age strata (RR: 2.20; 95% CI = 1.48–3.29). However, Puerto Rican females had a lower incidence of anal cancer than NHW and NHB women. An increased percent change in mortality was observed only in NHW and NHB men. A decreasing trend was observed in all racial/ethnic groups except for NHW women. Conclusion Our results support the notion that there are racial/ethnic differences in anal cancer incidence and mortality, with potential disparities among men and women in PR compared with USH men and women. Given the increasing incidence trends in anal cancer, particularly among PR, NHW, and NHB men, further investigation is needed to better elucidate screening practices that can aid in the prevention of anal cancer. PMID:23781623

  5. Important considerations for recruiting women to cancer genetics studies in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    August, Euna M; Quinn, Gwen P; Perales, Rossybelle; Closser, Zuheily; Dutil, Julie; Puig, Marieva; Vadaparampil, Susan T

    2012-03-01

    A goal of the Minority Institution/Cancer Center Partnership between the Ponce School of Medicine in Puerto Rico and the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute in Florida is to provide cross-cultural training in cancer research. This is achieved through a collaborative summer exchange program, which provides US students with an opportunity to conduct research in Puerto Rico. As part of this program, students recruited participants and collected data for a study to enhance the understanding of sociocultural factors among Puerto Rican women regarding genetic testing for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer. Limited studies have examined cancer genetics issues among Latinos, particularly those specific to the various Latino subgroups, such as Puerto Ricans. As a result of the student training experience, culturally appropriate strategies for the recruitment of women in Puerto Rico have been identified. These recommendations can inform the design of cancer research projects and interventions targeting the Puerto Rican population. PMID:21866412

  6. Important Considerations for Recruiting Women to Cancer Genetics Studies in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    August, Euna M.; Quinn, Gwen P.; Perales, Rossybelle; Closser, Zuheily; Dutil, Julie; Puig, Marieva; Vadaparampil, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    A goal of the Minority Institution/Cancer Center Partnership between the Ponce School of Medicine in Puerto Rico and the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute in Florida is to provide cross-cultural training in cancer research. This is achieved through a collaborative summer exchange program, which provides US students with an opportunity to conduct research in Puerto Rico. As part of this program, students recruited participants and collected data for a study to enhance the understanding of sociocultural factors among Puerto Rican women regarding genetic testing for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer. Limited studies have examined cancer genetics issues among Latinos, particularly those specific to the various Latino subgroups, such as Puerto Ricans. As a result of the student training experience, culturally appropriate strategies for the recruitment of women in Puerto Rico have been identified. These recommendations can inform the design of cancer research projects and interventions targeting the Puerto Rican population. PMID:21866412

  7. "i saw puerto rico once": A Review of the Literature on Puerto Rican Families and School Achievement in the United States. Report No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidalgo, Nitza M.

    Representing part of the first phase of a 5-year ethnographic research project, this report investigates the ways in which Puerto Rican families influence their children's school achievement. The report examines the history of Puerto Rico and the migration of Puerto Ricans to the United States. Puerto Rican community organizations, both local and…

  8. The Puerto Rico Component of the National Tsunami Hazard and Mitigation Program Pr-Nthmp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerfano Moreno, V. A.; Hincapie-Cardenas, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunami hazard assessment, detection, warning, education and outreach efforts are intended to reduce losses to life and property. The Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN) is participating in an effort with local and federal agencies, to developing tsunami hazard risk reduction strategies under the National Tsunami Hazards and Mitigation Program (NTHMP). This grant supports the TsunamiReady program which is the base of the tsunami preparedness and mitigation in PR. The Caribbean region has a documented history of damaging tsunamis that have affected coastal areas. The seismic water waves originating in the prominent fault systems around PR are considered to be a near-field hazard for Puerto Rico and the Virgin islands (PR/VI) because they can reach coastal areas within a few minutes after the earthquake. Sources for local, regional and tele tsunamis have been identified and modeled and tsunami evacuation maps were prepared for PR. These maps were generated in three phases: First, hypothetical tsunami scenarios on the basis of the parameters of potential underwater earthquakes were developed. Secondly, each of these scenarios was simulated. The third step was to determine the worst case scenario (MOM). The run-ups were drawn on GIS referenced maps and aerial photographs. These products are being used by emergency managers to educate the public and develop mitigation strategies. Online maps and related evacuation products are available to the public via the PR-TDST (PR Tsunami Decision Support Tool). Currently all the 44 coastal municipalities were recognized as TsunamiReady by the US NWS. The main goal of the program is to declare Puerto Rico as TsunamiReady, including two cities that are not coastal but could be affected by tsunamis. Based on these evacuation maps, tsunami signs were installed, vulnerability profiles were created, communication systems to receive and disseminate tsunami messages were installed in each TWFP, and tsunami response plans were approved. Also, the existing tsunami protocol and criteria in the PR/VI was updated. This paper describes the PR-NTHMP project, including the real time earthquake and tsunami monitoring as well as the specific protocols used to broadcast tsunami messages. The paper highlights tsunami hazards assessment, detection, warning, education and outreach in Puerto Rico.

  9. CDF and PDF Comparison Between Humacao, Puerto Rico and Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Rosana

    2004-01-01

    The knowledge of the atmospherics phenomenon is an important part in the communication system. The principal factor that contributes to the attenuation in a Ka band communication system is the rain attenuation. We have four years of tropical region observations. The data in the tropical region was taken in Humacao, Puerto Rico. Previous data had been collected at various climate regions such as desserts, template area and sub-tropical regions. Figure 1 shows the ITU-R rain zone map for North America. Rain rates are important to the rain attenuation prediction models. The models that predict attenuation generally are of two different kinds. The first one is the regression models. By using a data set these models provide an idea of the observed attenuation and rain rates distribution in the present, past and future. The second kinds of models are physical models which use the probability density functions (PDF).

  10. AIDS-Related Stigma and Health Professionals in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Torres, Yamilette; Cintrón-Bou, Francheska N.; Varas-Díaz, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses an important issue in the AIDS epidemic in Puerto Rico: AIDS stigma among health professionals and health profession students. AIDS stigma has been documented among health services providers such as doctors, nurses, psychologists, and social workers. It has detrimental effects of the services provided and the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The main objective of this study was to explore AIDS stigma manifestations among a sample composed of eighty health professionals and health profession students who participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Four thematic categories stemmed from the data analysis process. These addressed the following subjects: social manifestations of stigma, stigma manifestations in the workplace, use of sensitive information to control PLWHA, and surveillance of PLWHA. Participants manifested instances of stigmatization they had witnessed in their work and training scenarios. Furthermore, they elaborated on the need to place effective surveillance mechanism on PLWHA in order to control the epidemic. PMID:21423837

  11. A rainfall intensity-duration threshold for landslides in a humid- tropical environment, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, M.C.; Simon, A.

    1993-01-01

    The leading cause of landslides in Puerto Rico is intense and/or prolonged rainfall. A rainfall threshold for rainfall-triggered landsliding is delimited by 256 storms that occurred between 1959 and 1991 in the central mountains of Puerto Rico, where mean annual rainfall is close to or in excess of 2000mm. Forty-one of the 256 storms produced intense and/or prolonged rainfall that resulted in tens to hundreds of landslides. As storm durations approach 100 h, the rainfall conditions necessary to initiate landsliding in Puerto Rico converge with those defined for temperate regions. -from Authors

  12. [Bioethical principles: planning and advance directives in Puerto Rico].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Rivera, José; Ferrer, Jorge J

    2009-01-01

    The libertarian principles of Personal Autonomy and Personalized Justice which grew mightily in the rapidly spreading young American democracy in the 18th and 19th centuries led to the development of Bioethics in the United States. The bioethical principles of Respect for Autonomy, Beneficence, non-Maleficence and Justice support the elaboration of advance directives (living will and the designation of a proxy to attend health matters) for when the patient is no longer capable to make health decisions. Advance directives can be drafted and signed in Puerto Rico with the help of a lawyer. They can also be legally prepared in a doctor's office or in a hospital if witnessed by a doctor and two persons who will not benefit from the patient's demise or are directly involved in his/her care). We present a model for advance directives which may be executed in a doctor's office or a hospital. The model fulfills the legal requirements of Puerto Rico Law 160 which became effective November 2001. It also fulfills requirements of the Patients Self-Determination Act that became effective in 1991.The document also contains standard options for organ donations. We discuss the fundamental bioethical principles which have given root to the development of the advance directives. We suggest that it may be economically advantageous to health insurance carriers to compensate physicians who help their patients in the execution of a valid document. The existence of this document may help prevent the large expenses associated with inappropriate admissions to intensive care of patients at the end-of-life. PMID:19954090

  13. 75 FR 40795 - Review of Sourcing Change, Foreign-Trade Subzone 61H, Baxter Healthcare of Puerto Rico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ... Board on February 25, 1997 (Board Order 875, 62 FR 10521, 3/7/1997) at the Baxter Healthcare of Puerto... period of five years. On August 25, 2003 (Board Order 1293, 68 FR 53346, 9/10/2003), the subzone was... Puerto Rico (Inhalation Anesthetics Manufacturing), Guayama, Puerto Rico Pursuant to the regulations...

  14. New seismic hazard maps for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, C.; Frankel, A.; Petersen, M.; Leyendecker, E.

    2010-01-01

    The probabilistic methodology developed by the U.S. Geological Survey is applied to a new seismic hazard assessment for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Modeled seismic sources include gridded historical seismicity, subduction-interface and strike-slip faults with known slip rates, and two broad zones of crustal extension with seismicity rates constrained by GPS geodesy. We use attenuation relations from western North American and worldwide data, as well as a Caribbean-specific relation. Results are presented as maps of peak ground acceleration and 0.2- and 1.0-second spectral response acceleration for 2% and 10% probabilities of exceedance in 50 years (return periods of about 2,500 and 500 years, respectively). This paper describes the hazard model and maps that were balloted by the Building Seismic Safety Council and recommended for the 2003 NEHRP Provisions and the 2006 International Building Code. ?? 2010, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  15. Puerto Rico State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The Puerto Rico State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Puerto Rico. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Puerto Rico. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Puerto Rico.

  16. And a Child Shall Lead Them: Learning Lives in the Project Hallways of Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesmith, Caryn

    2001-01-01

    Describes how Puerto Rico's teenage tutor, Jorge Aneudy Villalba, leads a children's learning crusade through an urban desert of poverty and despair, determined to prove the kids from the projects can make their own future. (Author/EV)

  17. First report of Tomato chlorotic spot virus in lettuce in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first report of Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) in lettuce in Puerto Rico. This report provides an overview of this virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scientists....

  18. 40 CFR 282.102 - Puerto Rico State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... program which make it more stringent, in accordance with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR..., Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board, 431 Ponce De Leon Avenue, Nacional Plaza, Suite 614, Hato...

  19. 77 FR 61381 - Foreign-Trade Zone 7-Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Authorization of Production Activity, Baxter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... (15 CFR part 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 36997, 6/20... Activity, Baxter Healthcare of Puerto Rico, (Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Intravenous Bags...

  20. Health effects associated with cyanobacteria exposure among beach attendees in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanobacteria and their toxins are associated with adverse human health effects, although among marine waters, the pyrrhophyta, including dinoflagellates are more recognized as health hazards. We recruited beach attendees during summer 2009, at Boquern Beach, Puerto Rico...

  1. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Puerto Rico (Fact Sheet); NREL(National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico - a U.S. territory located about 60 miles east of the Dominican Republic and directly west of the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  2. Coral reef condition and benthic sedimentation threat in four regions of south Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scleractinian corals, gorgonian octocorals, sponges and fishes were assessed near the cities of LaParguera, Gunica, Guayanilla, and Jobos along the southern coast of Puerto Rico in November December 2010. Survey sites were targeted near areas with varying benthic...

  3. Mold populations and dust mite allergen concentrations in house dust samples from across Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lifetime childhood asthma prevalence (LCAP) percentages in Puerto Rico HealthRegions (HR) are substantially higher in northeastern vs. southwestern HR. Higheraverage relative humidity in the northeast might promote mold and mite exposuresand possibly asthma prevalence. To test th...

  4. Health effects associated with cyanobacteria exposure among beach attendees in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanobacteria and their toxins are associated with adverse human health effects, although among marine waters, the pyrrhophyta, including dinoflagellates are more recognized as health hazards. We recruited beach attendees during summer 2009, at Boquerón Beach, Puerto Rico...

  5. New Seafloor Map of the Puerto Rico Trench Helps Assess Earthquake and Tsunami Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brink, Uri; Danforth, William; Polloni, Christopher; Andrews, Brian; Llanes, Pilar; Smith, Shepard; Parker, Eugene; Uozumi, Toshihiko

    2004-09-01

    The Puerto Rico Trench, the deepest part of the Atlantic Ocean, is located where the North American (NOAM) plate is subducting under the Caribbean plate (Figure 1). The trench region may pose significant seismic and tsunami hazards to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, where 4 million U.S. citizens reside. Widespread damage in Puerto Rico and Hispaniola from an earthquake in 1787 was estimated to be the result of a magnitude 8 earthquake north of the islands. A tsunami killed 40 people in NW Puerto Rico following a magnitude 7.3 earthquake in 1918. Large landslide escarpments have been mapped on the seafloor north of Puerto Rico, although their ages are unknown. The Puerto Rico Trench is atypical of oceanic trenches. Subduction is highly oblique (10°-20°) to the trench axis with a large component of left-lateral strike-slip motion. Similar convergence geometry is observed at the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench, the deepest point on Earth. In addition to its extremely deep seafloor, the Puerto Rico Trench is also characterized by the most negative free-air gravity anomaly on Earth, -380 mGal, located 50 km south of the trench, where water depth is 7950 m (Figure 2). A tilted carbonate platform provides evidence for extreme vertical tectonism in the region. This platform was horizontally deposited over Cretaceous to Paleocene arc rocks starting in the Late Oligocene. Then, at 3.5 Ma, the carbonate platform was tilted by 4° toward the trench over a time period of less than 40 kyr, such that its northern edge is at a depth of 4000 m and its reconstructed elevation on land in Puerto Rico is at +1300 m (Figures 1 and 2).

  6. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals §...

  7. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals §...

  8. Self-Identity and Bilingualism among Adolescent Return Migrants to Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucca-Irizarry, Nydia; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Migrant Puerto Rican children born or raised in the United States who moved to Puerto Rico during adolescence experienced drastic changes in their self-esteem and self-identity; in family and interpersonal relations; and in their relations with broader aspects of the new environment, including its physical, interpersonal, and cultural dimensions.…

  9. Plant Exploration in tropical forests of Puerto Rico to collect ornamental germplasm.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In May, 2005, an ornamental plant exploration trip was conducted in remnant forests of Puerto Rico. The main focus of this collection trip was Tabebuia haemantha, a rare Puerto Rican endemic that has many features of interest to horticulture. It is a small-statured tree, evergreen, red-flowered an...

  10. Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Rincon, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2003-02-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to consent to a proposal by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow public access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) reactor building located near Rincon, Puerto Rico for use as a museum. PREPA, the owner of the BONUS facility, has determined that the historical significance of this facility, as one of only two reactors of this design ever constructed in the world, warrants preservation in a museum, and that this museum would provide economic benefits to the local community through increased tourism. Therefore, PREPA is proposing development of the BONUS facility as a museum.

  11. Assessment of Genetic Diversity of Sweet Potato in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Cuevas, Hugo E.; Montero-Rojas, Milly; Bird-Pico, Fernando; Luciano-Rosario, Dianiris; Siritunga, Dimuth

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand for food and the need for conservation of agricultural and genetic resources. In Puerto Rico (PR), the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been poorly understood, although it has been part of the diet since Pre-Columbus time. Thus, 137 landraces from different localities around PR were collected and subjected to a genetic diversity analysis using 23 SSR-markers. In addition, 8 accessions from a collection grown in Gurabo, PR at the Agricultural Experimental Station (GAES), 10 US commercial cultivars and 12 Puerto Rican accessions from the USDA repository collection were included in this assessment. The results of the analysis of the 23 loci showed 255 alleles in the 167 samples. Observed heterozygosity was high across populations (0.71) while measurements of total heterozygosity revealed a large genetic diversity throughout the population and within populations. UPGMA clustering method revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 contained 12 PR accessions from the USDA repository collection, while cluster 2 consisted of PR landraces, US commercial cultivars and the PR accessions from GAES. Population structure analysis grouped PR landraces in five groups including four US commercial cultivars. Our study shows the presence of a high level of genetic diversity of sweet potato across PR which can be related to the genetic makeup of sweet potato, human intervention and out-crossing nature of the plant. The history of domestication and dispersal of sweet potato in the Caribbean and the high levels of genetic diversity found through this study makes sweet potato an invaluable resource that needs to be protected and further studied. PMID:25551388

  12. Assessment of genetic diversity of sweet potato in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Cuevas, Hugo E; Montero-Rojas, Milly; Bird-Pico, Fernando; Luciano-Rosario, Dianiris; Siritunga, Dimuth

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand for food and the need for conservation of agricultural and genetic resources. In Puerto Rico (PR), the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been poorly understood, although it has been part of the diet since Pre-Columbus time. Thus, 137 landraces from different localities around PR were collected and subjected to a genetic diversity analysis using 23 SSR-markers. In addition, 8 accessions from a collection grown in Gurabo, PR at the Agricultural Experimental Station (GAES), 10 US commercial cultivars and 12 Puerto Rican accessions from the USDA repository collection were included in this assessment. The results of the analysis of the 23 loci showed 255 alleles in the 167 samples. Observed heterozygosity was high across populations (0.71) while measurements of total heterozygosity revealed a large genetic diversity throughout the population and within populations. UPGMA clustering method revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 contained 12 PR accessions from the USDA repository collection, while cluster 2 consisted of PR landraces, US commercial cultivars and the PR accessions from GAES. Population structure analysis grouped PR landraces in five groups including four US commercial cultivars. Our study shows the presence of a high level of genetic diversity of sweet potato across PR which can be related to the genetic makeup of sweet potato, human intervention and out-crossing nature of the plant. The history of domestication and dispersal of sweet potato in the Caribbean and the high levels of genetic diversity found through this study makes sweet potato an invaluable resource that needs to be protected and further studied. PMID:25551388

  13. Floods of September 6, 1960, in eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne; Bogart, Dean Butler

    1961-01-01

    The floods of September 6, 1960, were the greatest known on many streams in eastern Puerto Rico. There were 117 lives lost, 30 persons missing, and 136 injured. Total damage was estimated in excess of $7 million. Several thousand persons were forced from their homes by the floods as 484, houses were destroyed and more than 3,600 others were. damaged. All main highways and most secondary roads were impassable for a short period during the floods and damage to them was heavy. Following the passage of Hurricane Donna off the northeast coast, rains of very high intensity fell over parts of the eastern half of the island, beginning about 9 p.m. September 5. By dawn September 6, rains totaling more than 10 inches over a large area produced floods in every river basin from the Rio Grande de Manati eastward. Flood discharges on the Rio Humacao, Rio Turabo, and Rio Valenciano were the greatest known and rank high among the notable floods on streams that drain from 6 to ]5 square miles. An outstanding feature of the floods was the unusually high magnitude of peak discharges--9 of the 24 peak discharges determined had Myers ratings greater than 80 percent.

  14. Effects of Aerosol PSD on Precipitation in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho, S. M.; Hosannah, N.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of aerosols on clouds and on the climate remains an uncertainty, however, it is of great importance to determine their effects on the formation of clouds and on precipitation. The objective is to study the effects of aerosol particle concentrations on precipitation. The is goal is, by using the aerosols particle size distribution (PSD) data from the Island of Puerto Rico (PR) located in the Caribbean, to better predict precipitation in PR and other Caribbean regions that are heavily exposed to naturally occurring maritime and continental aerosols (ex. Sea Salt, Saharan Dust). The aerosol PSD, and precipitation data values for the study was collected, respectively, from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). The data from three sites, Mayaguez (Western Region), La Parguera (Southwestern Region) and San Juan (Northeastern Region), was analyzed to determine and formulate seasonal and intra-seasonal relationships. PSD's were analyzed for fine and coarse mode size distributions and seasonal concentrations. Correlations between these variables with precipitation climatologies were identified. Correlations of concentrations of fine/course modes with suppression/enhancement of Caribbean precipitation in early rainfall, mid-summer droughts and rainfall seasons are formulated and hypotheses are established to comprehend these effects. Episodic and mean events are analyzed to justify these observations.

  15. Biodegradation of toxic chemicals in Guayanilla Bay, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Baqar R; Hinkey, Lynne M; Rodríguez, Nydia R; Govind, Nadathur S; Imam, Syed H

    2003-04-01

    Studies were conducted to assess the factors that may influence the rate and extent of biodegradation of biphenyl, naphthalene, phenanthrene, pentachlorophenol (PCP) and p-nitrophenol in water samples collected from the Guayanilla Bay (18 degrees N; 67.45 degrees W), southwest of Puerto Rico. In vitro studies mediated slow degradation of biphenyl, naphthalene and phenanthrene substrates by natural microbial flora present in the Bay. Addition of KNO(3) as a source of inorganic N greatly enhanced the degradation of phenanthrene but not of naphthalene, suggesting that effects on degradation due to nutrient limitation were compound specific. The rate and extent of degradation of naphthalene and PCP were higher in water samples collected closer to the source of contamination, i.e. the petrochemical complex. The identity of a phenanthrene degrading bacterium, previously identified by conventional phenotypic method (Zaidi et al., Utilizing Nature's Advanced Materials, Oxford Unviersity Press, 1999) as Alteromonas sp., was confirmed by partial DNA sequencing of the small subunit rRNA gene. PMID:12705914

  16. Radar investigation of barium releases over Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djuth, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) El Coqui rocket campaign was successfully carried out in Puerto Rico during the period 18 May through 12 July 1992. This report describes five chemical release experiments in the upper ionosphere supported by Geospace Research, Inc. during the El Coqui campaign. Additional spin-off science is also discussed. The El Coqui releases are designated AA-1 (rocket 36-082), AA-2 (rocket 36-081), AA-3b (rocket 36-064), AA-4 (rocket 36-065), and AA-7 (rocket 36-083). Particular attention is paid to releases AA-2 and AA-4. These two experiments involved the illumination of ionospheric release regions with powerful high-frequency (HF) radio waves transmitted from the Arecibo HF facility. In the AA-2 experiment, microinstabilities excited by the HF wave in a Ba(+) plasma were examined. This release yielded a smooth plasma cloud that helped clarify several fundamental issues regarding the physics of wave plasma instabilities. During AA-2 extremely strong HF-induced Langmuir turbulence was detected with the Arecibo 430 MHz radar. CF3Br was released in the AA-4 study to create an ionospheric hole that focused the HF beam. This experiment successfully explored wave-plasma coupling in an O(+) ionosphere under conditions of very high HF electric field strengths.

  17. Puerto Rico water resources planning model program description

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, D.W.; Maddock, Thomas; Karlinger, M.R.; Lloyd, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    Because the use of the Mathematical Programming System -Extended (MPSX) to solve large linear and mixed integer programs requires the preparation of many input data cards, a matrix generator program to produce the MPSX input data from a much more limited set of data may expedite the use of the mixed integer programming optimization technique. The Model Definition and Control Program (MODCQP) is intended to assist a planner in preparing MPSX input data for the Puerto Rico Water Resources Planning Model. The model utilizes a mixed-integer mathematical program to identify a minimum present cost set of water resources projects (diversions, reservoirs, ground-water fields, desalinization plants, water treatment plants, and inter-basin transfers of water) which will meet a set of future water demands and to determine their sequence of construction. While MODCOP was specifically written to generate MPSX input data for the planning model described in this report, the program can be easily modified to reflect changes in the model's mathematical structure.

  18. 10x10 comes full circle: Spanish version back to United States in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Alvaro; Joglar, Francisco; de Quirs, Fernn Gonzlez Bernaldo; Baum, Anala; Fernndez, Antonio; Garca, Sofa; Arredondo, Antonio Lpez; Hersh, William R

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation of the 10x10 certificate program in health information systems for a Puerto Rican audience is described. The 10x10 program was initially developed in the USA by the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU), then adapted to Latin America by Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires. Puerto Rico is in the intersection of the United States and Latin America, in terms of government, health care system, culture and language. Therefore, it seemed reasonable to re-adapt the program back to the USA, in Spanish, taking into account these facts and the experience of the team in delivering blended learning adapted to local needs. Forty professionals from Puerto Rico are currently taking the first version of the course, supported by the Regional Extension Center for Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands, and endorsed by the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA). PMID:23920908

  19. 27 CFR 17.5 - Products manufactured in Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands. 17.5 Section 17.5 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... Rico or the Virgin Islands. For additional provisions regarding drawback on distilled spirits contained....S. Virgin Islands, see part 26, subparts I and Ob, of this chapter....

  20. 27 CFR 17.5 - Products manufactured in Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands. 17.5 Section 17.5 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... Rico or the Virgin Islands. For additional provisions regarding drawback on distilled spirits contained....S. Virgin Islands, see part 26, subparts I and Ob, of this chapter....

  1. 27 CFR 17.5 - Products manufactured in Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands. 17.5 Section 17.5 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... Rico or the Virgin Islands. For additional provisions regarding drawback on distilled spirits contained....S. Virgin Islands, see part 26, subparts I and Ob, of this chapter....

  2. 27 CFR 17.5 - Products manufactured in Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands. 17.5 Section 17.5 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... Rico or the Virgin Islands. For additional provisions regarding drawback on distilled spirits contained....S. Virgin Islands, see part 26, subparts I and Ob, of this chapter....

  3. 27 CFR 17.5 - Products manufactured in Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands. 17.5 Section 17.5 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... Rico or the Virgin Islands. For additional provisions regarding drawback on distilled spirits contained....S. Virgin Islands, see part 26, subparts I and Ob, of this chapter....

  4. Modular Sequence: Puerto Rican Pupils in Mainland Schools. TTP 003.07. The Educational System in Puerto Rico. Teacher Corps Bilingual Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Univ., West Hartford, CT. Coll. of Education.

    This module provides readers with a comprehensive view of the historical development of education in Puerto Rico, including the present. Upon completion of this module, participants will be able to (a) describe significant historical developments of the educational system in Puerto Rico, (b) compare/contrast philosophical and structural…

  5. Los Jovenes en Puerto Rico: ?Quienes Son y Que Hacen? (The Youth of Puerto Rico: Who Are They and What Do They Do?).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roldan, Norma Rodriguez

    1993-01-01

    Answers questions about young people in Puerto Rico, drawing on governmental databases. Demographic characteristics and how young people fit into the social structure are described. A description of the physical and mental health of this population presents data on mortality, morbidity, adolescent pregnancy, and drug and alcohol use. (SLD)

  6. RH: DUBEY ET AL.-TOXOPLASMA GONDII FROM CATS IN PUERTO RICO MOUSE VIRULENT TOXOPLASMA GONDII ISOLATED FROM FERALCATS IN MONA ISLAND, PUERTO RICO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cats are essential in the life cycle of Toxoplasma gondii because they are the only hosts that can excrete the environmentally-resistant oocysts. Samples of serum, feces, and tissues from cats from Mona, a remote island off the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies t...

  7. Local Transmission of Zika Virus - Puerto Rico, November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dana L; Sharp, Tyler M; Torres, Jomil; Armstrong, Paige A; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge; Ryff, Kyle R; Martinez-Quiñones, Alma; Arias-Berríos, José; Mayshack, Marrielle; Garayalde, Glenn J; Saavedra, Sonia; Luciano, Carlos A; Valencia-Prado, Miguel; Waterman, Steve; Rivera-García, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, spread to the Region of the Americas (Americas) in mid-2015, and appears to be related to congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome (1,2). On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the occurrence of microcephaly cases in association with Zika virus infection to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.* On December 31, 2015, Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) reported the first locally acquired (index) case of Zika virus disease in a jurisdiction of the United States in a patient from southeastern Puerto Rico. During November 23, 2015-January 28, 2016, passive and enhanced surveillance for Zika virus disease identified 30 laboratory-confirmed cases. Most (93%) patients resided in eastern Puerto Rico or the San Juan metropolitan area. The most frequently reported signs and symptoms were rash (77%), myalgia (77%), arthralgia (73%), and fever (73%). Three (10%) patients were hospitalized. One case occurred in a patient hospitalized for Guillain-Barré syndrome, and one occurred in a pregnant woman. Because the most common mosquito vector of Zika virus, Aedes aegypti, is present throughout Puerto Rico, Zika virus is expected to continue to spread across the island. The public health response in Puerto Rico is being coordinated by PRDH with assistance from CDC. Clinicians in Puerto Rico should report all cases of microcephaly, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and suspected Zika virus disease to PRDH. Other adverse reproductive outcomes, including fetal demise associated with Zika virus infection, should be reported to PRDH. To avoid infection with Zika virus, residents of and visitors to Puerto Rico, particularly pregnant women, should strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites, including wearing pants and long-sleeved shirts, using permethrin-treated clothing and gear, using an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent, and ensuring that windows and doors have intact screens. PMID:26890470

  8. Ocean-Bottom Seismograph Array Results from the Puerto Rico Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meighan, H. E.; Pulliam, J.; Ten Brink, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    A six-month deployment of five ocean-bottom seismographs (OBS) in 2007 provided unique geometrical constraints on the style of faulting in a sharp corner of the boundary between North America (NOAM) and Caribbean (CAR) plates to the east of the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT). This region has been the site of numerous seismic swarms since 1976, as indicated by the historical catalog, and the OBS deployment capture two such swarms. When analyzed jointly with land-based stations operated by the Puerto Rico Seismic Network and Netherlands Antilles Network, the OBS recordings provide stronger geometrical constraints on hypocenters and focal mechanisms than is possible with land-based stations alone. Focal mechanism solutions, found by jointly fitting P-wave first-motion polarities and S/P amplitude ratios, produce left-lateral strike-slip and normal dip-slip events distributed broadly over the study region, but a sub-area dominated by right-lateral strike-slip events that corresponds to the two recorded swarms. A stress inversion reveals maximum horizontal compressive stress vectors for the broader region that are aligned with the local direction of NOAM-CAR plate convergence, as determined by previous studies, but the sub-area in which the swarms occurred is dominated by horizontal stresses that are nearly normal to the direction of convergence. When evaluated in the context of previous studies, these results support the hypothesis that the subducting NOAM plate is tearing, or crumpling, in this corner of the boundary. Tearing may result as the subducting slab accommodates the sharp bend here, as a response to mantle flow from CAR to NOAM regimes, or as a result of eastward propagation of the dramatic PRT, or as a combination of these events.

  9. The Great Puerto Rico ShakeOut - A Communications and Media Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Cordero, L.; Huérfano-Moreno, V.; Gómez, G.; Giménez-Porrata, A.; Ramos-Gómez, W.; Colón-Daleccio, N.

    2012-12-01

    On October 18, 2012 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN) in collaboration with Puerto Rico Emergency Management Agency (PREMA) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will be conducting the first Great Puerto Rico ShakeOut. Adequate communications strategies and redundant dissemination methods are a key component for the success of this earthquake exercise. EAS and NOAA Radio messages, indicating the beginning of the earthquake drill, will help emergency managers and the general public better coordinate their practices. Dissemination tools routinely used as part of PRSN earthquake and tsunami protocols, such as PRSNDANIS Broadcast, Ring Down, Ham Radio, RSS, SMS, fax and email service lists, will also be tested. Emergency Management and First Response Agencies at local, regional and state level are being asked to report the times the messages are received, thus allowing us to better assess the effectiveness of our dissemination methods and to establish a baseline for next year ShakeOut. In addition, a partnership with the Puerto Rico Radiobroadcaster Association allows a direct access through this media, facilitating PRSN staff participation on radio programming targeting diverse audiences. Radio spots have been developed to inform the public about the exercise, how to participate, what to do to be safe during an earthquake and how to develop or improve their safety plans. A media approach is critical for the success of the 2012 Puerto Rico ShakeOut since our earthquake drill takes place 2 weeks prior to the Island general election and on the peak-period of the hurricane season.

  10. Genetic structure of the gentle Africanized honey bee population (gAHB) in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Africanized honey bee is one of the most spectacular invasions in the Americas. African bees escaped from apiaries in Brazil in 1956, spread over Americas and by 1994 they were reported in Puerto Rico. In contrast to other places, the oceanic island conditions in Puerto Rico may mean a single introduction and different dynamics of the resident European and new-coming Africanized bees. To examine the genetic variation of honey bee feral populations and colonies from different locations in Puerto Rico, we used eight known polymorphic microsatellite loci. Results In Puerto Rico, gAHB population does not show any genetic structure (Fst = 0.0783), and is best described as one honey bee population, product of hybridization of AHB and EHB. The genetic variability in this Africanized population was similar to that reported in studies from Texas. We observed that European private allele frequencies are high in all but one locus. This contrasts with mainland Africanized populations, where European allele frequencies are diminished. Two loci with European private alleles, one on Linkage Group 7, known to carry two known defensiveness Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs), and the other on Linkage Group 1, known to carry three functionally studied genes and 11 candidate genes associated with Varroa resistance mechanisms were respectively, significantly greater or lower in European allele frequency than the other loci with European private alleles. Conclusions Genetic structure of Puerto Rico gAHB differs from mainland AHB populations, probably representing evolutionary processes on the island. PMID:23915100

  11. Energy Integrated dairy Farm System in Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Sasscer, D.S.; Morgan, T.O.

    1986-10-01

    Principles of energy-integrated farming were applied to the Rio Canas Dairy Farm, a privately-owned dairy farm and one of the largest dairy farms in Puerto Rico with a milking herd of 400 cows. Animal wastes were fed to two anaerobic digesters where methane gas was produced by bacterial degradation of organic material. The methane gas fueled an engine-generator to produce electricity for farm use and for sale to the public utility. The Wastes were partially stabilized by bacterial action with the digesters and the digester effluent passed to a liquid-solid separator. Solid fraction was composted and either used as bedding material for the cows or marketed as soil conditioner. The liquid fraction flowed to a storage pond and was used in the Greenfeed subsystem to fertilize forage crops for the cows. Estimated energy savings of the system were 1705 MBtu for the first two subsystems and 7,718 MBtu's for all three subsystems. Simple payback for the first two subsystems was very long (20 years) because facilities for effective manure recovery did not exist on the farm at the outset of the project, operational costs for manure collection were charged against the project, and system components were oversized. Including the Greenfeed subsystem, simple payback for the project was 8.2 years. Assuming that manure collection facilities and practices already existed and assuming proper sizing of all components, simple payback for the Anaerobic Digestion and Electrical Production subsystem and the Farm Waste Management subsystem was 5.8 years. Using data from this project, an estimate of the return on investment was projected for different herd sizes. Results suggested that for dairy farms with less than 500 cows, anaerobic digester systems are only marginally profitable.

  12. The ecology of Australorbis glabratus in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Harry, Harold W.; Aldrich, David V.

    1958-01-01

    Variations in the distribution of the water-snail Australorbis glabratus, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, have been studied in Puerto Rico, and an attempt made to correlate the distribution with environmental factors. The main sources of bilharziasis infection are flowing waters, but the evidence indicates that the snail is not found in fast-flowing, high-gradient reaches with falls of more than 20 meters per kilometre. The influence of physiographical features on stream gradient is examined and these findings correlated with the biota, water chemistry and human use of the stream. The alluvial areas of the island have many habitats favourable to A. glabratus and constitute the major foci for the transmission of bilharziasis. In general, artificial reservoirs and puddles do not appear to be suitable habitats for the snail. The numerous sink ponds in the Tertiary limestone area on the north coast contain the snail, yet the area is relatively free from bilharziasis, possibly because the ponds are little used. Although the size of A. glabratus populations is limited by many natural enemies, no organism has been found which could be deemed useful for artificial control. Some migratory birds, insects and amphibians may aid the dispersal of the snail. There are indications that the ionic composition of the water may be an important factor in limiting the distribution of A. glabratus. It is suggested that large amounts of carbonates and bicarbonates relative to the amounts of chlorides and sulfates may account for the absence of the snail from some habitats (e.g., limestone streams) and that copper and zinc may be limiting agents in some waters containing small amounts of dissolved solids. Concentrations of 0.050-0.100 p.p.m. of zinc, copper, cadmium or silver in distilled water produce a distress syndrome in the snails, and concentrations of more than 1.0 p.p.m. are rapidly fatal in most cases. PMID:13573114

  13. Contextual Risk and Promotive Processes in Puerto Rican Youths’ Internalizing Trajectories in Puerto Rico and New York

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Olazagasti, María A.; Shrout, Patrick E.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Canino, Glorisa J.; Bird, Héctor R.

    2012-01-01

    Research on ethnic-minority youths’ mental health has rarely examined developmental trajectories for the same ethnic group in contexts where they are a minority vs. where they are the majority, or mechanisms accounting for differences in trajectories across such contexts. This study examines Puerto Rican youth residing in two contexts -- one in which they are in their home culture of Puerto Rico, and one in which they are a minority group, in New York. We explore the relationship between social context, minority status, risk, resilience, and trajectories of internalizing symptoms after adjusting for factors related to migration. We found that youths’ reports of internalizing symptoms declined over time. Youth in New York had higher levels of internalizing symptoms than youth in Puerto Rico, but similar trajectories. Differences in internalizing symptoms across the two social contexts were accounted for by experiences of discrimination and exposure to violence. Parental monitoring was associated with fewer internalizing symptoms across the two sites, although this effect diminished over time. Contrary to what was expected, family religiosity was associated with higher levels of internalizing symptoms. This association was stronger in the New York than in the Puerto Rico site. PMID:23880390

  14. Contextual risk and promotive processes in Puerto Rican youths' internalizing trajectories in Puerto Rico and New York.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Olazagasti, María A; Shrout, Patrick E; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Canino, Glorisa J; Bird, Héctor R

    2013-08-01

    Research on ethnic-minority youths' mental health has rarely examined developmental trajectories for the same ethnic group in contexts where they are a minority versus where they are the majority or mechanisms accounting for differences in trajectories across such contexts. This study examines Puerto Rican youth residing in two contexts, one in which they are in their home culture of Puerto Rico and one in which they are a minority group, in New York. We explore the relationship among social context, minority status, risk, resilience, and trajectories of internalizing symptoms after adjusting for factors related to migration. We found that youths' reports of internalizing symptoms declined over time. Youths in New York had higher levels of internalizing symptoms than did youths in Puerto Rico, but they had similar trajectories. Differences in internalizing symptoms across the two social contexts were accounted for by experiences of discrimination and exposure to violence. Parental monitoring was associated with fewer internalizing symptoms across the two sites, although this effect diminished over time. Contrary to what was expected, family religiosity was associated with higher levels of internalizing symptoms. This association was stronger in New York than in the Puerto Rico site. PMID:23880390

  15. 7 CFR 319.73-3 - Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... QUARANTINE NOTICES Coffee § 319.73-3 Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii. (a) Mail. Samples of unroasted coffee that are transiting Hawaii or Puerto Rico en route... not limited to, sealed cartons, airtight containers, or vacuum packaging. Samples of unroasted...

  16. 7 CFR 319.73-3 - Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... QUARANTINE NOTICES Coffee § 319.73-3 Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii. (a) Mail. Samples of unroasted coffee that are transiting Hawaii or Puerto Rico en route... not limited to, sealed cartons, airtight containers, or vacuum packaging. Samples of unroasted...

  17. 7 CFR 319.73-3 - Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... QUARANTINE NOTICES Coffee § 319.73-3 Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii. (a) Mail. Samples of unroasted coffee that are transiting Hawaii or Puerto Rico en route... not limited to, sealed cartons, airtight containers, or vacuum packaging. Samples of unroasted...

  18. Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Questionnaire: Spanish for Puerto Rico Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulero-Portela, Ana L.; Colon-Santaella, Carmen L.; Cruz-Gomez, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire to Spanish for Puerto Rico. Five steps were followed for the cross-cultural adaptation: forward translations into Spanish for Puerto Rico, synthesis of the translations, back translations into English, revision by…

  19. 27 CFR 26.1 - Alcoholic products coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alcoholic products coming... AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Scope of Regulations § 26.1 Alcoholic products... taxes on taxable alcoholic products coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and the...

  20. 27 CFR 26.1 - Alcoholic products coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alcoholic products coming... AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Scope of Regulations § 26.1 Alcoholic products... taxes on taxable alcoholic products coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and the...

  1. 27 CFR 26.1 - Alcoholic products coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alcoholic products coming... AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Scope of Regulations § 26.1 Alcoholic products... taxes on taxable alcoholic products coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and the...

  2. 27 CFR 26.1 - Alcoholic products coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alcoholic products coming... AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Scope of Regulations § 26.1 Alcoholic products... taxes on taxable alcoholic products coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and the...

  3. 27 CFR 26.1 - Alcoholic products coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alcoholic products coming... AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Scope of Regulations § 26.1 Alcoholic products... taxes on taxable alcoholic products coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and the...

  4. 42 CFR 407.43 - Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and American Samoa.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the...) ENROLLMENT AND ENTITLEMENT State Buy-In Agreements § 407.43 Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and American Samoa. (a) Categories included in buy-in groups. The buy-in groups that...

  5. 42 CFR 407.43 - Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and American Samoa.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the...) ENROLLMENT AND ENTITLEMENT State Buy-In Agreements § 407.43 Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and American Samoa. (a) Categories included in buy-in groups. The buy-in groups that...

  6. 42 CFR 407.43 - Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and American Samoa.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the...) ENROLLMENT AND ENTITLEMENT State Buy-In Agreements § 407.43 Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and American Samoa. (a) Categories included in buy-in groups. The buy-in groups that...

  7. 42 CFR 407.43 - Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and American Samoa.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the...) ENROLLMENT AND ENTITLEMENT State Buy-In Agreements § 407.43 Buy-in groups available to Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and American Samoa. (a) Categories included in buy-in groups. The buy-in groups that...

  8. An Evaluation and Analysis of Past Landfill Closures in Puerto Rico as Guidance for Current and Future Closures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The island of Puerto Rico has faced several challenges related to the issue of closed landfills historically, many municipal landfills in Puerto Rico were not closed properly or abandoned, while others were closed in accordance with applicable rules but have sustained physical ...

  9. Public School Reform in Puerto Rico: Sustaining Colonial Models of Development. Contributions to the Study of Education, Number 60.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis, Jose

    Since 1898 the work of defining and realizing development in Puerto Rico has been carried out within the context of a political-economic relationship with the United States under colonialism. This book focuses on an assessment of the relationship between the history of educational reform policies in Puerto Rico and the issue of economic…

  10. 7 CFR 319.73-3 - Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Coffee § 319.73-3 Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii. (a) Mail. Samples of unroasted coffee that are transiting Hawaii or Puerto Rico en...

  11. 7 CFR 319.73-3 - Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Coffee § 319.73-3 Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii. (a) Mail. Samples of unroasted coffee that are transiting Hawaii or Puerto Rico en...

  12. First report of Raoiella indica Hirst (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) and its damage to coconut palms in Puerto Rico and Culebra Island

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first report of the occurrence of the Red Palm mite Raoiella indica and its damage in Puerto Rico and Culebra island. Raoiella indica is a new invasive pest threatening ornamental palm, coconut, and banana plantations. The mite was observed in eastern Puerto Rico and in Culebra island ...

  13. 78 FR 30270 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 61-San Juan, Puerto Rico, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Production Activity, Janssen Ortho LLC (Pharmaceutical Products Production), Gurabo, Puerto Rico The Puerto Rico Trade and Export Company, grantee of FTZ 61, submitted a notification of proposed production... production of various prescription and over-the-counter pharmaceutical products. Pursuant to 15 CFR...

  14. 75 FR 35315 - Improving Public Safety Communications in the 800 MHz Band; New 800 MHz Band Plan for Puerto Rico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... public safety and other land mobile communication systems operating in the band, 69 FR 67823, November 22... Puerto Rico market compared to other markets, 72 FR 39756, July 20, 2007. Rather than specify a band plan... 800 MHz band reconfiguration in Puerto Rico as well as alternative band plans, 73 FR 40274, July...

  15. An Evaluation and Analysis of Past Landfill Closures in Puerto Rico as Guidance for Current and Future Closures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The island of Puerto Rico has faced several challenges related to the issue of closed landfills – historically, many municipal landfills in Puerto Rico were not closed properly or abandoned, while others were closed in accordance with applicable rules but have sustained physical ...

  16. Eliciting stakeholder values for coral reef management tasks in the Guánica Bay watershed, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA is developing a valuation protocol for southwest Puerto Rico that will support the US Coral Reef Task Force’s (USCRTF) Partnership Initiative in the Guánica Bay/Rio Loco (GB/RL) Watershed. The GB/RL watershed is located in southwestern Puerto Rico and includes the urbaniz...

  17. 77 FR 75145 - Foreign-Trade Zone 61-San Juan, Puerto Rico; Application for Subzone; Sea World, Inc.; Guaynabo, PR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 61--San Juan, Puerto Rico; Application for Subzone; Sea World... for the facility of Sea World, Inc., located in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico. The application was...

  18. Maps Showing Composition of Surficial Sediments on the Insular Shelf of Southwestern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, Gerald L.

    1980-01-01

    The limited availability of onshore sand deposits for use in construction appears to be a future major problem in Puerto Rico (U.S. Bureau of Mines, 1972; Committee on Puerto Rico and the Sea, 1974). Consequently, the mining of offshore sand deposits as supplemental sources of construction aggregate may becom e necessary. For this reason, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Department of Natural Resources of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico have conducted investigations of potential offshore sand deposits on the Puerto Rico insular shelf. This report provides information on the composition of surficial sediments on the southwestern Puerto Rico shelf (fig. 1), an area that may be one of the more favorable potential sites for offshore sand resources. Water depths over most of the study area are less than 22 meters (m). The sea floor is composed of live and dead patch and fringing reefs, areas of rock exposures, and sedim ent-covered areas. The adjacent coastline includes prominent embaym ents and a conspicuous rock promontory (Cabo Rojo) connected by a tombolo to the mainland of Puerto Rico. The study area is in the belt of northeast trade winds. Waves approach the coast predominantly from the southeast, resulting in a predominantly westward littoral drift along the south coast (Grove and Trumbull, 1978). Local sand movement on the southern shelf is shown by an active sand wave field south of Bah1a Sucia in which the sand wave crests have migrated toward the southwest (Grove and Trumbull, 1978). The presence of the sand wave field suggests that large volumes of sand having potential for mining are locally present in the study area.

  19. Status of resistance to Bt maize in Spodoptera frugiperda: lessons from Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Storer, Nicholas P; Kubiszak, Mary E; Ed King, J; Thompson, Gary D; Santos, Antonio Cesar

    2012-07-01

    In 2006, reports of potential Spodoptera frugiperda resistance to TC1507 maize in Puerto Rico were received. Subsequent investigation confirmed that pest populations collected from several sites in Puerto Rico were largely unaffected by the Cry1F protein in bioassays, with resistance ratios likely in excess of 1000. Since then, we have continued monitoring populations in Puerto Rico and in southern areas of the mainland US. The majority of the collections from Puerto Rico continue to show high levels of Cry1F resistance whereas populations collected from the southern US mainland continue to show full susceptibility to Cry1F and TC1507 maize. It does not appear that resistant populations have spread to any measurable extent from Puerto Rico to mainland US, nor that local selection pressure from Cry1F-expressing maize or cotton production in the southern US has caused a measurable change in population susceptibility. Lessons learned from Puerto Rico are being applied in other parts of the Americas where TC1507 maize is grown and additional steps being taken to protect the long-term durability of Cry1F in maize in areas where similar selection pressure may be expected. Tactics include using locally-adapted germplasm that contain native Spodoptera resistance, a robust education program to teach end-users about the potential for resistance to develop appropriate crop stewardship, resistance monitoring, and the use of insecticides under high S. frugiperda pressure. Perhaps most importantly, pyramided trait products that produce two or more different Bt proteins are being introduced to further delay resistance development to Cry1F. PMID:22537834

  20. A giant submarine slope failure on the insular slope north of Puerto Rico: A response of Arecibo basin strata to tectonic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, W.C.; Danforth, W.W.; Scanlon, K.M. )

    1990-06-01

    An amphitheater-shaped scarp, approximately 55 km across in water depths from about 3,000 m to 6,700 m was imaged on the northern insular slope of Puerto Rico (southern slope of the Puerto Rico Trench) using the GLORIA side-scan sonar system. This scarp represents the removal of more than 1,500 m{sup 3} of Tertiary Arecibo basin strata. The head of the scarp coincides with the location of a fault zone observed on nearby seismic-reflection profiles. Interpretation of the GLORIA imagery, and a review of available bathymetric, geophysical, and stratigraphic data and tectonic-framework models suggest that the scarp formed as a consequence of slope failure induced by tectonic oversteepening of the insular slope. The oversteepening may be a result of the most recent episode of convergence of the Caribbean and North American plates, which began approximately 4 million years ago. The Arecibo basin strata have been tilted approximately 4{degree} to the north and are apparently gravitationally unstable under the present seismic regime. The volume of material involved in this slope failure is comparable to the material displaced in tsunamogenic submarine landslides along the Peru Trench and Hawaiian Ridge. Therefore, if the slope failure north of Puerto Rico was catastrophic, it was large enough to have generated a tsunami that would have flooded the low ground of northern Puerto Rico.

  1. Insects of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J.A.

    1994-07-01

    In this review of the literature on forest entomology in Puerto Rico, emphasis is given to research conducted in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF). This review should serve as an introduction to the insects inhabiting the LEF for researchers and as a guide for the identification of possible insect pests. There are three sections to this review. The first deals with basic insect ecology; the second, forest insect pests; and the third, insect attacks on dry wood and during wood seasoning. The reference section and appendices contain information on the systematics and taxonomy of different insect orders found in Puerto Rico.

  2. Bibliometric assessment of cancer research in Puerto Rico, 1903–2005

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Ana P.; Calo, William A.; Suárez-Balseiro, Carlos; Maura-Sardo, Mariano; Suárez, Erick

    2010-01-01

    Objective The analysis of scientific production in Puerto Rico is largely unexplored. The main aim of this study is to present the characteristics and trends of cancer publications in Puerto Rico’s biomedical journals and their relationship with the island’s cancer mortality. Methods A PubMed and a hard-copy search were performed to retrieve cancer-related articles published in the Puerto Rico Health Sciences Journal and the Boletín de la Asociación Médica de Puerto Rico from 1903 to 2005. Bibliometric indicators studied included the number of authors and references by article, first author’s institutional affiliation and country, document type, and language. The study type and tumor classification were also recorded. Cancer proportional mortality (M%) in Puerto Rico and the proportion of cancer-related articles (P%) published were also evaluated. The annual percent change (APC) was estimated to assess trends. Results A total of 369 articles were retrieved. The institutions with the majority of publications were universities (39.6%), English was the predominant publication language (72.1%), and the principal document type was original papers (69.6%). Epidemiologic studies were the dominant study type (62.1%), and the most studied cancers were digestive (15.4%) and gynecologic (9.6%). Although the P% has increased since 1913 (APC = 1.2%), the M% increased at a faster pace (APC = 2.7%). Conclusions Although a growth in the number of cancer publications is observed in these journals, it does not parallel the increase in proportional mortality. A better understanding of the cancer publications in Puerto Rico is essential to establish priorities, define future areas of research, and develop cancer control strategies. PMID:19531324

  3. Deployment of Ocean Bottom Seismometers South of the Puerto Rico Trench Yields new Insights Into the Behavior of Seismic Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, A. M.; Pulliam, J.; ten Brink, U. S.; Mintz, H. E.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Northeastern corner of the Puerto Rico - Virgin Islands tectonic block has experienced numerous seismic swarms over the past three decades. The earthquakes, located initially by the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), occur in the area denominated as the Sombrero Seismic Zone, a region on the forearc of the Puerto Rico trench north of the Virgin Islands. These events typically last for days to weeks and their magnitudes range from Ms 2 to 4, with ocassional Ms 5 to 6 events. Due to their location offshore, and the lack of land providing better seismic azimuthal coverage, these seismic swarms have been difficult to locate and hence, to identify their cause. Some explanations for their ocurrence have included a tear in the subducting North America plate and stress relief associated with subducted ridges, reflecting either asperities in the subduction process or re-activation of faults. A six-month deployment of 5 ocean bottom seismometers in 2007 recorded two seismic swarms in the area. The location of these instruments on the forearc provided an ideal temporary distribution of seismic stations. Data were jointly processed with PRSN land data to obtain better estimates of epicenters and focal depths. With these results we are able to identify the source of the swarms, suggest possible mechanisms, and assess the earthquake location bias at the PRSN, which will help develop a more accurate velocity model for the area. Preliminary results indicate a tendency of relocated swarm earthquakes from a 1D velocity model of Fisher and McCann (1984) to fall on a steeply dipping plane. If this plane represents the subduction interface, then it is steeper than the interface interpreted from Engdahl et al. (1998) catalog. In addition, our re-locations are systematically deeper than the original PRSN locations.

  4. Fungal pathogen complexes associated with rambutan, longan and mango diseases in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different fungi have been associated with diseased inflorescences, leaves, and fruits of mango, rambutan and longan. During a fungal disease survey conducted between 2008 and 2013 at six orchards of rambutan and longan, and one orchard of mango in Puerto Rico, symptoms such as fruit rot, infloresc...

  5. Economic Development Threatens Groundwater in Puerto Rico: Results of a Field Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbona, Sonia I.; Hunter, John M.

    1995-01-01

    Presents the results of a field study done on 7 wells providing 37% of the total aquifer production for 4 municipalities in Puerto Rico. Each sampled well showed signs of contamination by heavy metals, nitrate, and semivolatile organic compounds. Although found in low concentrations, current development threatens groundwater quality. (MJP)

  6. Population genetics of Zamia in Puerto Rico, a preliminary study with ten SSR loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three distinctive morphotypes of Zamia occur on Puerto Rico, which have been treated as three species: Z. amblyphyllidia, found on the north coast, and Z. portoricensis and Z. pumila, both found in the south. We investigated the population genetics of these species with ten microsatellite DNA loci a...

  7. Alternate Hosts of the Whitefly from Tomato Fields in Southern Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternate hosts of the silverleaf whitefly (WF) Bemisia tabacci, were studied in tomato fields in the south of Puerto Rico. Eighteen weed species were identified as alternate hosts of the WF. The prevalent weeds in the area are Triantema portulacastrum, Portulaca oleracea and Cleome viscose, but th...

  8. 5 CFR 532.275 - Special wage schedules for ship surveyors in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special wage schedules for ship surveyors... SERVICE REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.275 Special wage schedules for ship surveyors in Puerto Rico. (a) The Department of Defense shall establish special...

  9. 5 CFR 532.275 - Special wage schedules for ship surveyors in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special wage schedules for ship surveyors... SERVICE REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.275 Special wage schedules for ship surveyors in Puerto Rico. (a) The Department of Defense shall establish special...

  10. First report of multiple races of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rice nursery located in the Lajas Valley, in the southwestern corner of Puerto Rico has been used by US rice breeders for the past 43 years to produce one to two extra generations per year. In April, 2015, blast disease lesions were observed on rice breeding lines belonging to the USDA ARS DB NR...

  11. Estimating Green Net National Product for Puerto Rico: An Economic Measure of Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shanshan; Heberling, Matthew T

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the data sources and methodology used to estimate Green Net National Product (GNNP), an economic metric of sustainability, for Puerto Rico. Using the change in GNNP as a one-sided test of weak sustainability (i.e., positive growth in GNNP is not enough to show the economy is sustainable), we measure the movement away from sustainability by examining the change in GNNP from 1993 to 2009. In order to calculate GNNP, we require both economic and natural capital data, but limited data for Puerto Rico require a number of simplifying assumptions. Based on the environmental challenges faced by Puerto Rico, we include damages from air emissions and solid waste, the storm protection value of mangroves and the value of extracting crushed stone as components in the depreciation of natural capital. Our estimate of GNNP also includes the value of time, which captures the effects of technological progress. The results show that GNNP had an increasing trend over the 17 years studied with two periods of negative growth (2004-2006 and 2007-2008). Our additional analysis suggests that the negative growth in 2004-2006 was possibly due to a temporary economic downturn. However, the negative growth in 2007-2008 was likely from the decline in the value of time, suggesting the island of Puerto Rico was moving away from sustainability during this time. PMID:26721472

  12. Estimating Green Net National Product for Puerto Rico: An Economic Measure of Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shanshan; Heberling, Matthew T.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the data sources and methodology used to estimate Green Net National Product (GNNP), an economic metric of sustainability, for Puerto Rico. Using the change in GNNP as a one-sided test of weak sustainability (i.e., positive growth in GNNP is not enough to show the economy is sustainable), we measure the movement away from sustainability by examining the change in GNNP from 1993 to 2009. In order to calculate GNNP, we require both economic and natural capital data, but limited data for Puerto Rico require a number of simplifying assumptions. Based on the environmental challenges faced by Puerto Rico, we include damages from air emissions and solid waste, the storm protection value of mangroves and the value of extracting crushed stone as components in the depreciation of natural capital. Our estimate of GNNP also includes the value of time, which captures the effects of technological progress. The results show that GNNP had an increasing trend over the 17 years studied with two periods of negative growth (2004-2006 and 2007-2008). Our additional analysis suggests that the negative growth in 2004-2006 was possibly due to a temporary economic downturn. However, the negative growth in 2007-2008 was likely from the decline in the value of time, suggesting the island of Puerto Rico was moving away from sustainability during this time.

  13. Hosts breadth and parasitoids of fruit flies (Anastrepha spp.) (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty fruit species representing 12 families were collected from various locations in western Puerto Rico and monitored for the emergence of Anastrepha spp. pupae. We collected 14,154 tephritid pupae from 16 fruit species representing 10 families. The relative infestations of these fruits (pupae/kg...

  14. The distribution of pollution and environmental justice in Puerto Rico: a quantitative analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because few empirical studies on environmental justice and pollution distribution exist, we examine both issues in Puerto Rico. This research is part of a larger US EPA project related to sustainability issues. We calculate an environmental Gini coefficient using Toxic Release In...

  15. 42 CFR 412.210 - Puerto Rico rates for Federal fiscal years 1989 through 2003.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... discharge classified within a DRG, CMS establishes for the fiscal year a Puerto Rico prospective payment... urban area; and (ii) The weighting factor determined under § 412.60(b) for that DRG. (2) For hospitals... rural area; and (ii) The weighting factor (determined under § 412.60(b)) for that DRG. (e) Adjusting...

  16. Yield and fruit quality traits of mamey sapote grown at two locations in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six mamey sapote (Pouteria sapota) cultivars grown on an Oxisol and Ultisol were evaluated for four years under intensive management at Isabela and Corozal, Puerto Rico, respectively. There were significant differences in number and weight of fruit per hectare between locations and years. Signific...

  17. The Role of Socioeconomic Factors in the Prediction of Persistence in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dika, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    While research literature suggests that socioeconomic factors play a role in predicting educational attainment, very little research has been done to examine these relationships using data from Puerto Rico. A logistic regression approach was adopted to investigate the extent to which family and school socioeconomic factors predict retention from…

  18. Yield and Fruit Quality of Rambutan Cultivars Grown at Two Locations in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) cultivars grown on an Oxisol and Ultisol were evaluated for three years under intensive management at Isabela and Corozal, Puerto Rico, respectively. There were significant differences in number and weight of fruits per hectare between locations and years. Signi...

  19. First report of Dolabra nepheliae on rambutan and litchi in Hawaii and Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A stem canker disease on rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) and lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn. (Sapindaceae) was found on plants in Hawaii and Puerto Rico. The fungus associated with cankers was identified as Dolabra nepheliae C. Booth & Ting. Numerous black, stipitate, elongate ascomata were produc...

  20. 78 FR 9884 - Approval of Subzone Status; Zimmer Manufacturing BV; Ponce, Puerto Rico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval of Subzone Status; Zimmer Manufacturing BV; Ponce, Puerto Rico Pursuant... application to the Board for the establishment of a subzone at the facility of Zimmer Manufacturing BV located... comment has been given in the Federal Register (77 FR 68102, 11/15/2012) and the application has...

  1. Fungal diversity associated with rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) is an exotic tropical fruit of increasing importance in international markets, and that has awakened great interest from farmers in Puerto Rico. During 2008 and 2009, fruit rot and lesions on leaves, branches, and flowers were observed in rambutan orchards through t...

  2. University-Industry Partnership: An Important Cornerstone for Puerto Rico's Biotechnology Cluster Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saliceti-Piazza, L.; Buxeda, R.; Rivera, E.; Hormaza, M.; Morell, L.

    2003-01-01

    Successful knowledge-based economic models rely on synergy between government, industry and academia. This paper reviews the efforts to convert the island of Puerto Rico from a manufacturing to a high-tech manufacturing/research and development economy, with information technology and biotechnology as the main development strongholds. The…

  3. Evaluation of banana hybrids for tolerance to black leaf streak (Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet) in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Puerto Rico, bananas (including plantains) are important agricultural commodities; their combined production totaled 133,500 tons in 2008. Black leaf streak (BLS) and Sigatoka leaf spot diseases, caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis and M. musicola, respectively, are responsible for significant los...

  4. Fungal endophyte diversity in coffee plants from Colombia, Hawaii, Mexico and Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey of fungal endophytes in coffee plants was conducted in Colombia, Hawaii, Mexico and Puerto Rico. Coffee plant sections were sterilized and fungal endophytes were isolated using standard techniques, followed by DNA extraction and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of...

  5. Leaching Behavior of AGREMAX Collected from a Coal-Fired Power Plant in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reoprt provides results using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to illustrate how pH-dependence and percolation are related for a material being widely used in Puerto Rico for structural fill, road base, and other applications. Eluate concentrations from...

  6. Earthquakes and tsunamis in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nealon, J.W.; Dillon, William P.

    2001-01-01

    Many earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred in the northeastern Caribbean, where the movements of the Earth's surface plates are rapid and complicated. Future such events pose serious hazards to the 3.7 million people who live in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  7. Neighborhood Disorganization, Substance Use, and Violence among Adolescents in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Juan C.; Robles, Rafaela R.; Colon, Hector M.; Negron, Juan; Matos, Tomas D.; Calderon, Jose; Perez, Olga M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the role of neighborhoods in adolescent violence in poor neighborhoods in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The study is part of a larger longitudinal project examining risk and resilience in adolescents' ages 12 to 15 years old and their caregivers. Using a cross-sectional design, a self-completion questionnaire, and an interviewer…

  8. A Successful Applied Physics Program at the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Rafael J.; Guerra-Vela, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Presents innovative ideas that have been incorporated into the applied physics program at the Humacao Campus of the University of Puerto Rico since 1981. Describes a program that was designed as a professional (terminal) one with mechanisms to guide students who wish to pursue graduate studies. (Author/YDS)

  9. PUERTO RICO'S TROPICAL AGRICULTURE RESEARCH STATION - 100 YEARS OF TROPICAL RESEARCH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS, Tropical Agriculture Research Station (TARS) had its beginning in 1901, when Congress appropriated $5,000 and directed the Secretary of Agriculture to establish an experiment station in Puerto Rico to study agricultural problems of interest to the island. When established, TARS was th...

  10. Communication Ethics in the Communication Curriculum: United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson-Lepper, Tammy; Leavitt, Michelle A.; Hoffer, Melba; Charron, Lori N.; Ballard, Robert L.; Bell McManus, Leeanne M.; Holba, Annette M.; Jovanovic, Spoma; Tompkins, Paula S.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the status of communication ethics pedagogy at colleges and universities in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. Data were collected from 193 institutions that responded to an online survey. Results showed an increase in communication ethics courses compared with 19 years ago, with 51% now offering a required or

  11. Exposure to Rabies in Small Indian Mongooses (Herpestes auropunctatus) from Two Regions in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Are R; Johnson, Shylo R; Gilbert, Amy T; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2015-10-01

    The small Indian mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus) was introduced to several Caribbean Islands to control rat (Rattus spp.) damage to sugarcane plantations. Mongooses failed at suppressing rat populations and are now considered pests throughout most of their introduced range. Importantly, mongooses are rabies reservoirs on several Caribbean Islands. In Puerto Rico, mongooses have been implicated in up to 70% of reported animal rabies cases. There is no rabies vaccination program for wildlife in Puerto Rico, and data on rabies in mongooses are limited. We conducted a serosurvey of mongooses in two different ecologic environments in Puerto Rico: El Yunque National Forest and Cabo Rojo National Wildlife Refuge. We collected 119 serum samples from 112 mongooses, 44 (39.3%) of which were positive for rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies. We also collected oral swabs from 147 mongooses, including 88 from which we also collected serum. No oral swabs were positive for rabies virus RNA. Our data support previous research suggesting rabies virus is circulating within the mongoose population on Puerto Rico. PMID:26251987

  12. Language Officialization in Puerto Rico: Group-Making Discourses of Protectionism and Receptivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenk, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    This article applies social constructionism and groupism theory to discourses on language officialization in Puerto Rico. It examines three argumentative texts presented prior to the passage of Law #4 in 1991 making Spanish the sole official language of the island. Grounded critical discourse theory maintains that language form and content are…

  13. The condition of scleractinian corals and associated reef fauna in La Parguera, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scleractinian corals, octocorals, sponges, fishes, and foraminifera were assessed at 24 sites near La Parguera, Puerto Rico in fall 2008. Sites were selected to coincide with locations sampled by NOAA in 2005 for sediment contaminants. Our goals were to evaluate the sensitivity o...

  14. Maps showing the surficial geology of the Culebra shelf, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, M.A.; Torresan, M.E.; Trias, J.L.; Folger, D.W.; Wong, F.L.

    1997-01-01

    This study presents the surficial and shallow subbottom geology of the insular shelf around Culebra, Puerto Rico. In view of the need for sand and gravel for construction purposes in the area, we inferred the thickness of unlithified, surficial sediment deposits from high-resolution acoustic-reflection profiles and described seafloor sediment samples collected with a Shipek grab.

  15. Decision scenario analysis for addressing sediment accumulation in Lago Lucchetti, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Bayesian belief network (BBN) was used to characterize the effects of sediment accumulation on water storage capacity of a reservoir (Lago Lucchetti) in southwest Puerto Rico and the potential of different management options to increase reservoir life expectancy. Water and sedi...

  16. 33 CFR 165.778 - Security Zone; Port of Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Port of Mayaguez... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS... Security Zone; Port of Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. (a) Security zone. A moving and fixed security zone...

  17. 33 CFR 165.778 - Security Zone; Port of Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Port of Mayaguez... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS... Security Zone; Port of Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. (a) Security zone. A moving and fixed security zone...

  18. 33 CFR 165.778 - Security Zone; Port of Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Port of Mayaguez... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS... Security Zone; Port of Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. (a) Security zone. A moving and fixed security zone...

  19. Interactions of a Rhabditis sp. on the virulence of Heterorhabditis and Steinernema in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhabditis sp. nematodes were recovered from Galleria melonella cadavers exposed to soil collected from three regions of Puerto Rico. This nematode was then assayed for virulence to last instar larvae of Diaprepes abbreviatus, both alone and in conjunction with the entomopathogenic nematode species, ...

  20. 33 CFR 165.771 - Safety Zone; Bahia de Ponce, Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Bahia de Ponce, Puerto Rico. 165.771 Section 165.771 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and...

  1. Identifying Gifted Students in Puerto Rico: Validation of a Spanish Translation of the Gifted Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosado, Javier I.; Pfeiffer, Steven; Petscher, Yaacov

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of correctly identifying gifted students is a critical issue. Gifted education in Puerto Rico is marked by insufficient support and a lack of appropriate identification methods. This study examined the reliability and validity of a Spanish translation of the "Gifted Rating Scales-School Form" (GRS) with a sample of 618

  2. Genetic analysis of a novel invasion of Puerto Rico by an exotic constricting snake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R. Graham; Puente-Rolón, Alberto R.; Reed, Robert N.; Revell, Liam J.

    2013-01-01

    The tropical island Puerto Rico is potentially vulnerable to invasion by some species of exotic snakes; however, until now no established populations had been reported. Here we report and genetically characterize the nascent invasion of Puerto Rico by an exotic constricting snake of the family Boidae (Boa constrictor) using mtDNA and microsatellite data. Over 150 individual B. constrictor have been removed from Mayagüez municipality since May 2011, and our results from the genetic analysis of 32 individuals suggest that this population was recently founded by individuals of one subspecies from a genetic lineage common to zoo and breeding collections, but that the potential propagule pool consists of two subspecies. We also suggest that anthropogenic long-distance dispersal within the island of Puerto Rico may be occurring from the established population, with implications for further establishment across the island. This study represents the first report of the naturalization of an invasive species of boid snake in Puerto Rico and will be important in determining mitigation strategies for this invasion as well as providing a basis for comparison to other on-going studies of invasive snakes.

  3. The persistence of Gliocephalotrichum bulbilium and G. simplex causing fruit rot of rambutan in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit rot of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) is a pre and post-harvest disease problem that affects fruit quality. Significant post-harvest losses have occurred worldwide and several pathogens have been identified in Malaysia, Costa Rica, Hawaii, Thailand, and Puerto Rico. In 2011, fruit rot was o...

  4. ADHD Treatment Patterns of Youth Served in Public Sectors in San Diego and Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Canino, Glorisa; Landsverk, John; Wood, Patricia A.; Chavez, Ligia; Hough, Richard L.; Bauermeister, Jose J.; Ramirez, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    This article investigates geographic variation in stimulant medication use by youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) served by public mental health and/or drug and alcohol programs in San Diego (n = 790) during 1997-1998 and in Puerto Rico (n = 726) during 1998. Youth were stratified into four groups: (a) ADHD, (b) ADHD--not…

  5. AIDS/HIV among Hispanics in the Northeast and Puerto Rico: Report of Findings and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Hortensia

    1991-01-01

    Discusses six findings of the Northeast Hispanic Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) consortium's assessment of 2,527 members of the Hispanic community of the northeast United States and Puerto Rico. Highlights the subjects' needs for information, education, risk reduction, and services related to AIDS and the human immunodeficiency virus…

  6. SalHUD—A Graphical Interface to Public Health Data in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Zuazaga, Humberto G.; Arce-Corretjer, Roberto; Solá-Sloan, Juan M.; Conde, José G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper describes SalHUD, a prototype web-based application for visualizing health data from Puerto Rico. Our initial focus was to provide interactive maps displaying years of potential life lost (YPLL). Methods: The public-use mortality file for year 2008 was downloaded from the Puerto Rico Institute of Statistics website. Data was processed with R, Python and EpiInfo to calculate years of potential life lost for the leading causes of death on each of the 78 municipalities in the island. Death records were classified according to ICD-10 codes. YPLL for each municipality was integrated into AtlasPR, a D3 Javascript map library. Additional Javascript, HTML and CSS programing was required to display maps as a web-based interface. Results: YPLL for all municipalities are displayed on a map of Puerto Rico for each of the ten leading causes of death and for all causes combined, so users may dynamically explore the impact of premature mortality. Discussion: This work is the first step in providing the general public in Puerto Rico with user-friendly, interactive, visual access to public health data that is usually published in numerical, text-based media. PMID:26703677

  7. Non-PRASA Drinking Water Research on UV Disinfection in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA and InterAmerican University of San German worked with water treatment operators from Patillas, Puerto Rico on the installation, training and testing of pretreatment/UV disinfection systems in the communities of La Sofia and Apeadero. This presentation provides path...

  8. Suicidal Behaviors among Adolescents in Puerto Rico: Rates and Correlates in Clinical and Community Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jennifer; Ramirez, Rafael Roberto; Davies, Mark; Canino, Glorisa; Goodwin, Renee D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined rates and correlates of suicidal behavior among youth on the island of Puerto Rico. Data were drawn from two probability samples, one clinical (n = 736) and one community-based sample (n = 1,896), of youth ages 12 to 17. Consistent with previous studies in U.S. mainland adolescent populations, our results demonstrate that most

  9. Identifying Gifted Students in Puerto Rico: Validation of a Spanish Translation of the Gifted Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosado, Javier I.; Pfeiffer, Steven; Petscher, Yaacov

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of correctly identifying gifted students is a critical issue. Gifted education in Puerto Rico is marked by insufficient support and a lack of appropriate identification methods. This study examined the reliability and validity of a Spanish translation of the "Gifted Rating Scales-School Form" (GRS) with a sample of 618…

  10. THE PRESENCE OF THE COFFEE BERRY BORER (SCOLYTIDAE) IN PUERTO RICO: FACT OR FICTION?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A detailed examination of the coffee berry borer literature shows that reports indicating the presence of the insect in Puerto Rico in the early 1940's were based on an insect misidentification. One of these erroneous reports was used in a widely cited coffee book that includes a list of countries ...

  11. West Nile Virus from Blood Donors, Vertebrates, and Mosquitoes, Puerto Rico, 2007

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Kate L.; Bessoff, Kovi; Colón, Candimar; Barrera, Roberto; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was isolated from a human blood donor, a dead falcon, and mosquitoes in Puerto Rico in 2007. Phylogenetic analysis of the 4 isolates suggests a recent introduction of lineage I WNV that is closely related to WNV currently circulating in North America. PMID:19751597

  12. Modeling College Graduation GPA Considering Equity in Admissions: Evidence from the University of Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matos-Díaz, Horacio; García, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Over concerns about private school students' advantages in standardized tests, beginning in 1995-96 the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) implemented a new admissions formula that reduced the weight they previously had in the General Admissions Index (GAI), on which its admissions decisions are based. This study seeks to determine the possible…

  13. Active Learning: The Impact on Students Participating in an Extended Field Trip to Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruening, Thomas H.; Lopez, Josue; McCormick, David F.; Dominguez, David R.

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with 15 agriculture students before and after a field trip to Puerto Rico indicated that they considered it a significant and valuable learning experience that provided direct hands-on involvement. They learned content, were able to apply it, and developed sensitivity to another culture. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  14. Disseminated toxoplasmosis in Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) from Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necropsies were conducted on four Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) that were stranded in single events on the coastal beaches of Puerto Rico from August 2010-August 2011. Three manatees were emaciated and the gastrointestinal tracts were devoid of digesta. Microscopically, all manat...

  15. 40 CFR 131.42 - Antidegradation Implementation Methods for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality... antidegradation review shall be initiated as part of the Section 401—“Water Quality Certification Process” of the... February 2, 1989 Resolution R-89-2-2 of the Governing Board of the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality...

  16. 40 CFR 131.42 - Antidegradation Implementation Methods for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality... antidegradation review shall be initiated as part of the Section 401—“Water Quality Certification Process” of the... February 2, 1989 Resolution R-89-2-2 of the Governing Board of the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality...

  17. Citizen-volunteer and professional monitoring to identify fecal sources of contamination in southwestern Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    High concentrations of nutrients, fecal microorganisms, and sediments in surface waters can be a public health threat and can impact fringing coral reefs in Guánica Bay in southwestern Puerto Rico. Yet, the main factors and sources contributing to water quality degradation...

  18. First report of Tomato chlorotic spot virus in tomato, pepper and jimsonweed in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first report of Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) in Puerto Rico. TCSV was detected in tomato, pepper and jimsonweed. This report provides an overview of this virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scientists....

  19. 7 CFR 245.4 - Exceptions for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exceptions for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. 245.4 Section 245.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR FREE AND REDUCED PRICE MEALS AND FREE MILK IN SCHOOLS...

  20. First report of Gliocephalotrichum bulbilium and G. simplex causing fruit rot of rambutan in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Worldwide, significant post-harvest disease losses of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) have been reported and several pathogens have been associated with fruit rot. Even though rambutan was introduced to Puerto Rico in 1927, it was not until 1998 that commercial farms were established in the wester...

  1. Commercial potential of rambutan cultivars grown at two locations in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) cultivars grown on an Oxisol and Ultisol were evaluated for four years under intensive management at Isabela and Corozal, Puerto Rico, respectively. There were significant differences in number and weight of fruits per hectare between locations and years. Signif...

  2. A Decision Framework to Protect Coral Reefs in Gunica Bay, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Watershed Management Plan (WMP) for Gunica Bay, Puerto Rico, was introduced in 2008 by a nonprofit organization, the Center for Watershed Protection, with the intent of protecting coral reefs from damage related to watershed discharges. The plan was initially generated with th...

  3. Linking Decisions to Stakeholder Values in the Guanica Bay Watershed, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation lays the foundation for the session by introducing the Structured Decision-Making (SDM) approach that is being used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the Gunica Bay watershed of southwestern Puerto Rico. EPA is working with other agencies i...

  4. Citizen-volunteer and professional monitoring to identify fecal sources of contamination in southwestern Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    High concentrations of nutrients, fecal microorganisms, and sediments in surface waters can be a public health threat and can impact fringing coral reefs in Gunica Bay in southwestern Puerto Rico. Yet, the main factors and sources contributing to water quality degradation...

  5. 76 FR 64958 - Puerto Rico; Amendment No. 5 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Puerto Rico; Amendment No. 5 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice amends...

  6. 33 CFR 165.771 - Safety Zone; Bahia de Ponce, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone; Bahia de Ponce, Puerto Rico 165.771 Section 165.771 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and...

  7. A Decision Framework to Protect Coral Reefs in Guánica Bay, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Watershed Management Plan (WMP) for Guánica Bay, Puerto Rico, was introduced in 2008 by a nonprofit organization, the Center for Watershed Protection, with the intent of protecting coral reefs from damage related to watershed discharges. The plan was initially generated with th...

  8. Coral reef condition and benthic sedimentation threat in four regions of south Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scleractinian corals, gorgonian octocorals, sponges and fishes were assessed near the cities of LaParguera, Guánica, Guayanilla, and Jobos along the southern coast of Puerto Rico in November – December 2010. Survey sites were targeted near areas with varying benthic...

  9. Linking Decisions to Stakeholder Values in the Guanica Bay Watershed, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation lays the foundation for the session by introducing the Structured Decision-Making (SDM) approach that is being used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the Guánica Bay watershed of southwestern Puerto Rico. EPA is working with other agencies i...

  10. Settlement effects on Favia fragum (Scleractinia, Faviidae) exposed to different sediment sources from Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Agricultural production and urban development in Puerto Rico have increased the rate of sedimentation to the marine coastal environment, which has the potential to adversely affect coral-reef ecosystems. Settlement and metamorphosis of coral larvae are integral to the maintenance...

  11. Research project for integrated control of the southern cattle fever tick in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Puerto Rico (PR) is infested with the southern cattle fever tick (SCFT), Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, which is considered the most economically important external parasite of livestock worldwide. A research coalition involving the livestock industry in PR, the PR Department of Agriculture (...

  12. Issues for an Evaluation of Freire-Inspired Programs in the United States and Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facundo, Blanca

    Paulo Freire is a Brazilian educator whose theories link educational processes with revolutionary political aims. This report describes attempts by predominantly Latino proponents of his theories to develop "liberating education" (educacion liberadora) in the United States and in Puerto Rico. Section 1 describes the national, political, and…

  13. 27 CFR 19.520 - Spirits for shipment to Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Spirits for shipment to Puerto Rico. 19.520 Section 19.520 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label,...

  14. 27 CFR 19.520 - Spirits for shipment to Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spirits for shipment to Puerto Rico. 19.520 Section 19.520 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label,...

  15. 27 CFR 19.520 - Spirits for shipment to Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spirits for shipment to Puerto Rico. 19.520 Section 19.520 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label,...

  16. 27 CFR 19.520 - Spirits for shipment to Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Spirits for shipment to Puerto Rico. 19.520 Section 19.520 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label,...

  17. Linguistics and the Teaching of the Spanish Language in Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davila, Sonia I.

    This paper provides an overview of recent developments in the science of linguistics, and considers their relevance to the teaching of Spanish in Puerto Rico. First, three significant trends are explained and summarized: (1) structuralism, which emphasizes phonetics, pattern, and distribution, and rejects meaning as a tool of analysis; (2)…

  18. The Compelling Influence of Nonlinguistic Aims in Language Status Policy Planning in Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauch, Helen M.

    1992-01-01

    On April 5, 1991, Spanish was made the sole official language of Puerto Rico, a move that replaced the 1902 Official Languages Act, which had put English and Spanish on an equal footing on the island, in name if not in practice. This paper analyzes this language status policy decision in terms of both its linguistic and extralinguistic purposes…

  19. Demonstration of a Graywater Management Project at a Community Level on the Island of Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Housing development practices in Puerto Rico, especially in rural areas, have often not considered the proper treatment and disposal of wastewater or the collection and treatment of stormwater. These practices have created a legacy of communities without proper sewage disposal in...

  20. 77 FR 52310 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 61, San Juan, Puerto Rico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 61, San Juan, Puerto Rico Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign... Company, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 61, submitted an application to the Board for authority to...

  1. Communication Ethics in the Communication Curriculum: United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson-Lepper, Tammy; Leavitt, Michelle A.; Hoffer, Melba; Charron, Lori N.; Ballard, Robert L.; Bell McManus, Leeanne M.; Holba, Annette M.; Jovanovic, Spoma; Tompkins, Paula S.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the status of communication ethics pedagogy at colleges and universities in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. Data were collected from 193 institutions that responded to an online survey. Results showed an increase in communication ethics courses compared with 19 years ago, with 51% now offering a required or…

  2. 47 CFR 73.1210 - TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1210 TV/FM dual... educational television broadcast stations shall take all necessary precautions to assure that the...

  3. 47 CFR 73.1210 - TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1210 TV/FM dual... educational television broadcast stations shall take all necessary precautions to assure that the...

  4. 47 CFR 73.1210 - TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1210 TV/FM dual... educational television broadcast stations shall take all necessary precautions to assure that the...

  5. Pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi associated with longan (Dimocarpus longan L.) in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan L.) is an exotic tropical fruit native of Southwest Asia which belongs to the Sapindanceae family. In Puerto Rico, it was introduced in 1926 by USDA, Tropical Agriculture Research Station. In 1999 experimental plots were established for evaluation in various agroenvironment...

  6. Sulfur Cycling in the Rainforest of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, S. A.; Amundson, R.; Buss, H. L.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of climate on the terrestrial sulfur (S) cycle has received little scientific attention, despite the importance of the S geochemical cycle on earth. Here we focus on a wet end-member ecosystem, exploring S cycling at established CZEN sites in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico (~3.5 m of mean annual precipitation). Our research traces the major S sources to the ecosystem and assesses the degree to which this S has been biologically cycled before being leached out of the soils. In summer 2010 we collected horizon-based soil samples, six soil cores down to 1.5 m, and representative plant litter samples at two sites: one on granitic parent material (Rio Icacos) and one on meta-basalt (Bisley). At each site we sampled along a topographic gradient from ridgetop to the adjacent drainages. We have also been collecting monthly pore water samples and rainwater. In our analyses, we assume (as is the case for C and N) that soil S pools are largely at steady state, representing the balance between inputs and losses, and that, similarly, the δ34S value of soil S (mostly organic) represents the balance between that of the inputs and the S isotope composition of the various losses. Our data reveals a broad range of δ34S values in local bulk deposition. Correcting for seasalt using Cl shows that more than half of the sulfate in rainwater each month is of a non-seasalt origin with an isotopic value ranging from 2.0% to 11.6%. Bulk soil δ34S (average of 17.9%) falls within the range of bulk deposition (δ34S of 11.3-18.5%), suggesting that most, if not all, of the S here is of atmospheric origin. There is no significant difference between soil and plant bulk δ34S, implying little to no fractionation during plant uptake. Additionally, there is no apparent trend of isotope ratios with depth. We found that, on average, the soil on granitic parent material has more sulfate in the upper 50 cm compared to the basaltic soil, but the situation reverses below 50 cm. The carbon content of the two soils is similar, however the basaltic soil has significantly more chloride and nitrate throughout the profile and more bulk S in the upper 10 cm. All soils sampled on the ridgetop and hillslope show similar S content. Topography seems to make a difference only at the foot of the slope, close to a stream on the basaltic bedrock, where sulfate concentrations are significantly lower than at all other sites. Based on our data so far, it appears that soils and plants retain the isotope signal of S inputs, which indicates that the losses (which must equal inputs in these largely steady state situations) must lack significant isotopic fractionation. From an N isotope perspective, little apparent soil isotope change was viewed as suggestive of ecosystems that were highly conservative of N due to high biological demand (Amundson et al. 2003. GBC 17:1 1031). However, we will further explore the significance of the S isotope ratios by examining pore water chemistry and the parallel N cycle and its isotopes. Overall, the abiotic environment (rainfall, parent material and topography) plays a greater role in determining the S content and stable isotope ratios of soil S than the biological processes occurring in these soils.

  7. Submarine slope failures north of Puerto Rico, their estimated recurrence time, and their tsunami potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brink, U. S.; Geist, E. L.; Lynett, P. J.

    2004-12-01

    New multibeam bathymetry and coincident acoustic backscatter images of the 770-km long Puerto Rico trench reveal numerous slope failures at various sizes north of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. At the edge of the carbonate platform a few tens of km north of Puerto Rico, the failed material comprises carbonate blocks, which slid, at least initially, as coherent rock masses. The style of failure (rock falls and slide blocks vs. debris avalanche and debris flow) appears to be correlated with the thickness of the carbonate layers at the headwall of the slide. Extensional fissures, discovered in the ocean floor near the edge of the platform, suggest that the slope failure process is expected to continue in the future. The displacement of large coherent blocks and the steep slope (up to 45° ) at the failure point at the edge of the carbonate platform would imply higher slide velocity, and therefore a higher potential for tsunami runup than along many other U.S. coasts that are covered with clastic sediments. One of the identified failure scars at the edge of the platform, the Arecibo amphitheater, previously thought to represent a single giant slide with a volume of 900-1500 cu. km, appears instead to comprise multiple failures. Simulations of one of the slope failures within the Arecibo Amphitheater predict a maximum runup less than 20 m on the northern coast of Puerto Rico. A minimum recurrence time for slope failures along the edge of the carbonate platform can be estimated assuming that the failure process has continued since the tilting of the platform about 3.5 m.y. ago, that the failures have a characteristic area and thickness similar to those observed and assuming that the edge of the platform was initially straight. Elsewhere along the northwestern margin of the island, a 22-km wide slide scarp was discovered in the Upper Mona rift and could be associated with the 1918 tsunami and earthquake that hit northwestern Puerto Rico. Other large submarine slides were discovered for the first time on the northern side of the Puerto Rico trench on the downgoing North American plate. Because these slides occur in deep water (6000 m), have large horizontal and vertical (20 x 1.5 km) dimensions, and the tsunamis emanating from these slides are directed toward Puerto Rico, they are of particular concern and necessitate further study.

  8. Radio diagnostics and analysis on the Puerto Rico CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, J. E. S.; Bruhn, F.; Isham, B.; Rincon-Charris, A.

    2014-04-01

    The Puerto Rico CubeSat is a collaboration between Interamerican University of Puerto Rico, the University of Puerto Rico, the Ana G. Ḿendez University System, NASA Marshal Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama at Huntsville, the Swedish Institute of Space Physics, and M¨alardalens University. Principle goals include providing aerospace and systems engineering experiences to students at the participating institutions. Mission objectives include the acquisition of space weather data to aid in better understanding the Sun to Earth connection. The Puerto Rico Cube- Sat is a 3U configuration, 10 × 10 × 30 cm. Active attitude control will be used to align the long (3U) axis along the orbital path, and the satellite will rotate along the 3U axis to assist in thermal management. The Puerto Rico CubeSat will carry two scientific payloads. One is CARLO (Charge Analyzer Responsive to Local Oscillation), which is designed to measure ion turbulence from 0 to 10 kHz. CARLO will operate in a ram configuration, thus giving it the ability to distinguish between ambient and spacecraftinduced irregularities in plasma density. The second payload is GIMMERF, a 0 to 30 MHz radio instrument, consisting of a digital 4-channel direct sampling receiver board, atmospheric-noise-limited preamplifiers, and four electrically short monopole antennas. The antennas are connected electronically, as dipoles, to enable measurements of the full 3-dimensional electric field vector signal, which, in turn makes it possible to characterize the radio emissions in terms of Stokes parameters and to perform direction finding. GIMME-RF will use artificial neural network technology to automatically identify radio data of interest. All radio data will be downloaded at 1% time resolution, and radio data of special interest (automatically identified or human selected) will be downloaded at full time and frequency resolution. CARLO and GIMME-RF are complementary instruments, as CARLO will measure low-frequency plasma turbulence, which affects radio propagation in the high-frequency radio band. The satellite communications system 1 EPSC Abstracts Vol. 9, EPSC2014-799, 2014 European Planetary Science Congress 2014 c Author(s) 2014 EPSC European Planetary Science Congress will operate at frequencies between 902 and 928 MHz and will share the same antenna used by GIMME-RF. The Puerto Rico CubeSat is expected to be ready for launch in 2016; a launch vehicle has not yet been identified. Support for the Puerto Rico Cubesat comes from the Puerto Rico Industrial Development Company (PRIDCO), the Puerto Rico NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), and the Interamerican University of Puerto Rico Bayaḿon Campus. The GIMMERF payload is supported by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), with in-kind contributions from Ḿalardalen's University and the Swedish Institute of Space Physics.

  9. Management of pest mole crickets in Florida and Puerto Rico with a nematode and parasitic wasp

    SciTech Connect

    Leppla, N.C.; Frank, J.H.; Adjei, M.B.; Vicente, N.E.

    2007-03-15

    Non-indigenous invasive mole crickets, Scapteriscus vicinus Scudder (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) in Florida and S. didactylus (Latreille) (the 'changa') in Puerto Rico, are being managed with an entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema scapterisci (Nguyen and Smart) (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae), and a parasitic wasp, Larra bicolor L. (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae). Pest mole cricket populations have declined by 95% in north central Florida since these specialist natural enemies were released and established in the 1980s. Commercial production of the nematode was initiated, nearly 70 billion were applied in 34 Florida counties, and their establishment, spread, and impact on mole crickets were monitored. The infected mole crickets dispersed the nematode rapidly, so that within 6 months these parasites were present in most of the insects trapped in experimental pastures. Three years later, mole cricket populations were reduced to acceptable levels and the bahiagrass had recovered. The nematode was released for the first time in Puerto Rico during 2001 and has persisted; the wasp was introduced in the late 1930s. The geographical distribution of the wasp is being expanded in Florida and Puerto Rico by planting plots of Spermacoce verticillata (L.), a wildflower indigenous to Puerto Rico and widely distributed in southern Florida. Pastures, sod farms, golf courses, landscapes, and vegetable farms in Florida and Puerto Rico are benefiting from biological control of invasive mole crickets. (author) [Spanish] Los grillotopos invasores no indigenas, Scapteriscus vicinus (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) en el estado de Florida y S. didactylus ('changa') en Puerto Rico, estan siendo manejados por el nematodo entomopathogeno, Steinernema scapterisci (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae) y la avispa parasitica, Larra bicolor (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae). Las poblaciones de los grillotopo plagas han declinado un 95% en el norte central de la Florida desde que estos enemigos naturales especialistas fueron liberados y establecidos en los 80s. Consecuentemente, la produccion comercial del nematodo fue iniciada, casi 70 billones fueron aplicados en 34 condados de la Florida, y se realizo un monitoreo para evaluar su establecimiento, dispersion e impacto sobre los grillotopos. Los gillotopos infectados dispersaron los nematodos rapidamente, tanto que despues de 6 meses estos parasitos estaban presentes en la mayoria de los insectos atrapados en los pastos experimentales. Tres anos despues, las poblaciones de los grillotopos fueron reducidas a niveles aceptables y los campos de pasto 'bahia' se recuperaron. El nematodo fue liberado para la primera vez en Puerto Rico durante del 2001 y ha persistido; la avispa fue introducida al final de los 30s. La distribucion geografica de la avispa se esta extendiendo en la Florida y Puerto Rico por medio de la siembra de parcelas de Spermacoce verticillata, una flor silvestre indigena a Puerto Rico y distribuida ampliamente en el sur de la Florida. Los campos de pasto, las operaciones comerciales de cesped, los campos de golf, los paisajes y las fincas de hortalizas en la Florida y Puerto Rico se estan beneficiando del control biologico de los grillotopos invasores. (author)

  10. Serpentinization history of the Río Guanajibo serpentinite body, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, Erin E.; Laó-Dávila, Daniel A.; Wolfe, Amy L.

    2015-10-01

    The Río Guanajibo serpentinite body (RGSB) near Mayagüez, Puerto Rico, is part of an ophiolite mélange thrust in an oceanic convergent zone. The aim of this study was to characterize the extent and chronology of serpentinization within this peridotite mass. Mineralogy, microstructures, and veining episodes within the RGSB were characterized using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and structural analyses. This study identified, for the first time, all three serpentine polymorphs (i.e., antigorite, chrysotile, lizardite) in serpentinite samples collected from Puerto Rico. Lizardite, the initial serpentine mineral formed from widespread hydration of olivine, was found throughout serpentinite samples. Chrysotile was the most abundant polymorph observed in sheared serpentinite samples, consistent with conditions favoring low fluid to rock ratios, supersaturation and abundant porosity. Antigorite was observed as a replacement texture in serpentinites that were not exposed to greenschist facies metamorphic conditions, and were frequently found in veins with a shear component. The results indicate that metamorphic conditions do not exclusively dictate polymorph formation. The mineralogy and textures observed within the different vein generations reflect the formation conditions, and deformational mechanisms, that occurred during the serpentinization process; six veining episodes (V1 - V6) were identified and grouped into four stages of serpentinization. Stage one (V1 and V2 type veins) represents the earliest stages of serpentinization and was characterized by microscopic fracture networks that formed as a result of cracking during the initial hydration of olivine under low water/rock ratios. During stage two (V3 and V4 type veins), fibrous crack - seal veins formed to accommodate continued volume expansion, via incremental fracture openings, caused by continued hydration of olivine. The ascension of serpentinite into the upper lithosphere was inferred to occur during Stage three; V5 type veins are associated with this stage. Textures and vein morphologies, representing supersaturated conditions and a decrease in temperature, were observed. Stage 4 (V6 type veins) was characterized by shear deformation features, which formed as a result of thrusting associated with the emplacement of the RGSB or Late Eocene transpression and fault reactivation along the Caribbean plate boundary.

  11. The Music of Puerto Rico; A Classroom Music Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Lloyd; Toro, Leonor

    With the assumption that the teacher of students with identifiable ethnic or cultural background must be prepared to deal with each student's heritage in a meaningful way, the document provides resource materials for Connecticut classroom teachers and/or music specialists with responsibilities for teaching children of Puerto Rican heritage. The…

  12. Non-Verbal Communication in Puerto Rico. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curt, Carmen Judith Nine

    Observations of the contrasts between Puerto Rican and Anglo nonverbal communication patterns, and their relevance in the classroom, are outlined and discussed. A general observation is that what is acceptable and permissible in one culture is usually not in the other, and teachers are urged to develop ways of making Anglo and Latin American…

  13. THE PEOPLE OF PUERTO RICO, A STUDY IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STEWARD, JULIAN H.; AND OTHERS

    THIS BOOK REPORTS A CULTURAL-HISTORICAL STUDY OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR PATTERNS OF CERTAIN PUERTO RICAN SUBCULTURES. THE AIMS OF THE STUDY WERE TO ANALYZE THE CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND TO EXPLAIN IT IN TERMS OF THE HISTORICAL CHANGES WHICH HAVE OCCURRED ON THE ISLAND, AND TO DETERMINE HOW THESE HISTORICALLY DERIVED PATTERNS HAVE BEEN ADAPTED…

  14. 76 FR 66768 - Puerto Rico Disaster #PR-00016

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... Rico (FEMA-4040-DR), dated 10/ 18/2011. Incident: Tropical Storm Maria. Incident Period: 09/08/2011... Piedras, Maunabo, Orocovis, Patillas, Ponce, Rio Grande, San Lorenzo, Santa Isabel, Villalba. The...

  15. Building a long distance training program to enhance clinical cancer research capacity in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Appleyard, Caroline B; Antonia, Scott J; Sullivan, Daniel M; Santiago-Cardona, Pedro G; Cceres, William; Velez, Hector; Torres-Ruiz, Jose A; Wright, Kenneth L

    2014-01-01

    Barriers persist in the development and delivery of effective cancer therapies to under-represented minority populations. In Puerto Rico, cancer is the second leading cause of death, yet cancer research awareness and training opportunities remain somewhat limited on the island. These limitations hinder progress toward decreasing the cancer health disparities that exist within the Puerto Rican population. The predominantly Hispanic population of Puerto Rico is the focus of a partnership between the Ponce Health Sciences University-Medical School and Ponce Research Institute (PHSU) in Ponce, Puerto Rico and the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida. The Partnership goals are to reduce these barriers through an integrated, multipronged approach of training and education alongside outreach and research components. This report describes the approaches, successes and challenges of enhancing clinical cancer research capacity on the island and the unique challenges of a partnership between two institutes physically separated by long distances. Once fully developed this model may be exportable to other Latin American countries where the need is even greater. PMID:25626061

  16. Building a Long Distance Training Program to Enhance Clinical Cancer Research Capacity in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Appleyard, Caroline B.; Antonia, Scott J.; Sullivan, Daniel M.; Santiago-Cardona, Pedro G.; Cáceres, William; Velez, Hector; Torres-Ruiz, Jose A.; Wright, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    Barriers persist in the development and delivery of effective cancer therapies to under-represented minority populations. In Puerto Rico, cancer is the second leading cause of death, yet cancer research awareness and training opportunities remain somewhat limited on the island. These limitations hinder progress toward decreasing the cancer health disparities that exist within the Puerto Rican population. The predominantly Hispanic population of Puerto Rico is the focus of a partnership between the Ponce Health Sciences University-Medical School and Ponce Research Institute (PHSU) in Ponce, Puerto Rico and the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida. The Partnership goals are to reduce these barriers through an integrated, multipronged approach of training and education alongside outreach and research components. This report describes the approaches, successes and challenges of enhancing clinical cancer research capacity on the island and the unique challenges of a partnership between two institutes physically separated by long distances. Once fully developed this model may be exportable to other Latin American countries where the need is even greater. PMID:25626061

  17. Hydrogeology of Puerto Rico and the outlying islands of Vieques, Culebra, and Mona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gómez-Gómez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús; Santiago, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    The availability of hydrogeologic maps for Puerto Rico and the outlying islands of Vieques, Culebra, and Mona are important to hydrogeologists, groundwater specialists, and water resource managers and planners. These maps, in combination with the report, serve as a source of information to all users by providing basic hydrogeologic and hydrologic knowledge in a concise illustrated format. Puerto Rico and the outlying islands cover a total area of 8,927 square kilometers (km2). Of this total area, about 3,500 km2 are underlain by hydrogeologic units that are classified as intergranular or fissured. These hydrogeologic units form the principal aquifer systems throughout Puerto Rico and the outlying islands. In Puerto Rico, the most extensive and intensely developed aquifers are the North Coast Limestone aquifer system and the South Coastal Alluvial Plain aquifer system. Withdrawals from these two aquifer systems constitute nearly 70 percent of the total groundwater withdrawn in Puerto Rico. The spatial extent of the North Coast Limestone aquifer system is about 2,000 km2. Within this aquifer system, groundwater development is greatest in the 800-km2 area between the Río Grande de Arecibo and the Río de la Plata. This also is the area for which concern is the highest regarding the future use of groundwater as a primary source of water for domestic and industrial use. With an estimated withdrawal of 280,000 cubic meters per day (m3/d), groundwater constituted the principal source of water within this area providing 100 percent of the water for self-supplied industries and about 85 percent for public water supplies in 1985. By 2005, groundwater withdrawals decreased to 150,000 m3/d. The spatial extent of the South Coastal Alluvial Plain aquifer system is about 470 km2. The estimated consumptive groundwater withdrawal from the aquifer system was 190,000 m3/d in 1980 and 170,000 m3/d in 2005. About 60 percent and 40 percent of the groundwater withdrawal from the South Coastal Alluvial Plain aquifer system was used for public water supply and irrigation, respectively. In the outlying islands of Vieques, Culebra, and Mona, only Vieques is underlain by aquifers of any local importance. The Resolución and Esperanza aquifers underlie an area covering 16 km2 on the island of Vieques. Prior to 1978 when an underwater public water-supply pipeline connecting Vieques to the main island of Puerto Rico was completed, groundwater withdrawal from the two aquifers was as much as 2,500 m3/d. Groundwater withdrawals in Vieques island in 2005 were estimated at less than 100 m3/d. The potential development of relatively untapped groundwater resources in Puerto Rico is limited to the Río Grande de Añasco valley and the Río Culebrinas valley in the western part of the island and to the Río Grande de Arecibo part of the North Coast Limestone aquifer system. In general, the North Coast Limestone and the South Coastal Alluvial Plain aquifer systems, which are the two principal groundwater-flow systems in Puerto Rico, show evidence of aquifer overdraft as indicated by regional increases in concentrations of dissolved solids. Optimization of withdrawals through conjunctive use of both surface-water and groundwater sources and by instituting water conservation measures has the greatest potential to ensure the continued use of groundwater resources. In support of these efforts, programs also could be implemented to improve database information regarding groundwater withdrawals and the contribution of surface-water diversions to surface-water flow, especially within the southern coastal plain of Puerto Rico.

  18. Cryptosporidium in small water systems in Puerto Rico: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Guy; Minnigh, Harvey A; Hunter, Paul R; Chalmers, Rachel M; Ramírez Toro, Graciela I

    2015-09-01

    A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the occurrence of Cryptosporidium in four very small drinking water systems supplying communities in rural Puerto Rico. Water samples (40 L) were collected and oocysts were concentrated by calcium carbonate flocculation, recovered by immunomagnetic separation and detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Cryptosporidium oocysts were identified in all four systems. This is the first report of evidence of the potential public health risk from this chlorine-resistant pathogen in Puerto Rican small water systems. Further work is warranted to fully assess the health risks that Cryptosporidium and other protozoa pose to populations served by community-managed small drinking water systems. PMID:26322771

  19. Land use, population dynamics, and land-cover change in eastern Puerto Rico: Chapter B in Water quality and landscape processes of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, William A.; Martinuzzi, Sebastián; Pares-Ramos, Isabel K.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed current and historic land use and land cover in the Luquillo Mountains and surrounding area in eastern Puerto Rico, including four small subwatersheds that are study watersheds of the U.S. Geological Survey's Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program. This region occupies an area of 1,616 square kilometers, about 18 percent of the total land in Puerto Rico. Closed forests occupy about 37 percent of the area, woodlands and shrublands 7 percent, nonforest vegetation 43 percent, urban development 10 percent, and water and natural barrens total less than 2 percent. The area has been classified into three main land-use categories by integrating recent census information (population density per barrio in the year 2000) with satellite image analyses (degree of developed area versus natural land cover). Urban land use (in this analysis, land with more than 20 percent developed cover within a 1-square-kilometer area and population density greater than 500 people per square kilometer) covered 16 percent of eastern Puerto Rico. Suburban land use (more than 80 percent natural land cover, more than 500 people per square kilometer, and primarily residential) covers 50 percent of the area. Rural land use (more than 80 percent natural land cover, less than 500 people per square kilometer, and primarily active or abandoned agricultural, wetland, steep slope, or protected conservation areas) covered 34 percent of the area. Our analysis of land-cover change indicates that in the 1990s, forest cover increased at the expense of woodlands and grasslands. Urban development increased by 16 percent during that time. The most pronounced change in the last seven decades has been the shift from a nonforested to a forested landscape and the intensification of the ring of urbanization that surrounds the long-protected Luquillo Experimental Forest.

  20. Hydrology and climate of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico: Chapter C in Water quality and landscape processes of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Puerto Rico lies directly in the path of the easterly trade winds, which deliver steady rainfall to the mountains and steer tropical wave systems toward the island. Hurricanes and tropical storms derived from these tropical waves differ in frequency and intensity, contributing to substantial interannual variation in precipitation and stream discharge. Puerto Rico's steep topography and small water-storage capacity leave the island's water supply and developed flood plains vulnerable to extreme weather events, such as hurricanes, floods, and droughts. This vulnerability may increase in the future owing to ongoing change, both local (such as land-cover shifts, water-supply projects, and construction of roads and other infrastructure) and regional (climate variability and change). Climate change, which could lead to more intense and prolonged droughts as well as an increase in the magnitude and frequency of destructive storms in the Caribbean, may alter temperature and affect the availability of water for human and ecosystem needs. Accurate assessment of hydrologic regimes and water budgets is therefore crucial for effective management of water resources. As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets program, hydrologic and geomorphologic processes and stream chemistry of four small watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico, which differ in geology and land cover, have been studied since 1991. Spatial and temporal characteristics of precipitation and stream discharge, along with water budgets, were determined for the watersheds for the period 1991 to 2005. The locations of the watersheds relative to the Luquillo Mountains and the range's associated rain shadow dominate hydrological processes, dwarfing influences of land cover. The influence of geology is reflected in recession characteristics of the rivers (recession is faster in soils overlying volcaniclastic bedrock) and in hillslope geomorphic processes (sediment is delivered at higher rates from soils overlying granitic bedrock).

  1. Atmospheric inputs to watersheds of the Luquillo Mountains in eastern Puerto Rico: Chapter D in Water quality and landscape processes of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallard, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years of precipitation-chemistry data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program site at El Verde, Puerto Rico, demonstrate that three major sources control the composition of solutes in rain in eastern Puerto Rico. In order of importance, these sources are marine salts, temperate contamination from the Northern Hemisphere, and Sahara Desert dust. Marine salts are a source of roughly 82 percent of the ionic charge in precipitation; marine salt inputs are greatest in January. Evaluation of 15 years of U.S. Geological Survey data for four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico suggests that large storms, including hurricanes, are associated with exceptionally high chloride concentrations in stream waters. Some of these storms were missed in sampling by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program, and therefore its data on the marine contribution likely underestimate chloride. The marine contribution is a weak source of acidity. Temperate contamination contributes about 10 percent of the ionic charge in precipitation; contaminants are primarily nitrate, ammonia, and sulfate derived from various manmade and natural sources. Peak deposition of temperate contaminants is during January, April, and May, months in which strong weather fronts arrive from the north. Temperate contamination, a strong source of acidity, is the only component that is increasing through time. Sahara Desert dust provides 5 percent of the ionic charge in precipitation; it is strongly seasonal, peaking in June and July during times of maximum dust transport from the Sahara and sub-Saharan regions. This dust contributes, on average, enough alkalinity to neutralize the acidity in June and July rains.

  2. Modeling Tsunamis from Potential Submarine Landslides in the Puerto Rico Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, A. M.; Horrillo, J.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.; Mercado, A.

    2012-12-01

    Evidence of submarine landslides found on high-resolution bathymetry around the Puerto Rico - Virgin Islands region indicate that tsunamis may have formed in the past, thus affecting coastal zones around Puerto Rico. Furthermore, it suggests that future submarine landslides in the vicinity are likely to occur in the future, resulting in destruction and devastation never seen before for coastal communities in Puerto Rico. With the presence of massive amphitheaters offshore along the northern Puerto Rico coast, and the most recent evidence of the October 11, 1918 tsunami along its northwestern coast, the threat to coastal communities is higher than previously thought. Submarine landslides progress through time as slopes reach their stability. With numerous processes leading to instabilities and subsequent failure, the possibility of experiencing new submarine landslides is real and thus require an assessment as to quantify potential sources, their dimensions, volumes, resulting tsunamis, and their effects onshore. As part of a project to produce evacuation maps from potential sources, the National Tsunami Hazards Mitigation Program funded the Puerto Rico Seismic Network to identify sources, run tsunami simulations and estimate inundation and run-up values. In addition to 15 past submarine landslides observed in the region's bathymetry, 5 scenarios of submarine landslides have been identified as potentially occurring in the future. Whether any or all of these potential case scenarios occur in the upcoming century is unknown, however, results from this study are critical to quantify their effects along coastal areas and therefore prepare communities for their occurrence. Three such cases lie along the northern offshore region, where the Arecibo and Loiza amphitheaters are found, an area where the geology favors such phenomenons. In contrast, the southern offshore region do not show a similar trend and thus seem unlikely to produce large events. We have used available bathymetry for Puerto Rico region from the National Geophysical Data Center and have used the Tsunami3d and NeoWave tsunami software packages for the simulations. The fact that submarine landslides are often triggered by earthquakes, and a large event have not occurred in the region for the past 94 years, quantifying the threats is a priority for tsunami preparedness.

  3. Urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations among pregnant women in Northern Puerto Rico: Distribution, temporal variability, and predictors

    PubMed Central

    Cantonwine, David E.; Cordero, José F.; Rivera-González, Luis O.; Del Toro, Liza V. Anzalota; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Calafat, Antonia M.; Crespo, Noe; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio; Padilla, Ingrid Y.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.; Meeker, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Phthalate contamination exists in the North coast karst aquifer system in Puerto Rico. In light of potential health impacts associated with phthalate exposure, targeted action for elimination of exposure sources may be warranted, especially for sensitive populations such as pregnant women. However, information on exposure to phthalates from a variety of sources in Puerto Rico is lacking. The objective of this study was to determine concentrations and predictors of urinary phthalate biomarkers measured at multiple times during pregnancy among women living in the Northern karst area of Puerto Rico. Methods We recruited 139 pregnant women in Northern Puerto Rico and collected urine samples and questionnaire data at three separate visits (18±2 weeks, 22±2 weeks, and 26±2 weeks of gestation). Urine samples were analyzed for eleven phthalate metabolites: mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate, mono-2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl phthalate, mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate, mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-n-butyl phthalate, mono-benzyl phthalate, mono-isobutyl phthalate, mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP), mono carboxyisononyl phthalate (MCNP), and mono carboxyisooctyl phthalate (MCOP). Results Detectable concentrations of phthalate metabolites among pregnant women living in Puerto Rico was prevalent, and metabolite concentrations tended to be higher than or similar to those measured in women of reproductive age from the general US population. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from very weak (MCNP; 0.05) to moderate (MEP; 0.44) reproducibility among all phthalate metabolites. We observed significant or suggestive positive associations between urinary phthalate metabolites concentrations and water usage/storage habits (MEP, MCNP, MCOP), use of personal care products (MEP), and consumption of certain food items (MCPP, MCNP, and MCOP). Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first study to report concentrations, temporal variability, and predictors of phthalate biomarkers among pregnant women in Puerto Rico. Preliminary results suggest several potentially important exposure sources to phthalates in this population and future analysis from this ongoing prospective cohort will help to inform targeted approaches to reduce exposure. PMID:24161445

  4. Puerto Rico: marine sediments, terrestrial and seafloor imagery, and tectonic interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, Kathryn M.; Briere, Peter R.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Puerto Rico is an island situated in the plate boundary zone between the Caribbean and the North American Plates. This is a geologically fascinating, tectonically active region, where the Caribbean Plate has over-ridden the North American Plate and is now sliding past it with strike-slip motion. The details of this tectonic interaction are poorly understood, largely because much of the region lies under water, making it difficult to study. The geologic setting of Puerto Rico has created or contributed to several pressing societal issues, related to human safety, environmental health, and economic development. Because the island lies on an active plate boundary, earthquakes are a constant threat and the densely populated coastal areas are vulnerable to tsunamis. Coastal erosion is a concern in many coastal areas, but is particularly serious to an island economy which relies heavily on a thriving tourist industry. In Puerto Rico, illegal mining of beach sands for use as aggregate has exacerbated coastal erosion and left coastal communities more exposed to the ravages of storms and tsunamis. The serious need for an affordable local source of aggregate to use in the growing construction industry on the island has created a strong interest in locating and evaluating offshore sand and gravel deposits. During the last 20 years the U.S. Geological Survey, often in cooperation with the Puerto Rico Department of Natural Resources and/or the University of Puerto Rico, has conducted a variety of projects to address the geologic aspects of these pressing societal issues. The papers and data presented here are the results of these projects. Some have been previously published elsewhere; others, such as the database of surficial sediments of the Puerto Rico insular shelf, interpretation of side-looking airborne radar imagery of the island, and the GIS data, are presented here for the first time. The purpose of this CD is to make the results of these diverse studies available in a readily accessible digital form, so that managers, planners, and other researchers can utilize the results.

  5. Update: Ongoing Zika Virus Transmission - Puerto Rico, November 1, 2015-April 14, 2016.

    PubMed

    Dirlikov, Emilio; Ryff, Kyle R; Torres-Aponte, Jomil; Thomas, Dana L; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge; Caraballo, Elba V; Garcia, Myriam; Segarra, Marangely Olivero; Malave, Graciela; Simeone, Regina M; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Reyes, Lourdes Romero; Alvarado-Ramy, Francisco; Harris, Angela F; Rivera, Aidsa; Major, Chelsea G; Mayshack, Marrielle; Alvarado, Luisa I; Lenhart, Audrey; Valencia-Prado, Miguel; Waterman, Steve; Sharp, Tyler M; Rivera-Garcia, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes species mosquitoes, and symptoms of infection can include rash, fever, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis (1).* Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly and other severe brain defects (2). Infection has also been associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome (3). In December 2015, Puerto Rico became the first U.S. jurisdiction to report local transmission of Zika virus, with the index patient reporting symptom onset on November 23, 2015 (4). This report provides an update to the epidemiology of and public health response to ongoing Zika virus transmission in Puerto Rico. During November 1, 2015-April 14, 2016, a total of 6,157 specimens from suspected Zika virus-infected patients were evaluated by the Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) and CDC Dengue Branch (which is located in San Juan, Puerto Rico), and 683 (11%) had laboratory evidence of current or recent Zika virus infection by one or more tests: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Zika virus-infected patients resided in 50 (64%) of 78 municipalities in Puerto Rico. Median age was 34 years (range = 35 days-89 years). The most frequently reported signs and symptoms were rash (74%), myalgia (68%), headache (63%), fever (63%), and arthralgia (63%). There were 65 (10%) symptomatic pregnant women who tested positive by RT-PCR or IgM ELISA. A total of 17 (2%) patients required hospitalization, including 5 (1%) patients with suspected Guillain-Barré syndrome. One (<1%) patient died after developing severe thrombocytopenia. The public health response to the outbreak has included increased laboratory capacity to test for Zika virus infection (including blood donor screening), implementation of enhanced surveillance systems, and prevention activities focused on pregnant women. Vector control activities include indoor and outdoor residual spraying and reduction of mosquito breeding environments focused around pregnant women's homes. Residents of and travelers to Puerto Rico should continue to employ mosquito bite avoidance behaviors, take precautions to reduce the risk for sexual transmission (5), and seek medical care for any acute illness with rash or fever. PMID:27149205

  6. Project PROBE Leg I - Report and archive of multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter , CTD/XBT and GPS navigation data collected during USGS Cruise 02051 (NOAA Cruise RB0208) Puerto Rico Trench September 24, 2002 to September 30, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Worley, Charles R.; Smith, Shep; Stepka, Thomas; Williams, Glynn F.

    2006-01-01

    On September 24-30, 2002, six days of scientific surveying to map a section of the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT) took place aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship Ron Brown. The cruise was funded by NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration. Multibeam bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data were collected over an area of about 25,000 sq. km of the Puerto Rico trench and its vicinity at water depths of 4000-8400 m. Weather conditions during the entire survey were good; there were light to moderate winds and 1-2 foot swells experiencing minor chop. The roll and pitch of the ship's interaction with the ocean were not conspicuous. Cruise participants included personnel from USGS, NOAA, and University of New Hampshire Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping/Joint Hydrographic Center. The cruise resulted in the discovery of a major active strike-slip fault system close to the trench, submarine slides on the descending North American tectonic plate, and an extinct mud volcano, which was cut by the strike-slip fault system. Another strike-slip fault system closer to Puerto Rico that was previously considered to accommodate much of the relative plate motion appears to be inactive. The seaward continuation of the Mona Rift, a zone of extension between Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic that generated a devastating tsunami in 1918, was mapped for the first time.

  7. 42 CFR 412.211 - Puerto Rico rates for Federal fiscal year 2004 and subsequent fiscal years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... each discharge classified within a DRG, CMS establishes for the fiscal year a Puerto Rico prospective... § 412.60(b) for that DRG. (e) Adjusting for different area wage levels. CMS adjusts the proportion...

  8. 77 FR 43063 - Affirmation of Vertical Datum for Surveying and Mapping Activities for the Territory of Puerto Rico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Activities for the Territory of Puerto Rico AGENCY: National Geodetic Survey (NGS), National Ocean Service... National Ocean Service (NOS), National Geodetic Survey (NGS), has completed the definition and... control monuments is available in digital form, from the NGS Web site:...

  9. POLLUTION PREVENTION INCENTIVES TO THE STATES GRANT: PUERTO RICO SOURCE REDUCTION AND REPLACEMENT OF HAZARDOUS SOLVENTS IN AUTOMOTIVE WORKSHOPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This activity includes visiting 600 workshops affiliated with the Automotive Mechanics and Technicians Associations of Puerto Rico (AMTAPR) to demonstrate cost-effective strategies for reducing pollution and replacing solvents. Six hundred P2 assessments of automotive repair fa...

  10. Contrasting responses of coral reef fauna and foraminiferal assemblages to human influence in La Parguera, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reef biota including stony corals, sponges, gorgonians, fish, benthic macroinvertebrates and foraminifera were surveyed in coastal waters near La Parguera, in southwestern Puerto Rico. The goal was to evaluate sensitivity of coral reef biological indicators to human distur...

  11. 78 FR 16465 - Foreign-Trade Zone 7-Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Authorization of Production Activity, Pepsi Cola...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... inviting public comment (77 FR 70417, 11-26-2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of... Activity, Pepsi Cola Puerto Rico Distributing, LLC (Soft Drink and Fruit Drink Beverages), Toa Baja,...

  12. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  13. Disseminated toxoplasmosis in Antillean manatees Trichechus manatus manatus from Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bossart, Gregory D.; Mignucci-Ginannoni, Antonio A.; Rivera-Guzman, Antonio L.; Jimenez-Marrero, Nilda M.; Camus, Alvin C.; Bonde, Robert K.; Dubey, Jitender P.; Reif, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Necropsies were conducted on 4 Antillean manatees Trichechus manatus manatus that were stranded in single events on the coastal beaches of Puerto Rico from August 2010 to August 2011. Three manatees were emaciated and the gastrointestinal tracts were devoid of digesta. Microscopically, all manatees had severe widespread inflammatory lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and heart with intralesional tachyzoites consistent with Toxoplasma gondii identified by histological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. The gastrointestinal lesions included severe, multifocal to diffuse, chronic-active enteritis, colitis and/or gastritis often with associated ulceration, necrosis and hemorrhage. Enteric leiomyositis was severe and locally extensive in all cases and associated with the most frequently observed intralesional protozoans. Moderate to severe, multifocal, chronic to chronic-active, necrotizing myocarditis was also present in all cases. Additionally, less consistent inflammatory lesions occurred in the liver, lung and a mesenteric lymph node and were associated with fewer tachyzoites. Sera (n = 30) collected from free-ranging and captive Puerto Rican manatees and a rehabilitated/released Puerto Rican manatee from 2003 to 2012 were tested for antibodies for T. gondii. A positive T. gondii antibody titer was found in 2004 in 1 (3%) of the free-ranging cases tested. Disease caused by T. gondii is rare in manatees. This is the first report of toxoplasmosis in Antillean manatees from Puerto Rico. Additionally, these are the first reported cases of disseminated toxoplasmosis in any sirenian. The documentation of 4 cases of toxoplasmosis within one year and the extremely low seroprevalence to T. gondiisuggest that toxoplasmosis may be an emerging disease in Antillean manatees from Puerto Rico.

  14. Disseminated toxoplasmosis in Antillean manatees Trichechus manatus manatus from Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Bossart, Gregory D; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Rivera-Guzman, Antonio L; Jimenez-Marrero, Nilda M; Camus, Alvin C; Bonde, Robert K; Dubey, Jitender P; Reif, John S

    2012-11-01

    Necropsies were conducted on 4 Antillean manatees Trichechus manatus manatus that were stranded in single events on the coastal beaches of Puerto Rico from August 2010 to August 2011. Three manatees were emaciated and the gastrointestinal tracts were devoid of digesta. Microscopically, all manatees had severe widespread inflammatory lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and heart with intralesional tachyzoites consistent with Toxoplasma gondii identified by histological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. The gastrointestinal lesions included severe, multifocal to diffuse, chronic-active enteritis, colitis and/or gastritis often with associated ulceration, necrosis and hemorrhage. Enteric leiomyositis was severe and locally extensive in all cases and associated with the most frequently observed intralesional protozoans. Moderate to severe, multifocal, chronic to chronic-active, necrotizing myocarditis was also present in all cases. Additionally, less consistent inflammatory lesions occurred in the liver, lung and a mesenteric lymph node and were associated with fewer tachyzoites. Sera (n = 30) collected from free-ranging and captive Puerto Rican manatees and a rehabilitated/released Puerto Rican manatee from 2003 to 2012 were tested for antibodies for T. gondii. A positive T. gondii antibody titer was found in 2004 in 1 (3%) of the free-ranging cases tested. Disease caused by T. gondii is rare in manatees. This is the first report of toxoplasmosis in Antillean manatees from Puerto Rico. Additionally, these are the first reported cases of disseminated toxoplasmosis in any sirenian. The documentation of 4 cases of toxoplasmosis within one year and the extremely low seroprevalence to T. gondii suggest that toxoplasmosis may be an emerging disease in Antillean manatees from Puerto Rico. PMID:23135141

  15. ``From Earth to the Solar System'' Traveling Exhibit Visits Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantoja, C. A.; Lebrón, M. E.; Isidro, G. M.

    2013-04-01

    Puerto Rico was selected as one of the venues for the exhibit “From Earth to the Solar System” (FETTSS) during the month of October 2011. A set of outreach activities were organized to take place during the month of October aligned with the FETTSS themes. These activities included the following: 1) Main Exhibit, 2) Guided tours for school groups, 3) Planet Festival, 4) Film Festival and 5) Astronomy Conferences. We describe this experience and in particular the work with a group of undergraduate students from the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) that assisted in the outreach events. Among this group were three blind students. The FETTSS exhibit included a set of tactile and Braille images for the blind and visually impaired. A special exhibit was prepared with additional adapted materials for the visually impaired. This allowed blind visitors to participate and the general public to become more aware of the needs of this population.

  16. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-03-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on brownfield sites in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. All of the assessed sites are landfills. The sites were assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.119/kWh and incentives offered by Puerto Rico and by the serving utility, PREPA. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  17. Some Seismic Profiles near the Western End of the Puerto Rico Trench.

    PubMed

    Northrop, J; Ransone, M

    1962-03-01

    A cooperative program of seismic refraction profiling was completed in the vicinity of the Puerto Rico Trench by Hudson Laboratories, Woods Hole, Lamont, and Texas A. & M. Profiles completed near the western end of the Trench were analyzed at Hudson Laboratories. Five seismic layers are indicated below the water layer. The thickness/velocity relationships are as follows: 5.1 km of 1.5 km/sec. (water); 1 km of 1.7 km/sec. (sediment); 1.5 km of 3 km/sec. (metamorphics?); 2 km of 5.5 km/sec. (basement); and 2 km of 7.1 km/sec. (high speed basement). Below these, typical Moho velocities of 8.1 km/sec. were measured. Total depth to Moho ranges from 9 to 12 km below sea level, the greatest variation occurring in the basement layers. The least depth was measured 65 miles north of the Puerto Rico Trench. PMID:19873544

  18. Some Seismic Profiles near the Western End of the Puerto Rico Trench

    PubMed Central

    Northrop, John; Ransone, Morris

    1962-01-01

    A cooperative program of seismic refraction profiling was completed in the vicinity of the Puerto Rico Trench by Hudson Laboratories, Woods Hole, Lamont, and Texas A. & M. Profiles completed near the western end of the Trench were analyzed at Hudson Laboratories. Five seismic layers are indicated below the water layer. The thickness/velocity relationships are as follows: 5.1 km of 1.5 km/sec. (water); 1 km of 1.7 km/sec. (sediment); 1.5 km of 3 km/sec. (metamorphics?); 2 km of 5.5 km/sec. (basement); and 2 km of 7.1 km/sec. (high speed basement). Below these, typical Moho velocities of 8.1 km/sec. were measured. Total depth to Moho ranges from 9 to 12 km below sea level, the greatest variation occurring in the basement layers. The least depth was measured 65 miles north of the Puerto Rico Trench. PMID:19873544

  19. Response of sponges with autotrophic endosymbionts during the coral-bleaching episode in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, V. P.

    1990-04-01

    An updated list of sponges with algal endosymbionts including new records for Puerto Rico and the Caribbean, indicates that thirty-five species of common Caribbean sponges possess photosynthetic endosymbionts. Of these, 23 (67.6%) species in seven orders, were found with unicellular chroococcoid cyanobacteria ( Aphanocapsa-like) and 5 (14.7%) hadromerid species were found with zooxanthellae. Sponges with other algae as symbionts occur less frequently (≦6%). Thirty-one common sponge species were inspected for bleaching during coral-bleaching months (July-September 1987; January 1988) in Puerto Rico. Anthosigmella varians, Xestospongia muta and Petrosia pellasarca bleached partially, but only few individuals within any given population became bleached and the bleaching of sponges was very localized. Adaptations between cyanobacterial symbionts and sponges, acquired during the long evolutionary history of these two taxa may explain the paucity of bleached sponges when compared to the high incidence of bleached corals reported.

  20. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 12. Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Wegley, H.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Puerto Rico/US Virgin Island atlas assimilates three collections of wind resource data: one for the region as a whole and one each for both the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. For the two subregions, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in both subregions are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  1. Discovering the Universe from the Caribbean: Puerto Rico Prepares for the IYA2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrón Santos, M. E.; Pantoja, C. A.; Alonso, J. L.; Altschuler, D. R.; Olmi, L.

    2008-11-01

    A committee has been established at the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) to organize the local International Year of Astronomy {http://www.astronomy2009pr.org} (IYA2009) activities in the island and coordinate the international global activities. We are coordinating efforts with the members of the PR-NASA Space Grant Consortium, local government agencies, and non-profit organizations interested in education. We plan to have events throughout the island taking care to facilitate the participation of families and youth from economically disadvantaged communities. We wish that all the activities in 2009 emphasize the value of personal effort in reaching your goals, the importance of mathematics in modern life and the development of scientific awareness. Aligned with the IYA2009 major goals and considering the particular needs of our community, we have selected eight core activities for Puerto Rico. This poster describes how we will celebrate.

  2. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in the coastal waters of Georgia, Puerto Rico and Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Holman, Chelsea B; Bachoon, D S; Otero, Ernesto; Ramsubhag, Adesh

    2014-02-15

    Fecal pollution in the coastal marine environments was assessed at eleven sampling locations along the Georgia coast and Trinidad, and nine sites from Puerto-Rico. Membrane filtration (EPA method 1604 and method 1600) was utilized for Escherichia coli and enterococci enumeration at each location. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) amplification of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was used to determine the presence of the Helicobacter pylori in marine samples. There was no significant correlation between the levels of E. coli, enterococci and H. pylori in these water samples. H. pylori was detected at four of the 31 locations sampled; Oak Grove Island and Village Creek Landing in Georgia, Maracas river in Trinidad, and Ceiba Creek in Puerto Rico. The study confirms the potential public health risk to humans due to the widespread distribution of H. pylori in subtropical and tropical costal marine waters. PMID:24332757

  3. Chemical, physical, biochemical, and bacteriological characteristics at selected stream sites in Puerto Rico, 1976-77

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones, F.; Vasquez, Pedro; Pena-Cortes, Rafael

    1978-01-01

    In 1969, the Caribbean District of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, initiated the operation of a network to monitor some parameters indicative of water-quality changes at selected stream sites. In 1974, at the request of the Environmental Quality Board of Puerto Rico, the network was modified to conform with the Environmental Protection Agency National Water Quality Surveillance System. The purpose of the present network is to monitor changes in water quality between the upstream and downstream stations. The expanded network consisted of 58 stations. During 1976, five had been discontinued. One other was added late in 1976. Most of the stations in the original network have been maintained, thus providing some degree of continuity. The monitoring stations used in this report are shown on a map and listed in a table. The results of the network operation are summarized for the period July 1976 to August 1977. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. A giant submarine slope failure on the northern insular slope of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, W.C.; Danforth, W.W.; Scanlon, K.M.; Masson, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    A large amphitheater-shaped scarp, approximately 55 km across, was imaged on the northern insular slope of Puerto Rico using long-range sidescan sonar and bathymetric data. This scarp results from the removal of more than 1500 km3 of Tertiary strata. A review of seismic-reflection profiles, stratigraphic data, and subsidence models of the northern insular margin of Puerto Rico were used to infer that large-scale slope failure was induced by the tectonic oversteepening of the insular slope and was responsible for the formation of the scarp. The oversteepening probably was caused by the most recent episode of convergence of the Caribbean and North American plates, which began between approximately 4 and 2.5 m.y. ago. The Tertiary strata have been tilted approximately 4.5?? to the north in the last 4 m.y. ?? 1991.

  5. Floods of September 16, 1975 in the Tallaboa Valley, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Karl G.

    1981-01-01

    The most severe flood since 1928 inundated the Rio Tallaboa Valley on the south coast of Puerto Rico on September 16, 1975. Peak discharge was about 666 cubic meters per second. The flood has an estimated recurrence interval of 20 years. The data provided in the report can be used in making rational decisions in formulating effective flood-plain regulations that would minimize flood problems in the Tallaboa Valley. (USGS)

  6. [A new species of the chiton Lepidochitona (Polyplacophora: Ischnochitonidae) from Puerto Rico].

    PubMed

    García-Ríos, Cedar I

    2010-06-01

    The genus Lepidochitona Gray, 1821 has two species in the Caribbean: L. liozonis (Dall & Simpson, 1901) and L. rosea Kaas, 1972. We describe a third species: Lepidochitona rufoi sp. nov. from Puerto Rico. Lepidochitona rufoi differs from both in having a finely granulose tegmentum, smaller size, a very fine central radula tooth, and different anal plate form and color pattern. It also differs from L. liozonis in having longer marginal spicules. PMID:20527464

  7. A needs assessment of health department employees in Puerto Rico and Florida.

    PubMed

    Capriles-Quirós, José A; McCoy, H Virginia; Darrow, William W; Ríos, Ruth E; Rubens, Muni; Silva-Suarez, Georgina; Hughes, Shannon

    2014-03-01

    Public health training centers were established to enhance competencies in skills required to meet 21st-century public health challenges. In 2011, the Puerto Rico-Florida Public Health Training Center conducted surveys to assess the training needs of two populations of public health workers serving Hispanic communities: Florida Department of Health employees and workers at the regional and central offices of the Puerto Rico Department of Health. The two surveys were similar, but not identical in content and administration. A 52.6% response rate was achieved in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, where limited computer access necessitated use of a pen-and-paper survey. A 20.7% response rate was achieved in Florida, where an online survey was used and incomplete responses were problematic. Puerto Rico respondents (n = 1,414) were similar in age (Mdn age = 48 years) to Hispanic Florida respondents (n = 546, Mdn age =45 years). They also reported higher levels of academic achievement and more years of experience in public health. Nevertheless, self-assessed public health competency scores were in the low- to mid-range for Hispanic respondents in both locales. Although self-assessed training priorities differed, Hispanic employees in both jurisdictions preferred hands-on and face-to-face training to distance learning. Findings indicate a need for training based on adult learning theory, targeted to entry-level employees, and addressing the top five self-assessed training needs, especially health promotion and disease prevention and public health law and policy, which emerged as priority training areas in both survey populations. PMID:24578362

  8. Climatological data for the rice-growing areas along the North Coast of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roman-Mas, Angel; Green, Bruce

    1987-01-01

    Rainfall, temperature, wind velocity and pan evaporation data were collected from May 1983 to September 1985, in the rice growing areas of Vega Baja, Manati, and Arecibo in northern Puerto Rico. Daily values and statistics including mean, standard deviation, extremes, and totals for each month of record were compiled. Descriptions of equipment installation and operation, data processing, and significance of climatological data for rice cultivation are presented. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2005-02-01

    This report documents the findings of the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) assessment at Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico, by a team of PNNL engineers under contract to the Installation Management Agency (IMA) Southeast Region Office (SERO). Funding support was also provided by the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The purpose of the assessment was to determine how energy is consumed at Fort Buchanan, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

  10. Studying the radiogeochemistry of the Caribbean National Forest and the BONUS Power Plant in Puerto Rico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ithier-Guzman, W.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Environmental impact studies on anthropogenic radionuclides have been conducted worldwide since the initiation of above ground nuclear weapons testing over 5 decades ago. During the 1960's Puerto Rico was the site of two ecological studies involving the release of radionuclides into the rainforest. More recently, radionuclides were introduced in Puerto Rico on the island of Vieques via military activities involving the use of depleted uranium shell casings. An investigation of radionuclide distribution and behavior throughout Puerto Rico was initiated in the fall of 2003. Two sampling sites for this investigation are the Caribbean National Forest (CNF) and the region immediately surrounding a prototype nuclear power plant (BONUS) in Rincon, PR. Samples collected from these sites have been analyzed using gamma spectroscopy, grain size analysis and X-ray diffraction techniques. Gamma analysis indicated the presence of Cs-137 at both sites. Cs-137 activities at the CNF ranges from 0.361 Bq/g to below detection limits. Cs-137 activities determined from the BONUS reactor site were lower than those at CNF ranging from below detection limits to 0.011 Bq/g. Grain size analysis revealed that the clay size particles present at CNF are between the range of 27.17% and 6.84%. In most cases the clay size particle concentrations for samples collected near the BONUS Reactor volume were relatively high (22.39% maximum), however some samples contained concentrations as low as 2.79%. Cesium preferentially absorbs to small grain size particles. Correlations between particle size and cesium concentrations were derived. Major outcomes from this on-going investigation will include the determination of local radionuclide concentrations, distributions and behaviors, with respect to aquatic geochemistry, dominant transport processes and ecological characteristics in Puerto Rico.

  11. Summary of selected characteristics of large reservoirs in the United States and Puerto Rico, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruddy, B.C.; Hitt, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents selected characteristics of 2,728 reservoirs and controlled natural lakes located within the 50 States of the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Data are presented for reservoirs that have normal capacities of at least 5,000 acre-ft or maximum capacities of at least 25,000 acre-ft and that were completed as of January 1, 1988. Reservoir data include: location, maximum capacity, normal capacity, surface area, drainage area, year completed, and use. The normal capacities of the 2,728 reservoirs and controlled natural lakes total more than 467 million acre-ft, and the combined surface areas for 2,362 of those reservoirs total almost 16 million acres. More than 9% (259) of the reservoirs are located in California. The total normal capacity of reservoirs in California is more than 40 million acre-ft (about 8.6% of the total normal capacity for the United States and Puerto Rico), and the total surface area is almost 700,000 acres (about 4.4% of the listed total surface area for the United States and Puerto Rico). (USGS)

  12. Population size, survival, and movements of white-cheeked pintails in Eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collazo, J.A.; Bonilla-Martinez, G.

    2001-01-01

    We estimated numbers and survival of White-cheeked Pintails (Anas bahamensis) in eastern Puerto Rico during 1996-1999. We also quantified their movements between Culebra Island and the Humacao Wildlife Refuge, Puerto Rico. Mark-resight population size estimates averaged 1020 pintails during nine, 3-month sampling periods from January 1997 to June 1999. On average, minimum regional counts were 38 % lower than mark-resight estimates (mean = 631). Adult survival was 0.51 ?? 0.09 (SE). This estimate is similar for other anatids of similar size but broader geographic distribution. The probability of pintails surviving and staying in Humacao was hiher (67 %) than for counterparts on Culebra (31 %). The probability of surviving and moving from Culebra to Humacao (41 %) was higher than from Humacao to Culebra (20 %). These findings, and available information on reproduction, indicate that the Humacao Wildlife Refuge refuge has an important role in the regional demography of pintails. Our findings on population numbers and regional survival are encouraging, given concerns about the species' status due to habitat loss and hunting. However, our outlook for the species is tempered by the remaining gaps in the population dynamics of pintails; for examples, survival estimates of broods and fledglings (age 0-1) are needed for a comprehensive status assessment. Until additional data are obtianed, White-cheeked Pintails should continue to be protectd from hunting in Puerto Rico.

  13. [The effect of cesarean section deliveries on female sterilization in Puerto Rico].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Calzada, J L

    1989-08-01

    For the last decades Puerto Rico has had the highest rate of female sterilization of the world. However, it was to be expected that the increasing trend will slow down with the appearance of new and effective birth control methods and the increasing educational level of the population. The data obtained from an island-wide sample survey undertaken in 1982 demonstrated that this was not the case and that the rate of female sterilization continued to increase. The authors hypothesis was that this unexpected situation was a result of the remarkable increase observed in cesarean childbirth in the Island. Thus, the main objective of this study was to examine the relationship between cesarean childbirth and female sterilization. Utilizing the 1982 sample survey data the authors demonstrated that surgical deliveries had increased so rapidly during the last decades that Puerto Rico seems to be the leading country of the world, confirming the findings of a 1980 study. These data also showed that there was a very strong association between cesarean childbirth and female sterilization. A partial correlation analysis tend to demonstrate that surgical delivery in Puerto Rico, is at present, a stronger determinant of female sterilization than fertility. PMID:2616718

  14. Late HIV testing in a cohort of HIV-infected patients followed in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Tossas-Milligan, Katherine Y.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Fernandez-Santos, Diana M.; Dworkin, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Late HIV testing (LT) defined as an AIDS diagnosis within a year of first positive HIV test is associated with higher HIV transmission, lower HAART effectiveness, and worse outcomes. Latinos represent 36% of LT in the US, yet research concerning LT among HIV cases in Puerto Rico is scarce. Methods Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with LT and Cochran-Armitage test to describe LT trends in an HIV infected cohort followed at a specialized HIV clinic in Puerto Rico. Results From 2000 to 2011, 47% of eligible patients were LT, with lower median CD4 count (54 vs. 420 cells/mm3) and higher median HIV viral load counts (253,680 vs. 23,700 copies/mL), when compared to non-LT patients. LT prevalence decreased significantly, from 47% in 2000 to 37% in 2011. In a mutually adjusted logistic regression model, males, older age at enrolment and past history of IDU significantly increased LT odds whereas history of amphetamine use decreased LT odds. Stratified by mode of transmission, only men who have sex with men (MSM), had a significant reduction in the proportion of LT, from 67% in 2000 to 33% in 2011. Conclusion These results suggest a gap in early HIV detection in Puerto Rico that decreased only among MSM. A closer evaluation of HIV testing guideline implementation among non MSM in the Island is needed. PMID:26356739

  15. The frequency and distribution of recent landslides in three montane tropical regions of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Matthew C.; Torres-Sánchez, Angel J.

    1998-09-01

    Landslides are common in steep mountainous areas of Puerto Rico where mean annual rainfall and the frequency of intense storms are high. Each year, landslides cause extensive damage to property and occasionally result in loss of life. Average population density is high, 422 people/km 2, and is increasing. This increase in population density is accompanied by growing stress on the natural environment and physical infrastructure. As a result, human populations are more vulnerable to landslide hazards. The Blanco, Cibuco, and Coamo study areas range in surface area from 276 to 350 km 2 and represent the climatologic, geographic, and geologic conditions that typify Puerto Rico. Maps of recent landslides developed from 1:20,000-scale aerial photographs, in combination with a computerized geographic information system, were used to evaluate the frequency and distribution of shallow landslides in these areas. Several types of landslides were documented—rainfall-triggered debris flows, shallow soil slips, and slumps were most abundant. Hillslopes in the study area that have been anthropogenically modified, exceed 12° in gradient, are greater than 300 m in elevation, and face the east-northeast, are most prone to landsliding. A set of simplified matrices representing geographic conditions in the three study areas was developed and provides a basis for the estimation of the spatial controls on the frequency of landslides in Puerto Rico. This approach is an example of an analysis of the frequency of landslides that is computationally simple, and therefore, may be easily transferable to other settings.

  16. Host breadth and parasitoids of fruit flies (Anastrepha spp.) (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David A; Goenaga, Ricardo

    2008-02-01

    Twenty fruit species representing 12 families were collected from various regions in western Puerto Rico and monitored for the emergence of Anastrepha spp. pupae. We collected 14,154 tephritid pupae from 16 fruit species representing 10 families. The relative infestations of these fruits (pupae per kilogram of fruit) were recorded. Recorded host ranges were not in complete agreement with those reported in the literature. This host-use pattern should give pause to regulators of fruit importation and exportation that base their decisions on literature from regions other than those of immediate interest to them. We recovered the braconid parasitoid Utetes anastrephae (Viereck) from tephritid pupae collected from Mangifera indica L., Spondias mombin L., Psidium guajava L., Chrysobalanus icacos L., Terminalia catappa L., and Garcinia intermedia (Pittier) Hammel. We collected one specimen of the parasitoid Doryctobracon aerolatus (Szepligeti) from the west coast (Añasco), which had not been previously reported in Puerto Rico. We present a preliminary phenology of what are probably the primary fruit hosts of the Anastrepha spp. of Puerto Rico. We also present the first report of Garcinia intermedia (Pittier) Hammel and Coffea arabica L. as reproductive hosts of A. suspensa. PMID:18348802

  17. Beyond quarantine: a history of leprosy in Puerto Rico, 1898-1930s.

    PubMed

    Levison, Julie H

    2003-01-01

    From biblical times to the modern period, leprosy has been a disease associated with stigma. This mark of disgrace, physically present in the sufferers' sores and disfigured limbs, and embodied in the identity of a "leper", has cast leprosy into the shadows of society. This paper draws on primary sources, written in Spanish, to reconstruct the social history of leprosy in Puerto Rico when the United States annexed this island in 1898. The public health policies that developed over the period of 1898 to the 1930s were unique to Puerto Rico because of the interplay between political events, scientific developments and popular concerns. Puerto Rico was influenced by the United States' priorities for public health, and the leprosy control policies that developed were superimposed on vestiges of the colonial Spanish public health system. During the United States' initial occupation, extreme segregation sacrificed the individual rights and liberties of these patients for the benefit of society. The lives of these leprosy sufferers were irrevocably changed as a result. PMID:14650415

  18. Notes from the Field: Imported Cases of Malaria - Puerto Rico, July-October 2015.

    PubMed

    Dirlikov, Emilio; Rodríguez, Carmen; Morales, Shirley; Martínez, Laura Castro; Mendez, Juan B; Sanchez, Anibal Cruz; Burgos, Jesús Hernández; Santiago, Zobeida; Cuevas-Ruis, Rosa Ivette; Camacho, Sheila Adorno; Mercado, Enid Román; Guzmán, Jessica Falcón; Ryff, Kyle; Luna-Pinto, Carolina; Arguin, Paul M; Chenet, Stella M; Silva-Flannery, Luciana; Ljolje, Dragan; Velázquez, Julio Cadiz; Thomas, Dana; Garcia, Brenda Rivera

    2016-01-01

    On July 16 2015, the Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) was notified of a case of malaria, diagnosed by a hospital parasitology laboratory in a student who had traveled to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, during late June for a school-organized graduation trip. Malaria is a mosquito-borne parasitic infection, characterized by fever, shaking chills, headaches, muscle pains, nausea, general malaise, and vomiting (1). Malaria can be clinically difficult to distinguish from other acute febrile illnesses, and a definitive diagnosis requires demonstration of malaria parasites using microscopy or molecular diagnostic tests. The student's initial diagnosis on July 10 was suspected dengue virus infection. Puerto Rico eliminated local malaria transmission during the mid-1950s (2); however, reintroduction remains a risk because of the presence of a competent vector (Anopheles albimanus) and ease of travel to areas where the disease is endemic, including Hispaniola, the island shared by the Dominican Republic and Haiti, and the only island in the Caribbean with endemic malaria (3). During 2014, the Dominican Republic reported 496 confirmed malaria cases and four associated deaths; Haiti reported 17,662 confirmed cases and nine deaths (4). During 2000-2014, Puerto Rico reported a total of 35 imported malaria cases (range = 0-7 per year); three cases were imported from Hispaniola. During June-August 2015, eight confirmed malaria cases among travelers to the Dominican Republic were reported to CDC's National Malaria Surveillance System (CDC, unpublished data, 2015). PMID:27030910

  19. Turtle-associated salmonellosis in Puerto Rico. Hazards of the global turtle trade.

    PubMed

    Tauxe, R V; Rigau-Pérez, J G; Wells, J G; Blake, P A

    1985-07-12

    After the Puerto Rico Department of Health received a report of salmonellosis in an infant who had contact with a pet turtle, we conducted a case-control study in two urban areas in Puerto Rico to measure the extent of pet turtle-associated salmonellosis there. Ten (17%) of 60 infants with salmonellosis but none of their matched controls had a history of exposure to a pet turtle in the two weeks before onset of illness. Two other case patients were also exposed to a pet turtle--an 8-year-old child and an adult with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and Salmonella bacteremia. A variety of Salmonella serogroups were represented in the turtle-associated cases. All turtle lots collected from pet shops in Puerto Rico were culture-positive for Salmonella; 89% yielded Salmonella pomona. Contamination of the turtles probably occurred at the farm before distribution, since S pomona was also isolated from turtles exported from the same farm to Guam and to Yugoslavia. The estimated 3 to 4 million turtles exported annually from the United States are an important potential route for global dissemination of human salmonellosis. PMID:3999366

  20. Wellbore heat flow from the Toa Baja scientific drillhole, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.N. ); Larue, D.K. )

    1991-03-01

    Heat flow values, determined from temperature logs and estimates of thermal conductivity from geophysical logs range from 23 to 37 mW/m{sup 2} from 800 to 2,500 m depth in the Toa Baja scientific drillhole on the north, central coast of Puerto Rico. Near the target seismic reflector at the base of the well, an active hydrothermal system was encountered in which heat flow of up to 90 mW/m{sup 2} was found in a mineralized zone beneath a volcanic sill or flow. The heat flow then dropped to 50 mW/m{sub 2} beneath this subhorizontal flow zone. The mining of heat from downdip is proposed to account for this thermal anomaly, as well as the scatter in the heat flow determined from the few other wells drilled into Puerto Rico. The time-temperature history of the well indicates that Eocene volcaniclastics of the lower 2 km were deposited into a geothermal gradient of 60C/km north of an active arc (heat flow estimated to have been 120-180 mW/m{sup 2}). Uplift, erosion and cooling occurred between 40 and 30 Ma. Reburial and deposition of Oligocene-Miocene Limestones produced the present-day geothermal gradient of 15C/km (heat flow of 30-50 mW/m{sup 2}). Based upon comparisons with slab cooling models, the crustal thickness beneath Puerto Rico is estimated to be closer to continental then oceanic.

  1. Lead, mercury, and cadmium in feathers of tropical terns in Puerto Rico and Australia.

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Gochfeld, M

    1991-08-01

    Levels of lead, cadmium, and mercury were examined in breast feathers of terns nesting on offshore islets near Culebra, Puerto Rico and on Michaelmas Cay and Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Levels of all metals in these tropical terns were predicted to be lower than those of terns nesting in temperate regions, because the tropical species feed offshore of non-industrial areas where contamination should be less than for temperature-nesting species that feed in inshore estuaries near industrialized areas. This prediction was not supported by the evidence. In Puerto Rico, lead and cadmium levels were highest in bridled tern (Sterna anaethetus), and mercury levels were highest in sooty (S. fuscata) and roseate tern (S. dougallii). In Australia, levels of lead and mercury were higher in black noddy (A. minutus) and lower for sooty tern; and cadmium levels were highest for brown noddy (A. stolidus) and sooty tern, and lowest for black noddy. Metal levels for the tropical terns nesting in Puerto Rico and Australia generally were not lower than levels reported for temperate-nesting or mainland nesting birds (except for mercury in Australia). PMID:1958083

  2. Analysis of Coastal Sediment Plume Dynamics in Puerto Rico using MODIS/Terra 250-m Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, D. B.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Mendez-Lazaro, P.; McCarthy, M.; Chen, F. R.

    2014-12-01

    Anomalous events of suspended sediments can degrade water quality in nearshore ecosystems by reducing light penetration, inhibiting primary production, and delivering pollutants associated with the sediment particles. Coral reefs, for example, are subject to stress by anomalous sediment loads. The island of Puerto Rico has a diverse topography, with steep mountain slopes, episodic high-intensity rainfall events, and weathered soils that lead to episodes of high sediment volumes being delivered to the coastal zone by rivers. We developed a time series of turbidity observations based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery for use in the coastal areas of Puerto Rico. The product uses remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) of Band 1 (645 nm) at a spatial resolution of 250 m. These estimates were compared to in-situ turbidity measurements collected in San Juan Bay. Sediment plumes from the major rivers of Puerto Rico were assessed quantitatively and compared with time-series of meteorological and other parameters, including precipitation, river discharge, and wind velocity. The spatial extent of plumes, the timing and duration of plume events, and their potential impact on coral reefs are examined. Results show that plume events are episodic and short-lived, but that they may affect coral reefs located several kilometers offshore.

  3. Land Use Patterns and Fecal Contamination of Coastal Waters in Western Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norat, Jose

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Environmental Health of the Graduate School of Public Health of the Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico (UPR-RCM) conducted this research project on how different patterns of land use affect the microbiological quality of rivers flowing into Mayaguez Bay in Western Puerto Rico. Coastal shellfish growing areas, stream and ocean bathing beaches, and pristine marine sites in the Bay are affected by the discharge of the three study rivers. Satellite imagery was used to study watershed land uses which serve as point and nonpoint sources of pathogens affecting stream and coastal water users. The study rivers drain watersheds of different size and type of human activity (including different human waste treatment and disposal facilities). Land use and land cover in the study watersheds were interpreted, classified and mapped using remotely sensed images from NASA's Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). This study found there is a significant relationship between watershed land cover and microbiological water quality of rivers flowing into Mayaguez Bay in Western Puerto Rico. Land covers in the Guanajibo, Anasco, and Yaguez watersheds were classified into forested areas, pastures, agricultural zones and urban areas so as to determine relative contributions to fecal water contamination. The land cover classification was made processing TM images with IDRISI and ERDAS software.

  4. Trans-Atlantic tsunamis: Simulations of the 1755 Lisbon and of hypothetical Puerto Rico trench earthquake tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkan, R.; ten Brink, U. S.; Lin, J.

    2008-12-01

    The great Lisbon earthquake of November 1, 1755 with an estimated moment magnitude of 8.5-9.0, was the most destructive earthquake in European history. Run-ups from a trans-oceanic tsunami were reported in the Caribbean, Brazil and Newfoundland, but there were no reports along the U.S. East Coast. Previous attempts to characterize the 1755 Lisbon earthquake source utilized geophysical surveys and modeling of the near-field earthquake intensity and near-field tsunami run-up. Here we attempt to constrain the source parameters using the far-field tsunami effects because trans-oceanic tsunami run-ups are less influenced by near source bathymetry and are unaffected by triggered submarine landslides at the source. Our far- and near-field tsunami simulations based on relative amplitude comparison, limit the earthquake source area to a region located south of Gorringe Bank in the center of Horseshoe Plain. This location contrasts with previously suggested sources such as the Marqués de Pombal and Gulf of Cadiz faults, which are farther to the east. Based on relative wave amplitude and polarity, the earthquake was likely a thrust event on a fault striking about 345 deg. and dipping to the ENE which is almost perpendicular to the trend of Gorringe Bank. Gorringe Bank, the Madeira-Tore Rise (MTR), and the Azores appear to have acted as topographic scatterers for tsunami energy, shielding most of the U.S. East Coast (with the exception of Florida) from the 1755 Lisbon tsunami. By contrast, sources located west of the MTR or in the Gulf of Cadiz could potentially affect the southeastern coast of the U.S. The Azores-Iberia plate boundary west of the MTR is characterized by strike-slip faults, which are less likely to generate tsunamis, but the Gulf of Cadiz may have thrust faults. Simulations of a hypothetical M8.9 tsunamigenic earthquake in the Puerto Rico trench were conducted to investigate its possible effect on coastal Europe. The recorded history of Western Europe extends at least 500 years earlier than that of the Caribbean and North America, hence, if historical reports of widespread flooding in coastal Europe are found, they could indicate past seismic activity in the Puerto Rico trench. Our preliminary simulations suggest that coastal Europe from western Ireland, to the northern Iberian peninsula, would be impacted by this hypothetical tsunami source. The southern Iberian peninsula and Morocco would be much less affected. We thank the Tsunami Computational Portal at ARSC and NACSE for computational support.

  5. The Genetic Diversity and Evolution of HIV-1 Subtype B Epidemic in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    López, Pablo; Rivera-Amill, Vanessa; Rodríguez, Nayra; Vargas, Freddie; Yamamura, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 epidemics in Caribbean countries, including Puerto Rico, have been reported to be almost exclusively associated with the subtype B virus (HIV-1B). However, while HIV infections associated with other clades have been only sporadically reported, no organized data exist to accurately assess the prevalence of non-subtype B HIV-1 infection. We analyzed the nucleotide sequence data of the HIV pol gene associated with HIV isolates from Puerto Rican patients. The sequences (n = 945) were obtained from our “HIV Genotyping” test file, which has been generated over a period of 14 years (2001–2014). REGA subtyping tool found the following subtypes: B (90%), B-like (3%), B/D recombinant (6%), and D/B recombinant (0.6%). Though there were fewer cases, the following subtypes were also found (in the given proportions): A1B (0.3%), BF1 (0.2%), subtype A (01-AE) (0.1%), subtype A (A2) (0.1%), subtype F (12BF) (0.1%), CRF-39 BF-like (0.1%), and others (0.1%). Some of the recombinants were identified as early as 2001. Although the HIV epidemic in Puerto Rico is primarily associated with HIV-1B virus, our analysis uncovered the presence of other subtypes. There was no indication of subtype C, which has been predominantly associated with heterosexual transmission in other parts of the world. PMID:26703695

  6. The Genetic Diversity and Evolution of HIV-1 Subtype B Epidemic in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    López, Pablo; Rivera-Amill, Vanessa; Rodríguez, Nayra; Vargas, Freddie; Yamamura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 epidemics in Caribbean countries, including Puerto Rico, have been reported to be almost exclusively associated with the subtype B virus (HIV-1B). However, while HIV infections associated with other clades have been only sporadically reported, no organized data exist to accurately assess the prevalence of non-subtype B HIV-1 infection. We analyzed the nucleotide sequence data of the HIV pol gene associated with HIV isolates from Puerto Rican patients. The sequences (n = 945) were obtained from our "HIV Genotyping" test file, which has been generated over a period of 14 years (2001-2014). REGA subtyping tool found the following subtypes: B (90%), B-like (3%), B/D recombinant (6%), and D/B recombinant (0.6%). Though there were fewer cases, the following subtypes were also found (in the given proportions): A1B (0.3%), BF1 (0.2%), subtype A (01-AE) (0.1%), subtype A (A2) (0.1%), subtype F (12BF) (0.1%), CRF-39 BF-like (0.1%), and others (0.1%). Some of the recombinants were identified as early as 2001. Although the HIV epidemic in Puerto Rico is primarily associated with HIV-1B virus, our analysis uncovered the presence of other subtypes. There was no indication of subtype C, which has been predominantly associated with heterosexual transmission in other parts of the world. PMID:26703695

  7. Nesting ecology and behavior of Broad-winged Hawks in moist karst forests of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hengstenberg, D.W.; Vilella, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    The Puerto Rican Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus brunnescens) is an endemic and endangered subspecies inhabiting upland montane forests of Puerto Rico. The reproductive ecology, behavior, and nesting habitat of the Broad-winged Hawk were studied in Ri??o Abajo Forest, Puerto Rico, from 2001-02. We observed 158 courtship displays by Broad-winged Hawks. Also, we recorded 25 territorial interactions between resident Broad-winged Hawks and intruding Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis jamaicensis). Broad-winged Hawks displaced intruding Red-tailed Hawks from occupied territories (P = 0.009). Mayfield nest survival was 0.67 across breeding seasons (0.81 in 2001, N = 6; 0.51 in 2002, N = 4), and pairs averaged 1.1 young per nest (years combined). The birds nested in mixed species timber plantations and mature secondary forest. Nests were placed in the upper reaches of large trees emerging from the canopy. Nest tree DBH, understory stem density, and distance to karst cliff wall correctly classified (77.8%) nest sites. ?? 2005 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  8. Improvements of Real Time First Motion Focal Mechanism and Noise Characteristics of New Sites at the Puerto Rico Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. M.; Lopez, A. M.; Huerfano, V.; Lugo, J.; Cancel, J.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic networks need quick and efficient ways to obtain information related to seismic events for the purposes of seismic activity monitoring, risk assessment, and scientific knowledge among others. As part of an IRIS summer internship program, two projects were performed to provide a tool for quick faulting mechanism and improve seismic data at the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN). First, a simple routine to obtain a focal mechanisms, the geometry of the fault, based on first motions was developed and implemented for data analysts routine operations at PRSN. The new tool provides the analyst a quick way to assess the probable faulting mechanism that occurred while performing the interactive earthquake location procedure. The focal mechanism is generated on-the-fly when data analysts pick P wave arrivals onsets and motions. Once first motions have been identified, an in-house PRSN utility is employed to obtain the double couple representation and later plotted using GMT's psmeca utility. Second, we addressed the issue of seismic noise related to thermal fluctuations inside seismic vaults. Seismic sites can be extremely noisy due to proximity to cultural activities and unattended thermal fluctuations inside sensor housings, thus resulting in skewed readings. In the past, seismologists have used different insulation techniques to reduce the amount of unwanted noise that a seismometers experience due to these thermal changes with items such as Styrofoam, and fiber glass among others. PRSN traditionally uses Styrofoam boxes to cover their seismic sensors, however, a proper procedure to test how these method compare to other new techniques has never been approached. The deficiency of properly testing these techniques in the Caribbean and especially Puerto Rico is that these thermal fluctuations still happen because of the intense sun and humidity. We conducted a test based on the methods employed by the IRIS Transportable Array, based on insulation by sand burial of the sensor. Two Guralps CMG-3T's connected to RefTek's 150 digitizers were used at PRSN's MPR site seismic vault to compare the two types of insulation. Two temperature loggers were placed along each seismic sensor for a period of one week to observe how much thermal fluctuations occur in each insulation method and then compared its capability for noise reduction due to thermal fluctuations. With only a single degree Celsius fluctuation inside the sand (compared to almost twice that value for the foam) the sensor buried in sand provided the best insulation for the seismic vault. In addition, the quality of the data was analyzed by comparing both sensors using PQLX. We show results of this analysis and also provide a site characteristic of new stations to be included in the daily earthquake location operations at the PRSN.

  9. Geologic and hydrologic data collected at test hole NC-8, Vega Alta, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús; Scharlach, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Test hole NC-8 was drilled in the municipality of Vega Alta as part of a study of the aquifers in the Northern Coastal Province of Puerto Rico. Test hole NC-8 was drilled to a depth of 1,736 feet below land surface. Geologic and hydrologic data collected during drilling included continuous core, water- quality samples, water-level measurements, and estimates of aquifer yields from the water-bearing zones. Test hole NC-8 penetrated five geologic formations of middle Tertiary age: the Aymamon Limestone, the Los Puertos Formation, the Cibao Formation, the Lares Limestone, and the San Sebastian Formation. Test hole NC-8 penetrated a water-table aquifer and seven artesian aquifers.

  10. Estimating soil turnover rate from tree uprooting during hurricanes in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenart, M.T.; Falk, D.A.; Scatena, F.N.; Osterkamp, W.R.

    2010-01-01

    Soil turnover by tree uprooting in primary and secondary forests on the island of Puerto Rico was measured in 42 study plots in the months immediately after the passage of a Category 3 hurricane. Trunk basal area explained 61% of the variability of mound volume and 53% of the variability of mound area. The proportion of uprooted trees, the number of uprooted trees, or the proportion of uprooted basal area explained 84-85% of the variation in hurricane-created mound area. These same variables explain 79-85% of the variation in mound volume. The study indicates that the soil turnover period from tree uprooting by Puerto Rican hurricanes is between 1600 and 4800 years. These rates are faster than soil turnover by landslides and background treefall in the same area and provide a useful age constraint on soil profile development and soil carbon sequestration in these dynamic landscapes. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Ethnic conflict and the psychology of liberation in Guatemala, Peru, and Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Comas-Di-az, L; Lykes, M B; Alarco-n, R D

    1998-07-01

    Ethnic identity and conflict in Guatemala, Peru, and Puerto Rico are complexly embedded within dynamic systems of class- and race-based geopolitics. Whereas overt violence and terror have permeated both Guatemalan and Peruvian societies, overt conflict has undermined Puerto Rican nationhood. Despite similarities among these 3 countries of Hispano-America, there are important particularities that inform psychological theory and practice. This article explores selected contributions of a psychology of liberation informed by indigenous psychologies and reflexive praxis. The challenges these conflicts and their consequences pose to psychologists seeking to work with populations most deeply affected by these social inequalities are analyzed. It concludes with suggestions of how psychology can move toward the development of community-based responses to psychosocial oppression that foster enhanced individual and collective development in a context of social change. PMID:9735060

  12. Depositional history of Oligocene-Miocene carbonate rocks of northeastern Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlach, R. )

    1990-05-01

    The apparent tectonic stability of the northern Puerto Rico platform during the late Oligocene and early Miocene allows for the depositional history of subsurface carbonate rocks of northeastern Puerto Rico to be related to major changes in eustatic sea level. During a late Oligocene north to south transgression of sea level, fluvial/deltaic to shallow marine terrigenous sediments (San Sebastian Formation) and, subsequently, open-ramp carbonates (Lares Limestone) accumulated in the central basin. Following a minor regression (third-order cycle ), a more extensive early Miocene( ) transgression resulted in deposition of deeper ramp carbonate mudstone and marl (Mudstone unit) in an apparent trough in the central basin, and open-ramp reefal carbonate (upper Lares) was deposited over a wider area of the basin. The San Sebastian Formation/Lares Limestone/Mudstone Unit sequence was most likely deposited during the second-order supercycle, TB{sub 1}. An early Miocene relative fall in sea level resulted in deposition of interfingering inner-ramp limestone and terrigenous sediments (Cibao Formation) and the development of subaerial costs, especially in the upper part of the unit. During a sea level rise, terrigenous deposition decreased and gave way to inner- and middle-ramp carbonate sediments (Los Puertos Limestone). A middle Miocene highstand in sea level brought basin-wide deposition of open-ramp carbonate sediments (Aymamon Ls). The Cibao Formation/Los Puertos Limestone/Aymamon. Limestone sequence may correspond to the second-order supercycle, TB{sub 2}. During the late middle Miocene( ), the carbonate platform was exposed and extensively karsted, possibly in an event related to the sea level drop at the end of TB{sub 2}.

  13. Atlas of ground-water resources in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1996-01-01

    This atlas presents an overview of the ground-water resources of the main island of Puerto Rico; two of its larger offshore islands, Isla de Culebra and Isla de Vieques; and the three principal islands of the U.S. Virgin Islands, St. Thomas, St. John, and St. Croix. The atlas presents the most important ground-water information available for these islands, and is written for water managers and the general public. It describes, through the use of maps, graphs, and hydrogeologic sections, the most important aspects of the geohydrology, ground-water flow system, and groundwater withdrawals for the principal aquifers in these islands. Most of the information presented in the atlas is from published reports, although unpublished data from ongoing studies by the U.S. Geological Survey were used to prepare parts of the atlas. This report provides a useful compilation of information concerning major aquifers in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands and provides a first step in gaining a general knowledge of these aquifers. More detailed information is available from the primary sources referenced in the report. The atlas contains an introductory section and 15 sections describing the ground-water resources of 12 regions within the 7 ground-water areas of the main island of Puerto Rico, Isla de Culebra and Isla de Vieques (described in a single section of the atlas), and the U.S. Virgin Islands (St. Thomas and St. John are described in one section of the atlas and St. Croix in another), and a concluding section describing present and potential problems related to the development of ground-water resources. Information presented in each of 15 descriptive sections of the atlas include the (1) location and major geographic features of the area covered by that section, (2) population and estimated (4) hydrogeology of the area, (5) ground-water levels and movements, and (6) a description of soil permeabilities.

  14. The Development of the Puerto Rico Lightning Detection Network for Meteorological Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legault, Marc D.; Miranda, Carmelo; Medin, J.; Ojeda, L. J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    A land-based Puerto Rico Lightning Detection Network (PR-LDN) dedicated to the academic research of meteorological phenomena has being developed. Five Boltek StormTracker PCI-Receivers with LTS-2 Timestamp Cards with GPS and lightning detectors were integrated to Pentium III PC-workstations running the CentOS linux operating system. The Boltek detector linux driver was compiled under CentOS, modified, and thoroughly tested. These PC-workstations with integrated lightning detectors were installed at five of the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) campuses distributed around the island of PR. The PC-workstations are left on permanently in order to monitor lightning activity at all times. Each is networked to their campus network-backbone permitting quasi-instantaneous data transfer to a central server at the UPR-Bayam n campus. Information generated by each lightning detector is managed by a C-program developed by us called the LDN-client. The LDN-client maintains an open connection to the central server operating the LDN-server program where data is sent real-time for analysis and archival. The LDN-client also manages the storing of data on the PC-workstation hard disk. The LDN-server software (also an in-house effort) analyses the data from each client and performs event triangulations. Time-of-arrival (TOA) and related hybrid algorithms, lightning-type and event discriminating routines are also implemented in the LDN-server software. We also have developed software to visually monitor lightning events in real-time from all clients and the triangulated events. We are currently monitoring and studying the spatial, temporal, and type distribution of lightning strikes associated with electrical storms and tropical cyclones in the vicinity of Puerto Rico.

  15. Settlement Effects on Favia fragum (Scleractinia, Faviidae) Exposed to Different Sediment Sources from Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, C.; Randall, C.; Barron, M.

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural production and urban development in Puerto Rico have increased the rate of sedimentation to the coastal, marine environment, which has the potential to adversely affect coral-reef ecosystems. The processes of settlement and metamorphosis of coral larvae are integral to the maintenance and recovery of coral reefs, yet the effects of sedimentation in Puerto Rico on these processes are not well understood. Planulae from laboratory cultured colonies of Favia fragum were exposed to sediment from shallow, marine habitats of Guánica (Brown Inlet) and Peñuelas (Tallaboa Bay), Puerto Rico to determine how sediment source, concentration, and grain-size affect larval settlement. Planulae were exposed to six concentrations of Guánica and Peñuelas sediment ranging from 20 to 640 mg cm-2 and to a single concentration (20 mg cm-2) of Peñuelas sediment fractioned into five grain-size classes (<32 μm, 33-63 μm, 64-125 μm, 126-250 μm, and 251-500 μm). Larval settlement decreased as the concentration of sediment increased, resulting in a median effective concentration (EC50) of 31.2 mg cm-2 for Guánica sediment and 1.7 mg cm-2 for Peñuelas sediment. There was no apparent effect of sediment grain size on the settlement of planulae exposed to 20 mg cm-2 of Peñuelas sediment. These results suggest that the source of sediment can be an important factor determining the success of coral settlement, and that coral settlement can be inhibited at concentrations of sediment that are below thresholds considered to be protective of reef-building corals.

  16. Variations of the spatiotemporal patterns of CVOCs concentrations in northern karst of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Ghasemizadeh, R.; Padilla, I. Y.; Irizarry, C.; Yegen, C.; Kaeli, D.; Alshawabkeh, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    The northern Puerto Rico is characterized as karst topography, where the groundwater is a major source of water use to the island. Various types of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds (CVOCs), which are due to improper disposal of industrial waste, are detected in these karst aquifers. It is important to study the spatiotemporal distribution patterns of the CVOCs in this region, which are posing a serious threat to both the ecological and human health. In this study, various historical CVOCs data from 264 wells across the northern karst region from January 1982 to December 2000 were collected from a number of reports and studies. We found that 38% (99 out of 264) of the sites had at least one sample with CVOC concentration above the standards established to protect human health over the study period. We found that the distribution of the CVOCs spatially varied with areas containing clusters of sites contaminated by different organic compound. The response of CVOC concentrations were occasionally retarded even though they were depleted significantly in the source zones. The study confirmed that the measured CVOC concentrations decreased during the study period at most of the sites. The source origin (toxics release locations and quantities) and the intrinsic characteristics of the karst (high heterogeneity and complex hydraulic behavior) are most likely related with the spatial and temporal distribution patterns of CVOCs. The study of the spatiotemporal patterns of CVOCs concentrations in the northern karst aquifers has important implications on the public water use, especially when it coincides with the recent population growth in this region. Locations of Puerto Rico, the northern karst region of Puerto Rico and 264 sampling sites in the karst region.

  17. Association of NOD2 and IL23R with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, Veroushka; Guo, Xiuqing; Vendrell, Roberto; Haritunians, Talin; Klomhaus, Alexandra M.; Li, Dalin; McGovern, Dermot P. B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Torres, Esther A.; Taylor, Kent D.

    2014-01-01

    The Puerto Rico population may be modeled as an admixed population with contributions from three continents: Sub-Saharan Africa, Ancient America, and Europe. Extending the study of the genetics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to an admixed population such as Puerto Rico has the potential to shed light on IBD genes identified in studies of European populations, find new genes contributing to IBD susceptibility, and provide basic information on IBD for the care of US patients of Puerto Rican and Latino descent. In order to study the association between immune-related genes and Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in Puerto Rico, we genotyped 1159 Puerto Rican cases, controls, and family members with the ImmunoChip. We also genotyped 832 subjects from the Human Genome Diversity Panel to provide data for estimation of global and local continental ancestry. Association of SNPs was tested by logistic regression corrected for global continental descent and family structure. We observed the association between Crohn’s disease and NOD2 (rs17313265, 0.28 in CD, 0.19 in controls, OR 1.5, p = 9×10−6) and IL23R (rs11209026, 0.026 in CD, 0.0.071 in controls, OR 0.4, p = 3.8×10−4). The haplotype structure of both regions resembled that reported for European populations and “local” continental ancestry of the IL23R gene was almost entirely of European descent. We also observed suggestive evidence for the association of the BAZ1A promoter SNP with CD (rs1200332, 0.45 in CD, 0.35 in controls, OR 1.5, p = 2×10−6). Our estimate of continental ancestry surrounding this SNP suggested an origin in Ancient America for this putative susceptibility region. Our observations underscored the great difference between global continental ancestry and local continental ancestry at the level of the individual gene, particularly for immune-related loci. PMID:25259511

  18. Quantifying discharge uncertainty from remotely sensed precipitation data products in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerasinghe, H.; Raoufi, R.; Yoon, Y.; Beighley, E., II; Alshawabkeh, A.

    2014-12-01

    Preterm birth is a serious health issue in the United States that contributes to over one-third of all infant deaths. Puerto Rico being one of the hot spots, preliminary research found that the high preterm birth rate can be associated with exposure to some contaminants in water used on daily basis. Puerto Rico has more than 200 contaminated sites including 16 active Superfund sites. Risk of exposure to contaminants is aggravated by unlined landfills lying over the karst regions, highly mobile and dynamic nature of the karst aquifers, and direct contact with surface water through sinkholes and springs. Much of the population in the island is getting water from natural springs or artesian wells that are connected with many of these potentially contaminated karst aquifers. Mobility of contaminants through surface water flows and reservoirs are largely known and are highly correlated with the variations in hydrologic events and conditions. In this study, we quantify the spatial and temporal distribution of Puerto Rico's surface water stores and fluxes to better understand potential impacts on the distribution of groundwater contamination. To quantify and characterize Puerto Rico's surface waters, hydrologic modeling, remote sensing and field measurements are combined. Streamflow measurements are available from 27 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gauging stations with drainage areas ranging from 2 to 510 km2. Hillslope River Routing (HRR) model is used to simulate hourly streamflow from watersheds larger than 1 km2 that discharge to ocean. HRR model simulates vertical water balance, lateral surface and subsurface runoff and river discharge. The model consists of 4418 sub-catchments with a mean model unit area (i.e., sub-catchment) of 1.8 km2. Using gauged streamflow measurements for validation, we first assess model results for simulated discharge using three precipitation products: TRMM-3B42 (3 hour temporal resolution, 0.25 degree spatial resolution); NWS stage-III radar rainfall (~ 5 min temporal resolution and 4 km spatial resolution); and gauge measurements from 37 rainfall stations for the period 2000-2012. We then explore methods for combining each product to improve overall model performance. Effects of varied spatial and temporal rainfall resolutions on simulated discharge are also investigated.

  19. Water budget and hydraulic aspects of artificial recharge, south coast of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisel, J.E.; Gonzalez, Jose Raul

    1979-01-01

    An analog model was used to evaluate ground-water conditions on the south coast of Puerto Rico. Water levels during a normal period and during an extended drought were simulated. Recharge and discharge values are reported. The model was also used to evaluate the possibilities of using treated waste water to recharge the aquifer. Three methods were considered: infiltration basins, injection, and irrigation. The tests were planned to determine what changes in water levels would result if certain rates of application were used. Because of the limited vertical hydraulic conductivity, irrigation is suggested as the most practical method of waste-water use. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. An Overview of the Great Puerto Rico ShakeOut 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, G.; Soto-Cordero, L.; Huérfano-Moreno, V.; Ramos-Gómez, W.; De La Matta, M.

    2012-12-01

    With a population of 4 million, Puerto Rico will be celebrating this year, for first time, an Island-wide earthquake drill following the Great California ShakeOut model. Most of our population has never experienced a large earthquake, since our last significant event occurred on 1918, and is not adequately prepared to respond to a sudden ground movement. During the moderate-size earthquakes (M5.2-5.8) that have been felt in Puerto Rico since 2010, and despite Puerto Rico Seismic Network education efforts, the general public reaction was inappropriate, occasionally putting themselves and others at risk. Our overarching goal for the Great Puerto Rico ShakeOut is to help develop seismic awareness and preparedness in our communities. In addition, our main objectives include: to teach the public to remain calm and act quickly and appropriately during a seismic event, the identification and correction of potential hazards that may cause injuries, and the development/update of mitigation plans for home, work place and/or school. We are also taking this opportunity to clarify the misconceptions of other methods of protection (e.g. triangle of life) and warning equipment and systems that do not have sound scientific or applicable basis for our country. We will be presenting an overview of the accomplishment of our earthquake drill and the different strategies we are using, such as internet, social media and collaboration with state government agencies and professional groups, to reach diverse age and educational level groups and to promote their participation. One of our main target groups this year are school students since their experience can have a direct and positive impact on their families. The drill webpage was developed in Spanish and English as well as our promotional and educational materials. Being the first time a Spanish-speaking country coordinates a ShakeOut exercise we hope our experience and the materials we are developing could be of use and benefit to other Spanish-speaking countries.

  1. Fe-Mn nodule field indicated by GLORIA, north of the Puerto Rico Trench

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, K.M.; Masson, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    A 2,500-km2 area of sea floor on the south-eastern flank of the Greater Antilles Outer Ridge north of the Puerto Rico Trench displays anomalously high acoustic backscattering properties on GLORIA longrange sidescan-sonar data. Previously collected dredges, bottom photographs, and sediment cores indicate the presence of Fe-Mn nodules within the area of high backscatter. We were able to map the extent of the inferred nodule field on the basis of acoustic property contrast between the nodule-covered sediment and the surrounding nodule-free sediment. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  2. Mud transportation on a steep shelf, Rio de La Plata shelf, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, K.A.; Pilkey, O.H.; Trumbull, J.V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Hurricanes David (August 29-30, 1979) and Frederick (September 2-5, 1979) caused major flooding of the Rio de La Plata in northern Puerto Rico. A thin mud layer was deposited across the narrow insular shelf adjacent to the river mouth. Within 5 months, fair-weather shelf-winnowing processes moved the mud layer entirely from the shelf, 0.5 to 2 km to the shelf break at the 50-m contour and beyond. The process of mud movement is termed 'mud hopping.' ?? 1982 A. M. Dowden, Inc.

  3. Terrestrial Sediment and Nutrient Discharge, and Their Potential Influence on Coral Reefs, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, M. C.; Webb, R. M.; Warne, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    Sediment and nutrient discharge to the insular shelf of Puerto Rico (18 degrees latitude), augmented by anthropogenic activity, is believed to have contributed to widespread degradation of coral reefs of Puerto Rico during the 20th century. Sediment deposition degrades coral reefs because it reduces the area of sea floor suitable for growth of new coral, diminishes the amount of light available for photosynthesis by symbiotic algae that live within individual coral animals, and in extreme cases, buries coral colonies. Land-use history and data from 30 water-discharge, 9 daily and 15 intermittent sediment-concentration, and 24 water-quality gaging stations were analyzed to investigate the timing and intensity of terrestrial sediment and nutrient discharge into coastal waters. Watersheds in Puerto Rico generally are small (10's to 100's of square km), channel gradients are steep, and stream valleys are deeply incised and narrow. Major storms are usually brief (<24 h) but intense such that the majority of the annual sediment discharge occurs in a few days. From 1960 through 2000 the highest mean daily discharge for a water year (October - September) accounted for 20 to 60 percent of the total annual sediment discharge. Major storms, with a return frequency of approximately a decade, were capable of discharging up to 30 times the median annual sediment-discharge volume. Prior to agricultural and industrial development, coastal waters are believed to have been relatively transparent, with strong currents and seasonal high-energy swells assisting corals in the removal of minor amounts of sediment deposited after storms. Land clearing and modification, first for agriculture and later for urban development, have increased sediment and nutrient influx to the coast during the 19th and 20th centuries. Although forest cover has increased to approximately 30 percent of the surface of Puerto Rico during the past 60 years, sediment eroded from hillslopes during the agricultural period is still being episodically transported from upland valleys to downstream floodplains and the coast. In response to better land management, the quality of water has improved significantly since the 1980s. Nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations in river waters are now well within regulatory limits, although current concentrations are as much as 10 times the estimated pre-settlement levels. Concentrations of pathogens also are improved but continue to be near or above regulatory limits. Unlike sediment discharge, which is episodic and intense, the discharge of river-borne nutrients and pathogens is a less intense but chronic stressor to coral reefs located near the mouths of rivers.

  4. Forest fragments as barriers to fruit fly dispersal: Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) populations in orchards and adjacent forest fragments in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    McPhail-type traps baited with ammonium acetate and putrescine were used to monitor populations of Anastrepha obliqua and A. suspensa at four sites in Guánica, Puerto Rico; one forest fragment in Ponce, Puerto Rico; in a commercial mango orchard in Guayanilla, PR; and an experimental carambola orcha...

  5. 33 CFR 334.1450 - Atlantic Ocean off north coast of Puerto Rico; practice firing areas, U.S. Army Forces Antilles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off north coast of Puerto Rico; practice firing areas, U.S. Army Forces Antilles. 334.1450 Section 334.1450 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1450 Atlantic Ocean off north coast of Puerto Rico; practice firing...

  6. 33 CFR 334.1450 - Atlantic Ocean off north coast of Puerto Rico; practice firing areas, U.S. Army Forces Antilles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off north coast of Puerto Rico; practice firing areas, U.S. Army Forces Antilles. 334.1450 Section 334.1450 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1450 Atlantic Ocean off north coast of Puerto Rico; practice firing...

  7. 33 CFR 334.1450 - Atlantic Ocean off north coast of Puerto Rico; practice firing areas, U.S. Army Forces Antilles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off north coast of Puerto Rico; practice firing areas, U.S. Army Forces Antilles. 334.1450 Section 334.1450 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1450 Atlantic Ocean off north coast of Puerto Rico; practice firing...

  8. Potentially Traumatic Events, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Depression among Adults in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, Cassie; Berenz, Erin C; Sheerin, Christina; Amstadter, Ananda B; Canino, Glorisa; Silberg, Judy

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to examine the prevalence of potentially traumatic events (PTEs), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; data available in males only), and depressive symptoms in a Puerto Rican sample of 678 adult caretakers (50% female) of twins participating in the Puerto Rican Infant Twin Study. The World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3.0 (CIDI 3.0) was utilized to assess rates of PTEs, PTSD, and depression among male participants while an abbreviated version of the CIDI 3.0 and the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire were administered to females to assess PTEs and depressive symptoms. Significantly more males than females reported exposure to a PTE (76.6% vs. 44.2%, χ(2) = 64.44, p < 0.001). In males, endorsement of multiple PTEs was associated with increased level of PTSD symptomatology (β = 0.33, p < 0.001). With regard to depression, a similar dose-response relationship was found in both males and females, with depressive symptoms increasing as number of PTEs increased (βs = 0.15, 0.16, ps < 0.05). Exposure to an attack with a weapon was significantly associated with increased depression symptoms in both males and females (βs = 0.24, 0.20, ps < 0.01, respectively). These findings highlight the need for identification of putative risk and resilience factors among PTE-exposed individuals in Puerto Rico. PMID:27064295

  9. Potentially Traumatic Events, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Depression among Adults in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Overstreet, Cassie; Berenz, Erin C.; Sheerin, Christina; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Canino, Glorisa; Silberg, Judy

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to examine the prevalence of potentially traumatic events (PTEs), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; data available in males only), and depressive symptoms in a Puerto Rican sample of 678 adult caretakers (50% female) of twins participating in the Puerto Rican Infant Twin Study. The World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3.0 (CIDI 3.0) was utilized to assess rates of PTEs, PTSD, and depression among male participants while an abbreviated version of the CIDI 3.0 and the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire were administered to females to assess PTEs and depressive symptoms. Significantly more males than females reported exposure to a PTE (76.6% vs. 44.2%, χ2 = 64.44, p < 0.001). In males, endorsement of multiple PTEs was associated with increased level of PTSD symptomatology (β = 0.33, p < 0.001). With regard to depression, a similar dose-response relationship was found in both males and females, with depressive symptoms increasing as number of PTEs increased (βs = 0.15, 0.16, ps < 0.05). Exposure to an attack with a weapon was significantly associated with increased depression symptoms in both males and females (βs = 0.24, 0.20, ps < 0.01, respectively). These findings highlight the need for identification of putative risk and resilience factors among PTE-exposed individuals in Puerto Rico. PMID:27064295

  10. History Shaped the Geographic Distribution of Genomic Admixture on the Island of Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Via, Marc; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Fejerman, Laura; Galanter, Joshua; Choudhry, Shweta; Toro-Labrador, Gladys; Viera-Vera, Jorge; Oleksyk, Taras K.; Beckman, Kenneth; Ziv, Elad; Risch, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary genetic variation among Latin Americans human groups reflects population migrations shaped by complex historical, social and economic factors. Consequently, admixture patterns may vary by geographic regions ranging from countries to neighborhoods. We examined the geographic variation of admixture across the island of Puerto Rico and the degree to which it could be explained by historic and social events. We analyzed a census-based sample of 642 Puerto Rican individuals that were genotyped for 93 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to estimate African, European and Native American ancestry. Socioeconomic status (SES) data and geographic location were obtained for each individual. There was significant geographic variation of ancestry across the island. In particular, African ancestry demonstrated a decreasing East to West gradient that was partially explained by historical factors linked to the colonial sugar plantation system. SES also demonstrated a parallel decreasing cline from East to West. However, at a local level, SES and African ancestry were negatively correlated. European ancestry was strongly negatively correlated with African ancestry and therefore showed patterns complementary to African ancestry. By contrast, Native American ancestry showed little variation across the island and across individuals and appears to have played little social role historically. The observed geographic distributions of SES and genetic variation relate to historical social events and mating patterns, and have substantial implications for the design of studies in the recently admixed Puerto Rican population. More generally, our results demonstrate the importance of incorporating social and geographic data with genetics when studying contemporary admixed populations. PMID:21304981

  11. Source and Fate of Sediments in the Bahia de Anasco, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, R. M.

    2005-12-01

    Sediments and wastewater mix in the insular marine waters of the Bah'{i}a de Añasco near Mayag{u}ez, Puerto Rico. Trace metal concentrations in fine sediments deposited in the bay were measured to assess potential impact of the ocean outfall on the biota and habitats that include coral reefs. A Q-mode factor analysis of elemental compositions identified three sediment sources and their relative proportions in 51 core and surficial samples collected from the bay and within the coral reefs: (1) sediments discharged by the R'{i}o Grande de Añasco; (2) calcareous skeletal remains; and (3) sediments discharged by the R'{i}o Guanajibo. The nickel and chromium derived from laterite deposits provide a unique fingerprint for sediments discharged from the R'{i}o Guanajibo. Naturally occurring concentrations of these elements exceed Probable Effect Limits (PEL's: 42 mg/kg for nickel and 160 mg/kg for chromium) in sediments deposited near the river mouth. The detection of mercury at 1 mg/kg in one sample from a core recovered near the wastewater outfall was the only indication of a possible outfall source in the data set. The temporal and spatial variations in source fractions proved useful in determining relative frequencies of historic floods and steady-state circulation patterns off the west coast of Puerto Rico.

  12. Red-tailed Hawk movements and use of habitat in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vilella, Francisco; Nimitz, Wyatt F.

    2012-01-01

    The Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) is a top predator of upland ecosystems in the Greater Antilles. Little information exists on the ecology of the insular forms of this widely distributed species. We studied movements and resource use of the Red-tailed Hawk from 2000 to 2002 in the montane forests of northeastern Puerto Rico. We captured 32 and used 21 radio-marked Red-tailed Hawks to delineate home range, core area shifts, and macrohabitat use in the Luquillo Mountains. Red-tailed Hawks in the Luquillo Mountains frequently perched near the top of canopy emergent trees and were characterized by wide-ranging capabilities and extensive spatial overlap. Home range size averaged 5,022.6 6 832.1 ha (305–11,288 ha) and core areas averaged 564.8 6 90.7 ha (150–1,230 ha). This species had large mean weekly movements (3,286.2 6 348.5 m) and a preference for roadside habitats. Our findings suggest fragmentation of contiguous forest outside protected areas in Puerto Rico may benefit the Red-tailed Hawk

  13. Population Declines of Mountain Coqui (Eleutherodactylus portoricensis) in the Cordillera Central of Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Brittany S.; Ríos-Franceschi, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The Mountain Coqui (Eleutherodactylus portoricensis) is a frog endemic to montane rainforests in the Cordillera Central and Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. Classified as endangered by the IUCN Red List and as vulnerable by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources of Puerto Rico, this species has undergone considerable decline in the Luquillo Mountains. To evaluate the population status of E. portoricensis across its entire range, we conducted ~87 hours of surveys at 18 historical localities and 25 additional localities that we considered suitable for this species. We generated occupancy models to estimate the probability of occurrence at surveyed sites and to identify geographic and climatic factors affecting site occupancy. We also constructed a suitability map to visualize population status in relation to the presence of land cover at elevations where the species has been documented, and determined the dates when populations were last detected at historical localities. Eleutherodactylus portoricensis was detected at 14 of 43 localities, including 10 of 18 historical localities, but it was not detected at any localities west of Aibonito (western Cordillera Central). Occupancy models estimated the probability of occurrence for localities in the western Cordillera Central as zero. Site occupancy was positively associated with montane cloud forest, and negatively associated with the western Cordillera Central, maximum temperature, and precipitation seasonality. The suitability map suggests that declines have occurred despite the presence of suitable habitat. We suggest upgrading the extinction risk of E. portoricensis and potentially developing a captive breeding program for this species. PMID:25685250

  14. Seasonal and habitat effects on dengue and West Nile virus vectors in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua; Amador, Manuel; Barrera, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The presence of West Nile (WNV) and dengue viruses and the lack of recent mosquito surveys in Puerto Rico prompted an investigation on the distribution and abundance of potential arbovirus vectors in the San Juan Metropolitan Area, and their variation with seasons and habitats. We sampled mosquitoes in early and late 2005 in 58 sites from forests, nonforest vegetation, wetlands, and high- and low-density housing areas using ovijars, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention miniature light/CO2 traps, and gravid traps. A total of 28 mosquito species was found. San Juan had potential WNV enzooticvectors (Culex nigripalpus) within and around the city in wetlands and forests, but few were captured in residential areas. A potential WNV bridge vector (Cx. quinquefasciatus) was abundant in urbanized areas, and it was positively correlated with the main dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. High-density housing areas harbored more Ae. aegypti. Container mosquitoes, including Aedes mediovittatus, were more abundant during the climax of the rainy season when most dengue occurs in Puerto Rico. The greatest risk for contracting WNV would be visiting forests and swamps at night. Culex (Culex) and Culex (Melanoconion) mosquito species were more abundant during the transition dry-wet seasons (March-May). PMID:19432067

  15. Progress in the development of a national noise action plan for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicea-Pou, Jose; Navon-Rivera, Milagros

    2005-09-01

    This presentation describes the strategies taken for the development of a noise plan for Puerto Rico. One of the most important initiatives was the establishment of an interagency committee to work on the plan. This committee identified as first priorities the need of information from studies on environmental noise levels and data from noise attitude surveys. The Environmental Quality Board is currently investigating the levels of environmental noise in different locations in the city of San Juan. The preliminary results reinforce the need of actions to control emitters of community noise, like recreational sounds (radios, TV, night clubs) and noise from vehicles with modified mufflers and boom cars. Additionally, to achieve the implementation of the plan and the development of local noise research, we developed an interagency agreement to establish a common fund to support those projects. This year we celebrated the second annual Puerto Rico Noise Awareness Day. The activities included the second symposium on noise pollution, the first art posters contest on noise in our environment for elementary school kids, and the award ceremony, ``Amigos del Menos Ruido.'' All these activities were developed to promote public awareness of this important social and environmental issue.

  16. Population dynamics of Eleutherodactylus coqui in cordillera forest reserves of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, J.H.; Vilella, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Various aspects of population structure and dynamics of Eleutherodactylus coqui in two forest reserves (Maricao and Guilarte) of the central mountain range of Puerto Rico were determined between July 1997 and June 1998. Adult density ranged from 8-25 animals/100 m2 for the wet season and 3-19 animals/100 m2 for the dry season. Abundance of froglets and juveniles was also greater in the wet season compared to the dry season. By contrast, egg mass counts were greater in the dry season compared to the wet season. Adult body size increased from wet to dry season as population density declined and was found to differ significantly between forests. Adult E. coqui trapped at similar elevations were larger in Guilarte compared to those in Maricao. Average body size for Maricao and Guilarte populations were smaller than those reported for populations in eastern Puerto Rico. Comparing average snout-vent length among frogs from the Luquillo Mountains, Guilarte Forest, and Maricao Forest, a gradient of decreasing body size was observed from east to west across the island.

  17. Neonatal Hyperglycemia due to Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Fargas-Berríos, N; García-Fragoso, L; García-García, I; Valcárcel, M

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hyperglycemia is a metabolic disorder found in the neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a very uncommon cause of hyperglycemia in the newborn, occurring in 1 in every 400,000 births. There are two subtypes of neonatal diabetes mellitus: permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). We describe a term, small for gestational age, female neonate with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus who presented with poor feeding tolerance and vomiting associated with hyperglycemia (385 mg/dL), glycosuria, and metabolic acidosis within the first 12 hours of life. The neonate was treated with intravenous insulin, obtaining a slight control of hyperglycemia. An adequate glycemia was achieved at 5 weeks of life. The molecular studies showed complete loss of maternal methylation at the TND differentially methylated region on chromosome 6q24. The etiology of this neonate's hyperglycemia was a hypomethylation of the maternal TND locus. A rare cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus must be considered if a neonate presents refractory hyperglycemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Puerto Rico of transient neonatal mellitus due to the uncommon mechanism of maternal hypomethylation of the TND locus. Its prevalence in Puerto Rico is unknown. PMID:26576310

  18. Vertebrate hosts of Aedes aegypti and Aedes mediovittatus (Diptera: Culicidae) in rural Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Roberto; Bingham, Andrea M; Hassan, Hassan K; Amador, Manuel; Mackay, Andrew J; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2012-07-01

    The distribution of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L.), the main vector of dengue viruses (DENV) worldwide, overlaps with Aedes (Gymnometopa) mediovittatus (Coquillett), the Caribbean treehole mosquito, in urban, suburban, and rural areas. Ae. mediovittatus is a competent vector of DENV with high rates of vertical DENV transmission in the laboratory. This study determined whether Ae. mediovittatus feeds on humans and compared its feeding patterns with co-occurring Ae. aegypti in two rural communities of Puerto Rico. Adult mosquitoes were captured for three consecutive days every week from July 2009 to May 2010 using BG-Sentinel traps with skin lures that were placed in the front yard of houses in both communities. Three methods were used to identify the 756 bloodmeals obtained in this study: a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for humans and dogs targeting cytochrome b; a PCR targeting the 16S rRNA; and a nested PCR targeting cytochrome b. Ae. mediovittatus fed mostly on humans (45-52%) and dogs (28-32%) but also on cats, cows, horses, rats, pigs, goats, sheep, and chickens. Ae. aegypti fed mostly on humans (76-79%) and dogs (18-21%) but also on cats, horses, and chickens. Our results indicate that Ae. mediovittatus may have a relatively high rate of vector-human contact, which might facilitate virus transmission or harborage in rural areas of Puerto Rico. PMID:22897052

  19. Estimation of magnitude and frequency of floods for streams in Puerto Rico : new empirical models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramos-Gines, Orlando

    1999-01-01

    Flood-peak discharges and frequencies are presented for 57 gaged sites in Puerto Rico for recurrence intervals ranging from 2 to 500 years. The log-Pearson Type III distribution, the methodology recommended by the United States Interagency Committee on Water Data, was used to determine the magnitude and frequency of floods at the gaged sites having 10 to 43 years of record. A technique is presented for estimating flood-peak discharges at recurrence intervals ranging from 2 to 500 years for unregulated streams in Puerto Rico with contributing drainage areas ranging from 0.83 to 208 square miles. Loglinear multiple regression analyses, using climatic and basin characteristics and peak-discharge data from the 57 gaged sites, were used to construct regression equations to transfer the magnitude and frequency information from gaged to ungaged sites. The equations have contributing drainage area, depth-to-rock, and mean annual rainfall as the basin and climatic characteristics in estimating flood peak discharges. Examples are given to show a step-by-step procedure in calculating a 100-year flood at a gaged site, an ungaged site, a site near a gaged location, and a site between two gaged sites.

  20. HISTORICAL CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER RESOURCES IN THE NORTH COAST KARST AQUIFERS OF PUERTO RICO

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Ingrid; Irizarry, Celys; Steele, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    The North Coast Karst Aquifer System of Puerto Rico is the island’s most productive aquifer. The characteristics that make it highly productive also make it vulnerable to contamination. This research, which addresses the historical contamination of groundwater resources in the northern karst region was conducted through integration of spatial hydrogeologic and contaminant concentration data in the La Plata-Arecibo area. The study used GIS technologies and focused on phthalates and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) and phthalates due to their ubiquitous presence in the environment as well as their presence in listed and potential superfund sites in Puerto Rico and U.S. and potential for exposure and health impacts. Results show an extensive historical contamination of the groundwater resources in the northern karst aquifers. Long-term contamination indicates the aquifers’ large capacity for storing and releasing contaminants and reflects a long-term potential for exposure. The degradation of this important water resource has resulted in a subsequent reduction of the extraction capacity and an increase in the cost of use. PMID:24772197

  1. Capacity Needs in Community-Based Organizations for Enhancing Translational Research in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Martnez, Giovanni; Sardias, Lili M.; Acosta-Perez, Edna; Medina, Lizbeth; Rivera, Mirza; Pattatucci, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Background In an effort to form and sustain communityacademic partnerships (CAPs) to enhance clinical and translational research, an assessment of needs for selecting and implementing evidence-based programs (EBPs) was conducted among a group of community-based organizations (CBOs) throughout Puerto Rico. Methods The survey was based on an instrument developed by the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network. It assessed specific service information, program selection/implementation processes, knowledge and perception of EBPs, funding venues, evaluation processes, and capacity and training needs. Recruitment consisted of contacting 100 nonprofit organizations in Puerto Rico that work or address specific health areas, namely, cancer, neurological disorders, HIV, and cardiovascular health. Results The survey revealed wide variability in understanding what constitutes an EBP. Training needs for building a productive translational research process also were identified. Prominent among these were securing funding for ongoing operations, utilizing data for decision making, developing collaborations, managing information, conducting community needs assessments, and program evaluation. Conclusions These findings point to important implications for promoting communitycampus partnerships for advancing clinical and translational research. PMID:24859102

  2. Insular Area energy vulnerability, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands. Technical Appendix 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.; Willard, E.E.; Efferding, S.

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared in response to Section 1406 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 192-486). The Act directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to ``conduct a study of the implications of the unique vulnerabilities of the insular areas to an oil supply disruption,`` and to ``outline how the insular areas shall gain access to vital oil supplies during times of national emergency.`` The Act defines the insular areas to be the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico in the Caribbean, and Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), and Palau in the Pacific. This report is the analysis of Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. In the study, ``unique vulnerabilities`` were defined as susceptibility to: (1) more frequent or more likely interruptions of oil supplies compared to the mainland, and/or (2) disproportionately larger or more likely economic losses in the event of an oil supply disruption. In order to asses unique vulnerabilities, the study examined in the insular areas` experience during past global disruptions of oil supplies and during local emergencies caused by natural disasters. The effects of several possible future global disruptions and local emergencies were also analyzed. Analyses were based on historical data, simulations using energy and economic models, and interviews with officials in the insular governments and the energy industry.

  3. Sociodemographic patterns of household water-use costs in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue; Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Padilla, Ingrid; Meeker, John D; Cordero, Jose F; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2015-08-15

    Variability of household water-use costs across different sociodemographic groups in Puerto Rico is evaluated using census microdata from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS). Multivariate analyses such as multiple linear regression (MLR) and factor analysis (FA) are used to classify, extract and interpret the household water-use costs. The FA results suggest two principal varifactors in explaining the variability of household water-use costs (64% in 2000 and 50% in 2010), which are grouped into a soft coefficient (social, economic and demographic characteristics of household residents, i.e., age, size, income, education) and a hard coefficient (dwelling conditions, i.e., number of rooms, units in the building, building age). The demographic profile of a high water-use household in Puerto Rico tends to be that of renters, people who live in larger or older buildings, people living in metro areas, or those with higher education level and higher income. The findings and discussions from this study will help decision makers to plan holistic and integrated water management to achieve water sustainability. PMID:25897735

  4. The breeding ecology of sea birds on Monito Island, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kepler, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    Monito Island, a 15-ha plateau surrounded by steep undercut cliffs, lies halfway between Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. Seven of the 9 sea birds are known to breed, and 2 (Blue-faced Booby and Laughing Gull) are here recorded as breeders in Puerto Rico for the first time. The Pelecaniformes are represented by 5 species, the White-tailed Tropicbird, the 3 pan-tropical boobies, and the Magnificent Frigatebird. The boobies all have long but annual breeding seasons, from fall through spring, showing a distinct breeding hiatus in the hot summer months, although some late-nesters may care for chicks during this period. The Magnificent Frigatebird has the most synchronous breeding, with a laying peak from late October to early December, when 70% of the population lay eggs. Four larids (Laughing Gull, Bridled Tern, Sooty Tern, and Brown Noddy) are summer residents vacating the island in August-September, and returning again in March-April. In general, they nest during the pelecaniform non-breeding season. The sea birds show a great range in nest site preference, with little overlap among them. Their diversity results from a combination of isolation, rugged cliffs, and the structural diversity of Monito Island. Although currently one of the outstanding sea bird colonies in the West Indies, Monito is threatened, and the colonies could be lost unless they are legally protected.

  5. Measuring HIV felt stigma: a culturally adapted scale targeting PLWHA in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Julio Cesar; Puig, Marieva; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Morales, Marangelie; Asencio, Gloria; Sala, Ana Cecilia; Castro, Eida; Santori, Carmen Vélez; Santiago, Lydia; Zorrilla, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to culturally adapt and validate a scale to measure HIV-related felt stigma in a group of People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Puerto Rico. The researchers conducted a two-phase cross-sectional study with 216 participants (60, first phase; 156, second phase). The first phase consisted of the cultural adaptation of the scale; the second evaluated its psychometric properties. After conducting a factor analysis, a 17-item scale, the HIV Felt-Stigma Scale (HFSS), resulted. Participants completed the Puerto Rico Comprehensive Center for the Study of Health Disparities Socio-demographic Questionnaire, the HFSS, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, and the Sexual Abuse dimension of the History of Abuse Questionnaire; the case managers completed the Case Manager Stigma Guide with subjects. The HFSS measures four dimensions: personalized stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concern with public attitudes. The alpha and Pearson correlation coefficients (0.91 and 0.68, respectively) indicated satisfactory validity and reliability; the scale suggested adequate convergent validity. The HFSS is a culturally sensitive instrument that fills the existing gap in the measurement of felt stigma in Spanish-speaking PLWHA. PMID:20665283

  6. Mold populations and dust mite allergen concentrations in house dust samples from across Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Vesper, Stephen; Choi, Hyunok; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Acosta, Luis M; Divjan, Adnan; Bolaños-Rosero, Benjamin; Rivera-Mariani, Felix; Chew, Ginger L

    2016-04-01

    Lifetime childhood asthma prevalence (LCAP) percentages in Puerto Rico Health Regions (HR) are substantially higher in northeastern vs. southwestern HR. Higher average relative humidity in the northeast might promote mold and mite exposures and possibly asthma prevalence. To test this hypothesis, mold contamination, Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) values were measured in floor dust (n = 26) and dust mite allergen concentrations in bed dust (n = 14). For this analysis, the eight HR were divided into those with LCAP > 30 % (n = 3) and <  30 % (n = 5). The average ERMI value was significantly greater (Wilcoxon Rank Sum, p < 0.001) in high than in low LCAP HR (14.5 vs. 9.3). The dust mite antigens Der p 1, Der f 1, and Blo t 5 were detected in 90 % of bed samples, but the concentrations were not significantly different in high vs. low LCAP HR. Mold exposures might partially explain the differences in LCAP HR in Puerto Rico. PMID:26412677

  7. Levels of Felt Stigma among a Group of People with HIV in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Julio; Morales, Marangelie; Castro, Eida; Puig, Marieva; Vélez, Carmen N.; Santiago, Lydia; Zorrilla, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV felt stigma is a major problem needing to be addressed because of its association with poor treatment adherence, decreases in help-seeking behaviors, high-risk sexual conduct, emotional discomfort, and the reduction of well-being in people with HIV/AIDS (PWHA). The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of felt stigma among PWHA in Puerto Rico. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 249 subjects (59% men, 41% women). Participants completed the Puerto Rico Comprehensive Center for HIV Disparities (PR-CCHD) Sociodemographic Questionnaire and the HIV Felt Sigma Scale. Results 80% of the subjects showed some level of felt stigma. Women showed significantly higher levels of HIV-related felt stigma than did men. Disclosure, negative self-image, and public attitude scores were also higher in women than in men. Sociodemographic variables such as age, marital status, employment status, income, and educational level showed significant associations with felt stigma and its dimensions. Conclusion Results of this study evidence the need to develop culturally sensitive intervention models to reduce the felt-stigma burden in PWHA. PMID:22783698

  8. Profiling of Alzheimer’s disease patients in Puerto Rico: A comparison of two distinct socioeconomic areas

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Mercado, Clara L; Figueroa, Raúl; Acosta, Heriberto; Arnold, Steven E; Vega, Irving E

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The Latino/Hispanic community in the United States is at higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than other ethnic groups. Specifically, Caribbean Hispanics showed a more severe Alzheimer’s disease symptomatology than any other ethnic group. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the mortality rate associated with Alzheimer’s disease in Puerto Rico is higher than that reported in the United States. Moreover, the mortality rate associated with Alzheimer’s disease was higher among Puerto Rican living in Puerto Rico than those in the mainland United States. There is also a differential geographical distribution of mortality rate associated with Alzheimer’s disease in Puerto Rico, which may be associated with differential socioeconomic status and/or access to healthcare. However, there is no information regarding the clinical profile of Alzheimer’s disease patients in Puerto Rico. Methods: Here, we present the results of a retrospective study directed to profile Alzheimer’s disease patients clustered into two groups based on areas previously determined with low (Metro Region) and high (Northwest-Central Region) mortality rate associated with Alzheimer’s disease in Puerto Rico. Results: Significant difference in the age-at-diagnosis and years of education was found among patients within the two studied regions. Despite these differences, both regions showed comparable levels of initial and last Mini Mental State Examination scores and rate of cognitive decline. Significant difference was also observed in the occurance of co-morbidities associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Conclusions: The differential profile of Alzheimer’s disease patients correlated with differences in socioeconomic status between these two regions, suggesting that covariant associated with social status may contribute to increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Further studies should be conducted to determine the role of socioeconomic factors and healthy living practices as risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26893902

  9. Climate as a driver of tropical insular diversity: comparative phylogeography of two ecologically distinctive frogs in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Brittany S.; Rodríguez-Robles, Javier A.; Cook, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of late Quaternary climate on distributions and evolutionary dynamics of insular species are poorly understood in most tropical archipelagoes. We used ecological niche models under past and current climate to derive hypotheses regarding how stable climatic conditions shaped genetic diversity in two ecologically distinctive frogs in Puerto Rico. Whereas the Mountain Coquí, Eleutherodactylus portoricensis, is restricted to montane forest in the Cayey and Luquillo Mountains, the Red-eyed Coquí, E. antillensis, is a habitat generalist distributed across the entire Puerto Rican Bank (Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, excluding St. Croix). To test our hypotheses, we conducted phylogeographic and population genetic analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear loci of each species across their range in Puerto Rico. Patterns of population differentiation in E. portoricensis, but not in E. antillensis, supported our hypotheses. For E. portoricensis, these patterns include: individuals isolated by long-term unsuitable climate in the Río Grande de Loíza Basin in eastern Puerto Rico belong to different genetic clusters; past and current climate strongly predicted genetic differentiation; and Cayey and Luquillo Mountains populations split prior to the last interglacial. For E. antillensis, these patterns include: genetic clusters did not fully correspond to predicted long-term unsuitable climate; and past and current climate weakly predicted patterns of genetic differentiation. Genetic signatures in E. antillensis are consistent with a recent range expansion into western Puerto Rico, possibly resulting from climate change and anthropogenic influences. As predicted, regions with a large area of long-term suitable climate were associated with higher genetic diversity in both species, suggesting larger and more stable populations. Finally, we discussed the implications of our findings for developing evidence-based management decisions for E. portoricensis, a taxon of special concern. Our findings illustrate the role of persistent suitable climatic conditions in promoting the persistence and diversification of tropical island organisms. PMID:26508809

  10. Caracteristicas de los Estudiantes de Ciencias Agricolas y de Economia Domestica de la Universidad de Puerto Rico (Characteristics of the Agricultural Science and Home Economics Students of the University of Puerto Rico). Publicacion 135.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lube, Edna Droz; Calero, Reinaldo

    As part of a U.S. Department of Agriculture research project on young adults, a questionnaire was distributed in the fall of 1977 to all agriculture science and home economics students at the University of Puerto Rico in order to determine their personal and parental backgrounds; work, college, and high school experiences; life goals and attitudes…

  11. Factors influencing tropical island freshwater fishes:Species, status, and management implications in puerto rico [Factores que influencian a los peces tropicales de agua dulce: Especies, estado actual e implicaciones para el manejo en Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wesley, Neal J.; Lilyestrom, C.G.; Kwak, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic effects including river regulation, watershed development, contamination, and fish introductions have substantially affected the majority of freshwater habitats in Europe and North America. This pattern of resource development and degradation is widespread in the tropics, and often little is known about the resources before they are lost. This article describes the freshwater resources of Puerto Rico and identifies factors that threaten conservation of native fishes. The fishes found in freshwater habitats of Puerto Rico represent a moderately diverse assemblage composed of 14 orders, 29 families, and 82 species. There are fewer than 10 species of native peripherally-freshwater fish that require a link to marine systems. Introductions of nonindigenous species have greatly expanded fish diversity in freshwater systems, and native estuarine and marine species (18 families) also commonly enter lowland rivers and brackish lagoons. Environmental alterations, including land use and development, stream channelization, pollution, and the impoundment of rivers, combined with nonnative species introductions threaten the health and sustainability of aquatic resources in Puerto Rico. Six principal areas for attention that are important influences on the current and future status of the freshwater fish resources of Puerto Rico are identified and discussed.

  12. Stratigraphy, Structure, and Geologic and Coastal Hazards in the Peñuelas to Salinas Area, Southern Puerto Rico: A Compendium of Published Literature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús

    2007-01-01

    The Puerto Rico Electrical Power Authority has proposed construction of a pipeline to convey natural gas from the municipio of Pe?uelas to the Aguirre thermoelectric power plant in the municipio of Salinas in southern Puerto Rico. To ensure that the geologic conditions along the possible routes do not represent a threat to the physical integrity of the natural gas pipeline, and thus comply with State and Federal regulations, the Puerto Rico Electrical Power Authority requested the U.S. Geological Survey to provide a synthesis of published literature of the geology of the coastal plain in the Pe?uelas to Salinas area. The study area is located in part of the Southern Coastal Plain of Puerto Rico. In the area that extends from the municipio of Pe?uelas eastward to the Laguna de las Salinas at Ponce, a distance of about 5 miles, the study area is underlain by middle Tertiary carbonate units. Eastward from the Laguna de las Salinas to the pipeline terminus at the Aguirre power plant in Salinas, a distance of about 30 miles, the terrain is underlain by fan-delta deposits of Quaternary age. The carbonate units and the fan-delta deposits are underlain by early Tertiary and older-age volcaniclastics with subordinate sedimentary rocks and lavas. The Great Southern Puerto Rico Fault Zone is the principal geologic structural feature in southern Puerto Rico. At present, the Great Southern Puerto Rico Fault Zone is considered largely quiescent, although it apparently is associated with minor earthquakes. There is no evidence of terrestrial, late Quaternary faulting within the Pe?uelas to Salinas area. Seismic activity in this area mostly originates from extension zones of more distal shallow sources such as Mona Canyon to the northwest and the Anegada Trough northeast of the island of Puerto Rico. The magnitude of completeness of earthquakes in the study area ranges from 2.0 to 2.5. The seismic density for the southern coast including the study area is about 0.128 earthquakes per square mile, which is close to the average for southwestern Puerto Rico. The estimated maximum peak ground acceleration most likely to occur in the study area, due to shallow depth seismicity with 2 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years, is 9 feet per second squared, as obtained by modeling results. The estimated peak ground acceleration with 2 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years, due to deep seismicity is 7 feet per second squared. In Ponce, the probability of exceedance per year is higher than 0.1 for the peak ground acceleration values less than 1 that result from shallow depth seismicity sources such as the Mona Passage extension zone. The potential for liquefaction due to seismic activity may exist in areas near the coastline that have loosely to poorly consolidated sedimentary deposits and a water table close to or at the land surface. Slope failure susceptibility within the study area, due to rainfall and seismic activity, may be limited to the area that extends westward from Laguna de las Salinas to Pe?uelas. In this area, foothills with slopes exceeding 10 degrees are close to the coastline and are underlain by clayey limestone and marls. In the remaining part of the study area, eastward from Laguna de las Salinas to Salinas, the land is either nearly flat or has a slope of less than 10 degrees; consequently, the susceptibility to landsliding (slope failure) caused by seismic activity and rainfall is considered to be minimal or nonexistent. Based on modeling results from a previous study, the estimated maximum inland extent of tsunami-induced flooding is 2,600 feet in the Laguna de las Salinas and Boca Chica, located in Ponce and Juana Diaz, respectively. Flooding about 3,000 and 2,800 feet from the coastline are estimated for areas near Punta Cabullon and Jobos areas, respectively. According to the modeling results, the estimated maximum runup of the tsunami-induced flooding ranges from 9 to 14 feet for the Boca Chica and Pu

  13. Possible environmental factors underlying amphibian decline in eastern Puerto Rico: Analysis of U.S. government data archives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallard, R.F.

    2001-01-01

    The past three decades have seen major declines in populations of several species of amphibians at high elevations in eastern Puerto Rico, a region unique in the humid tropics because of the degree of environmental monitoring that has taken place through the efforts of U.S. government agencies. I examined changes in environmental conditions by examining time-series data sets that extend back at least into the 1980s, a period when frog populations were declining. The data include forest cover; annual mean, minimum, and maximum daily temperature; annual rainfall; rain and stream chemistry; and atmospheric-dust transport. I examined satellite imagery and air-chemistry samples from a single National Aeronautics and Space Administration aircraft flight across the Caribbean showing patches of pollutants, described as thin sheets or lenses, in the lower troposphere. The main source of these pollutants appeared to be fires from land clearing and deforestation, primarily in Africa. Some pollutant concentrations were high and, in the case of ozone, approached health limits set for urban air. Urban pollution impinging on Puerto Rico, dust generation from Africa (potential soil pathogens), and tropical forest burning (gaseous pollutants) have all increased during the last three decades, overlapping the timing of amphibian declines in eastern Puerto Rico. None of the data sets pointed directly to changes so extreme that they might be considered a direct lethal cause of amphibian declines in Puerto Rico. More experimental research is required to link any of these environmental factors to this problem.

  14. Las Nuevas Tecnologias de la Informacion en las Bibliotecas Publicas de Puerto Rico: Impacto en el Personal Bibliotecario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Suarez, Damalin Judith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the status of Puerto Rico's public libraries to new information technologies. Obtaining the views of library staff working in the same, characteristics and attitudes and knowledge in new information technologies needed to serve as information specialists in libraries. To know the opinion of the…

  15. Environmental factors influencing the development of black leaf streak (Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet) on bananas in Puerto Rico.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of environmental factors on the development of black leaf streak (BLS) were studied in Puerto Rico under field conditions. Environmental factors evaluated included temperature, relative humidity, rainfall and solar radiation. Their effect on BLS was determined by recording the youngest...

  16. 76 FR 11681 - Improving Public Safety Communications in the 800 MHz Band; New 800 MHz Band Plan for Puerto Rico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... systems operating in the band, 69 FR 67823, November 22, 2004. In a Third Report and Order and Third... plan in the USVI as it had adopted in Puerto Rico, 75 FR 35363, June 22, 2010. The Bureau received two... orderly and efficient transition to the new 800 MHz band plan in the USVI. DATES: Effective March 3,...

  17. A Qualitative Study of Providers' Perception of Adherence of Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero-Mendez, Marta; Dawson-Rose, Carol S.; Solis-Baez, Solymar S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines healthcare providers' perceptions regarding experiences and factors that contribute to adherent and non-adherent behaviors to HIV treatment among women living with HIV infection in Puerto Rico and describes strategies implemented to improve adherence. Providers' accounts revealed that women with HIV infection are living "beyond…

  18. Analysis of Factors that Affect the Teacher Certification Exam Results in a University System in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garofalo, Jorge H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors that affect a teacher preparation exam results within a University System in Puerto Rico. Using Bertalanffy's System Theory as theoretical framework, this mixed methods study examined factors in the university system that could have affected student's preparation for a teacher exam (PCMAS by its…

  19. Development of Site Specific Climate Scenarios for River and Sediment discharge Using Macrophysical Climate Models: An Example from Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change and land use change are the primary drivers of changes in ecosystem services globally. Global climate models suggest that in the future Puerto Rico and other small islands in the Caribbean will experience changes in rainfall seasonality. It is anticipated that wa...

  20. First report of Lasiodiplodia theobromae causing inflorescence blight and fruit rot of longan (Dimocarpus longan L.) in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Longan is a tropical fruit tree in the Sapindaceae family. During a disease survey from 2008 to 2010, fruit rot and inflorescence blight (rotting of the rachis, rachilla and flowers) were observed at the USDA-ARS Research Farm in Isabela, Puerto Rico. Tissue sections (1 mm2) of diseased inflorescenc...

  1. 77 FR 70417 - Foreign-Trade Zone 7-Mayaguez, Puerto Rico; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Pepsi...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 7--Mayaguez, Puerto Rico; Notification of Proposed Production...-Trade Zones Board (15 CFR Sec. 400.22) was received on November 5, 2012. The PCPRD facility is located... for public inspection at the Office of the Executive Secretary, Foreign-Trade Zones Board, Room...

  2. Public Pedagogy in the Creative Strike: Destabilizing Boundaries and Re-Imagining Resistance in the University of Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I examine key symbols and strategies mobilized by students during the first system-wide strike in the University of Puerto Rico's history. I argue that these acts of creative cultural production not only supported the growth of participatory politics within the mobilization but that they also were tools for enacting public…

  3. Spanish through Authentic Literature and Traditional Art (of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic). A Teacher's Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. Inst. for Urban and Minority Education.

    This guide was compiled of instructional materials designed by teachers of Spanish at the elementary and secondary levels. The materials consist of lesson plans and readings, each with a slightly different perspective, which collectively give a comprehensive view of the history and culture of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. Many lessons…

  4. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, October 22, 1976-February 24, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    The Dental Auxiliary Department of the University of Puerto Rico designed a career option dental auxiliary training program which is a step ladder program with three exit points over a period of two academic years. The first option is a six-month track to train a traditional chairside dental auxiliary. The second option is a nine-month track to

  5. First report of Lasmenia sp. causing rachis necrosis, flower abortion, fruit rot and leaf spots on rambutan in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rambutan is an exotic tropical fruit that has increased in commercial importance for growers in Puerto Rico. In 2008 and 2009, fruit rot and lesions on both leaves and inflorescences were observed. A total of 276 diseased samples from these plant parts were collected at commercial orchards, Agricult...

  6. 78 FR 54623 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 7-Mayaguez, Puerto Rico; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... Production Activity; Puma Energy Caribe, LLC (Biodiesel Blending); Bayamon, Puerto Rico Puma Energy Caribe... Subzone 7F. The current request would add the blending of biodiesel to the scope of authority. Pursuant to... the specification of biodiesel (B100) (duty rate--4.6%). Public comment is invited from...

  7. 78 FR 37208 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of Puerto Rico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... otherwise be prohibited by regulations at 50 CFR part 622, as they pertain to Caribbean reef fish managed by... (when possible). After sampling is complete, the fish collected would be donated to the Puerto Rico Zoo...: Vermilion snapper (in Snapper Unit 1)--40 lb, (18 kg), round weight; gray, lane, mutton, dog,...

  8. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, October 22, 1976-February 24, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    The Dental Auxiliary Department of the University of Puerto Rico designed a career option dental auxiliary training program which is a step ladder program with three exit points over a period of two academic years. The first option is a six-month track to train a traditional chairside dental auxiliary. The second option is a nine-month track to…

  9. Differential Effects of Linguistic Imperialism on Second Language Learning: Americanisation in Puerto Rico Versus Russification in Estonia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clachar, Arlene

    1998-01-01

    Explores how Americanization and Russification differed in terms of their imperialist language policies and how these policies led two colonialized societies, Puerto Rico and Estonia, to respond in dramatically different ways to the pressures to learn English and Russian respectively. (Author/VWL)

  10. 75 FR 27225 - Hass Avocados from Mexico; Importation into the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and Other Changes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ...We are proposing to amend our fruits and vegetables regulations to provide for the importation of Hass avocados from Mexico into Puerto Rico under the same systems approach currently required for the importation of Hass avocados into all States of the United States from Michoac[aacute]n, Mexico. The systems approach requirements include trapping, orchard certification, limited production area,......

  11. Analysis of Factors that Affect the Teacher Certification Exam Results in a University System in Puerto Rico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garofalo, Jorge H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors that affect a teacher preparation exam results within a University System in Puerto Rico. Using Bertalanffy's System Theory as theoretical framework, this mixed methods study examined factors in the university system that could have affected student's preparation for a teacher exam (PCMAS by its

  12. Effects of Hydrogeologic Conditions on Groundwater Contamination of CVOCs in the North Coast Karst Aquifer of Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Torres, N. I.; Howard, J.; Padilla, I. Y.; Torres, P.; Cotto, I.; Irizarry, C.

    2012-12-01

    The karst system of northern Puerto Rico is the most productive aquifer of the island. It serves freshwater to industrial, domestic and agricultural purposes, and contributes to the ecological integrity of the region. The same characteristics that make this a highly productive aquifer, make it vulnerable to contamination of groundwater. Of particular importance is contamination with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), which have been related to preterm birth problems. A great extent of CVOC contamination has been seen in the North Coast of Puerto Rico since the 1970s. The main purposes of this study are (1) to relate the water quality of wells and springs with the hydrogeological conditions in the north coast limestone aquifer of Puerto Rico, and (2) to make a statistical analysis of the historical groundwater contamination in that area. To achieve these objectives, groundwater samples are collected from wells and springs during dry and wet seasons. Results show that trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and chloroform (TCM) are frequently detected in groundwater samples. A greater detection of CVOCs is detected during the wet season than the dry season. This is attributed to a greater capacity to flush stored contaminants during the wet season. Historical analysis of contamination in the north coast of Puerto Rico shows a high capacity of the aquifer to store and release contaminants. Future work will be focused the statistical analysis of the historical groundwater contamination data to understand the behavior of the contaminants in different hydrologic conditions.

  13. 75 FR 35363 - Improving Public Safety Communications in the 800 MHz Band; New 800 MHz Band Plan for Puerto Rico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (1998). Electronic Filers: Comments may be..., 69 FR 67823, November 22, 2004. In a Second Memorandum Opinion and Order, adopted in May 2007, the... markets, 72 FR 39756, July 20, 2007. Rather than specify a band plan for Puerto Rico, the...

  14. 78 FR 28167 - Special Local Regulation, Cruce a Nado Internacional de la Bahia de Ponce Puerto Rico, Bahia de...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... Puerto Rico, a swimming event. The event is scheduled to take place on Sunday, September 1,...

  15. 75 FR 30024 - Comment Sought on the Puerto Rico Telephone Company, Inc. Petition for Reconsideration of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    .... 05-337, CC Docket No. 96-45, and WC Docket No. 03-109 (75 FR 25113, May 7, 2010), the Commission... Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121, May 1, 1998. Electronic Filers: Comments may... COMMISSION Comment Sought on the Puerto Rico Telephone Company, Inc. Petition for Reconsideration of...

  16. 77 FR 12007 - Foreign-Trade Zone 7, Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority, Baxter Healthcare of Puerto Rico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... accordance with T/IM procedures, as authorized by FTZ Board Orders 1347 (69 FR 52857, 8/30/04) and 1480 (71 FR 55422, 9/22/06), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (76 FR 77479, 12... Healthcare of Puerto Rico, (Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Intravenous Bags and Administration Sets);...

  17. TECHNICAL REPORT ON STANDARDIZATION OF THE GENERAL APTITUDE TEST BATTERY, GENERAL WORKING POPULATION NORMS STUDY FOR PUERTO RICO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Employment Security (DOL), Washington, DC.

    THE POSSIBILITY OF PREDICTIVE ERROR WHEN APPLYING U.S. MAINLAND NORMS FOR THE GENERAL APTITUDE TEST BATTERY TO THE EMPLOYMENT COUNSELING AND SELECTION PROCESS IN PUERTO RICO, PROMPTED A STUDY TO ESTABLISH LOCAL NORMS FOR THE SPANISH LANGUAGE VERSION, BATERIA GENERAL DE PRUEBAS DE APTITUD. A STRATIFIED QUOTA SAMPLE OF 1,500 PERSONS WAS SELECTED…

  18. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  19. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  20. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico 165.776 Section 165.776 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific...

  1. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico. (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  2. Las Nuevas Tecnologias de la Informacion en las Bibliotecas Publicas de Puerto Rico: Impacto en el Personal Bibliotecario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Suarez, Damalin Judith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the status of Puerto Rico's public libraries to new information technologies. Obtaining the views of library staff working in the same, characteristics and attitudes and knowledge in new information technologies needed to serve as information specialists in libraries. To know the opinion of the

  3. Groundwater flow, variability, and transport pathways in the Mar Negro of the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (JBNERR) is a semi-enclosed ecosystem along the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. Agriculture, including vegetable, row crop, tree fruit, pasture, and poultry, is an important land use within the watershed. To better understand the potential impact of ...

  4. Leaching Behavior of “AGREMAX” Collected from a Coal-Fired Power Plant in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reoprt provides results using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to illustrate how pH-dependence and percolation are related for a material being widely used in Puerto Rico for structural fill, road base, and other applications. Eluate concentrations from...

  5. Introducing ShakeMap to potential users in Puerto Rico using scenarios of damaging historical and probable earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerfano, V. A.; Cua, G.; von Hillebrandt, C.; Saffar, A.

    2007-12-01

    The island of Puerto Rico has a long history of damaging earthquakes. Major earthquakes from off-shore sources have affected Puerto Rico in 1520, 1615, 1670, 1751, 1787, 1867, and 1918 (Mueller et al, 2003; PRSN Catalogue). Recent trenching has also yielded evidence of possible M7.0 events inland (Prentice, 2000). The high seismic hazard, large population, high tsunami potential and relatively poor construction practice can result in a potentially devastating combination. Efficient emergency response in event of a large earthquake will be crucial to minimizing the loss of life and disruption of lifeline systems in Puerto Rico. The ShakeMap system (Wald et al, 2004) developed by the USGS to rapidly display and disseminate information about the geographical distribution of ground shaking (and hence potential damage) following a large earthquake has proven to be a vital tool for post earthquake emergency response efforts, and is being adopted/emulated in various seismically active regions worldwide. Implementing a robust ShakeMap system is among the top priorities of the Puerto Rico Seismic Network. However, the ultimate effectiveness of ShakeMap in post- earthquake response depends not only on its rapid availability, but also on the effective use of the information it provides. We developed ShakeMap scenarios of a suite of damaging historical and probable earthquakes that severely impact San Juan, Ponce, and Mayagüez, the 3 largest cities in Puerto Rico. Earthquake source parameters were obtained from McCann and Mercado (1998); and Huérfano (2004). For historical earthquakes that generated tsunamis, tsunami inundation maps were generated using the TIME method (Shuto, 1991). The ShakeMap ground shaking maps were presented to local and regional governmental and emergency response agencies at the 2007 Annual conference of the Puerto Rico Emergency Management and Disaster Administration in San Juan, PR, and at numerous other emergency management talks and training sessions. Economic losses are estimated using the ShakeMap scenario ground motions (Saffar, 2007). The calibration tasks necessary in generating these scenarios (developing Vs30 maps, attenuation relationships) complement the on-going efforts of the Puerto Rico Seismic Network to generate ShakeMaps in real-time.

  6. Hydrogeology of the North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús

    1995-01-01

    The North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico is composed of three regional hydrogeologic units: an upper aquifer that contains an underlying saltwater zone near the coast, a middle confining unit, and a lower aquifer. The upper aquifer is unconfined, except in coastal areas where it is locally confined by fine-grained surficial deposits. The upper aquifer is mostly absent in the Rio Piedras area of northeastern Puerto Rico. The confining unit is composed of calcareous claystone, marl, chalky and silicified limestone, and locally clayey fine-grained sandstone. Test hole data indicate that the confining unit is locally leaky in the San Juan metropolitan area. An artesian zone of limited areal extent exists within the middle confining unit, in the central part of the study area. The lower aquifer mostly contains ground water under confined conditions except in the outcrop areas, where it is unconfined. The lower aquifer is thickest and most transmissive in the north-central part of the study area. Water in the lower aquifer is fresh throughout much of the area, but is brackish in some areas near San Juan and Guaynabo. West of the Rio Grande de Arecibo, the extent of the lower aquifer is uncertain. Data are insufficient to determine whether or not the existing multiple water-bearing units in this area are an extension of the more productive lower aquifer in the Manati to Arecibo area. Zones of moderate permeability exist within small lenses of volcanic conglomerate and sandstone of the San Sebastian Formation, but in general this formation is not a productive aquifer. Transmissivity values for the upper aquifer range from 200 to more than 280,000 feet squared per day. The transmissivity values for the upper aquifer generally are highest in the area between the Rio de la Plata and Rio Grande de Arecibo, where transmissivity values have been reported to exceed 100,000 feet squared per day in six locations. Transmissivity estimates for the lower aquifer are highest in north central Puerto Rico, where the Lares Limestone and the Montebello Limestone Member of the Cibao Formation have transmissivities as high as 500 and 3,600 feet squared per day, respectively.

  7. Health and cancer information seeking practices and preferences in Puerto Rico: creating an evidence base for cancer communication efforts.

    PubMed

    Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Finney Rutten, Lila J; Hesse, Bradford W; Davis, Terisa; Kornfeld, Julie; Sanchez, Marta; Moser, Richard P; Ortiz, Ana Patricia; Serrano-Rodriguez, Ruby A; Davis, Kia

    2010-01-01

    Effective communication around cancer control requires understanding of population information seeking practices and their cancer-relevant risk behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge. The Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) developed by the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) provides surveillance of the nation's investment in cancer communication tracking the effects of the changing communication environment on cancer-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The University of Puerto Rico Comprehensive Cancer Center (UPRCCC), the Puerto Rico Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System (PRBRFSS), and the NCI implemented HINTS in Puerto Rico in 2009. In this article we describe the health and cancer information seeking behaviors, sources of information, trust in information sources, and experiences seeking information among the population of Puerto Rico. A total of 639 (603 complete and 36 partially complete) interviews were conducted. Nearly one-third of respondents had ever looked for information about health (32.9%) or about cancer (28.1%). The Internet was the most frequently reported source of information. College educated (odds ratio [OR] = 7.6) and females (OR = 2.8) were more likely to seek health information. Similarly, college educated (OR = 5.4) and females (OR = 2.0) were more likely to seek cancer information. Only 32.7% of respondents had ever accessed the Internet, and college educated were more likely to use it (OR = 12.2). Results provide insights into the health and cancer information seeking behaviors and experiences of the population in Puerto Rico and contribute to the evidence base for cancer control planning on the island. PMID:21154082

  8. Comparison of Storage Capacity and Sedimentation Trends of Lago Guayabal, Puerto Rico-December 2001 and October 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soler-López, Luis R.

    2008-01-01

    Lago Guayabal dam is located on the Rio Jacaguas in the municipality of Villalba in southern Puerto Rico, about 4 kilometers north of the town of Juana Diaz and about 5 kilometers south of Villalba (fig. 1). The dam is owned and operated by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) and was constructed in 1913 for the irrigation of croplands in the southern coastal plains of Puerto Rico. The reservoir impounds the waters of the Rio Jacaguas and those of the Rio Toa Vaca, when the Toa Vaca dam overflows or releases water. The reservoir has a drainage area of 53.8 square kilometers. The dam is a concrete gravity structure with a normal pool (at top of flashboards) elevation of 103.94 meters above mean sea level (Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, 1988). During October 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Caribbean Water Science Center, in cooperation with the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority (PRASA) conducted a bathymetric survey of Lago Guayabal to update the reservoir storage capacity and actualize the reservoir sedimentation rate by comparing the 2006 data with the previous 2001 bathymetric survey results. The purpose of this report is to describe and document the USGS sedimentation survey conducted at Lago Guayabal during October 2006, including the methods used to update the reservoir storage capacity, sedimentation rates, and areas of substantial sediment accumulation since December 2001. The Lago Guayabal sedimentation history up to 2001 was published by the USGS in 2003 (Soler-Lopez, 2003); therefore, this report focuses on the comparison between the 2001 and current bathymetric surveys of Lago Guayabal.

  9. Clinicopathological Factors Associated to HER-2 Status in a Hospital-based Sample of Breast Cancer Patients in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Ana P.; Frías, Orquídea; González-Keelan, Carmen; Suárez, Erick; Capó, David; Pérez, Javier; Cabanillas, Fernando; Mora, Edna

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female malignancy in Puerto Rico. Cases with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) oncoprotein overamplification are associated with aggressive clinical behavior. Given the limited availability of information for Puerto Rico, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence and clinical correlates of HER-2 gene overexpression among a hospital-based female population of breast cancer cases. We analyzed data from 1,049 female patients with invasive breast cancer (diagnosed 2000–2005) at the I. González Martínez Oncologic Hospital and the Auxilio Mutuo Hospital. HER-2 status and other clinical characteristics were retrieved from the hospitals’ cancer registries, from the Puerto Rico Central Cancer Registry, and from a review of medical and pathological records. Prevalence odds ratios were estimated with 95% confidence intervals, using logistic regression models to quantify the association between HER-2 status and different clinicophatological factors. The overall prevalence of positive HER-2 expression was 22.5%. In the multivariate logistic regression model, factors significantly associated with HER-2 positivity included a diagnosis age of <50 years, having a tumor with negative progesterone receptor (PR) status, and having regional disease (p < 0.05). No significant differences in HER-2 positivity were observed by tumor histology or estrogen receptor (ER) status (p > 0.05). This is the most comprehensive epidemiological study to date on HER-2 status in Puerto Rico. The prevalence and correlates of HER-2 overexpression in this study are comparable to those observed in US populations. Study results will aid in the development of breast cancer control strategies in Puerto Rico. PMID:20799514

  10. Characterizing Manatee habitat use and seagrass grazing in Florida and Puerto Rico: Implications for conservation and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefebvre, L.W.; Reid, J.P.; Kenworthy, W.J.; Powell, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The Indian River Lagoon on the Atlantic coast of Florida, USA, and the east coast of Puerto Rico provide contrasting environments in which the endangered West Indian Manatee Trichechus manatus experiences different thermal regimes and seagrass communities. We compare Manatee feeding behaviour in these two regions, examine the ecological effects of Manatee grazing on a seagrass community in the Indian River Lagoon, describe the utility of aerial surveys, radio tracking, and seagrass mapping to study Manatee feeding patterns, and develop hypotheses on sirenian feeding strategies in temperate and tropical seagrass communities. In both the Indian River Lagoon and Puerto Rico, Manatees were typically observed grazing in water depths = 2.0 m and more frequently on the most abundant seagrasses present in the community: Halodule wrightii in the Indian River Lagoon and Thalassia testudinum in eastern Puerto Rico. Where both H. wrightii and Syringodium filiforme were consumed in the Indian River Lagoon, Manatees tended to remove more S. filiforme than H. wrightii rhizome + root biomass. Even though 80 to 95% of the short-shoot biomass and 50 to 67% of the rhizome + root biomass were removed, grazed patches of H. wrightii and S. filiforme recovered significantly between February and August. H. wrightii may be both more resistant and resilient than S. filiforme to the impacts of Manatee grazing. Despite the significantly greater abundance of T. testudinum in Puerto Rico, Manatees exhibited selective feeding by returning to specific sites with abundant H. wrightii. They also appeared to feed selectively on T. testudinum shoots associated with clumps of the calcareous alga Halimeda opuntia. We hypothesize that Florida Manatees are less specialized seagrass grazers than Manatees in tropical regions like Puerto Rico. Continued research on Manatee grazing ecology in temperate to tropical seagrass communities will enable better protection and management of these vital and unique marine resources.

  11. Atrazine fate and transport within the coastal zone in southeastern Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Potter, Thomas L; Bosch, David D; Dieppa, Angel; Whitall, David R; Strickland, Timothy C

    2013-02-15

    Agrichemical transport to coastal waters may have adverse ecological impact. This work examined atrazine fate and transport in a field adjacent to Puerto Rico's Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. The herbicide's use was linked to residue detection in shallow groundwater and movement toward the estuary; however, data indicated that transport via this pathway was small. In contrast, surface runoff as tropical storm systems moved through the area appeared to have high potential for atrazine transport. In this case, transport to the estuary was limited by runoff event timing relative to atrazine application and very rapid atrazine dissipation (DT(50)=1-3 days) in field soil. Soil incubation studies showed that accelerated degradation conditions had developed in the field due to repeated atrazine treatment. To improve weed management, atrazine replacement with other herbicide(s) is recommended. Use of products that have greater soil persistence may increase runoff risk. PMID:23321597

  12. Organizing, Educating, and Advocating for Health and Human Rights in Vieques, Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Maria Idalí

    2005-01-01

    I briefly review the process of community organization, education, and advocacy activities that ended the harmful military practices in the island-municipality of Vieques, Puerto Rico, while drawing attention to the intersection of human rights and social justice in the context of local and global implications. The Viequense experience was one of building an organization based on people’s experiences and strengths, educating people to increase individual and collective efficacy and power, and advocating for policy change with an assertive cohesive action. Public health practitioners must continue supporting community-led interventions in the restoration of the island’s environment and other resources vital for people’s health and well-being. PMID:15623851

  13. Analysis of The Surface Radiative Budget Using ATLAS Data for San Juan, Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, D. L.; Gonzalez, J.; Comarazamy, Daniel; Picon, Ana

    2007-01-01

    The additional beating of the air over the city is the result of the replacement of naturally vegetated surfaces with those composed of asphalt, concrete, rooftops and other man-made materials. The temperatures of these artificial surfaces can be 20 to 40 C higher than vegetated surfaces. This produces a dome of elevated air temperatures 5 to 8 C greater over the city, compared to the air temperatures over adjacent rural areas. Urban landscapes are a complex mixture of vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces. It is difficult to take enough temperature measurements over a large city area to characterize the complexity of urban radiant surface temperature variability. The NASA Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) operates in the visual and IR bands was used in February 2004 to collect data from San Juan, Puerto Rico with the main objective of investigating the Urban Heat Island (UHI) in tropical cities.

  14. Socioeconomic and Geographic Disparities in Health Information Seeking and Internet Use in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Bradford W; Moser, Richard P; Ortiz Martinez, Ana Patricia; Kornfeld, Julie; Vanderpool, Robin C; Byrne, Margaret; Tortolero Luna, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Background Geographically isolated Hispanic populations, such as those living in Puerto Rico, may face unique barriers to health information access. However, little is known about health information access and health information-seeking behaviors of this population. Objective To examine differences in health and cancer information seeking among survey respondents who ever used the Internet and those who did not, and to explore sociodemographic and geographic trends. Methods Data for our analyses were from a special implementation of the Health Information National Trends Survey conducted in Puerto Rico in 2009. We collected data through random digit dialing, computer-assisted telephone interviews (N = 639). The sample was drawn from the eight geographic regions of the Puerto Rico Department of Health. To account for complex survey design and perform weighted analyses to obtain population estimates, we analyzed the data using SUDAAN. Frequencies, cross-tabulation with chi-square, and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Geographic information system maps were developed to examine geographic distributions of Internet use and information seeking. Results Of 639 participants, 142 (weighted percentage 32.7%) indicated that they had ever gone online to access the Internet or World Wide Web; this proportion was substantially lower than that of US mainland Hispanics who reported using the Internet (49%). While 101 of 142 (weighted percentage 59.6%) respondents who used the Web had ever sought health information, only 118 of 497 (weighted percentage 20.0%) of those who did not use the Web had sought health information. The pattern was similar for cancer information: 76 of 142 respondents (weighted percentage 47.2%) who used the Web had ever sought cancer information compared with 105 of 497 (weighted percentage 18.8%) of those who had not used the Web. These results were slightly lower but generally consistent with US mainland Hispanics’ health (50.9%) and cancer (26.4%) information seeking. Results of separate logistic regression models controlling for sociodemographic characteristics demonstrated that, compared with individuals who did not seek health or cancer information, those who did were over 5 times as likely to have used the Internet (odds ratio 5.11, P < .001). Those who sought cancer information were over twice as likely to have used the Internet (odds ratio 2.5, P < .05). The frequency of Internet use and health and cancer information seeking was higher in the San Juan metro region than in more rural areas. Conclusions Our results contribute to the evidence base for health and cancer communication planning for Puerto Rico, and suggest that health education and outreach efforts should explore the use of available and trusted methods of dissemination such as radio and television, as well as community-based health care providers and organizations, to supplement and encourage use of the Internet as a source of health information. PMID:22849971

  15. Parasites and commensals of the West Indian manatee from Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mignucci-Giannoni, A. A.; Beck, C.A.; Montoya-Ospina, R. A.; Williams, E.H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Metazoan parasites and commensals were collected from dead manatees salvaged in Puerto Rico. Thirty-five manatees were examined between 1980 and 1998. Parasites and commensals were identified in 20 (57%) manatees and included 3 species of helminths, 1 nematode (Heterocheilus tunicatus) and 2 digeneans (Chiorchis fabaceus and Cochleotrema cochleotrema). Two species of commensals were also associated with manatees: a barnacle (Chelonibia manati) and a fish (whitefin remora, Echeneis neucratoides). The 3 species of helminths found in manatees constitute the first records of these parasite-host relationships for the study area. The record of C. manati is the first for the Caribbean, and thus the species is not endemic to the Gulf of Mexico as previously described. The speculation that West Indian manatees closer to the center of their geographic distribution would have a greater diversity of parasites was found not true for these insular specimens but perhaps could be true for continental South American specimens.

  16. Feasibility Study of Solar Photovoltaics on Landfills in Puerto Rico (Second Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a solar photovoltaics (PV) system on landfill sites in Puerto Rico. The purpose of this report is to assess the landfills with the highest potential for possible solar PV installation and estimate cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed tilt). The report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system. The landfills and sites considered in this report were all determined feasible areas in which to implement solar PV systems.

  17. Size distribution of trace metals in Ponce, Puerto Rico air particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infante, Rafael; Acosta, Iris L.

    The atmospheric particulate size distribution of nine heavy metals was measured in Ponce, a moderately industrial city in the south of Puerto Rico. Samples were collected in the city center and outlying suburban and rural locations during 1986. The size measurements were done with a cascade impactor. The elemental content of the size fractionated aerosol samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The particle size distributions observed for Cu, Cd, Pb, Mn and Fe were bimodal with a gradual progression from mainly coarse mode to mainly fine mode. Al, Ni and Zn were mostly associated with coarse particles and V size distribution was unimodal with maxima associated with fine particles. The particle size distribution did not vary significantly with the sites sampled in the urban area although some regional characteristics are observed. The data obtained strongly suggest motor vehicle traffic and fuel combustion as the principal pollution pources in Ponce aerosol.

  18. Organic and metal contamination in marine surface sediments of Guánica Bay, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Whitall, David; Mason, Andrew; Pait, Anthony; Brune, Lia; Fulton, Michael; Wirth, Ed; Vandiver, Lisa

    2014-03-15

    Land based sources of pollution have the potential to adversely impact valuable coral reef ecosystems. In Guánica Bay (Puerto Rico) sediment samples collected and analyzed in 2009 demonstrate unusually high concentrations of total chlordane, total PCBs, nickel and chromium. A variety of other contaminants (total DDT, total PAHs, As, Cu, Hg, and Zn) were also at levels which may indicate sediment toxicity. With the exception of chromium, all of these contaminants were detected in coral tissues (Porites astreoides), although it is unclear at what level these contaminants affect coral health. PCBs and chlordane are environmentally persistent and likely represent legacy pollution from historical uses in close geographic proximity to the Bay. We hypothesize that the high nickel and chromium levels are due to a combination of naturally high Ni and Cr in rock and soils in the watershed, and enhanced (human driven) erosional rates. PMID:24447634

  19. Assessing awareness and use of evidence-based programs for cancer control in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Calo, William A; Fernández, María E; Rivera, Mirza; Díaz, Elba C; Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Pattatucci, Angela; Wetter, David W

    2012-06-01

    The Community Cancer Control Outreach Program (CCCOP) is a community-academic partnership aimed at developing and implementing a cancer control outreach, research, and training program in Puerto Rico. The CCCOP surveyed 56 partners to assess their awareness, training needs, and use of resources related to evidence-based programs (EBPs). Despite relatively high levels (70 %) of confidence in adopting EBPs, there were low levels of awareness (37 %) and use (25 %) of existing EBPs resources. Respondents' who had used EBPs resources were more likely to have positive beliefs about EBPs than nonusers (p<0.05). Training needs were high among respondents and no significant differences were found between those who had and had not used existing EBPs resources. These findings can guide the development of training tools and technical assistance to increase the use of EBPs for Latino audiences. PMID:22528632

  20. Pollination Ecology and Breeding Systems of Five Gesneria Species from Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Martén-Rodríguez, Silvana; Fenster, Charles B.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Gesneria diversified in the Greater Antilles giving rise to various floral designs corresponding to different pollination syndromes. The goal of this study was to characterize the pollination and breeding systems of five Puerto Rican Gesneria species. Methods The study was conducted in Arecibo and El Yunke National Forest, Puerto Rico, between 2003 and 2007. Floral visitors were documented by human observers and video cameras. Floral longevity and nectar production were recorded for the five study species. Tests for self-compatibility and autonomous selfing were conducted through hand-pollination and bagging experiments. Key Results Floral phenology and nectar production schedules agree with nocturnal (in bell-shaped flowered G. pedunculosa and G. viridiflora subsp. sintenisii) or diurnal pollination syndromes (in tubular-flowered G. citrina, G. cuneifolia and G. reticulata). Nectar concentration is consistently low (8–13 %) across species. Gesneria citrina and G. cuneifolia are exclusively pollinated by hummingbirds, while Gesneria reticulata relies mostly on autonomous self-pollination, despite having classic ornithophilous flowers. A variety of floral visitors was recorded for the two species with bell-shaped flowers; however, not all visitors have the ability to transfer pollen. Bats are the primary pollinators of G. pedunculosa, with bananaquits probably acting as secondary pollinators. For G. viridiflora subsp. sintenisii, both bats and hummingbirds contact the flower's reproductive organs, thus, this species is considered to be a generalist despite its nocturnal floral syndrome. All species are self-compatible but only tubular-flowered Gesneria are capable of autonomous self-pollination. Conclusions The visitation patterns described in this study fit the predicted hummingbird and bat pollination syndromes and support both specialization and generalization of pollination systems in Puerto Rican Gesneria. Specialization is associated with low pollinator visitation, particularly by hummingbirds, which may explain the occurrence of autonomous selfing mechanisms in tubular-flowered species. PMID:18424471