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Sample records for puf9 regulates mrnas

  1. Regulation of maternal mRNAs in early development.

    PubMed

    Farley, Brian M; Ryder, Sean P

    2008-01-01

    Most sexually reproducing metazoans are anisogamous, meaning that the two gametes that combine during fertilization differ greatly in size. By convention, the larger gametes are considered female and are called ova, while the smaller gametes are male and are called sperm. In most cases, both gametes contribute similarly to the chromosomal content of the new organism. In contrast, the maternal gamete contributes nearly all of the cytoplasm. This cytoplasmic contribution is crucial to patterning early development; it contains the maternal proteins and transcripts that guide the early steps of development prior to the activation of zygotic transcription. This review compares and contrasts early development in common laboratory model organisms in order to highlight the similarities and differences in the regulation of maternal factors. We will focus on the production and reversible silencing of maternal mRNAs during oogenesis, their asymmetric activation after fertilization, and their subsequent clearance at the midblastula transition. Where possible, insights from mechanistic studies are presented. PMID:18365862

  2. Extracellular stimuli specifically regulate localized levels of individual neuronal mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Dianna E.; van Niekerk, Erna A.; Sasaki, Yukio; Mesngon, Mariano; Merianda, Tanuja T.; Williams, Gervan G.; Kendall, Marvin; Smith, Deanna S.; Bassell, Gary J.; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2007-01-01

    Subcellular regulation of protein synthesis requires the correct localization of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) within the cell. In this study, we investigate whether the axonal localization of neuronal mRNAs is regulated by extracellular stimuli. By profiling axonal levels of 50 mRNAs detected in regenerating adult sensory axons, we show that neurotrophins can increase and decrease levels of axonal mRNAs. Neurotrophins (nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin-3) regulate axonal mRNA levels and use distinct downstream signals to localize individual mRNAs. However, myelin-associated glycoprotein and semaphorin 3A regulate axonal levels of different mRNAs and elicit the opposite effect on axonal mRNA levels from those observed with neurotrophins. The axonal mRNAs accumulate at or are depleted from points of ligand stimulation along the axons. The translation product of a chimeric green fluorescent protein–β-actin mRNA showed similar accumulation or depletion adjacent to stimuli that increase or decrease axonal levels of endogenous β-actin mRNA. Thus, extracellular ligands can regulate protein generation within subcellular regions by specifically altering the localized levels of particular mRNAs. PMID:17785519

  3. Regulation of Natural mRNAs by the Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Peccarelli, Megan

    2014-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway is a specialized mRNA degradation pathway that degrades select mRNAs. This pathway is conserved in all eukaryotes examined so far, and it triggers the degradation of mRNAs that prematurely terminate translation. Originally identified as a pathway that degrades mRNAs with premature termination codons as a result of errors during transcription, splicing, or damage to the mRNA, NMD is now also recognized as a pathway that degrades some natural mRNAs. The degradation of natural mRNAs by NMD has been identified in multiple eukaryotes, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Arabidopsis thaliana, and humans. S. cerevisiae is used extensively as a model to study natural mRNA regulation by NMD. Inactivation of the NMD pathway in S. cerevisiae affects approximately 10% of the transcriptome. Similar percentages of natural mRNAs in the D. melanogaster and human transcriptomes are also sensitive to the pathway, indicating that NMD is important for the regulation of gene expression in multiple organisms. NMD can either directly or indirectly regulate the decay rate of natural mRNAs. Direct NMD targets possess NMD-inducing features. This minireview focuses on the regulation of natural mRNAs by the NMD pathway, as well as the features demonstrated to target these mRNAs for decay by the pathway in S. cerevisiae. We also compare NMD-targeting features identified in S. cerevisiae with known NMD-targeting features in other eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25038084

  4. Growth Hormone-Regulated mRNAs and miRNAs in Chicken Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huijuan; Shao, Fang; Yu, JianFeng; Jiang, Honglin; Han, Yaoping; Gong, Daoqing; Gu, Zhiliang

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a key regulatory factor in animal growth, development and metabolism. Based on the expression level of the GH receptor, the chicken liver is a major target organ of GH, but the biological effects of GH on the chicken liver are not fully understood. In this work we identified mRNAs and miRNAs that are regulated by GH in primary hepatocytes from female chickens through RNA-seq, and analyzed the functional relevance of these mRNAs and miRNAs through GO enrichment analysis and miRNA target prediction. A total of 164 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between GH-treated and control chicken hepatocytes, of which 112 were up-regulated and 52 were down-regulated by GH. A total of 225 chicken miRNAs were identified by the RNA-Seq analysis. Among these miRNAs 16 were up-regulated and 1 miRNA was down-regulated by GH. The GH-regulated mRNAs were mainly involved in growth and metabolism. Most of the GH-upregulated or GH-downregulated miRNAs were predicted to target the GH-downregulated or GH-upregulated mRNAs, respectively, involved in lipid metabolism. This study reveals that GH regulates the expression of many mRNAs involved in metabolism in female chicken hepatocytes, which suggests that GH plays an important role in regulating liver metabolism in female chickens. The results of this study also support the hypothesis that GH regulates lipid metabolism in chicken liver in part by regulating the expression of miRNAs that target the mRNAs involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:25386791

  5. Subcellular Profiling Reveals Distinct and Developmentally Regulated Repertoire of Growth Cone mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zivraj, Krishna H.; Tung, Yi Chun Loraine; Piper, Michael; Gumy, Laura; Fawcett, James W.; Yeo, Giles S. H.; Holt, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Cue-directed axon guidance depends partly on local translation in growth cones. Many mRNA transcripts are known to reside in developing axons, yet little is known about their subcellular distribution or, specifically, which transcripts are in growth cones. Here laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate the growth cones of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons of two vertebrate species, mouse and Xenopus, coupled with unbiased genomewide microarray profiling. An unexpectedly large pool of mRNAs defined predominant pathways in protein synthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, cancer, neurological disease, and signaling. Comparative profiling of “young” (pathfinding) versus “old” (target-arriving) Xenopus growth cones revealed that the number and complexity of transcripts increases dramatically with age. Many presynaptic protein mRNAs are present exclusively in old growth cones, suggesting that functionally related sets of mRNAs are targeted to growth cones in a developmentally regulated way. Remarkably, a subset of mRNAs was significantly enriched in the growth cone compared with the axon compartment, indicating that mechanisms exist to localize mRNAs selectively to the growth cone. Furthermore, some receptor transcripts (e.g., EphB4), present exclusively in old growth cones, were equally abundant in young and old cell bodies, indicating that RNA trafficking from the soma is developmentally regulated. Our findings show that the mRNA repertoire in growth cones is regulated dynamically with age and suggest that mRNA localization is tailored to match the functional demands of the growing axon tip as it transforms into the presynaptic terminal. PMID:21084603

  6. A coding-independent function of gene and pseudogene mRNAs regulates tumour biology

    PubMed Central

    Poliseno, Laura; Salmena, Leonardo; Zhang, Jiangwen; Carver, Brett; Haveman, William J.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The canonical role of messenger RNA (mRNA) is to deliver protein-coding information to sites of protein synthesis. However, given that microRNAs bind to RNAs, we hypothesized that RNAs possess a biological role in cancer cells that relies upon their ability to compete for microRNA binding and is independent of their protein-coding function. As a paradigm for the protein-coding-independent role of RNAs, we describe the functional relationship between the mRNAs produced by the PTEN tumour suppressor gene and its pseudogene (PTENP1) and the critical consequences of this interaction. We find that PTENP1 is biologically active as determined by its ability to regulate cellular levels of PTEN, and that it can exert a growth-suppressive role. We also show that PTENP1 locus is selectively lost in human cancer. We extend our analysis to other cancer-related genes that possess pseudogenes, such as oncogenic KRAS. Further, we demonstrate that the transcripts of protein coding genes such as PTEN are also biologically active. Together, these findings attribute a novel biological role to expressed pseudogenes, as they can regulate coding gene expression, and reveal a non-coding function for mRNAs. PMID:20577206

  7. Differential display of skin mRNAs regulated under varying environmental conditions in a mudskipper.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, T; Yasunaga, H; Yokota, S; Ando, M

    2002-07-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the terrestrial adaptation, as well as adaptation to different salinities, of the euryhaline and amphibious mudskipper ( Periophthalmus modestus), we have looked for the skin mRNAs that change during varying environmental conditions. Using differential mRNA display polymerase chain reaction, we compared skin mRNAs in mudskipper transferred from isotonic 30% seawater to fresh water or to seawater for 1 day and 7 days, as well as those kept out of water for 1 day. At the end of these periods, poly(A(+))RNA was prepared from the Cl(-)-secreting pectoral skins and also from the outer opercular skins where ion transport is negligible, and analyzed by differential display. We identified four cDNA products expressed differently under various environments as homologues of known genes. A further 34 cDNAs were expressed differentially, but they have no significant homology to identified sequences in GenBank. Northern blots demonstrate that mRNA levels of the actin-binding protein and the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase increased in the pectoral skins during seawater acclimation. The mRNA of the 90 kDa heat shock protein was down-regulated in water-deprived and freshwater fish, whose plasma cortisol levels were high. The aldolase mRNA was induced in both skins after desiccation. These four genes may be involved in the environmental adaptations. PMID:12122461

  8. Coding-independent regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN by competing endogenous mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Yvonne; Kats, Lev; Salmena, Leonardo; Weiss, Dror; Tan, Shen Mynn; Ala, Ugo; Karreth, Florian; Poliseno, Laura; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Lieberman, Judy; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Here we demonstrate that protein-coding RNA transcripts can crosstalk by competing for common microRNAs, with microRNA response elements as the foundation of this interaction. We have termed such RNA transcripts as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs). We tested this hypothesis in the context of PTEN, a key tumor suppressor whose abundance determines critical outcomes in tumorigenesis. By a combined computational and experimental approach, we identified and validated endogenous protein-coding transcripts that regulate PTEN, antagonize PI3K/AKT signaling and possess growth and tumor suppressive properties. Notably, we also show that these genes display concordant expression patterns with PTEN and copy number loss in cancers. Our study presents a road map for the prediction and validation of ceRNA activity and networks, and thus imparts a trans-regulatory function to protein-coding mRNAs. PMID:22000013

  9. IMP1 suppresses breast tumor growth and metastasis through the regulation of its target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Huang, Wenhe; Chen, Shaoying; Zhou, Yanchun; Li, Deling; Singer, Robert H.; Gu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the ability of IMP1 in inhibiting proliferation and invasiveness of breast carcinoma cells in vitro. In the current study, we utilized a mouse xenograft model to further investigate the function of IMP1 in breast tumor progression and its underlying mechanism. We demonstrated that IMP1 expression significantly suppressed the growth of MDA231 cell-derived xenograft tumors and subsequent lung metastasis. Microarray analyses and differential gene expression identified handful mRNAs, many of which were involved in breast tumor-growth and metastasis. Further studies revealed that these mRNAs were directly interacted with the KH34 domain of IMP1 and this interaction post-transcriptionally regulated their corresponding protein expression. Either deletion of the KH34 domain of IMP1 or alteration of the expression of IMP1-bound mRNAs affected cell proliferation and tumor growth, producing the same phenotypes as IMP1 knockdown. Correlation of increased IMP1 expression with the reduced levels of its bound mRNAs, such as PTGS2, GDF15 and IGF-2 transcripts, was also observed in human breast tumors. Our studies provide insights into a molecular mechanism that the positive function of IMP1 to inhibit breast tumor growth and metastasis could be through the regulation of its target mRNAs. PMID:26910917

  10. IMP1 suppresses breast tumor growth and metastasis through the regulation of its target mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangli; Huang, Zhenqiang; Liu, Xin; Huang, Wenhe; Chen, Shaoying; Zhou, Yanchun; Li, Deling; Singer, Robert H; Gu, Wei

    2016-03-29

    We have previously reported the ability of IMP1 in inhibiting proliferation and invasiveness of breast carcinoma cells in vitro. In the current study, we utilized a mouse xenograft model to further investigate the function of IMP1 in breast tumor progression and its underlying mechanism. We demonstrated that IMP1 expression significantly suppressed the growth of MDA231 cell-derived xenograft tumors and subsequent lung metastasis. Microarray analyses and differential gene expression identified handful mRNAs, many of which were involved in breast tumor-growth and metastasis. Further studies revealed that these mRNAs were directly interacted with the KH34 domain of IMP1 and this interaction post-transcriptionally regulated their corresponding protein expression. Either deletion of the KH34 domain of IMP1 or alteration of the expression of IMP1-bound mRNAs affected cell proliferation and tumor growth, producing the same phenotypes as IMP1 knockdown. Correlation of increased IMP1 expression with the reduced levels of its bound mRNAs, such as PTGS2, GDF15 and IGF-2 transcripts, was also observed in human breast tumors. Our studies provide insights into a molecular mechanism that the positive function of IMP1 to inhibit breast tumor growth and metastasis could be through the regulation of its target mRNAs. PMID:26910917

  11. Genomic Analyses of Sperm Fate Regulator Targets Reveal a Common Set of Oogenic mRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Daniel C.; Aoki, Scott T.; Ortiz, Marco A.; Kim, Kyung Won; Verheyden, Jamie M.; Kimble, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell specification as sperm or oocyte is an ancient cell fate decision, but its molecular regulation is poorly understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the FOG-1 and FOG-3 proteins behave genetically as terminal regulators of sperm fate specification. Both are homologous to well-established RNA regulators, suggesting that FOG-1 and FOG-3 specify the sperm fate post-transcriptionally. We predicted that FOG-1 and FOG-3, as terminal regulators of the sperm fate, might regulate a battery of gamete-specific differentiation genes. Here we test that prediction by exploring on a genomic scale the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) associated with FOG-1 and FOG-3. Immunoprecipitation of the proteins and their associated mRNAs from spermatogenic germlines identifies 81 FOG-1 and 722 FOG-3 putative targets. Importantly, almost all FOG-1 targets are also FOG-3 targets, and these common targets are strongly biased for oogenic mRNAs. The discovery of common target mRNAs suggested that FOG-1 and FOG-3 work together. Consistent with that idea, we find that FOG-1 and FOG-3 proteins co-immunoprecipitate from both intact nematodes and mammalian tissue culture cells and that they colocalize in germ cells. Taking our results together, we propose a model in which FOG-1 and FOG-3 work in a complex to repress oogenic transcripts and thereby promote the sperm fate. PMID:26564160

  12. Nucleolin binds to a subset of selenoprotein mRNAs and regulates their expression.

    PubMed

    Miniard, Angela C; Middleton, Lisa M; Budiman, Michael E; Gerber, Carri A; Driscoll, Donna M

    2010-08-01

    Selenium, an essential trace element, is incorporated into selenoproteins as selenocysteine (Sec), the 21st amino acid. In order to synthesize selenoproteins, a translational reprogramming event must occur since Sec is encoded by the UGA stop codon. In mammals, the recoding of UGA as Sec depends on the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element, a stem-loop structure in the 3' untranslated region of the transcript. The SECIS acts as a platform for RNA-binding proteins, which mediate or regulate the recoding mechanism. Using UV crosslinking, we identified a 110 kDa protein, which binds with high affinity to SECIS elements from a subset of selenoprotein mRNAs. The crosslinking activity was purified by RNA affinity chromatography and identified as nucleolin by mass spectrometry analysis. In vitro binding assays showed that purified nucleolin discriminates among SECIS elements in the absence of other factors. Based on siRNA experiments, nucleolin is required for the optimal expression of certain selenoproteins. There was a good correlation between the affinity of nucleolin for a SECIS and its effect on selenoprotein expression. As selenoprotein transcript levels and localization did not change in siRNA-treated cells, our results suggest that nucleolin selectively enhances the expression of a subset of selenoproteins at the translational level. PMID:20385601

  13. The PARN Deadenylase Targets a Discrete Set of mRNAs for Decay and Regulates Cell Motility in Mouse Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jerome E.; Lee, Ju Youn; Trembly, Jarrett; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Tian, Bin; Wilusz, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    PARN is one of several deadenylase enzymes present in mammalian cells, and as such the contribution it makes to the regulation of gene expression is unclear. To address this, we performed global mRNA expression and half-life analysis on mouse myoblasts depleted of PARN. PARN knockdown resulted in the stabilization of 40 mRNAs, including that encoding the mRNA decay factor ZFP36L2. Additional experiments demonstrated that PARN knockdown induced an increase in Zfp36l2 poly(A) tail length as well as increased translation. The elements responsible for PARN-dependent regulation lie within the 3′ UTR of the mRNA. Surprisingly, changes in mRNA stability showed an inverse correlation with mRNA abundance; stabilized transcripts showed either no change or a decrease in mRNA abundance. Moreover, we found that stabilized mRNAs had reduced accumulation of pre–mRNA, consistent with lower transcription rates. This presents compelling evidence for the coupling of mRNA decay and transcription to buffer mRNA abundances. Although PARN knockdown altered decay of relatively few mRNAs, there was a much larger effect on global gene expression. Many of the mRNAs whose abundance was reduced by PARN knockdown encode factors required for cell migration and adhesion. The biological relevance of this observation was demonstrated by the fact that PARN KD cells migrate faster in wound-healing assays. Collectively, these data indicate that PARN modulates decay of a defined set of mRNAs in mammalian cells and implicate this deadenylase in coordinating control of genes required for cell movement. PMID:22956911

  14. CRM 1-Mediated Degradation and Agonist-Induced Down-Regulation of β-Adrenergic Receptor mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ying; Lu, Huafei; Machida, Curtis A.

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY The β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) mRNAs are post-transcriptionally regulated at the level of mRNA stability and undergo accelerated agonist-mediated degradation via interaction of its 3' untranslated region (UTR) with RNA binding proteins, including the HuR nuclear protein. In a previous report [Kirigiti et al. (2001). Mol. Pharmacol. 60:1308-1324), we examined the agonist-mediated down-regulation of the rat β1-AR mRNAs, endogenously expressed in the rat C6 cell line and ectopically expressed in transfectant hamster DDT1MF2 and rat L6 cells. In this report, we determined that isoproterenol treatment of neonatal rat cortical neurons, an important cell type expressing β1-ARs in the brain, results in significant decreases in β1-AR mRNA stability, while treatment with leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the nuclear export receptor CRM 1, results in significant increases in β1-AR mRNA stability and nuclear retention. UV-crosslinking/immunoprecipitation and glycerol gradient fractionation analyses indicate that the β1-AR 3' UTR recognize complexes composed of HuR and multiple proteins, including CRM 1. Cell-permeable peptides containing the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) were used as inhibitors of CRM 1-mediated nuclear export. When DDT1MF2 transfectants were treated with isoproterenol and peptide inhibitors, only the co-addition of the NES inhibitor reversed the isoproterenol-induced reduction of β1-AR mRNA levels. Our results suggest that CRM 1-dependent NES-mediated mechanisms influence the degradation and agonist-mediated down-regulation of the β1-AR mRNAs. PMID:16997396

  15. Divergent protein coding regions in otherwise closely related androgen-regulated mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, C J; Eliopoulos, E; Higgins, S J

    1984-01-01

    Rat seminal vesicles serve as a model system for studying androgen action. We have sequenced and compared full length cDNAs for two major proteins (S and F) synthesised and secreted under hormonal control. Overall, mRNAS and mRNAF share 57% nucleotide sequence homology suggesting that their genes arose by duplication of a common ancestor. However, the mRNAs display a highly unusual regional distribution of sequence homology, with the untranslated regions (UTRs) being substantially more homologous than the protein-coding regions (PCRs). Detailed analysis of nucleotide substitutions at synonymous and replacement sites shows that the PCRs have evolved very rapidly. Evolutionary conservation of the UTRs is no higher than that of UTRs generally and thus provides no evidence of a specific regulatory role for the UTRs in androgen action. The primary sequences of proteins S and F have diverged so rapidly that they are the best examples of neutrally evolving proteins for which comparative nucleotide sequence data are available. However, despite their rapid divergence, the predicted higher order structures for both proteins consist largely of non-regular conformation. This is discussed in terms of their roles as structural components of the rodent copulatory plug. PMID:6548962

  16. Endogenous microRNAs in human microvascular endothelial cells regulate mRNAs encoded by hypertension-related genes.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Alison J; Baker, Maria Angeles; Liu, Yong; Liu, Pengyuan; Cowley, Allen W; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to systematically identify endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) in endothelial cells that regulate mRNAs encoded by genes relevant to hypertension. Small RNA deep sequencing was performed in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Of the 50 most abundant miRNAs identified, 30 had predicted target mRNAs encoded by genes with known involvement in hypertension or blood pressure regulation. The cells were transfected with anti-miR oligonucleotides to inhibit each of the 30 miRNAs and the mRNA abundance of predicted targets was examined. Of 95 miRNA-target pairs examined, the target mRNAs were significantly upregulated in 35 pairs and paradoxically downregulated in 8 pairs. The result indicated significant suppression of the abundance of mRNA encoded by ADM by endogenous miR-181a-5p, ATP2B1 by the miR-27 family, FURIN by miR-125a-5p, FGF5 by the let-7 family, GOSR2 by miR-27a-3p, JAG1 by miR-21-5p, SH2B3 by miR-30a-5p, miR-98, miR-181a-5p, and the miR-125 family, TBX3 by the miR-92 family, ADRA1B by miR-22-3p, ADRA2A by miR-30a-5p and miR-30e-5p, ADRA2B by miR-30e-5p, ADRB1 by the let-7 family and miR-98, EDNRB by the miR-92 family, and NOX4 by the miR-92 family, miR-100-5p, and miR-99b-5p (n=3-9; P<0.05 versus scrambled anti-miR). Treatment with anti-miR-21 decreased blood pressure in mice fed a 4% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the miRNAs targeting NOX4 mRNA increased H2O2 release from endothelial cells. The findings indicate widespread, tonic control of mRNAs encoded by genes relevant to blood pressure regulation by endothelial miRNAs and provide a novel and uniquely informative basis for studying the role of miRNAs in hypertension. PMID:26283043

  17. A 5′ cytosine binding pocket in Puf3p specifies regulation of mitochondrial mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Deyu; Stumpf, Craig R.; Krahn, Joseph M.; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.

    2010-11-03

    A single regulatory protein can control the fate of many mRNAs with related functions. The Puf3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exemplary, as it binds and regulates more than 100 mRNAs that encode proteins with mitochondrial function. Here we elucidate the structural basis of that specificity. To do so, we explore the crystal structures of Puf3p complexes with 2 cognate RNAs. The key determinant of Puf3p specificity is an unusual interaction between a distinctive pocket of the protein with an RNA base outside the 'core' PUF-binding site. That interaction dramatically affects binding affinity in vitro and is required for regulation in vivo. The Puf3p structures, combined with those of Puf4p in the same organism, illuminate the structural basis of natural PUF-RNA networks. Yeast Puf3p binds its own RNAs because they possess a -2C and is excluded from those of Puf4p which contain an additional nucleotide in the core-binding site.

  18. Registered report: A coding-independent function of gene and pseudogene mRNAs regulates tumour biology

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Israr; Kerwin, John; Owen, Kate; Griner, Erin; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from ‘A coding-independent function of gene and pseudogene mRNAs regulates tumour biology’ by Poliseno et al. (2010), published in Nature in 2010. The key experiments to be replicated are reported in Figures 1D, 2F-H, and 4A. In these experiments, Poliseno and colleagues report microRNAs miR-19b and miR-20a transcriptionally suppress both PTEN and PTENP1 in prostate cancer cells (Figure 1D; Poliseno et al., 2010). Decreased expression of PTEN and/or PTENP1 resulted in downregulated PTEN protein levels (Figure 2H), downregulation of both mRNAs (Figure 2G), and increased tumor cell proliferation (Figure 2F; Poliseno et al., 2010). Furthermore, overexpression of the PTEN 3′ UTR enhanced PTENP1 mRNA abundance limiting tumor cell proliferation, providing additional evidence for the co-regulation of PTEN and PTENP1 (Figure 4A; Poliseno et al., 2010). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08245.001 PMID:26335297

  19. Transcriptional regulation of coordinate changes in flagellar mRNAs during differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amoebae into flagellates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Walsh, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The nuclear run-on technique was used to measure the rate of transcription of flagellar genes during the differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amebae into flagellates. Synthesis of mRNAs for the axonemal proteins ..cap alpha..- and BETA-tubulin and flagellar calmodulin, as well as a coordinately regulated poly(A)/sup +/ RNA that codes for an unidentified protein, showed transient increases averaging 22-fold. The rate of synthesis of two poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs common to ameobae and flagellates was low until the transcription of the flagellar genes began to decline, at which time synthesis of the RNAs found in ameobae increased 3- to 10-fold. The observed changes in the rate of transcription can account quantitatively for the 20-fold increase in flagellar mRNA concentration during the differentiation. The data for the flagellar calmodulin gene demonstrate transcriptional regulation for a nontubulin axonemal protein. The data also demonstrate at least two programs of transcriptional regulation during the differentiation and raise the intriguing possibility that some significant fraction of the nearly 200 different proteins of the flagellar axoneme is transcriptionally regulated during the 1 h it takes N. gruberi amebae to form visible flagella.

  20. The STAR protein QKI-7 recruits PAPD4 to regulate post-transcriptional polyadenylation of target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ryota; Tsusaka, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Hiroko; Maehata, Takaharu; Hoshino, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that regulating the length of the poly(A) tail on an mRNA is an efficient means of controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In early development, transcription is silenced and gene expression is primarily regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. In somatic cells, considerable progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of negative regulation by deadenylation. However, positive regulation through elongation of the poly(A) tail has not been widely studied due to the difficulty in distinguishing whether any observed increase in length is due to the synthesis of new mRNA, reduced deadenylation or cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Here, we overcame this barrier by developing a method for transcriptional pulse-chase analysis under conditions where deadenylases are suppressed. This strategy was used to show that a member of the Star family of RNA binding proteins, QKI, promotes polyadenylation when tethered to a reporter mRNA. Although multiple RNA binding proteins have been implicated in cytoplasmic polyadenylation during early development, previously only CPEB was known to function in this capacity in somatic cells. Importantly, we show that only the cytoplasmic isoform QKI-7 promotes poly(A) tail extension, and that it does so by recruiting the non-canonical poly(A) polymerase PAPD4 through its unique carboxyl-terminal region. We further show that QKI-7 specifically promotes polyadenylation and translation of three natural target mRNAs (hnRNPA1, p27kip1 and β-catenin) in a manner that is dependent on the QKI response element. An anti-mitogenic signal that induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase elicits polyadenylation and translation of p27kip1 mRNA via QKI and PAPD4. Taken together, our findings provide significant new insight into a general mechanism for positive regulation of gene expression by post-transcriptional polyadenylation in somatic cells. PMID:26926106

  1. Regulation of smooth muscle contractility by competing endogenous mRNAs in intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Ren, Yuan; Wang, Yajie; Wang, Renzhi; Zhou, Qian; Peng, Yong; Li, Qi; Yu, Mengqiang; Jiang, Yugang

    2015-05-01

    Alterations in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) contribute to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms (IAs), but the genetic mechanisms underlying these alterations are unclear. We used microarray analysis to compare tissue small noncoding RNA and messenger RNA expression profiles in vessel wall samples from patients with late-stage IAs. We identified myocardin (MYOCD), a key contractility regulator of vascular SMCs, as a critical factor in IA progression. Using a multifaceted computational and experimental approach, we determined that depletion of competitive endogenous RNAs (ARHGEF12, FGF12, and ADCY5) enhanced factors that downregulate MYOCD, which induces the conversion of SMCs from differentiated contractile states into dedifferentiated phenotypes that exhibit enhanced proliferation, synthesis of new extracellular matrix, and organization of mural thrombi. These effects may lead to the repair and maintenance of IAs. This study presents guidelines for the prediction and validation of the IA regulator MYOCD in competitive endogenous RNA networks and facilitates the development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic tools for IAs. PMID:25868147

  2. Zonisamide up-regulated the mRNAs encoding astrocytic anti-oxidative and neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, M E; Sugimoto, K; Kubo, M; Iwaki, H; Tsujii, T; Kyaw, W T; Nishikawa, N; Nagai, M; Tanaka, J; Nomoto, M

    2012-08-15

    Zonisamide has been proven as an effective drug for the recovery of degenerating dopaminergic neurons in the animal models of Parkinson's disease. However, several lines of evidence have questioned the neuroprotective capacity of zonisamide in animal models of Parkinson's disease. Although it suppresses dopaminergic neurodegeneration in animal models, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of zonisamide are not fully understood. The current study demonstrates the effects of zonisamide on astrocyte cultures and two 6-hydroxydopamine-induced models of Parkinson's disease. Using primary astrocyte cultures, we showed that zonisamide up-regulated the expression of mRNA encoding mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, metallothionein-2, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, and manganese superoxide dismutase. Similar responses to zonisamide were found in substantia nigra where the rats were pre-treated with 6-hydroxydopamine. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced toxicity by zonisamide pre-treatment was also confirmed using rat mesencephalic organotypic slice cultures of substantia nigra. In addition to this, zonisamide post-treatment also attenuated the nigral tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that zonisamide protected dopamine neurons in two Parkinson's disease models through a novel mechanism, namely increasing the expression of some important astrocyte-mediated neurotrophic and anti-oxidative factors. PMID:22659113

  3. Registered report: Coding-independent regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN by competing endogenous mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Mitch; Coss, Chris; Wang, Hongyan; Cook, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “Coding-Independent Regulation of the Tumor Suppressor PTEN by Competing Endogenous 'mRNAs' by Tay and colleagues, published in Cell in 2011 (Tay et al., 2011). The experiments to be replicated are those reported in Figures 3C, 3D, 3G, 3H, 5A and 5B, and in Supplemental Figures 3A and B. Tay and colleagues proposed a new regulatory mechanism based on competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs), which regulate target genes by competitive binding of shared microRNAs. They test their model by identifying and confirming ceRNAs that target PTEN. In Figure 3A and B, they report that perturbing expression of putative PTEN ceRNAs affects expression of PTEN. This effect is dependent on functional microRNA machinery (Figure 3G and H), and affects the pathway downstream of PTEN itself (Figures 5A and B). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12470.001 PMID:26943900

  4. A small RNA regulates multiple ABC transporter mRNAs by targeting C/A-rich elements inside and upstream of ribosome-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Cynthia M.; Darfeuille, Fabien; Plantinga, Titia H.; Vogel, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The interactions of numerous regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) with target mRNAs have been characterized, but how sRNAs can regulate multiple, structurally unrelated mRNAs is less understood. Here we show that Salmonella GcvB sRNA directly acts on seven target mRNAs that commonly encode periplasmic substrate-binding proteins of ABC uptake systems for amino acids and peptides. Alignment of GcvB homologs of distantly related bacteria revealed a conserved G/U-rich element that is strictly required for GcvB target recognition. Analysis of target gene fusion regulation in vivo, and in vitro structure probing and translation assays showed that GcvB represses its target mRNAs by binding to extended C/A-rich regions, which may also serve as translational enhancer elements. In some cases (oppA, dppA), GcvB repression can be explained by masking the ribosome-binding site (RBS) to prevent 30S subunit binding. However, GcvB can also effectively repress translation by binding to target mRNAs at upstream sites, outside the RBS. Specifically, GcvB represses gltI mRNA translation at the C/A-rich target site located at positions −57 to −45 relative to the start codon. Taken together, our study suggests highly conserved regions in sRNAs and mRNA regions distant from Shine-Dalgarno sequences as important elements for the identification of sRNA targets. PMID:17974919

  5. The expression of insulin and insulin receptor mRNAs is regulated by nutritional state and glucose in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Caruso, Michael A; Sheridan, Mark A

    2012-01-15

    Many species of fish, including rainbow trout, possess multiple INS- and IR-encoding mRNAs. In this study, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used as a model to study the regulation of INS (INS1, INS2) and IR (IR1, IR2, IR3, and IR4) mRNA expression by nutritional state and glucose. In the nutritional state study, fish were either fed continuously, fasted (4 or 6 weeks), or fasted 4 weeks, then refed for 2 weeks. Nutritional state regulated INS and IR mRNA expression in a subtype- and tissue-specific manner. A 4-week fast reduced INS1 expression in endocrine pancreas (Brockmann body) and of INS1 and INS2 in brain, whereas a 6-week fast reduced the expression of both INS1 and INS2 in pancreas but only of INS1 in brain. Refeeding only restored INS2 levels in pancreas. In adipose tissue, by contrast, a 4-week fast increased INS1 expression, and a 6-week fast increased the expression of both INS1 and INS2. Nutritional state also modulated the pattern of IR mRNA expression. Fasting for 4 weeks resulted in no significant change in IR expression. Prolonged fasting (6 weeks) increased the expression of IR4 mRNA in the pancreas, adipose tissue, cardiac muscle, and gill; however, fasting decreased expression of IR3 mRNA in liver. Refeeding restored fasting-associated increases in IR4 expression in pancreas, adipose tissue, cardiac muscle, and gill, but had no effect on the fasting-associated decrease in IR3 expression in liver. Glucose differentially regulated the expression of INS and IR mRNAs in Brockmann bodies and liver pieces incubated in vitro, respectively. Low glucose (1 mM) reduced pancreatic expression of both INS1 and INS2 mRNAs compared to levels observed at 4 or 10 mM glucose. In the liver, IR1 and IR2 mRNA expression was insensitive to glucose concentration, whereas expression of IR3 and IR4 was attenuated at 1 and 10 mM compared to 4 mM glucose. These findings indicate that the pattern of INS and IR expression in selected tissues is regulated by

  6. Identification of LIN28B-bound mRNAs reveals features of target recognition and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Robin; Munschauer, Mathias; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Mayr, Florian; Heinemann, Udo; Kempa, Stefan; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Landthaler, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The conserved human LIN28 RNA-binding proteins function in development, maintenance of pluripotency and oncogenesis. We used PAR-CLIP and a newly developed variant of this method, iDo-PAR-CLIP, to identify LIN28B targets as well as sites bound by the individual RNA-binding domains of LIN28B in the human transcriptome at nucleotide resolution. The position of target binding sites reflected the known structural relative orientation of individual LIN28B-binding domains, validating iDo-PAR-CLIP. Our data suggest that LIN28B directly interacts with most expressed mRNAs and members of the let-7 microRNA family. The Lin28-binding motif detected in pre-let-7 was enriched in mRNA sequences bound by LIN28B. Upon LIN28B knockdown, cell proliferation and the cell cycle were strongly impaired. Quantitative shotgun proteomics of LIN28B depleted cells revealed significant reduction of protein synthesis from its RNA targets. Computational analyses provided evidence that the strength of protein synthesis reduction correlated with the location of LIN28B binding sites within target transcripts. PMID:23770886

  7. CstF64: Cell Cycle Regulation and Functional Role in 3′ End Processing of Replication-Dependent Histone mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valentina; Griesbach, Esther

    2014-01-01

    The 3′ end processing of animal replication-dependent histone mRNAs is activated during G1/S-phase transition. The processing site is recognized by stem-loop binding protein and the U7 snRNP, but cleavage additionally requires a heat-labile factor (HLF), composed of cleavage/polyadenylation specificity factor, symplekin, and cleavage stimulation factor 64 (CstF64). Although HLF has been shown to be cell cycle regulated, the mechanism of this regulation is unknown. Here we show that levels of CstF64 increase toward the S phase and its depletion affects histone RNA processing, S-phase progression, and cell proliferation. Moreover, analyses of the interactions between CstF64, symplekin, and the U7 snRNP-associated proteins FLASH and Lsm11 indicate that CstF64 is important for recruiting HLF to histone precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA)-resident proteins. Thus, CstF64 is central to the function of HLF and appears to be at least partly responsible for its cell cycle regulation. Additionally, we show that misprocessed histone transcripts generated upon CstF64 depletion mainly accumulate in the nucleus, where they are targets of the exosome machinery, while a small cytoplasmic fraction is partly associated with polysomes. PMID:25266659

  8. The Novel Poly(A) Polymerase Star-PAP is a Signal-Regulated Switch at the 3′-end of mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Laishram, Rakesh S.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The mRNA 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) modulates message stability, transport, intracellular location and translation. We have discovered a novel nuclear poly(A) polymerase termed Star-PAP (nuclear speckle targeted PIPKIα regulated-poly(A) polymerase) that couples with the transcriptional machinery and is regulated by the phosphoinositide lipid messenger phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI4,5P2), the central lipid in phosphoinositide signaling. PI4,5P2 is generated primarily by type I phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKI). Phosphoinositides are present in the nucleus including at nuclear speckles compartments separate from known membrane structures. PIPKs regulate cellular functions by interacting with PI4,5P2 effectors where PIPKs generate PI4,5P2 that then modulates the activity of the associated effectors. Nuclear PIPKIα interacts with and regulates Star-PAP, and PI4,5P2 specifically activates Star-PAP in a gene- and signaling-dependent manner. Importantly, other select signaling molecules integrated into the Star-PAP complex seem to regulate Star-PAP activities and processivities toward RNA substrates, and unique sequence elements around the Star-PAP binding sites within the 3′-UTR of target genes contribute to Star-PAP specificity for processing. Therefore, Star-PAP and its regulatory molecules form a signaling nexus at the 3′-end of target mRNAs to control the expression of select group of genes including the ones involved in stress responses. PMID:23306079

  9. Endogenous short RNAs generated by Dicer 2 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 regulate mRNAs in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor; Nicolas, Francisco; Moxon, Simon; Haro, Juan de; Calo, Silvia; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Moulton, Vincent; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa; Dalmay, Tamas

    2011-09-01

    Endogenous short RNAs (esRNAs) play diverse roles in eukaryotes and usually are produced from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by Dicer. esRNAs are grouped into different classes based on biogenesis and function but not all classes are present in all three eukaryotic kingdoms. The esRNA register of fungi is poorly described compared to other eukaryotes and it is not clear what esRNA classes are present in this kingdom and whether they regulate the expression of protein coding genes. However, evidence that some dicer mutant fungi display altered phenotypes suggests that esRNAs play an important role in fungi. Here, we show that the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides produces new classes of esRNAs that map to exons and regulate the expression of many protein coding genes. The largest class of these exonic-siRNAs (ex-siRNAs) are generated by RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase 1 (RdRP1) and dicer-like 2 (DCL2) and target the mRNAs of protein coding genes from which they were produced. Our results expand the range of esRNAs in eukaryotes and reveal a new role for esRNAs in fungi

  10. RBBP6 isoforms regulate the human polyadenylation machinery and modulate expression of mRNAs with AU-rich 3′ UTRs

    PubMed Central

    Di Giammartino, Dafne Campigli; Li, Wencheng; Ogami, Koichi; Yashinskie, Jossie J.; Hoque, Mainul; Tian, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Polyadenylation of mRNA precursors is mediated by a large multisubunit protein complex. Here we show that RBBP6 (retinoblastoma-binding protein 6), identified initially as an Rb- and p53-binding protein, is a component of this complex and functions in 3′ processing in vitro and in vivo. RBBP6 associates with other core factors, and this interaction is mediated by an unusual ubiquitin-like domain, DWNN (“domain with no name”), that is required for 3′ processing activity. The DWNN is also expressed, via alternative RNA processing, as a small single-domain protein (isoform 3 [iso3]). Importantly, we show that iso3, known to be down-regulated in several cancers, competes with RBBP6 for binding to the core machinery, thereby inhibiting 3′ processing. Genome-wide analyses following RBBP6 knockdown revealed decreased transcript levels, especially of mRNAs with AU-rich 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) such as c-Fos and c-Jun, and increased usage of distal poly(A) sites. Our results implicate RBBP6 and iso3 as novel regulators of 3′ processing, especially of RNAs with AU-rich 3′ UTRs. PMID:25319826

  11. Stabilization of cellular mRNAs and up-regulation of proteins by oligoribonucleotides homologous to the Bcl2 adenine-uridine rich element motif.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Annamaria; Ghisolfi, Laura; Franzi, Sara; Maresca, Giovanna; Gherzi, Roberto; Capaccioli, Sergio; Nicolin, Angelo; Canti, Gianfranco

    2007-02-01

    Adenine-uridine rich elements (AREs) play an important role in modulating mRNA stability, being the target site of many ARE-binding proteins (AUBPs) that are involved in the decay process. Three 26-mer 2'-O-methyl oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) homologous to the core region of ARE of bcl2 mRNA have been studied for decoy-aptamer activity in UV cross-linking assays. Sense-oriented ORNs competed with the ARE motif for the interaction with both destabilizing and stabilizing AUBPs in cell-free systems and in cell lines. Moreover, ORNs induced mRNA stabilization and up-regulated both Bcl2 mRNA and protein levels in the cells. Bcl2 ORNs stabilized other ARE-containing transcripts and up-regulated their expression. These results indicate that Bcl2 ORNs compete for AUBP-ARE interactions independently of ARE class and suggest that in the cell, the default labile status of ARE-containing mRNAs depends on the combined interaction of such transcripts with destabilizing AUBPs. PMID:17077270

  12. Endogenous short RNAs generated by Dicer 2 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 regulate mRNAs in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Francisco Esteban; Moxon, Simon; de Haro, Juan P; Calo, Silvia; Grigoriev, Igor V; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Moulton, Vincent; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M; Dalmay, Tamas

    2010-09-01

    Endogenous short RNAs (esRNAs) play diverse roles in eukaryotes and usually are produced from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by Dicer. esRNAs are grouped into different classes based on biogenesis and function but not all classes are present in all three eukaryotic kingdoms. The esRNA register of fungi is poorly described compared to other eukaryotes and it is not clear what esRNA classes are present in this kingdom and whether they regulate the expression of protein coding genes. However, evidence that some dicer mutant fungi display altered phenotypes suggests that esRNAs play an important role in fungi. Here, we show that the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides produces new classes of esRNAs that map to exons and regulate the expression of many protein coding genes. The largest class of these exonic-siRNAs (ex-siRNAs) are generated by RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase 1 (RdRP1) and dicer-like 2 (DCL2) and target the mRNAs of protein coding genes from which they were produced. Our results expand the range of esRNAs in eukaryotes and reveal a new role for esRNAs in fungi. PMID:20427422

  13. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence of riboswitch-regulated single mRNAs shows ligand-dependent accessibility bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Arlie J.; Lund, Paul E.; Blanco, Mario R.; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    In response to intracellular signals in Gram-negative bacteria, translational riboswitches--commonly embedded in messenger RNAs (mRNAs)--regulate gene expression through inhibition of translation initiation. It is generally thought that this regulation originates from occlusion of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence upon ligand binding; however, little direct evidence exists. Here we develop Single Molecule Kinetic Analysis of RNA Transient Structure (SiM-KARTS) to investigate the ligand-dependent accessibility of the SD sequence of an mRNA hosting the 7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1)-sensing riboswitch. Spike train analysis reveals that individual mRNA molecules alternate between two conformational states, distinguished by `bursts' of probe binding associated with increased SD sequence accessibility. Addition of preQ1 decreases the lifetime of the SD's high-accessibility (bursting) state and prolongs the time between bursts. In addition, ligand-jump experiments reveal imperfect riboswitching of single mRNA molecules. Such complex ligand sensing by individual mRNA molecules rationalizes the nuanced ligand response observed during bulk mRNA translation.

  14. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence of riboswitch-regulated single mRNAs shows ligand-dependent accessibility bursts

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Arlie J.; Lund, Paul E.; Blanco, Mario R.; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    In response to intracellular signals in Gram-negative bacteria, translational riboswitches—commonly embedded in messenger RNAs (mRNAs)—regulate gene expression through inhibition of translation initiation. It is generally thought that this regulation originates from occlusion of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence upon ligand binding; however, little direct evidence exists. Here we develop Single Molecule Kinetic Analysis of RNA Transient Structure (SiM-KARTS) to investigate the ligand-dependent accessibility of the SD sequence of an mRNA hosting the 7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1)-sensing riboswitch. Spike train analysis reveals that individual mRNA molecules alternate between two conformational states, distinguished by ‘bursts' of probe binding associated with increased SD sequence accessibility. Addition of preQ1 decreases the lifetime of the SD's high-accessibility (bursting) state and prolongs the time between bursts. In addition, ligand-jump experiments reveal imperfect riboswitching of single mRNA molecules. Such complex ligand sensing by individual mRNA molecules rationalizes the nuanced ligand response observed during bulk mRNA translation. PMID:26781350

  15. Isolation of cucumber CsARF cDNAs and expression of the corresponding mRNAs during gravity-regulated morphogenesis of cucumber seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yamasaki, S.; Fujii, N.; Hagen, G.; Guilfoyle, T.; Takahashi, H.

    Cucumber seedlings grown in a horizontal position develop a protuberance called peg on the lower side of the transition zone between the hypocotyl and the root. We have suggested that peg formation on the upper side of the gravistimulated transition zone is suppressed because cucumber seedlings grown in a vertical position or microgravity symmetrically develop two pegs on the transition zone. Plant hormone, auxin, is considered to play a crucial role in the gravity-regulated formation of peg. We have shown that the mRNAs of auxin-inducible genes (CsIAAs) isolated from cucumber accumulate more abundantly in the lower side of the transition zone than in the upper side when peg formation initiates. To reveal the mechanism of transcriptional regulation by auxin for peg formation, we isolated five cDNAs of Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) from cucumber and compared their mRNA accumulation with those of CsIAA1 and CsIAA2. The tissue specificity of mRNA accumulation of CsARF2 was similar to those of CsIAA1 and CsIAA2. The structural character of CsARF2 predicts it is transcriptional activator. These results suggest that CsARF2 may be involved in activation of the transcription of auxin-inducible genes including CsIAA1 for peg formation. Because mRNA accumulation of five CsARFs, including CsARF2, were affected by neither gravity nor auxin, transcriptional activity of CsARF2 may be regulated at post-transcriptional level to induce asymmetric mRNA accumulation of auxin-inducible genes in the transition zone.

  16. Coordinate regulation of a family of promastigote-enriched mRNAs by the 3′UTR PRE element in Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Timothy R.; Mishra, Krishna K.; LeBowitz, Jonathan H.; Forney, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is a key feature controlling gene expression in the protozoan parasite Leishmania. The nine-nucleotide paraflagellar rod regulatory element (PRE) in the 3′UTR of L. mexicana PFR2 is both necessary and sufficient for the observed ten-fold higher level of PFR2 mRNA in promastigotes compared to amastigotes. It is also found in the 3′UTRs of all known PFR genes. A search of the L. major Friedlin genomic database revealed several genes that share this cis element including a homolog of a heterotrimeric kinesin II subunit, and a gene that shares identity to a homolog of a Plasmodium antigen. In this study, we show that genes that harbor the PRE display promastigote-enriched transcript accumulation ranging from 4 – 15 fold. Northern analysis on episomal block substitution constructs revealed that the regulatory element is necessary for the proper steady-state accumulation of mRNA in L. mexicana paraflagellar rod gene 4 (PFR4). Also we show that the PRE plays a major role in the proper steady-state mRNA accumulation of PFR1, but may not account for the full regulatory mechanism acting on this mRNA. Our evidence suggests that the PRE coordinately regulates the mRNA abundance of not only the PFR family of genes, but in a larger group of genes that have unrelated functions. Although the PRE alone can regulate some mRNAs, it may also act in concert with additional elements to control other RNA transcripts. PMID:18023890

  17. Translation Regulation and RNA Granule Formation after Heat Shock of Procyclic Form Trypanosoma brucei: Many Heat-Induced mRNAs Are also Increased during Differentiation to Mammalian-Infective Forms.

    PubMed

    Minia, Igor; Merce, Clementine; Terrao, Monica; Clayton, Christine

    2016-09-01

    African trypanosome procyclic forms multiply in the midgut of tsetse flies, and are routinely cultured at 27°C. Heat shocks of 37°C and above result in general inhibition of translation, and severe heat shock (41°C) results in sequestration of mRNA in granules. The mRNAs that are bound by the zinc-finger protein ZC3H11, including those encoding refolding chaperones, escape heat-induced translation inhibition. At 27°C, ZC3H11 mRNA is predominantly present as an untranslated cytosolic messenger ribonucleoprotein particle, but after heat shocks of 37°C-41°C, the ZC3H11 mRNA moves into the polysomal fraction. To investigate the scope and specificities of heat-shock translational regulation and granule formation, we analysed the distributions of mRNAs on polysomes at 27°C and after 1 hour at 39°C, and the mRNA content of 41°C heat shock granules. We found that mRNAs that bind to ZC3H11 remained in polysomes at 39°C and were protected from sequestration in granules at 41°C. As previously seen for starvation stress granules, the mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins were excluded from heat-shock granules. 70 mRNAs moved towards the polysomal fraction after the 39°C heat shock, and 260 increased in relative abundance. Surprisingly, many of these mRNAs are also increased when trypanosomes migrate to the tsetse salivary glands. It therefore seems possible that in the wild, temperature changes due to diurnal variations and periodic intake of warm blood might influence the efficiency with which procyclic forms develop into mammalian-infective forms. PMID:27606618

  18. Untranslated regions of mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Mignone, Flavio; Gissi, Carmela; Liuni, Sabino; Pesole, Graziano

    2002-01-01

    Gene expression is finely regulated at the post-transcriptional level. Features of the untranslated regions of mRNAs that control their translation, degradation and localization include stem-loop structures, upstream initiation codons and open reading frames, internal ribosome entry sites and various cis-acting elements that are bound by RNA-binding proteins. PMID:11897027

  19. Ribosome traffic on mRNAs maps to gene ontology: genome-wide quantification of translation initiation rates and polysome size regulation.

    PubMed

    Ciandrini, Luca; Stansfield, Ian; Romano, M Carmen

    2013-01-01

    To understand the complex relationship governing transcript abundance and the level of the encoded protein, we integrate genome-wide experimental data of ribosomal density on mRNAs with a novel stochastic model describing ribosome traffic dynamics during translation elongation. This analysis reveals that codon arrangement, rather than simply codon bias, has a key role in determining translational efficiency. It also reveals that translation output is governed both by initiation efficiency and elongation dynamics. By integrating genome-wide experimental data sets with simulation of ribosome traffic on all Saccharomyces cerevisiae ORFs, mRNA-specific translation initiation rates are for the first time estimated across the entire transcriptome. Our analysis identifies different classes of mRNAs characterised by their initiation rates, their ribosome traffic dynamics, and by their response to ribosome availability. Strikingly, this classification based on translational dynamics maps onto key gene ontological classifications, revealing evolutionary optimisation of translation responses to be strongly influenced by gene function. PMID:23382661

  20. Ribosome Traffic on mRNAs Maps to Gene Ontology: Genome-wide Quantification of Translation Initiation Rates and Polysome Size Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ciandrini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    To understand the complex relationship governing transcript abundance and the level of the encoded protein, we integrate genome-wide experimental data of ribosomal density on mRNAs with a novel stochastic model describing ribosome traffic dynamics during translation elongation. This analysis reveals that codon arrangement, rather than simply codon bias, has a key role in determining translational efficiency. It also reveals that translation output is governed both by initiation efficiency and elongation dynamics. By integrating genome-wide experimental data sets with simulation of ribosome traffic on all Saccharomyces cerevisiae ORFs, mRNA-specific translation initiation rates are for the first time estimated across the entire transcriptome. Our analysis identifies different classes of mRNAs characterised by their initiation rates, their ribosome traffic dynamics, and by their response to ribosome availability. Strikingly, this classification based on translational dynamics maps onto key gene ontological classifications, revealing evolutionary optimisation of translation responses to be strongly influenced by gene function. PMID:23382661

  1. Genetic analysis of the phenobarbital regulation of the cytochrome P-450 2b-9 and aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 mRNAs in mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    Damon, M; Fautrel, A; Guillouzo, A; Corcos, L

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the genetic background on the phenobarbital inducibility of cytochrome P-450 2b-9, cytochrome P-450 2b-10 and aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 mRNAs in mice. We analysed the basal expression and the phenobarbital inducibility of both cytochrome P-450 mRNAs by semi-quantitative specific reverse transcription-PCR analyses in five inbred mouse strains (A/J,BALB/cByJ,C57BL/6J, DBA/2J and SWR/J). Male mice constitutively expressed cytochrome P-450 2b-9 and cytochrome P-450 2b-10 mRNAs, but a number of differences in their response to phenobarbital were observed. In all these mouse strains, phenobarbital induced cytochrome P-450 2b-10 mRNA whereas it could have either a positive or a negative effect on cytochrome P-450 2b-9 expression, depending on the strain and the sex of the mice. Specifically, phenobarbital increased cytochrome P-450 2b-9 expression in C57BL/6J males while it decreased it in DBA/2J mice. Interestingly, dexamethasone was able to mimic the phenobarbital effect on both cytochromes P-450 in these two strains. Aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 mRNA was always induced by phenobarbital, except in the C57BL/6J strain. Genetic analysis revealed that the phenobarbital-inducible phenotype was either a semi-dominant or a recessive trait in F1 animals from a C57BL/6J x DBA/2J cross for the cytochrome P-450 2b-9 and the aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 genes, respectively. This study suggests that the genetic basis for phenobarbital induction in mice depends on the target gene, and that more than one regulatory step would by involved in this response pathway. PMID:8713075

  2. Corticosterone differentially regulates the bilateral response of astrocyte mRNAs in the hippocampus to entorhinal cortex lesions in male rats.

    PubMed

    Laping, N J; Nichols, N R; Day, J R; Finch, C E

    1991-07-01

    This study examined the effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) and corticosterone (CORT) replacement on the levels of two astrocyte mRNAs during responses to unilateral entorhinal cortex lesions (ECL) to identify molecular mechanisms involved in glucocorticoid modulation of astrocyte activation following deafferentation. Both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2) mRNA were increased in the ipsilateral hippocampus 4 days following unilateral ECL. In unlesioned ADX rats CORT replacement decreased both messages in the hippocampus. CORT replacement suppressed the ECL-induced increase of GFAP mRNA in the contralateral, but not ipsilateral hippocampus of ADX rats. In contrast, CORT decreased SGP-2 mRNA both ipsi- and contralaterally. It is clear that several regulatory mechanisms are responsible for maintaining a physiological balance of astrocyte activity in the adult brain, and that changes in circuit integrity and the endocrine milieu can alter this balance. PMID:1717807

  3. Genome-wide analysis reveals the differential regulations of mRNAs and miRNAs in Dorset and Small Tail Han sheep muscles.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiangyang; Luo, Qingmiao; Qin, Xiaoyu

    2015-05-15

    Sheep are highly diverse species raised for meat and other agricultural products. The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetic regulators that could control muscle growth and development in different sheep breeds. The study showed that the differentially expressed genes are involved in various cellular activities, such as metabolic cascades, catalytic function and signaling pathway. Many signaling molecules are also found to be differentially expressed, suggesting important roles of signaling pathways contributing to genetic diversity and sheep development. Analysis of miRNAs suggested important roles of miRNAs in controlling muscle differences. This study provided a genome-wide resolution of mRNA and miRNA regulations in muscles from Dorset and Han sheep. PMID:25732516

  4. Regulation and tissue-specific distribution of mRNAs for three extracellular invertase isoenzymes of tomato suggests an important function in establishing and maintaining sink metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Godt, D E; Roitsch, T

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to gain insight into the contribution of extracellular invertases for sink metabolism in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). The present study shows that extracellular invertase isoenzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising four members: Lin5, Lin6, Lin7, and Lin8. The regulation of mRNA levels by internal and external signals and the distribution in sink and source tissues has been determined and compared with mRNA levels of the intracellular sucrose (Suc)-cleaving enzymes Suc synthase and vacuolar invertase. The specific regulation of Lin5, Lin6, and Lin7 suggests an important function of apoplastic cleavage of Suc by cell wall-bound invertase in establishing and maintaining sink metabolism. Lin6 is expressed under conditions that require a high carbohydrate supply. The corresponding mRNA shows a sink tissue-specific distribution and the concentration is elevated by stress-related stimuli, by the growth-promoting phytohormone zeatin, and in response to the induction of heterotrophic metabolism. The expression of Lin5 and Lin7 in gynoecia and stamens, respectively, suggests an important function in supplying carbohydrates to these flower organs, whereas the Lin7 mRNA was found to be present exclusively in this specific sink organ. PMID:9306701

  5. Drosha, DGCR8, and Dicer mRNAs are down-regulated in human cells infected with dengue virus 4, and play a role in viral pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Casseb, S M M; Simith, D B; Melo, K F L; Mendonça, M H; Santos, A C M; Carvalho, V L; Cruz, A C R; Vasconcelos, P F C

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) and its four serotypes (DENV1-4) belong to the Flavivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. DENV infection is a life-threatening disease, which results in up to 20,000 deaths each year. Viruses have been shown to encode trans-regulatory small RNAs, or microRNAs (miRNAs), which bind to messenger RNA and negatively regulate host or viral gene expression. During DENV infections, miRNAs interact with proteins in the RNAi pathway, and are processed by ribonucleases such as Dicer and Drosha. This study aims to investigate Drosha, DGCR8, and Dicer expression levels in human A-549 cells following DENV4 infection. DENV4 infected A-549 cells were collected daily for 5 days, and RNA was extracted to quantify viral load. Gene expression of Drosha, Dicer, and DGCR8 was determined using quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). We found that DENV4 infection exhibited the highest viral load 3 days post-infection. Dicer, Drosha, and DGCR8 showed reduced expression following DENV4 infection as compared with negative controls. In addition, we hypothesize that reduced expression of DGCR8 may not only be related to miRNA biogenesis, but also other small RNAs. This study may change our understanding regarding the relationship between host cells and the dengue virus. PMID:27173348

  6. mRNAs Hit a Sticky Wicket.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    Drosophila germ cell specification depends on localization of mRNAs required for patterning to the posterior of the oocyte during oogenesis. In a recent issue of Nature, Vourekas et al. (2016) suggest that Aubergine in complex with piRNAs may provide a low-specificity anchoring mechanism for posterior mRNAs. PMID:27046827

  7. Differential distribution of ELMO1 and ELMO2 mRNAs in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hironori; Fujimoto, Satoshi; Ishida, Chisaki; Ishikawa, Yukio; Negishi, Manabu

    2006-02-16

    ELMO is an upstream regulator of the Rho family small GTPase Rac. We investigated the distributions of mRNAs of two subtypes of ELMO, ELMO1 and ELMO2, in the developing mouse brain. Both ELMO1 and ELMO2 mRNAs are widely distributed in the developing mouse brain, but they were expressed in different neuronal populations in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum. Thus, ELMO1 and ELMO2 may play different roles during brain development. PMID:16443196

  8. Ribosome association contributes to restricting mRNAs to the cell body of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z; McLaren, R S; Winters, C A; Ralston, E

    1998-12-01

    In neurons, mRNAs are differentially sorted to axons, dendrites, and the cell body. Recently, regions of certain mRNAs have been identified that target those mRNAs for translocation to the processes. However, the mechanism by which many, if not most mRNAs are retained in the cell body is not understood. Total inhibition of translation, by puromycin or cycloheximide, results in the mislocalization of cell body mRNAs to dendrites. We have examined the effect of translational inhibitors on the localization of ferritin mRNA, the translation of which can also be inhibited specifically by reducing iron levels. Using nonisotopic in situ hybridization, ferritin mRNA is found restricted to the cell body of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Following treatment with either puromycin or cycloheximide, it migrates into dendrites. Control experiments reveal that the drugs affect neither the viability of the neuronal cultures, nor the steady-state level of ferritin mRNA. When transcription and protein synthesis are inhibited simultaneously, ferritin mRNA is found in the dendrites of puromycin, but not of cycloheximide-treated neurons. However, the localization of ferritin mRNA is unaffected by changes in iron concentration that regulate its translation rate specifically. We propose a model whereby cell body-restricted mRNAs are maintained in that location by association with ribosomes and with another cell component, which traps mRNAs when they are freed of ribosome association. The release of all mRNA species, as happens after total protein synthesis inhibition, floods the system and allows cell body mRNAs to diffuse into dendrites. In contrast, the partial release of the single ferritin mRNA species does not saturate the trapping system and the mRNA is retained in the cell body. PMID:9888989

  9. Antagonism of microRNA-122 in mice by systemically administered LNA-antimiR leads to up-regulation of a large set of predicted target mRNAs in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Elmén, Joacim; Lindow, Morten; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Bak, Mads; Christensen, Mette; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Hedtjärn, Maj; Hansen, Jens Bo; Hansen, Henrik Frydenlund; Straarup, Ellen Marie; McCullagh, Keith; Kearney, Phil; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) is an abundant liver-specific miRNA, implicated in fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism as well as hepatitis C viral replication. Here, we report that a systemically administered 16-nt, unconjugated LNA (locked nucleic acid)-antimiR oligonucleotide complementary to the 5′ end of miR-122 leads to specific, dose-dependent silencing of miR-122 and shows no hepatotoxicity in mice. Antagonism of miR-122 is due to formation of stable heteroduplexes between the LNA-antimiR and miR-122 as detected by northern analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated uptake of the LNA-antimiR in mouse liver cells, which was accompanied by markedly reduced hybridization signals for mature miR-122 in treated mice. Functional antagonism of miR-122 was inferred from a low cholesterol phenotype and de-repression within 24 h of 199 liver mRNAs showing significant enrichment for miR-122 seed matches in their 3′ UTRs. Expression profiling extended to 3 weeks after the last LNA-antimiR dose revealed that most of the changes in liver gene expression were normalized to saline control levels coinciding with normalized miR-122 and plasma cholesterol levels. Combined, these data suggest that miRNA antagonists comprised of LNA are valuable tools for identifying miRNA targets in vivo and for studying the biological role of miRNAs and miRNA-associated gene-regulatory networks in a physiological context. PMID:18158304

  10. MicroRNA-mediated repression of nonsense mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ya; Lin, Jimin; Xu, Beiying; Hu, Sida; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Ligang

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have established important roles for microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating gene expression. Here, we report that miRNAs also serve as a surveillance system to repress the expression of nonsense mRNAs that may produce harmful truncated proteins. Upon recognition of the premature termination codon by the translating ribosome, the downstream portion of the coding region of an mRNA is redefined as part of the 3′ untranslated region; as a result, the miRNA-responsive elements embedded in this region can be detected by miRNAs, triggering accelerated mRNA deadenylation and translational inhibition. We demonstrate that naturally occurring cancer-causing APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) nonsense mutants which escape nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) are repressed by miRNA-mediated surveillance. In addition, we show that miRNA-mediated surveillance and exon–exon junction complex-mediated NMD are not mutually exclusive and act additively to enhance the repressive activity. Therefore, we have uncovered a new role for miRNAs in repressing nonsense mutant mRNAs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03032.001 PMID:25107276

  11. Systematic imaging reveals features and changing localization of mRNAs in Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Jambor, Helena; Surendranath, Vineeth; Kalinka, Alex T; Mejstrik, Pavel; Saalfeld, Stephan; Tomancak, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    mRNA localization is critical for eukaryotic cells and affects numerous transcripts, yet how cells regulate distribution of many mRNAs to their subcellular destinations is still unknown. We combined transcriptomics and systematic imaging to determine the tissue-specific expression and subcellular distribution of 5862 mRNAs during Drosophila oogenesis. mRNA localization is widespread in the ovary and detectable in all of its cell types—the somatic epithelial, the nurse cells, and the oocyte. Genes defined by a common RNA localization share distinct gene features and differ in expression level, 3′UTR length and sequence conservation from unlocalized mRNAs. Comparison of mRNA localizations in different contexts revealed that localization of individual mRNAs changes over time in the oocyte and between ovarian and embryonic cell types. This genome scale image-based resource (Dresden Ovary Table, DOT, http://tomancak-srv1.mpi-cbg.de/DOT/main.html) enables the transition from mechanistic dissection of singular mRNA localization events towards global understanding of how mRNAs transcribed in the nucleus distribute in cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05003.001 PMID:25838129

  12. Proteomic analysis reveals the dynamic association of proteins with translated mRNAs in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Alves, Lysangela R; Avila, Andréa R; Correa, Alejandro; Holetz, Fabíola B; Mansur, Fernanda C B; Manque, Patrício A; de Menezes, Juliana P B; Buck, Gregory A; Krieger, Marco A; Goldenberg, Samuel

    2010-03-01

    Gene regulation is mainly post-transcriptional in trypanosomatids. The stability of mRNA and access to polysomes are thought to be tightly regulated, allowing Trypanosoma cruzi to adapt to the different environmental conditions during its life cycle. Post-transcriptional regulation requires the association between mRNAs and certain proteins to form mRNP complexes. We investigated the dynamic association between proteins and mRNAs, using poly(T) beads to isolate and characterize proteins and protein complexes bound to poly-A+ mRNAs. The protein content of these fractions was analyzed by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We identified 542 protein component of the mRNP complexes associated with mRNAs. Twenty-four of the proteins obtained were present in all fractions, whereas some other proteins were exclusive to a particular fraction: epimastigote polysomal (0.37%) and post-polysomal (2.95%) fractions; stress polysomal (13.8%) and post-polysomal (40.78%) fractions. Several proteins known to be involved in mRNA metabolism were identified, and this was considered important as it made it possible to confirm the reliability of our mRNP isolation approach. This procedure allowed us to have a first insight into the composition and dynamics of mRNPs in T. cruzi. PMID:20060445

  13. Hormonal regulation of rat hypothalamic neuropeptide mRNAs: effect of hypophysectomy and hormone replacement on growth-hormone-releasing factor, somatostatin and the insulin-like growth factors.

    PubMed

    Wood, T L; Berelowitz, M; Gelato, M C; Roberts, C T; LeRoith, D; Millard, W J; McKelvy, J F

    1991-03-01

    Hormonal feedback regulation of hypothalamic peptides putatively involved in growth hormone (GH) regulation has been studied by measurement of steady-state mRNA levels in male hypophysectomized rats with or without thyroid hormone, corticosterone, testosterone or GH replacement. Hypothalamic GH-releasing factor (GRF) mRNA levels increased progressively following hypophysectomy to 420% of sham levels after 15 days while hypothalamic insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA levels decreased to less than 40% of sham levels. Whole hypothalamic somatostatin mRNA levels were not significantly different from sham. One week of continuous GH infusion restored hypothalamic IGF-I mRNA to levels (95%) indistinguishable from those in sham-operated controls but had no effect on either IGF-II or GRF mRNA. Thyroid hormone, corticosterone and testosterone treatment without GH had no effect on the hypophysectomy-induced reduction of either IGF-I or IGF-II mRNA levels but reversed the elevation of GRF mRNA. We conclude that hypothalamic IGF-I may be involved in GH feedback regulation and thus may function as a hypothalamic modulator of GH. In contrast, IGF-II may be regulated by one of the pituitary trophic hormones but not by GH or the target hormones tested. Finally, hypothalamic GRF mRNA regulation appears to be complex and may include target hormone feedback. PMID:1674982

  14. Multiple Export Mechanisms for mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Delaleau, Mildred; Borden, Katherine L. B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear mRNA export plays an important role in gene expression. We describe the mechanisms of mRNA export including the importance of mRNP assembly, docking with the nuclear basket of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), transit through the central channel of the NPC and cytoplasmic release. We describe multiple mechanisms of mRNA export including NXF1 and CRM1 mediated pathways. Selective groups of mRNAs can be preferentially transported in order to respond to cellular stimuli. RNAs can be selected based on the presence of specific cis-acting RNA elements and binding of specific adaptor proteins. The role that dysregulation of this process plays in human disease is also discussed. PMID:26343730

  15. Aubergine iCLIP Reveals piRNA-Dependent Decay of mRNAs Involved in Germ Cell Development in the Early Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Barckmann, Bridlin; Pierson, Stéphanie; Dufourt, Jérémy; Papin, Catherine; Armenise, Claudia; Port, Fillip; Grentzinger, Thomas; Chambeyron, Séverine; Baronian, Grégory; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Curk, Tomaz; Simonelig, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway plays an essential role in the repression of transposons in the germline. Other functions of piRNAs such as post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs are now emerging. Here, we perform iCLIP with the PIWI protein Aubergine (Aub) and identify hundreds of maternal mRNAs interacting with Aub in the early Drosophila embryo. Gene expression profiling reveals that a proportion of these mRNAs undergo Aub-dependent destabilization during the maternal-to-zygotic transition. Strikingly, Aub-dependent unstable mRNAs encode germ cell determinants. iCLIP with an Aub mutant that is unable to bind piRNAs confirms piRNA-dependent binding of Aub to mRNAs. Base pairing between piRNAs and mRNAs can induce mRNA cleavage and decay that are essential for embryonic development. These results suggest general regulation of maternal mRNAs by Aub and piRNAs, which plays a key developmental role in the embryo through decay and localization of mRNAs encoding germ cell determinants. PMID:26257181

  16. Nuleclear extracts of Crithidia fasciculata contain a factor(s) that binds to the 5'-untranslated regions of TOP2 and RPA1 mRNAs containing sequences required for their cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, R; Ray, D S

    1998-09-11

    The Crithidia fasciculata replication protein A gene, RPA1, and topoisomerase II gene, TOP2, encode proteins involved in the replication of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, respectively. Transcripts of both genes accumulate periodically during the cell cycle and attain their maximum levels just before S phase. Octamer consensus sequences within the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of both genes have been shown to be necessary for cycling of these transcripts. Using a gel retardation assay, we show here that nuclear extracts of C. fasciculata contain a protein factor(s) that binds specifically to RNA from 5'-UTRs of TOP2 and RPA1 genes. In addition, mutations in the consensus octamer sequence abolish binding to the RNA in both cases. Ultraviolet cross-linking using a radiolabeled TOP2 5'-UTR probe identified proteins with apparent molecular masses of 74 and 37 kDa in the RNA-protein complex. Nuclear extracts prepared from synchronized cells show that the binding activity varies during the cell cycle in parallel with TOP2 and RPA1 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the cell cycle regulation of the mRNA levels of trypanosomatid DNA replication genes may be mediated by binding of specific proteins to conserved sequences in the 5'-UTR of their transcripts. PMID:9726980

  17. Dietary sucrose enhances processing of mRNA-S14 nuclear precursor.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, L A; Mariash, C N

    1991-12-01

    The rapid response of rat hepatic mRNA-S14 to hormonal or dietary manipulation makes it an excellent model to study the control of lipogenic enzyme mRNA. The mechanism of regulation of this mRNA by triiodothyronine (T3) or sucrose remains controversial. Although initial studies suggested that T3 stabilized the nuclear precursor, subsequent studies suggest that T3 acts by increasing the transcriptional rate of this gene. More recently, the induction of mRNA-S14 by sucrose administration was shown to be associated with an increase in transcriptional "run-on" activity. Because T3 and carbohydrate feeding synergistically regulate this mRNA, we studied the response to short and long term high carbohydrate feeding in hypothyroid and euthyroid rats. We found the response to the lipogenic diet was rapid in hypothyroid rats, with maximal levels of mRNA-S14 attained by 4 h (2.2 +/- 0.6 chow fed versus 13.5 +/- 2.5 pg/micrograms RNA on lipogenic diet). The rapid induction by the lipogenic diet contrasts with the diminished response to sucrose by gastric gavage (4.6 +/- 1.2 pg/micrograms RNA) over the same time interval. Despite the large increase in the mature mRNA induced by the lipogenic diet, the rise in the nuclear precursor was small and not different from that observed after sucrose gavage (0.14 +/- 0.01 chow, 0.26 +/- 0.03 sucrose gavage, 0.25 +/- 0.04 pg/micrograms RNA lipogenic diet). The molar ratio of the mature to precursor mRNA-S14 showed progressive increases with the smallest level in the fasting rat, an intermediate level in the chow-fed and sucrose gavaged rats, and the highest level in the animals fed a lipogenic diet (2.1, 16.5, 16.3, 62.7, respectively). Based on the previously reported half-life for the mature mRNA-S14, these data show that feeding sucrose by gavage or by a lipogenic diet leads to enhanced fractional conversion of precursor to mature mRNA-S14 with a simultaneous stabilization of the precursor mRNA-S14. PMID:1744084

  18. Sequestration of Highly Expressed mRNAs in Cytoplasmic Granules, P-Bodies, and Stress Granules Enhances Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Lavut, Anna; Raveh, Dina

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses indicate that a core 10%–15% of the yeast genome is modulated by a variety of different stresses. However, not all the induced genes undergo translation, and null mutants of many induced genes do not show elevated sensitivity to the particular stress. Elucidation of the RNA lifecycle reveals accumulation of non-translating mRNAs in cytoplasmic granules, P-bodies, and stress granules for future regulation. P-bodies contain enzymes for mRNA degradation; under stress conditions mRNAs may be transferred to stress granules for storage and return to translation. Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is elevated by stress; and here we analyzed the steady state levels, decay, and subcellular localization of the mRNA of the gene encoding the F-box protein, UFO1, that is induced by stress. Using the MS2L mRNA reporter system UFO1 mRNA was observed in granules that colocalized with P-bodies and stress granules. These P-bodies stored diverse mRNAs. Granules of two mRNAs transported prior to translation, ASH1-MS2L and OXA1-MS2L, docked with P-bodies. HSP12 mRNA that gave rise to highly elevated protein levels was not observed in granules under these stress conditions. ecd3, pat1 double mutants that are defective in P-body formation were sensitive to mRNAs expressed ectopically from strong promoters. These highly expressed mRNAs showed elevated translation compared with wild-type cells, and the viability of the mutants was strongly reduced. ecd3, pat1 mutants also exhibited increased sensitivity to different stresses. Our interpretation is that sequestration of highly expressed mRNAs in P-bodies is essential for viability. Storage of mRNAs for future regulation may contribute to the discrepancy between the steady state levels of many stress-induced mRNAs and their proteins. Sorting of mRNAs for future translation or decay by individual cells could generate potentially different phenotypes in a genetically identical population and enhance

  19. A beacon in the cytoplasm: Tracking translation of single mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Pingali, Hema V; Hilliker, Angela K

    2016-09-12

    Translation is carefully regulated to control protein levels and allow quick responses to changes in the environment. Certain questions about translation in vivo have been unattainable until now. In this issue, Pichon et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201605024) describe a new technique to allow real-time monitoring of translation on single mRNAs. PMID:27597752

  20. Protein arginine methyltransferase CARM1 attenuates the paraspeckle-mediated nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shi-Bin; Xiang, Jian-Feng; Li, Xiang; Xu, Yefen; Xue, Wei; Huang, Min; Wong, Catharine C; Sagum, Cari A; Bedford, Mark T; Yang, Li; Cheng, Donghang; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2015-03-15

    In many cells, mRNAs containing inverted repeated Alu elements (IRAlus) in their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) are inefficiently exported to the cytoplasm. Such nuclear retention correlates with paraspeckle-associated protein complexes containing p54(nrb). However, nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus is variable, and how regulation of retention and export is achieved is poorly understood. Here we show one mechanism of such regulation via the arginine methyltransferase CARM1 (coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1). We demonstrate that disruption of CARM1 enhances the nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus. CARM1 regulates this nuclear retention pathway at two levels: CARM1 methylates the coiled-coil domain of p54(nrb), resulting in reduced binding of p54(nrb) to mRNAs containing IRAlus, and also acts as a transcription regulator to suppress NEAT1 transcription, leading to reduced paraspeckle formation. These actions of CARM1 work together synergistically to regulate the export of transcripts containing IRAlus from paraspeckles under certain cellular stresses, such as poly(I:C) treatment. This work demonstrates how a post-translational modification of an RNA-binding protein affects protein-RNA interaction and also uncovers a mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the long noncoding RNA NEAT1. PMID:25792598

  1. Protein arginine methyltransferase CARM1 attenuates the paraspeckle-mediated nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shi-Bin; Xiang, Jian-Feng; Li, Xiang; Xu, Yefen; Xue, Wei; Huang, Min; Wong, Catharine C.; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    In many cells, mRNAs containing inverted repeated Alu elements (IRAlus) in their 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) are inefficiently exported to the cytoplasm. Such nuclear retention correlates with paraspeckle-associated protein complexes containing p54nrb. However, nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus is variable, and how regulation of retention and export is achieved is poorly understood. Here we show one mechanism of such regulation via the arginine methyltransferase CARM1 (coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1). We demonstrate that disruption of CARM1 enhances the nuclear retention of mRNAs containing IRAlus. CARM1 regulates this nuclear retention pathway at two levels: CARM1 methylates the coiled-coil domain of p54nrb, resulting in reduced binding of p54nrb to mRNAs containing IRAlus, and also acts as a transcription regulator to suppress NEAT1 transcription, leading to reduced paraspeckle formation. These actions of CARM1 work together synergistically to regulate the export of transcripts containing IRAlus from paraspeckles under certain cellular stresses, such as poly(I:C) treatment. This work demonstrates how a post-translational modification of an RNA-binding protein affects protein–RNA interaction and also uncovers a mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the long noncoding RNA NEAT1. PMID:25792598

  2. Alternative Mechanisms to Initiate Translation in Eukaryotic mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Salas, Encarnación; Piñeiro, David; Fernández, Noemí

    2012-01-01

    The composition of the cellular proteome is under the control of multiple processes, one of the most important being translation initiation. The majority of eukaryotic cellular mRNAs initiates translation by the cap-dependent or scanning mode of translation initiation, a mechanism that depends on the recognition of the m7G(5′)ppp(5′)N, known as the cap. However, mRNAs encoding proteins required for cell survival under stress bypass conditions inhibitory to cap-dependent translation; these mRNAs often harbor internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements in their 5′UTRs that mediate internal initiation of translation. This mechanism is also exploited by mRNAs expressed from the genome of viruses infecting eukaryotic cells. In this paper we discuss recent advances in understanding alternative ways to initiate translation across eukaryotic organisms. PMID:22536116

  3. nanoCAGE reveals 5′ UTR features that define specific modes of translation of functionally related MTOR-sensitive mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gandin, Valentina; Masvidal, Laia; Hulea, Laura; Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Cargnello, Marie; McLaughlan, Shannon; Cai, Yutian; Balanathan, Preetika; Morita, Masahiro; Rajakumar, Arjuna; Furic, Luc; Pollak, Michael; Porco, John A.; St-Pierre, Julie; Pelletier, Jerry; Larsson, Ola; Topisirovic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of MTOR-regulated mRNA translation remains unresolved. Whereas ribosome-profiling suggested that MTOR almost exclusively stimulates translation of the TOP (terminal oligopyrimidine motif) and TOP-like mRNAs, polysome-profiling indicated that MTOR also modulates translation of mRNAs without the 5′ TOP motif (non-TOP mRNAs). We demonstrate that in ribosome-profiling studies, detection of MTOR-dependent changes in non-TOP mRNA translation was obscured by low sensitivity and methodology biases. Transcription start site profiling using nano-cap analysis of gene expression (nanoCAGE) revealed that not only do many MTOR-sensitive mRNAs lack the 5′ TOP motif but that 5′ UTR features distinguish two functionally and translationally distinct subsets of MTOR-sensitive mRNAs: (1) mRNAs with short 5′ UTRs enriched for mitochondrial functions, which require EIF4E but are less EIF4A1-sensitive; and (2) long 5′ UTR mRNAs encoding proliferation- and survival-promoting proteins, which are both EIF4E- and EIF4A1-sensitive. Selective inhibition of translation of mRNAs harboring long 5′ UTRs via EIF4A1 suppression leads to sustained expression of proteins involved in respiration but concomitant loss of those protecting mitochondrial structural integrity, resulting in apoptosis. Conversely, simultaneous suppression of translation of both long and short 5′ UTR mRNAs by MTOR inhibitors results in metabolic dormancy and a predominantly cytostatic effect. Thus, 5′ UTR features define different modes of MTOR-sensitive translation of functionally distinct subsets of mRNAs, which may explain the diverse impact of MTOR and EIF4A inhibitors on neoplastic cells. PMID:26984228

  4. nanoCAGE reveals 5' UTR features that define specific modes of translation of functionally related MTOR-sensitive mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Gandin, Valentina; Masvidal, Laia; Hulea, Laura; Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Cargnello, Marie; McLaughlan, Shannon; Cai, Yutian; Balanathan, Preetika; Morita, Masahiro; Rajakumar, Arjuna; Furic, Luc; Pollak, Michael; Porco, John A; St-Pierre, Julie; Pelletier, Jerry; Larsson, Ola; Topisirovic, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    The diversity of MTOR-regulated mRNA translation remains unresolved. Whereas ribosome-profiling suggested that MTOR almost exclusively stimulates translation of the TOP (terminal oligopyrimidine motif) and TOP-like mRNAs, polysome-profiling indicated that MTOR also modulates translation of mRNAs without the 5' TOP motif (non-TOP mRNAs). We demonstrate that in ribosome-profiling studies, detection of MTOR-dependent changes in non-TOP mRNA translation was obscured by low sensitivity and methodology biases. Transcription start site profiling using nano-cap analysis of gene expression (nanoCAGE) revealed that not only do many MTOR-sensitive mRNAs lack the 5' TOP motif but that 5' UTR features distinguish two functionally and translationally distinct subsets of MTOR-sensitive mRNAs: (1) mRNAs with short 5' UTRs enriched for mitochondrial functions, which require EIF4E but are less EIF4A1-sensitive; and (2) long 5' UTR mRNAs encoding proliferation- and survival-promoting proteins, which are both EIF4E- and EIF4A1-sensitive. Selective inhibition of translation of mRNAs harboring long 5' UTRs via EIF4A1 suppression leads to sustained expression of proteins involved in respiration but concomitant loss of those protecting mitochondrial structural integrity, resulting in apoptosis. Conversely, simultaneous suppression of translation of both long and short 5' UTR mRNAs by MTOR inhibitors results in metabolic dormancy and a predominantly cytostatic effect. Thus, 5' UTR features define different modes of MTOR-sensitive translation of functionally distinct subsets of mRNAs, which may explain the diverse impact of MTOR and EIF4A inhibitors on neoplastic cells. PMID:26984228

  5. Uridylation prevents 3′ trimming of oligoadenylated mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Sement, François Michaël; Ferrier, Emilie; Zuber, Hélène; Merret, Rémy; Alioua, Malek; Deragon, Jean-Marc; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cécile; Lange, Heike; Gagliardi, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of mRNAs is usually initiated by deadenylation, the shortening of long poly(A) tails to oligo(A) tails of 12–15 As. Deadenylation leads to decapping and to subsequent 5′ to 3′ degradation by XRN proteins, or alternatively 3′ to 5′ degradation by the exosome. Decapping can also be induced by uridylation as shown for the non-polyadenylated histone mRNAs in humans and for several mRNAs in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Aspergillus nidulans. Here we report a novel role for uridylation in preventing 3′ trimming of oligoadenylated mRNAs in Arabidopsis. We show that oligo(A)-tailed mRNAs are uridylated by the cytosolic UTP:RNA uridylyltransferase URT1 and that URT1 has no major impact on mRNA degradation rates. However, in absence of uridylation, oligo(A) tails are trimmed, indicating that uridylation protects oligoadenylated mRNAs from 3′ ribonucleolytic attacks. This conclusion is further supported by an increase in 3′ truncated transcripts detected in urt1 mutants. We propose that preventing 3′ trimming of oligo(A)-tailed mRNAs by uridylation participates in establishing the 5′ to 3′ directionality of mRNA degradation. Importantly, uridylation prevents 3′ shortening of mRNAs associated with polysomes, suggesting that a key biological function of uridylation is to confer 5′ to 3′ polarity in case of co-translational mRNA decay. PMID:23748567

  6. Accumulation of long-lived mRNAs associated with germination in embryos during seed development of rice.

    PubMed

    Sano, Naoto; Ono, Hanako; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Kanekatsu, Motoki

    2015-07-01

    Mature dry seeds contain translatable mRNAs called long-lived mRNAs. Early studies have shown that protein synthesis during the initial phase of seed germination occurs from long-lived mRNAs, without de novo transcription. However, the gene expression systems that generate long-lived mRNAs in seeds are not well understood. To examine the accumulation of long-lived mRNAs in developing rice embryos, germination tests using the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D (Act D) were performed with the Japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Although over 70% of embryos at 10 days after flowering (DAF) germinated in the absence of the inhibitor, germination was remarkably impaired in embryos treated with Act D. In contrast, more than 70% of embryos at 20, 25, 30 and 40 DAF germinated in the presence of Act D. The same results were obtained when another cultivar, Koshihikari, was used, indicating that the long-lived mRNAs required for germination predominantly accumulate in embryos between 10 and 20 DAF during seed development. RNA-Seq identified 529 long-lived mRNA candidates, encoding proteins such as ABA, calcium ion and phospholipid signalling-related proteins, and HSP DNA J, increased from 10 to 20 DAF and were highly abundant in 40 DAF embryos of Nipponbare and Koshihikari. We also revealed that these long-lived mRNA candidates are clearly up-regulated in 10 DAF germinating embryos after imbibition, suggesting that the accumulation of these mRNAs in embryos is indispensable for the induction of germination. The findings presented here may facilitate in overcoming irregular seed germination or producing more vigorous seedlings. PMID:25941326

  7. UTRdb: a specialized database of 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Pesole, G; Liuni, S; Grillo, G; Saccone, C

    1998-01-01

    The important role the untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs may play in gene regulation and expression is now widely acknowledged. For this reason we developed UTRdb, a specialized database of 5'- and 3'-untranslated sequences of eukaryotic mRNAs cleaned from redundancy. UTRdb entries are enriched with specialized information not present in the primary databases, including the presence of functional patterns already demonstrated by experimental analysis to have some functional role. A collection of such patterns is being collected in UTRsite database (http://bio-www.ba.cnr.it:8000/srs5/) which can also be used with appropriate computational tools to detect known functional patterns contained in mRNA untranslated regions. PMID:9399833

  8. UTRdb: a specialized database of 5' and 3' untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Pesole, G; Liuni, S; Grillo, G; Ippedico, M; Larizza, A; Makalowski, W; Saccone, C

    1999-01-01

    The 5' and 3' untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs may play a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression controlling mRNA localization, stability and translational efficiency. For this reason we developed UTRdb (http://bigarea.area.ba.cnr.it:8000/BioWWW/#U TRdb), a specialized database of 5' and 3' untranslated sequences of eukaryotic mRNAs cleaned from redundancy. UTRdb entries are enriched with specialized information not present in the primary databases including the presence of nucleotide sequence patterns already demonstrated by experimental analysis to have some functional role. All these patterns have been collected in the UTRsite database so that it is possible to search any input sequence for the presence of annotated functional motifs. Furthermore, UTRdb entries have been annotated for the presence of repetitive elements. PMID:9847176

  9. Axonal and dendritic localization of mRNAs for glycogen-metabolizing enzymes in cultured rodent neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Localization of mRNAs encoding cytoskeletal or signaling proteins to neuronal processes is known to contribute to axon growth, synaptic differentiation and plasticity. In addition, a still increasing spectrum of mRNAs has been demonstrated to be localized under different conditions and developing stages thus reflecting a highly regulated mechanism and a role of mRNA localization in a broad range of cellular processes. Results Applying fluorescence in-situ-hybridization with specific riboprobes on cultured neurons and nervous tissue sections, we investigated whether the mRNAs for two metabolic enzymes, namely glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP), the key enzymes of glycogen metabolism, may also be targeted to neuronal processes. If it were so, this might contribute to clarify the so far enigmatic role of neuronal glycogen. We found that the mRNAs for both enzymes are localized to axonal and dendritic processes in cultured lumbar spinal motoneurons, but not in cultured trigeminal neurons. In cultured cortical neurons which do not store glycogen but nevertheless express glycogen synthase, the GS mRNA is also subject to axonal and dendritic localization. In spinal motoneurons and trigeminal neurons in situ, however, the mRNAs could only be demonstrated in the neuronal somata but not in the nerves. Conclusions We could demonstrate that the mRNAs for major enzymes of neural energy metabolism can be localized to neuronal processes. The heterogeneous pattern of mRNA localization in different culture types and developmental stages stresses that mRNA localization is a versatile mechanism for the fine-tuning of cellular events. Our findings suggest that mRNA localization for enzymes of glycogen metabolism could allow adaptation to spatial and temporal energy demands in neuronal events like growth, repair and synaptic transmission. PMID:24898526

  10. Exon Junction Complexes Show a Distributional Bias toward Alternatively Spliced mRNAs and against mRNAs Coding for Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hauer, Christian; Sieber, Jana; Schwarzl, Thomas; Hollerer, Ina; Curk, Tomaz; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Hentze, Matthias W; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2016-08-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) connects spliced mRNAs to posttranscriptional processes including RNA localization, transport, and regulated degradation. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of bona fide EJC binding sites across the transcriptome including all four RNA binding EJC components eIF4A3, BTZ, UPF3B, and RNPS1. Integration of these data sets permits definition of high-confidence EJC deposition sites as well as assessment of whether EJC heterogeneity drives alternative nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathways. Notably, BTZ (MLN51 or CASC3) emerges as the EJC subunit that is almost exclusively bound to sites 20-24 nucleotides upstream of exon-exon junctions, hence defining EJC positions. By contrast, eIF4A3, UPF3B, and RNPS1 display additional RNA binding sites suggesting accompanying non-EJC functions. Finally, our data show that EJCs are largely distributed across spliced RNAs in an orthodox fashion, with two notable exceptions: an EJC deposition bias in favor of alternatively spliced transcripts and against the mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins. PMID:27475226

  11. mRNAs from human adenovirus 2 early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, A; Gilardi, P; Näslund, A; LeMoullec, J M; Pettersson, U; Perricaudet, M

    1984-01-01

    The molecular structure of the mRNAs from early region 4 of human adenovirus 2 has been studied by Northern blot analysis, S1 nuclease analysis, and sequence analysis of cDNA clones. The results make it possible to identify four different splice donor sites and six different splice acceptor sites. The structure of 12 different mRNAs can be deduced from the analysis. The mRNAs have identical 5' and 3' ends and are thus likely to be processed from a common mRNA precursor by differential splicing. The different mRNA species are formed by the removal of one to three introns, and they all carry a short 5' leader segment. The introns appear to serve two functions; they either place a 5' leader segment in juxtaposition with an open reading frame or fuse two open translational reading frames. The early region 4 mRNAs can encode at least seven unique polypeptides. Images PMID:6088804

  12. LRPPRC is necessary for polyadenylation and coordination of translation of mitochondrial mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Metodiev, Metodi D; Wredenberg, Anna; Bratic, Ana; Park, Chan Bae; Cámara, Yolanda; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Zickermann, Volker; Wibom, Rolf; Hultenby, Kjell; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Brandt, Ulrich; Stewart, James B; Gustafsson, Claes M; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2012-01-18

    Regulation of mtDNA expression is critical for maintaining cellular energy homeostasis and may, in principle, occur at many different levels. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing (LRPPRC) protein regulates mitochondrial mRNA stability and an amino-acid substitution of this protein causes the French-Canadian type of Leigh syndrome (LSFC), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by complex IV deficiency. We have generated conditional Lrpprc knockout mice and show here that the gene is essential for embryonic development. Tissue-specific disruption of Lrpprc in heart causes mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with drastic reduction in steady-state levels of most mitochondrial mRNAs. LRPPRC forms an RNA-dependent protein complex that is necessary for maintaining a pool of non-translated mRNAs in mammalian mitochondria. Loss of LRPPRC does not only decrease mRNA stability, but also leads to loss of mRNA polyadenylation and the appearance of aberrant mitochondrial translation. The translation pattern without the presence of LRPPRC is misregulated with excessive translation of some transcripts and no translation of others. Our findings point to the existence of an elaborate machinery that regulates mammalian mtDNA expression at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:22045337

  13. LRPPRC is necessary for polyadenylation and coordination of translation of mitochondrial mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Metodiev, Metodi D; Wredenberg, Anna; Bratic, Ana; Park, Chan Bae; Cámara, Yolanda; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Zickermann, Volker; Wibom, Rolf; Hultenby, Kjell; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Brandt, Ulrich; Stewart, James B; Gustafsson, Claes M; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of mtDNA expression is critical for maintaining cellular energy homeostasis and may, in principle, occur at many different levels. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing (LRPPRC) protein regulates mitochondrial mRNA stability and an amino-acid substitution of this protein causes the French-Canadian type of Leigh syndrome (LSFC), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by complex IV deficiency. We have generated conditional Lrpprc knockout mice and show here that the gene is essential for embryonic development. Tissue-specific disruption of Lrpprc in heart causes mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with drastic reduction in steady-state levels of most mitochondrial mRNAs. LRPPRC forms an RNA-dependent protein complex that is necessary for maintaining a pool of non-translated mRNAs in mammalian mitochondria. Loss of LRPPRC does not only decrease mRNA stability, but also leads to loss of mRNA polyadenylation and the appearance of aberrant mitochondrial translation. The translation pattern without the presence of LRPPRC is misregulated with excessive translation of some transcripts and no translation of others. Our findings point to the existence of an elaborate machinery that regulates mammalian mtDNA expression at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:22045337

  14. The mRNAs associated to a zinc finger protein from Trypanosoma cruzi shift during stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Lysangela Ronalte; Oliveira, Camila; Mörking, Patrícia Alves; Kessler, Rafael Luis; Martins, Sharon Toledo; Romagnoli, Bruno Accioly Alves; Marchini, Fabricio Kerrynton; Goldenberg, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosome gene expression is regulated almost exclusively at the posttranscriptional level, through mRNA stability, storage and degradation. Here, we characterize the ribonucleoprotein complex (mRNPs) corresponding to the zinc finger protein TcZC3H39 from T. cruzi comparing cells growing in normal conditions and under nutritional stress. The nutritional stress is a key step during T. cruzi differentiation from epimastigote form to human infective metacyclic trypomastigote form. The mechanisms by which the stress, altogether with other stimuli, triggers differentiation is not well understood. This work aims to characterize the TcZC3H39 protein during stress response. Using cells cultured in normal and stress conditions, we observed a dynamic change in TcZC3H39 granule distribution, which appeared broader in stressed epimastigotes. The protein core of the TcZC3H39-mRNP is composed of ribosomes, translation factors and RBPs. The TcZC3H39-mRNP could act sequestering highly expressed mRNAs and their associated ribosomes, potentially slowing translation in stress conditions. A shift were observed in the mRNAs associated with TcZC3H39: the number of targets in unstressed epimastigotes was smaller than that in stressed parasites, with no clear functional clustering in normal conditions. By contrast, in stressed parasites, the targets of TcZC3H39 were mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins and a remarkable enrichment in mRNAs for the cytochrome c complex (COX), highly expressed mRNAs in the replicative form. This identification of a new component of RNA granules in T. cruzi, the TcZC3H39 protein, provides new insight into the mechanisms involved in parasite stress responses and the regulation of gene expression during T. cruzi differentiation. PMID:25180711

  15. Mature mRNAs accumulated in the nucleus are neither the molecules in transit to the cytoplasm nor constitute a stockpile for gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, D; Boutain, S; Audibert, A; Dautry, F

    2000-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the regulation of pre-mRNA processing is still poorly known. The accumulation of various mature mRNAs, which can be observed in the nuclei of mammalian cells, is suggestive of a regulatory role of transport. However, the significance of these nuclear mRNA is presently unknown. We have used a tetracycline-regulated promoter to investigate the dynamics of these pools of mRNAs upon arrest of transcription. We observed, for beta-globin and LT-alpha genes, a slow disappearance of these mRNA from the nucleus, with an apparent half-life that is similar to their cytoplasmic half-life. In view of these dynamics, these mRNA cannot simply be mature mRNAs in transit to the cytoplasm. They could be mRNAs retained in the nucleus, provided that the regulation of mRNA stability is comparable in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. But, because of their limited stability, these nuclear mRNAs cannot constitute a significant stock for gene expression. Alternatively, they could reflect a bidirectional transport of mRNA, that is, to and from the cytoplasm, which would provide a direct explanation for the similarity in both compartments of their half-life and poly(A) tail shortening over time. PMID:10917593

  16. RNase-L control of cellular mRNAs: roles in biologic functions and mechanisms of substrate targeting.

    PubMed

    Brennan-Laun, Sarah E; Ezelle, Heather J; Li, Xiao-Ling; Hassel, Bret A

    2014-04-01

    RNase-L is a mediator of type 1 interferon-induced antiviral activity that has diverse and critical cellular roles, including the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and the control of the innate immune response. Although RNase-L was originally shown to mediate the endonucleolytic cleavage of both viral and ribosomal RNAs in response to infection, more recent evidence indicates that RNase-L also functions in the regulation of cellular mRNAs as an important mechanism by which it exerts its diverse biological functions. Despite this growing body of work, many questions remain regarding the roles of mRNAs as RNase-L substrates. This review will survey known and putative mRNA substrates of RNase-L, propose mechanisms by which it may selectively cleave these transcripts, and postulate future clinical applications. PMID:24697205

  17. RNase-L Control of Cellular mRNAs: Roles in Biologic Functions and Mechanisms of Substrate Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Brennan-Laun, Sarah E.; Ezelle, Heather J.; Li, Xiao-Ling

    2014-01-01

    RNase-L is a mediator of type 1 interferon-induced antiviral activity that has diverse and critical cellular roles, including the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and the control of the innate immune response. Although RNase-L was originally shown to mediate the endonucleolytic cleavage of both viral and ribosomal RNAs in response to infection, more recent evidence indicates that RNase-L also functions in the regulation of cellular mRNAs as an important mechanism by which it exerts its diverse biological functions. Despite this growing body of work, many questions remain regarding the roles of mRNAs as RNase-L substrates. This review will survey known and putative mRNA substrates of RNase-L, propose mechanisms by which it may selectively cleave these transcripts, and postulate future clinical applications. PMID:24697205

  18. The Fragile X Protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation

    PubMed Central

    Lucá, Rossella; Averna, Michele; Zalfa, Francesca; Vecchi, Manuela; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Fata, Giorgio La; Del Nonno, Franca; Nardacci, Roberta; Bianchi, Marco; Nuciforo, Paolo; Munck, Sebastian; Parrella, Paola; Moura, Rute; Signori, Emanuela; Alston, Robert; Kuchnio, Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Vito Michele; Piacentini, Mauro; De Strooper, Bart; Achsel, Tilmann; Neri, Giovanni; Neven, Patrick; Evans, D Gareth; Carmeliet, Peter; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is well established in brain, where its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome (FXS). FMRP is almost ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that, in addition to its effects in brain, it may have fundamental roles in other organs. There is evidence that FMRP expression can be linked to cancer. FMR1 mRNA, encoding FMRP, is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A decreased risk of cancer has been reported in patients with FXS while a patient-case with FXS showed an unusual decrease of tumour brain invasiveness. However, a role for FMRP in regulating cancer biology, if any, remains unknown. We show here that FMRP and FMR1 mRNA levels correlate with prognostic indicators of aggressive breast cancer, lung metastases probability and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We establish that FMRP overexpression in murine breast primary tumours enhances lung metastasis while its reduction has the opposite effect regulating cell spreading and invasion. FMRP binds mRNAs involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion including E-cadherin and Vimentin mRNAs, hallmarks of EMT and cancer progression. PMID:24092663

  19. The fragile X protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation.

    PubMed

    Lucá, Rossella; Averna, Michele; Zalfa, Francesca; Vecchi, Manuela; Bianchi, Fabrizio; La Fata, Giorgio; Del Nonno, Franca; Nardacci, Roberta; Bianchi, Marco; Nuciforo, Paolo; Munck, Sebastian; Parrella, Paola; Moura, Rute; Signori, Emanuela; Alston, Robert; Kuchnio, Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Vito Michele; Piacentini, Mauro; De Strooper, Bart; Achsel, Tilmann; Neri, Giovanni; Neven, Patrick; Evans, D Gareth; Carmeliet, Peter; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is well established in brain, where its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome (FXS). FMRP is almost ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that, in addition to its effects in brain, it may have fundamental roles in other organs. There is evidence that FMRP expression can be linked to cancer. FMR1 mRNA, encoding FMRP, is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A decreased risk of cancer has been reported in patients with FXS while a patient-case with FXS showed an unusual decrease of tumour brain invasiveness. However, a role for FMRP in regulating cancer biology, if any, remains unknown. We show here that FMRP and FMR1 mRNA levels correlate with prognostic indicators of aggressive breast cancer, lung metastases probability and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We establish that FMRP overexpression in murine breast primary tumours enhances lung metastasis while its reduction has the opposite effect regulating cell spreading and invasion. FMRP binds mRNAs involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion including E-cadherin and Vimentin mRNAs, hallmarks of EMT and cancer progression. PMID:24092663

  20. Widespread mRNA Association with Cytoskeletal Motor Proteins and Identification and Dynamics of Myosin-Associated mRNAs in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Casolari, Jason M.; Thompson, Michael A.; Salzman, Julia; Champion, Lowry M.; Moerner, W. E.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2012-01-01

    Programmed mRNA localization to specific subcellular compartments for localized translation is a fundamental mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation that affects many, and possibly all, mRNAs in eukaryotes. We describe her e a systematic approach to identify the RNA cargoes associated with the cytoskeletal motor proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in combination with live-cell 3D super-localization microscopy of endogenously tagged mRNAs. Our analysis identified widespread association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins, including association of Myo3 with mRNAs encoding key regulators of actin branching and endocytosis such as WASP and WIP. Using conventional fluorescence microscopy and expression of MS2-tagged mRNAs from endogenous loci, we observed a strong bias for actin patch nucleator mRNAs to localize to the cell cortex and the actin patch in a Myo3- and F-actin dependent manner. Use of a double-helix point spread function (DH-PSF) microscope allowed super-localization measurements of single mRNPs at a spatial precision of 25 nm in x and y and 50 nm in z in live cells with 50 ms exposure times, allowing quantitative profiling of mRNP dynamics. The actin patch mRNA exhibited distinct and characteristic diffusion coefficients when compared to a control mRNA. In addition, disruption of F-actin significantly expanded the 3D confinement radius of an actin patch nucleator mRNA, providing a quantitative assessment of the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to mRNP dynamic localization. Our results provide evidence for specific association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins in yeast, suggest that different mRNPs have distinct and characteristic dynamics, and lend insight into the mechanism of actin patch nucleator mRNA localization to actin patches. PMID:22359641

  1. Multiple mechanisms of reinitiation on bicistronic calicivirus mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zinoviev, Alexandra; Hellen, Christopher U T; Pestova, Tatyana V

    2015-03-19

    Reinitiation is a strategy used by viruses to express several cistrons from one mRNA. Although extremely weak after translation of long open reading frames (ORFs) on cellular mRNAs, reinitiation occurs efficiently on subgenomic bicistronic calicivirus mRNAs, enabling synthesis of minor capsid proteins. The process is governed by a short element upstream of the restart AUG, designated "termination upstream ribosomal binding site" (TURBS). It contains the conserved Motif 1 complementary to h26 of 18S rRNA, displayed in the loop of a hairpin formed by species-specific Motifs 2/2(∗). To determine the advantages conferred on reinitiation by TURBS, we reconstituted this process in vitro on two model bicistronic calicivirus mRNAs. We found that post-termination ribosomal tethering of mRNA by TURBS allows reinitiation by post-termination 80S ribosomes and diminishes dependence on eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) of reinitiation by recycled 40S subunits, which can be mediated either by eIFs 2/1/1A or by Ligatin following ABCE1-dependent or -independent splitting of post-termination complexes. PMID:25794616

  2. Pluripotent State Induction in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Using mRNAs of Reprogramming Factors

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ahmed Kamel; Zhang, Zhentao; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Zhiyong; Abbott, Louise C.; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells has great potential to provide therapeutic treatments for a number of diseases as well as provide insight into mechanisms underlying early embryonic development. Improvement of induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) generation through mRNA-based methods is currently an area of intense research. This approach provides a number of advantages over previously used methods such as DNA integration and insertional mutagenesis. Using transfection of specifically synthesized mRNAs of various pluripotency factors, we generated iPSCs from mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. The genetic, epigenetic and functional properties of the iPSCs were evaluated at different times during the reprogramming process. We successfully introduced synthesized mRNAs, which localized correctly inside the cells and exhibited efficient and stable translation into proteins. Our work demonstrated a robust up-regulation and a gradual promoter de-methylation of the pluripotency markers, including non-transfected factors such as Nanog, SSEA-1 (stage-specific embryonic antigen 1) and Rex-1 (ZFP-42, zinc finger protein 42). Using embryonic stem cells (ESCs) conditions to culture the iPS cells resulted in formation of ES-like colonies after approximately 12 days with only five daily repeated transfections. The colonies were positive for alkaline phosphatase and pluripotency-specific markers associated with ESCs. This study revealed the ability of pluripotency induction and generation of mouse mRNA induced pluripotent stem cells (mRNA iPSCs) using transfection of specifically synthesized mRNAs of various pluripotency factors into mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. These generated iPSCs exhibited molecular and functional properties similar to ESCs, which indicate that this method is an efficient and viable alternative to ESCs and can be used for further biological, developmental and therapeutic investigations. PMID:25437916

  3. Quail Pax-6 (Pax-QNR) mRNAs are expressed from two promoters used differentially during retina development and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Plaza, S; Dozier, C; Turque, N; Saule, S

    1995-01-01

    During investigations on the regulation of the Pax-6 gene, we characterized a cDNA from quail neuroretina showing a 5' untranslated region distinct from that previously described and initiated from an internal promoter. Using RNase protection and primer extension mapping, we localized this second quail Pax-6 promoter, termed P1. As reported for the already described P0 promoter, P1 was also transactivated in vitro by the p46Pax-QNR protein. RNase protection assays performed with quail neuroretina RNA showed that P1-initiated mRNAs were detected before the P0-initiated mRNAs, remained constant up to embryonic day 8, and decreased slowly thereafter whereas, P0-initiated mRNAs accumulated up to embryonic day 8. In contrast, quail retinal pigmented epithelium expressed only the P1-initiated mRNAs. Transformation of these cells by the v-myc oncogene induced neuronal traits in the culture, which thereafter, in addition to the P1-initiated mRNAs, expressed Pax-QNR from the P0 promoter. These results suggest that expression of the quail Pax-6 gene is under the control of different regulators through alternate promoters, P0 being activated at the onset of neuronal differentiation. PMID:7760830

  4. Somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor-I and Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNAs in rate fetal and adult tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, P.K.; Moats-Staats, B.M.; Hynes, M.A.; Simmons, J.G.; Jansen, M.; D'ercole, A.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.

    1986-11-05

    Somatomedin-C or insulin-like growth factor I (Sm-C/IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) have been implicated in the regulation of fetal growth and development. In the present study /sup 32/P-labeled complementary DNA probes encoding human and mouse Sm-C/IGF-I and human IGF-II were used in Northern blot hybridizations to analyze rat Sm-C/IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs in poly(A/sup +/) RNAs from intestine, liver, lung, and brain of adult rats and fetal rats between day 14 and 17 of gestation. In fetal rats, all four tissues contained a major mRNA of 1.7 kilobase (kb) that hybridized with the human Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA and mRNAs of 7.5, 4.7, 1.7, and 1.2 kb that hybridized with the mouse Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA. Adult rat intestine, liver, and lung also contained these mRNAs but Sm-C/IGF-I mRNAs were not detected in adult rat brain. These findings provide direct support for prior observations that multiple tissues in the fetus synthesize immunoreactive Sm-C/IGF-I and imply a role for Sm-C/IGF-I in fetal development as well as postnatally. Multiple IGF-II mRNAs of estimated sizes 4.7, 3.9, 2.2, 1.75, and 1.2 kb were observed in fetal rat intestine, liver, lung, and brain. The 4.7- and 3.9-kb mRNAs were the major hybridizing IGF-II mRNAs in all fetal tissues. Higher abundance of IGF-II mRNAs in rat fetal tissues compared with adult tissues supports prior hypotheses, based on serum IGF-II concentrations, that IGF-II is predominantly a fetal somatomedin. IGF-II mRNAs are present, however, in some poly(A/sup +/) RNAs from adult rat tissues. The brain was the only tissue in the adult rat where the 4.7- and 3.9-kb IGF-II mRNAs were consistently detected. These findings suggest that a role for IGF-II in the adult rat, particularly in the central nervous system, cannot be excluded.

  5. Isolation of mRNAs associated with yeast mitochondria to study mechanisms of localized translation.

    PubMed

    Lesnik, Chen; Arava, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Most of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nucleus and need to be imported into the organelle. Import may occur while the protein is synthesized near the mitochondria. Support for this possibility is derived from recent studies, in which many mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins were shown to be localized to the mitochondria vicinity. Together with earlier demonstrations of ribosomes' association with the outer membrane, these results suggest a localized translation process. Such localized translation may improve import efficiency, provide unique regulation sites and minimize cases of ectopic expression. Diverse methods have been used to characterize the factors and elements that mediate localized translation. Standard among these is subcellular fractionation by differential centrifugation. This protocol has the advantage of isolation of mRNAs, ribosomes and proteins in a single procedure. These can then be characterized by various molecular and biochemical methods. Furthermore, transcriptomics and proteomics methods can be applied to the resulting material, thereby allow genome-wide insights. The utilization of yeast as a model organism for such studies has the advantages of speed, costs and simplicity. Furthermore, the advanced genetic tools and available deletion strains facilitate verification of candidate factors. PMID:24686138

  6. Autoregulated changes in stability of polyribosome-bound. beta. -tubulin mRNAs are specified by the first 13 translated nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.J.; Gay, D.A.; Pachter, J.S.; Cleveland, D.W.

    1988-03-01

    The expression of tubulin polypeptides in animal cells is controlled by an autoregulatory mechanism whereby increases in the tubulin subunit concentration result in rapid and specific degradation of tubulin mRNAs. The authors have now determined that the sequences that are necessary and sufficient to specify mouse ..beta..-tubulin mRNAs as substrates for this autoregulated instability reside within the first 13 translated nucleotides (which encode the first four ..beta..-tubulin amino acids Met-Arg-Glu-Ile). This domain has been functionally conserved throughout evolution, inasmuch as sequences isolated from the analogous region of human, chicken, and yeast ..beta..-tubulin mRNAs also confer autoregulation. Further, for an RNA to be a substrate for regulation, not only must it carry the 13-nucleotide coding sequence, but it must also be ribosome bound and its translation must proceed 3' to codon 41.

  7. Discovery of shear- and side-specific mRNAs and miRNAs in human aortic valvular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Casey J.; Ankeny, Randall F.; Nerem, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The role of endothelial cells (ECs) in aortic valve (AV) disease remains relatively unknown; however, disease preferentially occurs in the fibrosa. We hypothesized oscillatory shear (OS) present on the fibrosa stimulates ECs to modify mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) inducing disease. Our goal was to identify mRNAs and miRNAs differentially regulated by OS and laminar shear (LS) in human AVECs (HAVECs) from the fibrosa (fHAVECs) and ventricularis (vHAVECs). HAVECs expressed EC markers as well as some smooth muscle cell markers and functionally aligned with the flow. HAVECs were exposed to OS and LS for 24 h, and total RNA was analyzed by mRNA and miRNA microarrays. We found over 700 and 300 mRNAs down- and upregulated, respectively, by OS; however, there was no side dependency. mRNA microarray results were validated for 26 of 28 tested genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed thrombospondin 1 (Thbs1) and NF-κB inhibitor-α (Nfkbia) as highly connected, shear-sensitive genes. miRNA array analysis yielded 30 shear-sensitive miRNAs and 3 side-specific miRNAs. miRNA validation confirmed 4 of 17 shear-sensitive miRNAs and 1 of 3 side-dependent miRNAs. Using miRWalk and several filtering steps, we identified shear-sensitive mRNAs potentially targeted by shear-sensitive miRNAs. These genes and signaling pathways could act as therapeutic targets of AV disease. PMID:21705672

  8. Overexpression of E2F mRNAs Associated with Gastric Cancer Progression Identified by the Transcription Factor and miRNA Co-Regulatory Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, XiaoTian; Ni, ZhaoHui; Duan, ZiPeng; Xin, ZhuoYuan; Wang, HuaiDong; Tan, JiaYi; Wang, GuoQing; Li, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated at the transcription and translation levels; thus, both transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNA) play roles in regulation of gene expression. This study profiled differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs in gastric cancer tissues to construct a TF and miRNA co-regulatory network in order to identify altered genes in gastric cancer progression. A total of 70 cases gastric cancer and paired adjacent normal tissues were subjected to cDNA and miRNA microarray analyses. We obtained 887 up-regulated and 93 down-regulated genes and 41 down-regulated and 4 up-regulated miRNAs in gastric cancer tissues. Using the Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database, we obtained 105 genes that are regulated by the E2F family of genes and using Targetscan, miRanda, miRDB and miRWalk tools, we predicted potential targeting genes of these 45 miRNAs. We then built up the E2F-related TF and miRNA co-regulatory gene network and identified 9 hub-genes. Furthermore, we found that levels of E2F1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 mRNAs associated with gastric cancer cell invasion capacity, and has associated with tumor differentiation. These data showed Overexpression of E2F mRNAs associated with gastric cancer progression. PMID:25646628

  9. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus nsp1 Inhibits Host Gene Expression by Selectively Targeting mRNAs Transcribed in the Nucleus while Sparing mRNAs of Cytoplasmic Origin

    PubMed Central

    Lokugamage, Kumari G.; Narayanan, Krishna; Nakagawa, Keisuke; Terasaki, Kaori; Ramirez, Sydney I.; Tseng, Chien-Te K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The newly emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) represent highly pathogenic human CoVs that share a property to inhibit host gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Similar to the nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) of SARS-CoV that inhibits host gene expression at the translational level, we report that MERS-CoV nsp1 also exhibits a conserved function to negatively regulate host gene expression by inhibiting host mRNA translation and inducing the degradation of host mRNAs. Furthermore, like SARS-CoV nsp1, the mRNA degradation activity of MERS-CoV nsp1, most probably triggered by its ability to induce an endonucleolytic RNA cleavage, was separable from its translation inhibitory function. Despite these functional similarities, MERS-CoV nsp1 used a strikingly different strategy that selectively targeted translationally competent host mRNAs for inhibition. While SARS-CoV nsp1 is localized exclusively in the cytoplasm and binds to the 40S ribosomal subunit to gain access to translating mRNAs, MERS-CoV nsp1 was distributed in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm and did not bind stably to the 40S subunit, suggesting a distinctly different mode of targeting translating mRNAs. Interestingly, consistent with this notion, MERS-CoV nsp1 selectively targeted mRNAs, which are transcribed in the nucleus and transported to the cytoplasm, for translation inhibition and mRNA degradation but spared exogenous mRNAs introduced directly into the cytoplasm or virus-like mRNAs that originate in the cytoplasm. Collectively, these data point toward a novel viral strategy wherein the cytoplasmic origin of MERS-CoV mRNAs facilitates their escape from the inhibitory effects of MERS-CoV nsp1. IMPORTANCE Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a highly pathogenic human CoV that emerged in Saudi Arabia in 2012. MERS-CoV has a zoonotic origin and poses a major threat to public health

  10. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Induction of Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase mRNAs in Mouse LiverS

    PubMed Central

    Celius, Trine; Roblin, Steven; Harper, Patricia A.; Matthews, Jason; Boutros, Paul C.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Okey, Allan B.

    2016-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are important in detoxication but generally are considered not to be inducible by xenobiotics. Our recent microarray studies revealed induction of FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in liver of mice with wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) but not in Ahr-null mice. The aim of the present study was to delineate mechanisms of FMO regulation. In adult male mice, basal FMO3 mRNA is low but was induced 6-fold at 4 h and 6000-fold at 24 h. The ED50 was approximately 1 μg/kg for FMO2 and FMO3, similar to that for the classic AHR-regulated gene, Cyp1a1. In adult female mice basal FMO3 mRNA is high and was not induced at 4 h but was elevated 8-fold at 24 h. FMO5 mRNA was significantly down-regulated by TCDD in both male and female adult mice. Juvenile mice show no sex difference in response to TCDD; FMO3 was induced 4 to 6-fold by TCDD in both sexes. Chromatin immuno-precipitation demonstrated recruitment of AHR and aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator proteins to Fmo3 regulatory regions, suggesting that induction by TCDD is a primary AHR-mediated event. Although FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs were highly induced by TCDD in adult males, overall FMO catalytic activity increased only modestly. In contrast to the striking up-regulation of FMO2 and FMO3 in mouse liver, TCDD has little effect on FMO mRNA in rat liver. However, FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs were highly induced in transgenic mice that express wild-type rat AHR, indicating that lack of induction in rat is not due to an incompetent AHR in this species. PMID:18765683

  11. Alternative mechanisms of initiating translation of mammalian mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R J

    2005-12-01

    Of all the steps in mRNA translation, initiation is the one that differs most radically between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Not only is there no equivalent of the prokaryotic Shine-Dalgarno rRNA-mRNA interaction, but also what requires only three initiation factor proteins (aggregate size approximately 125 kDa) in eubacteria needs at least 28 different polypeptides (aggregate >1600 kDa) in mammalian cells, which is actually larger than the size of the 40 S ribosomal subunit. Translation of the overwhelming majority of mammalian mRNAs occurs by a scanning mechanism, in which the 40 S ribosomal subunit, primed for initiation by the binding of several initiation factors including the eIF2 (eukaryotic initiation factor 2)-GTP-MettRNA(i) complex, is loaded on the mRNA immediately downstream of the 5'-cap, and then scans the RNA in the 5'-->3' direction. On recognition of (usually) the first AUG triplet via base-pairing with the Met-tRNA(i) anticodon, scanning ceases, triggering GTP hydrolysis and release of eIF2-GDP. Finally, ribosomal subunit joining and the release of the other initiation factors completes the initiation process. This sketchy outline conceals the fact that the exact mechanism of scanning and the precise roles of the initiation factors remain enigmatic. However, the factor requirements for initiation site selection on some viral IRESs (internal ribosome entry sites/segments) are simpler, and investigations into these IRES-dependent mechanisms (particularly picornavirus, hepatitis C virus and insect dicistrovirus IRESs) have significantly enhanced our understanding of the standard scanning mechanism. This article surveys the various alternative mechanisms of initiation site selection on mammalian (and other eukaryotic) cellular and viral mRNAs, starting from the simplest (in terms of initiation factor requirements) and working towards the most complex, which paradoxically happens to be the reverse order of their discovery. PMID:16246087

  12. Inhibition of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-interacting Kinase (MNK) Preferentially Affects Translation of mRNAs Containing Both a 5'-Terminal Cap and Hairpin.

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Nadejda L; Song, Anren; Gram, Hermann; Edens, Mary Ann; Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-02-12

    The MAPK-interacting kinases 1 and 2 (MNK1 and MNK2) are activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) or p38 in response to cellular stress and extracellular stimuli that include growth factors, cytokines, and hormones. Modulation of MNK activity affects translation of mRNAs involved in the cell cycle, cancer progression, and cell survival. However, the mechanism by which MNK selectively affects translation of these mRNAs is not understood. MNK binds eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and phosphorylates the cap-binding protein eIF4E. Using a cell-free translation system from rabbit reticulocytes programmed with mRNAs containing different 5'-ends, we show that an MNK inhibitor, CGP57380, affects translation of only those mRNAs that contain both a cap and a hairpin in the 5'-UTR. Similarly, a C-terminal fragment of human eIF4G-1, eIF4G(1357-1600), which prevents binding of MNK to intact eIF4G, reduces eIF4E phosphorylation and inhibits translation of only capped and hairpin-containing mRNAs. Analysis of proteins bound to m(7)GTP-Sepharose reveals that both CGP and eIF4G(1357-1600) decrease binding of eIF4E to eIF4G. These data suggest that MNK stimulates translation only of mRNAs containing both a cap and 5'-terminal RNA duplex via eIF4E phosphorylation, thereby enhancing the coupled cap-binding and RNA-unwinding activities of eIF4F. PMID:26668315

  13. 5'-Terminal AUGs in Escherichia coli mRNAs with Shine-Dalgarno Sequences: Identification and Analysis of Their Roles in Non-Canonical Translation Initiation.

    PubMed

    Beck, Heather J; Fleming, Ian M C; Janssen, Gary R

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the Escherichia coli transcriptome identified a unique subset of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that contain a conventional untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence upstream of the gene's start codon while also containing an AUG triplet at the mRNA's 5'- terminus (5'-uAUG). Fusion of the coding sequence specified by the 5'-terminal putative AUG start codon to a lacZ reporter gene, as well as primer extension inhibition assays, reveal that the majority of the 5'-terminal upstream open reading frames (5'-uORFs) tested support some level of lacZ translation, indicating that these mRNAs can function both as leaderless and canonical SD-leadered mRNAs. Although some of the uORFs were expressed at low levels, others were expressed at levels close to that of the respective downstream genes and as high as the naturally leaderless cI mRNA of bacteriophage λ. These 5'-terminal uORFs potentially encode peptides of varying lengths, but their functions, if any, are unknown. In an effort to determine whether expression from the 5'-terminal uORFs impact expression of the immediately downstream cistron, we examined expression from the downstream coding sequence after mutations were introduced that inhibit efficient 5'-uORF translation. These mutations were found to affect expression from the downstream cistrons to varying degrees, suggesting that some 5'-uORFs may play roles in downstream regulation. Since the 5'-uAUGs found on these conventionally leadered mRNAs can function to bind ribosomes and initiate translation, this indicates that canonical mRNAs containing 5'-uAUGs should be examined for their potential to function also as leaderless mRNAs. PMID:27467758

  14. Analysis of Nitric Oxide-Stabilized mRNAs in Human Fibroblasts Reveals HuR-Dependent Heme Oxygenase 1 Upregulation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kuwano, Yuki; Rabinovic, Ariel; Srikantan, Subramanya; Gorospe, Myriam; Demple, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    We previously observed that nitric oxide (NO) exposure increases the stability of mRNAs encoding heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and TIEG-1 in human and mouse fibroblasts. Here, we have used microarrays to look broadly for changes in mRNA stability in response to NO treatment. Using human IMR-90 and mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts treated with actinomycin D to block de novo transcription, microarray analysis suggested that the stability of the majority of mRNAs was unaffected. Among the mRNAs that were stabilized by NO treatment, seven transcripts were found in both IMR-90 and NIH 3T3 cells (CHIC2, GADD45B, HO-1, PTGS2, RGS2, TIEG, and ID3) and were chosen for further analysis. All seven mRNAs showed at least one hit of a signature motif for the stabilizing RNA-binding protein (RBP) HuR; accordingly, ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that all seven mRNAs associated with HuR. In keeping with a functional role of HuR in the response to NO, a measurable fraction of HuR increased in the cytoplasm following NO treatment. However, among the seven transcripts, only HO-1 mRNA showed a robust increase in the level of its association with HuR following NO treatment. In turn, HO-1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced when HuR levels were silenced in IMR-90 cells, and they were elevated when HuR was overexpressed. In sum, our results indicate that NO stabilizes mRNA subsets in fibroblasts, identify HuR as an RBP implicated in the NO response, reveal that HuR alone is insufficient for stabilizing several mRNAs by NO, and show that HO-1 induction by NO is regulated by HuR. PMID:19289500

  15. 5’-Terminal AUGs in Escherichia coli mRNAs with Shine-Dalgarno Sequences: Identification and Analysis of Their Roles in Non-Canonical Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Heather J.; Fleming, Ian M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the Escherichia coli transcriptome identified a unique subset of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that contain a conventional untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence upstream of the gene’s start codon while also containing an AUG triplet at the mRNA’s 5’- terminus (5’-uAUG). Fusion of the coding sequence specified by the 5’-terminal putative AUG start codon to a lacZ reporter gene, as well as primer extension inhibition assays, reveal that the majority of the 5’-terminal upstream open reading frames (5’-uORFs) tested support some level of lacZ translation, indicating that these mRNAs can function both as leaderless and canonical SD-leadered mRNAs. Although some of the uORFs were expressed at low levels, others were expressed at levels close to that of the respective downstream genes and as high as the naturally leaderless cI mRNA of bacteriophage λ. These 5’-terminal uORFs potentially encode peptides of varying lengths, but their functions, if any, are unknown. In an effort to determine whether expression from the 5’-terminal uORFs impact expression of the immediately downstream cistron, we examined expression from the downstream coding sequence after mutations were introduced that inhibit efficient 5’-uORF translation. These mutations were found to affect expression from the downstream cistrons to varying degrees, suggesting that some 5’-uORFs may play roles in downstream regulation. Since the 5’-uAUGs found on these conventionally leadered mRNAs can function to bind ribosomes and initiate translation, this indicates that canonical mRNAs containing 5’-uAUGs should be examined for their potential to function also as leaderless mRNAs. PMID:27467758

  16. The CCR4-NOT complex mediates deadenylation and degradation of stem cell mRNAs and promotes planarian stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology. PMID:24367277

  17. The CCR4-NOT Complex Mediates Deadenylation and Degradation of Stem Cell mRNAs and Promotes Planarian Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A. Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology. PMID:24367277

  18. Integrated analysis of noncoding RNAs and mRNAs reveals their potential roles in the biological activities of the growth hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lei; Qi, Haolong; Xiao, Yusha; Li, Changsheng; Wang, Yitao; Guo, Tao; Liu, Zhisu; Liu, Quanyan

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have important regulatory potential in various biological processes. The molecular mechanisms by which growth hormone receptor (GHR) deficiency protects against age-related pathologies, reduces the incidence and delays the occurrence of fatal neoplasms are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate miRNA, lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles and the potential functional roles of these RNA molecules in GHR knockout (GHR-KO) mice. Microarray expression profiles of miRNAs, lncRNAs and mRNAs were determined in wild type control mice and in GHR-KO mice. Differential expression, pathway and gene network analyses were developed to identify the possible biological roles of functional RNA molecules. Compared to wild type control mice, 1695 lncRNAs, 914 mRNAs and 9 miRNAs were upregulated and 1747 lncRNAs, 786 mRNAs and 21 miRNAs were downregulated in female GHR-KO mice. Moreover, 1265 lncRNAs, 724 mRNAs and 41 miRNAs were upregulated and 1377 lncRNAs, 765 mRNAs and 16 miRNAs were downregulated in male GHR-KO mice compared to wild type mice. Co-expression analysis of mRNAs, lncRNAs, and miRNAs showed that mRNAs including Hemxi2, Ero1Ib, 4933434i20RIK, Pde7a and Lgals1, lncRNAs including ASMM9PARTA014848, EL605414-P1, ASMM9PARTA051724, ASMM9PARTA045378 and ASMM9PARTA049185, and miRNAs including miR-188-3p, miR-690, miR-709 and miR-710 are situated at the core position of a three-dimensional lncRNA-mRNA-miRNA regulatory network. KEGG analysis showed that the most significantly regulated pathway was steroid hormone biosynthesis. We identified a set of lncRNAs, miRNAs and mRNAs that were aberrantly expressed in GHR-KO mice. Our results provide a foundation and an expansive view of the biological activities of the GHR. PMID:27064376

  19. Role of 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions of mRNAs in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sangeeta; Pal, Jayanta K

    2009-05-01

    Protein synthesis is often regulated at the level of initiation of translation, making it a critical step. This regulation occurs by both the cis-regulatory elements, which are located in the 5'- and 3'-UTRs (untranslated regions), and trans-acting factors. A breakdown in this regulation machinery can perturb cellular metabolism, leading to various physiological abnormalities. The highly structured UTRs, along with features such as GC-richness, upstream open reading frames and internal ribosome entry sites, significantly influence the rate of translation of mRNAs. In this review, we discuss how changes in the cis-regulatory sequences of the UTRs, for example, point mutations and truncations, influence expression of specific genes at the level of translation. Such modifications may tilt the physiological balance from healthy to diseased states, resulting in conditions such as hereditary thrombocythaemia, breast cancer, fragile X syndrome, bipolar affective disorder and Alzheimer's disease. This information tends to establish the crucial role of UTRs, perhaps as much as that of coding sequences, in health and disease. PMID:19275763

  20. The histone H3 and H4 mRNAs are polyadenylated in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Chaubet, N; Chaboute, M E; Clément, B; Ehling, M; Philipps, G; Gigot, C

    1988-01-01

    Northern blot analysis revealed that the histone H3 and H4 mRNAs are of unusual large size in germinating maize embryos. S1-mapping experiments show that the 3'-untranslated regions of the mRNAs transcribed from 3 H3 and 2 H4 maize genes previously described are much longer than in the non-polyadenylated histone mRNAs which represent a major class in animals. Moreover, oligo d(T) cellulose fractionation of RNAs isolated at different developmental stages indicates that more than 99% of the maize H3 and H4 mRNAs are polyadenylated. A putative polyadenylation signal is present in all five genes 17 to 27 nucleotides before the 3'-ends of the mRNAs. Images PMID:2831497

  1. Identification of microRNAs and mRNAs associated with multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wanzhong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xin; Song, Wenzhi; Cui, Xiangyan; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious impediment to the success of chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer. To identify microRNAs and mRNAs associated with MDR of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells, we developed a multidrug-resistant human laryngeal cancer subline, designated Hep-2/v, by exposing Hep-2 cells to stepwise increasing concentrations of vincristine (0.02-0.96'µM). Microarray assays were performed to compare the microRNA and mRNA expression profiles of Hep-2 and Hep-2/v cells. Compared to Hep-2 cells, Hep-2/v cells were more resistant to chemotherapy drugs (∼45-fold more resistant to vincristine, 5.1-fold more resistant to cisplatin, and 5.6-fold more resistant to 5-fluorouracil) and had a longer doubling time (42.33±1.76 vs 28.75±1.12'h, P<0.05), higher percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase (80.98±0.52 vs 69.14±0.89, P<0.05), increased efflux of rhodamine 123 (95.97±0.56 vs 12.40±0.44%, P<0.01), and up-regulated MDR1 expression. A total of 7 microRNAs and 605 mRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cell types. Of the differentially expressed mRNAs identified, regulator of G-protein signaling 10, high-temperature requirement protein A1, and nuclear protein 1 were found to be the putative targets of the differentially expressed microRNAs identified. These findings may open a new avenue for clarifying the mechanisms responsible for MDR in laryngeal cancer. PMID:23780424

  2. Enhanced translation by Nucleolin via G-rich elements in coding and non-coding regions of target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Tominaga, Kumiko; Lee, Eun Kyung; Srikantan, Subramanya; Kang, Min-Ju; Kim, Mihee M.; Selimyan, Roza; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Yang, Xiaoling; Carrier, France; Zhan, Ming; Becker, Kevin G.; Gorospe, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate gene expression at many post-transcriptional levels, including mRNA stability and translation. The RBP nucleolin, with four RNA-recognition motifs, has been implicated in cell proliferation, carcinogenesis and viral infection. However, the subset of nucleolin target mRNAs and the influence of nucleolin on their expression had not been studied at a transcriptome-wide level. Here, we globally identified nucleolin target transcripts, many of which encoded cell growth- and cancer-related proteins, and used them to find a signature motif on nucleolin target mRNAs. Surprisingly, this motif was very rich in G residues and was not only found in the 3′-untranslated region (UTR), but also in the coding region (CR) and 5′-UTR. Nucleolin enhanced the translation of mRNAs bearing the G-rich motif, since silencing nucleolin did not change target mRNA stability, but decreased the size of polysomes forming on target transcripts and lowered the abundance of the encoded proteins. In summary, nucleolin binds G-rich sequences in the CR and UTRs of target mRNAs, many of which encode cancer proteins, and enhances their translation. PMID:21737422

  3. The essential polysome-associated RNA-binding protein RBP42 targets mRNAs involved in Trypanosoma brucei energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anish; Morales, Rachel; Banday, Mahrukh; Garcia, Stacey; Hao, Li; Cross, George A.M.; Estevez, Antonio M.; Bellofatto, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins that target mRNA coding regions are emerging as regulators of post-transcriptional processes in eukaryotes. Here we describe a newly identified RNA-binding protein, RBP42, which targets the coding region of mRNAs in the insect form of the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei. RBP42 is an essential protein and associates with polysome-bound mRNAs in the cytoplasm. A global survey of RBP42-bound mRNAs was performed by applying HITS-CLIP technology, which captures protein–RNA interactions in vivo using UV light. Specific RBP42–mRNA interactions, as well as mRNA interactions with a known RNA-binding protein, were purified using specific antibodies. Target RNA sequences were identified and quantified using high-throughput RNA sequencing. Analysis revealed that RBP42 bound mainly within the coding region of mRNAs that encode proteins involved in cellular energy metabolism. Although the mechanism of RBP42's function is unclear at present, we speculate that RBP42 plays a critical role in modulating T. brucei energy metabolism. PMID:22966087

  4. Enhanced translation by Nucleolin via G-rich elements in coding and non-coding regions of target mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Tominaga, Kumiko; Lee, Eun Kyung; Srikantan, Subramanya; Kang, Min-Ju; Kim, Mihee M; Selimyan, Roza; Martindale, Jennifer L; Yang, Xiaoling; Carrier, France; Zhan, Ming; Becker, Kevin G; Gorospe, Myriam

    2011-10-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate gene expression at many post-transcriptional levels, including mRNA stability and translation. The RBP nucleolin, with four RNA-recognition motifs, has been implicated in cell proliferation, carcinogenesis and viral infection. However, the subset of nucleolin target mRNAs and the influence of nucleolin on their expression had not been studied at a transcriptome-wide level. Here, we globally identified nucleolin target transcripts, many of which encoded cell growth- and cancer-related proteins, and used them to find a signature motif on nucleolin target mRNAs. Surprisingly, this motif was very rich in G residues and was not only found in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR), but also in the coding region (CR) and 5'-UTR. Nucleolin enhanced the translation of mRNAs bearing the G-rich motif, since silencing nucleolin did not change target mRNA stability, but decreased the size of polysomes forming on target transcripts and lowered the abundance of the encoded proteins. In summary, nucleolin binds G-rich sequences in the CR and UTRs of target mRNAs, many of which encode cancer proteins, and enhances their translation. PMID:21737422

  5. Dysregulated expression of microRNAs and mRNAs in myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaping; Pan, Xiaohong; Fan, Youqi; Hu, Xinyang; Liu, Xianbao; Xiang, Meixiang; Wang, Jian’an

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a major cause of mortality in the general population. However, the molecular phenotypes and therapeutic targets of AMI patients remain unclear. By profiling genome-wide transcripts and microRNAs (miRNAs) in a cohort of 23 AMI patients and 23 non-AMI patients, we found 218 dysregulated genes identified in the infarcted heart tissues from AMI patients relative to non-AMI controls. Pathway enrichment analysis of the dysregulated genes pointed to cell signaling/communication, cell/organism defense and cell structure/motility. We next compared the expression profiles of potential regulating miRNAs, suggesting that dysregulation of a number of AMI-associated genes (e.g., IL12A, KIF1A, HIF1α and CDK13) may be attributed to the dysregulation of their respective regulating miRNAs. One potentially pathogenic miRNA-mRNA pair, miR-210-HIF1α, was confirmed in a mouse model of myocardial infarction (MI). Inhibition of miR-210 expression improved the survival and cardiac function of MI mice. In conclusion, we presented the pathologic relationships between miRNAs and their gene targets in AMI. Such deregulated microRNAs and mRNAs like miR-210 serve as novel therapeutic targets of AMI. PMID:26807177

  6. Bicaudal-C spatially controls translation of vertebrate maternal mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Cooke, Amy; Park, Sookhee; Dewey, Colin N.; Wickens, Marvin; Sheets, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    The Xenopus Cripto-1 protein is confined to the cells of the animal hemisphere during early embryogenesis where it regulates the formation of anterior structures. Cripto-1 protein accumulates only in animal cells because cripto-1 mRNA in cells of the vegetal hemisphere is translationally repressed. Here, we show that the RNA binding protein, Bicaudal-C (Bic-C), functioned directly in this vegetal cell-specific repression. While Bic-C protein is normally confined to vegetal cells, ectopic expression of Bic-C in animal cells repressed a cripto-1 mRNA reporter and associated with endogenous cripto-1 mRNA. Repression by Bic-C required its N-terminal domain, comprised of multiple KH motifs, for specific binding to relevant control elements within the cripto-1 mRNA and a functionally separable C-terminal translation repression domain. Bic-C-mediated repression required the 5′ CAP and translation initiation factors, but not a poly(A) tail or the conserved SAM domain within Bic-C. Bic-C-directed immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing of associated mRNAs identified multiple Bic-C-regulated mRNA targets, including cripto-1 mRNA, providing new insights and tools for understanding the role of Bic-C in vertebrate development. PMID:24062572

  7. Interplay of viral miRNAs and host mRNAs and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir

    2011-10-01

    Recent experiments indicate that several viruses may encode microRNAs (miRNAs) in cells. Such RNAs may interfere with the host mRNAs and proteins. We present a kinetic analysis of this interplay. In our treatment, the viral miRNA is considered to be able to associate with the host mRNA with subsequent degradation. This process may result in a decline of the mRNA population and also in a decline of the population of the protein encoded by this mRNA. With these ingredients, we first show the types of the corresponding steady-state kinetics in the cases of positive and negative regulation of the miRNA synthesis by the protein. In addition, we scrutinize the situation when the protein regulates the virion replication or, in other words, provides a feedback for the replication. For the negative feedback, the replication rate is found to increase with increasing the intracellular virion population. For the positive feedback, the replication rate first increases and then drops. These features may determine the stability of steady states.

  8. The differential expression of mRNAs and long noncoding RNAs between ectopic and eutopic endometria provides new insights into adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Fei; Zhou, Ji; Ni, Xiaobei; Huo, Ran; Shi, Zhonghua

    2016-02-01

    Adenomyosis, defined as ectopic endometrial tissue within the myometrium, can often be misdiagnosed as multiple uterine leiomyomata or endometrial thickening. We therefore performed a combined mRNA and long noncoding (lnc)RNA microarray and bioinformatic analysis of eutopic and ectopic endometria in women with adenomyosis to better understand its pathogenesis and help in the development of a semi-invasive diagnostic test. A total of 586 mRNAs were increased and 305 mRNAs decreased in the ectopic endometrium of adenomyosis compared with the eutopic endometrium, while 388 lncRNA transcripts were up-regulated and 188 down-regulated in ectopic compared with paired eutopic endometrial tissue. Bioinformatic analysis suggested a series of metabolic and molecular abnormalities in adenomyosis, which have many similarities with endometriosis. Furthermore, our study constitutes the first known report of lncRNA expression patterns in human adenomyosis ectopic and eutopic endometrial tissue. PMID:26662114

  9. Identification and comparison of stable and unstable mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Herrick, D; Parker, R; Jacobson, A

    1990-01-01

    We developed a procedure to measure mRNA decay rates in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and applied it to the determination of half-lives for 20 mRNAs encoded by well-characterized genes. The procedure utilizes Northern (RNA) or dot blotting to quantitate the levels of individual mRNAs after thermal inactivation of RNA polymerase II in an rpb1-1 temperature-sensitive mutant. We compared the results of this procedure with results obtained by two other procedures (approach to steady-state labeling and inhibition of transcription with Thiolutin) and also evaluated whether heat shock alter mRNA decay rates. We found that there are no significant differences in the mRNA decay rates measured in heat-shocked and non-heat-shocked cells and that, for most mRNAs, different procedures yield comparable relative decay rates. Of the 20 mRNAs studied, 11, including those encoded by HIS3, STE2, STE3, and MAT alpha 1, were unstable (t1/2 less than 7 min) and 4, including those encoded by ACT1 and PGK1, were stable (t1/2 greater than 25 min). We have begun to assess the basis and significance of such differences in the decay rates of these two classes of mRNA. Our results indicate that (i) stable and unstable mRNAs do not differ significantly in their poly(A) metabolism; (ii) deadenylation does not destabilize stable mRNAs; (iii) there is no correlation between mRNA decay rate and mRNA size; (iv) the degradation of both stable and unstable mRNAs depends on concomitant translational elongation; and (v) the percentage of rare codons present in most unstable mRNAs is significantly higher than in stable mRNAs. Images PMID:2183028

  10. Levels of mRNAs which code for small, acid-soluble spore proteins and their LacZ gene fusions in sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, J M; Fajardo-Cavazos, P; Setlow, P

    1988-01-01

    The levels of mRNAs from genes (sspA, B and E) which code for major small, acid-soluble, spore proteins of Bacillus subtilis have been determined, as well as the levels of mRNAs from ssp-lacZ gene fusions. Increasing the gene dosage of ssp-lacZ fusions resulted in parallel increases in both the ssp-lacZ mRNA level and the rate of b-galactosidase accumulation. Similarly, an 11-fold increase in sspE gene dosage gave a comparable increase in sspE mRNA, but at most a 1.5-fold increase in the amount of sspE gene product accumulated. In contrast, an 11-fold increase in the dosage of the sspA or B genes had no significant effect on the level of total sspA plus sspB mRNA, but did alter the ratios of these mRNAs as well as the amount of their gene products, to reflect the altered ratio of the two genes. These results suggest that intact ssp genes, but not ssp-lacZ gene fusions, are subject to feedback regulation of gene expression, with this regulation of the sspA and B genes effected by modulation of mRNA levels, while the feedback regulation of the sspE gene is at the post-transcriptional level. Images PMID:2456528

  11. Acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNAs in thymus and thymomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kornstein, M. J.; Asher, O.; Fuchs, S.

    1995-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder characterized in most cases by serological antibody against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Evidence for intrathymic localization of AChR suggests that the thymus has an important role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Using reverse transcription followed by the polymerase chain reaction, we have demonstrated AChR alpha-subunit mRNA in thymuses and thymomas from patients with and without myasthenia gravis. We have also studied the expression of myogenin which is known to be involved in the regulation of AChR expression. By using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we found myogenin mRNAs in all of the thymuses and thymomas. Thus, both AChR alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNA are present in all of these specimens. By immunohistochemistry myoid cells (desmin and myoglobin positive) were present in all (four of four) thymuses studied and in two of five thymomas. Thus, in thymomas, nonmyoid cells might express both AChR and myogenin. These results indicate that cells within the thymus and thymoma express AChR and its regulatory protein myogenin and that such cells, under certain conditions, might play a role in the triggering of myasthenia gravis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7778671

  12. Very short-lived and stable mRNAs from resting human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, S L; Cooper, H L

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of degradation of newly synthesized cytoplasmic poly(A)-bearing RNA have been examined in resting human lymphocytes. Two classes were identified, a very labile component with a half-life of less than 17 min and a stable component which remains apparently undiminished during 24 hr of observation. Both classes have molecular weights between 2.5 and 3.5 x 10(5) but the stable material has a narrower size distribution and a slightly lower average molecular weight than the short-lived component. The fate of stable RNA synthesized in the resting cell was also examined after growth stimulation with phytohemagglutinin after 2 and 6 hr of treatment. No transfer of stable material into the labile pool could be discerned; the amount of stable material remained constant. The existence of two species of mRNAs with different lifetimes in animal cells provides a potential means for regulation of protein synthesis by controlling the supply of specific messages. Furthermore, such a short-lived mRNA species may explain the observed disparity between the amount of poly(A)-bearing heterogeneous RNA produced in the nucleus and the amount of mature message found in the cytoplasm. PMID:1060069

  13. Induction of proteins and mRNAs after uv irradiation of human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kartasova, T.; Ponec, M.; van de Putte, P.

    1988-02-01

    uv sensitivity of cultured human epidermal keratinocytes was analyzed at different growth conditions and compared with the sensitivity of dermal fibroblasts derived from the same skin specimen. No significant differences in survival curves were found between these two cell types, although keratinocytes grown under standard conditions were slightly more resistant to uv irradiation than fibroblasts. The extracellular concentration of calcium appeared to be critical not only in the regulation of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, but also in the uv sensitivity of these cells: keratinocytes grown under conditions which favor cell proliferation (low calcium concentration) are more resistant to uv irradiation than those grown under conditions favoring differentiation (high calcium concentration). Two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis was used to detect a possible effect of uv irradiation on the accumulation of specific mRNAs in the cytoplasm and/or on the synthesis of specific proteins. Proteins were pulse labeled in vivo with (/sup 35/S)methionine or synthesized in vitro in rabbit reticulocyte lysates on mRNA isolated from keratinocytes that were irradiated with different uv doses at different periods of time prior to isolation. Alterations in expression were demonstrated for several proteins in both in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  14. Distal Alternative Last Exons Localize mRNAs to Neural Projections.

    PubMed

    Taliaferro, J Matthew; Vidaki, Marina; Oliveira, Ruan; Olson, Sara; Zhan, Lijun; Saxena, Tanvi; Wang, Eric T; Graveley, Brenton R; Gertler, Frank B; Swanson, Maurice S; Burge, Christopher B

    2016-03-17

    Spatial restriction of mRNA to distinct subcellular locations enables local regulation and synthesis of proteins. However, the organizing principles of mRNA localization remain poorly understood. Here we analyzed subcellular transcriptomes of neural projections and soma of primary mouse cortical neurons and two neuronal cell lines and found that alternative last exons (ALEs) often confer isoform-specific localization. Surprisingly, gene-distal ALE isoforms were four times more often localized to neurites than gene-proximal isoforms. Localized isoforms were induced during neuronal differentiation and enriched for motifs associated with muscleblind-like (Mbnl) family RNA-binding proteins. Depletion of Mbnl1 and/or Mbnl2 reduced localization of hundreds of transcripts, implicating Mbnls in localization of mRNAs to neurites. We provide evidence supporting a model in which the linkage between genomic position of ALEs and subcellular localization enables coordinated induction of localization-competent mRNA isoforms through a post-transcriptional regulatory program that is induced during differentiation and reversed in cellular reprogramming and cancer. PMID:26907613

  15. Differential stability of c-myc mRNAS in a cell-free system

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, R.; Calame, K.

    1988-07-01

    The authors have developed a simple cell-free system for studying the stability of different mRNAs in vitro. They demonstrate that the threefold greater stability in vivo of truncated c-myc mRNA (lacking exon 1) compared with that of full-length c-myc mRNA is maintained in our in vitro system. Chimeric mRNAs in which the first exon of c-myc was fused to immunoglobulin C ..cap alpha.. heavy chain of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNAs were not rapidly degraded, demonstrating that c-myc exon 1 alone is not sufficient to tag mRNAs for rapid degradation. Competition experiments show that full-length c-myc mRNA is specifically recognized by a factor(s) responsible for its rapid degradation. This system will allow further characterization and purification of these factors.

  16. Expression of mRNAs encoding mammalian chromosomal proteins HMG-I and HMG-Y during cellular proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.R.; Disney, J.E.; Wyatt, C.R.; Reeves, R. )

    1990-03-01

    The high mobility group chromosomal proteins HMG-I and HMG-Y are closely related isoforms that are expressed at high levels in rapidly dividing, undifferentiated mammalian cells. The authors analyzed HMG-I/Y mRNA levels at various cell cycle stages in murine NIH/3T3 fibroblasts partially synchronized by seeding from quiescent, contact-inhibited cultures. Flow microfluorometric analysis of DNA content demonstrated a comparable degree of synchronization in such seeded NIH 3T3 cell populations as is obtained by serum deprivation or other means and has the added advantage of avoiding the use of possibly detrimental inhibitors or metabolic starvation to induce such synchrony. They show that HMG-I/Y mRNA levels gradually increase in NIH/3T3 cells during the first 16 hours after seeding (G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} to late S phase), but thereafter remain constant, in contrast to the cell cycle-regulated expression of the histone H3 gene. The HMG-I/Y mRNAs appear to be very stable; there was no decrease in their levels 6 hours after actinomycin D transcription termination. The proportion of HMG-I to HMG-Y mRNAs was greater in the human than in the murine cells examined, appeared to be greater in proliferating than in quiescent cells, and did not always correspond with the HMG-I to HMG-Y protein ratio.

  17. Expression of muscarinic acetylcholine and dopamine receptor mRNAs in rat basal ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, D.M. Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Bethesda, MD ); Levey, A.I. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD ); Brann, M.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Within the basal ganglia, acetylcholine and dopamine play a central role in the extrapyramidal control of motor function. The physiologic effects of these neurotransmitters are mediated by a diversity of receptor subtypes, several of which have now been cloned. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are encoded by five genes (m1-m5), and of the two known dopamine receptor subtypes (D1 and D2) the D2 receptor gene has been characterized. To gain insight into the physiological roles of each of these receptor subtypes, the authors prepared oligodeoxynucleotide probes to localize receptor subtype mRNAs within the rat striatum and substantia nigra by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Within the striatum, three muscarinic (m1, m2, m4) receptor mRNAs and the D2 receptor mRNA were detected. The m1 mRNA was expressed in most neurons; the m2 mRNA, in neurons which were both very large and rare; and the m4 and D2 mRNAs, in 40-50% of the neurons, one-third of which express both mRNAs. Within the substantia nigra, pars compacta, only the m5 and D2 mRNAs were detected, and most neurons expressed both mRNAs. These data provide anatomical evidence for the identity of the receptor subtypes which mediate the diverse effects of muscarinic and dopaminergic drugs on basal ganglia function.

  18. IGF2BP2/IMP2-Deficient mice resist obesity through enhanced translation of Ucp1 mRNA and Other mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Zhao, Liping; Wrighting, Diedra; Krämer, Dana; Majithia, Amit; Wang, Yanqun; Cracan, Valentin; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Mootha, Vamsi K; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Thorburn, David R; Minichiello, Liliana; Altshuler, David; Avruch, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Although variants in the IGF2BP2/IMP2 gene confer risk for type 2 diabetes, IMP2, an RNA binding protein, is not known to regulate metabolism. Imp2(-/-) mice gain less lean mass after weaning and have increased lifespan. Imp2(-/-) mice are highly resistant to diet-induced obesity and fatty liver and display superior glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, increased energy expenditure, and better defense of core temperature on cold exposure. Imp2(-/-) brown fat and Imp2(-/-) brown adipocytes differentiated in vitro contain more UCP1 polypeptide than Imp2(+/+) despite similar levels of Ucp1 mRNA; the Imp2(-/-)adipocytes also exhibit greater uncoupled oxygen consumption. IMP2 binds the mRNAs encoding Ucp1 and other mitochondrial components, and most exhibit increased translational efficiency in the absence of IMP2. In vitro IMP2 inhibits translation of mRNAs bearing the Ucp1 untranslated segments. Thus IMP2 limits longevity and regulates nutrient and energy metabolism in the mouse by controlling the translation of its client mRNAs. PMID:25863250

  19. Polypyrimidine tract binding protein 1 protects mRNAs from recognition by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zhiyun; Quek, Bao Lin; Beemon, Karen L; Hogg, J Robert

    2016-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway degrades mRNAs containing long 3'UTRs to perform dual roles in mRNA quality control and gene expression regulation. However, expansion of vertebrate 3'UTR functions has required a physical expansion of 3'UTR lengths, complicating the process of detecting nonsense mutations. We show that the polypyrimidine tract binding protein 1 (PTBP1) shields specific retroviral and cellular transcripts from NMD. When bound near a stop codon, PTBP1 blocks the NMD protein UPF1 from binding 3'UTRs. PTBP1 can thus mark specific stop codons as genuine, preserving both the ability of NMD to accurately detect aberrant mRNAs and the capacity of long 3'UTRs to regulate gene expression. Illustrating the wide scope of this mechanism, we use RNA-seq and transcriptome-wide analysis of PTBP1 binding sites to show that many human mRNAs are protected by PTBP1 and that PTBP1 enrichment near stop codons correlates with 3'UTR length and resistance to NMD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11155.001 PMID:26744779

  20. Brain-expressed 3′UTR extensions strengthen miRNA cross-talk between ion channel/transporter encoding mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wehrspaun, Claudia C.; Ponting, Chris P.; Marques, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    Why protein-coding genes express transcripts with longer 3′untranslated regions (3′UTRs) in the brain rather than in other tissues remains poorly understood. Given the established role of 3′UTRs in post-transcriptional regulation of transcript abundance and their recently highlighted contributions to miRNA-mediated cross-talk between mRNAs, we hypothesized that 3′UTR lengthening enhances coordinated expression between functionally-related genes in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we annotated 3′UTRs of human brain-expressed genes and found that transcripts encoding ion channels or transporters are specifically enriched among those genes expressing their longest 3′UTR extension in this tissue. These 3′UTR extensions have high density of response elements predicted for those miRNAs that are specifically expressed in the human frontal cortex (FC). Importantly, these miRNA response elements are more frequently shared among ion channel/transporter-encoding mRNAs than expected by chance. This indicates that miRNA-mediated cross-talk accounts, at least in part, for the observed coordinated expression of ion channel/transporter genes in the adult human brain. We conclude that extension of these genes' 3′UTRs enhances the miRNA-mediated cross-talk among their transcripts which post-transcriptionally regulates their mRNAs' relative levels. PMID:24616735

  1. Expression of hepatic mRNAs for insulin-like growth factors-I and -II during the development of hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Gallo, G; de Marchis, M; Voci, A; Fugassa, E

    1991-12-01

    The effect of thyroid status on the expression of insulin-like growth factors-I and -II mRNAs in the liver of developing rats has been investigated. Northern blot analyses of the specific mRNA demonstrated the presence of four IGF-II mRNA species which were strongly expressed in fetal liver and progressively declined after birth, becoming undetectable after week 3. This decrease was markedly delayed in the liver of hypothyroid rats. In addition, expression of IGF-I mRNA, absent in fetal liver, began during week 1 after birth and progressively increased with age. This increase was markedly delayed in the liver of hypothyroid rats. The data suggest that thyroid hormones regulate rat development via the co-ordinate expression of hepatic IGF-II and IGF-I mRNAs. PMID:1783883

  2. Characteristics of glycine receptors expressed by embryonic rat brain mRNAs.

    PubMed

    García-Alcocer, G; García-Colunga, J; Martínez-Torres, A; Miledi, R

    2001-02-27

    A study was made of glycine (Gly) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat mRNAs isolated from the encephalon, midbrain, and brainstem of 18-day-old rat embryos. In oocytes injected with encephalon, midbrain, or brainstem mRNAs, the Gly-current amplitudes (membrane current elicited by Gly; 1 mM Gly) were respectively 115 +/- 35, 346 +/- 28, and 389 +/- 22 nA, whereas the GABA-currents (1 mM GABA) were all < or =40 nA. Moreover, the Gly-currents desensitized faster in oocytes injected with encephalon or brainstem mRNAs. The EC(50) for Gly was 611 +/- 77 microM for encephalon, 661 +/- 28 microM for midbrain, and 506 +/- 18 microM for brainstem mRNA-injected oocytes, and the corresponding Hill coefficients were all approximately 2. Strychnine inhibited all of the Gly-currents, with an IC(50) of 56 +/- 3 nM for encephalon, 97 +/- 4 nM for midbrain, and 72 +/- 4 nM for brainstem mRNAs. During repetitive Gly applications, the Gly-currents were potentiated by 1.6-fold for encephalon, 2.1-fold for midbrain, and 1.3-fold for brainstem RNA-injected oocytes. Raising the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration significantly increased the Gly-currents in oocytes injected with midbrain and brainstem mRNAs. Reverse transcription-PCR studies showed differences in the Gly receptor (GlyR) alpha-subunits expressed, whereas the beta-subunit was present in all three types of mRNA. These results indicate differential expression of GlyR mRNAs in the brain areas examined, and these mRNAs lead to the expression of GlyRs that have different properties. The modulation of GlyRs by Ca(2+) could play important functions during brain development. PMID:11226317

  3. A Phosphorylated Cytoplasmic Autoantigen, GW182, Associates with a Unique Population of Human mRNAs within Novel Cytoplasmic Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Eystathioy, Theophany; Chan, Edward K. L.; Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Keene, Jack D.; Griffith, Kevin; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2002-01-01

    A novel human cellular structure has been identified that contains a unique autoimmune antigen and multiple messenger RNAs. This complex was discovered using an autoimmune serum from a patient with motor and sensory neuropathy and contains a protein of 182 kDa. The gene and cDNA encoding the protein indicated an open reading frame with glycine-tryptophan (GW) repeats and a single RNA recognition motif. Both the patient's serum and a rabbit serum raised against the recombinant GW protein costained discrete cytoplasmic speckles designated as GW bodies (GWBs) that do not overlap with the Golgi complex, endosomes, lysosomes, or peroxisomes. The mRNAs associated with GW182 represent a clustered set of transcripts that are presumed to reside within the GW complexes. We propose that the GW ribonucleoprotein complex is involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by sequestering a specific subset of gene transcripts involved in cell growth and homeostasis. PMID:11950943

  4. Differential nonsense mediated decay of mutated mRNAs in mismatch repair deficient colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    El-Bchiri, Jamila; Buhard, Olivier; Penard-Lacronique, Virginie; Thomas, Gilles; Hamelin, Richard; Duval, Alex

    2005-08-15

    The nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) system normally targets mRNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs) for rapid degradation. We investigated for a putative role of NMD in cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI-H cancers), because numerous mutant mRNAs containing PTC are generated in these tumors as a consequence of their mismatch repair deficiency. Using a quantitative RT-PCR approach in a large series of colorectal cancer cell lines, we demonstrate a significantly increased rate of degradation of mutant mRNAs containing a PTC compared with wild-type. A specific siRNA strategy was used to inhibit RENT-1 and/or RENT-2 activity, two major genes in the NMD system. This allowed us to show that increased degradation of PTC-containing mRNAs in MSI-H tumors was partly dependent upon NMD activity. The efficiency of NMD for the degradation of mutant mRNAs from target genes was highly variable in these cancers. NMD degraded some of them (TGFssRII, MSH3, GRK4), although allowing the persistent expression of others (BAX, TCF-4). This is of particular interest within the context of a proposed conservation of biological activity for the corresponding mutated proteins. We thus propose that NMD might play an important role in the selection of target gene mutations with a functional role in MSI-H carcinogenesis. PMID:16000315

  5. Different mRNAs code for dopa decarboxylase in tissues of neuronal and nonneuronal origin

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, M.; Coge, F.; Gros, F.; Thibault, J. )

    1991-03-15

    A cDNA clone for dopa decarboxylase has been isolated from a rat pheochromocytoma cDNA library and the cDNA sequence has been determined. It corresponds to an mRNA of 2094 nucleotides. The length of the mRNA was measured by primer-extension of rat pheochromocytoma RNA and the 5{prime} end of the sequence of the mRNA was confirmed by the PCR. A probe spanning the translation initiation site of the mRNA was used to hybridize with mRNAs from various organs of the rat. S1 nuclease digestion of the mRNAs annealed with this probe revealed two classes of mRNAs. The comparison of the cDNA sequence and published sequences for rat liver, human pheochromocytoma, and Droxophila dopa decarboxylase supported the conclusion that two mRNAs are produced: one is specific for tissue of neuronal origin and the other is specific for tissues of nonneuronal (mesodermal or endodermal) origin. The neuronal mRNA contains a 5{prime} untranslated sequence that is highly conserved between human and rat pheochromocytoma including a GA stretch. The coding sequence and the 3{prime} untranslated sequence of mRNAs from rat liver and pheochromocytoma are identical. The rat mRNA differs only in the 5{prime} untranslated region. Thus a unique gene codes for dopa decarboxylase and this gene gives rise to at least two transcripts presumably in response to different signals during development.

  6. Shwachman–Bodian–Diamond syndrome (SBDS) protein deficiency impairs translation re-initiation from C/EBPα and C/EBPβ mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    In, Kyungmin; Zaini, Mohamad A.; Müller, Christine; Warren, Alan J.; von Lindern, Marieke; Calkhoven, Cornelis F.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Shwachman–Bodian–Diamond Syndrome (SBDS) gene cause Shwachman–Diamond Syndrome (SDS), a rare congenital disease characterized by bone marrow failure with neutropenia, exocrine pancreatic dysfunction and skeletal abnormalities. The SBDS protein is important for ribosome maturation and therefore SDS belongs to the ribosomopathies. It is unknown, however, if loss of SBDS functionality affects the translation of specific mRNAs and whether this could play a role in the development of the clinical features of SDS. Here, we report that translation of the C/EBPα and -β mRNAs, that are indispensible regulators of granulocytic differentiation, is altered by SBDS mutations or knockdown. We show that SBDS function is specifically required for efficient translation re-initiation into the protein isoforms C/EBPα-p30 and C/EBPβ-LIP, which is controlled by a single cis-regulatory upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5′ untranslated regions (5′ UTRs) of both mRNAs. Furthermore, we show that as a consequence of the C/EBPα and -β deregulation the expression of MYC is decreased with associated reduction in proliferation, suggesting that failure of progenitor proliferation contributes to the haematological phenotype of SDS. Therefore, our study provides the first indication that disturbance of specific translation by loss of SBDS function may contribute to the development of the SDS phenotype. PMID:26762974

  7. Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS) protein deficiency impairs translation re-initiation from C/EBPα and C/EBPβ mRNAs.

    PubMed

    In, Kyungmin; Zaini, Mohamad A; Müller, Christine; Warren, Alan J; von Lindern, Marieke; Calkhoven, Cornelis F

    2016-05-19

    Mutations in the Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond Syndrome (SBDS) gene cause Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS), a rare congenital disease characterized by bone marrow failure with neutropenia, exocrine pancreatic dysfunction and skeletal abnormalities. The SBDS protein is important for ribosome maturation and therefore SDS belongs to the ribosomopathies. It is unknown, however, if loss of SBDS functionality affects the translation of specific mRNAs and whether this could play a role in the development of the clinical features of SDS. Here, we report that translation of the C/EBPα and -β mRNAs, that are indispensible regulators of granulocytic differentiation, is altered by SBDS mutations or knockdown. We show that SBDS function is specifically required for efficient translation re-initiation into the protein isoforms C/EBPα-p30 and C/EBPβ-LIP, which is controlled by a single cis-regulatory upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs) of both mRNAs. Furthermore, we show that as a consequence of the C/EBPα and -β deregulation the expression of MYC is decreased with associated reduction in proliferation, suggesting that failure of progenitor proliferation contributes to the haematological phenotype of SDS. Therefore, our study provides the first indication that disturbance of specific translation by loss of SBDS function may contribute to the development of the SDS phenotype. PMID:26762974

  8. UTRdb and UTRsite: specialized databases of sequences and functional elements of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Pesole, Graziano; Liuni, Sabino; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Larizza, Alessandra; Makalowski, Wojciech; Saccone, Cecilia

    2000-01-01

    The 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs may play a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression controlling mRNA localization, stability and translational efficiency. For this reason we developed UTRdb, a specialized database of 5′ and 3′ untranslated sequences of eukaryotic mRNAs cleaned from redundancy. UTRdb entries are enriched with specialized information not present in the primary databases including the presence of nucleotide sequence patterns already demonstrated by experimental analysis to have some functional role. All these patterns have been collected in the UTRsite database so that it is possible to search any input sequence for the presence of annotated functional motifs. Furthermore, UTRdb entries have been annotated for the presence of repetitive elements. All internet resources implemented for retrieval and functional analysis of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs are accessible at http://bigarea.area.ba.cnr.it:8000/EmbIT/UTRHome/ PMID:10592223

  9. UTRdb and UTRsite: specialized databases of sequences and functional elements of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs. Update 2002

    PubMed Central

    Pesole, Graziano; Liuni, Sabino; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Mignone, Flavio; Gissi, Carmela; Saccone, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    The 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions (5′- and 3′-UTRs) of eukaryotic mRNAs are known to play a crucial role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression modulating nucleo-cytoplasmic mRNA transport, translation efficiency, subcellular localization and stability. UTRdb is a specialized database of 5′ and 3′ untranslated sequences of eukaryotic mRNAs cleaned from redundancy. UTRdb entries are enriched with specialized information not present in the primary databases including the presence of nucleotide sequence patterns already demonstrated by experimental analysis to have some functional role. All these patterns have been collected in the UTRsite database so that it is possible to search any input sequence for the presence of annotated functional motifs. Furthermore, UTRdb entries have been annotated for the presence of repetitive elements. All Internet resources we implemented for retrieval and functional analysis of 5′- and 3′-UTRs of eukaryotic mRNAs are accessible at http://bighost.area.ba.cnr.it/BIG/UTRHome/. PMID:11752330

  10. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.J. . E-mail: sjflint@molbio.princeton.edu; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  11. Translation of a Small Subset of Caenorhabditis elegans mRNAs Is Dependent on a Specific Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Isoform

    PubMed Central

    Dinkova, Tzvetanka D.; Keiper, Brett D.; Korneeva, Nadejda L.; Aamodt, Eric J.; Rhoads, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    The mRNA cap-binding protein eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) participates in protein synthesis initiation, translational repression of specific mRNAs, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Multiple isoforms of eIF4E are expressed in a variety of organisms, but their specific roles are poorly understood. We investigated one Caenorhabditis elegans isoform, IFE-4, which has homologues in plants and mammals. IFE-4::green fluorescent protein (GFP) was expressed in pharyngeal and tail neurons, body wall muscle, spermatheca, and vulva. Knockout of ife-4 by RNA interference (RNAi) or a null mutation produced a pleiotropic phenotype that included egg-laying defects. Sedimentation analysis demonstrated that IFE-4, but not IFE-1, was present in 48S initiation complexes, indicating that it participates in protein synthesis initiation. mRNAs affected by ife-4 knockout were determined by DNA microarray analysis of polysomal distribution. Polysome shifts, in the absence of total mRNA changes, were observed for only 33 of the 18,967 C. elegans mRNAs tested, of which a disproportionate number were related to egg laying and were expressed in neurons and/or muscle. Translational regulation was confirmed by reduced levels of DAF-12, EGL-15, and KIN-29. The functions of these proteins can explain some phenotypes observed in ife-4 knockout mutants. These results indicate that translation of a limited subset of mRNAs is dependent on a specific isoform of eIF4E. PMID:15601834

  12. Human trabecular meshwork cells express BMP antagonist mRNAs and proteins.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Vidales, Tara; Fitzgerald, Ashley M; Clark, Abbot F

    2016-06-01

    Glaucoma patients have elevated aqueous humor and trabecular meshwork (TM) levels of transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-β2). TGF-β2 has been associated with increased extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition (i.e. fibronectin), which is attributed to the increased resistance of aqueous humor outflow through the TM. We have previously demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 selectively counteracts the profibrotic effect of TGF-β2 with respect to ECM synthesis in the TM, and this action is reversed by the BMP antagonist gremlin. Thus, the BMP and TGF-β signaling pathways antagonize each other's antifibrotic and profibrotic roles. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cultured human TM cells: (a) express other BMP antagonists including noggin, chordin, BMPER, BAMBI, Smurf1 and 2, and (b) whether expression of these proteins is regulated by exogenous TGF-β2 treatment. Primary human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells were grown to confluency and treated with TGF-β2 (5 ng/ml) for 24 or 48 h in serum-free medium. Untreated cell served as controls. qPCR and Western immunoblots (WB) determined that human TM cells expressed mRNAs and proteins for the BMP antagonist proteins: noggin, chordin, BMPER, BAMBI, and Smurf1/2. Exogenous TGF-β2 decreased chordin, BMPER, BAMBI, and Smurf1 mRNA and protein expression. In contrast, TGF-β2 increased secreted noggin and Smurf2 mRNA and protein levels. BMP antagonist members are expressed in the human TM. These molecules may be involved in the normal function of the TM as well as TM pathogenesis. Altered expression of BMP antagonist members may lead to functional changes in the human TM. PMID:27167364

  13. Rapid degradation of replication-dependent histone mRNAs largely occurs on mRNAs bound by nuclear cap-binding proteins 80 and 20

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Junho; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ye Kyung; Song, Ok-Kyu; Kim, Min Kyung; Lee, Byung-Gil; Song, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2013-01-01

    The translation of mammalian messenger RNAs (mRNAs) can be driven by either cap-binding proteins 80 and 20 (CBP80/20) or eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)4E. Although CBP80/20-dependent translation (CT) is known to be coupled to an mRNA surveillance mechanism termed nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), its molecular mechanism and biological role remain obscure. Here, using a yeast two-hybrid screening system, we identify a stem-loop binding protein (SLBP) that binds to a stem-loop structure at the 3′-end of the replication-dependent histone mRNA as a CT initiation factor (CTIF)-interacting protein. SLBP preferentially associates with the CT complex of histone mRNAs, but not with the eIF4E-depedent translation (ET) complex. Several lines of evidence indicate that rapid degradation of histone mRNA on the inhibition of DNA replication largely takes place during CT and not ET, which has been previously unappreciated. Furthermore, the ratio of CBP80/20-bound histone mRNA to eIF4E-bound histone mRNA is larger than the ratio of CBP80/20-bound polyadenylated β-actin or eEF2 mRNA to eIF4E-bound polyadenylated β-actin or eEF2 mRNA, respectively. The collective findings suggest that mRNAs harboring a different 3′-end use a different mechanism of translation initiation, expanding the repertoire of CT as a step for determining the fate of histone mRNAs. PMID:23234701

  14. Developmental changes in translatable mRNAs for the cerebral enolase isozymes alphaalpha and gammagamma.

    PubMed Central

    Zeitoun, Y; Lamandé, N; Keller, A; Gros, F; Legault-Demare, L

    1983-01-01

    Using the rabbit reticulocyte cell-free translation system we have estimated during ontogenesis the proportions of in vitro translatable alpha and gamma brain enolase mRNAs, which are two minor mRNA species. No polypeptide precursor to these enzyme subunits appears to be synthesized during translation in vitro. During brain development, the changes in translatable alpha and gamma mRNA content seem to parallel those of the corresponding antigens. The proportion of each of the enolase mRNAs is highest in adult mouse brain. Mechanisms controlling alpha and gamma antigen expression are discussed. In order to prepare the specific cDNA probes, purification of alpha and gamma mRNAs was undertaken. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:11892794

  15. Unequal distribution of N6-methyladenosine in influenza virus mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Narayan, P; Ayers, D F; Rottman, F M; Maroney, P A; Nilsen, T W

    1987-04-01

    Influenza virus mRNA is posttranscriptionally methylated at internal adenosine residues to form N6-methyladenosine (m6A). It has been previously shown that there is an average of three m6A residues per influenza virus mRNA (R. M. Krug, M. A. Morgan, and A. J. Shatkin, J. Virol. 20:45-53, 1976). To determine the distribution of m6A in the different influenza virus mRNAs, we purified six of the mRNAs by hybrid selection, digested them with nuclease, and determined their methylation patterns by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The amount of m6A in the different mRNAs varied from one in matrix to eight in hemagglutinin. PMID:3600638

  16. Translation dynamics of single mRNAs in live cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; Eliscovich, Carolina; Yoon, Young J.; Singer, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Translation is the fundamental biological process converting mRNA information into proteins. Single-molecule imaging in live cells has illuminated the dynamics of RNA transcription; however, it is not yet applicable to translation. Here, we report single-molecule imaging of nascent peptides (SINAPS) to assess translation in live cells. The approach provides direct readout of initiation, elongation, and location of translation. We show that mRNAs coding for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins are translated when they encounter the ER membrane. Single-molecule fluorescence recovery after photobleaching provides direct measurement of elongation speed (5 amino acids per second). In primary neurons, mRNAs are translated in proximal dendrites but repressed in distal dendrites and display “bursting” translation. This technology provides a tool with which to address the spatiotemporal translation mechanism of single mRNAs in living cells. PMID:27313041

  17. Single particle imaging of mRNAs crossing the nuclear pore: Surfing on the edge.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Truong, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Six years ago, the Singer lab published a landmark paper which described how individual mRNA particles cross the nuclear pore complex in mammalian tissue culture cells. This involved the simultaneous imaging of mRNAs, each labeled by a large number of tethered fluorescent proteins and fluorescently tagged nuclear pore components. Now two groups have applied this technique to the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Their results indicate that in the course of nuclear export, mRNAs likely engage complexes that are present on either side of the pore and that these interactions are modulated by proteins present in the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex. These findings lend support to the notion that just before and/or after the completion of nuclear export, mRNPs undergo one or more maturation steps that prepare the packaged mRNAs for translation. These results represent new and exciting insights into the mechanism of mRNA nuclear export. PMID:27276446

  18. Translation dynamics of single mRNAs in live cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Eliscovich, Carolina; Yoon, Young J; Singer, Robert H

    2016-06-17

    Translation is the fundamental biological process converting mRNA information into proteins. Single-molecule imaging in live cells has illuminated the dynamics of RNA transcription; however, it is not yet applicable to translation. Here, we report single-molecule imaging of nascent peptides (SINAPS) to assess translation in live cells. The approach provides direct readout of initiation, elongation, and location of translation. We show that mRNAs coding for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins are translated when they encounter the ER membrane. Single-molecule fluorescence recovery after photobleaching provides direct measurement of elongation speed (5 amino acids per second). In primary neurons, mRNAs are translated in proximal dendrites but repressed in distal dendrites and display "bursting" translation. This technology provides a tool with which to address the spatiotemporal translation mechanism of single mRNAs in living cells. PMID:27313041

  19. Characterization and Complexity of Wheat Developing Endosperm mRNAs 1

    PubMed Central

    Pernollet, Jean-Claude; Vaillant, Victor

    1984-01-01

    Free and membrane-bound (MB) polysomes and the corresponding polyadenylated RNAs (polyA+ RNAs) have been isolated from developing wheat endosperm (Triticum aestivum L.) Free and MB poly(A)+ RNAs, analyzed on isokinetic sucrose gradient with [3H]polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] hybridization detection, appear to be 11S to 12S in size with a 7% poly(A) tail for MB RNAs. cDNAs synthesized using both of these mRNA populations in presence of a potent RNase inhibitor (RNasin), have been used for hybridization kinetics experiments. The mean square fitting analysis of the hybridization kinetics between MB cDNA and its template reveals the presence of two abundance classes representing roughly ⅔ and ⅓ of the MB poly(A)+ RNAs and containing the information for approximately 75 superabundant species (21,000 copies per cell) and 750 intermediate species (530 copies per cell), respectively. The mRNA population extracted from free polysomes is divided into three abundance classes. The first one is composed of superabundant sequences which would correspond to the MB superabundant mRNAs. The free mRNAs consist of about 11,000 diverse sequences, most of them being rare sequences. Heterologous hybridizations of MB cDNAs to free mRNAs have shown that some mRNAs are common to both populations. This could be explained either by a partial contamination or by free polysomes en route to their membrane destination. Contrary to the low number of diverse mRNAs corresponding to the legume seed storage proteins, the wheat endosperm superabundant mRNAs consist of about 75 different sequences which would encode most of the seed storage proteins, especially gliadins. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16663795

  20. Zar1 represses translation in Xenopus oocytes and binds to the TCS in maternal mRNAs with different characteristics than Zar2.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomomi M; Cook, Jonathan M; Kotter, Cassandra V; Khat, Terry; Silva, Kevin D; Ferreyros, Michael; Holt, Justin W; Knight, Jefferson D; Charlesworth, Amanda

    2013-10-01

    Maternal mRNAs are translationally regulated during early development. Zar1 and its closely related homolog, Zar2, are both crucial in early development. Xenopus laevis Zygote arrest 2 (Zar2) binds to the Translational Control Sequence (TCS) in maternal mRNAs and regulates translation. The molecular mechanism of Zar1 has not been described. Here we report similarities and differences between Xenopus Zar1 and Zar2. Analysis of Zar sequences in vertebrates revealed two Zar family members with conserved, characteristic amino acid differences in the C-terminal domain. The presence of only two vertebrate Zar proteins was supported by analyzing Zar1 synteny. We propose that the criteria for naming Zar sequences are based on the characteristic amino acids and the chromosomal context. We also propose reclassification of some Zar sequences. We found that Zar1 is expressed throughout oogenesis and is stable during oocyte maturation. The N-terminal domain of Zar1 repressed translation of a reporter construct in immature oocytes. Both Zar1 and Zar2 bound to the TCS in the Wee1 and Mos 3' UTRs using a zinc finger in the C-terminal domain. However, Zar1 had much higher affinity for RNA than Zar2. To show the functional significance of the conserved amino acid substitutions, these residues in Zar2 were mutated to those found in Zar1. We show that these residues contributed to the different RNA binding characteristics of Zar1 compared to Zar2. Our study shows that Zar proteins have generally similar molecular functions in the translational regulation of maternal mRNAs, but they may have different roles in early development. PMID:23827238

  1. Organ-Specific Stability of Two Lemna rbcS mRNAs Is Determined Primarily in the Nuclear Compartment.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, J. L.; Silverthorne, J.

    1995-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the organ-specific expression of two members of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (rbcS) gene family is post-transcriptionally regulated in Lemna gibba. While both small subunit genes encoding SSU1 and SSU5B were transcribed at comparable levels in root and frond nuclei, SSU1 mRNA accumulated to high levels in both roots and fronds in contrast to SSU5B mRNA, which was of very low abundance in the roots compared with the fronds. In this study, we have used two approaches to pinpoint the step(s) at which SSU1 and SSU5B mRNAs are differentially accumulated in these organs. In the first approach, total nuclear steady state mRNA was isolated from roots and fronds, and the amount of each transcript was measured by RNase protection assays and compared with the transcription rates in isolated nuclei. In the second approach, cordycepin was used to inhibit mRNA synthesis in Lemna fronds or roots, and the rate of decay of each mRNA was measured by RNA gel blot analysis or RNase protection assays. Our findings indicate that the differential accumulation of SSU1 and SSU5B mRNAs in the fronds versus the roots is determined primarily in the nuclear compartment. In addition, SSU1 was found to have a longer half-life in total steady state mRNA than SSU5B had in both organs. This feature probably accounts for SSU1 being the predominantly expressed family member. PMID:12242353

  2. Embryonic Corneal Schwann Cells Express Some Schwann Cell Marker mRNAs, but No Mature Schwann Cell Marker Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Abigail H.; Albrecht, Michael; Pettit-Scott, Maya; Conrad, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Embryonic chick nerves encircle the cornea in pericorneal tissue until embryonic day (E)9, then penetrate the anterior corneal stroma, invade the epithelium, and branch over the corneal surface through E20. Adult corneal nerves, cut during transplantation or LASIK, never fully regenerate. Schwann cells (SCs) protect nerve fibers and augment nerve repair. This study evaluates SC differentiation in embryonic chick corneas. Methods Fertile chicken eggs were incubated from E0 at 38°C, 45% humidity. Dissected permeabilized corneas plus pericorneal tissue were immunostained for SC marker proteins. Other corneas were paraffin embedded, sectioned, and processed by in situ hybridization for corneal-, nerve-related, and SC marker gene expression. E9 to E20 corneas, dissected from pericorneal tissue, were assessed by real-time PCR (QPCR) for mRNA expression. Results QPCR revealed unchanging low to moderate SLIT2/ROBO and NTN/UNC5 family, BACE1, and CADM3/CADM4 expressions, but high NEO1 expression. EGR2 and POU3F1 expressions never surpassed PAX3 expression. ITGNA6/IT-GNB4 expressions increased 20-fold; ITGNB1 expression was high. SC marker S100 and MBP expressions increased; MAG, GFAP, and SCMP expressions were very low. Antibodies against the MPZ, MAG, S100, and SCMP proteins immunostained along pericorneal nerves, but not along corneal nerves. In the cornea, SLIT2 and SOX10 mRNAs were expressed in anterior stroma and epithelium, whereas PAX3, S100, MBP, and MPZL1 mRNAs were expressed only in corneal epithelium. Conclusions Embryonic chick corneas contain SCs, as defined by SOX10 and PAX3 transcription, which remain immature, at least in part because of stromal transcriptional and epithelial translational regulation of some SC marker gene expression. PMID:19387082

  3. Correlated mRNAs and miRNAs from co-expression and regulatory networks affect porcine muscle and finally meat properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physiological processes aiding the conversion of muscle to meat involve many genes associated with muscle structure and metabolic processes. MicroRNAs regulate networks of genes to orchestrate cellular functions, in turn regulating phenotypes. Results We applied weighted gene co-expression network analysis to identify co-expression modules that correlated to meat quality phenotypes and were highly enriched for genes involved in glucose metabolism, response to wounding, mitochondrial ribosome, mitochondrion, and extracellular matrix. Negative correlation of miRNA with mRNA and target prediction were used to select transcripts out of the modules of trait-associated mRNAs to further identify those genes that are correlated with post mortem traits. Conclusions Porcine muscle co-expression transcript networks that correlated to post mortem traits were identified. The integration of miRNA and mRNA expression analyses, as well as network analysis, enabled us to interpret the differentially-regulated genes from a systems perspective. Linking co-expression networks of transcripts and hierarchically organized pairs of miRNAs and mRNAs to meat properties yields new insight into several biological pathways underlying phenotype differences. These pathways may also be diagnostic for many myopathies, which are accompanied by deficient nutrient and oxygen supply of muscle fibers. PMID:23915301

  4. Obesity-Dependent Increases in Oocyte mRNAs Are Associated With Increases in Proinflammatory Signaling and Gut Microbial Abundance of Lachnospiraceae in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Anderson, Christopher L; Timme, Kelsey R; Kurz, Scott G; Fernando, Samodha C; Wood, Jennifer R

    2016-04-01

    RNAs stored in the metaphase II-arrested oocyte play important roles in successful embryonic development. Their abundance is defined by transcriptional activity during oocyte growth and selective degradation of transcripts during LH-induced oocyte maturation. Our previous studies demonstrated that mRNA abundance is increased in mature ovulated oocytes collected from obese humans and mice and therefore may contribute to reduced oocyte developmental competence associated with metabolic dysfunction. In the current study mouse models of diet-induced obesity were used to determine whether obesity-dependent increases in proinflammatory signaling regulate ovarian abundance of oocyte-specific mRNAs. The abundance of oocyte-specific Bnc1, Dppa3, and Pou5f1 mRNAs as well as markers of proinflammatory signaling were significantly increased in ovaries of obese compared with lean mice which were depleted of fully grown preovulatory follicles. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses also demonstrated increased association of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 with the Pou5f1 promoter in ovaries of obese mice suggesting that proinflammatory signaling regulates transcription of this gene in the oocyte. The cecum microbial content of lean and obese female mice was subsequently examined to identify potential relationships between microbial composition and proinflammatory signaling in the ovary. Multivariate Association with Linear Models identified significant positive correlations between cecum abundance of the bacterial family Lachnospiraceae and ovarian abundance of Tnfa as well as Dppa3, Bnc1, and Pou5f1 mRNAs. Together, these data suggest that diet-induced changes in gut microbial composition may be contributing to ovarian inflammation which in turn alters ovarian gene expression and ultimately contributes to obesity-dependent reduction in oocyte quality and development of infertility in obese patients. PMID:26881311

  5. A profusion of upstream open reading frame mechanisms in polyamine-responsive translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Atkins, John F; Michael, Antony J

    2010-01-01

    In many eukaryotic mRNAs one or more short 'upstream' open reading frames, uORFs, precede the initiator of the main coding sequence. Upstream ORFs are functionally diverse as illustrated by their variety of features in polyamine pathway biosynthetic mRNAs. Their propensity to act as sensors for regulatory circuits and to amplify the signals likely explains their occurrence in most polyamine pathway mRNAs. The uORF-mediated polyamine responsive autoregulatory circuits found in polyamine pathway mRNAs exemplify the translationally regulated dynamic interface between components of the proteome and metabolism. PMID:19920120

  6. Ribonuclease III-mediated processing of specific Neisseria meningitidis mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    De Gregorio, Eliana; Abrescia, Chiara; Carlomagno, M Stella; Di Nocera, Pier Paolo

    2003-01-01

    Approx. 2% of the Neisseria meningitidis genome consists of small DNA insertion sequences known as Correia or nemis elements, which feature TIRs (terminal inverted repeats) of 26-27 bp in length. Elements interspersed with coding regions are co-transcribed with flanking genes into mRNAs, processed at double-stranded RNA structures formed by TIRs. N. meningitidis RNase III (endoribonuclease III) is sufficient to process nemis+ RNAs. RNA hairpins formed by nemis with the same termini (26/26 and 27/27 repeats) are cleaved. By contrast, bulged hairpins formed by 26/27 repeats inhibit cleavage, both in vitro and in vivo. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, all hairpin types formed similar retarded complexes upon incubation with RNase III. The levels of corresponding nemis+ and nemis- mRNAs, and the relative stabilities of RNA segments processed from nemis+ transcripts in vitro, may both vary significantly. PMID:12826014

  7. Spatial and temporal accumulation of mRNAs encoding two common lignin peroxidases in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Moukha, S M; Wösten, H A; Mylius, E J; Asther, M; Wessels, J G

    1993-01-01

    Accumulation of peroxidases and their mRNAs was localized in colonies of Phanerochaete chrysosporium sandwiched between perforated polycarbonate membranes. Northern (RNA) blot analyses of colonial rings and in situ hybridizations with specific probes for manganese(II)-dependent peroxidase (MnP-1) and lignin peroxidase (LiP H8) mRNAs indicated that the expression of MnP-1 and Lip H8 genes started simultaneously in the central area of 3-day-old colonies. With time the signals for both transcripts spread to more-peripheral areas while decreasing in intensity. Furthermore, the appearance of MnP protein, as detected with specific immune serum, immediately followed accumulation of the MnP-1 mRNA transcript. However, LiP protein could be detected only some time after accumulation of LiP H8 mRNA. Images PMID:8501073

  8. Endogenous siRNAs derived from transposons and mRNAs in Drosophila somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ghildiyal, Megha; Seitz, Hervé; Horwich, Michael D; Li, Chengjian; Du, Tingting; Lee, Soohyun; Xu, Jia; Kittler, Ellen L W; Zapp, Maria L; Weng, Zhiping; Zamore, Phillip D

    2008-05-23

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) direct RNA interference (RNAi) in eukaryotes. In flies, somatic cells produce siRNAs from exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as a defense against viral infection. We identified endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs), 21 nucleotides in length, that correspond to transposons and heterochromatic sequences in the somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster. We also detected endo-siRNAs complementary to messenger RNAs (mRNAs); these siRNAs disproportionately mapped to the complementary regions of overlapping mRNAs predicted to form double-stranded RNA in vivo. Normal accumulation of somatic endo-siRNAs requires the siRNA-generating ribonuclease Dicer-2 and the RNAi effector protein Argonaute2 (Ago2). We propose that endo-siRNAs generated by the fly RNAi pathway silence selfish genetic elements in the soma, much as Piwi-interacting RNAs do in the germ line. PMID:18403677

  9. Sequence-dependent but not sequence-specific piRNA adhesion traps mRNAs to the germ plasm

    PubMed Central

    Vrettos, Nicholas; Maragkakis, Manolis; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2016-01-01

    The conserved Piwi family of proteins and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) play a central role in genomic stability, which is inextricably tied with germ cell formation, by forming ribonucleoproteins (piRNPs) that silence transposable elements (TEs)1. In Drosophila melanogaster and other animals, primordial germ cell (PGC) specification in the developing embryo is driven by maternal mRNAs and proteins that assemble into specialized mRNPs localized in the germ (pole) plasm at the posterior of the oocyte2,3. Maternal piRNPs, especially those loaded on Aubergine (Aub), a Piwi protein, are transmitted to the germ plasm to initiate transposon silencing in the offspring germline4–7. Transport of mRNAs to the oocyte by midoogenesis is an active, microtubule-dependent process8; mRNAs necessary for PGC formation are enriched in the germ plasm at late oogenesis via a diffusion and entrapment mechanism, whose molecular identity remains unknown8,9. Aub is a central component of germ granule RNPs, which house mRNAs in the germ plasm10–12 and interactions between Aub and Tudor are essential for the formation of germ granules13–16. Here we show that Aub-loaded piRNAs use partial base pairing characteristic of Argonaute RNPs to bind mRNAs randomly, acting as an adhesive trap that captures mRNAs in the germ plasm, in a Tudor-dependent manner. Strikingly, germ plasm mRNAs in Drosophilids are generally longer and more abundant than other mRNAs, suggesting that they provide more target sites for piRNAs to promote their preferential tethering in germ granules. Thus complexes containing Tudor, Aub piRNPs and mRNAs couple piRNA inheritance with germline specification. Our findings reveal an unexpected function for Piwi ribonucleoprotein complexes in mRNA trapping that may be generally relevant to the function of animal germ granules. PMID:26950602

  10. Polycistronic trypanosome mRNAs are a target for the exosome

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Susanne; Piper, Sophie; Estevez, Antonio; Carrington, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have several mRNA quality control checkpoints to avoid the production of aberrant proteins. Intron-containing mRNAs are actively degraded by the nuclear exosome, prevented from nuclear exit and, if these systems fail, degraded by the cytoplasmic NMD machinery. Trypanosomes have only two introns. However, they process mRNAs from long polycistronic precursors by trans-splicing and polycistronic mRNA molecules frequently arise from any missed splice site. Here, we show that RNAi depletion of the trypanosome exosome, but not of the cytoplasmic 5′-3′ exoribonuclease XRNA or the NMD helicase UPF1, causes accumulation of oligocistronic mRNAs. We have also revisited the localization of the trypanosome exosome by expressing eYFP-fusion proteins of the exosome subunits RRP44 and RRP6. Both proteins are significantly enriched in the nucleus. Together with published data, our data suggest a major nuclear function of the trypanosome exosome in rRNA, snoRNA and mRNA quality control. PMID:26946399

  11. Polycistronic trypanosome mRNAs are a target for the exosome.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Susanne; Piper, Sophie; Estevez, Antonio; Carrington, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have several mRNA quality control checkpoints to avoid the production of aberrant proteins. Intron-containing mRNAs are actively degraded by the nuclear exosome, prevented from nuclear exit and, if these systems fail, degraded by the cytoplasmic NMD machinery. Trypanosomes have only two introns. However, they process mRNAs from long polycistronic precursors by trans-splicing and polycistronic mRNA molecules frequently arise from any missed splice site. Here, we show that RNAi depletion of the trypanosome exosome, but not of the cytoplasmic 5'-3' exoribonuclease XRNA or the NMD helicase UPF1, causes accumulation of oligocistronic mRNAs. We have also revisited the localization of the trypanosome exosome by expressing eYFP-fusion proteins of the exosome subunits RRP44 and RRP6. Both proteins are significantly enriched in the nucleus. Together with published data, our data suggest a major nuclear function of the trypanosome exosome in rRNA, snoRNA and mRNA quality control. PMID:26946399

  12. Death of a dogma: eukaryotic mRNAs can code for more than one protein.

    PubMed

    Mouilleron, Hélène; Delcourt, Vivian; Roucou, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    mRNAs carry the genetic information that is translated by ribosomes. The traditional view of a mature eukaryotic mRNA is a molecule with three main regions, the 5' UTR, the protein coding open reading frame (ORF) or coding sequence (CDS), and the 3' UTR. This concept assumes that ribosomes translate one ORF only, generally the longest one, and produce one protein. As a result, in the early days of genomics and bioinformatics, one CDS was associated with each protein-coding gene. This fundamental concept of a single CDS is being challenged by increasing experimental evidence indicating that annotated proteins are not the only proteins translated from mRNAs. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics and ribosome profiling have detected productive translation of alternative open reading frames. In several cases, the alternative and annotated proteins interact. Thus, the expression of two or more proteins translated from the same mRNA may offer a mechanism to ensure the co-expression of proteins which have functional interactions. Translational mechanisms already described in eukaryotic cells indicate that the cellular machinery is able to translate different CDSs from a single viral or cellular mRNA. In addition to summarizing data showing that the protein coding potential of eukaryotic mRNAs has been underestimated, this review aims to challenge the single translated CDS dogma. PMID:26578573

  13. Death of a dogma: eukaryotic mRNAs can code for more than one protein

    PubMed Central

    Mouilleron, Hélène; Delcourt, Vivian; Roucou, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    mRNAs carry the genetic information that is translated by ribosomes. The traditional view of a mature eukaryotic mRNA is a molecule with three main regions, the 5′ UTR, the protein coding open reading frame (ORF) or coding sequence (CDS), and the 3′ UTR. This concept assumes that ribosomes translate one ORF only, generally the longest one, and produce one protein. As a result, in the early days of genomics and bioinformatics, one CDS was associated with each protein-coding gene. This fundamental concept of a single CDS is being challenged by increasing experimental evidence indicating that annotated proteins are not the only proteins translated from mRNAs. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics and ribosome profiling have detected productive translation of alternative open reading frames. In several cases, the alternative and annotated proteins interact. Thus, the expression of two or more proteins translated from the same mRNA may offer a mechanism to ensure the co-expression of proteins which have functional interactions. Translational mechanisms already described in eukaryotic cells indicate that the cellular machinery is able to translate different CDSs from a single viral or cellular mRNA. In addition to summarizing data showing that the protein coding potential of eukaryotic mRNAs has been underestimated, this review aims to challenge the single translated CDS dogma. PMID:26578573

  14. CNOT3 suppression promotes necroptosis by stabilizing mRNAs for cell death-inducing proteins

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toru; Kikuguchi, Chisato; Sharma, Sahil; Sasaki, Toshio; Tokumasu, Miho; Adachi, Shungo; Natsume, Tohru; Kanegae, Yumi; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    The CCR4-NOT complex is conserved in eukaryotes and is involved in mRNA metabolism, though its molecular physiological roles remain to be established. We show here that CNOT3-depleted mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) undergo cell death. Levels of other complex subunits are decreased in CNOT3-depleted MEFs. The death phenotype is rescued by introduction of wild-type (WT), but not mutated CNOT3, and is not suppressed by the pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fluoromethylketone. Gene expression profiling reveals that mRNAs encoding cell death-related proteins, including receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) and RIPK3, are stabilized in CNOT3-depleted MEFs. Some of these mRNAs bind to CNOT3, and in the absence of CNOT3 their poly(A) tails are elongated. Inhibition of RIPK1-RIPK3 signaling by a short-hairpin RNA or a necroptosis inhibitor, necrostatin-1, confers viability upon CNOT3-depleted MEFs. Therefore, we conclude that CNOT3 targets specific mRNAs to prevent cells from being disposed to necroptotic death. PMID:26437789

  15. Switches in gene expression including microRNA and a large number of distinct mRNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2008-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the kinetics of gene expression depends on the interplay of messenger RNAs (mRNAs), proteins, and nonprotein coding RNAs, or, more specifically, microRNAs. Some microRNAs may target hundreds of mRNAs. To describe this case, the author proposes a kinetic model implying that the microRNA synthesis is suppressed by the protein produced via the translation of one of the target mRNAs. With physically reasonable model parameters, the model predicts bistability or, in other words, switches in the expression of hundreds of genes.

  16. Heat Shock Proteins and Their mRNAs in Dry and Early Imbibing Embryos of Wheat 1

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Kenneth W.; Abernethy, Rollin H.

    1990-01-01

    Two-dimensional gels of in vitro translation products of mRNAs isolated from quiescent wheat (Triticum aestivum) embryos demonstrate the presence of mRNAs encoding heat shock proteins (hsps). There were no detectable differences in the mRNAs found in mature embryos from field grown, from 25°C growth chamber cultivated, or from plants given 38°C heat stresses at different stages of seed development. The mRNAs encoding several developmentally dependent (dd) hsps were among those found in the dry embryos. Stained two-dimensional gels of proteins extracted from 25°C growth chamber cultivated wheat embryos demonstrated the presence of hsps, including dd hsps. A study of the relationship of preexisting hsp mRNAs and the heat shock response during early imbibition was undertaken. Heat shocks (42°C, 90 minutes) were administered following 1.5, 16, and 24 hours of 25°C imbibition. While the mRNAs encoding the low molecular weight hsps decayed rapidly upon imbibition, the mRNAs for dd hsps persisted longer and were still detectable following 16 hours of imbibition. After 1.5 hours of imbibition, the mRNAs for the dd hsps did not accumulate in response to heat shock, even though the synthesis of the proteins was enhanced. Thus, an applied heat shock appeared to lead to the preferential translation of preexisting dd hsp mRNAs. The mRNAs for the other hsps, except hsp 70, were newly transcribed at all of the imbibition times examined. The behavior of the hsp 70 group of proteins during early imbibition was examined by RNA gel blot analysis. The mRNAs for the hsp 70 group were detectable at moderate levels in the quiescent embryo. The relative level of hsp 70 mRNA increased after the onset of imbibition at 25°C and remained high through 25.5 hours of prior imbibition. The maximal levels of these mRNAs at 25°C was reached at 17.5 hours of imbibition. Heat shock caused modest additional accumulation of hsp70 mRNA at later imbibition times. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

  17. Capped mRNAs with reduced secondary structure can function in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sonenberg, N.; Guertin, D.; Lee, K.A.W.

    1982-12-01

    Extracts form poliovirus-infected HeLa cells were used to study ribosome binding of native and denatured reovirus mRNAs and translation of capped mRNAs with different degrees of secondary structure. Here, the authors demonstrate that ribosomes in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells could form initiation complexes with denatured reovirus mRNA, in contrast to their inability to bind native reovirus mRNA. Furthermore, the capped alfalfa mosiac virus 4 RNA, which is most probable devoid of stable secondary structure at its 5' end, could be translated at much higher efficiency than could other capped mRNAs in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells.

  18. ncRNA-mediated bistability in the synthesis of hundreds of distinct mRNAs and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2010-02-01

    The kinetics of gene expression can be bistable due to the feedback between the mRNA and protein formation. In eukaryotic cells, the interplay between mRNAs and proteins can be influenced by non-coding RNAs. Some of these RNAs, e.g., microRNAs, may target hundreds of distinct mRNAs. The model presented here shows how a non-coding RNA can be used as a mediator in order to involve numerous mRNAs and proteins into a bistable network.

  19. Mini-review: Making scent of the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in olfactory axons

    PubMed Central

    Dubacq, Caroline; Fouquet, Coralie; Trembleau, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Rodents contain in their genome more than 1,000 functional odorant receptor genes, which are specifically expressed by the olfactory sensory neurons projecting from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb. Strong evidence for the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in the axon of olfactory sensory neurons was obtained, but no function has been assigned to these axonal mRNAs yet. The aim of this review is to discuss the evidence for the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in olfactory sensory axons, and to speculate on their possible function in the wiring of the mouse olfactory sensory projections. PMID:23959692

  20. Characterization of binding of LARP6 to the 5’ stem-loop of collagen mRNAs: Implications for synthesis of type I collagen

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, Lela; Longo, Liam; Zhang, Yujie; Stefanovic, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Type I collagen is composed of 2 polypeptides, α1(I) and α2(I), which fold into triple helix. Collagen α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs have a conserved stem-loop structure in their 5’ UTRs, the 5’SL. LARP6 binds the 5’SL to regulate type I collagen expression. We show that 5 nucleotides within the single stranded regions of 5’SL contribute to the high affinity of LARP6 binding. Mutation of individual nucleotides abolishes the binding in gel mobility shift assay. LARP6 binding to 5’SL of collagen α2(I) mRNA is more stable than the binding to 5’SL of α1(I) mRNA, although the equilibrium binding constants are similar. The more stable binding to α2(I) mRNA may favor synthesis of the heterotrimeric type I collagen. LARP6 needs 2 domains to contact 5’SL, the La domain and the RRM. T133 in the La domain is critical for folding of the protein, while loop 3 in the RRM is critical for binding 5’SL. Loop 3 is also involved in the interaction of LARP6 and protein translocation channel SEC61. This interaction is essential for type I collagen synthesis, because LARP6 mutant which binds 5’SL but which does not interact with SEC61, suppresses collagen synthesis in a dominant negative manner. We postulate that LARP6 directly targets collagen mRNAs to the SEC61 translocons to facilitate coordinated translation of the 2 collagen mRNAs. The unique sequences of LARP6 identified in this work may have evolved to enable its role in type I collagen biosynthesis. PMID:25692237

  1. Deletion of intestinal epithelial insulin receptor attenuates high-fat diet-induced elevations in cholesterol and stem, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cell mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Sarah F.; Santoro, M. Agostina; Mah, Amanda T.; Keku, J. Adeola; Bortvedt, Amy E.; Blue, R. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) regulates nutrient uptake and utilization in multiple organs, but its role in the intestinal epithelium is not defined. This study developed a mouse model with villin-Cre (VC) recombinase-mediated intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific IR deletion (VC-IRΔ/Δ) and littermate controls with floxed, but intact, IR (IRfl/fl) to define in vivo roles of IEC-IR in mice fed chow or high-fat diet (HFD). We hypothesized that loss of IEC-IR would alter intestinal growth, biomarkers of intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESC) or other lineages, body weight, adiposity, and glucose or lipid handling. In lean, chow-fed mice, IEC-IR deletion did not affect body or fat mass, plasma glucose, or IEC proliferation. In chow-fed VC-IRΔ/Δ mice, mRNA levels of the Paneth cell marker lysozyme (Lyz) were decreased, but markers of other differentiated lineages were unchanged. During HFD-induced obesity, IRfl/fl and VC-IRΔ/Δ mice exhibited similar increases in body and fat mass, plasma insulin, mRNAs encoding several lipid-handling proteins, a decrease in Paneth cell number, and impaired glucose tolerance. In IRfl/fl mice, HFD-induced obesity increased circulating cholesterol; numbers of chromogranin A (CHGA)-positive enteroendocrine cells (EEC); and mRNAs encoding Chga, glucose-dependent insulinotrophic peptide (Gip), glucagon (Gcg), Lyz, IESC biomarkers, and the enterocyte cholesterol transporter Scarb1. All these effects were attenuated or lost in VC-IRΔ/Δ mice. These results demonstrate that IEC-IR is not required for normal growth of the intestinal epithelium in lean adult mice. However, our findings provide novel evidence that, during HFD-induced obesity, IEC-IR contributes to increases in EEC, plasma cholesterol, and increased expression of Scarb1 or IESC-, EEC-, and Paneth cell-derived mRNAs. PMID:25394660

  2. Reprogramming of Pancreatic Exocrine Cells AR42J Into Insulin-producing Cells Using mRNAs for Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Koblas, Tomas; Leontovyc, Ivan; Loukotova, Sarka; Kosinova, Lucie; Saudek, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of pancreatic nonendocrine cells into insulin-producing β-cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes. However, its clinical application is limited by the potential for insertional mutagenesis associated with the viral vectors currently used for cell reprogramming. With the aim of developing a nonintegrative reprogramming strategy for derivation of insulin-producing cells, here, we evaluated a new approach utilizing synthetic messenger RNAs encoding reprogramming transcription factors. Administration of synthetic mRNAs encoding three key transcription regulators of β-cell differentiation-Pdx1, Neurogenin3, and MafA-efficiently reprogrammed the pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells. In addition to the insulin genes expression, the synthetic mRNAs also induced the expressions of genes important for proper pancreatic β-cell function, including Sur1, Kir6.2, Pcsk1, and Pcsk2. Pretreating cells with the chromatin-modifying agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine further enhanced reprogramming efficiency, increasing the proportion of insulin-producing cells from 3.5 ± 0.9 to 14.3 ± 1.9% (n = 4). Moreover, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine pretreatment enabled the reprogrammed cells to respond to glucose challenge with increased insulin secretion. In conclusion, our results support that the reprogramming of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, induced by synthetic mRNAs encoding pancreatic transcription factors, represents a promising approach for cell-based diabetes therapy. PMID:27187823

  3. Cellular Selenoprotein mRNA Tethering via Antisense Interactions with Ebola and HIV-1 mRNAs May Impact Host Selenium Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ethan Will; Ruzicka, Jan A; Premadasa, Lakmini; Zhao, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein expression by non-coding RNAs typically involves effects on mRNA degradation and/or ribosomal translation. The possibility of virus-host mRNA-mRNA antisense tethering interactions (ATI) as a gain-of-function strategy, via the capture of functional RNA motifs, has not been hitherto considered. We present evidence that ATIs may be exploited by certain RNA viruses in order to tether the mRNAs of host selenoproteins, potentially exploiting the proximity of a captured host selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element to enable the expression of virally-encoded selenoprotein modules, via translation of in-frame UGA stop codons as selenocysteine. Computational analysis predicts thermodynamically stable ATIs between several widely expressed mammalian selenoprotein mRNAs (e.g., isoforms of thioredoxin reductase) and specific Ebola virus mRNAs, and HIV-1 mRNA, which we demonstrate via DNA gel shift assays. The probable functional significance of these ATIs is further supported by the observation that, in both viruses, they are located in close proximity to highly conserved in-frame UGA stop codons at the 3' end of open reading frames that encode essential viral proteins (the HIV-1 nef protein and the Ebola nucleoprotein). Significantly, in HIV/AIDS patients, an inverse correlation between serum selenium and mortality has been repeatedly documented, and clinical benefits of selenium in the context of multi-micronutrient supplementation have been demonstrated in several well-controlled clinical trials. Hence, in the light of our findings, the possibility of a similar role for selenium in Ebola pathogenesis and treatment merits serious investigation. PMID:26369818

  4. Cellular Selenoprotein mRNA Tethering via Antisense Interactions with Ebola and HIV-1 mRNAs May Impact Host Selenium Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ethan Will; Ruzicka, Jan A.; Premadasa, Lakmini; Zhao, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein expression by non-coding RNAs typically involves effects on mRNA degradation and/or ribosomal translation. The possibility of virus-host mRNA-mRNA antisense tethering interactions (ATI) as a gain-of-function strategy, via the capture of functional RNA motifs, has not been hitherto considered. We present evidence that ATIs may be exploited by certain RNA viruses in order to tether the mRNAs of host selenoproteins, potentially exploiting the proximity of a captured host selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element to enable the expression of virally-encoded selenoprotein modules, via translation of in-frame UGA stop codons as selenocysteine. Computational analysis predicts thermodynamically stable ATIs between several widely expressed mammalian selenoprotein mRNAs (e.g., isoforms of thioredoxin reductase) and specific Ebola virus mRNAs, and HIV-1 mRNA, which we demonstrate via DNA gel shift assays. The probable functional significance of these ATIs is further supported by the observation that, in both viruses, they are located in close proximity to highly conserved in-frame UGA stop codons at the 3′ end of open reading frames that encode essential viral proteins (the HIV-1 nef protein and the Ebola nucleoprotein). Significantly, in HIV/AIDS patients, an inverse correlation between serum selenium and mortality has been repeatedly documented, and clinical benefits of selenium in the context of multi-micronutrient supplementation have been demonstrated in several well-controlled clinical trials. Hence, in the light of our findings, the possibility of a similar role for selenium in Ebola pathogenesis and treatment merits serious investigation. PMID:26369818

  5. Sink limitation induces the expression of multiple soybean vegetative lipoxygenase mRNAs while the endogenous jasmonic acid level remains low.

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, T W; Koetje, D S; Stephenson, L C; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Grimes, H D

    1995-01-01

    The response of individual members of the lipoxygenase multigene family in soybeans to sink deprivation was analyzed. RNase protection assays indicated that a novel vegetative lipoxygenase gene, vlxC, and three other vegetative lipoxygenase mRNAs accumulated in mature leaves in response to a variety of sink limitations. These data suggest that several members of the lipoxygenase multigene family are involved in assimilate partitioning. The possible involvement of jasmonic acid as a signaling molecule regulating assimilate partitioning into the vegetative storage proteins and lipoxygenases was directly assessed by determining the endogenous level of jasmonic acid in leaves from plants with their pods removed. There was no rise in the level of endogenous jasmonic acid coincident with the strong increase in both vlxC and vegetative storage protein VspB transcripts in response to sink limitation. Thus, expression of the vegetative lipoxygenases and vegetative storage proteins is not regulated by jasmonic acid in sink-limited leaves. PMID:7549487

  6. Imaging single mRNAs to study dynamics of mRNA export in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bensidoun, Pierre; Raymond, Pascal; Oeffinger, Marlene; Zenklusen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Regulation of mRNA and protein expression occurs at many levels, initiated at transcription and followed by mRNA processing, export, localization, translation and mRNA degradation. The ability to study mRNAs in living cells has become a critical tool to study and analyze how the various steps of the gene expression pathway are carried out. Here we describe a detailed protocol for real time fluorescent RNA imaging using the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein, which allows mRNA detection with high spatial and temporal resolution in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and can be applied to study various stages of mRNA metabolism. We describe the different parameters required for quantitative single molecule imaging in yeast, including strategies for genomic integration, expression of a PP7 coat protein GFP fusion protein, microscope setup and analysis strategies. We illustrate the method's use by analyzing the behavior of nuclear mRNA in yeast and the role of the nuclear basket in mRNA export. PMID:26784711

  7. eIF2alpha kinases GCN2 and PERK modulate transcription and translation of distinct sets of mRNAs in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Dang Do, An N; Kimball, Scot R; Cavener, Douglas R; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2009-08-01

    In eukaryotes, selective derepression of mRNA translation through altered utilization of upstream open reading frames (uORF) or internal ribosomal entry sites (IRES) regulatory motifs following exposure to stress is regulated at the initiation stage through the increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 on its alpha-subunit (eIF2alpha). While there is only one known eIF2alpha kinase in yeast, general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2), mammals have evolved to express at least four: GCN2, heme-regulated inhibitor kinase (HRI), double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), and PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum-resident kinase (PERK). So far, the main known distinction among these four kinases is their activation in response to different acute stressors. In the present study, we used the in situ perfused mouse liver model and hybridization array analyses to assess the general translational response to stress regulated by two of these kinases, GCN2 and PERK, and to differentiate between the downstream effects of activating GCN2 versus PERK. The resulting data showed that at least 2.5% of mouse liver mRNAs are subject to derepressed translation following stress. In addition, the data demonstrated that eIF2alpha kinases GCN2 and PERK differentially regulate mRNA transcription and translation, which in the latter case suggests that increased eIF2alpha phosphorylation is not sufficient for derepression of translation. These findings open an avenue for more focused future research toward groups of mRNAs that code for the early cellular stress response proteins. PMID:19509078

  8. Expressed miRNAs target feather related mRNAs involved in cell signaling, cell adhesion and structure during chicken epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weier; Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2016-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miRNA regulation contributes to a diverse set of processes including cellular differentiation and morphogenesis which leads to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms and is thus key to animal development. Feathers are one of the most distinctive features of extant birds and are important for multiple functions including flight, thermal regulation, and sexual selection. However, the role of miRNAs in feather development has been woefully understudied despite the identification of cell signaling pathways, cell adhesion molecules and structural genes involved in feather development. In this study, we performed a microarray experiment comparing the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs among three embryonic stages of development and two tissues (scutate scale and feather) of the chicken. We combined this expression data with miRNA target prediction tools and a curated list of feather related genes to produce a set of 19 miRNA-mRNA duplexes. These targeted mRNAs have been previously identified as important cell signaling and cell adhesion genes as well as structural genes involved in feather and scale morphogenesis. Interestingly, the miRNA target site of the cell signaling pathway gene, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family, Member A3 (ALDH1A3), is unique to birds indicating a novel role in Aves. The identified miRNA target site of the cell adhesion gene, Tenascin C (TNC), is only found in specific chicken TNC splice variants that are differentially expressed in developing scutate scale and feather tissue indicating an important role of miRNA regulation in epidermal differentiation. Additionally, we found that β-keratins, a major structural component of avian and reptilian epidermal appendages, are targeted by multiple miRNA genes. In conclusion, our work provides quantitative expression data on miRNAs and mRNAs

  9. Sequence-dependent but not sequence-specific piRNA adhesion traps mRNAs to the germ plasm.

    PubMed

    Vourekas, Anastassios; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Vrettos, Nicholas; Maragkakis, Manolis; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2016-03-17

    The conserved Piwi family of proteins and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) have a central role in genomic stability, which is inextricably linked to germ-cell formation, by forming Piwi ribonucleoproteins (piRNPs) that silence transposable elements. In Drosophila melanogaster and other animals, primordial germ-cell specification in the developing embryo is driven by maternal messenger RNAs and proteins that assemble into specialized messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) localized in the germ (pole) plasm at the posterior of the oocyte. Maternal piRNPs, especially those loaded on the Piwi protein Aubergine (Aub), are transmitted to the germ plasm to initiate transposon silencing in the offspring germ line. The transport of mRNAs to the oocyte by midoogenesis is an active, microtubule-dependent process; mRNAs necessary for primordial germ-cell formation are enriched in the germ plasm at late oogenesis via a diffusion and entrapment mechanism, the molecular identity of which remains unknown. Aub is a central component of germ granule RNPs, which house mRNAs in the germ plasm, and interactions between Aub and Tudor are essential for the formation of germ granules. Here we show that Aub-loaded piRNAs use partial base-pairing characteristics of Argonaute RNPs to bind mRNAs randomly in Drosophila, acting as an adhesive trap that captures mRNAs in the germ plasm, in a Tudor-dependent manner. Notably, germ plasm mRNAs in drosophilids are generally longer and more abundant than other mRNAs, suggesting that they provide more target sites for piRNAs to promote their preferential tethering in germ granules. Thus, complexes containing Tudor, Aub piRNPs and mRNAs couple piRNA inheritance with germline specification. Our findings reveal an unexpected function for piRNP complexes in mRNA trapping that may be generally relevant to the function of animal germ granules. PMID:26950602

  10. Expression of type I and type V collagen mRNAs in the elasmoid scales of a teleost fish as revealed by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Le Guellec, D; Zylberberg, L

    1998-01-01

    The ability of scale-forming cells to produce both type I and type V collagens was investigated by in situ hybridization at the light and electron microscope levels. Biochemical analyses reported that type I collagen, the predominant component, was associated with the minor type V collagen in the collagenous matrix of the teleost scales where, thin and thick collagen fibrils formed distinct layers. Thin collagen fibrils of the external layer were produced by the episquamal scleroblasts scattered on the outer scale surface, while thick collagen fibrils forming the compact basal plate were produced by the hyposquamal scleroblasts lining the inner surface of the scale. We demonstrated that episquamal and hyposquamal scleroblasts contained mRNAs for alpha1(I) and alpha1(V) collagens. Quantification by image analysis of the relative amount of alpha1(I) and alpha1(V) mRNAs in episquamal and hyposquamal scleroblasts suggests that the gene expression of type V collagen was proportionally higher in episquamal scleroblasts. These results support our hypothesis that the diameter of the thin fibrils of the external layer is regulated by the significant amount of type V collagen that interacts with type I collagen. PMID:11063006

  11. Electrophoretic separation of in vitro translation products on giant two-dimensional gels allows detailed analysis of cellular mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Colbert, R.A.; Young, D.A.

    1986-11-05

    The in vitro translation products of mRNA pretreated with methylmercuric hydroxide were examined by giant two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In addition to increasing overall translational efficiency approximately 2.5-fold, methylmercuric hydroxide selectively increases the translation of mRNAs coding for higher molecular mass (greater than 45 kDa) proteins, allowing the routine resolution of 1500 (35S)methionine-labeled proteins. This yields 3 to 4-fold the number of translation products seen with smaller size two-dimensional gels. With this method we compare thymus cell proteins synthesized in vivo with the products of in vitro translation of mRNA recovered from thymus cells. Fifty-eight percent of the translation products are qualitatively the same as proteins synthesized in vivo (similar Mr, pI, and neighboring proteins), with 64% of these also being quantitatively similar (less than 5-fold difference). A comparison of thymus mRNA in vitro translation products with those coded for by mRNA from liver reveals only 32% qualitative similarity, with 63% of these also being quantitatively similar. These results are discussed in relation to predictions of mRNA abundance and complexity based on DNA:RNA hybridization data. Giant two-dimensional gel separations of in vitro translation products appear to be useful for detecting less abundant cellular mRNAs, including those that may be regulated by hormones or other physiological mediators.

  12. Aire-dependent peripheral tissue antigen mRNAs in mTEC cells feature networking refractoriness to microRNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Claudia; Oliveira, Ernna H; Almeida, Renata S; Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Pezzi, Nicole; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T; Donadi, Eduardo A; Passos, Geraldo A

    2015-01-01

    The downregulation of PTA genes in mTECs is associated with the loss of self-tolerance, and the role of miRNAs in this process is not fully understood. Therefore, we studied the expression of mRNAs and miRNAs in mTECs from autoimmune NOD mice during the period when loss of self-tolerance occurs in parallel with non-autoimmune BALB/c mice. Although the expression of the transcriptional regulator Aire was unchanged, we observed downregulation of a set of PTA mRNAs. A set of miRNAs was also differentially expressed in these mice. The reconstruction of miRNA-mRNA interaction networks identified the controller miRNAs and predicted the PTA mRNA targets. Interestingly, the known Aire-dependent PTAs exhibited pronounced refractoriness in the networking interaction with miRNAs. This study reveals the existence of a new mechanism in mTECs, and this mechanism may have importance in the control of self-tolerance. PMID:25220732

  13. Splice junctions in adenovirus 2 early region 4 mRNAs: multiple splice sites produce 18 to 24 RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Tigges, M A; Raskas, H J

    1984-01-01

    We localized the splice junctions in adenovirus 2 early region 4 (E4) mRNAs. Processing of the E4 precursor RNA positioned the donor splice site of the 5' leader sequence adjacent to acceptor sites near the 5' ends of five of the six open reading regions in the E4 transcription unit. Of particular interest among the E4 mRNAs is an extensively spliced class which includes multiple species with sizes ranging from 1.1 to 0.75 kilobases (kb). Purified 1.1- to 0.75-kb mRNAs specified at least 10 polypeptides in vitro. We detected eight acceptor and two donor splice sites utilized in the deletion of the intron from the 3' portion of these mRNAs. E4 RNAs were isolated from the cytoplasm of infected cells at 5, 9, 12, and 18 h after infection. The E4 mRNAs were present throughout infection, but different members of the 1.1- to 0.7-kb class were predominant at each time assayed. Alternate splicing of the 3.0-kb E4 precursor RNA can generate as many as 25 mRNAs that encode at least 16 polypeptides. Images PMID:6336328

  14. Expression of Procyclin mRNAs during Cyclical Transmission of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite causing human sleeping sickness, relies on the tsetse fly for its transmission. In the insect, EP and GPEET procyclins are the major surface glycoproteins of procyclic (midgut) forms of the parasite, with GPEET predominating in the early procyclic form and two isoforms of EP in the late procyclic form. EP procyclins were previously detected on salivary gland trypanosomes, presumably epimastigotes, by immunoelectron microscopy. However, no procyclins could be detected by mass spectrometry when parasites were isolated from infected glands. We have used qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR to analyse the procyclin mRNAs expressed by trypanosomes in the tsetse midgut and salivary glands at different time points after infection. The coding regions of the three EP isoforms (EP1, EP2 and EP3) are extremely similar, but their 3′ untranslated regions contain unique sequences that make it possible to assign the cDNAs amplified by this technique. With the exception of EP2, we found that the spectrum of procyclin mRNAs expressed in the midgut mirrors the protein repertoire of early and established procyclic forms. Surprisingly, procyclin mRNAs, including that of GPEET, are present at relatively high levels in salivary gland trypanosomes, although the proteins are rarely detected by immunofluorescence. Additional experiments using transgenic trypanosomes expressing reporter genes or mutant forms of procyclin point to a mechanism of translational or post-translational control, involving the procyclin coding regions, in salivary gland trypanosomes. It is widely accepted that T. brucei always has a coat of either variant surface glycoprotein or procyclin. It has been known for many years that the epimastigote form does not have a variant surface glycoprotein coat. The finding that this life cycle stage is usually negative for procyclin as well is new, and means that the paradigm will need to be revised. PMID:16276404

  15. Globin mRNAs are primers for the transcription of influenza viral RNA in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bouloy, Michele; Plotch, Stephen J.; Krug, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Because influenza viral RNA transcription in vitro is greatly enhanced by the addition of a primer dinucleotide, ApG or GpG, we have proposed that viral RNA transcription in vivo requires initiation by primer RNAs synthesized by the host cell, specifically by RNA polymerase II, thereby explaining the α-amanitin sensitivity of viral RNA transcription in vivo. Here, we identify such primer RNAs, initially in reticulocyte extracts, where they are shown to be globin mRNAs. Purified globin mRNAs very effectively stimulated viral RNA transcription in vitro, and the resulting transcripts directed the synthesis of all the nonglycosylated virus-specific proteins in micrococcal nuclease-treated L cell extracts. The viral RNA transcripts synthesized in vitro primed by ApG also directed the synthesis of the nonglycosylated virus-specific proteins, but the globin mRNA-primed transcripts were translated about 3 times more efficiently. The translation of the globin mRNA-primed, but not the ApG-primed, viral RNA transcripts was inhibited by 7-methylguanosine 5′-phosphate in the presence of S-adenosylhomocysteine, suggesting that the globin mRNA-primed transcripts contained a 5′-terminal methylated cap structure. We propose that this cap was transferred from the globin mRNA primer to the newly synthesized viral RNA transcripts, because no detectable de novo synthesis of a methylated cap occurred during globin mRNA-primed viral RNA transcription. Preliminary experiments indicate that other purified eukaryotic mRNAs also stimulate influenza viral RNA transcription in vitro. Images PMID:283399

  16. Polycistronic mRNAs code for polypeptides of the Vibrio harveyi luminescence system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, C.M.; Graham, A.D.; Boylan, M.; Evans, J.F.; Hasel, K.W.; Meighen, E.A.; Graham, A.F.

    1985-03-01

    DNA coding for the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of Vibrio harveyi luciferase, the luxA and luxB genes, and the adjoining chromosomal regions on both sides of these genes (total of 18 kilobase pairs) was cloned into Escherichia coli. Using labeled DNA coding for the ..cap alpha.. subunit as a hybridization probe, the authors identified a set of polycistronic mRNAs (2.6, 4, 7, and 8 kilobases) by Northern blotting; the most prominent of these was the one 4 kilobases long. This set of mRNAs was induced during the development of bioluminescence in V. harveyi. Furthermore, the same set of mRNAs was synthesized in E. coli by a recombinant plasmid that contained a 12-kilobase pair length of V. harveyi DNA and expressed the genes for the luciferase subunits. A cloned DNA segment corresponding to the major 4-kilobase mRNA coded for the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of luciferase, as well as a 32,000-dalton protein upstream from these genes that could be specifically modified by acyl-coenzyme A and is a component of the bioluminescence system. V. harveyi mRNA that was hybridized to the released from cloned DNA encompassing the luxA and luxB genes was translated in vitro. Luciferase ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits and the 32,000-dalton polypeptide were detected among the products, along with 42,000- and 55,000-dalton polypeptides, which are encoded downstream from the lux genes and are thought to be involved in luminescence.

  17. Interplay of noncoding RNAs, mRNAs, and proteins during the growth of eukaryotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2010-10-15

    Numerous biological functions of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in eukaryotic cells are based primarily on their ability to pair with target mRNAs and then either to prevent translation or to result in rapid degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Using a general model describing this scenario, we show that ncRNAs may help to maintain constant mRNA and protein concentrations during the growth of cells. The possibility of observation of this effect on the global scale is briefly discussed.

  18. Determining exon connectivity in complex mRNAs by nanopore sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Mohan T; Rajadinakaran, Gopinath; Graveley, Brenton R

    2015-01-01

    Short-read high-throughput RNA sequencing, though powerful, is limited in its ability to directly measure exon connectivity in mRNAs that contain multiple alternative exons located farther apart than the maximum read length. Here, we use the Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencer to identify 7,899 'full-length' isoforms expressed from four Drosophila genes, Dscam1, MRP, Mhc, and Rdl. These results demonstrate that nanopore sequencing can be used to deconvolute individual isoforms and that it has the potential to be a powerful method for comprehensive transcriptome characterization. PMID:26420219

  19. Interplay of noncoding RNAs, mRNAs, and proteins during the growth of eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2010-10-01

    Numerous biological functions of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in eukaryotic cells are based primarily on their ability to pair with target mRNAs and then either to prevent translation or to result in rapid degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Using a general model describing this scenario, we show that ncRNAs may help to maintain constant mRNA and protein concentrations during the growth of cells. The possibility of observation of this effect on the global scale is briefly discussed.

  20. Profiles of nuclear and mitochondrial encoded mRNAs in developing and quiescent embryos of Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Hardewig, I; Anchordoguy, T J; Crawford, D L; Hand, S C

    1996-05-24

    Embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana are able to withstand long bouts of environmental anoxia by entering a quiescent state during which metabolism is greatly depressed. Recent evidence supports a global arrest of protein synthesis during quiescence. In this study we measured the amounts of mRNA for a mitochondrial-encoded subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (COX I) and for nuclear-encoded actin during aerobic development, anaerobiosis, and aerobic acidosis (artificial quiescence imposed by intracellular acidification under aerobic conditions). The levels of both COX I and actin transcripts increased significantly during aerobic development. COX I mRNA levels were tightly correlated with previous measures of COX catalytic activity, which suggests that COX synthesis could be regulated by message concentration during aerobic development. The ontogenetic increase for these mRNAs was blocked by anoxia and aerobic acidosis. Importantly, the levels of COX I and actin mRNA did not decline appreciably during the 6 h bouts of quiescence, even though protein synthesis is acutely arrested by these same treatments. Thus, the constancy of mRNA levels during quiescence indicate that reduced protein synthesis is not caused by message limitation, but rather, is likely controlled at the translational level. One advantage of this regulatory mechanism is the conservation of mRNA molecules during quiescence, which would potentially favor a quick resumption of translation as soon as oxygen is returned to the embryos. Finally, because anoxia and aerobic acidosis are both characterized by acidic intracellular pH, the reduction in pH may serve, directly or indirectly, as one signal regulating levels of mRNA in this embryo during quiescence. PMID:8817476

  1. Bacteriophage T4 polynucleotide kinase triggers degradation of mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Sylvain; Richard, Graziella; Bontems, François; Uzan, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4-encoded RegB endoribonuclease is produced during the early stage of phage development and targets mostly (but not exclusively) the Shine–Dalgarno sequences of early genes. In this work, we show that the degradation of RegB-cleaved mRNAs depends on a functional T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNK). The 5′-OH produced by RegB cleavage is phosphorylated by the kinase activity of PNK. This modification allows host RNases G and E, with activity that is strongly stimulated by 5′-monophosphate termini, to attack mRNAs from the 5′-end, causing their destabilization. The PNK-dependent pathway of degradation becomes effective 5 min postinfection, consistent with our finding that several minutes are required for PNK to accumulate after infection. Our work emphasizes the importance of the nature of the 5′ terminus for mRNA stability and depicts a pathway of mRNA degradation with 5′- to 3′-polarity in cells devoid of 5′–3′ exonucleases. It also ascribes a role for T4 PNK during normal phage development. PMID:22499790

  2. Single molecule tracking of quantum dot-labeled mRNAs in a cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihama, Yo; Funatsu, Takashi

    2009-03-27

    Single particle tracking (SPT) is a powerful technique for studying mRNA dynamics in cells. Although SPT of mRNA has been performed by labeling mRNA with fluorescent dyes or proteins, observation of mRNA for long durations with high temporal resolution has been difficult due to weak fluorescence and rapid photobleaching. Using quantum dots (QDs), we succeeded in observing the movement of individual mRNAs for more than 60 s, with a temporal resolution of 30 ms. Intronless and truncated ftz mRNA, synthesized in vitro and labeled with QDs, was microinjected into the nuclei of Cos7 cells. Almost all mRNAs were in motion, and statistical analyses revealed anomalous diffusion between barriers, with a microscopic diffusion coefficient of 0.12 {mu}m{sup 2}/s and a macroscopic diffusion coefficient of 0.025 {mu}m{sup 2}/s. Diffusion of mRNA was observed in interchromatin regions but not in histone2B-GFP-labeled chromatin regions. These results provide direct evidence of channeled mRNA diffusion in interchromatin regions.

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Selective Modulation of microRNAs and mRNAs by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in B Cells Induced to Undergo Class-Switch DNA Recombination and Plasma Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian; Sanchez, Helia N.; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    As we have suggested, epigenetic factors, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), can interact with genetic programs to regulate B cell functions, thereby informing antibody and autoantibody responses. We have shown that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDI) inhibit the differentiation events critical to the maturation of the antibody response: class-switch DNA recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM), and plasma cell differentiation, by modulating intrinsic B cell mechanisms. HDI repress the expression of AID and Blimp-1, which are critical for CSR/SHM and plasma cell differentiation, respectively, in mouse and human B cells by upregulating selected miRNAs that silenced AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 mRNAs, as demonstrated by multiple qRT-PCRs (J Immunol 193:5933–5950, 2014). To further define the selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of miRNA and gene expression, we performed genome-wide miRNA-Seq and mRNA-Seq analysis in B cells stimulated by LPS plus IL-4 and treated with HDI or nil. Consistent with what we have shown using qRT-PCR, these HDI-treated B cells displayed reduced expression of Aicda and Prdm1, and increased expression of miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361, which target Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b, which target Prdm1. In B cells induced to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation, about 23% of over 22,000 mRNAs analyzed were expressed at a significantly high copy number (more than 20 copies/cell). Only 18 (0.36%) of these highly expressed mRNAs, including Aicda, Prdm1, and Xbp1, were downregulated by HDI by 50% or more. Further, only 16 (0.30%) of the highly expressed mRNAs were upregulated (more than twofold) by HDI. The selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of gene expression was emphasized by unchanged expression of the genes that are involved in regulation, targeting, or DNA repair processes of CSR, as well as unchanged expression of the genes encoding epigenetic regulators and factors that are important for cell signaling or

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Selective Modulation of microRNAs and mRNAs by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in B Cells Induced to Undergo Class-Switch DNA Recombination and Plasma Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tian; Sanchez, Helia N; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    As we have suggested, epigenetic factors, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), can interact with genetic programs to regulate B cell functions, thereby informing antibody and autoantibody responses. We have shown that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDI) inhibit the differentiation events critical to the maturation of the antibody response: class-switch DNA recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM), and plasma cell differentiation, by modulating intrinsic B cell mechanisms. HDI repress the expression of AID and Blimp-1, which are critical for CSR/SHM and plasma cell differentiation, respectively, in mouse and human B cells by upregulating selected miRNAs that silenced AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 mRNAs, as demonstrated by multiple qRT-PCRs (J Immunol 193:5933-5950, 2014). To further define the selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of miRNA and gene expression, we performed genome-wide miRNA-Seq and mRNA-Seq analysis in B cells stimulated by LPS plus IL-4 and treated with HDI or nil. Consistent with what we have shown using qRT-PCR, these HDI-treated B cells displayed reduced expression of Aicda and Prdm1, and increased expression of miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361, which target Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b, which target Prdm1. In B cells induced to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation, about 23% of over 22,000 mRNAs analyzed were expressed at a significantly high copy number (more than 20 copies/cell). Only 18 (0.36%) of these highly expressed mRNAs, including Aicda, Prdm1, and Xbp1, were downregulated by HDI by 50% or more. Further, only 16 (0.30%) of the highly expressed mRNAs were upregulated (more than twofold) by HDI. The selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of gene expression was emphasized by unchanged expression of the genes that are involved in regulation, targeting, or DNA repair processes of CSR, as well as unchanged expression of the genes encoding epigenetic regulators and factors that are important for cell signaling or

  5. Selective Translation of Leaderless mRNAs by Specialized Ribosomes Generated by MazF in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Vesper, Oliver; Amitai, Shahar; Belitsky, Maria; Byrgazov, Konstantin; Kaberdina, Anna Chao; Engelberg-Kulka, Hanna; Moll, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Summary Escherichia coli (E. coli) mazEF is a stress-induced toxin-antitoxin (TA) module. The toxin MazF is an endoribonuclease that cleaves single-stranded mRNAs at ACA sequences. Here, we show that MazF cleaves at ACA sites at or closely upstream of the AUG start codon of some specific mRNAs and thereby generates leaderless mRNAs. Moreover, we provide evidence that MazF also targets 16S rRNA within 30S ribosomal subunits at the decoding center, thereby removing 43 nucleotides from the 3′ terminus. As this region comprises the anti-Shine-Dalgarno (aSD) sequence that is required for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs, a subpopulation of ribosomes is formed that selectively translates the described leaderless mRNAs both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, we have discovered a modified translation machinery that is generated in response to MazF induction and that probably serves for stress adaptation in Escherichia coli. PMID:21944167

  6. Enrichment and characterization of the mRNAs of four aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Sellami, M; Rether, B; Gangloff, J; Ebel, J P; Bonnet, J

    1983-01-01

    We have partially purified the messenger RNAs for yeast arginyl-, aspartyl-, valyl-, alpha and beta subunits of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases in order to study their biosynthesis and ultimately, to isolate their genes. Sucrose gradient fractionation of poly U-Sepharose selected mRNAs resulted in a ten fold enrichment of the in vitro translation activity of these mRNAs. The translation products of messenger RNAs for arginyl- and valyl-tRNA synthetases have the same molecular weight as the purified enzymes; translation of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase messenger RNA yielded a 68 kD molecular weight polypeptide (while the purified cristallisable enzyme appears as a 64-66 kD doublet, which, as we showed is a proteolysis product). The translation of the mRNAs for alpha and beta phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase gave polypeptides having the same molecular weight as those obtained from the purified enzyme, but the major translation products are slightly heavier, indicating that they may be translated as precursors. As estimated from centrifugation experiments mRNAs of arginyl-, aspartyl-, alpha and beta subunits of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase were 1700-2000 nucleotides long, indicating that alpha and beta are translated from two different mRNAs. Images PMID:6344009

  7. Identification of alternatively spliced mRNAs encoding potential new regulatory proteins in cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Carpenter, S; Christensen, J; Storgaard, T; Viuff, B; Wannemuehler, Y; Belousov, J; Roth, J A

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction was used to detect and characterize low-abundance bovine leukemia virus (BLV) mRNAs. In infected cattle we could detect spliced mRNA with a splice pattern consistent with a Tax/Rex mRNA, as well as at least four alternatively spliced RNAs. Two of the alternatively spliced mRNAs encoded hitherto unrecognized BLV proteins, designated RIII and GIV. The Tax/Rex and alternatively spliced mRNAs could be detected at their highest levels in BLV-infected cell cultures; the next highest levels were found in samples from calves experimentally infected at 6 weeks postinoculation. Alternatively spliced mRNAs were also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in naturally infected animals; they were detected by a nested polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, the GIV mRNA was specifically detected in naturally infected cows with persistent lymphocytosis and in two of five calves at 6 months after experimental infection with BLV. Furthermore, the calf with the strongest signal for GIV had the highest lymphocyte counts. These data may suggest a correlation between expression of the GIV product and development of persistent lymphocytosis. Some of the donor and acceptor sites in the alternatively spliced mRNAs were highly unusual. The biological mechanisms and significance of such a choice of unexpected splice sites are currently unknown. Images PMID:8380084

  8. miR-190 is upregulated in Epstein-Barr Virus type I latency and modulates cellular mRNAs involved in cell survival and viral reactivation.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Elizabeth M; Shao, Ying; Wang, Yan; Yuan, Yan

    2014-09-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is a prevalent human pathogen infecting over 90% of the population. Much of the success of the virus is attributed to its ability to maintain latency. The detailed mechanisms underlying the establishment and maintenance of EBV latency remain poorly understood. A microRNA profiling study revealed differential expression of many cellular miRNAs between types I and III latency cells, suggesting cellular miRNAs may play roles in regulating EBV latency. mir-190 is the most differentially up-regulated miRNA in type I latency cells as compared with type III latency cells and the up-regulation appears to be attributed to EBER RNAs that express in higher levels in type I latency cells than type III cells. With the aide of a lentiviral overexpression system and microarray analysis, several cellular mRNAs are identified as potential targets of mir-190. By targeting TP53INP1, miR-190 enhances cell survival by preventing apoptosis and relieving G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Additionally, miR-190 down-regulates NR4A3, a cellular immediate-early gene for EBV reactivation, and inhibits the expression of the viral immediate-early gene bzlf1 and viral lytic DNA replication. Taken together, our data revealed a mechanism that EBV utilizes a cellular microRNA to promote host cell survival and prevent virus from entering lytic life cycle for latency maintenance. PMID:25086243

  9. Sequence analysis and compositional properties of untranslated regions of human mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Pesole, G; Fiormarino, G; Saccone, C

    1994-03-25

    A detailed computer analysis of the untranslated regions, 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR, of human mRNA sequences is reported. The compositional properties of these regions, compared with those of the corresponding coding regions, indicate that 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR are less affected by the isochore compartmentalization than the corresponding third codon positions of mRNAs. The presence of higher functional constraints in 5'-UTR is also reported. Dinucleotide analysis shows a depletion of CpG and TpA in both sequences. A search for significant sequence motifs using the WORDUP algorithm reveals the patterns already known to have a functional role in the mRNA UTR, and several other motifs whose functional roles remain to be demonstrated. This type of analysis may be particularly useful for guiding site-directed mutagenesis experiments. In addition, it can be used for assessing the nature of anonymous sequences now produced in large amounts in megabase sequencing projects. PMID:8144029

  10. Targeting cellular mRNAs translation by CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuchen; Chen, Zhicong; He, Anbang; Zhan, Yonghao; Li, Jianfa; Liu, Li; Wu, Hanwei; Zhuang, Chengle; Lin, Junhao; Zhang, Qiaoxia; Huang, Weiren

    2016-01-01

    Recently CRISPR-Cas9 system has been reported to be capable of targeting a viral RNA, and this phenomenon thus raises an interesting question of whether Cas9 can also influence translation of cellular mRNAs. Here, we show that both natural and catalytically dead Cas9 can repress mRNA translation of cellular genes, and that only the first 14 nt in the 5′ end of sgRNA is essential for this process. CRISPR-Cas9 can suppress the protein expression of an unintended target gene without affecting its DNA sequence and causes unexpected phenotypic changes. Using the designed RNA aptamer-ligand complexes which physically obstruct translation machinery, we indicate that roadblock mechanism is responsible for this phenomenon. Our work suggests that studies on Cas9 should avoid the potential off-target effects by detecting the alteration of genes at both the DNA and protein levels. PMID:27405721

  11. Preferential Translation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus mRNAs Is Conferred by Transcription from the Viral Genome▿

    PubMed Central

    Whitlow, Zackary W.; Connor, John H.; Lyles, Douglas S.

    2006-01-01

    Host protein synthesis is inhibited in cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). It has been proposed that viral mRNAs are subjected to the same inhibition but are predominantly translated because of their abundance. To compare translation efficiencies of viral and host mRNAs during infection, we used an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter expressed from a recombinant virus or from the host nucleus in stably transfected cells. Translation efficiency of host-derived EGFP mRNA was reduced more than threefold at eight hours postinfection, while viral-derived mRNA was translated around sevenfold more efficiently than host-derived EGFP mRNA in VSV-infected cells. To test whether mRNAs transcribed in the cytoplasm are resistant to shutoff of translation during VSV infection, HeLa cells were infected with a recombinant simian virus 5 (rSV5) that expressed GFP. Cells were then superinfected with VSV or mock superinfected. GFP mRNA transcribed by rSV5 was not resistant to translation inhibition during superinfection with VSV, indicating that transcription in the cytoplasm is not sufficient for preventing translation inhibition. To determine if cis-acting sequences in untranslated regions (UTRs) were involved in preferential translation of VSV mRNAs, we constructed EGFP reporters with VSV or control UTRs and measured the translation efficiency in mock-infected and VSV-infected cells. The presence of VSV UTRs did not affect mRNA translation efficiency in mock- or VSV-infected cells, indicating that VSV mRNAs do not contain cis-acting sequences that influence translation. However, we found that when EGFP mRNAs transcribed by VSV or by the host were translated in vitro, VSV-derived EGFP mRNA was translated 22 times more efficiently than host-derived EGFP mRNA. This indicated that VSV mRNAs do contain cis-acting structural elements (that are not sequence based), which enhance translation efficiency of viral mRNAs. PMID:17005665

  12. Direct Reprogramming of Human Fibroblasts to Hepatocyte-Like Cells by Synthetic Modified mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Simeonov, Kamen P.; Uppal, Hirdesh

    2014-01-01

    Direct reprogramming by overexpression of defined transcription factors is a promising new method of deriving useful but rare cell types from readily available ones. While the method presents numerous advantages over induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell approaches, a focus on murine conversions and a reliance on retroviral vectors limit potential human applications. Here we address these concerns by demonstrating direct conversion of human fibroblasts to hepatocyte-like cells via repeated transfection with synthetic modified mRNAs. Hepatic induction was achieved with as little as three transcription factor mRNAs encoding HNF1A plus any two of the factors, FOXA1, FOXA3, or HNF4A in the presence of an optimized hepatic growth medium. We show that the absolute necessity of exogenous HNF1A mRNA delivery is explained both by the factor's inability to be activated by any other factors screened and its simultaneous ability to strongly induce expression of other master hepatic transcription factors. Further analysis of factor interaction showed that a series of robust cross-activations exist between factors that induce a hepatocyte-like state. Transcriptome and small RNA sequencing during conversion toward hepatocyte-like cells revealed global preferential activation of liver genes and miRNAs over those associated with other endodermal tissues, as well as downregulation of fibroblast-associated genes. Induced hepatocyte-like cells also exhibited hepatic morphology and protein expression. Our data provide insight into the process by which direct hepatic reprogramming occurs in human cells. More importantly, by demonstrating that it is possible to achieve direct reprogramming without the use of retroviral gene delivery, our results supply a crucial step toward realizing the potential of direct reprogramming in regenerative medicine. PMID:24963715

  13. Annexin II is associated with mRNAs which may constitute a distinct subpopulation.

    PubMed Central

    Vedeler, A; Hollås, H

    2000-01-01

    Protein-mRNA interactions affect mRNA transport, anchorage, stability and translatability in the cytoplasm. During the purification of three subpopulations of polysomes, it was observed that a 36-kDa protein, identified as annexin II, is associated with only one specific population of polysomes, namely cytoskeleton-associated polysomes. This association appears to be calcium-dependent since it was sensitive to EGTA and could be reconstituted in vitro. UV irradiation resulted in partial, EGTA-resistant cross-linking of annexin II to the polysomes. Binding of (32)P-labelled total RNA to proteins isolated from the cytoskeleton-bound polysomes on a NorthWestern blot resulted in a radioactive band having the same mobility as annexin II and, most importantly, purified native annexin II immobilized on nitrocellulose specifically binds mRNA. The mRNA population isolated from cytoskeleton-bound polysomes binds to annexin II with the highest affinity as compared with those isolated from free or membrane-bound polysomes. Interestingly, the annexin II complex, isolated from porcine small intestinal microvilli was a far better substrate for mRNA binding than the complex derived from transformed Krebs II ascites cells. When cytoskeleton-associated polysomes were split into 60 S and 40 S ribosomal subunits, and a peak containing mRNA complexes, annexin II fractionated with the mRNAs. Finally, using affinity purification of mRNA on poly(A)(+)-coupled magnetic beads, annexin II was only detected in association with messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) present in the cytoskeletal fraction (non-polysomal mRNPs). These results, derived from both in vitro experiments and cell fractionation, suggest that annexin II binds directly to the RNA moiety of mRNP complexes containing a specific population of mRNAs. PMID:10839987

  14. Regional heterogeneity of expression of renal NPRs, TonEBP, and AQP-2 mRNAs in rats with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung Ah; Park, Byung Mun; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Soo Mi; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Kim, Won; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2015-07-01

    To understand the pathophysiology of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) - induced acute kidney injury (AKI), the present study defined changes in renal function, plasma renotropic hormones and its receptors in the kidney 2, 5, or 7 days after 45 min-renal ischemia in rats. Blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, and osmolarity increased 2 days after I/R injury and tended to return to control level 7 days after I/R injury. Decreased renal function tended to return to control level 5 days after I/R injury. However, plasma concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide and renin did not change. In control kidney, natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A, -B and -C mRNAs were highly expressed in medulla (ME), inner cortex (IC), and outer cortex (OC), respectively, and tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP), auqaporin-2 (AQP-2) and eNOS mRNAs were highly expressed in ME. NPR-A and -B mRNA expressions were markedly decreased 2 days after I/R injury. On 5 days after I/R injury, NPR-A mRNA expression increased in OC and recovered to control level in IC but not in ME. NPR-B mRNA expression was increased in OC, and recovered to control level in IC and ME. NPR-C mRNA expression was markedly decreased in OC 2 and 5 days after I/R injury. TonEBP, APQ-2 and eNOS mRNA expressions were markedly decreased 2 days after I/R injury and did not recover in ME 7 days after I/R injury. Therefore, we suggest that there is a regional heterogeneity of regulation of renal NPRs, TonEBP, and APQ-2 mRNA in AKI. PMID:25858778

  15. Single-molecule imaging of {beta}-actin mRNAs in the cytoplasm of a living cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Mai; Ishihama, Yo; Shirasaki, Yoshitaka; Kurama, Hideki; Funatsu, Takashi

    2009-04-15

    {beta}-Actin mRNA labeled with an MS2-EGFP fusion protein was expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts and its localization and movement were analyzed by single-molecule imaging. Most {beta}-Actin mRNAs localized to the leading edge, while some others were observed in the perinuclear region. Singe-molecule tracking of individual mRNAs revealed that the majority of mRNAs were in unrestricted Brownian motion at the leading edge and in restricted Brownian motion in the perinuclear region. The macroscopic diffusion coefficient of mRNA (D{sub MACRO}) at the leading edge was 0.3 {mu}m{sup 2}/s. On the other hand, D{sub MACRO} in the perinuclear region was 0.02 {mu}m{sup 2}/s. The destruction of microfilaments with cytochalasin D, which is known to delocalize {beta}-actin mRNAs, led to an increase in D{sub MACRO} to 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2}/s in the perinuclear region. These results suggest that the microstructure, composed of microfilaments, serves as a barrier for the movement of {beta}-actin mRNA.

  16. Deep sequencing shows multiple oligouridylations are required for 3' to 5' degradation of histone mRNAs on polyribosomes.

    PubMed

    Slevin, Michael K; Meaux, Stacie; Welch, Joshua D; Bigler, Rebecca; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Su, Wei; Rhoads, Robert E; Prins, Jan F; Marzluff, William F

    2014-03-20

    Histone mRNAs are rapidly degraded when DNA replication is inhibited during S phase with degradation initiating with oligouridylation of the stem loop at the 3' end. We developed a customized RNA sequencing strategy to identify the 3' termini of degradation intermediates of histone mRNAs. Using this strategy, we identified two types of oligouridylated degradation intermediates: RNAs ending at different sites of the 3' side of the stem loop that resulted from initial degradation by 3'hExo and intermediates near the stop codon and within the coding region. Sequencing of polyribosomal histone mRNAs revealed that degradation initiates and proceeds 3' to 5' on translating mRNA and that many intermediates are capped. Knockdown of the exosome-associated exonuclease PM/Scl-100, but not the Dis3L2 exonuclease, slows histone mRNA degradation consistent with 3' to 5' degradation by the exosome containing PM/Scl-100. Knockdown of No-go decay factors also slowed histone mRNA degradation, suggesting a role in removing ribosomes from partially degraded mRNAs. PMID:24656133

  17. SV40-IMMORTALIZED NON-TUMORIGENIC AND TUMORIGENIC CELL LINES DIFFER IN EXPRESSION OF HALLMARK VIRAL RESPONSE MRNAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SV40-Immortalized Non-Tumorigenic and Tumorigenic Cell Lines Differ in Expression of Hallmark Viral Response mRNAs.

    Prior to the use of an in vitra/in viva transformation system to examine the tumorigenic activity of environmental contaminants, in vitra gene expression pa...

  18. Translation efficiency of adenovirus early region 1A mRNAs deleted in the 5' untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, K R; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    Adenovirus deletion mutants were studied to examine the influence of the 5' untranslated sequence on the translation of early region 1A mRNAs. Alterations of the 5' untranslated sequence, including complete deletion of the wild-type 5' untranslated sequence, did not significantly affect the rate of translation. Images PMID:6471170

  19. Organization of early region 1B of human adenovirus type 2: identification of four differentially spliced mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, A; Pettersson, U

    1985-01-01

    The mRNAs from early region 1B of adenovirus type 2 have been studied by Northern blot, S1 nuclease, and cDNA analysis. Two novel mRNAs, designated 14S and 14.5S, have been observed in addition to the previously identified 9S, 13S, and 22S mRNAs. They are 1.26 and 1.31 kilobases long and differ from the 13S and 22S mRNAs in being composed of three exons instead of two. Their two terminal exons are the same as those present in the 13S mRNA, whereas the middle exon is unique to each of the two novel mRNA species. The structures of the 14S and 14.5S mRNAs allow the prediction of their coding capacities: both mRNA species, like the 22S and 13S mRNAs, contain an uninterrupted translational reading frame encoding a 21,000-molecular-weight (21K) polypeptide. The 14S mRNA can, in addition, encode a 16.5K polypeptide which shares N-terminal and C-terminal sequences with the 55K polypeptide, known to be encoded by the 22S mRNA. The 14.5S mRNA species encodes a hypothetical 9.2K polypeptide which has the same N terminus as the 55K polypeptide but a unique C terminus. The two mRNAs differ in their kinetics of appearance; the 14.5S mRNA is preferentially expressed late after infection in contrast to the 14S mRNA, which is present in approximately equal amounts early and late after infection. Taken together with previously published information the results suggest that early region 1B of adenovirus type 2 encodes five proteins in addition to virion polypeptide IX. These have predicted molecular weights of 55,000, 21,000, 16,500, 9,200, and 8,100. Images PMID:3989911

  20. Mature maternal mRNAs are longer than zygotic ones and have complex degradation kinetics in sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Gildor, Tsvia; Malik, Assaf; Sher, Noa; Ben-Tabou de-Leon, Smadar

    2016-06-01

    Early in embryogenesis, maternally deposited transcripts are degraded and new zygotic transcripts are generated during the maternal to zygotic transition. Recent works have shown that early zygotic transcripts are short compared to maternal transcripts, in zebrafish and Drosophila species. The reduced zygotic transcript length was attributed to the short cell cycle in these organisms that prevents the transcription of long primary transcripts (intron delay). Here we study the length of maternal mRNAs and their degradation kinetics in two sea urchin species to further the understanding of maternal gene usage and processing. Early zygotic primary transcripts and mRNAs are shorter than maternal ones in the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Yet, while primary transcripts length increases when cell cycle lengthens, typical for intron delay, the relatively short length of zygotic mRNAs is consistent. The enhanced mRNA length is due to significantly longer maternal open reading frames and 3'UTRs compared to the zygotic lengths, a ratio that does not change with developmental time. This implies unique usage of both coding sequences and regulatory information in the maternal stage compared to the zygotic stages. We extracted the half-lifetimes due to maternal and zygotic degradation mechanisms from high-density time course of a set of maternal mRNAs in Paracentrotus lividus. The degradation rates due to maternal and zygotic degradation mechanisms are not correlated, indicating that these mechanisms are independent and relay on different regulatory information. Our studies illuminate specific structural and kinetic properties of sea urchin maternal mRNAs that might be broadly shared by other organisms. PMID:27085752

  1. Multiple microRNAs within the 14q32 cluster target the mRNAs of major type 1 diabetes autoantigens IA-2, IA-2β, and GAD65.

    PubMed

    Abuhatzira, Liron; Xu, Huanyu; Tahhan, Georges; Boulougoura, Afroditi; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Notkins, Abner L

    2015-10-01

    Islet antigen (IA)-2, IA-2β, and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65) are major autoantigens in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Autoantibodies to these autoantigens appear years before disease onset and are widely used as predictive markers. Little is known, however, about what regulates the expression of these autoantigens. The present experiments were initiated to test the hypothesis that microRNAs (miRNAs) can target and affect the levels of these autoantigens. Bioinformatics was used to identify miRNAs predicted to target the mRNAs coding IA-2, IA-2β, and GAD65. RNA interference for the miRNA processing enzyme Dicer1 and individual miRNA mimics and inhibitors were used to confirm the effect in mouse islets and MIN6 cells. We show that the imprinted 14q32 miRNA cluster contains 56 miRNAs, 32 of which are predicted to target the mRNAs of T1D autoantigens and 12 of which are glucose-sensitive. Using miRNA mimics and inhibitors, we confirmed that at least 7 of these miRNAs modulate the mRNA levels of the T1D autoantigens. Dicer1 knockdown significantly reduced the mRNA levels of all 3 autoantigens, further confirming the importance of miRNAs in this regulation. We conclude that miRNAs are involved in regulating the expression of the major T1D autoantigens. PMID:26148972

  2. The BTG4 and CAF1 complex prevents the spontaneous activation of eggs by deadenylating maternal mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Michał; Pfender, Sybille; Santhanam, Balaji; Schuh, Melina

    2016-09-01

    Once every menstrual cycle, eggs are ovulated into the oviduct where they await fertilization. The ovulated eggs are arrested in metaphase of the second meiotic division, and only complete meiosis upon fertilization. It is crucial that the maintenance of metaphase arrest is tightly controlled, because the spontaneous activation of the egg would preclude the development of a viable embryo (Zhang et al. 2015 J. Genet. Genomics 42, 477-485. (doi:10.1016/j.jgg.2015.07.004); Combelles et al. 2011 Hum. Reprod. 26, 545-552. (doi:10.1093/humrep/deq363); Escrich et al. 2011 J. Assist. Reprod. Genet. 28, 111-117. (doi:10.1007/s10815-010-9493-5)). However, the mechanisms that control the meiotic arrest in mammalian eggs are only poorly understood. Here, we report that a complex of BTG4 and CAF1 safeguards metaphase II arrest in mammalian eggs by deadenylating maternal mRNAs. As a follow-up of our recent high content RNAi screen for meiotic genes (Pfender et al. 2015 Nature 524, 239-242. (doi:10.1038/nature14568)), we identified Btg4 as an essential regulator of metaphase II arrest. Btg4-depleted eggs progress into anaphase II spontaneously before fertilization. BTG4 prevents the progression into anaphase by ensuring that the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is completely inhibited during the arrest. The inhibition of the APC/C relies on EMI2 (Tang et al. 2010 Mol. Biol. Cell 21, 2589-2597. (doi:10.1091/mbc.E09-08-0708); Ohe et al. 2010 Mol. Biol. Cell 21, 905-913. (doi:10.1091/mbc.E09-11-0974)), whose expression is perturbed in the absence of BTG4. BTG4 controls protein expression during metaphase II arrest by forming a complex with the CAF1 deadenylase and we hypothesize that this complex is recruited to the mRNA via interactions between BTG4 and poly(A)-binding proteins. The BTG4-CAF1 complex drives the shortening of the poly(A) tails of a large number of transcripts at the MI-MII transition, and this wave of deadenylation is essential for the arrest in

  3. Three rat preprotachykinin mRNAs encode the neuropeptides substance P and neurokinin A.

    PubMed Central

    Krause, J E; Chirgwin, J M; Carter, M S; Xu, Z S; Hershey, A D

    1987-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides were used to screen a rat striatal cDNA library for sequences corresponding to the tachykinin peptides substance P and neurokinin A. The cDNA library was constructed from RNA isolated from the rostral portion of the rat corpus striatum, the site of striatonigral cell bodies. Two types of cDNAs were isolated and defined by restriction enzyme analysis and DNA sequencing to encode both substance P and neurokinin A. The two predicted preprotachykinin protein precursors (130 and 115 amino acids in length) differ from each other by a pentadecapeptide sequence between the two tachykinin sequences, and both precursors possess appropriate processing signals for substance P and neurokinin A production. The presence of a third preprotachykinin mRNA of minor abundance in rat striatum was established by S1 nuclease protection experiments. This mRNA encodes a preprotachykinin of 112 amino acids containing substance P but not neurokinin A. These three mRNAs are derived from one rat gene as a result of differential RNA processing; thus, this RNA processing pattern further increases the diversity of products that can be generated from the preprotachykinin gene. Images PMID:2433692

  4. Complete set of mitochondrial pan-edited mRNAs in Leishmania mexicana amazonensis LV78

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Dmitri A.

    2010-01-01

    Editing of mRNA transcribed from the mitochondrial cryptogenes ND8 (G1), ND9 (G2), G3, G4, ND3 (G5), RPS12 (G6) was investigated in Leishmania mexicana amazonensis, strain LV78, by amplification of the cDNA, cloning and sequencing. For each of these genes, extensively and partially edited transcripts were found to be relatively abundant compared to the respective pre-edited molecules. Moreover, the editing patterns observed in a majority of transcripts of each gene were consistent among themselves which allowed for inferring consensus editing sequences. The open reading frames contained in the consensus sequences were predicted to encode polypeptides that were highly similar to their counterparts in other species of Trypanosomatidae. Several kinetoplast DNA minicircles from this species available in the public domain were found to contain genes for guide RNAs which mediate editing of some of the mRNAs. The results indicate that the investigated strain of L. m. amazonensis has preserved its full editing capacity in spite of the long-term maintenance in culture. This property differs drastically from the other Leishmania species which lost some or all of the G1–G5 mRNA editing ability in culture. PMID:20546801

  5. Effect of zinc deficiency of expression of specific mRNAs in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.J.; Kimball, S.R.; Leure-duPree, A.E.; Jefferson, L.S. )

    1991-03-15

    Retinol is released from the liver bound to a specific transport protein, retinol binding protein (RBP), which binds to transthyretin (TTR) to transport retinol to the retinal pigment epithelium for use in the visual cycle. The synthesis of RBP as well as the transport of vitamin A from the liver is especially sensitive to zinc deficiency (ZD). Impaired hepatic synthesis of RBP has been reported in zinc-deficient rats. In the present study, the effect of ZD on the expression of mRNAs in the liver was examined by isolating total RNA from control, pair-fed, and zinc-deficient rats and translating the RNA in a messenger-dependent reticulocyte lysate. The radiolabeled translation products were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography. The amounts of 12 of the approximately 200 radiolabeled translation products which could be distinguished were found to be altered in zinc-deficient compare to control samples. To investigate the expression of a specific mRNA, a cDNA to TTR was employed to probe the RNA samples. Slot blot analysis revealed that TTR mRNA was reduced to 57 {plus minus} 14% of the control in pair-fed rats to 29 {plus minus} 19% of control in zinc-deficient rats. The decrease in TTR mRNA is consistent with the observation that serum TTR is decreased during zinc deficiency caused by cirrhosis.

  6. Discovery of m7G-cap in eukaryotic mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    FURUICHI, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Terminal structure analysis of an insect cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV) genome RNA in the early 1970s at the National Institute of Genetics in Japan yielded a 2′-O-methylated nucleotide in the 5′ end of double-stranded RNA genome. This finding prompted me to add S-adenosyl-L-methionine, a natural methylation donor, to the in vitro transcription reaction of viruses that contain RNA polymerase. This effort resulted in unprecedented mRNA synthesis that generates a unique blocked and methylated 5′ terminal structure (referred later to as “cap” or “m7G-cap”) in the transcription of silkworm CPV and human reovirus and vaccinia viruses that contain RNA polymerase in virus particles. Initial studies with viruses paved the way to discover the 5′-cap m7GpppNm structure present generally in cellular mRNAs of eukaryotes. I participated in those studies and was able to explain the pathway of cap synthesis and the significance of the 5′ cap (and capping) in gene expression processes, including transcription and protein synthesis. In this review article I concentrate on the description of these initial studies that eventually led us to a new paradigm of mRNA capping. PMID:26460318

  7. Accumulation of hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNAs in response to fungal elicitor and infection

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Allan M.; Bell, John N.; Cramer, Carole L.; Bailey, John A.; Varner, Joseph E.; Lamb, Chris J.

    1985-01-01

    Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) are important structural components of plant cell walls and also accumulate in response to infection as an apparent defense mechanism. Accumulation of HRGP mRNA in biologically stressed bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cells was monitored by blot hybridization with 32P-labeled tomato genomic HRGP sequences. Elicitor treatment of suspension-cultured cells caused a marked increase in hybridizable HRGP mRNA. The response was less rapid but more prolonged than that observed for mRNAs encoding enzymes of phytoalexin biosynthesis. HRGP mRNA also accumulated during race:cultivar-specific interactions between bean hypocotyls and the partially biotrophic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the causal agent of anthracnose. In an incompatible interaction (host resistant) there was an early increase in HRGP mRNA correlated with expression of hypersensitive resistance; whereas, in a compatible interaction (host susceptible), marked accumulation of HRGP mRNA occurred as a delayed response at the onset of lesion formation. In both interactions, mRNA accumulation was observed in uninfected cells distant from the site of fungal inoculation, indicating intercellular transmission of an elicitation signal. Images PMID:16593612

  8. Polymorphic CUG repeats in human mRNAs and their effects on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bin; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa; Mathews, Michael B

    2005-01-01

    Expanded CUG repeats in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the gene encoding myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 disease (DM1). The presence of such repeats has been found to impede gene expression at several levels in model systems. We took a bioinformatic approach to survey all human mRNA sequences for polymorphic CUG repeats. Our survey revealed that CUG repeats occur widely in various regions of mRNAs, with higher frequency in protein coding regions than 5'-UTRs or 3'-UTRs. About 30 genes were found to contain CUG repeats that are polymorphic in the number of repeats, suggesting the potential to expand or shrink. However, long polymorphic repeats were restricted to the 3'-UTR of the DMPK gene and the coding region of the ribosomal protein L14 gene. Using cell-free translation systems, we showed that extended CUG repeats can inhibit protein synthesis in vitro in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate, but not in wheat germ extracts, consistent with our previous finding of an interaction of CUG repeats with the protein kinase PKR. In transfected cells, CUG repeats can inhibit gene expression both in cis and in trans. However, observations with PKR-minus cells indicate that these effects are not primarily attributable to the interaction of extended CUG repeats with PKR. Northwestern blotting detected the presence in human cells of more CUG-binding proteins than are currently known. PMID:17114933

  9. Exosomes enriched in stemness/metastatic-related mRNAS promote oncogenic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Marta; Silva, Javier; Herrera, Alberto; Herrera, Mercedes; Peña, Cristina; Martín, Paloma; Gil-Calderón, Beatriz; Larriba, María Jesús; Coronado, Mª José; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Turrión, Víctor S.; Provencio, Mariano; Sánchez, Antonio; Bonilla, Félix; García-Barberán, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells efficiently transfer exosome contents (essentially mRNAs and microRNAs) to other cell types, modifying immune responses, cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we analyzed the exosomes release by breast tumor cells with different capacities of stemness/metastasis based on CXCR4 expression, and evaluated their capacity to generate oncogenic features in recipient cells. Breast cancer cells overexpressing CXCR4 showed an increase in stemness-related markers, and in proliferation, migration and invasion capacities. Furthermore, recipient cells treated with exosomes from CXCR4-cells showed increased in the same abilities. Moreover, inoculation of CXCR4-cell-derived exosomes in immunocompromised mice stimulated primary tumor growth and metastatic potential. Comparison of nucleic acids contained into exosomes isolated from patients revealed a “stemness and metastatic” signature in exosomes of patients with worse prognosis. Finally, our data supported the view that cancer cells with stem-like properties show concomitant metastatic behavior, and their exosomes stimulate tumor progression and metastasis. Exosomes-derived nucleic acids from plasma of breast cancer patients are suitable markers in the prognosis of such patients. PMID:26528758

  10. Exosomes enriched in stemness/metastatic-related mRNAS promote oncogenic potential in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Marta; Silva, Javier; Herrera, Alberto; Herrera, Mercedes; Peña, Cristina; Martín, Paloma; Gil-Calderón, Beatriz; Larriba, María Jesús; Coronado, M Josés; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Turrión, Víctor S; Provencio, Mariano; Sánchez, Antonio; Bonilla, Félix; García-Barberán, Vanesa

    2015-12-01

    Cancer cells efficiently transfer exosome contents (essentially mRNAs and microRNAs) to other cell types, modifying immune responses, cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we analyzed the exosomes release by breast tumor cells with different capacities of stemness/metastasis based on CXCR4 expression, and evaluated their capacity to generate oncogenic features in recipient cells. Breast cancer cells overexpressing CXCR4 showed an increase in stemness-related markers, and in proliferation, migration and invasion capacities. Furthermore, recipient cells treated with exosomes from CXCR4-cells showed increased in the same abilities. Moreover, inoculation of CXCR4-cell-derived exosomes in immunocompromised mice stimulated primary tumor growth and metastatic potential. Comparison of nucleic acids contained into exosomes isolated from patients revealed a "stemness and metastatic" signature in exosomes of patients with worse prognosis. Finally, our data supported the view that cancer cells with stem-like properties show concomitant metastatic behavior, and their exosomes stimulate tumor progression and metastasis. Exosomes-derived nucleic acids from plasma of breast cancer patients are suitable markers in the prognosis of such patients. PMID:26528758

  11. Human proviral mRNAs down regulated in choriocarcinoma encode a zinc finger protein related to Krüppel.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, N; Shimotohno, K; VanLeeuwen, D; Cohen, M

    1990-01-01

    RNA transcripts of the HERV-R (ERV3) human provirus that are abundant in placenta but absent in choriocarcinoma contain nonproviral genomic sequences at their 3' ends. We report here the isolation of cDNA clones of these genomic sequences. The transcripts encode a Krüppel-related zinc finger protein consisting of a unique leader region and more than 12 28-amino-acid finger motifs. Images PMID:2115127

  12. Peptide nucleic acids targeting β-globin mRNAs selectively inhibit hemoglobin production in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Giulia; Gemmo, Chiara; Fabbri, Enrica; Manicardi, Alex; Accardo, Igea; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Finotti, Alessia; Breveglieri, Giulia; Salvatori, Francesca; Borgatti, Monica; Lampronti, Ilaria; Bresciani, Alberto; Altamura, Sergio; Corradini, Roberto; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of hemoglobinopathies, amending altered hemoglobins and/or globins produced in excess is an important part of therapeutic strategies and the selective inhibition of globin production may be clinically beneficial. Therefore the development of drug-based methods for the selective inhibition of globin accumulation is required. In this study, we employed peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to alter globin gene expression. The main conclusion of the present study was that PNAs designed to target adult murine β-globin mRNA inhibit hemoglobin accumulation and erythroid differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells with high efficiency and fair selectivity. No major effects were observed on cell proliferation. Our study supports the concept that PNAs may be used to target mRNAs that, similar to globin mRNAs, are expressed at very high levels in differentiating erythroid cells. Our data suggest that PNAs inhibit the excess production of globins involved in the pathophysiology of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:25405921

  13. Simultaneous Visualization of Multiple mRNAs and Matrix Metalloproteinases in Living Cells Using a Fluorescence Nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei; Yang, Huijun; Li, Na; Yang, Limin; Tang, Bo

    2015-04-13

    Simultaneous monitoring of multiple tumour markers is of great significance for improving the accuracy of early cancer detection. In this study, a fluorescence nanoprobe has been prepared that can simultaneously monitor and visualize multiple mRNAs and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in living cells. Confocal fluorescence imaging results indicate that the nanoprobe could effectively distinguish between cancer cells and normal cells even if one tumour maker of normal cells was overexpressed. Furthermore, it can detect changes in the expression levels of mRNAs and MMPs in living cells. The current approach could provide new tools for early cancer detection and monitoring the changes in expression levels of biomarkers during tumour progression. PMID:25752514

  14. On the nature and differential distribution of mRNAs in hippocampal neurites: implications for neuronal functioning.

    PubMed Central

    Miyashiro, K; Dichter, M; Eberwine, J

    1994-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with a mosaic of cytoplasmic and membrane proteins differentially distributed in axons, dendrites, and somata. In Drosophila and Xenopus, mRNA localization coupled with local translation is a powerful mechanism by which regionalized domains of surface or cytoplasmic proteins are generated. In neurons, there is substantial ultrastructural evidence positing the presence of protein synthetic machinery in neuronal processes, especially at or near postsynaptic sites. There are, however, remarkably few reports of mRNAs localized to these regions. We now present direct evidence that an unexpectedly large number of mRNAs, including members of the glutamate receptor family, second messenger system, and components of the translational control apparatus, are present in individual processes of hippocampal cells in culture. Images PMID:7971965

  15. Competition between splicing and polyadenylation reactions determines which adenovirus region E3 mRNAs are synthesized

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, H.A.; Wold, W.S.M.

    1988-08-01

    Complex transcription units encode multiple mRNAs which arise by alternative processing of a common pre-mRNA precursor. It is not known how the pre-mRNA processing pathways are determined or controlled. The authors are investigating this problem by using the E3 complex transcription unit of adenovirus as a model. Their approach is to construct virus mutants with lesions in E3 and then determine how the mutation affects the accumulation of E3 mRNAs in vivo. They report results which indicate that competition between splicing reactions and polyadenylation reactions occurs in vivo and that this plays an important role in alternative pre-mRNA processing.

  16. Rhn1, a Nuclear Protein, Is Required for Suppression of Meiotic mRNAs in Mitotically Dividing Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hada, Kazumasa; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2012-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, many meiotic mRNAs are transcribed during mitosis and meiosis and selectively eliminated in mitotic cells. However, this pathway for mRNA decay, called the determinant of selective removal (DSR)-Mmi1 system, targets only some of the numerous meiotic mRNAs that are transcribed in mitotic cells. Here we describe Rhn1, a nuclear protein involved in meiotic mRNA suppression in vegetative fission yeast. Rhn1 is homologous to budding yeast Rtt103 and localizes to one or a few discrete nuclear dots in growing vegetative cells. Rhn1 colocalizes with a pre-mRNA 3′-end processing factor, Pcf11, and with the 5′–3′ exoribonuclease, Dhp1; moreover, Rhn1 coimmunoprecipitates with Pcf11. Loss of rhn1 results in elevated sensitivity to high temperature, to thiabendazole (TBZ), and to UV. Interestingly, meiotic mRNAs—including moa1+, mcp5+, and mug96+—accumulate in mitotic rhn1Δ cells. Accumulation of meiotic mRNAs also occurs in strains lacking Lsk1, a kinase that phosphorylates serine 2 (Ser-2) in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and in strains lacking Sen1, an ATP-dependent 5′–3′ RNA/DNA helicase: notably, both Lsk1 and Sen1 have been implicated in termination of Pol II-dependent transcription. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of cids-2, a Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of rhn1+, leads to elevated expression of a germline-specific gene, pgl-1, in somatic cells. These results indicate that Rhn1 contributes to the suppression of meiotic mRNAs in vegetative fission yeast and that the mechanism by which Rhn1 downregulates germline-specific transcripts may be conserved in unicellular and multicellular organisms. PMID:22912768

  17. RNA Sequencing and Proteogenomics Reveal the Importance of Leaderless mRNAs in the Radiation-Tolerant Bacterium Deinococcus deserti

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Arjan; Roche, David; Fernandez, Bernard; Ludanyi, Monika; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Pignol, David; Vallenet, David; Armengaud, Jean; Blanchard, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Deinococcus deserti is a desiccation- and radiation-tolerant desert bacterium. Differential RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed to explore the specificities of its transcriptome. Strikingly, for 1,174 (60%) mRNAs, the transcription start site was found exactly at (916 cases, 47%) or very close to the translation initiation codon AUG or GUG. Such proportion of leaderless mRNAs, which may resemble ancestral mRNAs, is unprecedented for a bacterial species. Proteomics showed that leaderless mRNAs are efficiently translated in D. deserti. Interestingly, we also found 173 additional transcripts with a 5′-AUG or 5′-GUG that would make them competent for ribosome binding and translation into novel small polypeptides. Fourteen of these are predicted to be leader peptides involved in transcription attenuation. Another 30 correlated with new gene predictions and/or showed conservation with annotated and nonannotated genes in other Deinococcus species, and five of these novel polypeptides were indeed detected by mass spectrometry. The data also allowed reannotation of the start codon position of 257 genes, including several DNA repair genes. Moreover, several novel highly radiation-induced genes were found, and their potential roles are discussed. On the basis of our RNA-seq and proteogenomics data, we propose that translation of many of the novel leaderless transcripts, which may have resulted from single-nucleotide changes and maintained by selective pressure, provides a new explanation for the generation of a cellular pool of small peptides important for protection of proteins against oxidation and thus for radiation/desiccation tolerance and adaptation to harsh environmental conditions. PMID:24723731

  18. Inhibition of host protein synthesis and degradation of cellular mRNAs during infection by influenza and herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    Cloned DNA copies of two cellular genes were used to monitor, by blot hybridization, the stability of particular cell mRNAs after infection by influenza virus and herpes virus. The results indicated that the inhibition of host cell protein synthesis that accompanied infection by each virus could be explained by a reduction in the amounts of cellular mRN As in the cytoplasm, and they suggested that this decrease was due to virus-mediated mRNA degradation.

  19. Translating mRNAs strongly correlate to proteins in a multivariate manner and their translation ratios are phenotype specific.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Cui, Yizhi; Jin, Jingjie; Guo, Jiahui; Wang, Guibin; Yin, Xingfeng; He, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Gong

    2013-05-01

    As a well-known phenomenon, total mRNAs poorly correlate to proteins in their abundances as reported. Recent findings calculated with bivariate models suggested even poorer such correlation, whereas focusing on the translating mRNAs (ribosome nascent-chain complex-bound mRNAs, RNC-mRNAs) subset. In this study, we analysed the relative abundances of mRNAs, RNC-mRNAs and proteins on genome-wide scale, comparing human lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells with normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells, respectively. As discovered, a strong correlation between RNC-mRNAs and proteins in their relative abundances could be established through a multivariate linear model by integrating the mRNA length as a key factor. The R(2) reached 0.94 and 0.97 in A549 versus HBE and H1299 versus HBE comparisons, respectively. This correlation highlighted that the mRNA length significantly contributes to the translational modulation, especially to the translational initiation, favoured by its correlation with the mRNA translation ratio (TR) as observed. We found TR is highly phenotype specific, which was substantiated by both pathway analysis and biased TRs of the splice variants of BDP1 gene, which is a key transcription factor of transfer RNAs. These findings revealed, for the first time, the intrinsic and genome-wide translation modulations at translatomic level in human cells at steady-state, which are tightly correlated to the protein abundance and functionally relevant to cellular phenotypes. PMID:23519614

  20. Translating mRNAs strongly correlate to proteins in a multivariate manner and their translation ratios are phenotype specific

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Cui, Yizhi; Jin, Jingjie; Guo, Jiahui; Wang, Guibin; Yin, Xingfeng; He, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Gong

    2013-01-01

    As a well-known phenomenon, total mRNAs poorly correlate to proteins in their abundances as reported. Recent findings calculated with bivariate models suggested even poorer such correlation, whereas focusing on the translating mRNAs (ribosome nascent-chain complex-bound mRNAs, RNC-mRNAs) subset. In this study, we analysed the relative abundances of mRNAs, RNC-mRNAs and proteins on genome-wide scale, comparing human lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells with normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells, respectively. As discovered, a strong correlation between RNC-mRNAs and proteins in their relative abundances could be established through a multivariate linear model by integrating the mRNA length as a key factor. The R2 reached 0.94 and 0.97 in A549 versus HBE and H1299 versus HBE comparisons, respectively. This correlation highlighted that the mRNA length significantly contributes to the translational modulation, especially to the translational initiation, favoured by its correlation with the mRNA translation ratio (TR) as observed. We found TR is highly phenotype specific, which was substantiated by both pathway analysis and biased TRs of the splice variants of BDP1 gene, which is a key transcription factor of transfer RNAs. These findings revealed, for the first time, the intrinsic and genome-wide translation modulations at translatomic level in human cells at steady-state, which are tightly correlated to the protein abundance and functionally relevant to cellular phenotypes. PMID:23519614

  1. Differential expression of pancreatic protein and chemosensing receptor mRNAs in NKCC1-null intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Emily M; Vairamani, Kanimozhi; Shull, Gary E

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the intestinal functions of the NKCC1 Na+-K+-2Cl cotransporter (SLC12a2 gene), differential mRNA expression changes in NKCC1-null intestine were analyzed. METHODS: Microarray analysis of mRNA from intestines of adult wild-type mice and gene-targeted NKCC1-null mice (n = 6 of each genotype) was performed to identify patterns of differential gene expression changes. Differential expression patterns were further examined by Gene Ontology analysis using the online Gorilla program, and expression changes of selected genes were verified using northern blot analysis and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. Histological staining and immunofluorescence were performed to identify cell types in which upregulated pancreatic digestive enzymes were expressed. RESULTS: Genes typically associated with pancreatic function were upregulated. These included lipase, amylase, elastase, and serine proteases indicative of pancreatic exocrine function, as well as insulin and regenerating islet genes, representative of endocrine function. Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that differential expression of exocrine pancreas mRNAs was specific to the duodenum and localized to a subset of goblet cells. In addition, a major pattern of changes involving differential expression of olfactory receptors that function in chemical sensing, as well as other chemosensing G-protein coupled receptors, was observed. These changes in chemosensory receptor expression may be related to the failure of intestinal function and dependency on parenteral nutrition observed in humans with SLC12a2 mutations. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that loss of NKCC1 affects not only secretion, but also goblet cell function and chemosensing of intestinal contents via G-protein coupled chemosensory receptors. PMID:26909237

  2. Novel epididymis-specific mRNAs downregulated by HE6/Gpr64 receptor gene disruption.

    PubMed

    Davies, Ben; Behnen, Martina; Cappallo-Obermann, Heike; Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai; Theuring, Franz; Kirchhoff, Christiane

    2007-05-01

    Targeted disruption of the epididymis-specific HE6/Gpr64 receptor gene in mice led to male infertility. In order to characterize the phenotype at a molecular level, we compared the gene expression patterns of wild type (wt) versus knockout (KO) caput epididymides. The caput region of KO males, although morphologically normal, nevertheless showed an aberrant expression pattern. Combining micro array analysis, differential library screening, Northern blot analysis and quantitative RT-PCR, we found that the knockout of the HE6/Gpr64 receptor was mainly associated with the downregulation of genes specific to the initial segment. The list of KO downregulated transcripts comprised Enpp2/autotaxin, the lipocalins 8 and 9, the beta-defensin Defb42, cystatins 8 and 12, as well as the membrane proteins Adam (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease) 28, claudin-10, EAAC1, and the novel Me9. Clusterin/ApoJ and osteopontin/Spp1 mRNAs, on the other hand, were upregulated in the KO tissues. The Me9 transcript was studied in further detail, and we report here a cluster of related epididymis-specific genes. Me9 is specifically expressed in the initial segment and is representative of a novel and highly conserved mammalian gene family. The family consists of single-exon genes only; intron-containing paralogs have not yet been ascertained. The cloned cDNA sequences predicted hydrophobic polytopic membrane proteins containing the DUF716 motif. Protein expression was shown in the rodent caput epididymidis but remained uncertain in primates. PMID:17034053

  3. Norepinephrine triggers metaplasticity of LTP by increasing translation of specific mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Maity, Sabyasachi; Rah, Sean; Sonenberg, Nahum; Gkogkas, Christos G; Nguyen, Peter V

    2015-10-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is a key modulator of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, a brain structure crucially involved in memory formation. NE boosts synaptic plasticity mostly through initiation of signaling cascades downstream from beta (β)-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs). Previous studies demonstrated that a β-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol, can modify the threshold for long-term potentiation (LTP), a putative cellular mechanism for learning and memory, in a process known as "metaplasticity." Metaplasticity is the ability of synaptic plasticity to be modified by prior experience. We asked whether NE itself could engage metaplastic mechanisms in area CA1 of mouse hippocampal slices. Using extracellular field potential recording and stimulation, we show that application of NE (10 µM), which did not alter basal synaptic strength, enhances the future maintenance of LTP elicited by subthreshold, high-frequency stimulation (HFS: 1 × 100 Hz, 1 sec). HFS applied 30 min after NE washout induced long-lasting (>4 h) LTP, which was significantly extended in duration relative to HFS alone. This NE-induced metaplasticity required β1-AR activation, as coapplication of the β1-receptor antagonist CGP-20712A (1 µM) attenuated maintenance of LTP. We also found that NE-mediated metaplasticity was translation- and transcription-dependent. Polysomal profiles of CA1 revealed increased translation rates for specific mRNAs during NE-induced metaplasticity. Thus, activation of β-ARs by NE primes synapses for future long-lasting plasticity on time scales extending beyond fast synaptic transmission; this may facilitate neural information processing and the subsequent formation of lasting memories. PMID:26373828

  4. Most mammalian mRNAs are conserved targets of microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robin C.; Farh, Kyle Kai-How; Burge, Christopher B.; Bartel, David P.

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous RNAs that pair to sites in mRNAs to direct post-transcriptional repression. Many sites that match the miRNA seed (nucleotides 2–7), particularly those in 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs), are preferentially conserved. Here, we overhauled our tool for finding preferential conservation of sequence motifs and applied it to the analysis of human 3′UTRs, increasing by nearly threefold the detected number of preferentially conserved miRNA target sites. The new tool more efficiently incorporates new genomes and more completely controls for background conservation by accounting for mutational biases, dinucleotide conservation rates, and the conservation rates of individual UTRs. The improved background model enabled preferential conservation of a new site type, the “offset 6mer,” to be detected. In total, >45,000 miRNA target sites within human 3′UTRs are conserved above background levels, and >60% of human protein-coding genes have been under selective pressure to maintain pairing to miRNAs. Mammalian-specific miRNAs have far fewer conserved targets than do the more broadly conserved miRNAs, even when considering only more recently emerged targets. Although pairing to the 3′ end of miRNAs can compensate for seed mismatches, this class of sites constitutes less than 2% of all preferentially conserved sites detected. The new tool enables statistically powerful analysis of individual miRNA target sites, with the probability of preferentially conserved targeting (PCT) correlating with experimental measurements of repression. Our expanded set of target predictions (including conserved 3′-compensatory sites), are available at the TargetScan website, which displays the PCT for each site and each predicted target. PMID:18955434

  5. Identification of mRNAs with enhanced expression in ripening strawberry fruit using polymerase chain reaction differential display.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, J Q; Lanahan, M B; Conner, T W; Klee, H J

    1995-03-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex developmental process that involves specific changes in gene expression and cellular metabolism. In climateric fruits these events are coordinated by the gaseous hormone ethylene, which is synthesized autocatalytically in the early stages of ripening. Nonclimacteric fruits do not synthesize or respond to ethylene in this manner, yet undergo many of the same physiological and biochemical changes associated with the production of a ripe fruit. To gain insight into the molecular determinants associated with nonclimacteric fruit ripening, we examined mRNA populations in ripening strawberry fruit using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) differential display. Five mRNAs with ripening-enhanced expression were identified using this approach. Three of the mRNAs appear to be fruit-specific, with little or no expression detected in vegetative tissues. Sequence analysis of cDNA clones revealed positive identities for three of the five mRNAs based on homology to known proteins. These results indicate that the differential display technique can be a useful tool to study fruit ripening and other developmental processes in plants at the RNA level. PMID:7766892

  6. Two Chlamydomonas OPR proteins stabilize chloroplast mRNAs encoding small subunits of photosystem II and cytochrome b6 f.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Johnson, Xenie; Cavaiuolo, Marina; Bohne, Alexandra-Viola; Nickelsen, Joerg; Vallon, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In plants and algae, chloroplast gene expression is controlled by nucleus-encoded proteins that bind to mRNAs in a specific manner, stabilizing mRNAs or promoting their splicing, editing, or translation. Here, we present the characterization of two mRNA stabilization factors of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which both belong to the OctotricoPeptide Repeat (OPR) family. MCG1 is necessary to stabilize the petG mRNA, encoding a small subunit of the cytochrome b6 f complex, while MBI1 stabilizes the psbI mRNA, coding for a small subunit of photosystem II. In the mcg1 mutant, the small RNA footprint corresponding to the 5'-end of the petG transcript is reduced in abundance. In both cases, the absence of the small subunit perturbs assembly of the cognate complex. Whereas PetG is essential for formation of a functional cytochrome b6 f dimer, PsbI appears partly dispensable as a low level of PSII activity can still be measured in its absence. Thus, nuclear control of chloroplast gene expression is not only exerted on the major core subunits of the complexes, but also on small subunits with a single transmembrane helix. While OPR proteins have thus far been involved in translation or trans-splicing of plastid mRNAs, our results expand the potential roles of this repeat family to their stabilization. PMID:25898982

  7. Rotavirus Prevents the Expression of Host Responses by Blocking the Nucleocytoplasmic Transport of Polyadenylated mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Rosa M.; Mora, Silvia I.; Romero, Pedro; Arias, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important agent of severe gastroenteritis in young children. Early in infection, these viruses take over the host translation machinery, causing a severe shutoff of cell protein synthesis while viral proteins are efficiently synthesized. In infected cells, there is an accumulation of the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein in the nucleus, induced by the viral protein NSP3. Here we found that poly(A)-containing mRNAs also accumulate and become hyperadenylated in the nuclei of infected cells. Using reporter genes bearing the untranslated regions (UTRs) of cellular or viral genes, we found that the viral UTRs do not determine the efficiency of translation of mRNAs in rotavirus-infected cells. Furthermore, we showed that while a polyadenylated reporter mRNA directly delivered into the cytoplasm of infected cells was efficiently translated, the same reporter introduced as a plasmid that needs to be transcribed and exported to the cytoplasm was poorly translated. Altogether, these results suggest that nuclear retention of poly(A)-containing mRNAs is one of the main strategies of rotavirus to control cell translation and therefore the host antiviral and stress responses. PMID:23536677

  8. Identification of mRNAs differentially expressed in quiescence or in late G1 phase of the cell cycle in human breast cancer cells by using the differential display method.

    PubMed Central

    Alpan, R. S.; Sparvero, S.; Pardee, A. B.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The decision for a cell to enter the DNA synthesis (S) phase of the cell cycle or to arrest in quiescence is likely to be determined by genes expressed in the late G1 phase, at the restriction point. Loss of restriction point control is associated with malignant cellular transformation and cancer. For this reason, identifying genes that are differentially expressed in late G1 phase versus quiescence is important for understanding the molecular basis of normal and malignant growth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The differential display (DD) method detects mRNA species that are different between sets of mammalian cells, allowing their recovery and cloning of the corresponding cDNAs. Using this technique, we compared mRNAs from synchronized human breast cancer cells (21 PT) in quiescence and in late G1. RESULTS: Six mRNAs differentially expressed in late G1 or in quiescence were identified. One mRNA expressed 10 hr after serum induction showed 99% homology to a peptide transporter involved in antigen presentation of the class I major histocompatibility complex (TAP-1) mRNA. Another mRNA expressed specifically in quiescence and down-regulated 2 hr following serum induction showed 98% homology to human NADP+ -dependent cytoplasmic malic enzyme (EC1.1.1.40) mRNA, which is an important enzyme in fatty acid synthesis and lipogenesis. Three others showed high homology to different mRNAs in the GeneBank, corresponding to genes having unknown functions. Finally, one mRNA revealed no significant homology to known genes in the GeneBank. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that DD is an efficient and powerful method for the identification of growth-related genes which may have a role in cancer development. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:8827717

  9. Nuclear accumulation of mRNAs underlies G4C2-repeat-induced translational repression in a cellular model of C9orf72 ALS.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Simona; Serrano, Alessia; Gerbino, Valeria; Giorgi, Alessandra; Di Francesco, Laura; Nencini, Monica; Bozzo, Francesca; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Bagni, Claudia; Cestra, Gianluca; Carrì, Maria Teresa; Achsel, Tilmann; Cozzolino, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    A common feature of non-coding repeat expansion disorders is the accumulation of RNA repeats as RNA foci in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm of affected cells. These RNA foci can be toxic because they sequester RNA-binding proteins, thus affecting various steps of post-transcriptional gene regulation. However, the precise step that is affected by C9orf72 GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansion, the major genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is still poorly defined. In this work, we set out to characterise these mechanisms by identifying proteins that bind to C9orf72 RNA. Sequestration of some of these factors into RNA foci was observed when a (G4C2)31 repeat was expressed in NSC34 and HeLa cells. Most notably, (G4C2)31 repeats widely affected the distribution of Pur-alpha and its binding partner fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMRP, also known as FMR1), which accumulate in intra-cytosolic granules that are positive for stress granules markers. Accordingly, translational repression is induced. Interestingly, this effect is associated with a marked accumulation of poly(A) mRNAs in cell nuclei. Thus, defective trafficking of mRNA, as a consequence of impaired nuclear mRNA export, might affect translation efficiency and contribute to the pathogenesis of C9orf72 ALS. PMID:25788698

  10. Notch and Delta mRNAs in early-stage and mid-stage Drosophila embryos exhibit complementary patterns of protein producing potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Andrew; Wesley, Uma; Wesley, Cedric

    2010-01-01

    Notch and Delta proteins generate Notch signaling that specifies cell fates during animal development. There is an intriguing phenomenon in Drosophila embryogenesis that has not received much attention and whose significance to embryogenesis is unknown. Notch and Delta mRNAs expressed in early-stage embryos are shorter than their counterparts in mid-stage embryos. We show here that the difference in sizes is due to mRNA 3′ processing at alternate polyadenylation sites. While the early-stage Notch mRNA has a lower protein-producing potential than the mid-stage Notch mRNA, the early-stage Delta mRNA has a higher protein-producing potential than the mid-stage Delta mRNA. Our data can explain the complementary patterns of Notch and Delta protein levels in early-stage and mid-stage embryos. Our data also raise the possibility that the manner and regulation of Notch signaling change in the course of embryogenesis and that this change is effected by 3′ UTR and mRNA 3′ processing factors. PMID:20201103

  11. Occurrence of androgen and estrogen receptor mRNAs in the harderian gland: a comparative survey.

    PubMed

    Varriale, B

    1996-06-01

    In Rana esculenta the presence of an androgen receptor in both the male and female Harderian gland (HG) has been demonstrated. Hybridization analysis has evidenced a high degree of homology between the rat androgen receptor cDNA and the frog androgen receptor mRNA (fARmRNA). Correspondingly the molecular size of fARmRNA is similar to those described in mammals (9.4 kb). In in vivo experiments testosterone (T) increases the levels of fARmRNA. The use of the antiandrogen alone or in combination with T prevents the increase of fARmRNA. In the control animals a loss of fARmRNA has been observed. In primary cultures of HG cells, the steady-state levels of fARmRNA increase in the cells exposed to T. These results suggest that T exerts an autoinduction on its own receptor, increasing the levels of fARmRNA. In Xenopus laevis the HG shows a sexual dimorphism of the protein pattern. The female shows two major proteins (210 and 180 kDa). Administration of estradiol to the male shifts the protein pattern into the female one. In this respect an estrogen receptor mRNA (ERmRNA) has been found in the female gland and can be induced in the male one. No ARmRNA has been detected in either sexes. A similar sex dimorphism has been found in Gallus domesticus. The female pattern is characterised by a protein fraction of about 210 kDa, the male one by a protein fraction of about 180 kDa. In 4-day-old chicks no sex differences have been found. An ERmRNA is expressed in the female, while no ARmRNA has been detected in both sexes. Neither AR nor ER mRNAs have been detected in the chick HG. Among mammals the HG or the hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) shows an androgen-dependent sex dimorphism. In in vitro experiments T 10(-12) M induces a onefold increase of ARm-RNA with respect to unexposed cells. This effect reaches its maximum (4.4-fold) when cells are exposed to T 10(-8) M. The size of the hamster ARmRNA is similar to that observed in other mammals (9.5 kb). The above results suggest that

  12. Cross-talks between microRNAs and mRNAs in pancreatic tissues of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, CAIMING; OUYANG, XIAOXI; LV, QING; ZHANG, YAOU; XIE, WEIDONG

    2015-01-01

    Network cross-talks between microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNAs may be useful to elucidate the pathological mechanisms of pancreatic islet cells in diabetic individuals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cross-talks between miRNAs and mRNAs in pancreatic tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice through microarray and bioinformatic methods. Based on the miRNA microarray, 64 upregulated and 72 downregulated miRNAs were observed in pancreatic tissues in diabetic mice compared to the normal controls. Based on the mRNA microarrray, 507 upregulated mRNAs and 570 downregulated mRNAs were identified in pancreatic tissues in diabetic mice compared to the normal controls. Notably, there were 246 binding points between upregulated miRNA and downregulated mRNAs; simultaneously, there were 583 binding points between downregulated miRNA and upregulated mRNAs. These changed mRNA may potentially involve the following signaling pathways: Insulin secretion, pancreatic secretion, mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway, forkhead box O signaling pathway and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-protein kinase B signaling. The fluctuating effects of miRNAs and matched mRNAs indicated that miRNAs may have wide cross-talks with mRNAs in pancreatic tissues of type 1 diabetic mice. The cross-talks may play important roles in contributing to impaired islet functions and the development of diabetes. However, further functional validation should be conducted in the future. PMID:26137232

  13. The RNA Binding Protein Tudor-SN Is Essential for Stress Tolerance and Stabilizes Levels of Stress-Responsive mRNAs Encoding Secreted Proteins in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    dit Frey, Nicolas Frei; Muller, Philippe; Jammes, Fabien; Kizis, Dimosthenis; Leung, Jeffrey; Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Bianchi, Michele Wolfe

    2010-01-01

    Tudor-SN (TSN) copurifies with the RNA-induced silencing complex in animal cells where, among other functions, it is thought to act on mRNA stability via the degradation of specific dsRNA templates. In plants, TSN has been identified biochemically as a cytoskeleton-associated RNA binding activity. In eukaryotes, it has recently been identified as a conserved primary target of programmed cell death–associated proteolysis. We have investigated the physiological role of TSN by isolating null mutations for two homologous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. The double mutant tsn1 tsn2 displays only mild growth phenotypes under nonstress conditions, but germination, growth, and survival are severely affected under high salinity stress. Either TSN1 or TSN2 alone can complement the double mutant, indicating their functional redundancy. TSN accumulates heterogeneously in the cytosol and relocates transiently to a diffuse pattern in response to salt stress. Unexpectedly, stress-regulated mRNAs encoding secreted proteins are significantly enriched among the transcripts that are underrepresented in tsn1 tsn2. Our data also reveal that TSN is important for RNA stability of its targets. These findings show that TSN is essential for stress tolerance in plants and implicate TSN in new, potentially conserved mechanisms acting on mRNAs entering the secretory pathway. PMID:20484005

  14. Increased food intake stimulates GnRH-I, glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit and follistatin mRNAs, and ovarian follicular numbers in laying broiler breeder hens.

    PubMed

    Ciccone, N A; Dunn, I C; Sharp, P J

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study, in 36 week-old laying broiler breeder hens, was to establish the effects on reproductive neuroendocrine gene expression of reinstating ad libitum food intake after moderate food restriction from 2 weeks of age. Seven days of ad libitum feeding increased the number of large pre-ovulatory ovarian follicles and gonadotropin releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I), glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit and follistatin mRNAs. Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) was also increased while plasma follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was reduced. There were no associated changes in gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), LHbeta or FSHbeta mRNAs. The mechanism underlying the increased expression of alpha-subunit and follistatin mRNAs was investigated in vitro by incubating pituitary fragments with pulses of GnRH-I. This treatment increased alpha-subunit and follistatin mRNAs but did not affect gonadotropin beta-subunit mRNAs. It is concluded that lifting food restriction in laying hens increases GnRH-I gene transcription or mRNA stability which may be a consequence, or cause of increased GnRH-I release. This, in turn, increases glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit and follistatin mRNAs, resulting in increased plasma LH and decreased plasma FSH, respectively. PMID:16737793

  15. Expression Profiling of Differentiating Eosinophils in Bone Marrow Cultures Predicts Functional Links between MicroRNAs and Their Target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Eyers, Fiona; Xiang, Yang; Guo, Man; Young, Ian G.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate complex transcriptional networks underpin immune responses. However, little is known about the specific miRNA networks that control differentiation of specific leukocyte subsets. In this study, we profiled miRNA expression during differentiation of eosinophils from bone marrow (BM) progenitors (bmEos), and correlated expression with potential mRNA targets involved in crucial regulatory functions. Profiling was performed on whole BM cultures to document the dynamic changes in miRNA expression in the BM microenvironment over the differentiation period. miRNA for network analysis were identified in BM cultures enriched in differentiating eosinophils, and chosen for their potential ability to target mRNA of factors that are known to play critical roles in eosinophil differentiation pathways or cell identify. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified 68 miRNAs with expression patterns that were up- or down- regulated 5-fold or more during bmEos differentiation. By employing TargetScan and MeSH databases, we identified 348 transcripts involved in 30 canonical pathways as potentially regulated by these miRNAs. Furthermore, by applying miRanda and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA), we identified 13 specific miRNAs that are temporally associated with the expression of IL-5Rα and CCR3 and 14 miRNAs associated with the transcription factors GATA-1/2, PU.1 and C/EBPε. We have also identified 17 miRNAs that may regulate the expression of TLRs 4 and 13 during eosinophil differentiation, although we could identify no miRNAs targeting the prominent secretory effector, eosinophil major basic protein. Conclusions/Significance This is the first study to map changes in miRNA expression in whole BM cultures during the differentiation of eosinophils, and to predict functional links between miRNAs and their target mRNAs for the regulation of eosinophilopoiesis. Our findings provide an important resource that will

  16. Toward the mechanism of eIF4F-mediated ribosomal attachment to mammalian capped mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Parimal; Hellen, Christopher U T; Pestova, Tatyana V

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal attachment to mammalian capped mRNAs is achieved through the cap-eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-eIF4G-eIF3-40S chain of interactions, but the mechanism by which mRNA enters the mRNA-binding channel of the 40S subunit remains unknown. To investigate this process, we recapitulated initiation on capped mRNAs in vitro using a reconstituted translation system. Formation of initiation complexes at 5'-terminal AUGs was stimulated by the eIF4E-cap interaction and followed "the first AUG" rule, indicating that it did not occur by backward scanning. Initiation complexes formed even at the very 5' end of mRNA, implying that Met-tRNAi (Met) inspects mRNA from the first nucleotide and that initiation does not have a "blind spot." In assembled initiation complexes, the cap was no longer associated with eIF4E. Omission of eIF4A or disruption of eIF4E-eIF4G-eIF3 interactions converted eIF4E into a specific inhibitor of initiation on capped mRNAs. Taken together, these results are consistent with the model in which eIF4E-eIF4G-eIF3-40S interactions place eIF4E at the leading edge of the 40S subunit, and mRNA is threaded into the mRNA-binding channel such that Met-tRNAi (Met) can inspect it from the first nucleotide. Before entering, eIF4E likely dissociates from the cap to overcome steric hindrance. We also found that the m(7)G cap specifically interacts with eIF3l. PMID:27401559

  17. Polyadenylated and 3' processed mRNAs are transcribed from the mouse histone H2A.X gene.

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, T; Kato, T; Morita, T; Nozaki, M; Kubota, H; Yagi, H; Matsushiro, A

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a mouse histone H2A.X from a cDNA library of teratocarcinoma F9 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of this clone is 97% identical to human histone H2A.X. The first 119 residues of the mouse H2A.X were very similar (96-97%) to those of the major H2A histones (H2A.1 and H2A.2) of mouse and the long carboxy terminal sequence of H2A.X was homologous with those of several lower eukaryotes. Northern blot analysis revealed that this cDNA hybridized with two mRNAs in different sizes, 0.5 kb and 1.4 kb. The two mRNAs were present in tissue culture cells, and in spleen, thymus and testes of mice, but the ratio of abundance of the two transcripts differed in different cells and tissues. The shorter mRNA contained the highly conserved palindromic sequence typical of the 3' end of replication-dependent histone genes. The amount of this transcript was coupled to DNA synthesis and rapidly decreased in culture cells. It was synthesized just after the beginning of S-phase and degraded just after the end of S-phase. On the other hand, the longer mRNA was polyadenylated at 0.9 kb downstream from the palindromic sequence. This transcript was very stable when compared with the shorter one. These results indicate that these two mRNAs are transcribed from a single gene and maintained differently during the cell cycle, perhaps to maintain a partially replication-dependent level of histone H2A.X. Images PMID:2041781

  18. Hypothalamic Expression of Melanocortin-4 Receptor and Agouti-related Peptide mRNAs During the Estrous Cycle of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Mohammad Reza; Jafarzadeh Shirazi, Mohammad Reza; Tamadon, Amin; Akhlaghi, Amir; Salehi, Mohammad Saied; Niazi, Ali; Moghadam, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Melanocortin- 4 receptor (MC4R) and agouti- related peptide (AgRP) are involved in energy homeostasis in rats. According to MC4R and AgRP effects on luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, they may influence the estrous cycle of rats. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of MC4R and AgRP mRNAs at different stages of estrous cycle in the rat’s hypothalamus. The estrous cycle stages (proestrus, estrus, metestrus and diestrus) were determined in 20 adult female rats using vaginal smears. The rats were divided into four equal groups (n=5). Four ovariectomized rats were selected as controls two weeks after surgery. Using real- time PCR, relative expressions (compared to controls) of MC4R and AgRP mRNAs in the hypothalamus of rats were compared in four different groups of estrous cycle. The relative expression of MC4R mRNA in the hypothalamus of female rats during proestrus stage was higher than those in other stages (P=0.001). Despite a lower mean of relative expression of AgRP mRNA at proestrus stage, the relative expression of AgRP mRNA of the four stages of estrous cycle did not differ (P>0.05). In conclusion, changes in the relative expression of MC4R and AgRP mRNAs in four stages of rat estrous cycle indicated a stimulatory role of MC4R in the proestrus and preovulatory stages and an inhibitory role of AgRP in gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and LH secretions. PMID:25317405

  19. Dopamine Receptor Gene Expression in Human Amygdaloid Nuclei: Elevated D4 Receptor mRNAs in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Lianbin; Szebeni, Katalin; Szebeni, Attila; Klimek, Violetta; Stockmeier, Craig A; Karolewicz, Beata; Kalbfleisch, John; Ordway, Gregory A

    2008-01-01

    Previous findings from this laboratory demonstrating changes in dopamine (DA) transporter and D2 receptors in the amygdaloid complex of subjects with major depression indicate that disruption of dopamine neurotransmission to the amygdala may contribute to behavioral symptoms associated with depression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to investigate the regional distribution of gene expression of DA receptors in the human amygdala. In addition, relative levels of mRNA of DA receptors in the basal amygdaloid nucleus were measured postmortem in subjects with major depression and normal control subjects. All five subtypes of DA receptor mRNA were detected in all amygdaloid subnuclei, although D1, D2, and D4 receptor mRNAs were more abundant than D3 and D5 mRNAs by an order of magnitude. The highest level of D1 mRNA was found in the central nucleus, whereas D2 mRNA was the most abundant in the basal nucleus. Levels of D4 mRNA were highest in the basal and central nuclei. In the basal nucleus, amounts of D4, but not D1 or D2, mRNAs were significantly higher in subjects with major depression and depressed suicide victims, as compared to control subjects. These findings demonstrate that the D1, D2 and D4 receptors are the major subtypes of DA receptors in the human amygdala. Elevated DA receptor gene expression in depressive subjects further implicates altered dopaminergic transmission in the amygdala in depression. PMID:18371940

  20. Constitutive expression of various xenobiotic and endobiotic transporter mRNAs in the choroid plexus of rats.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Supratim; Cherrington, Nathan J; Li, Ning; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively determine the constitutive expression levels of various transporter mRNAs in rat choroid plexus. To provide a reference for the relative expression levels, the expression of various transporter mRNAs in choroid plexus were compared with that in liver, kidney, and ileum. The mRNA levels of multidrug resistance protein (Mrp)1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6; multidrug resistance (Mdr)1a, 1b, and 2; organic anion transporting polypeptide (Oatp)1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 12, and Oat-K (1/2); organic anion transporter (Oat)1, 2, and 3; organic cation transporter (Oct)1, 2, 3, N1, and N2; bile acid transporters sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp), bile salt excretory protein (Bsep), and ileal bile acid transporter (Ibat); divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), Menke's and Wilson's metal transporters; equilibrative nucleotide transporters (Ent) 1 and 2, and constitutive nucleotide transporters (Cnt)1 and 2; peptide transporters (Pept)1 and 2; as well as ATP-binding cassette (Abc)G5 and 8 were measured in choroid plexus by the branched DNA signal amplification method. Mrp1, 4, and 5, Oatp3, Menke's transporter, DMT1, Ent1, and Pept2 mRNAs were expressed in choroid plexus at higher levels than in liver, kidney, or ileum. OctN1 and N2, Oatp2, Oat2 and 3, and Cnt1 and 2 mRNAs expressions were detectable in choroid plexus, but the levels were lower compared with that in liver, kidney, or ileum. The remaining transporters [Mrp2, Mrp3, Oct1, Oct2, Oatp1, Oatp4, Oatp5, Oatp12, Oat-K (1/2), Ntcp, Bsep, Ibat, Mdr1a, Mdr1b, Mdr2, Oat1, Ent2, Pept1, AbcG5, AbcG8] were expressed at very low levels in choroid plexus. The constitutive expression levels of different transporters in choroid plexus may provide an insight into the range of xenobiotics that can potentially be transported by the choroid plexus, thereby providing a means of xenobiotic detoxification in the brain. PMID:14570765

  1. Stress and Withdrawal from Chronic Ethanol Induce Selective Changes in Neuroimmune mRNAs in Differing Brain Sites.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Darin J; Harper, Kathryn M; Whitman, Buddy A; Zimomra, Zachary; Breese, George R

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a strong risk factor in alcoholic relapse and may exert effects that mimic aspects of chronic alcohol exposure on neurobiological systems. With the neuroimmune system becoming a prominent focus in the study of the neurobiological consequences of stress, as well as chronic alcohol exposure proving to be a valuable focus in this regard, the present study sought to compare the effects of stress and chronic ethanol exposure on induction of components of the neuroimmune system. Rats were exposed to either 1 h exposure to a mild stressor (restraint) or exposure to withdrawal from 15 days of chronic alcohol exposure (i.e., withdrawal from chronic ethanol, WCE) and assessed for neuroimmune mRNAs in brain. Restraint stress alone elevated chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mRNAs in the cerebral cortex within 4 h with a return to a control level by 24 h. These increases were not accompanied by an increase in corresponding proteins. Withdrawal from WCE also elevated cytokines, but did so to varying degrees across different cytokines and brain regions. In the cortex, stress and WCE induced CCL2, TNFα, IL-1β, and TLR4 mRNAs. In the hypothalamus, only WCE induced cytokines (CCL2 and IL-1β) while in the hippocampus, WCE strongly induced CCL2 while stress and WCE induced IL-1β. In the amygdala, only WCE induced CCL2. Finally-based on the previously demonstrated role of corticotropin-releasing factor 1 (CRF1) receptor inhibition in blocking WCE-induced cytokine mRNAs-the CRF1 receptor antagonist CP154,526 was administered to a subgroup of stressed rats and found to be inactive against induction of CCL2, TNFα, or IL-1β mRNAs. These differential results suggest that stress and WCE manifest broad neuroimmune effects in brain depending on the cytokine and brain region, and that CRF inhibition may not be a relevant mechanism in non-alcohol exposed animals. Overall, these

  2. Characterization and differential expression patterns of conserved microRNAs and mRNAs in three genders of the rice field eel (Monopterus albus).

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Guo, Wei; Hu, Qing; Zou, Ming; Tang, Rong; Chi, Wei; Li, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs that can regulate target mRNAs by binding to their sequences in the 3' untranslated region. The expression of miRNAs and their biogenetic pathway are involved in sexual differentiation and in the regulation of the development of germ cells and gonadal somatic cells. The rice field eel (Monopterus albus) undergoes a natural sexual transformation from female to male via an intersex stage during its life cycle. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of this sexual transformation, miRNAs present in the different sexual stages of the rice field eel were identified by high-throughput sequencing technology. A significantly differential expression among the 3 genders (p < 0.001) was observed for 48 unique miRNAs and 3 miRNAs*. Only 9 unique miRNAs showed a more than 8-fold change in their expression among the 3 genders, including mal-miR-430a and mal-miR-430c which were higher in females than in males. However, mal-miR-430b was only detected in males. Several potential miRNA target genes (cyp19a, cyp19b, nr5a1b, foxl2 amh, and vasa) were also investigated. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated highly specific expression patterns of these genes in the 3 genders of the rice field eel. Many of these genes are targets of mal-miR-430b according to the TargetScan and miRTarBase. These results suggest that the miR-430 family may be involved in the sexual transformation of the rice field eel. PMID:25427634

  3. Regulation of protein synthesis during sea urchin early development

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    Fertilization of the sea urchin egg results in a 20-40 fold increase in the rate of protein synthesis. The masked message hypothesis proposes that mRNAs are masked or unavailable for translation in the egg. We devised an in vivo assay to test this hypothesis. Our results show that masked mRNAs limit protein synthesis in the unfertilized egg. In addition, we show that protein synthesis is also regulated at the level of translational machinery. Following fertilization is a period of rapid cell divisions. This period, known as the rapid cleavage stage, is characterized by the transient synthesis of a novel set of proteins. The synthesis of these proteins is programmed by maternal mRNAs stored in the unfertilized egg. To study the behavior of these mRNAs, we prepared a cDNA library from polysomal poly (A+) RNA from 2-hour embryos. ({sup 32}P) labeled probes, prepared from the cDNA library, were used to monitor the levels of individual mRNAs in polysomes at fertilization and during early development.

  4. TDP-43 binds and transports G-quadruplex-containing mRNAs into neurites for local translation.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Akira; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Yuto; Watanabe, Sumiko; Ishihama, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Growth and differentiation of the neurites depends on long-distance transport of a specific set of mRNAs to restricted area and their local translation. Here, we found that a TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa in size (TDP-43) plays an essential role in intracellular transport of mRNA. For identification of target RNAs recognized by TDP-43, we purified TDP-43 in soluble dimer form and subjected to in vitro systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) screening. All the TDP-43-bound RNAs were found to contain G-quadruplex (G4). Using a double-fluorescent probe system, G4-containing RNAs were found to be transported, together with TDP-43, into the distal neurites. Two lines of evidence indicated that loss of function of TDP-43 results in the neurodegenerative disorder: (i) amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-linked mutant TDP-43M337V lacks the activity of binding and transport of G4-containing mRNAs; and (ii) RNA containing G4-forming GGGGCC repeat expansion from the ALS-linked C9orf72 gene absorbs TDP-43, thereby reducing the intracellular pool of functional TDP-43. Taken together, we propose that TDP-43 within neurons plays an essential role of mRNA transport into distal neurites for local translation, and thus, dysfunctions of TDP-43 cause neural diseases such as ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. PMID:26915990

  5. The Bicoid Stability Factor Controls Polyadenylation and Expression of Specific Mitochondrial mRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Grönke, Sebastian; Stewart, James B.; Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Kukat, Christian; Wibom, Rolf; Habermann, Bianca; Partridge, Linda; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2011-01-01

    The bicoid stability factor (BSF) of Drosophila melanogaster has been reported to be present in the cytoplasm, where it stabilizes the maternally contributed bicoid mRNA and binds mRNAs expressed from early zygotic genes. BSF may also have other roles, as it is ubiquitously expressed and essential for survival of adult flies. We have performed immunofluorescence and cell fractionation analyses and show here that BSF is mainly a mitochondrial protein. We studied two independent RNAi knockdown fly lines and report that reduced BSF protein levels lead to a severe respiratory deficiency and delayed development at the late larvae stage. Ubiquitous knockdown of BSF results in a severe reduction of the polyadenylation tail lengths of specific mitochondrial mRNAs, accompanied by an enrichment of unprocessed polycistronic RNA intermediates. Furthermore, we observed a significant reduction in mRNA steady state levels, despite increased de novo transcription. Surprisingly, mitochondrial de novo translation is increased and abnormal mitochondrial translation products are present in knockdown flies, suggesting that BSF also has a role in coordinating the mitochondrial translation in addition to its role in mRNA maturation and stability. We thus report a novel function of BSF in flies and demonstrate that it has an important intra-mitochondrial role, which is essential for maintaining mtDNA gene expression and oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:22022283

  6. Differential stability of host mRNAs in Friend erythroleukemia cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mayman, B.A.; Nishioka, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection on cellular macromolecules were investigated in Friend erythroleukemia cells. The patterns of protein synthesis, examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, demonstrated that by 4 h postinfection the synthesis of many host proteins, with the exception of histones, was inhibited. Examination of the steady-state level of histone H3 mRNA by molecular hybridization of total RNA to a cloned mouse histone H3 complementary DNA probe demonstrated that the ratio of histone H3 mRNA to total RNA remained unchanged for the first 4 h postinfection. In contrast, the steady-state levels of globin and actin mRNAs decreased progressively at early intervals postinfection. Studies on RNA synthesis in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the transcription of the histone H3 gene was inhibited to approximately the same extent as that of actin gene. It was concluded that the stabilization of preexisting histone H3 mRNA was responsible for the persistence of H3 mRNA and histone protein synthesis in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected Friend erythroleukemia cells. The possible mechanisms influencing the differential stability of host mRNAs during the course of productive infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 are discussed.

  7. The ribosomal protein Asc1/RACK1 is required for efficient translation of short mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mary K; Rojas-Duran, Maria F; Gangaramani, Paritosh; Gilbert, Wendy V

    2016-01-01

    Translation is a core cellular process carried out by a highly conserved macromolecular machine, the ribosome. There has been remarkable evolutionary adaptation of this machine through the addition of eukaryote-specific ribosomal proteins whose individual effects on ribosome function are largely unknown. Here we show that eukaryote-specific Asc1/RACK1 is required for efficient translation of mRNAs with short open reading frames that show greater than average translational efficiency in diverse eukaryotes. ASC1 mutants in S. cerevisiae display compromised translation of specific functional groups, including cytoplasmic and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and display cellular phenotypes consistent with their gene-specific translation defects. Asc1-sensitive mRNAs are preferentially associated with the translational ‘closed loop’ complex comprised of eIF4E, eIF4G, and Pab1, and depletion of eIF4G mimics the translational defects of ASC1 mutants. Together our results reveal a role for Asc1/RACK1 in a length-dependent initiation mechanism optimized for efficient translation of genes with important housekeeping functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11154.001 PMID:27117520

  8. Herpes simplex virus-infected cells contain a function(s) that destabilizes both host and viral mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, A D; Frenkel, N

    1987-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus virion contains a function that mediates the shutoff of host-protein synthesis and the degradation of host mRNA. Viral mutants affected in this function (vhs mutants) have previously been derived. Cells infected with these mutants exhibit a more stable synthesis of host as well as the immediate early (alpha)-viral proteins. We now show that a function associated with purified virions of the wild-type virus reduces the half-life of host and alpha mRNAs, whereas purified vhs-1 mutant virions lack this activity. The functional half-life of many early (beta)- and late (gamma)-viral mRNAs is also prolonged in mutant virus infections. These studies suggest that the wild-type virion brings into cells a function that indiscriminately reduces the half-life of both host and viral transcripts and that the early translational shutoff of the host is a consequence of this function. This function may facilitate rapid transitions in the expression of groups of genes that are transcriptionally turned on at different times after infection. Images PMID:3031658

  9. PERK mediates the IRES-dependent translational activation of mRNAs encoding angiogenic growth factors after ischemic stress.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Céline; Dubrac, Alexandre; Quelen, Cathy; Desquesnes, Aurore; Van Den Berghe, Loic; Ségura, Christèle; Filleron, Thomas; Pyronnet, Stéphane; Prats, Hervé; Brousset, Pierre; Touriol, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is induced by various conditions, including hypoxia. Although cap-dependent translation is globally inhibited during ischemia, the mRNAs encoding two important proangiogenic growth factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), are translated at early time points in ischemic muscle. The translation of these mRNAs can occur through internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs), rather than through cap-dependent translation. Hypoxic conditions also induce the unfolded protein response (UPR) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, leading us to assess the interplay between hypoxia, ER stress, and IRES-mediated translation of FGF-2 and VEGF We found that unlike cap-dependent translation, translation through FGF-2 and VEGF IRESs was efficient in cells and transgenic mice subjected to ER stress-inducing stimuli. We identified PERK, a kinase that is activated by ER stress, as the driver of VEGF and FGF-2 IRES-mediated translation in cells and in mice expressing IRES-driven reporter genes and exposed to hypoxic stress. These results demonstrate the role of IRES-dependent translation in the induction of the proangiogenic factors VEGF and FGF-2 in response to acute hypoxic stress. Furthermore, the PERK pathway could be a viable pharmacological target to improve physiological responses to ischemic situations. PMID:27141928

  10. Differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs identified by microarray analysis in GBS patients vs healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Fang; Ma, Xiaofeng; Peng, Xiaolin; Zhang, Rongxin; Kong, Dexin; Simard, Alain R.; Hao, Junwei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our present study was to determine whether message RNAs (mRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are expressed differentially in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) compared with healthy controls. The mRNA and lncRNA profiles of GBS patients and healthy controls were generated by using microarray analysis. From microarray analysis, we listed 310 mRNAs and 114 lncRNAs with the mRMR software classed into two sample groups, GBS patients and healthy controls. KEGG mapping demonstrated that the top seven signal pathways may play important roles in GBS development. Several GO terms, such as cytosol, cellular macromolecular complex assembly, cell cycle, ligase activity, protein catabolic process, etc., were enriched in gene lists, suggesting a potential correlation with GBS development. Co-expression network analysis indicated that 113 lncRNAs and 303 mRNAs were included in the co-expression network. Our present study showed that these differentially expressed mRNAs and lncRNAs may play important roles in GBS development, which provides basic information for defining the mechanism(s) that promote GBS. PMID:26898505

  11. Expression of adenovirus-2 early region 4: assignment of the early region 4 polypeptides to their respective mRNAs, using in vitro translation.

    PubMed Central

    Tigges, M A; Raskas, H J

    1982-01-01

    Adenovirus-2 early region 4 (E4; map positions 91.3 to 99.1) encodes six 5' and 3' coterminal, differently spliced mRNAs, which are 2.5, 2.1, 1.8, 1.5, 1.2, and 0.8 kilobases (kb) long. Hybridization selection with five cloned viral DNA fragments that hybridize with subsets of E4 mRNAs was used to purify these six mRNAs and a previously unreported 3.0-kb mRNA from virus-infected cells. E4 mRNAs which were purified by hybridization selection with cloned EcoRI fragment C (map positions 89.7 to 100) were also fractionated by size. The purified mRNAs were then translated in rabbit reticulocyte or wheat germ lysate systems. The full complement of E4 mRNAs specified as many as 16 different polypeptides, with molecular weights ranging from 24,000 (24K) to 10K. The most abundant E4 mRNA, which was 2.1 kb long, specified an 11K polypeptide. The 1.5-kb mRNA, which differed from the 2.1-kb mRNA only by deletion of a second intron from the 3' untranslated region, also specified an 11K polypeptide. The second most abundant mRNA, which was 1.8 kb long, and the 1.2-kb mRNA, which had an intron deleted from the 3' untranslated region, specified a 15K polypeptide. This polypeptide was labeled more intensely with [5,6-(3)H]leucine than with [35S]methionine. The 3.0- and 2.5-kb mRNAs specified four polypeptides (24K, 22K, 19K, and 17K). Translation of E4 mRNAs with a mean size of 0.8 kb, which accumulated preferentially in the presence of cycloheximide, yielded at least 10 polypeptides that migrated in polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular weights ranging from 21,800 to 10,000. On the basis of translation in wheat germ lysates and the distribution of polypeptides encoded by size-fractionated mRNAs, we concluded that the 0.8-kb mRNA size class includes a heterogeneous mixture of mRNAs which are probably formed as the result of utilization of alternate splice acceptor and donor sites during removal of the second intron. Our polypeptide assignments for the 2.1-, 1.8-, 1.5-, and 1

  12. Smoking-related microRNAs and mRNAs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Ming-Wei; Yu, Sung-Liang; Lin, Wen-Chang; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Chen, Po-Hua; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2016-08-15

    Teenager smoking is of great importance in public health. Functional roles of microRNAs have been documented in smoke-induced gene expression changes, but comprehensive mechanisms of microRNA-mRNA regulation and benefits remained poorly understood. We conducted the Teenager Smoking Reduction Trial (TSRT) to investigate the causal association between active smoking reduction and whole-genome microRNA and mRNA expression changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A total of 12 teenagers with a substantial reduction in smoke quantity and a decrease in urine cotinine/creatinine ratio were enrolled in genomic analyses. In Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes altered by smoke reduction were mainly associated with glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway. The integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA found eleven differentially expressed microRNAs negatively correlated with predicted target genes. CD83 molecule regulated by miR-4498 in human PBMC, was critical for the canonical pathway of communication between innate and adaptive immune cells. Our data demonstrated that microRNAs could regulate immune responses in human PBMC after habitual smokers quit smoking and support the potential translational value of microRNAs in regulating disease-relevant gene expression caused by tobacco smoke. PMID:27321975

  13. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) E1 Binds to hnRNP A2 and Inhibits Translation of A2 Response Element mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kosturko, Linda D.; Maggipinto, Michael J.; Korza, George; Lee, Joo Won; Carson, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2 is a trans-acting RNA-binding protein that mediates trafficking of RNAs containing the cis-acting A2 response element (A2RE). Previous work has shown that A2RE RNAs are transported to myelin in oligodendrocytes and to dendrites in neurons. hnRNP E1 is an RNA-binding protein that regulates translation of specific mRNAs. Here, we show by yeast two-hybrid analysis, in vivo and in vitro coimmunoprecipitation, in vitro cross-linking, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy that hnRNP E1 binds to hnRNP A2 and is recruited to A2RE RNA in an hnRNP A2-dependent manner. hnRNP E1 is colocalized with hnRNP A2 and A2RE mRNA in granules in dendrites of oligodendrocytes. Overexpression of hnRNP E1 or microinjection of exogenous hnRNP E1 in neural cells inhibits translation of A2RE mRNA, but not of non-A2RE RNA. Excess hnRNP E1 added to an in vitro translation system reduces translation efficiency of A2RE mRNA, but not of nonA2RE RNA, in an hnRNP A2-dependent manner. These results are consistent with a model where hnRNP E1 recruited to A2RE RNA granules by binding to hnRNP A2 inhibits translation of A2RE RNA during granule transport. PMID:16775011

  14. Tristetraprolin Recruits Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4E2 To Repress Translation of AU-Rich Element-Containing mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xianzun

    2015-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) regulates the expression of AU-rich element-containing mRNAs through promoting the degradation and repressing the translation of target mRNA. While the mechanism for promoting target mRNA degradation has been extensively studied, the mechanism underlying translational repression is not well established. Here, we show that TTP recruits eukaryotic initiation factor 4E2 (eIF4E2) to repress target mRNA translation. TTP interacted with eIF4E2 but not with eIF4E. Overexpression of eIF4E2 enhanced TTP-mediated translational repression, and downregulation of endogenous eIF4E2 or overexpression of a truncation mutant of eIF4E2 impaired TTP-mediated translational repression. Overexpression of an eIF4E2 mutant that lost the cap-binding activity also impaired TTP's activity, suggesting that the cap-binding activity of eIF4E2 is important in TTP-mediated translational repression. We further show that TTP promoted eIF4E2 binding to target mRNA. These results imply that TTP recruits eIF4E2 to compete with eIF4E to repress the translation of target mRNA. This notion is supported by the finding that downregulation of endogenous eIF4E2 increased the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) protein without affecting the mRNA levels in THP-1 cells. Collectively, these results uncover a novel mechanism by which TTP represses target mRNA translation. PMID:26370510

  15. Hypoglycemic Effects of Three Medicinal Plants in Experimental Diabetes: Inhibition of Rat Intestinal α-glucosidase and Enhanced Pancreatic Insulin and Cardiac Glut-4 mRNAs Expression

    PubMed Central

    Moradabadi, Leila; Montasser Kouhsari, Shideh; Fehresti Sani, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L., Alliaceae), Persian shallot (Allium ascalonicum L., Alliaceae ) and Sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) are believed to have hypoglycemic properties and have been used traditionally as antidiabetic herbal medicines in Iran. In this study, diabetes was induced by subcutaneous injection of alloxan monohydrate (100 mg kg−1) to male Wistar rats. Antidiabetic effects of methanolic extracts of the above mentioned three plants on alloxan-diabetic rats was investigated in comparison with the effects of antidiabetic drugs such as acarbose, glibenclamide and metformin by measuring postprandial blood glucose (PBG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), inhibition of rat intestinal α-glucosidase enzymes activities and pancreatic Insulin and cardiac Glut-4 mRNAs expression. In short term period, hypoglycemic effects of A. sativum and A. ascalonicum showed significant reduction of PBG similar to glibenclamide (5 mg kg−1 bw) while S. officinalis significantly reduced PBG similar to acarbose (20 mg kg−1 bw). After 3 weeks of treatment by methanolic plant extracts, significant chronic decrease in the PBG was observed similar to metformin (100 mg kg−1 bw). For OGTT, S. officinalis reduced PBG in a similar way as acarbose (20 mg kg−1 bw). Intestinal sucrase and maltase activities were inhibited significantly by A. sativum, A. ascalonicum and S. officinalis. In addition, we observed increased expression of Insulin and Glut-4 genes in diabetic rats treated with these plants extracts. Up regulation of Insulin and Glut-4 genes expression and inhibition of α-glucosidaseactivities are the two mechanisms that play a considerable role in hypoglycemic action of garlic, shallot and sage. PMID:24250646

  16. Hypoglycemic Effects of Three Medicinal Plants in Experimental Diabetes: Inhibition of Rat Intestinal α-glucosidase and Enhanced Pancreatic Insulin and Cardiac Glut-4 mRNAs Expression.

    PubMed

    Moradabadi, Leila; Montasser Kouhsari, Shideh; Fehresti Sani, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L., Alliaceae), Persian shallot (Allium ascalonicum L., Alliaceae ) and Sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) are believed to have hypoglycemic properties and have been used traditionally as antidiabetic herbal medicines in Iran. In this study, diabetes was induced by subcutaneous injection of alloxan monohydrate (100 mg kg(-1)) to male Wistar rats. Antidiabetic effects of methanolic extracts of the above mentioned three plants on alloxan-diabetic rats was investigated in comparison with the effects of antidiabetic drugs such as acarbose, glibenclamide and metformin by measuring postprandial blood glucose (PBG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), inhibition of rat intestinal α-glucosidase enzymes activities and pancreatic Insulin and cardiac Glut-4 mRNAs expression. In short term period, hypoglycemic effects of A. sativum and A. ascalonicum showed significant reduction of PBG similar to glibenclamide (5 mg kg(-1) bw) while S. officinalis significantly reduced PBG similar to acarbose (20 mg kg(-1) bw). After 3 weeks of treatment by methanolic plant extracts, significant chronic decrease in the PBG was observed similar to metformin (100 mg kg(-1) bw). For OGTT, S. officinalis reduced PBG in a similar way as acarbose (20 mg kg(-1) bw). Intestinal sucrase and maltase activities were inhibited significantly by A. sativum, A. ascalonicum and S. officinalis. In addition, we observed increased expression of Insulin and Glut-4 genes in diabetic rats treated with these plants extracts. Up regulation of Insulin and Glut-4 genes expression and inhibition of α-glucosidaseactivities are the two mechanisms that play a considerable role in hypoglycemic action of garlic, shallot and sage. PMID:24250646

  17. Lissencephaly-1 promotes the recruitment of dynein and dynactin to transported mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Dix, Carly I.; Soundararajan, Harish Chandra; Dzhindzhev, Nikola S.; Begum, Farida; Suter, Beat; Ohkura, Hiroyuki; Stephens, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Microtubule-based transport mediates the sorting and dispersal of many cellular components and pathogens. However, the mechanisms by which motor complexes are recruited to and regulated on different cargos remain poorly understood. Here we describe a large-scale biochemical screen for novel factors associated with RNA localization signals mediating minus end–directed mRNA transport during Drosophila development. We identified the protein Lissencephaly-1 (Lis1) and found that minus-end travel distances of localizing transcripts are dramatically reduced in lis1 mutant embryos. Surprisingly, given its well-documented role in regulating dynein mechanochemistry, we uncovered an important requirement for Lis1 in promoting the recruitment of dynein and its accessory complex dynactin to RNA localization complexes. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Lis1 levels regulate the overall association of dynein with dynactin. Our data therefore reveal a critical role for Lis1 within the mRNA localization machinery and suggest a model in which Lis1 facilitates motor complex association with cargos by promoting the interaction of dynein with dynactin. PMID:23918939

  18. Community effects in regulation of translation

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Paul M; Kanke, Matt; Kenny, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Certain forms of translational regulation, and translation itself, rely on long-range interactions between proteins bound to the different ends of mRNAs. A widespread assumption is that such interactions occur only in cis, between the two ends of a single transcript. However, certain translational regulatory defects of the Drosophila oskar (osk) mRNA can be rescued in trans. We proposed that inter-transcript interactions, promoted by assembly of the mRNAs in particles, allow regulatory elements to act in trans. Here we confirm predictions of that model and show that disruption of PTB-dependent particle assembly inhibits rescue in trans. Communication between transcripts is not limited to different osk mRNAs, as regulation imposed by cis-acting elements embedded in the osk mRNA spreads to gurken mRNA. We conclude that community effects exist in translational regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10965.001 PMID:27104756

  19. Widespread translational control contributes to the regulation of Arabidopsis photomorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Jung; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chen, Ho-Ming; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    Environmental ‘light' has a vital role in regulating plant growth and development. Transcriptomic profiling has been widely used to examine how light regulates mRNA levels on a genome-wide scale, but the global role of translational regulation in the response to light is unknown. Through a transcriptomic comparison of steady-state and polysome-bound mRNAs, we reveal a clear impact of translational control on thousands of genes, in addition to transcriptomic changes, during photomorphogenesis. Genes encoding ribosomal protein are preferentially regulated at the translational level, which possibly contributes to the enhanced translation efficiency. We also reveal that mRNAs regulated at the translational level share characteristics of longer half-lives and shorter cDNA length, and that transcripts with a cis-element, TAGGGTTT, in their 5′ untranslated region have higher translatability. We report a previously neglected aspect of gene expression regulation during Arabidopsis photomorphogenesis. The identities and molecular signatures associated with mRNAs regulated at the translational level also offer new directions for mechanistic studies of light-triggered translational enhancement in Arabidopsis. PMID:22252389

  20. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova-St. Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  1. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova-St Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  2. Dysfunctional miRNA-Mediated Regulation in Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaohan; Zhang, Junying

    2016-01-01

    Past research on pathogenesis of a complex disease suggests that differentially expressed message RNAs (mRNAs) can be noted as biomarkers of a disease. However, significant miRNA-mediated regulation change might also be more deep underlying cause of a disease. In this study, a miRNA-mediated regulation module is defined based on GO terms (Gene Ontology terms) from which dysfunctional modules are identified as the suspected cause of a disease. A miRNA-mediated regulation module contains mRNAs annotated to a GO term and MicroRNAs (miRNAs) which regulate the mRNAs. Based on the miRNA-mediated regulation coefficients estimated from the expression profiles of the mRNA and the miRNAs, a SW (single regulation-weight) value is then designed to evaluate the miRNA-mediated regulation change of an mRNA, and the modules with significantly differential SW values are thus identified as dysfunctional modules. The approach is applied to Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and it identifies 70 dysfunctional miRNA-mediated regulation modules from initial 4381 modules. The identified dysfunctional modules are detected to be comprehensive reflection of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. The proposed approach suggests that accumulated alteration in miRNA-mediated regulation might cause functional alterations, which further cause a disease. Moreover, this approach can also be used to identify diffentially miRNA-mediated regulated mRNAs showing more comprehensive underlying association with a disease than differentially expressed mRNAs. PMID:27258182

  3. Differential induction of mRNAs for the glycolytic and ethanolic fermentative pathways by hypoxia and anoxia in maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Andrews, D L; MacAlpine, D M; Johnson, J R; Kelley, P M; Cobb, B G; Drew, M C

    1994-12-01

    Fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase (ALD) and enolase (ENO) from the glycolytic pathway and pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) from the ethanolic fermentative pathway, are enzymes previously identified as among those synthesized selectively in O2-deficient roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The present study measured levels of transcripts representing these two pathways in 5-mm root tips, root axes (the remainder of the primary seminal root), and shoots of maize seedlings to determine how closely both pathways were co-induced and how they were modulated by changes in O2 concentration. In hypoxic seedlings with the roots in solution sparged with 5% (v/v) O2 (balance N2) and the shoots in the same gaseous atmosphere, mRNAs for Pdc1 and Adh2 in root tips both increased about 15-fold during the first 12 h, followed by a decline toward initial levels by 18 to 24h. Message levels for Ald1 and Eno1 showed only small changes during hypoxia. When expression was examined under anoxia, the extent to which all four mRNAs increased in different tissues depended on whether the seedlings had been previously acclimated to hypoxia or were anoxically shocked. The results show that although all the genes examined increased expression during hypoxia and/or anoxia, they differed in the rapidity and magnitude of the response and in the time to reach maximal message levels: there was no common pattern of change of message levels for the glycolytic or for the fermantative enzymes. PMID:7846162

  4. Localization of the mRNAs for two dopamine D2 receptor isoforms in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Y; Sora, I; Tomita, H; Akiyama, K; Otsuki, S; Yamamura, H I

    1991-12-01

    Two molecular forms of the dopamine D2 receptor were generated by alternative RNA splicing. To investigate the relative distributions of the two mRNAs encoding the D2 receptor isoforms, D2(415) and D2(444), we performed in situ hybridization histochemistry in the rat brain with the two oligonucleotide probes. An insert probe complementary to an additional fragment of the D2 receptor mRNA cloned from the rat brain, and a spanning probe complementary to its contiguous sequence were used. These 48 base probes were 3'-end labeled with [35S]dATP. The brains were dissected from male SD rats and frozen in dry ice and acetone. Cryostat sections (16 microns) were collected on gelatin coated slides and stored at -20 degrees C. In situ hybridization studies were conducted with a probe concentration of 1 x 10(6) dpm/100 microliters of buffer per brain slice at 37 degrees C for 18-20 h in a humid chamber. The slides were washed, dried and exposed to tritium sensitive film for one week. The autoradiograph showed that both mRNA were present at high levels in the corpus striatum, accumbens nucleus and substantia nigra (pars compacta). Identical patterns of labeling were obtained in the rat brain using both the insert and spanning probes, although the optical densities detected with the insert probe were higher than those with the spanning probe in the corpus striatum. This suggests that both D2 receptor mRNAs are expressed similarly in each region of the rat brain and D2(444) expressed dominantly in the corpus striatum. PMID:1813683

  5. Regulation of hyaluronan synthases in mouse uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Taro; Sakuta, Tomohiro; Kanayama, Toshiji

    2005-02-18

    We examined the expression pattern of hyaluronan synthase (HAS) mRNAs in the uterine cervix of pregnant mice. The expression levels of HAS-1 and -2 mRNAs peaked at delivery, whereas that of HAS-3 mRNA peaked on the 15th day of pregnancy. The regulation of HAS mRNA expression was examined in pregnant mouse uterine cervical fibroblasts. The expression of HAS-1, -2, and -3 mRNAs was significantly augmented by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). Progesterone significantly interfered with expression of HAS-1 and -2 mRNAs, but significantly increased the expression of HAS-3 mRNA. Low-molecular-weight hyaluronan significantly enhanced only the expression of HAS-1 mRNA. These results indicate that HAS in the uterine cervix is regulated in a complex manner by IL-1beta, progesterone, and low-molecular-weight hyaluronan, of which changes in the cervical tissue and serum closely participate in uterine cervical ripening and/or inflammation. PMID:15649434

  6. Identification of novel liver-specific mRNAs in plasma for biomarkers of drug-induced liver injury and quantitative evaluation in rats treated with various hepatotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Shingo; Miyamoto, Makoto; Takami, Kenji; Kanki, Masayuki; Ono, Atsushi; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yasuo; Urushidani, Tetsuro

    2013-03-01

    Circulating liver-specific mRNAs such as albumin (Alb) and α-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (Ambp) have been reported to be potential biomarkers for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). We identified novel circulating liver-specific mRNAs and quantified them, together with the two previously reported mRNAs, in plasma from rats treated with various hepatotoxicants to validate circulating liver-specific mRNAs as biomarkers for DILI. Among six genes selected from the database, high liver specificity of apolipoprotein h (Apoh) and group-specific component (Gc) mRNAs were confirmed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and the copy numbers of these mRNAs elevated in plasma from rats treated with thioacetamide. Liver-specific mRNAs (Alb, Ambp, Apoh, and Gc) were quantified by real-time RT-PCR in plasma from rats with single dosing of seven hepatotoxicants. There were noticeable interindividual and intercompound variabilities in the severity of liver injury. The levels of four mRNAs increased almost in parallel and correlated with changes in the alanine aminotransferase (ALT) values and the hepatocellular necrosis scores at 24h after dosing. It was noteworthy that the magnitude of the increases in mRNA levels was greater than that in the ALT value. Time course analysis within 24h after dosing revealed that the timing of the increase was different among mRNA species, and the plasma levels of Alb and Gc mRNAs increased substantially earlier than the ALT values, suggesting that patterns of changes in circulating liver-specific mRNAs indicate the progression of liver injury. These results strongly support the reliability and usefulness of the four circulating liver-specific mRNAs as biomarkers for DILI. PMID:23288050

  7. Deep sequencing shows multiple oligouridylations are required for 3′ to 5′ degradation of histone mRNAs on polyribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Slevin, Michael K.; Meaux, Stacie; Welch, Joshua D.; Bigler, Rebecca; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Su, Wei; Rhoads, Robert E.; Prins, Jan F.; Marzluff, William F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone mRNAs are rapidly degraded when DNA replication is inhibited during S-phase with degradation initiating with oligouridylation of the stemloop at the 3′ end. We developed a customized RNA-Seq strategy to identify the 3′ termini of degradation intermediates of histone mRNAs. Using this strategy, we identified two types of oligouridylated degradation intermediates: RNAs ending at different sites of the 3′ side of the stemloop that resulted from initial degradation by 3′hExo and intermediates near the stop codon and within the coding region. Sequencing of polyribosomal histone mRNAs revealed that degradation initiates and proceeds 3′ to 5′ on translating mRNA and many intermediates are capped. Knockdown of the exosome-associated exonuclease Pml/Scl-100, but not the Dis3L2 exonuclease, slows histone mRNA degradation, consistent with 3′ to 5′ degradation by the exosome containing PM/Scl-100. Knockdown of No-go decay factors also slowed histone mRNA degradation, suggesting a role in removing ribosomes from partially degraded mRNAs. PMID:24656133

  8. The adenovirus E1B-55K transforming polypeptide modulates transport or cytoplasmic stabilization of viral and host cell mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Pilder, S; Moore, M; Logan, J; Shenk, T

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus type 5 mutant H5dl338 lacks 524 base pairs within early region 1B. The mutation removed a portion of the region encoding the related E1B-55K and -17K polypeptides but did not disturb the E1B-21K coding region. The virus can be propagated in 293 cells which contain and express the adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B regions, but it is defective for growth in HeLa cells, in which its final yield is reduced about 100-fold compared with the wild-type virus. The mutant also fails to transform rat cells at normal efficiency. The site of the dl338 defect was studied in HeLa cells. Early gene expression and DNA replication appeared normal. Late after infection, mRNAs coded by the major late transcription unit accumulated to reduced levels. At a time when transcription rates and steady-state nuclear RNA species were normal, the rate at which late mRNA accumulated in the cytoplasm was markedly reduced. Furthermore, in contrast to the case with the wild type, transport and accumulation of cellular mRNAs continued late after infection with dl338. Thus, the E1B product appears to facilitate transport and accumulation of viral mRNAs late after infection while blocking the same processes for cellular mRNAs. Images PMID:2946932

  9. G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 Are Required for Translation of Interferon Stimulated mRNAs and Are Targeted by a Dengue Virus Non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bidet, Katell; Dadlani, Dhivya; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNA-host protein interactions are critical for replication of flaviviruses, a genus of positive-strand RNA viruses comprising major vector-borne human pathogens including dengue viruses (DENV). We examined three conserved host RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 in dengue virus (DENV-2) infection and found them to be novel regulators of the interferon (IFN) response against DENV-2. The three RBPs were required for the accumulation of the protein products of several interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), and for efficient translation of PKR and IFITM2 mRNAs. This identifies G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 as novel regulators of the antiviral state. Their antiviral activity was antagonized by the abundant DENV-2 non-coding subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA), which bound to G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1, inhibited their activity and lead to profound inhibition of ISG mRNA translation. This work describes a new and unexpected level of regulation for interferon stimulated gene expression and presents the first mechanism of action for an sfRNA as a molecular sponge of anti-viral effectors in human cells. PMID:24992036

  10. Posttranscriptional m(6)A Editing of HIV-1 mRNAs Enhances Viral Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Edward M; Bogerd, Hal P; Kornepati, Anand V R; Kang, Dong; Ghoshal, Delta; Marshall, Joy B; Poling, Brigid C; Tsai, Kevin; Gokhale, Nandan S; Horner, Stacy M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2016-05-11

    Covalent addition of a methyl group to adenosine N(6) (m(6)A) is an evolutionarily conserved and common RNA modification that is thought to modulate several aspects of RNA metabolism. While the presence of multiple m(6)A editing sites on diverse viral RNAs was reported starting almost 40 years ago, how m(6)A editing affects virus replication has remained unclear. Here, we used photo-crosslinking-assisted m(6)A sequencing techniques to precisely map several m(6)A editing sites on the HIV-1 genome and report that they cluster in the HIV-1 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). Viral 3' UTR m(6)A sites or analogous cellular m(6)A sites strongly enhanced mRNA expression in cis by recruiting the cellular YTHDF m(6)A "reader" proteins. Reducing YTHDF expression inhibited, while YTHDF overexpression enhanced, HIV-1 protein and RNA expression, and virus replication in CD4+ T cells. These data identify m(6)A editing and the resultant recruitment of YTHDF proteins as major positive regulators of HIV-1 mRNA expression. PMID:27117054

  11. Circadian control of mRNA polyadenylation dynamics regulates rhythmic protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Shihoko; Sher-Chen, Elaine L.; Green, Carla B.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A) tails are 3′ modifications of eukaryotic mRNAs that are important in the control of translation and mRNA stability. We identified hundreds of mouse liver mRNAs that exhibit robust circadian rhythms in the length of their poly(A) tails. Approximately 80% of these are primarily the result of nuclear adenylation coupled with rhythmic transcription. However, unique decay kinetics distinguish these mRNAs from other mRNAs that are transcribed rhythmically but do not exhibit poly(A) tail rhythms. The remaining 20% are uncoupled from transcription and exhibit poly(A) tail rhythms even though the steady-state mRNA levels are not rhythmic. These are under the control of rhythmic cytoplasmic polyadenylation, regulated at least in some cases by cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding proteins (CPEBs). Importantly, we found that the rhythmicity in poly(A) tail length is closely correlated with rhythmic protein expression, with a several-hour delay between the time of longest tail and the time of highest protein level. Our study demonstrates that the circadian clock regulates the dynamic polyadenylation status of mRNAs, which can result in rhythmic protein expression independent of the steady-state levels of the message. PMID:23249735

  12. Developmental expression of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 and three GnRH mRNAs in the teleost fish cobia.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, J Shaik; Benninghoff, Abby D; Holt, G Joan; Khan, Izhar A

    2007-02-01

    The cDNAs of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) and three prepro-gonadotropin-releasing hormones, GnRH-I (seabream GnRH), GnRH-II (chicken GnRH-II), and GnRH-III (salmon GnRH) were isolated and cloned from the brain of the teleost fish cobia, Rachycentron canadum. The cobia GPR54 cDNA was 95 and 51-56% identical to those of tilapia and mammalian models respectively. The GnRH cDNA sequences of cobia showed strong identities to those of tilapia, Atlantic croaker, red drum, and the seabass and seabream species. The real-time quantitative RT-PCR methods allowed detection of all three GnRH mRNAs on the first day after hatching (DAH). The GnRH-I mRNA levels, which were the lowest among the three GnRHs, increased gradually with two distinct peaks in larvae at 3 and 4 DAH. On the other hand, GnRH-II and GnRH-III mRNAs were significantly higher in larvae at 2 and 6 DAH compared with those on the preceding days. In addition, significant peaks of all the three GnRH mRNAs were observed in the brains of 26-day-old fish. The finding of higher GnRH-I and GnRH-II mRNAs in males than females at 153 DAH may be related to early puberty observed during the first year in laboratory-reared male cobia. Moreover, this study demonstrates for the first time the expression of GPR54 mRNA during larval development in a vertebrate species. The concomitant expression patterns of GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs during different stages of larval and juvenile developments, and during early puberty in male cobia suggest a potential relationship between GPR54 and multiple GnRHs during these stages of development consistent with the role of GPR54 in controlling GnRH release in mammals. The increase in GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs observed during early puberty in cobia is consistent with a similar change reported in pubertal rats. This finding together with the localization of GPR54 mRNAs on GnRH neurons in fish and mammals suggests that the GPR54-GnRH interactions may be conserved in different vertebrate groups

  13. Distribution of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein mRNAs in normal, hyperplastic, and preneoplastic rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Alpini, G.; Aragona, E.; Dabeva, M.; Salvi, R.; Shafritz, D. A.; Tavoloni, N.

    1992-01-01

    The nature of bile duct-like (oval) cells proliferating during chemical hepatocarcinogenesis has been controversial. To investigate this issue further, the authors compared the hepatic distribution of albumin (ALB) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) mRNAs in rats in which oval cell proliferation was induced by feeding a choline-devoid diet containing 0.1% ethionine (CDE, a hepatocarcinogenic diet) with that in normal rats and in rats in which biliary epithelial cell hyperplasia was induced by either bile duct ligation or feeding alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT). Northern blot analysis in parenchymal and nonparenchymal liver cells isolated from these animals demonstrated that ALB mRNA was present in the hepatocytes of both control and experimental animals, whereas this transcript was detected in nonparenchymal epithelial cells only in CDE-fed rats. Alpha-fetoprotein mRNA was not seen in either parenchymal or nonparenchymal cells isolated from normal or hyperplastic livers induced by bile duct ligation or ANIT feeding. In CDE-fed rats, however, both parenchymal and nonparenchymal cell populations displayed AFP message. In situ hybridization directly demonstrated nonparenchymal cell expression of both ALB and AFP transcripts in CDE-fed rats. Most surprisingly, ALB and AFP mRNAs were also detected by in situ hybridization in occasional nonparenchymal cells located in portal tracts near the limiting plate in normal liver, as well as under conditions associated with bile duct hyperplasia. Immunohistochemical studies of intermediate filament proteins, cytokeratin 19 (a marker of glandular epithelia), vimentin (a marker of mesenchymal lineage), and desmin (a marker of muscle cell differentiation) demonstrated that oval cells, as well as normal and hyperplastic bile duct cells, were positive for cytokeratin 19 and negative for both vimentin and desmin. Cytokeratin-positive oval cells formed duct profiles and were connected to preexisting ductules and ducts. These results are

  14. SR proteins SRp20 and 9G8 contribute to efficient export of herpes simplex virus 1 mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero-Paunetto, Laurimar; Li Ling; Hernandez, Felicia P.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    2010-06-05

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) mRNAs are exported to the cytoplasm through the export receptor TAP/NFX1. HSV-1 multifunctional protein ICP27 interacts with TAP/NXF1, binds viral RNAs, and is required for efficient viral RNA export. In ICP27 mutant infections, viral RNA export is reduced but not ablated, indicating that other export adaptors can aid in viral RNA export. Export adaptor protein Aly/REF is recruited to viral replication compartments, however, Aly/REF knockdown has little effect on viral RNA export. SR proteins SRp20 and 9G8 interact with TAP/NXF1 and mediate export of some cellular RNAs. We report that siRNA knockdown of SRp20 or 9G8 resulted in about a 10 fold decrease in virus yields and in nuclear accumulation of poly(A+) RNA. In infected cells depleted of SRp20, newly transcribed Bromouridine-labeled RNA also accumulated in the nucleus. We conclude that SRp20 and 9G8 contribute to HSV-1 RNA export.

  15. Multiple binding of repressed mRNAs by the P-body protein Rck/p54

    PubMed Central

    Ernoult-Lange, Michèle; Baconnais, Sonia; Harper, Maryannick; Minshall, Nicola; Souquere, Sylvie; Boudier, Thomas; Bénard, Marianne; Andrey, Philippe; Pierron, Gérard; Kress, Michel; Standart, Nancy; le Cam, Eric; Weil, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Translational repression is achieved by protein complexes that typically bind 3′ UTR mRNA motifs and interfere with the formation of the cap-dependent initiation complex, resulting in mRNPs with a closed-loop conformation. We demonstrate here that the human DEAD-box protein Rck/p54, which is a component of such complexes and central to P-body assembly, is in considerable molecular excess with respect to cellular mRNAs and enriched to a concentration of 0.5 mM in P-bodies, where it is organized in clusters. Accordingly, multiple binding of p54 proteins along mRNA molecules was detected in vivo. Consistently, the purified protein bound RNA with no sequence specificity and high nanomolar affinity. Moreover, bound RNA molecules had a relaxed conformation. While RNA binding was ATP independent, relaxing of bound RNA was dependent on ATP, though not on its hydrolysis. We propose that Rck/p54 recruitment by sequence-specific translational repressors leads to further binding of Rck/p54 along mRNA molecules, resulting in their masking, unwinding, and ultimately recruitment to P-bodies. Rck/p54 proteins located at the 5′ extremity of mRNA can then recruit the decapping complex, thus coupling translational repression and mRNA degradation. PMID:22836354

  16. Evolutionary conservation of a molecular machinery for export and expression of mRNAs with retained introns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baomin; Rekosh, David

    2015-01-01

    Intron retention is one of the least studied forms of alternative splicing. Through the use of retrovirus and other model systems, it was established many years ago that mRNAs with retained introns are subject to restriction both at the level of nucleocytoplasmic export and cytoplasmic expression. It was also demonstrated that specific cis-acting elements in the mRNA could serve to bypass these restrictions. Here we show that one of these elements, the constitutive transport element (CTE), first identified in the retrovirus MPMV and subsequently in the human NXF1 gene, is a highly conserved element. Using GERP analysis, CTEs with strong primary sequence homology, predicted to display identical secondary structure, were identified in NXF genes from >30 mammalian species. CTEs were also identified in the predicted NXF1 genes of zebrafish and coelacanths. The CTE from the zebrafish NXF1 was shown to function efficiently to achieve expression of mRNA with a retained intron in human cells in conjunction with zebrafish Nxf1 and cofactor Nxt proteins. This demonstrates that all essential functional components for expression of mRNA with retained introns have been conserved from fish to man. PMID:25605961

  17. On the Contribution of Protein Spatial Organization to the Physicochemical Interconnection between Proteins and Their Cognate mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Andreas; Zagrovic, Bojan; Polyansky, Anton A.

    2014-01-01

    Early-stage evolutionary development of the universal genetic code remains a fundamental, open problem. One of the possible scenarios suggests that the code evolved in response to direct interactions between peptides and RNA oligonucleotides in the primordial environment. Recently, we have revealed a strong matching between base-binding preferences of modern protein sequences and the composition of their cognate mRNA coding sequences. These results point directly at the physicochemical foundation behind the code’s origin, but also support the possibility of direct complementary interactions between proteins and their cognate mRNAs, especially if the two are unstructured. Here, we analyze molecular-surface mapping of knowledge-based amino-acid/nucleobase interaction preferences for a set of complete, high-resolution protein structures and show that the connection between the two biopolymers could remain relevant even for structured, folded proteins. Specifically, protein surface loops are strongly enriched in residues with a high binding propensity for guanine and cytosine, while adenine- and uracil-preferring residues are uniformly distributed throughout protein structures. Moreover, compositional complementarity of cognate protein and mRNA sequences remains strong even after weighting protein sequence profiles by residue solvent exposure. Our results support the possibility that protein/mRNA sequence complementarity may also translate to cognate interactions between structured biopolymers. PMID:25423140

  18. Analysis of Transcription Factor mRNAs in Identified Oxytocin and Vasopressin Magnocellular Neurons Isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Lubelski, Daniel; Rashid, Omar M.; Salinas, Yasmmyn D.; Shi, YiJun; Ponzio, Todd; Fields, Raymond; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Gainer, Harold

    2013-01-01

    The oxytocin (Oxt) and vasopressin (Avp) magnocellular neurons (MCNs) in the hypothalamus are the only neuronal phenotypes that are present in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), and are characterized by their robust and selective expression of either the Oxt or Avp genes. In this paper, we take advantage of the differential expression of these neuropeptide genes to identify and isolate these two individual phenotypes from the rat SON by laser capture microdissection (LCM), and to analyze the differential expression of several of their transcription factor mRNAs by qRT-PCR. We identify these neuronal phenotypes by stereotaxically injecting recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral (rAAV) vectors which contain cell-type specific Oxt or Avp promoters that drive expression of EGFP selectively in either the Oxt or Avp MCNs into the SON. The fluorescent MCNs are then dissected by LCM using a novel Cap Road Map protocol described in this paper, and the purified MCNs are extracted for their RNAs. qRT-PCR of these RNAs show that some transcription factors (RORA and c-jun) are differentially expressed in the Oxt and Avp MCNs. PMID:23894472

  19. Changing expression profiles of lncRNAs, mRNAs, circRNAs and miRNAs during osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Ce; Cao, Zhen; Yang, Bo; Ding, Ning; Hou, Tianyong; Luo, Fei; Kang, Fei; Li, Jianmei; Yang, Xiaochao; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Junyu; Quan, Hongyu; Xu, Jianzhong; Dong, Shiwu

    2016-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic organ continuously undergoing shaping, repairing and remodeling. The homeostasis of bone is maintained by the balance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Osteoclasts (OCs) are specialized multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or monocytes/macrophage progenitor cells. There are different stages during osteoclastogenesis, and one of the most important steps to form functional osteoclasts is realized by cell-cell fusion. In our study, microarray was performed to detect the expression profiles of lncRNA, mRNA, circRNA and miRNA at different stages during osteoclastogenesis of RAW264.7 cells. Often changed RNAs were selected and clustered among the four groups with Venn analysis. The results revealed that expressions of 518 lncRNAs, 207 mRNAs, 24 circRNAs and 37 miRNAs were often altered at each stage during OC differentiation. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) biological pathway analysis were performed to predict the functions of differentially expressed lncRNAs and co-expressed potential targeting genes. Co-expression networks of lncRNA-mRNA and circRNA-miRNA were constructed based on the correlation analysis between the differentially expressed RNAs. The present study provided a systematic perspective on the potential function of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) during osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26856880

  20. Differential action of pateamine A on translation of genomic and subgenomic mRNAs from Sindbis virus.

    PubMed

    González-Almela, Esther; Sanz, Miguel Angel; García-Moreno, Manuel; Northcote, Peter; Pelletier, Jerry; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-10-01

    Pateamine A (Pat A) is a natural marine product that interacts specifically with the translation initiation factor eIF4A leading to the disruption of the eIF4F complex. In the present study, we have examined the activity of Pat A on the translation of Sindbis virus (SINV) mRNAs. Translation of genomic mRNA is strongly suppressed by Pat A, as shown by the reduction of nsP1 or nsP2 synthesis. Notably, protein synthesis directed by subgenomic mRNA is resistant to Pat A inhibition when the compound is added at late times following infection; however, subgenomic mRNA is sensitive to Pat A in transfected cells or in cell free systems, indicating that this viral mRNA exhibits a dual mechanism of translation. A detailed kinetic analysis of Pat A inhibition in SINV-infected cells demonstrates that a switch occurs approximately 4h after infection, rendering subgenomic mRNA translation more resistant to Pat A inhibition. PMID:26057151

  1. Tristetraprolin Recruits the Herpes Simplex Virion Host Shutoff RNase to AU-Rich Elements in Stress Response mRNAs To Enable Their Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Minfeng; Taddeo, Brunella

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) package and bring into cells an RNase designated virion host shutoff (VHS) RNase. In infected cells, the VHS RNase targets primarily stress response mRNAs characterized by the presence of AU-rich elements in their 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). In uninfected cells, these RNAs are sequestered in exosomes or P bodies by host proteins that bind to the AU-rich elements. In infected cells, the AU-rich RNAs are deadenylated and cleaved close to the AU-rich elements, leading to long-term persistence of nontranslatable RNAs consisting of the 5′ portions of the cleavage products. The host proteins that bind to the AU-rich elements are either resident in cells (e.g., TIA-1) or induced (e.g., tristetraprolin). Earlier, this laboratory reported that tristetraprolin binds VHS RNase. To test the hypothesis that tristetraprolin directs VHS RNase to the AU-rich elements, we mapped the domains of VHS and tristetraprolin required for their interactions. We report that VHS binds to the domain of tristetraprolin that enables its interaction with RNA. A single amino acid substitution in that domain abolished the interaction with RNA but did not block the binding to VHS RNase. In transfected cells, the mutant but not the wild-type tristetraprolin precluded the degradation of the AU-rich RNAs by VHS RNase. We conclude that TTP mediates the cleavage of the 3′ UTRs of stress response mRNAs by recruiting the VHS RNase to the AU-rich elements. IMPORTANCE The primary host response to HSV infection is the synthesis of stress response mRNAs characterized by the presence of AU-rich elements in their 3′ UTRs. These mRNAs are the targets of the virion host shutoff (VHS) RNase. The VHS RNase binds both to mRNA cap structure and to tristetraprolin, an inducible host protein that sequesters AU-rich mRNAs in exosomes or P bodies. Here we show that tristetraprolin recruits VHS RNase to the AU-rich elements and enables the degradation of the stress response

  2. Induced ectopic expression of HigB toxin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in growth inhibition, reduced abundance of a subset of mRNAs and cleavage of tmRNA

    PubMed Central

    Schuessler, Dorothée L; Cortes, Teresa; Fivian-Hughes, Amanda S; Lougheed, Kathryn E A; Harvey, Evelyn; Buxton, Roger S; Davis, Elaine O; Young, Douglas B

    2013-01-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the genes Rv1954A–Rv1957 form an operon that includes Rv1955 and Rv1956 which encode the HigB toxin and the HigA antitoxin respectively. We are interested in the role and regulation of this operon, since toxin–antitoxin systems have been suggested to play a part in the formation of persister cells in mycobacteria. To investigate the function of the higBA locus, effects of toxin expression on mycobacterial growth and transcript levels were assessed in M. tuberculosis H37Rv wild type and in an operon deletion background. We show that expression of HigB toxin in the absence of HigA antitoxin arrests growth and causes cell death in M. tuberculosis. We demonstrate HigB expression to reduce the abundance of IdeR and Zur regulated mRNAs and to cleave tmRNA in M. tuberculosis, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis. This study provides the first identification of possible target transcripts of HigB in M. tuberculosis. PMID:23927792

  3. Analysis of Circadian Regulation of Poly(A) Tail Length

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Shihoko; Green, Carla B.

    2015-01-01

    The poly(A) tail is found on the 3’-end of most eukaryotic mRNAs, and its length significantly contributes to the mRNAs half-life and translational competence. Circadian regulation of poly(A) tail length is a powerful mechanism to confer rhythmicity in gene expression post-transcriptionally, and provides a means to regulate protein levels independent of rhythmic transcription in the nucleus. Therefore, analysis of circadian poly(A) tail length regulation is important for a complete understanding of rhythmic physiology, since rhythmically expressed proteins are the ultimate mediators of rhythmic function. Nevertheless, it has previously been challenging to measure changes in poly(A) tail length, especially at a global level, due to technical constraints. However, new methodology based on differential fractionation of mRNAs based on the length of their tails has recently been developed. In this chapter, we will describe these methods as used for examining the circadian regulation of poly(A) tail length and will provide detailed experimental procedures to measure poly(A) tail length both at a the single mRNA level and the global level. Although this chapter concentrates on methods we used for analyzing poly(A) tail length in the mammalian circadian system, the methods described here can be applicable to any organisms and any biological processes. PMID:25662466

  4. Coordinate estrogen-regulated instability of serum protein-coding messenger RNAs in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Pastori, R L; Moskaitis, J E; Buzek, S W; Schoenberg, D R

    1991-04-01

    Estrogen causes the cytoplasmic destabilization of albumin and gamma-fibrinogen mRNA in Xenopus laevis liver. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether mRNA destabilization is a generalized phenomenon in response to estrogen, or whether this process is restricted to a particular class of mRNAs. To address this, we have expanded our bank of serum protein-coding cDNA clones to include transferrin, the second protein of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor and clone 12B, for which there is no mammalian homolog. Together with albumin and gamma-fibrinogen, these represent more than 85% of the mRNAs encoding liver secreted proteins. Estrogen administration to male Xenopus or to liver explant cultures causes the generalized disappearance of all of these mRNAs. In contrast, estrogen has no effect on actin, ferritin, or poly(A)-binding protein mRNA, all of which encode intracellular proteins. We have previously demonstrated that albumin mRNA is degraded in both messenger ribonucleoprotein and polysome fractions. Sucrose gradient analysis demonstrates the same pattern for degradation of all other serum protein-coding mRNAs. Estrogen has no effect on the amounts or gradient distribution of actin, ferritin, or poly(A)-binding protein mRNA. We conclude that regulated destabilization of mRNAs encoding secreted proteins is a generalized phenomenon in response to estrogen stimulation of Xenopus liver. PMID:1922078

  5. Translational reprogramming following UVB irradiation is mediated by DNA-PKcs and allows selective recruitment to the polysomes of mRNAs encoding DNA repair enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Powley, Ian R.; Kondrashov, Alexander; Young, Lucy A.; Dobbyn, Helen C.; Hill, Kirsti; Cannell, Ian G.; Stoneley, Mark; Kong, Yi-Wen; Cotes, Julia A.; Smith, Graeme C.M.; Wek, Ron; Hayes, Christopher; Gant, Timothy W.; Spriggs, Keith A.; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    UVB-induced lesions in mammalian cellular DNA can, through the process of mutagenesis, lead to carcinogenesis. However, eukaryotic cells have evolved complex mechanisms of genomic surveillance and DNA damage repair to counteract the effects of UVB radiation. We show that following UVB DNA damage, there is an overall inhibition of protein synthesis and translational reprogramming. This reprogramming allows selective synthesis of DDR proteins, such as ERCC1, ERCC5, DDB1, XPA, XPD, and OGG1 and relies on upstream ORFs in the 5′ untranslated region of these mRNAs. Experiments with DNA-PKcs-deficient cell lines and a specific DNA-PKcs inhibitor demonstrate that both the general repression of mRNA translation and the preferential translation of specific mRNAs depend on DNA-PKcs activity, and therefore our data establish a link between a key DNA damage signaling component and protein synthesis. PMID:19451221

  6. Detection of cell-free, liver-specific mRNAs in peripheral blood from rats with hepatotoxicity: a potential toxicological biomarker for safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Makoto; Yanai, Mariko; Ookubo, Shingo; Awasaki, Naoko; Takami, Kenji; Imai, Ryoetsu

    2008-12-01

    To verify the concept that cell-free organ/tissue-specific mRNAs leaking from drug-damaged organs/tissues into peripheral blood could be toxicological biomarkers for identification of the target organs of drug toxicity, we attempted to detect liver-specific mRNAs in peripheral blood from rats with chemical-induced hepatotoxicity. We selected alpha(1)-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (Ambp) and albumin mRNAs as tentative liver-specific biomarkers and successfully detected them by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR in peripheral blood 24 h after D-galactosamine HCl (D-gal) or acetaminophen administration. Moreover, albumin mRNA was detected 2 h after D-gal administration, although plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were still unchanged. On the other hand, in peripheral blood from rat with bupivacaine HCl-induced skeletal muscle damage, neither Ambp nor albumin mRNA was detectable while plasma creatine kinase, ALT, and AST levels prominently increased 2 or 12 h after dosing. Furthermore, Ambp mRNA was also detectable in filtered plasma from rats with liver damage, indicating that cell-free Ambp mRNA can be present in peripheral blood. In conclusion, cell-free, liver-specific Ambp, and albumin mRNAs were detectable in peripheral blood from rats with chemical-induced liver damage. It is believed that the detection of cell-free organ/tissue-specific mRNA in peripheral blood is a promising approach in the survey of toxicological biomarkers. PMID:18779383

  7. Nutrient status modulates the expression of nesfatin-1 encoding nucleobindin 2A and 2B mRNAs in zebrafish gut, liver and brain.

    PubMed

    Hatef, Azadeh; Shajan, Sooraj; Unniappan, Suraj

    2015-05-01

    Nesfatin-1 is a naturally occurring, 82-amino acid peptide processed from the precursor nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), a highly conserved protein among vertebrates. In fish, two isoforms of NUCB2 (NUCB2A and NUCB2B) exist, and nesfatin-1 has been identified in goldfish and Ya fish. We recently reported the presence and appetite suppressing effects of nesfatin-1 in goldfish. The main objectives of this study were to characterize NUCB2 in zebrafish, and determine whether NUCB2 mRNAs are affected by food availability. Tissue distribution of NUCB2A and NUCB2B mRNAs, and NUCB2/nesfatin-1-like immunoreactivity (ir) in the gut of zebrafish were also investigated. In zebrafish, nesfatin-1 region (1-82 amino acids) in NUCB2A is 78% identical to NUCB2B. Both NUCB2A and NUCB2 mRNAs were most abundant in the liver, while less expression was found in other tissues including the brain and gut. NUCB2/nesfatin-1-like immunoreactivity was detected in the mucosal layer cells of zebrafish anterior gastrointestinal tract. NUCB2A and NUCB2B mRNA expression were decreased in the brain of zebrafish 3h after feeding, and after a 7-day food deprivation. Both NUCB2A and NUCB2B mRNAs in the gut were also decreased following 7 days of food deprivation, while NUCB2B mRNA was increased in the liver. Our results provide molecular and functional evidences to support potential anorectic and metabolic roles for endogenous nesfatin-1 in zebrafish. To our knowledge, this is the first report on NUCB2B characterization in vertebrates. PMID:25260251

  8. Effects of starvation and refeeding on gonadotropin and thyrotropin subunit mRNAs in male Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Cockrem, John F; Ishii, Susumu

    2002-04-01

    The contents of mRNAs encoding LH beta-, FSH beta-, TSH beta- and common alpha-subunit precursor molecules were measured in food-deprived and subsequently re-fed male Japanese quail. Pituitary LH beta, FSH beta and common alpha mRNA levels were decreased by starvation, and increased to the control levels by re-feeding. The rates of decreases of LH beta and common alpha mRNA levels were greater the corresponding rate for FSH beta levels. Pituitary TSH beta mRNA levels were not decreased by starvation, but increased transitorily by re-feeding. Plasma LH and triiodothyronine levels were decreased by starvation, and then increased to control levels by re-feeding, while plasma FSH and thyroxine levels did not show significant changes. Plasma LH and FSH levels showed positive correlations with pituitary common alpha and FSH beta mRNA levels, respectively, while plasma thyroxine levels showed a negative correlation with TSH beta mRNA levels. Hepatic weight was decreased slightly but significantly by starvation, and then showed a remarkable rebound after re-feeding was started. These results suggest that LH synthesis and secretion are more sensitive to starvation than FSH synthesis and secretion in Japanese quail, and that LH production recovered to initial levels within several days when birds were fully fed. Also, there is a possibility that the synthesis of TSH is accelerated transitorily by re-feeding. Furthermore, these results showed that there are different relationships between the plasma levels of LH, FSH, and TSH and the various hormone subunit mRNA levels. The remarkable change in hepatic weight leads us to assume that hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism is affected by starvation and re-feeding. PMID:12130823

  9. Cellular localization of guanylin and uroguanylin mRNAs in human and rat duodenal and colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Brenna, Øystein; Furnes, Marianne W; Munkvold, Bjørn; Kidd, Mark; Sandvik, Arne K; Gustafsson, Björn I

    2016-08-01

    Guanylin (GUCA2A/Guca2a/GN) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B/Guca2b/UGN) are expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and have been implicated in ion and fluid homeostasis, satiety, abdominal pain, growth and intestinal barrier integrity. Their cellular sources are debated and include goblet cells, entero-/colonocytes, enteroendocrine (EE) cells and tuft cells. We therefore investigated the cellular sources of GN and UGN mRNAs in human and rat duodenal and colonic epithelium with in situ hybridization (ISH) to determine co-expression with Chromogranin A (CHGA/Chga/CgA; enterochromaffin [EC] cells), defensin alpha 6 (DEFA6/Defa6; Paneth cells), mucin 2 (MUC2/Muc2; goblet cells) and selected tuft cell markers. GUCA2A/Guca2a expression was localized to goblet cells and colonocytes in human and rat colon. In human duodenum, GUCA2A was expressed in Paneth cells and was scarce in villous epithelial cells. In rat duodenum, Guca2a was only localized to goblet cells. Guca2b was focally expressed in rat colon. In human and rat duodenum and in human colon, GUCA2B/Guca2b was expressed in dispersed solitary epithelial cells, some with a tuft cell-like appearance. Neither GUCA2A nor GUCA2B were co-expressed with CHGA in human duodenal cells. Consequently, EC cells are probably not the major source of human GN or UGN but other EE cells as a source of GN or UGN are not entirely excluded. No convincing overlap with tuft cell markers was found. For the first time, we demonstrate the cellular expression of GUCA2B in human duodenum. The specific cellular distribution of both GN and UGN differs between duodenum and colon and between human and rat intestines. PMID:27044258

  10. The cis-acting elements involved in endonucleolytic cleavage of the 3' UTR of human IGF-II mRNAs bind a 50 kDa protein.

    PubMed

    Scheper, W; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1996-03-15

    Site-specific cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs requires two cis-acting elements, I and II, that are both located in the 3' untranslated region and separated by almost 2 kb. These elements can interact and form a stable RNA-RNA stem structure. In this study we have initiated the investigation of transacting factors involved in the cleavage of IGF-II mRNAs. The products of the cleavage reaction accumulate in the cytoplasm, suggesting that cleavage occurs in this cellular compartment. By electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we have identified a cytoplasmic protein with an apparent molecular weight of 48-50 kDa, IGF-II cleavage unit binding protein (ICU-BP), that binds to the stem structure formed by interaction of parts of the cis-acting elements I and II. The binding is resistant to high K+ concentrations and is dependent on Mg2+. In addition, ICU-BP binding is dependent on the cell density and correlates inversely with the IGM-II mRNA levels. In vivo cross-linking data show that this protein is associated with IGF-II mRNAs in vivo. PMID:8604329

  11. Epigenetic Activation of a Subset of mRNAs by eIF4E Explains Its Effects on Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mamane, Yaël; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; Martineau, Yvan; Sato, Taka-Aki; Larsson, Ola; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2007-01-01

    Background Translation deregulation is an important mechanism that causes aberrant cell growth, proliferation and survival. eIF4E, the mRNA 5′ cap-binding protein, plays a major role in translational control. To understand how eIF4E affects cell proliferation and survival, we studied mRNA targets that are translationally responsive to eIF4E. Methodology/Principal Findings Microarray analysis of polysomal mRNA from an eIF4E-inducible NIH 3T3 cell line was performed. Inducible expression of eIF4E resulted in increased translation of defined sets of mRNAs. Many of the mRNAs are novel targets, including those that encode large- and small-subunit ribosomal proteins and cell growth-related factors. In addition, there was augmented translation of mRNAs encoding anti-apoptotic proteins, which conferred resistance to endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance Our results shed new light on the mechanisms by which eIF4E prevents apoptosis and transforms cells. Downregulation of eIF4E and its downstream targets is a potential therapeutic option for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs. PMID:17311107

  12. Identification of mRNAs that move over long distances using an RNA-Seq analysis of Arabidopsis/Nicotiana benthamiana heterografts.

    PubMed

    Notaguchi, Michitaka; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Takamasa

    2015-02-01

    Phloem is a conductive tissue that allocates nutrients from mature source leaves to sinks such as young developing tissues. Phloem also delivers proteins and RNA species, such as small RNAs and mRNAs. Intensive studies on plant systemic signaling revealed the essential roles of proteins and RNA species. However, many of their functions are still largely unknown, with the roles of transported mRNAs being particularly poorly understood. A major difficulty is the absence of an accurate and comprehensive list of mobile transcripts. In this study, we used a hetero-graft system with Nicotiana benthamiana as the recipient scion and Arabidopsis as the donor stock, to identify transcripts that moved long distances across the graft union. We identified 138 Arabidopsis transcripts as mobile mRNAs, which we collectively termed the mRNA mobilome. Reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative real-time PCR and droplet digital PCR analyses confirmed the mobility. The transcripts included potential signaling factors and, unexpectedly, more general factors. In our investigations, we found no preferred transcript length, no previously known sequence motifs in promoter or transcript sequences and no similarities between the level of the transcripts and that in the source leaves. Grafting experiments regarding the function of ERECTA, an identified transcript, showed that no function of the transcript mobilized. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying transcripts that move over long distances using a hetero-graft system between different plant taxa. PMID:25527829

  13. Phenol emulsion-enhanced DNA-driven subtractive cDNA cloning: isolation of low-abundance monkey cortex-specific mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, G.H.; Sutcliffe, J.G.

    1988-03-01

    To isolate cDNA clones of low-abundance mRNAs expressed in monkey cerebral cortex but absent from cerebellum, the authors developed an improved subtractive cDNA cloning procedure that requires only modest quantities of mRNA. Plasmid DNA from a monkey cerebellum cDNA library was hybridized in large excess to radiolabeled monkey cortex cDNA in a phenol emulsion-enhanced reaction. The unhybridized cortex cDNA was isolated by chromatography on hydroxyapatite and used to probe colonies from a monkey cortex cDNA library. Of 60,000 colonies screened, 163 clones were isolated and confirmed by colony hybridization or RNA blotting to represent mRNAs, ranging from 0.001% to 0.1% abundance, specific to or highly enriched in cerebral cortex relative to cerebellum. Clones of one medium-abundance mRNA were recovered almost quantitatively. Two of the lower-abundance mRNAs were expressed at levels reduced by a factor of 10 in Alzheimer disease relative to normal human cortex. One of these was identified as the monkey preprosomatostatin I mRNA.

  14. Long-range RNA interaction of two sequence elements required for endonucleolytic cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, W; Meinsma, D; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1995-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNAs are subject to site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region, leading to an unstable 5' cleavage product containing the IGF-II coding region and a very stable 3' cleavage product of 1.8 kb. This endonucleolytic cleavage is most probably the first and rate-limiting step in degradation of IGF-II mRNAs. Two sequence elements within the 3' untranslated region are required for cleavage: element I, located approximately 2 kb upstream of the cleavage site, and element II, encompassing the cleavage site itself. We have identified a stable double-stranded RNA stem structure (delta G = -100 kcal/mol [418.4 kJ/mol]) that can be formed between element I and a region downstream of the cleavage site in element II. This structure is conserved among human, rat, and mouse mRNAs. Detailed analysis of the requirements for cleavage shows that the relative position of the elements is not essential for cleavage. Furthermore, the distance between the coding region and the cleavage site does not affect the cleavage reaction. Mutational analysis of the long-range RNA-RNA interaction shows that not only the double-stranded character but also the sequence of the stable RNA stem is important for cleavage. PMID:7799930

  15. Translation of viral mRNAs that do not require eIF4E is blocked by the inhibitor 4EGI-1.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Natalia; García-Moreno, Manuel; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Carrasco, Luis

    2013-09-01

    High throughput screening has rendered new inhibitors of eukaryotic protein synthesis. One such molecule, 4EGI-1 has been reported to selectively block the initiation factor eIF4E. We have investigated the action of this inhibitor on translation directed by several viral mRNAs which, in principle, do not utilize eIF4E. We found that 4EGI-1 inhibits translation directed by poliovirus IRES, in rabbit reticulocyte lysates, to a similar extent as capped mRNA. Moreover, 4EGI-1 inhibits translation driven by poliovirus IRES, both in vitro and in cultured cells, despite cleavage of eIF4G by picornavirus proteases. Finally, translation of vesicular stomatitis virus mRNAs and Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA is blocked by 4EGI-1 in infected cells to a similar extent as cellular mRNAs. These findings cast doubt on the selective action of this inhibitor, and suggest that this molecule may affect other steps in protein synthesis unrelated to cap recognition by eIF4E. PMID:23870416

  16. Regulation of gene expression by ethylene during Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) fruit development.

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, J E; Cordes, S; Read, E; Fischer, R L

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of gene expression by the plant hormone ethylene by cloning mRNAs that accumulate in unripe tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum) exposed to exogenous ethylene. The response to exogenous ethylene is rapid; within 30-120 min we detect an increase in the cloned mRNA concentrations. DNA sequence analysis indicates that one of the ethylene-inducible genes is related to a gene encoding wound-inducible proteinase inhibitor I. We have measured ethylene production during fruit development and detect low basal levels in unripe fruit and much higher levels in ripening fruit. Blot hybridization experiments show that expression of the cloned genes is developmentally regulated by ethylene during fruit ripening: the mRNAs produced by these genes are more abundant in ripe fruit than in unripe fruit, and this mRNA accumulation is repressed by a competitive inhibitor of ethylene action, norbornadiene. However, during fruit development some of the cloned mRNAs begin to accumulate when ethylene production is at a basal level, whereas other mRNAs begin to accumulate later when the endogenous ethylene concentration increases, suggesting that gene expression during fruit development can be activated by ethylene in two ways. In some cases gene expression is primarily activated by an increase in sensitivity to basal ethylene levels, whereas in other cases it may be regulated by an increase in ethylene concentration. Images PMID:3472237

  17. mRNAs and Protein Synthetic Machinery Localize into Regenerating Spinal Cord Axons When They Are Provided a Substrate That Supports Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kalinski, Ashley L.; Sachdeva, Rahul; Gomes, Cynthia; Lee, Seung Joon; Shah, Zalak; Houle, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Although intra-axonal protein synthesis is well recognized in cultured neurons and during development in vivo, there have been few reports of mRNA localization and/or intra-axonal translation in mature CNS axons. Indeed, previous work indicated that mature CNS axons contain much lower quantities of translational machinery than PNS axons, leading to the conclusion that the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthesis is linked to the intrinsic capacity of a neuron for regeneration, with mature CNS neurons showing much less growth after injury than PNS neurons. However, when regeneration by CNS axons is facilitated, it is not known whether the intra-axonal content of translational machinery changes or whether mRNAs localize into these axons. Here, we have used a peripheral nerve segment grafted into the transected spinal cord of adult rats as a supportive environment for regeneration by ascending spinal axons. By quantitative fluorescent in situ hybridization combined with immunofluorescence to unambiguously distinguish intra-axonal mRNAs, we show that regenerating spinal cord axons contain β-actin, GAP-43, Neuritin, Reg3a, Hamp, and Importin β1 mRNAs. These axons also contain 5S rRNA, phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein, eIF2α translation factor, and 4EBP1 translation factor inhibitory protein. Different levels of these mRNAs in CNS axons from regenerating PNS axons may relate to differences in the growth capacity of these neurons, although the presence of mRNA transport and likely local translation in both CNS and PNS neurons suggests an active role in the regenerative process. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although peripheral nerve axons retain the capacity to locally synthesize proteins into adulthood, previous studies have argued that mature brain and spinal cord axons cannot synthesize proteins. Protein synthesis in peripheral nerve axons is increased during regeneration, and intra-axonally synthesized proteins have been shown to contribute to nerve regeneration

  18. Identification of altered microRNAs and mRNAs in the cumulus cells of PCOS patients: miRNA-509-3p promotes oestradiol secretion by targeting MAP3K8.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Liu, Chang; Hao, Cuifang; Tang, Qianqing; Liu, Riming; Lin, Shaoxia; Zhang, Luping; Yan, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine and metabolic disorder in women and is characterised by polycystic ovaries, hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation. Although the clinical and biochemical signs of PCOS are typically heterogeneous, abnormal folliculogenesis is considered a common characteristic of PCOS. Our aim is to identify the altered miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in the cumulus cells of PCOS patients to investigate their molecular function in the aetiology and pathophysiology of PCOS. In this study, the miRNA expression profiles of the cumulus cell samples isolated from five PCOS and five control patients were determined by an miRNA microarray. At the same time, the altered mRNA profiles of the same cumulus cell samples were also identified by a cDNA microarray. From the microarray data, 17 miRNAs and 1263 mRNAs showed significantly different expression in the PCOS cumulus cells. The differentially expressed miRNA-509-3p and its potential target gene (MAP3K8) were identified from the miRNA and mRNA microarrays respectively. The expression of miRNA-509-3p was up-regulated and MAP3K8 was down-regulated in the PCOS cumulus cells. The direct interaction between miRNA-509-3p and MAP3K8 was confirmed by a luciferase activity assay in KGN cells. In addition, miRNA-509-3p mimics or inhibitor transfection tests in KGN cells further confirmed that miRNA-509-3p improved oestradiol (E2) secretion by inhibiting the expression of MAP3K8 These results help to characterise the pathogenesis of anovulation in PCOS, especially the regulation of E2 production. PMID:27001999

  19. Correlation of ghrelin concentration and ghrelin, ghrelin-O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a mRNAs expression in the proventriculus and brain of the growing chicken.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Hiraga, Takeo; Teraoka, Hiroki; Yaosaka, Noriko; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    To determine mechanisms for age-related decrease of GHS-R1a expression in the chicken proventriculus, changes in mRNA expression of ghrelin and ghrelin-O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) as well as ghrelin concentrations in the proventriculus and plasma were examined in growing chickens. Changes in expression levels of ghrelin, GOAT and GHS-R1a mRNAs were also examined in different brain regions (pituitary, hypothalamus, thalamus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, midbrain and medulla oblongata). Ghrelin concentrations in the proventriculus and plasma increased with aging and reached plateaus at 30-50 days after hatching. High level of ghrelin mRNA decreased at 3 days after hatching, and it became stable at half of the initial level. Expression levels of GHS-R1a and GOAT decreased 3 or 5 days after hatching and became stable at low levels. Significant negative correlations were found between plasma ghrelin and mRNA levels of GOAT and GHS-R1a. Expression levels of ghrelin mRNA were different in the brain regions, but a significant change was not seen with aging. GHS-R1a expression was detected in all brain regions, and age-dependent changes were observed in the pituitary and cerebellum. Different from the proventriculus, the expression of GOAT in the brain increased or did not change with aging. These results suggest that decreased GHS-R1a and GOAT mRNA expression in the proventriculus is due to endogenous ghrelin-induced down-regulation. Expression levels of ghrelin, GOAT and GHS-R1a in the brain were independently regulated from that in the proventriculus, and age-related and region-dependent regulation pattern suggests a local effect of ghrelin system in chicken brain. PMID:25435492

  20. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by Piwi proteins and piRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Lin, Haifan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Piwi proteins and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are essential for gametogenesis, embryogenesis, and stem cell maintenance in animals. Piwi proteins act on transposon RNAs by cleaving the RNAs and by interacting with factors involved in RNA regulation. Additionally, piRNAs generated from transposons and psuedogenes can be used by Piwi proteins to regulate mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we discuss piRNA biogenesis, recent findings on post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs by the piRNA pathway, and the potential importance of this post-transcriptional regulation for a variety of biological processes such as gametogenesis, developmental transitions, and sex determination. PMID:25280102

  1. RNA-Binding Proteins in the Regulation of miRNA Activity: A Focus on Neuronal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Loffreda, Alessia; Rigamonti, Aurora; Barabino, Silvia M. L.; Lenzken, Silvia C.

    2015-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are key processes in the fine-tuning of cellular homeostasis. Two major actors in this scenario are RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) that together play important roles in the biogenesis, turnover, translation and localization of mRNAs. This review will highlight recent advances in the understanding of the role of RBPs in the regulation of the maturation and the function of miRNAs. The interplay between miRNAs and RBPs is discussed specifically in the context of neuronal development and function. PMID:26437437

  2. Redox regulation of photosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine H.

    2012-01-01

    Redox chemistry and redox regulation are central to the operation of photosynthesis and respiration. However, the roles of different oxidants and antioxidants in the regulation of photosynthetic or respiratory gene expression remain poorly understood. Leaf transcriptome profiles of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that are deficient in either hydrogen peroxide processing enzymes or in low molecular weight antioxidant were therefore compared to determine how different antioxidant systems that process hydrogen peroxide influence transcripts encoding proteins targeted to the chloroplasts or mitochondria. Less than 10 per cent overlap was observed in the transcriptome patterns of leaves that are deficient in either photorespiratory (catalase (cat)2) or chloroplastic (thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tapx)) hydrogen peroxide processing. Transcripts encoding photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle components were lower in glutathione-deficient leaves, as were the thylakoid NAD(P)H (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)) dehydrogenases (NDH) mRNAs. Some thylakoid NDH mRNAs were also less abundant in tAPX-deficient and ascorbate-deficient leaves. Transcripts encoding the external and internal respiratory NDHs were increased by low glutathione and low ascorbate. Regulation of transcripts encoding specific components of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains by hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate and glutathione may serve to balance non-cyclic and cyclic electron flow pathways in relation to oxidant production and reductant availability. PMID:23148274

  3. Identification of two DNA helicases UvrD and DinG as suppressors for lethality caused by mutant cspA mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok; Phadtare, Sangita; Inouye, Masayori

    2012-01-01

    CspA is a major cold shock-inducible protein (70 aa), and its major role in the cold shock response was shown to be as an RNA chaperone destabilizing secondary structure of mRNAs at low temperature. Previously, we showed that the overexpression of mutant cspA containing premature non-sense codons at various positions led to stalled ribosomes on mutant cspA transcripts, ultimately leading to cell death. This lethality is primarily due to the highly translatable cspA 5'-UTR that recruits most of the ribosomes from other mRNAs, which are then stalled at the abnormal stop codon. This was called the 'LACE' effect. We show here that non-sense mutation even at the 67th position as well as substitutions of aromatic amino acid residues present on the RNA-binding surface of CspA protein to alanine caused the LACE effect by trapping a substantial amount of ribosomes on cspA mRNAs. In an attempt to identify a suppressor(s), which may help the cells to recover from the inhibitory LACE effect, genetic screening of an Escherichia coli genomic library was performed. We isolated suppressors that contained the genomic fragments encoding uvrD and dinG, respectively, whose gene products are ATP-dependent DNA helicases. The nucleic acid-binding and ATPase activities of these two helicases were found to be essential for their suppression activity. This genomic screening offers an approach to shed light on the mechanistic of 5'-UTR of cspA mRNA and novel roles of E. coli helicases that function in DNA repair. PMID:22832783

  4. Hypothyroidism advances mammary involution in lactating rats through inhibition of PRL signaling and induction of LIF/STAT3 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Campo Verde Arboccó, Fiorella; Sasso, Corina V; Actis, Esteban A; Carón, Rubén W; Hapon, María Belén; Jahn, Graciela A

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid diseases have deleterious effects on lactation, litter growth and survival, and hinder the suckling-induced hormone release, leading in the case of hyperthyroidism, to premature mammary involution. To determine the effects of hypothyroidism (HypoT) on late lactation, we analyzed the effect of chronic 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU)-induced HypoT on mammary histology and the expression of members of the JAK/STAT/SOCS signaling pathway, milk proteins, prolactin (PRLR), estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR) and thyroid hormone (TR) receptors, markers of involution (such as stat3, lif, bcl2, BAX and PARP) on lactation (L) day 21. HypoT mothers showed increased histological markers of involution compared with control rats, such as adipose/epithelial ratio, inactive alveoli, picnotic nuclei and numerous detached apoptotic cells within the alveolar lumina. We also found decreased PRLR, β-casein and α-lactoalbumin mRNAs, but increased SOCS1, SOCS3, STAT3 and LIF mRNAs, suggesting a decrease in PRL signaling and induction of involution markers. Furthermore, Caspase-3 and 8 and PARP labeled cells and the expression of structural proteins such as β-Actin, α-Tubulin and Lamin B were increased, indicating the activation of apoptotic pathways and tissue remodelation. HypoT also increased PRA (mRNA and protein) and erβ and decreased erα mRNAs, and increased strongly TRα1, TRβ1, PRA and ERα protein levels. These results show that lactating HypoT rats have premature mammary involution, most probably induced by the inhibition of prolactin signaling along with the activation of the LIF-STAT3 pathway. PMID:26472537

  5. Identification of two DNA helicases UvrD and DinG as suppressors for lethality caused by mutant cspA mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok; Phadtare, Sangita; Inouye, Masayori

    2012-01-01

    CspA is a major cold-shock inducible protein (70 aa), and its major role in the cold-shock response was shown to be as an RNA chaperone destabilizing secondary structure of mRNAs at low temperature. Previously, we showed that the overexpression of mutant cspA containing premature nonsense codons at various positions led to stalled ribosomes on mutant cspA transcripts, ultimately leading to cell death. This lethality is primarily due to the highly translatable cspA 5′-UTR that recruits most of the ribosomes from other mRNAs, which are then stalled at the abnormal stop codon. This was called the ‘LACE’ effect. We show here that nonsense mutation even at 67th position as well as substitutions of aromatic amino acid residues present on the RNA-binding surface of CspA protein to alanine caused the LACE effect by trapping a substantial amount of ribosomes on cspA mRNAs. In an attempt to identify a suppressor(s), which may help the cells to recover from the inhibitory LACE effect, genetic screening of an E. coli genomic library was performed. We isolated suppressors that contained the genomic fragments encoding uvrD and dinG, respectively, whose gene products are ATP-dependent DNA helicases. The nucleic acid-binding and ATPase activities of these two helicases were found to be essential for their suppression activity. This genomic screening offers an approach to shed light on the mechanistic of 5′-UTR of cspA mRNA and novel roles of E. coli helicases that function in DNA repair. PMID:22832783

  6. A Tale of Two RNAs during Viral Infection: How Viruses Antagonize mRNAs and Small Non-Coding RNAs in The Host Cell.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Kristina M; Nag, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection initiates an array of changes in host gene expression. Many viruses dampen host protein expression and attempt to evade the host anti-viral defense machinery. Host gene expression is suppressed at several stages of host messenger RNA (mRNA) formation including selective degradation of translationally competent messenger RNAs. Besides mRNAs, host cells also express a variety of noncoding RNAs, including small RNAs, that may also be subject to inhibition upon viral infection. In this review we focused on different ways viruses antagonize coding and noncoding RNAs in the host cell to its advantage. PMID:27271653

  7. A Tale of Two RNAs during Viral Infection: How Viruses Antagonize mRNAs and Small Non-Coding RNAs in The Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Kristina M.; Nag, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection initiates an array of changes in host gene expression. Many viruses dampen host protein expression and attempt to evade the host anti-viral defense machinery. Host gene expression is suppressed at several stages of host messenger RNA (mRNA) formation including selective degradation of translationally competent messenger RNAs. Besides mRNAs, host cells also express a variety of noncoding RNAs, including small RNAs, that may also be subject to inhibition upon viral infection. In this review we focused on different ways viruses antagonize coding and noncoding RNAs in the host cell to its advantage. PMID:27271653

  8. Translation Initiation on mRNAs Bound by Nuclear Cap-binding Protein Complex CBP80/20 Requires Interaction between CBP80/20-dependent Translation Initiation Factor and Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 3g*

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Junho; Oh, Nara; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ye Kyung; Song, Ok-Kyu; Locker, Nicolas; Chi, Sung-Gil; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2012-01-01

    In the cytoplasm of mammalian cells, either cap-binding proteins 80 and 20 (CBP80/20) or eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4E can direct the initiation of translation. Although the recruitment of ribosomes to mRNAs during eIF4E-dependent translation (ET) is well characterized, the molecular mechanism for CBP80/20-dependent translation (CT) remains obscure. Here, we show that CBP80/20-dependent translation initiation factor (CTIF), which has been shown to be preferentially involved in CT but not ET, specifically interacts with eIF3g, a component of the eIF3 complex involved in ribosome recruitment. By interacting with eIF3g, CTIF serves as an adaptor protein to bridge the CBP80/20 and the eIF3 complex, leading to efficient ribosome recruitment during CT. Accordingly, down-regulation of CTIF using a small interfering RNA causes a redistribution of CBP80 from polysome fractions to subpolysome fractions, without significant consequence to eIF4E distribution. In addition, down-regulation of eIF3g inhibits the efficiency of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, which is tightly coupled to CT but not to ET. Moreover, the artificial tethering of CTIF to an intercistronic region of dicistronic mRNA results in translation of the downstream cistron in an eIF3-dependent manner. These findings support the idea that CT mechanistically differs from ET. PMID:22493286

  9. Transcriptional regulation of decreased protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, G.; Steffen, J. M.; Geoghegan, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory role of transcriptional alterations in unloaded skeletal muscles was investigated by determining levels of total muscle RNA and mRNA fractions in soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats subjected to whole-body suspension for up to 7 days. After 7 days, total RNA and mRNA contents were lower in soleus and gastrocnemius, compared with controls, but the concentrations of both RNAs per g muscle were unaltered. Alpha-actin mRNA (assessed by dot hybridization) was significantly reduced in soleus after 1, 3, and 7 days of suspension and in gastrocnemius after 3 and 7 days, but was unchanged in EDL. Protein synthesis directed by RNA extracted from soleus and EDL indicated marked alteration in mRNAs coding for several small proteins. Results suggest that altered transcription and availability of specific mRNAs contribute significantly to the regulation of protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading.

  10. Noise-induced multistability in the regulation of cancer by genes and pseudogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, K. G.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-07-01

    We extend a previously introduced model of stochastic gene regulation of cancer to a nonlinear case having both gene and pseudogene messenger RNAs (mRNAs) self-regulated. The model consists of stochastic Boolean genetic elements and possesses noise-induced multistability (multimodality). We obtain analytical expressions for probabilities for the case of constant but finite number of microRNA molecules which act as a noise source for the competing gene and pseudogene mRNAs. The probability distribution functions display both the global bistability regime as well as even-odd number oscillations for a certain range of model parameters. Statistical characteristics of the mRNA's level fluctuations are evaluated. The obtained results of the extended model advance our understanding of the process of stochastic gene and pseudogene expressions that is crucial in regulation of cancer.

  11. Translatome profiling in dormant and nondormant sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds highlights post-transcriptional regulation of germination.

    PubMed

    Layat, Elodie; Leymarie, Juliette; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Caius, José; Langlade, Nicolas; Bailly, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    Seed dormancy, which blocks germination in apparently favourable conditions, is a key regulatory control point of plant population establishment. As germination requires de novo translation, its regulation by dormancy is likely to be related to the association of individual transcripts to polysomes. Here, the polysome-associated mRNAs, that is, the translatome, were fractionated and characterized with microarrays in dormant and nondormant sunflower (Helianthus annuus) embryos during their imbibition at 10°C, a temperature preventing germination of dormant embryos. Profiling of mRNAs in polysomal complexes revealed that the translatome differs between germinating and nongerminating embryos. Association of transcripts with polysomes reached a maximum after 15 h of imbibition; at this time-point 194 polysome-associated transcripts were specifically found in nondormant embryos and 47 in dormant embryos only. The proteins corresponding to the polysomal mRNAs in nondormant embryos appeared to be very pertinent for germination and were involved mainly in transport, regulation of transcription or cell wall modifications. This work demonstrates that seed germination results from a timely regulated and selective recruitment of mRNAs to polysomes, thus opening novel fields of investigation for the understanding of this developmental process. PMID:25157915

  12. Ribosomal stress activates eEF2K–eEF2 pathway causing translation elongation inhibition and recruitment of Terminal Oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNAs on polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Gismondi, Angelo; Caldarola, Sara; Lisi, Gaia; Juli, Giada; Chellini, Lidia; Iadevaia, Valentina; Proud, Christopher G.; Loreni, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of adequate amounts of ribosomes is an essential task for the cell. It is therefore not surprising that regulatory circuits exist to organize the synthesis of ribosomal components. It has been shown that defect in ribosome biogenesis (ribosomal stress) induces apoptosis or cell cycle arrest through activation of the tumor suppressor p53. This mechanism is thought to be implicated in the pathophysiology of a group of genetic diseases such as Diamond Blackfan Anemia which are called ribosomopathies. We have identified an additional response to ribosomal stress that includes the activation of eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 kinase with a consequent inhibition of translation elongation. This leads to a translational reprogramming in the cell that involves the structurally defined group of messengers called terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNAs which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. In fact, while general protein synthesis is decreased by the impairment of elongation, TOP mRNAs are recruited on polysomes causing a relative increase in the synthesis of TOP mRNA-encoded proteins compared to other proteins. Therefore, in response to ribosomal stress, there is a change in the translation pattern of the cell which may help restore a sufficient level of ribosomes. PMID:25332393

  13. Ribosomal stress activates eEF2K-eEF2 pathway causing translation elongation inhibition and recruitment of terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNAs on polysomes.

    PubMed

    Gismondi, Angelo; Caldarola, Sara; Lisi, Gaia; Juli, Giada; Chellini, Lidia; Iadevaia, Valentina; Proud, Christopher G; Loreni, Fabrizio

    2014-11-10

    The synthesis of adequate amounts of ribosomes is an essential task for the cell. It is therefore not surprising that regulatory circuits exist to organize the synthesis of ribosomal components. It has been shown that defect in ribosome biogenesis (ribosomal stress) induces apoptosis or cell cycle arrest through activation of the tumor suppressor p53. This mechanism is thought to be implicated in the pathophysiology of a group of genetic diseases such as Diamond Blackfan Anemia which are called ribosomopathies. We have identified an additional response to ribosomal stress that includes the activation of eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 kinase with a consequent inhibition of translation elongation. This leads to a translational reprogramming in the cell that involves the structurally defined group of messengers called terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNAs which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. In fact, while general protein synthesis is decreased by the impairment of elongation, TOP mRNAs are recruited on polysomes causing a relative increase in the synthesis of TOP mRNA-encoded proteins compared to other proteins. Therefore, in response to ribosomal stress, there is a change in the translation pattern of the cell which may help restore a sufficient level of ribosomes. PMID:25332393

  14. Gibberellin-induced changes in the populations of translatable mRNAs and accumulated polypeptides in dwarfs of maize and pea

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, J.; Voytas, D.F.; Olszewski, N.E.; Ausubel, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the molecular mechanism of gibberellin-induced stem elongation in maize and pea. Dwarf mutants of maize and pea lack endogenous gibberellin (GA/sub 1/) but become phenotypically normal with exogenous applications of this hormone. Sections from either etiolated maize or green pea seedlings were incubated in the presence of (/sup 35/S) methionine for 3 hours with or without gibberellin. Labeled proteins from soluble and particulate fractions were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and specific changes in the patterns of protein synthesis were observed upon treatment with gibberellin. Polyadenylated mRNAs from etiolated or green maize shoots and green pea epicotyls treated or not with gibberellin (a 0.5 to 16 hour time course) were assayed by translation in a rabbit reticulocyte extract and separation of products by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both increases and decreases in the levels of specific polypeptides were seen for pea and corn, and these changes were observed within 30 minutes of treatment with gibberellin. Together, these data indicate that gibberellin induces changes in the expression of a subset of gene products within elongating dwarfs. This may be due to changes in transcription rate, mRNA stability, or increased efficiency of translation of certain mRNAs.

  15. Multiple G-quartet structures in pre-edited mRNAs suggest evolutionary driving force for RNA editing in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Leeder, W-Matthias; Hummel, Niklas F C; Göringer, H Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcript maturation in African trypanosomes requires a U-nucleotide specific RNA editing reaction. In its most extreme form hundreds of U's are inserted into and deleted from primary transcripts to generate functional mRNAs. Unfortunately, both origin and biological role of the process have remained enigmatic. Here we report a so far unrecognized structural feature of pre-edited mRNAs. We demonstrate that the cryptic pre-mRNAs contain numerous clustered G-nt, which fold into G-quadruplex (GQ) structures. We identified 27 GQ's in the different pre-mRNAs and demonstrate a positive correlation between the steady state abundance of guide (g)RNAs and the sequence position of GQ-elements. We postulate that the driving force for selecting G-rich sequences lies in the formation of DNA/RNA hybrid G-quadruplex (HQ) structures between the pre-edited transcripts and the non-template strands of mitochondrial DNA. HQ's are transcription termination/replication initiation sites and thus guarantee an unperturbed replication of the mt-genome. This is of special importance in the insect-stage of the parasite. In the transcription-on state, the identified GQ's require editing as a GQ-resolving activity indicating a link between replication, transcription and RNA editing. We propose that the different processes have coevolved and suggest the parasite life-cycle and the single mitochondrion as evolutionary driving forces. PMID:27436151

  16. Coexpression of wild-type and variant oestrogen receptor mRNAs in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Castles, C. G.; Klotz, D. M.; Fuqua, S. A.; Hill, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    Wild-type as well as variant oestrogen receptor (ER) mRNAs with exon 5 and 7 deleted were identified in a panel of human breast tumour cell lines by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction followed by dideoxynucleotide sequence analysis, and then quantitated by ribonuclease protection analysis. All cell lines categorised as ER+ by ligand-binding analysis expressed both wild-type and variant ER transcripts. Most cell lines classified as ER- did not express any ER transcript. However, three ER- cell lines (BT-20, MDA-MB-330 and T47Dco) expressed both wild-type and variant transcripts. A differential pattern of expression of wild type to variant was seen in both ER+ and ER- cell lines, however this pattern was not paralleled by differences in ligand-binding activity. Breast tumour cell lines previously classified as ER- expressed significantly lower levels of ER transcripts than did their ER+ counterparts. In view of these findings, as well as earlier reports that the exon 5 deletion ER variant encodes a dominant-positive receptor, it seems clear that some cell lines are misclassified as ER-, and express both wild-type and variant ER mRNAs, and that the overexpression of this variant may account, in part, for their oestrogen-independent phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7734323

  17. Cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1 export to uninfected cells exosomes containing STING, viral mRNAs, and microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kalamvoki, Maria; Du, Te; Roizman, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    STING (stimulator of IFN genes) activates the IFN-dependent innate immune response to infection on sensing the presence of DNA in cytosol. The quantity of STING accumulating in cultured cells varies; it is relatively high in some cell lines [e.g., HEp-2, human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL), and HeLa] and low in others (e.g., Vero cells). In a preceding publication we reported that STING was stable in four cell lines infected with herpes simplex virus 1 and that it was actively stabilized in at least two cell lines derived from human cancers. In this report we show that STING is exported from HEp-2 cells to Vero cells along with virions, viral mRNAs, microRNAs, and the exosome marker protein CD9. The virions and exosomes copurified. The quantity of STING and CD9 exported from one cell line to another was inoculum-size–dependent and reflected the levels of STING and CD9 accumulating in the cells in which the virus inoculum was made. The export of STING, an innate immune sensor, and of viral mRNAs whose major role may be in silencing viral genes in latently infected neurons, suggests that the virus has evolved mechanisms that curtail rather than foster the spread of infection under certain conditions. PMID:25368198

  18. Computational Selection and Experimental Validation of Allosteric Ribozymes That Sense a Specific Sequence of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase mRNAs as Universal Anticancer Therapy Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kostova, Gergana T.

    2013-01-01

    High expression levels of telomerase reverse transcriptase messenger RNAs in differentiated cells can be used as a common marker for cancer development. In this paper, we describe a novel computational method for selection of allosteric ribozymes that sense a specific sequence of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNAs. The in silico selection employed is based on computing secondary structures of RNA using the partition function in combination with a random search algorithm. We selected one of the ribozymes for experimental validation. The obtained results demonstrate that the tested ribozyme has a high-speed (∼1.8 per minute) of self-cleavage and is very selective. It can distinguish well between perfectly matching effector and the closest expressed RNA sequence in the human cell with 10 mismatches, with a ∼300-fold difference under physiologically relevant conditions. The presented algorithm is universal since the allosteric ribozymes can be designed to sense any specific RNA or DNA sequence of interest. Such designer ribozymes may be used for monitoring the expression of mRNAs in the cell and for developing novel anticancer gene therapies. PMID:24206267

  19. Resorption-cycle-dependent polarization of mRNAs for different subunits of V-ATPase in bone-resorbing osteoclasts.

    PubMed Central

    Laitala-Leinonen, T; Howell, M L; Dean, G E; Väänänen, H K

    1996-01-01

    Protein sorting in eukaryotic cells is mainly done by specific targeting of polypeptides. The present evidence from oocytes, neurons, and some other polarized cells suggests that protein sorting can be further facilitated by concentrating mRNAs to their corresponding subcellular areas. However, very little is known about the mechanism(s) involved in mRNA targeting, or how widespread and dynamic such mRNA sorting might be. In this study, we have used an in vitro cell culture system, where large multinucleated osteoclasts undergo continuous structural and functional changes from polarized (resorbing) to a nonpolarized (resting) stage. We demonstrate here, using a nonradioactive in situ hybridization technique and confocal microscopy, that mRNAs for several vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunits change their localization and polarity in osteoclasts according to the resorption cycle, whereas mRNA for cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase II is found diffusely located throughout the osteoclast during the whole resorption cycle. Antisense RNA against the 16-kDa or 60-kDa V-ATPase subunit inhibits polarization of the osteoclasts, as determined by cytoskeleton staining. Antisense RNA against carbonic anhydrase II, however, has no such effect. Images PMID:8741845

  20. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequences of the complementary DNAs to chicken skeletal muscle myosin two alkali light chain mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Nabeshima, Y; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Muramatsu, M; Ogata, K

    1982-01-01

    We report here the molecular cloning and sequence analysis of DNAs complementary to mRNAs for myosin alkali light chain of chicken embryo and adult leg skeletal muscle. pSMA2-1 contained an 818 base-pair insert that includes the entire coding region and 5' and 3' untranslated regions of A2 mRNA. pSMA1-1 contained a 848 base-pair insert that included the 3' untranslated region and almost all of the coding region except for the N-terminal 13 amino acid residues of the A1 light chain. The 741 nucleotide sequences of A1 and A2 mRNAs corresponding to C-terminal 141 amino acid residues and 3' untranslated regions were identical. The 5' terminal nucleotide sequences corresponding to N-terminal 35 amino acid residues of A1 chain were quite different from the sequences corresponding to N-terminal 8 amino acid residues and of the 5' untranslated region of A2 mRNA. These findings are discussed in relation to the structures of the genes for A1 and A2 mRNA. PMID:6128725

  1. Proteome-wide analysis reveals clues of complementary interactions between mRNAs and their cognate proteins as the physicochemical foundation of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Polyansky, Anton A; Hlevnjak, Mario; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Despite more than 50 years of effort, the origin of the genetic code remains enigmatic. Among different theories, the stereochemical hypothesis suggests that the code evolved as a consequence of direct interactions between amino acids and appropriate bases. If indeed true, such physicochemical foundation of the mRNA/protein relationship could also potentially lead to novel principles of protein-mRNA interactions in general. Inspired by this promise, we have recently explored the connection between the physicochemical properties of mRNAs and their cognate proteins at the proteome level. Using experimentally and computationally derived measures of solubility of amino acids in aqueous solutions of pyrimidine analogs together with knowledge-based interaction preferences of amino acids for different nucleobases, we have revealed a statistically significant matching between the composition of mRNA coding sequences and the base-binding preferences of their cognate protein sequences. Our findings provide strong support for the stereochemical hypothesis of genetic code’s origin and suggest the possibility of direct complementary interactions between mRNAs and cognate proteins even in present-day cells. PMID:23945356

  2. A short conserved motif in ALYREF directs cap- and EJC-dependent assembly of export complexes on spliced mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gromadzka, Agnieszka M.; Steckelberg, Anna-Lena; Singh, Kusum K.; Hofmann, Kay; Gehring, Niels H.

    2016-01-01

    The export of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) is the final of several nuclear posttranscriptional steps of gene expression. The formation of export-competent mRNPs involves the recruitment of export factors that are assumed to facilitate transport of the mature mRNAs. Using in vitro splicing assays, we show that a core set of export factors, including ALYREF, UAP56 and DDX39, readily associate with the spliced RNAs in an EJC (exon junction complex)- and cap-dependent manner. In order to elucidate how ALYREF and other export adaptors mediate mRNA export, we conducted a computational analysis and discovered four short, conserved, linear motifs present in RNA-binding proteins. We show that mutation in one of the new motifs (WxHD) in an unstructured region of ALYREF reduced RNA binding and abolished the interaction with eIF4A3 and CBP80. Additionally, the mutation impaired proper localization to nuclear speckles and export of a spliced reporter mRNA. Our results reveal important details of the orchestrated recruitment of export factors during the formation of export competent mRNPs. PMID:26773052

  3. Multiple G-quartet structures in pre-edited mRNAs suggest evolutionary driving force for RNA editing in trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, W.-Matthias; Hummel, Niklas F. C.; Göringer, H. Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcript maturation in African trypanosomes requires a U-nucleotide specific RNA editing reaction. In its most extreme form hundreds of U’s are inserted into and deleted from primary transcripts to generate functional mRNAs. Unfortunately, both origin and biological role of the process have remained enigmatic. Here we report a so far unrecognized structural feature of pre-edited mRNAs. We demonstrate that the cryptic pre-mRNAs contain numerous clustered G-nt, which fold into G-quadruplex (GQ) structures. We identified 27 GQ’s in the different pre-mRNAs and demonstrate a positive correlation between the steady state abundance of guide (g)RNAs and the sequence position of GQ-elements. We postulate that the driving force for selecting G-rich sequences lies in the formation of DNA/RNA hybrid G-quadruplex (HQ) structures between the pre-edited transcripts and the non-template strands of mitochondrial DNA. HQ’s are transcription termination/replication initiation sites and thus guarantee an unperturbed replication of the mt-genome. This is of special importance in the insect-stage of the parasite. In the transcription-on state, the identified GQ’s require editing as a GQ-resolving activity indicating a link between replication, transcription and RNA editing. We propose that the different processes have coevolved and suggest the parasite life-cycle and the single mitochondrion as evolutionary driving forces. PMID:27436151

  4. Increased Levels of Circulating and Tissue mRNAs of Oct-4, Sox-2, Bmi-1 and Nanog is ESCC Patients: Potential Tool for Minimally Invasive Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Kriti; Saraya, Anoop; Sharma, Rinu

    2012-01-01

    Background Early stages of esophageal cancer lack a specific symptom, a reliable biomarker and accurate non-invasive diagnostic modalities prompting the pressing need for identification of a marker for early diagnosis of this disease. Methods In the present study we investigated the levels of circulating and tissue mRNAs of Oct-3/4, Sox-2, Nanog and Bmi-1 in esophageal cancer patients using Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) with the aim of evaluating their potential as minimally invasive diagnostic markers. Result Increased transcript levels of Oct-4, Sox-2, Bmi-1 and Nanog were detected in (92%), (95%), (75%) and (67%) of the esophageal cancer tissues, respectively as compared with the matched distant normals. Conclusion Interestingly, most of the preneoplastic tissues exhibited increased transcript levels of these stemness markers suggesting their role in early stages of esophageal tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the detection of elevated levels of circulating mRNAs of Oct-4 and Nanog in sera of esophageal cancer patients emphasizes their potential as minimally invasive diagnostic markers for esophageal cancer. PMID:22493560

  5. Resistance of mRNAs with AUG-proximal nonsense mutations to nonsense-mediated decay reflects variables of mRNA structure and translational activity

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisco J.C.; Teixeira, Alexandre; Kong, Jian; Barbosa, Cristina; Silva, Ana Luísa; Marques-Ramos, Ana; Liebhaber, Stephen A.; Romão, Luísa

    2015-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a surveillance pathway that recognizes and selectively degrades mRNAs carrying premature termination codons (PTCs). The level of sensitivity of a PTC-containing mRNA to NMD is multifactorial. We have previously shown that human β-globin mRNAs carrying PTCs in close proximity to the translation initiation AUG codon escape NMD. This was called the ‘AUG-proximity effect’. The present analysis of nonsense codons in the human α-globin mRNA illustrates that the determinants of the AUG-proximity effect are in fact quite complex, reflecting the ability of the ribosome to re-initiate translation 3′ to the PTC and the specific sequence and secondary structure of the translated ORF. These data support a model in which the time taken to translate the short ORF, impacted by distance, sequence, and structure, not only modulates translation re-initiation, but also impacts on the exact boundary of AUG-proximity protection from NMD. PMID:26068473

  6. Hypoxia Induces Autophagy through Translational Up-Regulation of Lysosomal Proteins in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Chang, Chiao-May; Sun, H. Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia occurs in a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis. Tumor cells have to adapt to hypoxia by altering their gene expression and protein synthesis. Here, we showed that hypoxia inhibits translation through activation of PERK and inactivation of mTOR in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Prolonged hypoxia (1% O2, 16 h) dramatically inhibits general translation in HCT116 cells, yet selected mRNAs remain efficiently translated under such a condition. Using microarray analysis of polysome- associated mRNAs, we identified a large number of hypoxia-regulated genes at the translational level. Efficiently translated mRNAs during hypoxia were validated by polysome profiling and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of the up-regulated genes are involved in lysosome, glycan and lipid metabolism, antigen presentation, cell adhesion, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. The majority of down-regulated genes are involved in apoptosis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation. Further investigation showed that hypoxia induces lysosomal autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction through translational regulation in HCT116 cells. The abundance of several translation factors and the mTOR kinase activity are involved in hypoxia-induced mitochondrial autophagy in HCT116 cells. Our studies highlight the importance of translational regulation for tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:27078027

  7. A universal strategy for regulating mRNA translation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jicong; Arha, Manish; Sudrik, Chaitanya; Mukherjee, Abhirup; Wu, Xia; Kane, Ravi S.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a simple strategy to control mRNA translation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells which relies on a unique protein–RNA interaction. Specifically, we used the Pumilio/FBF (PUF) protein to repress translation by binding in between the ribosome binding site (RBS) and the start codon (in Escherichia coli), or by binding to the 5′ untranslated region of target mRNAs (in mammalian cells). The design principle is straightforward, the extent of translational repression can be tuned and the regulator is genetically encoded, enabling the construction of artificial signal cascades. We demonstrate that this approach can also be used to regulate polycistronic mRNAs; such regulation has rarely been achieved in previous reports. Since the regulator used in this study is a modular RNA-binding protein, which can be engineered to target different 8-nucleotide RNA sequences, our strategy could be used in the future to target endogenous mRNAs for regulating metabolic flows and signaling pathways in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. PMID:25845589

  8. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujie; Stefanovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days). However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6), is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR) of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL) structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP), 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25) and RNA helicase A (RHA), contribute to this process. PMID:27011170

  9. Stochastic Gene Expression in Networks of Post-transcriptional Regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Charles; Jia, Tao; Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    Post-transcriptional regulators, such as small RNAs and microRNAs, are critical elements of diverse cellular pathways. It has been postulated that, in several important cases, the role of these regulators is to to modulate the noise in gene expression for the regulated target. Correspondingly, general stochastic models have been developed, and results obtained, for the case in which a single sRNA regulates a single mRNA target. We generalize these results to networks containing a single mRNA regulated by multiple sRNAs and to networks containing multiple mRNAs regulated by a single sRNA. For these systems, we obtain exact expressions relating the mean levels of the sRNAs to the mean levels of the mRNAs. Additionally, we consider the convergence of the original model to an approximate model which considers sRNA concentrations to be high; for the latter model we derive an analytic form for the generating function of the protein distribution. Finally, we discuss potential experimental protocols which, in combination with the derived results, can be used to infer the underlying gene expression parameters.

  10. Untranslated regions from C4 amaranth AhRbcS1 mRNAs confer translational enhancement and preferential bundle sheath cell expression in transgenic C4 Flaveria bidentis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Corey, Amy C; Yin, Li-Ping; Ali, Shahjahan; Taylor, William C; Berry, James O

    2004-11-01

    Many aspects of photosynthetic gene expression are posttranscriptionally regulated in C4 plants. To determine if RbcS mRNA untranslated regions (UTRs) in themselves could confer any characteristic C4 expression patterns, 5'- and 3'-UTRs of AhRbcS1 mRNA from the C4 dicot amaranth were linked to a gusA reporter gene. These were constitutively transcribed from a cauliflower mosaic virus promoter and assayed for posttranscriptional expression patterns in transgenic lines of the C4 dicot Flaveria bidentis. Three characteristic C4 expression patterns were conferred by heterologous AhRbcS1 UTRs in transgenic F. bidentis. First, the AhRbcS1 UTRs conferred strong translational enhancement of gusA expression, relative to control constructs lacking these UTRs. Second, while the UTRs did not appear to confer tissue-specific expression when analyzed by beta-glucuronidase activity assays, differences in gusA mRNA accumulation were observed in leaves, stems, and roots. Third, the AhRbcS1 UTRs conferred preferential gusA expression (enzyme activity and gusA mRNA accumulation) in leaf bundle sheath cells. AhRbcS1 UTR-mediated translational enhancement was also observed in transgenic C3 plants (tobacco [Nicotiana tabacum]) and in in vitro translation extracts. These mRNAs appear to be translated with different efficiencies in C4 versus C3 plants, indicating that processes determining overall translational efficiency may vary between these two categories of higher plants. Our findings suggest that the AhRbcS1 5'-UTR functions as a strong translational enhancer in leaves and other tissues, and may work synergistically with the 3'-UTR to modulate overall levels of Rubisco gene expression in different tissues and cell types of C4 plants. PMID:15489276

  11. Tomato ovary-to-fruit transition is characterized by a spatial shift of mRNAs for cell wall invertase and its inhibitor with the encoded proteins localized to sieve elements.

    PubMed

    Palmer, William M; Ru, Lei; Jin, Ye; Patrick, John W; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Central to understanding fruit development is to elucidate the processes mediating a successful transition from pre-pollination ovaries to newly set fruit, a key step in establishing fruit yield potential. In tomato, cell wall invertase (CWIN) LIN5 and its inhibitor INH1 are essential for fruit growth. However, the molecular and cellular basis by which they exert their roles in ovary-to-fruit transition remains unknown. To address this issue, we conducted a study focusing on ovaries and fruitlets at 2 days before and 2 days after anthesis, respectively. In situ hybridization analyses revealed that LIN5 and INH1 exhibited a dispersed expression in ovaries compared with their phloem-specific expression in fruitlets. Remarkably, LIN5 and INH1 proteins were immunologically co-localized to cell walls of sieve elements (SEs) in ovaries immediately prior to anthesis and in young fruitlets, but were undetectable in provascular bundles of younger ovaries. A burst in CWIN activity occurred during ovary-to-fruit transition. Interestingly, the ovaries, but not the fruitlets, exhibited high expression of a defective invertase, SldeCWIN1, an ortholog of which is known to enhance inhibition of INH on CWIN activity in tobacco. Imaging of a fluorescent symplasmic tracer indicated an apoplasmic phloem unloading pathway operated in ovaries, contrary to the previously observed symplasmic unloading pathway in fruit pericarp. These new data indicate that (1) a phloem-specific patterning of the CWIN and INH mRNAs is induced during ovary-to-fruit transition, and (2) LIN5 protein functions specifically in walls of SEs and increases its activity during ovary-to-fruit transition, probably to facilitate phloem unloading and to generate a glucose signal positively regulating cell division, hence fruit set. PMID:25680776

  12. The fat mass and obesity associated gene (Fto) regulates activity of the dopaminergic midbrain circuitry.

    PubMed

    Hess, Martin E; Hess, Simon; Meyer, Kate D; Verhagen, Linda A W; Koch, Linda; Brönneke, Hella S; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Jordan, Sabine D; Saletore, Yogesh; Elemento, Olivier; Belgardt, Bengt F; Franz, Thomas; Horvath, Tamas L; Rüther, Ulrich; Jaffrey, Samie R; Kloppenburg, Peter; Brüning, Jens C

    2013-08-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) signaling governs the control of complex behaviors, and its deregulation has been implicated in a wide range of diseases. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of the Fto gene, encoding a nucleic acid demethylase, impairs dopamine receptor type 2 (D2R) and type 3 (D3R) (collectively, 'D2-like receptor')-dependent control of neuronal activity and behavioral responses. Conventional and DA neuron-specific Fto knockout mice show attenuated activation of G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel conductance by cocaine and quinpirole. Impaired D2-like receptor-mediated autoinhibition results in attenuated quinpirole-mediated reduction of locomotion and an enhanced sensitivity to the locomotor- and reward-stimulatory actions of cocaine. Analysis of global N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) modification of mRNAs using methylated RNA immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing in the midbrain and striatum of Fto-deficient mice revealed increased adenosine methylation in a subset of mRNAs important for neuronal signaling, including many in the DA signaling pathway. Several proteins encoded by these mRNAs had altered expression levels. Collectively, FTO regulates the demethylation of specific mRNAs in vivo, and this activity relates to the control of DA transmission. PMID:23817550

  13. Comparative Analysis of Differentially Expressed miRNAs and their Downstream mRNAs in Ovarian Cancer and its Associated Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard Licheng; Ali, Shadan; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Alosh, Baraa; Hayek, Kinda; Daaboul, MHD Fayez; Winer, Ira; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer (OC) in patients with endometriosis. Hence, development of new biomarkers may provide a positive clinical outcome for early detection. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in biological and pathological process and are currently used as diagnostic and prognostic markers in various cancers. In the current study, we assessed the differential expression of miRNAs from 19 paired ovarian cancer and its associated endometriosis tissue samples. In addition we also analyzed the downstream targets of those miRNAs. Methods Nineteen paired cases of ovarian cancer and endometriosis foci were identified by a gynecologic pathologist and macro-dissected. The total RNAs were extracted and subjected to comprehensive miRNA profiling from the pooled samples of these two different entities using microarray analysis. Later, the abnormal expressions of few selected miRNAs were validated in individual cases by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed target mRNAs which were validated by qRT-PCR. Results The miRNA profiling identified deregulation of greater than 1156 miRNAs in OC, of which the top seven were further validated by qRT-PCR. The expression of miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-451 were reduced significantly (p<0.0001) in the OC patients compared to its associated endometriosis. In contrast, the expression of miR-141, miR-200a, miR-200c, and miR-3613 were elevated significantly (p<0.05) in most of the OC patients. Furthermore, among the downstream mRNAs of these miRNAs, the level of PTEN expression was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in OC compared to endometriosis while no significant difference was observed in NF-κB expression. Conclusion The expression of miRNAs and mRNAs in OC were significantly different compared to its concurrent endometriosis. These differential expressed miRNAs may serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for OC

  14. RNA-binding proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Van Assche, Elke; Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steenackers, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is a very important mechanism to control gene expression in changing environments. In the past decade, a lot of interest has been directed toward the role of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacterial post-transcriptional regulation. However, sRNAs are not the only molecules controlling gene expression at this level, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role as well. CsrA and Hfq are the two best studied bacterial proteins of this type, but recently, additional proteins involved in post-transcriptional control have been identified. This review focuses on the general working mechanisms of post-transcriptionally active RBPs, which include (i) adaptation of the susceptibility of mRNAs and sRNAs to RNases, (ii) modulating the accessibility of the ribosome binding site of mRNAs, (iii) recruiting and assisting in the interaction of mRNAs with other molecules and (iv) regulating transcription terminator/antiterminator formation, and gives an overview of both the well-studied and the newly identified proteins that are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory processes. Additionally, the post-transcriptional mechanisms by which the expression or the activity of these proteins is regulated, are described. For many of the newly identified proteins, however, mechanistic questions remain. Most likely, more post-transcriptionally active proteins will be identified in the future. PMID:25784899

  15. Regulation of mRNA translation during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Weissman, Jonathan S; Vale, Ronald D

    2015-01-01

    Passage through mitosis is driven by precisely-timed changes in transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. However, the importance of translational regulation during mitosis remains poorly understood. Here, using ribosome profiling, we find both a global translational repression and identified ∼200 mRNAs that undergo specific translational regulation at mitotic entry. In contrast, few changes in mRNA abundance are observed, indicating that regulation of translation is the primary mechanism of modulating protein expression during mitosis. Interestingly, 91% of the mRNAs that undergo gene-specific regulation in mitosis are translationally repressed, rather than activated. One of the most pronounced translationally-repressed genes is Emi1, an inhibitor of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) which is degraded during mitosis. We show that full APC activation requires translational repression of Emi1 in addition to its degradation. These results identify gene-specific translational repression as a means of controlling the mitotic proteome, which may complement post-translational mechanisms for inactivating protein function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07957.001 PMID:26305499

  16. Cap-independent polysomal association of natural mRNAs encoding c-myc, BiP, and eIF4G conferred by internal ribosome entry sites.

    PubMed Central

    Johannes, G; Sarnow, P

    1998-01-01

    Sequence elements that can function as internal ribosome entry sites (IRES) have been identified in 5' noncoding regions of certain uncapped viral and capped cellular mRNA molecules. However, it has remained largely unknown whether IRES elements are functional when located in their natural capped mRNAs. Therefore, the polysomal association and translation of several IRES-containing cellular mRNAs was tested under conditions that severely inhibited cap-dependent translation, that is, after infection with poliovirus. It was found that several known IRES-containing mRNAs, such as BiP and c-myc, were both associated with the translation apparatus and translated in infected cells when cap-dependent translation of most host-cell mRNAs was blocked, indicating that the IRES elements were functional in their natural mRNAs. Curiously, the mRNAs that encode eukaryotic initiation factor 4GI (eIF4GI) and 4GII (eIF4GII), two proteins with high identity and similar functions in the initiation of cap-dependent translation, were both associated with polysomes in infected cells. The 5'-end sequences of eIF4GI mRNA were isolated from a cDNA expression library and shown to function as an internal ribosome entry site when placed into a dicistronic mRNA. These findings suggest that eIF4G proteins can be synthesized at times when 5' cap-dependent mRNA translation is blocked, supporting the notion that eIF4G proteins are needed in both 5' cap-independent and 5' cap-dependent translational initiation mechanisms. PMID:9848649

  17. Global Analysis of mRNA, Translation, and Protein Localization: Local Translation Is a Key Regulator of Cell Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Mardakheh, Faraz K.; Paul, Angela; Kümper, Sandra; Sadok, Amine; Paterson, Hugh; Mccarthy, Afshan; Yuan, Yinyin; Marshall, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Polarization of cells into a protrusive front and a retracting cell body is the hallmark of mesenchymal-like cell migration. Many mRNAs are localized to protrusions, but it is unclear to what degree mRNA localization contributes toward protrusion formation. We performed global quantitative analysis of the distributions of mRNAs, proteins, and translation rates between protrusions and the cell body by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative proteomics. Our results reveal local translation as a key determinant of protein localization to protrusions. Accordingly, inhibition of local translation destabilizes protrusions and inhibits mesenchymal-like morphology. Interestingly, many mRNAs localized to protrusions are translationally repressed. Specific cis-regulatory elements within mRNA UTRs define whether mRNAs are locally translated or repressed. Finally, RNAi screening of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) enriched in protrusions revealed trans-regulators of localized translation that are functionally important for protrusions. We propose that by deciphering the localized mRNA UTR code, these proteins regulate protrusion stability and mesenchymal-like morphology. PMID:26555054

  18. mTAIL-seq reveals dynamic poly(A) tail regulation in oocyte-to-embryo development.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jaechul; Lee, Mihye; Son, Ahyeon; Chang, Hyeshik; Kim, V Narry

    2016-07-15

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are subject to multiple types of tailing that critically influence mRNA stability and translatability. To investigate RNA tails at the genomic scale, we previously developed TAIL-seq, but its low sensitivity precluded its application to biological materials of minute quantity. In this study, we report a new version of TAIL-seq (mRNA TAIL-seq [mTAIL-seq]) with enhanced sequencing depth for mRNAs (by ∼1000-fold compared with the previous version). The improved method allows us to investigate the regulation of poly(A) tails in Drosophila oocytes and embryos. We found that maternal mRNAs are polyadenylated mainly during late oogenesis, prior to fertilization, and that further modulation occurs upon egg activation. Wispy, a noncanonical poly(A) polymerase, adenylates the vast majority of maternal mRNAs, with a few intriguing exceptions such as ribosomal protein transcripts. By comparing mTAIL-seq data with ribosome profiling data, we found a strong coupling between poly(A) tail length and translational efficiency during egg activation. Our data suggest that regulation of poly(A) tails in oocytes shapes the translatomic landscape of embryos, thereby directing the onset of animal development. By virtue of the high sensitivity, low cost, technical robustness, and broad accessibility, mTAIL-seq will be a potent tool to improve our understanding of mRNA tailing in diverse biological systems. PMID:27445395

  19. SUMOylation Is an Inhibitory Constraint that Regulates the Prion-like Aggregation and Activity of CPEB3.

    PubMed

    Drisaldi, Bettina; Colnaghi, Luca; Fioriti, Luana; Rao, Nishta; Myers, Cory; Snyder, Anna M; Metzger, Daniel J; Tarasoff, Jenna; Konstantinov, Edward; Fraser, Paul E; Manley, James L; Kandel, Eric R

    2015-06-23

    Protein synthesis is crucial for the maintenance of long-term-memory-related synaptic plasticity. The prion-like cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein 3 (CPEB3) regulates the translation of several mRNAs important for long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Here, we provide evidence that the prion-like aggregation and activity of CPEB3 is controlled by SUMOylation. In the basal state, CPEB3 is a repressor and is soluble. Under these circumstances, CPEB3 is SUMOylated in hippocampal neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Following neuronal stimulation, CPEB3 is converted into an active form that promotes the translation of target mRNAs, and this is associated with a decrease of SUMOylation and an increase of aggregation. A chimeric CPEB3 protein fused to SUMO cannot form aggregates and cannot activate the translation of target mRNAs. These findings suggest a model whereby SUMO regulates translation of mRNAs and structural synaptic plasticity by modulating the aggregation of the prion-like protein CPEB3. PMID:26074071

  20. Quantitation of fungal mRNAs in complex substrates by reverse transcription PCR and its application to Phanerochaete chrysosporium-colonized soil.

    PubMed Central

    Lamar, R T; Schoenike, B; Vanden Wymelenberg, A; Stewart, P; Dietrich, D M; Cullen, D

    1995-01-01

    Thorough analysis of fungi in complex substrates has been hampered by inadequate experimental tools for assessing physiological activity and estimating biomass. We report a method for the quantitative assessment of specific fungal mRNAs in soil. The method was applied to complex gene families of Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a white-rot fungus widely used in studies of organopollutant degradation. Among the genes implicated in pollutant degradation, two closely related lignin peroxidase transcripts were detected in soil. The pattern of lignin peroxidase gene expression was unexpected; certain transcripts abundant in defined cultures were not detected in soil cultures. Transcripts encoding cellobiohydrolases and beta-tubulin were also detected. The method will aid in defining the roles of specific genes in complex biological processes such as organopollutant degradation, developing strategies for strain improvement, and identifying specific fungi in environmental samples. PMID:7793933

  1. Isolation and characterization of the human tyrosine hydroxylase gene: identification of 5' alternative splice sites responsible for multiple mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, K.L.; Anhalt, M.J.; Martin, B.M.; Kelsoe, J.R.; Winfield, S.L.; Ginns, E.I.

    1987-11-03

    A full-length genomic clone for human tyrosine hydroxylase (L-tyrosine, tetrahydropteridine:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.16.2) has been isolated. A human brain genomic library constructed in EMBL3 was screened by using a rat cDNA for tyrosine hydroxylase as a probe. Out of one million recombinant phage, one clone was identified that hybridized to both 5' and 3' rat cDNA probes. Restriction endonuclease mapping, Southern blotting, and sequence analysis revealed that, like its rodent counterpart, the human gene is single copy, contains 13 primary exons, and spans approximately 8 kilobases (kb). In contrast to the rat gene, human tyrosine hydroxylase undergoes alternative RNA processing within intron 1, generating at least three distinct mRNAs. A comparison of the human tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylalanine hydroxylase genes indicates that although both probably evolved from a common ancestral gene, major changes in the size of introns have occurred since their divergence.

  2. RT-PCR detection of CYP1A1, 1A2, and 2E1 mRNAs in rat nasal tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, S.L.; Kim, S.G.; States, J.C.; Dahl, A.R.; Hotchkiss, J.; Novak, R.F. Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM )

    1991-03-15

    The expression of P450 in nasal tissue is of considerable importance given the exposure of these tissues to xenobiotics and the role of P450s in xenobiotic metabolism. CYP1A1, 1A2 and 2E1 mRNA expression was examined in olfactory tissue of rats exposed to 5 ppm pyridine 6 h daily for 4 d. RT-PCR was performed on poly(A){sup +} RNA using gene specific primers selected from published rat liver 1A1, 1A2 and 2E1 cDNAs. RT-PCR products derived from nasal mRNAs were detected and co-migrated with liver 1A1, 1A2 and 2W1 Rt-PCR products. Identical restriction patterns were obtained from HinfI and HpaII digests of nasal and liver 1A1 RT-PCR products; restriction digest patterns of nasal and liver 1A2 RT-PCR products were also identical. Southern analyses of nasal RT-PCR products, using liver 1A1 and 12 DNA probes, showed a single band suggesting considerable homology between nasal and liver 1A1 and 1A2 fragments. Cloning and sequencing of nasal 1A1, 1A2 and 2E1 RT-PCR products will confirm the identity of these gene products. These results show that 1A1, 1A2 and 2E1 mRNAs are expressed in rat olfactory tissue and suggest that the fragments examined share homology with those expressed in liver.

  3. pp32 (ANP32A) Expression Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth and Induces Gemcitabine Resistance by Disrupting HuR Binding to mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bildzukewicz, Nikolai A.; Richards, Nathan G.; Rittenhouse, David W.; Einstein, Lisa; Cozzitorto, Joseph A.; Keen, Judith C.; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Gorospe, Myriam; Gonye, Gregory E.; Yeo, Charles J.; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.; Brody, Jonathan R.

    2010-01-01

    The expression of protein phosphatase 32 (PP32, ANP32A) is low in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancers and is linked to the levels of HuR (ELAV1), a predictive marker for gemcitabine response. In pancreatic cancer cells, exogenous overexpression of pp32 inhibited cell growth, supporting its long-recognized role as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. In chemotherapeutic sensitivity screening assays, cells overexpressing pp32 were selectively resistant to the nucleoside analogs gemcitabine and cytarabine (ARA-C), but were sensitized to 5-fluorouracil; conversely, silencing pp32 in pancreatic cancer cells enhanced gemcitabine sensitivity. The cytoplasmic levels of pp32 increased after cancer cells are treated with certain stressors, including gemcitabine. pp32 overexpression reduced the association of HuR with the mRNA encoding the gemcitabine-metabolizing enzyme deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), causing a significant reduction in dCK protein levels. Similarly, ectopic pp32 expression caused a reduction in HuR binding of mRNAs encoding tumor-promoting proteins (e.g., VEGF and HuR), while silencing pp32 dramatically enhanced the binding of these mRNA targets. Low pp32 nuclear expression correlated with high-grade tumors and the presence of lymph node metastasis, as compared to patients' tumors with high nuclear pp32 expression. Although pp32 expression levels did not enhance the predictive power of cytoplasmic HuR status, nuclear pp32 levels and cytoplasmic HuR levels associated significantly in patient samples. Thus, we provide novel evidence that the tumor suppressor function of pp32 can be attributed to its ability to disrupt HuR binding to target mRNAs encoding key proteins for cancer cell survival and drug efficacy. PMID:21152064

  4. Knockdown of Carboxypeptidase A6 in Zebrafish Larvae Reduces Response to Seizure-Inducing Drugs and Causes Changes in the Level of mRNAs Encoding Signaling Molecules.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mark William; Sapio, Matthew R; Leal, Rodrigo B; Fricker, Lloyd D

    2016-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) is an extracellular matrix metallocarboxypeptidase that modulates peptide and protein function by removal of hydrophobic C-terminal amino acids. Mutations in the human CPA6 gene that reduce enzymatic activity in the extracellular matrix are associated with febrile seizures, temporal lobe epilepsy, and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. The characterization of these human mutations suggests a dominant mode of inheritance by haploinsufficiency through loss of function mutations, however the total number of humans with pathologic mutations in CPA6 identified to date remains small. To better understand the relationship between CPA6 and seizures we investigated the effects of morpholino knockdown of cpa6 mRNA in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Knockdown of cpa6 mRNA resulted in resistance to the effect of seizure-inducing drugs pentylenetetrazole and pilocarpine on swimming behaviors. Knockdown of cpa6 mRNA also reduced the levels of mRNAs encoding neuropeptide precursors (bdnf, npy, chga, pcsk1nl, tac1, nts, edn1), a neuropeptide processing enzyme (cpe), transcription factor (c-fos), and molecules implicated in glutamatergic signaling (grin1a and slc1a2b). Treatment of zebrafish embryos with 60 mM pilocarpine for 1 hour led to reductions in levels of many of the same mRNAs when measured 1 day after pilocarpine exposure, except for c-fos which was elevated 1 day after pilocarpine treatment. Pilocarpine treatment, like cpa6 knockdown, led to a reduced sensitivity to pentylenetetrazole when tested 1 day after pilocarpine treatment. Taken together, these results add to mounting evidence that peptidergic systems participate in the biological effects of seizure-inducing drugs, and are the first in vivo demonstration of the molecular and behavioral consequences of cpa6 insufficiency. PMID:27050163

  5. Knockdown of Carboxypeptidase A6 in Zebrafish Larvae Reduces Response to Seizure-Inducing Drugs and Causes Changes in the Level of mRNAs Encoding Signaling Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Mark William; Sapio, Matthew R.; Leal, Rodrigo B.; Fricker, Lloyd D.

    2016-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) is an extracellular matrix metallocarboxypeptidase that modulates peptide and protein function by removal of hydrophobic C-terminal amino acids. Mutations in the human CPA6 gene that reduce enzymatic activity in the extracellular matrix are associated with febrile seizures, temporal lobe epilepsy, and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. The characterization of these human mutations suggests a dominant mode of inheritance by haploinsufficiency through loss of function mutations, however the total number of humans with pathologic mutations in CPA6 identified to date remains small. To better understand the relationship between CPA6 and seizures we investigated the effects of morpholino knockdown of cpa6 mRNA in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Knockdown of cpa6 mRNA resulted in resistance to the effect of seizure-inducing drugs pentylenetetrazole and pilocarpine on swimming behaviors. Knockdown of cpa6 mRNA also reduced the levels of mRNAs encoding neuropeptide precursors (bdnf, npy, chga, pcsk1nl, tac1, nts, edn1), a neuropeptide processing enzyme (cpe), transcription factor (c-fos), and molecules implicated in glutamatergic signaling (grin1a and slc1a2b). Treatment of zebrafish embryos with 60 mM pilocarpine for 1 hour led to reductions in levels of many of the same mRNAs when measured 1 day after pilocarpine exposure, except for c-fos which was elevated 1 day after pilocarpine treatment. Pilocarpine treatment, like cpa6 knockdown, led to a reduced sensitivity to pentylenetetrazole when tested 1 day after pilocarpine treatment. Taken together, these results add to mounting evidence that peptidergic systems participate in the biological effects of seizure-inducing drugs, and are the first in vivo demonstration of the molecular and behavioral consequences of cpa6 insufficiency. PMID:27050163

  6. Translational activity and functional stability of human fibroblast beta 1 and beta 2 interferon mRNAs lacking 3'-terminal RNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, H; Sagar, A D; Sehgal, P B

    1981-01-01

    Polyadenylylated mRNA was purified from poly(I).poly(C)- and cycloheximide-superinduced human fibroblast (FS-4) cultures. The mRNA was subjected to electrophoresis through an agarose/CH3HgOH gel, and human fibroblast beta 1 and beta 2 interferon mRNAs were isolated. Each mRNA preparation was phosphorolyzed at 0 degrees C for 20 min by using a molar excess of polynucleotide phosphorylase to produce RNAs lacking poly(A) and then incubated at 37 degrees C for varying lengths of time to allow the phosphorylase to further digest the deadenylylated RNA from the 3' end in a processive and synchronous manner. Removal of the poly(A) (less than or equal to 100 residues) and approximately 100 adjacent residues from human fibroblast beta 1 interferon mRNA (native length, 900 residues, including a 3'-noncoding region of 203 residues) did not alter the translational activity or the functional stability of this mRNA in Xenopus oocytes, whereas deletion of the poly(A) and approximately 200 adjacent residues decreased its translational efficiency. On the other hand, removal of the poly(A) (approximately 200 residues) and approximately 200 adjacent residues from human fibroblast beta 2 interferon mRNA (native length, 1300 residues) did not alter the translational activity or the functional stability of this molecule in oocytes. Thus, neither the poly(A) nor large segments of the 3'-noncoding region (which includes the hexanucleotide A-A-U-A-A-A sequence, at least in the case of beta 1 mRNA) are required for the maintenance of the functional stability of human beta 1 and beta 2 interferon mRNAs in Xenopus oocytes. Images PMID:6165016

  7. Human thyroid peroxidase: complete cDNA and protein sequence, chromosome mapping, and identification of two alternately spliced mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, S.; Kotani, T.; McBride, O.W.; Umeki, K.; Hirai, K.; Nakayama, T.; Ohtaki, S.

    1987-08-01

    Two forms of human thyroid peroxidase cDNAs were isolated from a lambdagt11 cDNA library, prepared from Graves disease thyroid tissue mRNA, by use of oligonucleotides. The longest complete cDNA, designated phTPO-1, has 3048 nucleotides and an open reading frame consisting of 933 amino acids, which would encode a protein with a molecular weight of 103,026. Five potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites are found in the deduced amino acid sequence. The second peroxidase cDNA, designated phTPO-2, is almost identical to phTPO-1 beginning 605 base pairs downstream except that it contains 1-base-pair difference and lacks 171 base pairs in the middle of the sequence. This results in a loss of 57 amino acids corresponding to a molecular weight of 6282. Interestingly, this 171-nucleotide sequence has GT and AG at its 5' and 3' boundaries, respectively, that are in good agreement with donor and acceptor splice site consensus sequences. Using specific oligonucleotide probes for the mRNAs derived from the cDNA sequences hTOP-1 and hTOP-2, the authors show that both are expressed in all thyroid tissues examined and the relative level of two mRNAs is different in each sample. The results suggest that two thyroid peroxidase proteins might be generated through alternate splicing of the same gene. By using somatic cell hybrid lines, the thyroid peroxidase gene was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 2.

  8. High-throughput sequencing of partially edited trypanosome mRNAs reveals barriers to editing progression and evidence for alternative editing.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Rachel M; Bruno, Andrew E; Bard, Jonathan E; Buck, Michael J; Read, Laurie K

    2016-05-01

    Uridine insertion/deletion RNA editing in kinetoplastids entails the addition and deletion of uridine residues throughout the length of mitochondrial transcripts to generate translatable mRNAs. This complex process requires the coordinated use of several multiprotein complexes as well as the sequential use of noncoding template RNAs called guide RNAs. The majority of steady-state mitochondrial mRNAs are partially edited and often contain regions of mis-editing, termed junctions, whose role is unclear. Here, we report a novel method for sequencing entire populations of pre-edited partially edited, and fully edited RNAs and analyzing editing characteristics across populations using a new bioinformatics tool, the Trypanosome RNA Editing Alignment Tool (TREAT). Using TREAT, we examined populations of two transcripts, RPS12 and ND7-5', in wild-typeTrypanosoma brucei We provide evidence that the majority of partially edited sequences contain junctions, that intrinsic pause sites arise during the progression of editing, and that the mechanisms that mediate pausing in the generation of canonical fully edited sequences are distinct from those that mediate the ends of junction regions. Furthermore, we identify alternatively edited sequences that constitute plausible alternative open reading frames and identify substantial variability in the 5' UTRs of both canonical and alternatively edited sequences. This work is the first to use high-throughput sequencing to examine full-length sequences of whole populations of partially edited transcripts. Our method is highly applicable to current questions in the RNA editing field, including defining mechanisms of action for editing factors and identifying potential alternatively edited sequences. PMID:26908922

  9. Enhanced stability and polyadenylation of select mRNAs support rapid thermogenesis in the brown fat of a hibernator.

    PubMed

    Grabek, Katharine R; Diniz Behn, Cecilia; Barsh, Gregory S; Hesselberth, Jay R; Martin, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    During hibernation, animals cycle between torpor and arousal. These cycles involve dramatic but poorly understood mechanisms of dynamic physiological regulation at the level of gene expression. Each cycle, Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT) drives periodic arousal from torpor by generating essential heat. We applied digital transcriptome analysis to precisely timed samples to identify molecular pathways that underlie the intense activity cycles of hibernator BAT. A cohort of transcripts increased during torpor, paradoxical because transcription effectively ceases at these low temperatures. We show that this increase occurs not by elevated transcription but rather by enhanced stabilization associated with maintenance and/or extension of long poly(A) tails. Mathematical modeling further supports a temperature-sensitive mechanism to protect a subset of transcripts from ongoing bulk degradation instead of increased transcription. This subset was enriched in a C-rich motif and genes required for BAT activation, suggesting a model and mechanism to prioritize translation of key proteins for thermogenesis. PMID:25626169

  10. Is post-transcriptional stabilization, splicing and translation of selective mRNAs a key to the DNA damage response?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, cells activate a complex, kinase-based signaling network that consists of two components—a rapid phosphorylation-driven signaling cascade that results in immediate inhibition of Cdk/cyclin complexes to arrest the cell cycle along with recruitment of repair machinery to damaged DNA, followed by a delayed transcriptional response that promotes cell cycle arrest through the induction of Cdk inhibitors, such as p21. In recent years a third layer of complexity has emerged that involves post-transcriptional control of mRNA stability, splicing and translation as a critical part of the DNA damage response. Here, we describe recent work implicating DNA damage-dependent modification of RNA-binding proteins that are responsible for some of these mRNA effects, highlighting recent work on post-transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle checkpoint protein/apoptosis inducer Gadd45α by the checkpoint kinase MAPKAP Kinase-2. PMID:21173571

  11. Repetitive elements regulate circular RNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilusz, Jeremy E

    2015-01-01

    It was long assumed that eukaryotic precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs) are almost always spliced to generate a linear mRNA that is subsequently translated to produce a protein. However, it is now clear that thousands of protein-coding genes can be non-canonically spliced to produce circular noncoding RNAs, some of which are expressed at much higher levels than their associated linear mRNAs. How then does the splicing machinery decide whether to generate a linear mRNA or a circular RNA? Recent work has revealed that intronic repetitive elements, including sequences derived from transposons, are critical regulators of this decision. In most cases, circular RNA biogenesis appears to be initiated when complementary sequences from 2 different introns base pair to one another. This brings the splice sites from the intervening exon(s) into close proximity and facilitates the backsplicing event that generates the circular RNA. As many pre-mRNAs contain multiple intronic repeats, distinct circular transcripts can be produced depending on which repeats base pair to one another. Intronic repeats are thus critical regulatory sequences that control the functional output of their host genes, and potentially cause the functions of protein-coding genes to be highly divergent across species. PMID:26442181

  12. Theoretical studies on sRNA-mediated regulation in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiao-Xue; Xu, Liu-Fang; Shi, Hua-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Small RNA(sRNA)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation differs from protein-mediated regulation. Through base-pairing, sRNA can regulate the target mRNA in a catalytic or stoichiometric manner. Some theoretical models were built for comparison of the protein-mediated and sRNA-mediated modes in the steady-state behaviors and noise properties. Many experiments demonstrated that a single sRNA can regulate several mRNAs, which causes crosstalk between the targets. Here, we focus on some models in which two target mRNAs are silenced by the same sRNA to discuss their crosstalk features. Additionally, the sequence-function relationship of sRNA and its role in the kinetic process of base-pairing have been highlighted in model building. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11121403 and 11274320), the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y4KF171CJ1), the National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scholar of China (Grant No. 11304115), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M541282).

  13. Translational regulation during stage transitions in malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liwang; Lindner, Scott; Miao, Jun

    2015-04-01

    The complicated life cycle of the malaria parasite involves a vertebrate host and a mosquito vector, and translational regulation plays a prominent role in orchestrating the developmental events in the two transition stages: gametocytes and sporozoites. Translational regulation is executed in both global and transcript-specific manners. Plasmodium uses a conserved mechanism involving phosphorylation of eIF2α to repress global protein synthesis during the latent period of sporozoite development in the mosquito salivary glands. Transcript-specific translational regulation is achieved by a network of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), among which the Dhh1 RNA helicase DOZI and Puf family RBPs are by far the best studied in Plasmodium. While the DOZI complex defines a new P granule with a role in protecting certain gametocyte mRNAs from degradation, the Puf proteins appear to repress expression of mRNAs in both gametocytes and sporozoites. These examples underscore the significance of translational regulation in Plasmodium development. PMID:25387887

  14. The reciprocal regulation between splicing and 3'-end processing.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Most eukaryotic precursor mRNAs are subjected to RNA processing events, including 5'-end capping, splicing and 3'-end processing. These processing events were historically studied independently; however, since the early 1990s tremendous efforts by many research groups have revealed that these processing factors interact with each other to control each other's functions. U1 snRNP and its components negatively regulate polyadenylation of precursor mRNAs. Importantly, this function is necessary for protecting the integrity of the transcriptome and for regulating gene length and the direction of transcription. In addition, physical and functional interactions occur between splicing factors and 3'-end processing factors across the last exon. These interactions activate or inhibit splicing and 3'-end processing depending on the context. Therefore, splicing and 3'-end processing are reciprocally regulated in many ways through the complex protein-protein interaction network. Although interesting questions remain, future studies will illuminate the molecular mechanisms underlying the reciprocal regulation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:499-511. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1348 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27019070

  15. Multiple pathways regulate the expression of genes encoding sodium channel subunits in developing neurons.

    PubMed

    Giraud, P; Alcaraz, G; Jullien, F; Sampo, B; Jover, E; Couraud, F; Dargent, B

    1998-05-01

    In primary cultures of fetal neurons, activation of sodium channels with either alpha-scorpion toxin or veratridine caused a rapid and persistent decrease of mRNAs encoding beta2 and different sodium channel alpha mRNAs. In contrast, beta1 subunit mRNA was up-regulated by sodium channel activation. This phenomenon was calcium-independent. The effects of activating toxins on mRNAs of different sodium channel subunits were mimicked by membrane depolarization. An important aspect of this study was the demonstration that cAMP also caused rapid reduction of alphaI, alphaII and alphaIII mRNA levels whereas beta1 subunit mRNA was up regulated and beta2 subunit mRNA was not affected. Sodium channel activation by veratridine was shown to increase cAMP immunoreactivity in cultured neurons, but alphaII mRNA down-regulation induced by activating toxins was not reversed by protein kinase A antagonists, indicating that this phenomenon is not protein kinase A dependent. The effects of cAMP and membrane depolarisation were antagonized by the PKA inhibitor H89. These results are indicative of the existence of multiple and independent regulatory pathways modulating the expression of sodium channel genes in the developing central nervous system. PMID:9602139

  16. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of the RNA-binding protein Staufen1

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Karine; Ghram, Mehdi; Viranaicken, Wildriss; Trépanier, Véronique; Mollet, Stéphanie; Fréchina, Céline; DesGroseillers, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Staufen1 (Stau1) is a ribonucleic acid (RNA)-binding protein involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Recent studies indicate that Stau1-bound messenger RNAs (mRNAs) mainly code for proteins involved in transcription and cell cycle control. Consistently, we report here that Stau1 abundance fluctuates through the cell cycle in HCT116 and U2OS cells: it is high from the S phase to the onset of mitosis and rapidly decreases as cells transit through mitosis. Stau1 down-regulation is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Stau1 interacts with the APC/C co-activators Cdh1 and Cdc20 via its first 88 N-terminal amino acids. The importance of controlling Stau155 levels is underscored by the observation that its overexpression affects mitosis entry and impairs proliferation of transformed cells. Microarray analyses identified 275 Stau155-bound mRNAs in prometaphase cells, an early mitotic step that just precedes Stau1 degradation. Interestingly, several of these mRNAs are more abundant in Stau155-containing complexes in cells arrested in prometaphase than in asynchronous cells. Our results point out for the first time to the possibility that Stau1 participates in a mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression that is linked to cell cycle progression in cancer cells. PMID:24906885

  17. Ultrastructural detection of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase protein and its subunit mRNAs in wild-type and holoenzyme-deficient Nicotiana using immuno-gold and in-situ-hybridization techniques.

    PubMed

    Brangeon, J; Nato, A; Forchioni, A

    1989-02-01

    In-situ-localization techniques have been adapted to the ultrastructural detection of the holoenzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) and its composite large- and smallsubunit mRNAs in wild-type and mutant RuBPCase deficient plantlets of Nicotiana tabacum L. Immuno-gold techniques which show the distribution of target proteins have confirmed visually the presence of the holoenzyme in the wild-type plastids and its total absence in the enzyme-less mutant. Using in-situ hybridization coupled with electron microscopy and biotinylated probes for the two subunits, we have directly visualized specific small-subunit mRNAs located in the cytoplasm and large-subunit mRNAs confined to plastids in the enzyme-deficient mutant, and with apparent distributions comparable to those visualized in the wild-type counterpart. These results show that (i) gene products can be visualized in situ by electronmicroscopy techniques under conditions where the respective cellular compartments are readily recognizable and (ii) that an accumulation of mRNAs corresponding to the composite subunits can occur without translation and-or assembly of the protein. PMID:24212337

  18. Lost in translation: miRNAs and mRNAs in ischemic preconditioning and ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Roberta A; Pourpirali, Somayeh

    2016-06-01

    Ischemic stress involves nutrient deprivation, hypoxia, acidosis, and altered levels of various ions and metabolites. Reperfusion, which abruptly alters these parameters, is a second stress to already stressed cells. Ischemic preconditioning, in which brief ischemia alternates with reperfusion to elicit a protective response to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, revealed the existence of a highly conserved, cell-autonomous, and nearly ubiquitous program. While we often assume that evolutionary selection is irrelevant with respect to myocardial infarctions-which generally occur long after reproduction-the program of ischemia tolerance may date back much further, to hibernating squirrels, turtles, and estivating frogs and snails (extremophiles), which must survive by entering a hypometabolic state. This relationship is further strengthened by the presence of similar signaling pathways and regulatory mechanisms such as mRNA localization and miRNA regulation. These parallels may offer new insights into the myocardial response to I/R injury. This review will explore some of the recent advances in our understanding of autophagy and mitochondrial turnover in the setting of I/R injury, and related findings drawn from research on hibernating extremophiles. PMID:26582464

  19. Expression patterns of mRNAs for methanotrophy and thiotrophy in symbionts of the hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis.

    PubMed

    Wendeberg, Annelie; Zielinski, Frank U; Borowski, Christian; Dubilier, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis (Mytilidae) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hosts symbiotic sulfur- and methane-oxidizing bacteria in its gills. In this study, we investigated the activity and distribution of these two symbionts in juvenile mussels from the Logatchev hydrothermal vent field (14°45'N Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Expression patterns of two key genes for chemosynthesis were examined: pmoA (encoding subunit A of the particulate methane monooxygenase) as an indicator for methanotrophy, and aprA (encoding the subunit A of the dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase) as an indicator for thiotrophy. Using simultaneous fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of rRNA and mRNA we observed highest mRNA FISH signals toward the ciliated epithelium where seawater enters the gills. The levels of mRNA expression differed between individual specimens collected in a single grab from the same sampling site, whereas no obvious differences in symbiont abundance or distribution were observed. We propose that the symbionts respond to the steep temporal and spatial gradients in methane, reduced sulfur compounds and oxygen by modifying gene transcription, whereas changes in symbiont abundance and distribution take much longer than regulation of mRNA expression and may only occur in response to long-term changes in vent fluid geochemistry. PMID:21734728

  20. Glucocorticoids inhibit coordinated translation of. cap alpha. - and. beta. -globin mRNAs in Friend erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Papaconstantinou, J.; Stewart, J.A.; Rabek, J.P.; McClintock, P.R.; Wong, E.Y.

    1983-12-01

    The dimethylsulfoxide (Me/sub 2/SO)-mediated induction of hemoglobin synthesis in Friend erythroleukemia cells is inhibited by the glucocorticoids hydrocortisone, dexamethasone, and fluocinolone acetonide; hydrocortisone, at concentrations of 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -8/ M inhibits by 90-30% and fluocinolone acetonide at concentrations of 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -11/ M shows a greater than 90% inhibition. At these concentrations the hormones have no effect on cell growth or viability. In this study it has been shown that there is a group of proteins, including the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globins, whose regulation is associated with the induction of Friend erythroleukemia cell differentiation, and that the expression of these, in addition to ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin, is affected by glucocorticoids. It is concluded that, although the translation of ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin mRNA is a major site of inhibition by glucocorticoids, there is a detectable amount of ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin mRNA translation which results in unequal amounts of globin synthesis and an overall more potent inhibition of hemoglobin formation.

  1. Expression profiles of subtracted mRNAs during cellular senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jung Ki; Choi, Seong-jun; Kim, Jin Kyeoung

    2013-05-01

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible cell cycle arrest that limits the replicative lifespan of cells. Senescence suppresses development of tumors by regulating aging factors, such as cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) and telomerase. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed between young human mesenchymal stem cells (Y-hMSCs) and senescent human mesenchymal stem cells (S-hMSCs). We selected positive clones that were functionally characterized by referring to public databases using NCBI BLAST tool. This search revealed that 19 genes were downregulated, and 43 genes were upregulated in S-hMSCs relative to Y-hMSCs. Among subtracted clones in Y-hMSCs, most of genes markedly were related to metabolic functions. These genes, PDIA3, WDR1, FSTL1, COPG1, LMAN1, and PDIA6, significantly downregulated. Conversely, genes for subtracted clones in S-hMSCs were mostly associated with cell adhesion. In particular, the expression levels of 9 genes, HSP90B1, EID1, ATP2B4, DDAH1, PRNP, RAB1A, PGS5, TM4SF1 and SSR3, gradually increased during senescence. These genes have not previously been identified as being related to cellular senescence, but they seemed to be potentially affected during cellular senescence. PMID:23466301

  2. Equol, an isoflavone metabolite, regulates cancer cell viability and protein synthesis initiation via c-Myc and eIF4G.

    PubMed

    de la Parra, Columba; Borrero-Garcia, Luis D; Cruz-Collazo, Ailed; Schneider, Robert J; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological studies implicate dietary soy isoflavones as breast cancer preventives, especially due to their anti-estrogenic properties. However, soy isoflavones may also have a role in promoting breast cancer, which has yet to be clarified. We previously reported that equol, a metabolite of the soy isoflavone daidzein, may advance breast cancer potential via up-regulation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4GI (eIF4GI). In estrogen receptor negative (ER-) metastatic breast cancer cells, equol induced elevated levels of eIF4G, which were associated with increased cell viability and the selective translation of mRNAs that use non-canonical means of initiation, including internal ribosome entry site (IRES), ribosome shunting, and eIF4G enhancers. These mRNAs typically code for oncogenic, survival, and cell stress molecules. Among those mRNAs translationally increased by equol was the oncogene and eIF4G enhancer, c-Myc. Here we report that siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Myc abrogates the increase in cancer cell viability and mammosphere formation by equol, and results in a significant down-regulation of eIF4GI (the major eIF4G isoform), as well as reduces levels of some, but not all, proteins encoded by mRNAs that are translationally stimulated by equol treatment. Knockdown of eIF4GI also markedly reduces an equol-mediated increase in IRES-dependent mRNA translation and the expression of specific oncogenic proteins. However, eIF4GI knockdown did not reciprocally affect c-Myc levels or cell viability. This study therefore implicates c-Myc as a potential regulator of the cancer-promoting effects of equol via up-regulation of eIF4GI and selective initiation of translation on mRNAs that utilize non-canonical initiation, including certain oncogenes. PMID:25593313

  3. RNA-Sequencing Quantification of Hepatic Ontogeny and Tissue Distribution of mRNAs of Phase II Enzymes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gunewardena, Sumedha; Cui, Julia Y.; Yoo, Byunggil; Zhong, Xiao-bo; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-01-01

    Phase II conjugating enzymes play key roles in the metabolism of xenobiotics. In the present study, RNA sequencing was used to elucidate hepatic ontogeny and tissue distribution of mRNA expression of all major known Phase II enzymes, including enzymes involved in glucuronidation, sulfation, glutathione conjugation, acetylation, methylation, and amino acid conjugation, as well as enzymes for the synthesis of Phase II cosubstrates, in male C57BL/6J mice. Livers from male C57BL/6J mice were collected at 12 ages from prenatal to adulthood. Many of these Phase II enzymes were expressed at much higher levels in adult livers than in perinatal livers, such as Ugt1a6b, -2a3, -2b1, -2b5, -2b36, -3a1, and -3a2; Gsta1, -m1, -p1, -p2, and -z1; mGst1; Nat8; Comt; Nnmt; Baat; Ugdh; and Gclc. In contrast, hepatic mRNA expression of a few Phase II enzymes decreased during postnatal liver development, such as mGst2, mGst3, Gclm, and Mat2a. Hepatic expression of certain Phase II enzymes peaked during the adolescent stage, such as Ugt1a1, Sult1a1, Sult1c2, Sult1d1, Sult2as, Sult5a1, Tpmt, Glyat, Ugp2, and Mat1a. In adult mice, the total transcripts for Phase II enzymes were comparable in liver, kidney, and small intestine; however, individual Phase II enzymes displayed marked tissue specificity among the three organs. In conclusion, this study unveils for the first time developmental changes in mRNA abundance of all major known Phase II enzymes in mouse liver, as well as their tissue-specific expression in key drug-metabolizing organs. The age- and tissue-specific expression of Phase II enzymes indicate that the detoxification of xenobiotics is highly regulated by age and cell type. PMID:23382457

  4. Hepatic ontogeny and tissue distribution of mRNAs of epigenetic modifiers in mice using RNA-sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Cui, Julia; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Yoo, Byunggil; Zhong, Xiao-bo; Klaassen, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Developmental regulation of gene expression is controlled by distinct epigenetic signatures catalyzed by various epigenetic modifiers. Little is known about the ontogeny and tissue distribution of these epigenetic modifiers. In the present study, we used a novel approach of RNA-sequencing to elucidate hepatic ontogeny and tissue distribution of mRNA expression of 142 epigenetic modifiers, including enzymes involved in DNA methylation/demethylation, histone acetylation/deacetylation, histone methylation/demethylation, histone phosphorylation and chromosome remodeling factors in male C57BL/6 mice. Livers from male C57BL/6 mice were collected at 12 ages from prenatal to adulthood. Many of these epigenetic modifiers were expressed at much higher levels in perinatal livers than adult livers, such as Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Apobec3, Kat1, Ncoa4, Setd8, Ash2l, Dot1l, Cbx1, Cbx3, Cbx5, Cbx6, Ezh2, Suz12, Eed, Suv39h1, Suv420h2, Dek, Hdac1, Hdac2, Hdac7, Kdm2b, Kdm5c, Kdm7, Prmt1–5, Prmt7, Smarca4, Smarcb1, Chd4 and Ino80e. In contrast, hepatic mRNA expression of a few epigenetic modifiers increased during postnatal liver development, such as Smarca2, Kdm1b, Cbx7 and Chd3. In adult mice (60 d of age), most epigenetic modifiers were expressed at moderately (1–3-fold) higher levels in kidney and/or small intestine than liver. In conclusion, this study, for the first time, unveils developmental changes in mRNA abundance of all major known epigenetic modifiers in mouse liver. These data suggest that ontogenic changes in mRNA expression of epigenetic modifiers may play important roles in determining the addition and/or removal of corresponding epigenetic signatures during liver development. PMID:22772165

  5. Beta-globin mRNAs capped with m7G, m2.7(2)G or m2.2.7(3)G differ in intrinsic translation efficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, E; Stepinski, J; Ekiel, I; Jin, Y; Haber, D; Sijuwade, T; Tahara, S M

    1988-01-01

    We examined the intramolecular effect of altered cap structures on translation efficiency of artificial beta-globin mRNAs. For these studies, synthetic dinucleotides of the form X(5')ppp(5')G [X = 7-methyl guanosine (m7G), 2,7-dimethyl guanosine (m2(2,7)G) or 2,2,7-trimethyl guanosine (m3(2,2,7)G)], were transcriptionally incorporated into mRNAs, containing rabbit beta-globin coding sequences, using T7 RNA polymerase and a beta-globin cDNA template. These synthetic mRNAs were assayed in reticulocyte lysate for activity relative to m7G-capped mRNA. m2(2,7)G-Capped mRNA was found to be 1.5-fold more active than m7G-capped mRNA. Messenger RNA capped with m3(2,2,7)G was less active with activity of 0.24 relative to its m7G-capped counterpart (activity = 1.0). These data suggest that m7G-capped mRNAs become more active as translation templates after addition of a single N2 methyl moiety, which is especially pertinent to gene expression in togaviridae. The latter are observed to synthesize m2(2,7)G and m3(2,2,7)G-capped mRNAs in addition to m7G-capped templates during the course of infection in animal cells. Images PMID:3174438

  6. Hepatic and Renal Cytochrome P450 Gene Regulation During Citrobacter rodentium Infection in Wildtype and Toll-like Receptor 4 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Terrilyn A.; Sherman, Melanie; Antonovic, Leposava; Kardar, Sean S.; Strobel, Henry W.; Kalman, Daniel; Morgan, Edward T.

    2005-01-01

    C. rodentium is the rodent equivalent of human enteropathogenic E. coli infection. This study investigated regulation of hepatic and renal cytochrome P450 (P450) mRNAs, hepatic P450 proteins, cytokines and acute phase proteins during C. rodentium infection. Female C3H/HeOuJ (HeOu) and C3H/HeJ (HeJ) mice (which lack functional toll-like receptor 4 [TLR4]) were infected with C. rodentium by oral gavage, and sacrificed 6 days later. Hepatic CYP4A10 and 4A14 mRNAs were decreased in HeOu mice (<4% of control). CYP3A11, 2C29, 4F14, and 4F15 mRNAs were reduced to 16–55% of control levels, whereas CYP2A5, 4F16, and 4F18 mRNAs were induced (180, 190, and 600% of control, respectively). The pattern of P450 regulation in HeJ mice was similar to that in HeOu mice for most P450s, with the exception of the TLR4-dependence of CYP4F15. Hepatic CYP2C, 3A, and 4A proteins in both groups were decreased, whereas CYP2E protein was not. Renal CYP4A10 and 4A14 mRNAs were significantly down-regulated in HeOu mice, whereas other P450s were unaffected. Most renal P450 mRNAs in infected HeJ mice were increased, notably CYP4A10, 4A14, 4F18, 2A5 and 3A13. Hepatic levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα mRNAs were significantly increased in infected HeOu mice, whereas only TNFα mRNA was significantly increased in HeJ mice. Hepatic α1-acid glycoprotein was induced in both groups, whereas α-fibrinogen and angiotensinogen were unchanged. These data indicate that hepatic inflammation induced by C. rodentium infection is mainly TLR4-independent, and suggest that hepatic P450 down-regulation in this model may be cytokine-mediated. PMID:16339354

  7. mRNA modifications: Dynamic regulators of gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of a gene is a tightly regulated process and is exerted by a myriad of different mechanisms. Recently, RNA modifications located in coding sequences of mRNAs, have been identified as potential regulators of gene expression. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C), pseudouridine (Ψ) and N1-methyladenosine (m1A) have been found within open reading frames of mRNAs. The presence of these mRNA modifications has been implicated to modulate the fate of an mRNA, ranging from maturation to its translation and even degradation. However, many aspects concerning the biological functions of mRNA modifications remain elusive. Recently, systematic in vitro studies allowed a first glimpse of the direct interplay of mRNA modifications and the efficiency and fidelity of ribosomal translation. It thereby became evident that the effects of mRNA modifications were, astonishingly versatile, depending on the type, position or sequence context. The incorporation of a single modification could either prematurely terminate protein synthesis, reduce the peptide yield or alter the amino acid sequence identity. These results implicate that mRNA modifications are a powerful mechanism to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. PMID:27351916

  8. Regulation of cytokines by small RNAs during skin inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Intercellular signaling by cytokines is a vital feature of the innate immune system. In skin, an inflammatory response is mediated by cytokines and an entwined network of cellular communication between T-cells and epidermal keratinocytes. Dysregulated cytokine production, orchestrated by activated T-cells homing to the skin, is believed to be the main cause of psoriasis, a common inflammatory skin disorder. Cytokines are heavily regulated at the transcriptional level, but emerging evidence suggests that regulatory mechanisms that operate after transcription play a key role in balancing the production of cytokines. Herein, we review the nature of cytokine signaling in psoriasis with particular emphasis on regulation by mRNA destabilizing elements and the potential targeting of cytokine-encoding mRNAs by miRNAs. The proposed linkage between mRNA decay mediated by AU-rich elements and miRNA association is described and discussed as a possible general feature of cytokine regulation in skin. Moreover, we describe the latest attempts to therapeutically target cytokines at the RNA level in psoriasis by exploiting the cellular RNA interference machinery. The applicability of cytokine-encoding mRNAs as future clinical drug targets is evaluated, and advances and obstacles related to topical administration of RNA-based drugs targeting the cytokine circuit in psoriasis are described. PMID:20594301

  9. Interleukin-1β induced Stress Granules Sequester COX-2 mRNA and Regulates its Stability and Translation in Human OA Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammad Y.; Haqqi, Tariq M.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced and immediate expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA is observed in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes but the synthesis of protein found significantly delayed. Here we investigated the role of stress granules (SGs), ribonucleoprotein complexes that regulate mRNA translation, in the delayed translation of COX-2 mRNAs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Stimulation of human chondrocytes with IL-1β activated the stress response genes and the phosphorylation of eIF2α that triggered the assembly of SGs. Using combined immunofluorescence staining of SGs markers and COX-2 protein, RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization and RNA immunoprecipitation, the COX-2 mRNAs were found sequestered in SGs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. No increase in COX-2 protein expression was observed during the persistence of SGs but enhanced expression of COX-2 protein was noted upon clearance of the SGs. Inhibition of SGs clearance blocked COX-2 mRNA translation whereas blocking the assembly of SGs by TIA-1 depletion resulted in rapid and increased production of COX-2 and PGE2. Our findings show for the first time assembly of SGs and sequestration of COX-2 mRNAs in human OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. Post-transcriptional regulation of COX-2 mRNAs translation by SGs indicates a role in IL-1β-mediated catabolic response that could be therapeutically targeted in OA. PMID:27271770

  10. Differential expression of miRNAs and their target mRNAs in endometria prior to maternal recognition of pregnancy associates with endometrial receptivity for in vivo- and in vitro-produced bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Tesfaye, Dawit; Schellander, Karl; Hoelker, Michael; Hadlich, Frieder; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial receptivity is a prerequisite for successful embryo implantation and pregnancy. Receptivity involves complex processes promoted by many transcripts that are key components of molecular pathways that depend on ovarian hormones and that contribute to shaping structural, metabolic, and communication properties of endometrial cells toward reception of embryos. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of the expression of these transcripts encoding effector molecules. We acquired miRNA and mRNA signatures, miRNA-mRNA pairs, and regulatory networks linked with the emergence and maintenance of postimplantation pregnancy. Endometrial tissue samples were obtained at Days 3 and 7 of the estrous cycle of cows that did or did not become pregnant after transfer of either in vivo-produced (IVV) or in vitro-produced (IVT) embryos in the next cycle following the biopsy. We report a list of endometrial miRNAs that were differentially expressed between Day 3 and Day 7 of the bovine estrous cycle (including miR-1290, miR-3437, miR-1246, miR-486, miR-3107, and miR-382), that differed with high or low endometrial receptivity (miR-3902-3p, miR-1825, miR-H14-3p, miR-885-3p, miR-504-3p, and miR-186), or that differed among the IVT and IVV transfers (miR-449a/b/c, miR-138, miR-874, miR-4342, miR-2231, and miR-2751). Moreover, mRNA transcripts were also analyzed, and pairs of negatively correlated miRNAs and mRNAs were predicted in silico. The miRNA-mRNA target pairs had roles in response to hormonal stimuli and oxidative stress, chromatin organization, miRNA-mediated epigenetic histone changes, cell proliferation, p53 signaling, and apoptosis. Overall, we identified significant miRNAs, miRNA-mRNA pairs, and functional networks that are associated with the state of pregnancy at Day 28 as a parameter of endometrial receptivity and that are affected by estrous cycle and embryo culture systems. PMID:25253731

  11. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.

  12. DEAD-box protein DDX3 associates with eIF4F to promote translation of selected mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Rubilar, Paulina S; Limousin, Taran; de Breyne, Sylvain; Décimo, Didier; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2012-09-12

    Here, we have characterized a step in translation initiation of viral and cellular mRNAs that contain RNA secondary structures immediately at the vicinity of their m(7)GTP cap. This is mediated by the DEAD-box helicase DDX3 which can directly bind to the 5' of the target mRNA where it clamps the entry of eIF4F through an eIF4G and Poly A-binding protein cytoplasmic 1 (PABP) double interaction. This could induce limited local strand separation of the secondary structure to allow 43S pre-initiation complex attachment to the 5' free extremity of the mRNA. We further demonstrate that the requirement for DDX3 is highly specific to some selected transcripts, cannot be replaced or substituted by eIF4A and is only needed in the very early steps of ribosome binding and prior to 43S ribosomal scanning. Altogether, these data define an unprecedented role for a DEAD-box RNA helicase in translation initiation. PMID:22872150

  13. Discovery of new genes and deletion editing in Physarum mitochondria enabled by a novel algorithm for finding edited mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gott, Jonatha M.; Parimi, Neeta; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Gene finding is complicated in organisms that exhibit insertional RNA editing. Here, we demonstrate how our new algorithm Predictor of Insertional Editing (PIE) can be used to locate genes whose mRNAs are subjected to multiple frameshifting events, and extend the algorithm to include probabilistic predictions for sites of nucleotide insertion; this feature is particularly useful when designing primers for sequencing edited RNAs. Applying this algorithm, we successfully identified the nad2, nad4L, nad6 and atp8 genes within the mitochondrial genome of Physarum polycephalum, which had gone undetected by existing programs. Characterization of their mRNA products led to the unanticipated discovery of nucleotide deletion editing in Physarum. The deletion event, which results in the removal of three adjacent A residues, was confirmed by primer extension sequencing of total RNA. This finding is remarkable in that it comprises the first known instance of nucleotide deletion in this organelle, to be contrasted with nearly 500 sites of single and dinucleotide addition in characterized mitochondrial RNAs. Statistical analysis of this larger pool of editing sites indicates that there are significant biases in the 2 nt immediately upstream of editing sites, including a reduced incidence of nucleotide repeats, in addition to the previously identified purine-U bias. PMID:16147990

  14. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR formore » nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.« less

  15. Hel-N1: an autoimmune RNA-binding protein with specificity for 3' uridylate-rich untranslated regions of growth factor mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, T D; Gao, F; King, P H; Andrews, L G; Keene, J D

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the RNA binding specificity of Hel-N1, a human neuron-specific RNA-binding protein, which contains three RNA recognition motifs. Hel-N1 is a human homolog of Drosophila melanogaster elav, which plays a vital role in the development of neurons. A random RNA selection procedure revealed that Hel-N1 prefers to bind RNAs containing short stretches of uridylates similar to those found in the 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) of oncoprotein and cytokine mRNAs such as c-myc, c-fos, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Direct binding studies demonstrated that Hel-N1 bound and formed multimers with c-myc 3' UTR mRNA and required, as a minimum, a specific 29-nucleotide stretch containing AUUUG, AUUUA, and GUUUUU. Deletion analysis demonstrated that a fragment of Hel-N1 containing 87 amino acids, encompassing the third RNA recognition motif, forms an RNA binding domain for the c-myc 3' UTR. In addition, Hel-N1 was shown to be reactive with autoantibodies from patients with paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis both before and after binding to c-myc mRNA. Images PMID:8497264

  16. Molecular classification of an elasmobranch angiotensin receptor: quantification of angiotensin receptor and natriuretic peptide receptor mRNAs in saltwater and freshwater populations of the Atlantic stingray.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew N; Henning, Toni; Gelsleichter, James; Nunez, B Scott

    2010-12-01

    Among the most conserved osmoregulatory hormone systems in vertebrates are the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the natriuretic peptides (NPs). We examined the RAS and NP system in the euryhaline Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina (Lesueur). To determine the relative sensitivity of target organs to these hormonal systems, we isolated cDNA sequences encoding the D. sabina angiotensin receptor (AT) and natriuretic peptide type-B receptor (NPR-B). We then determined the tissue-specific expression of their mRNAs in saltwater D. sabina from local Texas waters and an isolated freshwater population in Lake Monroe, Florida. AT mRNA was most abundant in interrenal tissue from both populations. NPR-B mRNA was most abundant in rectal gland tissue from both populations, and also highly abundant in the kidney of saltwater D. sabina. This study is the first to report the sequence of an elasmobranch angiotensin receptor, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that the D. sabina receptor is more similar to AT(1) vs. AT(2) proteins. This classification is further supported by molecular analysis of AT(1) and AT(2) proteins demonstrating conservation of AT(1)-specific amino acid residues and motifs in D. sabina AT. Molecular classification of the elasmobranch angiotensin receptor as an AT(1)-like protein provides fundamental insight into the evolution of the vertebrate RAS. PMID:20869458

  17. Cbk1 regulation of the RNA binding protein Ssd1 integrates cell fate with translational control

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jaclyn M.; Wanless, Antony G.; Seidel, Christopher W.; Weiss, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Spatial control of gene expression, at the level of both transcription and translation, is critical for cellular differentiation [1-4]. In budding yeast, the conserved Ndr/warts kinase Cbk1 localizes to the new daughter cell where it acts as a cell fate determinant. Cbk1 both induces a daughter-specific transcriptional program and promotes morphogenesis in a less well-defined role [5-8]. Cbk1 is essential in cells expressing functional Ssd1, an RNA binding protein of unknown function [9-11]. We show that Cbk1 inhibits Ssd1 in vivo. Loss of this regulation dramatically slows bud expansion, leading to highly aberrant cell wall organization at the site of cell growth. Ssd1 associates with specific mRNAs, a significant number of which encode cell wall remodeling proteins. Translation of these messages is rapidly and specifically suppressed when Cbk1 is inhibited; this suppression requires Ssd1. Transcription of several of these Ssd1-associated mRNAs is also regulated by Cbk1, indicating that the kinase controls both the transcription and translation of daughter-specific mRNAs. This work suggests a novel system by which cells coordinate localized expression of genes involved in processes critical for cell growth and division. PMID:19962308

  18. To translate, or not to translate: viral and host mRNA regulation by interferon-stimulated genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Melody M H; MacDonald, Margaret R; Rice, Charles M

    2015-06-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is one of the first lines of cellular defense against viral pathogens. As a result of IFN signaling, a wide array of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) products is upregulated to target different stages of the viral life cycle. We review recent findings implicating a subset of ISGs in translational regulation of viral and host mRNAs. Translation inhibition is mediated either by binding to viral RNA or by disrupting physiological interactions or levels of the translation complex components. In addition, many of these ISGs localize to translationally silent cytoplasmic granules, such as stress granules and processing bodies, and intersect with the microRNA (miRNA)-mediated silencing pathway to regulate translation of cellular mRNAs. PMID:25748385

  19. An oxygen-regulated switch in the protein synthesis machinery

    PubMed Central

    Uniacke, James; Holterman, Chet E.; Lachance, Gabriel; Franovic, Aleksandra; Jacob, Mathieu D.; Fabian, Marc R.; Payette, Josianne; Holcik, Martin; Pause, Arnim; Lee, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein synthesis involves the translation of ribonucleic acid information into proteins, the building blocks of life. The initial step of protein synthesis consists of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) binding to the 7-methylguanosine (m7-GpppG) 5′cap of mRNAs1,2. Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) represses cap-mediated translation by sequestering eIF4E through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent mechanisms3–6. While the internal ribosome entry site is an alternative translation initiation mechanism, this pathway alone cannot account for the translational capacity of hypoxic cells7,8. This raises a fundamental question in biology as to how proteins are synthesized in periods of oxygen scarcity and eIF4E inhibition9. Here, we uncover an oxygen-regulated translation initiation complex that mediates selective cap-dependent protein synthesis. Hypoxia stimulates the formation of a complex that includes the oxygen-regulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α), the RNA binding protein RBM4 and the cap-binding eIF4E2, an eIF4E homologue. PAR-CLIP10 analysis identified an RNA hypoxia response element (rHRE) that recruits this complex to a wide array mRNAs, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Once assembled at the rHRE, HIF-2α/RBM4/eIF4E2 captures the 5′cap and targets mRNAs to polysomes for active translation thereby evading hypoxia-induced repression of protein synthesis. These findings demonstrate that cells have evolved a program whereby oxygen tension switches the basic translation initiation machinery. PMID:22678294

  20. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  1. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP–RNA complexes known as “riboclusters.” These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  2. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP-RNA complexes known as "riboclusters." These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  3. Noncoding RNAs: Regulators of the Mammalian Transcription Machinery.

    PubMed

    Eidem, Tess M; Kugel, Jennifer F; Goodrich, James A

    2016-06-19

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is required to produce mRNAs and some noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) within mammalian cells. This coordinated process is precisely regulated by multiple factors, including many recently discovered ncRNAs. In this perspective, we will discuss newly identified ncRNAs that facilitate DNA looping, regulate transcription factor binding, mediate promoter-proximal pausing of Pol II, and/or interact with Pol II to modulate transcription. Moreover, we will discuss new roles for ncRNAs, as well as a novel Pol II RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity that regulates an ncRNA inhibitor of transcription. As the multifaceted nature of ncRNAs continues to be revealed, we believe that many more ncRNA species and functions will be discovered. PMID:26920110

  4. The role of IGFs in the regulation of ovarian follicular growth in the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula).

    PubMed

    Juengel, Jennifer L; Haydon, Lisa J; Mester, Brigitta; Thomson, Brian P; Beaumont, Michael; Eckery, Douglas C

    2010-08-01

    IGFs are known to be key regulators of ovarian follicular growth in eutherian mammals, but little is known regarding their role in marsupials. To better understand the potential role of IGFs in the regulation of follicular growth in marsupials, expression of mRNAs encoding IGF1, IGF2, IGF1R, IGF-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), IGFBP4 and IGFBP5 was localized by in situ hybridization in developing ovarian follicles of the brushtail possum. In addition, the effects of IGF1 and IGF2 on granulosa cell function were tested in vitro. Both granulosa and theca cells synthesize IGF mRNAs, with the theca expressing IGF1 mRNA and granulosa cell expressing IGF2 mRNA. Oocytes and granulosa cells express IGF1R. Granulosa and theca cells expressed IGFBP mRNAs, although the pattern of expression differed between the BPs. IGFBP5 mRNA was differentially expressed as the follicles developed with granulosa cells of antral follicles no longer expressing IGFBP5 mRNA, suggesting an increased IGF bioavailability in the antral follicle. The IGFBP protease, PAPPA mRNA, was also expressed in granulosa cells of growing follicles. Both IGF1 and IGF2 stimulated thymidine incorporation but had no effect on progesterone production. Thus, IGF may be an important regulator of ovarian follicular development in marsupials as has been shown in eutherian mammals. PMID:20522481

  5. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Expression Analysis of MicroRNAs and mRNAs in Barley under Various Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ferdous, Jannatul; Li, Yuan; Reid, Nicolas; Langridge, Peter; Shi, Bu-Jun; Tricker, Penny J.

    2015-01-01

    For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR), the selection of appropriate reference genes as an internal control for normalization is crucial. We hypothesized that non-coding, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) would be stably expressed in different barley varieties and under different experimental treatments, in different tissues and at different developmental stages of plant growth and therefore might prove to be suitable reference genes for expression analysis of both microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNAs. In this study, we examined the expression stability of ten candidate reference genes in six barley genotypes under five experimental stresses, drought, fungal infection, boron toxicity, nutrient deficiency and salinity. We compared four commonly used housekeeping genes; Actin (ACT), alpha-Tubulin (α-TUB), Glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), ADP-ribosylation factor 1-like protein (ADP), four snoRNAs; (U18, U61, snoR14 and snoR23) and two microRNAs (miR168, miR159) as candidate reference genes. We found that ADP, snoR14 and snoR23 were ranked as the best of these candidates across diverse samples. For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR), the selection of appropriate reference genes as an internal control for normalization is crucial. We hypothesized that non-coding, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) would be stably expressed in different barley varieties and under different experimental treatments, in different tissues and at different developmental stages of plant growth and therefore might prove to be suitable reference genes for expression analysis of both microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNAs. In this study, we examined the expression stability of ten candidate reference genes in six barley genotypes under five experimental stresses, drought, fungal infection, boron toxicity, nutrient deficiency and salinity. We

  6. Expression of mRNAs encoding for growth factors, ECM molecules, and MMP13 in mono-cultures and co-cultures of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts and alveolar bone cells.

    PubMed

    Winter, S; Kohl, A; Huppertz, A; Herold-Mende, C; Wiest, T; Komposch, G; Tomakidi, P

    2005-03-01

    Although the function and effects of many growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules have been described for several periodontal tissues in vivo and in vitro, the molecular interactions involved in the communication between cells of the periodontal ligament and the alveolar bone are poorly understood. To contribute to the identification of such interactions, we have generated co-cultures (CCs) of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and alveolar bone cells (ABCs) and compared mRNA expression for various growth factors, ECM molecules, and matrix metalloproteinase13 (MMP13) after 1 and 2 weeks with matched mono-cultures (MCs) by reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction. Compared with CCs of 1 week, PDLs and ABCs after 2 weeks revealed relatively high levels of all analyzed mRNAs, viz., for EGF, HGF, VEGF, TGFbeta1, collagen-I (COL1), osteonectin (ON), fibronectin (FN1), and MMP13. At week 2, when compared with MCs, CCs showed an elevation of all tested mRNAs in PDLs and ABCs, except for TGFbeta1 and FN1, which only increased in PDLs. After 1 week, when CCs were compared with MCs, mRNAs for HGF and TGFbeta1 were less abundant in PDLs and ABCs, whereas the other genes exhibited lower expression levels in only one of the cell types. Analysis of our data indicated that the expression of mRNAs for growth factors and for COL1, ON, FN1, and MMP13 was modulated in the distinct cell types with respect to culture time and culture type. The differences in the mRNA expression patterns between CCs and MCs suggest that the respective genes are involved in the molecular interactions of PDLs and ABCs. PMID:15668800

  7. Hormonal stimulation of starfish oocytes induces partial degradation of the 3' termini of cyclin B mRNAs with oligo(U) tails, followed by poly(A) elongation.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Hiroe; Chiba, Kazuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    In yeast, plant, and mammalian somatic cells, short poly(A) tails on mRNAs are subject to uridylation, which mediates mRNA decay. Although mRNA uridylation has never been reported in animal oocytes, maternal mRNAs with short poly(A) tails are believed to be translationally repressed. In this study, we found that 96% of cyclin B mRNAs with short poly(A) tails were uridylated in starfish oocytes. Hormonal stimulation induced poly(A) elongation of cyclin B mRNA, and 62% of long adenine repeats did not contain uridine residues. To determine whether uridylated short poly(A) tails destabilize cyclin B mRNA, we developed a method for producing RNAs with the strict 3' terminal sequences of cyclin B, with or without oligo(U) tails. When we injected these synthetic RNAs into starfish oocytes prior to hormonal stimulation, we found that uridylated RNAs were as stable as nonuridylated RNAs. Following hormonal stimulation, the 3' termini of short poly(A) tails of synthesized RNAs containing oligo(U) tails were trimmed, and their poly(A) tails were subsequently elongated. These results indicate that uridylation of short poly(A) tails in cyclin B mRNA of starfish oocytes does not mediate mRNA decay; instead, hormonal stimulation induces partial degradation of uridylated short poly(A) tails in the 3'-5' direction, followed by poly(A) elongation. Oligo(U) tails may be involved in translational inactivation of mRNAs. PMID:27048146

  8. Identification of true differentially expressed mRNAs in a pair of human bladder transitional cell carcinomas using an improved differential display procedure.

    PubMed

    Gromova, I; Gromov, P; Celis, J E

    1999-02-01

    Differential display in combination with arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprinting has become one of the most powerful techniques to identify and isolate mRNAs that are differentially expressed in pairs of biological samples. However, in many cases the cDNA band corresponding to the differentially amplified product contains several cDNA species that comigrate with the cDNA of interest due to the poor resolution of the fingerprinting gels, thus hampering further analysis and identification of the desirable cDNA. To improve the electrophoretic resolution of differentially amplified cDNAs, we have utilized Resolver Gold agarose gel electrophoresis (Ingenius) as an additional step to overcome downstream problems encountered during RNA fingerprinting experiments. To illustrate the power of the modified differential display procedure we present a detailed analysis of the cDNA products differentially displayed in tumor biopsies obtained from a noninvasive (grade II, Ta) and an invasive (grade III, T2-T4) human bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Several genes that were differentially expressed in this tumor pair were identified. These included: tropomyosin 4, the protein disulfide isomerase precursor (PDI), MRP14, signal transducer CD24, keratins 8 and 13, cytochrome oxidase subunit IV (COXIV), putative transcription factor HOX-1.3, as well as two novel genes of yet unknown function. All of the identified cDNAs were shown to be truly differentially expressed by Northern blotting, reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) analysis of the corresponding lesions. PMID:10197429

  9. Identification of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR analysis of microRNAs and mRNAs in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Cassol, Daniela; Cruz, Fernanda P; Espindola, Kauê; Mangeon, Amanda; Müller, Caroline; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Corrêa, Régis L; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is one of the most powerful and sensitive techniques to the study of gene expression. Several factors influence RT-qPCR performance though, including the stability of the reference genes used for data normalization. While the selection of appropriate reference genes is crucial for accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, no suitable reference genes have been previously identified in castor bean under drought stress. In this study, the expression stability of eleven mRNAs, thirteen microRNAs (miRNAs) and one small nuclear RNA were analyzed in roots and leaves across different levels of water deficit. Three different algorithms were employed to analyze the RT-qPCR data, and the resulting outputs were merged using a non-weighted unsupervised rank aggregation method. Our analysis indicated that the Elongation factor 1-beta (EF1B), Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and ADP-ribosylation factor (ADP) ranked as the best candidates across diverse samples submitted to different levels of drought conditions. EF1B and Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and EF1B and SKP1/ASK-interacting protein 16 (SKIP16) were found as the most suitable reference genes for expression analysis in roots and leaves, respectively. In addition, miRNAs miR168, miR160 and miR397 were selected as optimal reference genes across all tissues and treatments. miR168 and miR156 were recommended as reference for roots, while miR168 and miR160 were recommended for leaves. Together, our results constitute the first attempt to identify and validate the most suitable reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression in castor bean under drought stress. PMID:27156134

  10. Methylations of adenosine residues (m6A) in pre-mRNA are important for formation of late simian virus 40 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Finkel, D; Groner, Y

    1983-12-01

    Cycloleucine, a competitive inhibitor of methionine transferase was used to generate in vivo partially methylated mRNA in SV40-infected BSC-1 cells. Cycloleucine at 0.5 mg/ml causes more than a 30% decrease in internal m6As of late SV40 mRNA with only minor effect on the dimethyladenosine of the 5' caps m7GpppmAm. After treatment with 2 and 5 mg/ml of cycloleucine, internal m6As were reduced by 10- and 100-fold, respectively. The inhibition of BSC-1 mRNA methylations paralleled that observed for late SV40 mRNAs. In cells exposed to 2 mg/ml cycloleucine production of late SV40 mRNA was inhibited by 80% whereas the amount of SV40 nuclear RNA was only slightly reduced. Size fractionation of SV40 nuclear RNA from cycloleucine-treated cells revealed a loss of SV40 19 S RNA with a corresponding increase of fragmented RNA sedimenting between 11 to 5 S, so that the total amount of SV40 RNA in the nucleus was almost unchanged. Analysis of viral transcription complexes from cells treated with cycloleucine indicated that SV40 transcription was not affected by cycloleucine. SV40-transformed cells, in contrast to BSC-1 cells, were able to process and transport undermethylated RNA. When transformed cells were treated with 2 mg/ml cycloleucine no changes in quantities or size of cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA were detected. The data argues for a role of internal m6A moieties in modulating the processing-linked transport of mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of nontransformed cells. Transformed cells may escape these controls due to structural alterations in their perinuclear regions. PMID:6318439

  11. Nucleotides Flanking the Start Codon in hsp70 mRNAs with Very Short 5’-UTRs Greatly Affect Gene Expression in Haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenchao; Yang, Guopeng; He, Yue; Zhang, Shaoming; Chen, Haiyan; Shen, Ping; Chen, Xiangdong; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Leaderless translation is prevalent in haloarchaea, with many of these leaderless transcripts possessing short 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs) less than 10 nucleotides. Whereas, little is known about the function of this very short 5’-UTR. Our previous studies determined that just four nucleotides preceded the start codon of hsp70 mRNA in Natrinema sp. J7, with residues -3A and +4G, relative to the A of the ATG start codon, acting as the preferred bases around the start codon of all known haloarchaeal hsp70 genes. Here, we examined the effects of nucleotides flanking the start codon on gene expression. The results revealed that shortening and deletion of the short 5’-UTR enhanced transcript levels; however, it led to significant reductions in overall translational efficiency. AUG was efficiently used as start codons, in both the presence and absence of short 5’-UTRs. GUG also could initiate translation, even though it was so inefficient that it would not be detected without considerably elevated transcript. Nucleotide substitutions at position -4 to +6 were shown to affect gene expression by transcript and/or translational levels. Notably, -3A and A/U nucleotides at position +4~+6 were more optimal for gene expression. Nucleotide transversions of -3A to -3C and +4G to +4T with hsp70 promoter from either Haloferax volcanii DS70 or Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 showed the same effects on gene expression as that of Natrinema sp. J7. Taken together, our results suggest that the nucleotides flanking the start codon in hsp70 mRNAs with very short 5’-UTRs play an important role in haloarchaeal gene expression. PMID:26379277

  12. Reversible Oligonucleotide Chain Blocking Enables Bead Capture and Amplification of T-Cell Receptor α and β Chain mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hanson, W Miachel; Chen, Zhe; Jackson, Laurie K; Attaf, Meriem; Sewell, Andrew K; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Phillips, John D

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has proven to be an exceptionally powerful tool for studying genetic variation and differences in gene expression profiles between cell populations. However, these population-wide studies are limited by their inability to detect variation between individual cells within a population, inspiring the development of single-cell techniques such as Drop-seq, which add a unique barcode to the mRNA from each cell prior to sequencing. Current Drop-seq technology enables capture, amplification, and barcoding of the entire mRNA transcriptome of individual cells. NGS can then be used to sequence the 3'-end of each message to build a cell-specific transcriptional landscape. However, current technology does not allow high-throughput capture of information distant from the mRNA poly-A tail. Thus, gene profiling would have much greater utility if beads could be generated having multiple transcript-specific capture sequences. Here we report the use of a reversible chain blocking group to enable synthesis of DNA barcoded beads having capture sequences for the constant domains of the T-cell receptor α and β chain mRNAs. We demonstrate that these beads can be used to capture and pair TCRα and TCRβ sequences from total T-cell RNA, enabling reverse transcription and PCR amplification of these sequences. This is the first example of capture beads having more than one capture sequence, and we envision that this technology will be of high utility for applications such as pairing the antigen receptor chains that give rise to autoimmune diseases or measuring the ratios of mRNA splice variants in cancer stem cells. PMID:27478996

  13. Expression of specific mRNAs during adipose differentiation: identification of an mRNA encoding a homologue of myelin P2 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bernlohr, D A; Angus, C W; Lane, M D; Bolanowski, M A; Kelly, T J

    1984-01-01

    To identify and characterize specific mRNAs that increase in abundance during differentiation of mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, a cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+RNA isolated from differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Mixed probe isotope ratio selection and RNA blot analyses have identified several unique cDNA clones that represent mRNA species expressed either exclusively or at dramatically increased levels in differentiated cells. Further characterization of one such clone (pAL422) revealed that the corresponding mRNA, detectable only after differentiation, is approximately the same length (600 +/- 150 bases) as the cDNA insert (672 bases). The complete nucleotide sequence of the cDNA insert in pAL422 revealed a single long open reading frame that encodes a 132 amino acid polypeptide (the 422 protein) of 14.6 kDa. These and other results suggest that this cDNA may represent a nearly full-length copy of the mRNA. Computer-assisted analyses showed that the 422 protein shares 69% and 64% homology with myelin P2 proteins from rabbit and bovine peripheral nerves, respectively, as well as 23% and 30% homology with fatty-acid binding proteins from rat liver and intestine, respectively. Moreover, the mRNA hybrid selected by pAL422 DNA directs the in vitro translation of an approximately equal to 13 kDa polypeptide, and this protein is specifically immunoprecipitated by antiserum against bovine myelin P2. These observations strongly suggest that the 422 protein is a structural, and possibly functional, analog of myelin P2. Images PMID:6206497

  14. THE MECHANISM OF EUKARYOTIC TRANSLATION INITIATION AND PRINCIPLES OF ITS REGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Richard J.; Hellen, Christopher U.T.; Pestova, Tatyana V.

    2015-01-01

    PREFACE Protein synthesis is principally regulated at the initiation stage (rather than during elongation or termination), allowing rapid, reversible and spatial control over gene expression. Progress over recent years in determining the structures and activities of initiation factors, and in mapping their interactions within ribosomal initiation complexes, has significantly advanced our understanding of the complex translation initiation process. These developments have provided a solid foundation for studies of regulation of initiation by mechanisms that include modulation of the activity of initiation factors (which affects almost all scanning-dependent initiation), or via sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins and microRNAs (which thus impact individual mRNAs). PMID:20094052

  15. Regulation of Flavonoid Biosynthetic Genes in Germinating Arabidopsis Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Kubasek, WL; Shirley, BW; McKillop, A; Goodman, HM; Briggs, W; Ausubel, FM

    1992-01-01

    Many higher plants, including Arabidopsis, transiently display purple anthocyanin pigments just after seed germination. We observed that steady state levels of mRNAs encoded by four flavonoid biosynthetic genes, PAL1 (encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 1), CHS (encoding chalcone synthase), CHI (encoding chalcone isomerase), and DFR (encoding dihydroflavonol reductase), were temporally regulated, peaking in 3-day-old seedlings grown in continuous white light. Except for the case of PAL1 mRNA, mRNA levels for these flavonoid genes were very low in seedlings grown in darkness. Light induction studies using seedlings grown in darkness showed that PAL1 mRNA began to accumulate before CHS and CHI mRNAs, which, in turn, began to accumulate before DFR mRNA. This order of induction is the same as the order of the biosynthetic steps in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our results suggest that the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway is coordinately regulated by a developmental timing mechanism during germination. Blue light and UVB light induction experiments using red light- and dark-grown seedlings showed that the flavonoid biosynthetic genes are induced most effectively by UVB light and that blue light induction is mediated by a specific blue light receptor. PMID:12297632

  16. Transient Induction of Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase and 4-Coumarate: CoA Ligase mRNAs in Potato Leaves Infected with Virulent or Avirulent Races of Phytophthora infestans1

    PubMed Central

    Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Cretin, Claude; Kombrink, Erich; Rohwer, Frauke; Taylor, Janet; Scheel, Dierk; Hahlbrock, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    Infection of potato leaves with the fungal pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Pi) resulted in the rapid stimulation of phenylpropanoid metabolism. Increases in the activities of several mRNAs, including those encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), were detectable within a few hours postinoculation, as demonstrated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins synthesized in vitro. This effect was closely mimicked by application of Pi culture filtrate through cut leaf stems. PAL and 4CL mRNA activities were also rapidly and transiently induced in potato cell suspension cultures by treatments with Pi culture filtrate or arachidonic acid. This induction was exploited to generate cDNA probes complementary to PAL and 4CL mRNAs. Blot hybridizations using these probes revealed almost immediate, transient and coordinate increases in the transcription rates and subsequent changes in the amounts of PAL and 4CL mRNAs in leaves treated with Pi culture filtrate. Similar changes in the mRNA amounts were found in infected leaves of potato cultivars carrying resistance genes R1 (cv Datura) or R4 (cv Isola), independent of whether a virulent or an avirulent Pi pathotype was used for inoculation. These results are discussed in relation to recent cytological observations with the same potato cultivars and Pi pathotypes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16665678

  17. Overexpression of the lily p70(s6k) gene in Arabidopsis affects elongation of flower organs and indicates TOR-dependent regulation of AP3, PI and SUP translation.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Tsai-Yu; Kong, Lih-Ren; Chen, Chun-Hung; Shaw, Chih-Chi; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2009-09-01

    The p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70(s6k)) signaling pathway plays a key role in regulating the cell cycle via translational regulation of specific 5'TOP mRNAs. However, the function of this signaling pathway is still poorly understood in plants. Ectopic expression of the lily putative p70(s6k) gene, LS6K1, resulted in up-regulation of NAP (NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI) and PISTILLATA (PI) expression, and significantly inhibited cell expansion for petals and stamens, resulting in the male sterility phenotype in transgenic Arabidopsis. Sequence analysis revealed that the genes involved in petal and stamen development, such as APETALA3 (AP3), PI and SUPERMAN (SUP), probably encode 5'TOP mRNAs. Green fluorescent protein (GFP), fused to oligopyrimidine tract sequences that were identified in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of AP3, PI and SUP, was translationally regulated in human cells in response to mitogen stimulation and inhibition by the macrolide antibiotic rapamycin. Furthermore, 35S::LS6K1 significantly up-regulated beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in the flower buds of transgenic plants carrying the GUS transgene fused to the AP3 promoter and the 5' UTR. These results have identified a novel role for the p70(s6k) gene in regulating cell division and the expansion of petals and stamens by translational regulation of the 5'TOP mRNAs once ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis. PMID:19651701

  18. Inhibition of translation by IFIT family members is determined by their ability to interact selectively with the 5′-terminal regions of cap0-, cap1- and 5′ppp- mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parimal; Sweeney, Trevor R.; Skabkin, Maxim A.; Skabkina, Olga V.; Pestova, Tatyana V.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal recruitment of cellular mRNAs depends on binding of eIF4F to the mRNA’s 5′-terminal ‘cap’. The minimal ‘cap0’ consists of N7-methylguanosine linked to the first nucleotide via a 5′-5′ triphosphate (ppp) bridge. Cap0 is further modified by 2′-O-methylation of the next two riboses, yielding ‘cap1’ (m7GpppNmN) and ‘cap2’ (m7GpppNmNm). However, some viral RNAs lack 2′-O-methylation, whereas others contain only ppp- at their 5′-end. Interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) are highly expressed effectors of innate immunity that inhibit viral replication by incompletely understood mechanisms. Here, we investigated the ability of IFIT family members to interact with cap1-, cap0- and 5′ppp- mRNAs and inhibit their translation. IFIT1 and IFIT1B showed very high affinity to cap-proximal regions of cap0-mRNAs (K1/2,app ∼9 to 23 nM). The 2′-O-methylation abrogated IFIT1/mRNA interaction, whereas IFIT1B retained the ability to bind cap1-mRNA, albeit with reduced affinity (K1/2,app ∼450 nM). The 5′-terminal regions of 5′ppp-mRNAs were recognized by IFIT5 (K1/2,app ∼400 nM). The activity of individual IFITs in inhibiting initiation on a specific mRNA was determined by their ability to interact with its 5′-terminal region: IFIT1 and IFIT1B efficiently outcompeted eIF4F and abrogated initiation on cap0-mRNAs, whereas inhibition on cap1- and 5′ppp- mRNAs by IFIT1B and IFIT5 was weaker and required higher protein concentrations. PMID:24371270

  19. Evidence for variation in the optimal translation initiation complex: plant eIF4B, eIF4F, and eIF(iso)4F differentially promote translation of mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Laura K; Allen, M Leah; Dennis, Michael D; Browning, Karen S

    2009-08-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4B is known to interact with multiple initiation factors, mRNA, rRNA, and poly(A) binding protein (PABP). To gain a better understanding of the function of eIF4B, the two isoforms from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were expressed and analyzed using biophysical and biochemical methods. Plant eIF4B was found by ultracentrifugation and light scattering analysis to most likely be a monomer with an extended structure. An extended structure would facilitate the multiple interactions of eIF4B with mRNA as well as other initiation factors (eIF4A, eIF4G, PABP, and eIF3). Eight mRNAs, barley (Hordeum vulgare) alpha-amylase mRNA, rabbit beta-hemoglobin mRNA, Arabidopsis heat shock protein 21 (HSP21) mRNA, oat (Avena sativa) globulin, wheat (Triticum aestivum) germin, maize (Zea mays) alcohol dehydrogenase, satellite tobacco necrosis virus RNA, and alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) 4, were used in wheat germ in vitro translation assays to measure their dependence on eIF4B and eIF4F isoforms. The two Arabidopsis eIF4B isoforms, as well as native and recombinant wheat eIF4B, showed similar responses in the translation assay. AMV RNA 4 and Arabidopsis HSP21 showed only a slight dependence on the presence of eIF4B isoforms, whereas rabbit beta-hemoglobin mRNA and wheat germin mRNA showed modest dependence. Barley alpha-amylase, oat globulin, and satellite tobacco necrosis virus RNA displayed the strongest dependence on eIF4B. These results suggest that eIF4B has some effects on mRNA discrimination during initiation of translation. Barley alpha-amylase, oat globulin, and rabbit beta-hemoglobin mRNA showed the highest activity with eIF4F, whereas Arabidopsis HSP21 and AMV RNA 4 used both eIF4F and eIF(iso)4F equally well. These results suggest that differential or optimal translation of mRNAs may require initiation complexes composed of specific isoforms of initiation factor gene products. Thus, individual mRNAs or classes of mRNAs may respond to the

  20. VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Von Eschen, R.L.; Scheele, P.F.

    1962-04-24

    A transistorized voltage regulator which provides very close voitage regulation up to about 180 deg F is described. A diode in the positive line provides a constant voltage drop from the input to a regulating transistor emitter. An amplifier is coupled to the positive line through a resistor and is connected between a difference circuit and the regulating transistor base which is negative due to the difference in voltage drop across thc diode and the resistor so that a change in the regulator output causes the amplifier to increase or decrease the base voltage and current and incrcase or decrease the transistor impedance to return the regulator output to normal. (AEC)

  1. YB-1 regulates stress granule formation and tumor progression by translationally activating G3BP1

    PubMed Central

    Somasekharan, Syam Prakash; El-Naggar, Amal; Leprivier, Gabriel; Cheng, Hongwei; Hajee, Shamil; Grunewald, Thomas G.P.; Zhang, Fan; Ng, Tony; Delattre, Olivier; Evdokimova, Valentina; Wang, Yuzhuo; Gleave, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Under cell stress, global protein synthesis is inhibited to preserve energy. One mechanism is to sequester and silence mRNAs in ribonucleoprotein complexes known as stress granules (SGs), which contain translationally silent mRNAs, preinitiation factors, and RNA-binding proteins. Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) localizes to SGs, but its role in SG biology is unknown. We now report that YB-1 directly binds to and translationally activates the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of G3BP1 mRNAs, thereby controlling the availability of the G3BP1 SG nucleator for SG assembly. YB-1 inactivation in human sarcoma cells dramatically reduces G3BP1 and SG formation in vitro. YB-1 and G3BP1 expression are highly correlated in human sarcomas, and elevated G3BP1 expression correlates with poor survival. Finally, G3BP1 down-regulation in sarcoma xenografts prevents in vivo SG formation and tumor invasion, and completely blocks lung metastasis in mouse models. Together, these findings demonstrate a critical role for YB-1 in SG formation through translational activation of G3BP1, and highlight novel functions for SGs in tumor progression. PMID:25800057

  2. LRPPRC and SLIRP interact in a ribonucleoprotein complex that regulates posttranscriptional gene expression in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sasarman, Florin; Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Antonicka, Hana; Wai, Timothy; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2010-04-15

    Mutations in LRPPRC are responsible for the French Canadian variant of Leigh syndrome (LSFC), a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a tissue-specific deficiency in cytochrome c oxidase (COX). To investigate the pathogenic mechanism of disease, we studied LRPPRC function in LSFC and control fibroblasts. The level of mutated LRPPRC is reduced in LSFC cells, and this results in decreased steady-state levels of most mitochondrial mRNAs, but not rRNAs or tRNAs, a phenotype that can be reproduced by siRNA-mediated knockdown of LRPPRC in control cells. Processing of the primary transcripts appears normal. The resultant defect in mitochondrial protein synthesis in LSFC cells disproportionately affects the COX subunits, leading to an isolated COX assembly defect. Further knockdown of LRPPRC produces a generalized assembly defect in all oxidative phosphorylation complexes containing mtDNA-encoded subunits, due to a severe decrease in all mitochondrial mRNAs. LRPPRC exists in a high-molecular-weight complex, and it coimmunoprecipitates with SLIRP, a stem-loop RNA-binding protein. Although this interaction does not depend on mitochondrial mRNA, both proteins show reduced stability in its absence. These results implicate LRPPRC in posttranscriptional mitochondrial gene expression as part of a ribonucleoprotein complex that regulates the stability and handling of mature mRNAs. PMID:20200222

  3. SLIRP Regulates the Rate of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis and Protects LRPPRC from Degradation.

    PubMed

    Lagouge, Marie; Mourier, Arnaud; Lee, Hyun Ju; Spåhr, Henrik; Wai, Timothy; Kukat, Christian; Silva Ramos, Eduardo; Motori, Elisa; Busch, Jakob D; Siira, Stefan; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the in vivo role of SLIRP in regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene expression and show here that it stabilizes its interacting partner protein LRPPRC by protecting it from degradation. Although SLIRP is completely dependent on LRPPRC for its stability, reduced levels of LRPPRC persist in the absence of SLIRP in vivo. Surprisingly, Slirp knockout mice are apparently healthy and only display a minor weight loss, despite a 50-70% reduction in the steady-state levels of mtDNA-encoded mRNAs. In contrast to LRPPRC, SLIRP is dispensable for polyadenylation of mtDNA-encoded mRNAs. Instead, deep RNA sequencing (RNAseq) of mitochondrial ribosomal fractions and additional molecular analyses show that SLIRP is required for proper association of mRNAs to the mitochondrial ribosome and efficient translation. Our findings thus establish distinct functions for SLIRP and LRPPRC within the LRPPRC-SLIRP complex, with a novel role for SLIRP in mitochondrial translation. Very surprisingly, our results also demonstrate that mammalian mitochondria have a great excess of transcripts under basal physiological conditions in vivo. PMID:26247782

  4. SLIRP Regulates the Rate of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis and Protects LRPPRC from Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lagouge, Marie; Mourier, Arnaud; Lee, Hyun Ju; Spåhr, Henrik; Wai, Timothy; Kukat, Christian; Silva Ramos, Eduardo; Motori, Elisa; Busch, Jakob D.; Siira, Stefan; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the in vivo role of SLIRP in regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene expression and show here that it stabilizes its interacting partner protein LRPPRC by protecting it from degradation. Although SLIRP is completely dependent on LRPPRC for its stability, reduced levels of LRPPRC persist in the absence of SLIRP in vivo. Surprisingly, Slirp knockout mice are apparently healthy and only display a minor weight loss, despite a 50–70% reduction in the steady-state levels of mtDNA-encoded mRNAs. In contrast to LRPPRC, SLIRP is dispensable for polyadenylation of mtDNA-encoded mRNAs. Instead, deep RNA sequencing (RNAseq) of mitochondrial ribosomal fractions and additional molecular analyses show that SLIRP is required for proper association of mRNAs to the mitochondrial ribosome and efficient translation. Our findings thus establish distinct functions for SLIRP and LRPPRC within the LRPPRC-SLIRP complex, with a novel role for SLIRP in mitochondrial translation. Very surprisingly, our results also demonstrate that mammalian mitochondria have a great excess of transcripts under basal physiological conditions in vivo. PMID:26247782

  5. Allogeneic T cell responses are regulated by a specific miRNA-mRNA network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaping; Tawara, Isao; Zhao, Meng; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Toubai, Tomomi; Mathewson, Nathan; Tamaki, Hiroya; Nieves, Evelyn; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Reddy, Pavan

    2013-01-01

    Donor T cells that respond to host alloantigens following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) induce graft-versus-host (GVH) responses, but their molecular landscape is not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene (mRNA) expression and fine-tune the molecular responses of T cells. We stimulated naive T cells with either allogeneic or nonspecific stimuli and used argonaute cross-linked immunoprecipitation (CLIP) with subsequent ChIP microarray analyses to profile miR responses and their direct mRNA targets. We identified a unique expression pattern of miRs and mRNAs following the allostimulation of T cells and a high correlation between the expression of the identified miRs and a reduction of their mRNA targets. miRs and mRNAs that were predicted to be differentially regulated in allogeneic T cells compared with nonspecifically stimulated T cells were validated in vitro. These analyses identified wings apart-like homolog (Wapal) and synaptojanin 1 (Synj1) as potential regulators of allogeneic T cell responses. The expression of these molecular targets in vivo was confirmed in MHC-mismatched experimental BMT. Targeted silencing of either Wapal or Synj1 prevented the development of GVH response, confirming a role for these regulators in allogeneic T cell responses. Thus, this genome-wide analysis of miRNA-mRNA interactions identifies previously unrecognized molecular regulators of T cell responses. PMID:24216511

  6. Sensitization to the behavioural effects of cocaine: alterations in tyrosine hydroxylase or endogenous opioid mRNAs are not necessarily involved.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Fischer, D; Schäfer, M K; Ferger, B; Gross, S; Westermann, R; Weihe, E; Kuschinsky, K

    2001-03-01

    After repeated administration of cocaine at intervals, sensitization phenomena can be observed, so that its behavioural effects are enhanced. Since this phenomenon is long-lasting, it was of interest to study which persistent alterations in the activity of dopaminergic neurones or of endogenous opioid systems downstream of dopaminergic synapses in the basal ganglia are involved in the sensitization. Cocaine (10 mg/kg i.p.) was administered to rats on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 and saline on days 2, 4 and 6 ("repeated cocaine"), or saline was injected on days 1-6 and cocaine on day 7 ("acute cocaine"), or saline was injected on days 1-7 ("saline group"). The "repeated cocaine" schedule led to a significant sensitization to the locomotor activation produced by cocaine on day 7 or on day 17, 10 days after the end of sensitization protocol. Microdialysis in the nucleus accumbens which was performed after administration of cocaine (10 mg/kg i.p.) on day 7, or after an administration of the same dose 10 days after the last administration of cocaine, respectively, revealed significant acute increases of extracellular dopamine to about 200% of basal values. These increases were similar in "acute cocaine" and in "repeated cocaine" animals both after 7 days and after 17 days. For in situ hybridization studies, rats were sacrificed on day 7, 4.5 h after the last cocaine or saline administration. The mRNA for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in substantia nigra + ventral tegmental area was significantly elevated to about 140% of saline controls both in the "repeated cocaine" and the "acute cocaine" group as compared with the "saline group". In contrast, there were no differences between the three groups in the mRNAs of preprodynorphin or preproenkephalin levels measured in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell). These results suggest that sensitization phenomena to cocaine are not necessarily connected with alterations in the dopaminergic activity in the mesolimbic system or in the

  7. Towards simultaneous individual and tissue identification: A proof-of-principle study on parallel sequencing of STRs, amelogenin, and mRNAs with the Ion Torrent PGM.

    PubMed

    Zubakov, D; Kokmeijer, I; Ralf, A; Rajagopalan, N; Calandro, L; Wootton, S; Langit, R; Chang, C; Lagace, R; Kayser, M

    2015-07-01

    DNA-based individual identification and RNA-based tissue identification represent two commonly-used tools in forensic investigation, aiming to identify crime scene sample donors and helping to provide links between DNA-identified sample donors and criminal acts. Currently however, both analyses are typically performed separately. In this proof-of-principle study, we developed an approach for the simultaneous analysis of forensic STRs, amelogenin, and forensic mRNAs based on parallel targeted DNA/RNA sequencing using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine(®) (PGM™) System coupled with the AmpliSeq™ targeted amplification. We demonstrated that 9 autosomal STRs commonly used for individual identification (CSF1PO, D16S539, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, TH01, TPOX, and vWA), the AMELX/AMELY system widely applied for sex identification, and 12 mRNA markers previously established for forensic tissue identification (ALAS2 and SPTB for peripheral blood, MMP10 and MMP11 for menstrual blood, HTN3 and STATH for saliva, PRM1 and TGM4 for semen, CYP2B7P1 and MUC4 for vaginal secretion, CCL27 and LCE1C for skin) together with two candidate reference mRNA markers (HPRT1 and SDHA) can all be successfully combined. Unambiguous mRNA-based tissue identification was achieved in all samples from all forensically relevant tissues tested, and STR sequencing analysis of the tissue sample donors was 100% concordant with conventional STR profiling using a commercial kit. Successful STR analysis was obtained from 1ng of genomic DNA and mRNA analysis from 10ng total RNA; however, sensitivity limits were not investigated in this proof-of-principle study and are expected to be much lower. Since dried materials with noticeable RNA degradation and small DNA/RNA amplicons with high-coverage sequencing were used, the achieved correct individual and tissue identification demonstrates the suitability of this approach for analyzing degraded materials in future forensic applications. Overall

  8. Characterization of five different proteins produced by alternatively spliced mRNAs from the human cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, G B; Erdogan, S; Jones, R E; Loughney, K; Scotland, G; Hoffmann, R; Wilkinson, I; Farrell, C; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized complete cDNAs for two isoforms (HSPDE4D4 and HSPDE4A5) encoded by the human PDE4D gene, one of four genes that encode cAMP-specific rolipram-inhibited 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (type IVPDEs; PDE4 family). The HSPDE4D4 and HSPDE4D5 cDNAs encode proteins of 810 and 746 amino acids respectively. A comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these two cDNAs with those encoding the three other human PDE4D proteins (HSPDE4D1, HSPDE4D2 and HSPDE4D3) demonstrates that each corresponding mRNA transcript has a unique region of sequence at or near its 5'-end, consistent with alternative mRNA splicing. Transient expression of the five cDNAs in monkey COS-7 cells produced proteins of apparent molecular mass under denaturing conditions of 68, 68, 95, 119 and 105 kDa for isoforms HSPDE4D1-5 respectively. Immunoblotting of human cell lines and rat brain demonstrated the presence of species that co-migrated with the proteins produced in COS-7 cells. COS-cell-expressed and native HSPDE4D1 and HSPDE4D2 were found to exist only in the cytosol, whereas HSPDE4D3, HSPDE4D4 and HSPDE4D5 were found in both cytosolic and particulate fractions. The IC50 values for the selective PDE4 inhibitor rolipram for the cytosolic forms of the five enzymes were similar (0.05-0.14 microM), whereas they were 2-7-fold higher for the particulate forms of HSPDE4D3 and HSPDE4D5 (0.32 and 0.59 microM respectively), than for the corresponding cytosolic forms. Our data indicate that the N-terminal regions of the HSPDE4D3, HSPDE4D4 and HSPDE4D5 proteins, which are derived from alternatively spliced regions of their mRNAs, are important in determining their subcellular localization, activity and differential sensitivity to inhibitors. PMID:9371713

  9. Poly(A) binding protein abundance regulates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F assembly in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Caleb; Perez, Cesar; Mohr, Ian

    2012-04-10

    By commandeering cellular translation initiation factors, or destroying those dispensable for viral mRNA translation, viruses often suppress host protein synthesis. In contrast, cellular protein synthesis proceeds in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected cells, forcing viral and cellular mRNAs to compete for limiting translation initiation factors. Curiously, inactivating the host translational repressor 4E-BP1 in HCMV-infected cells stimulates synthesis of the cellular poly(A) binding protein (PABP), significantly increasing PABP abundance. Here, we establish that new PABP synthesis is translationally controlled by the HCMV-encoded UL38 mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1-activator. The 5' UTR within the mRNA encoding PABP contains a terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) element found in mRNAs, the translation of which is stimulated in response to mitogenic, growth, and nutritional stimuli, and proteins encoded by TOP-containing mRNAs accumulated in HCMV-infected cells. Furthermore, UL38 expression was necessary and sufficient to regulate expression of a PABP TOP-containing reporter. Remarkably, preventing the rise in PABP abundance by RNAi impaired eIF4E binding to eIF4G, thereby reducing assembly of the multisubunit initiation factor eIF4F, viral protein production, and replication. This finding demonstrates that viruses can increase host translation initiation factor concentration to foster their replication and defines a unique mechanism whereby control of PABP abundance regulates eIF4F assembly. PMID:22431630

  10. A hairpin within YAP mRNA 3'UTR functions in regulation at post-transcription level.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuen; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Feng, Guoxing; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Xiao, Zelin; Lu, Zhanping; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-04-01

    The central dogma of gene expression is that DNA is transcribed into messenger RNAs, which in turn serve as the template for protein synthesis. Recently, it has been reported that mRNAs display regulatory roles that rely on their ability to compete for microRNA binding, independent of their protein-coding function. However, the regulatory mechanism of mRNAs remains poorly understood. Here, we report that a hairpin within YAP mRNA 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) functions in regulation at post-transcription level through generating endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs). Bioinformatics analysis for secondary structure showed that YAP mRNA displayed a hairpin structure (termed standard hairpin, S-hairpin) within its 3'UTR. Surprisingly, we observed that the overexpression of S-hairpin derived from YAP 3'UTR (YAP-sh) increased the luciferase reporter activities of transcriptional factor NF-κB and AP-1 in 293T cells. Moreover, we identified that a fragment from YAP-sh, an esiRNA, was able to target mRNA 3'UTR of NF2 (a member of Hippo-signaling pathway) and YAP mRNA 3'UTR itself in hepatoma cells. Thus, we conclude that the YAP-sh within YAP mRNA 3'UTR may serve as a novel regulatory element, which functions in regulation at post-transcription level. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of mRNAs in regulatory function. PMID:25727017

  11. Cycling in the nucleus: regulation of RNA 3' processing and nuclear organization of replication-dependent histone genes.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Valentina; Schümperli, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The histones which pack new DNA during the S phase of animal cells are made from mRNAs that are cleaved at their 3' end but not polyadenylated. Some of the factors used in this reaction are unique to it while others are shared with the polyadenylation process that generates all other mRNAs. Recent work has begun to shed light on how the cell manages the assignment of these common components to the two 3' processing systems, and how it achieves their cell cycle-regulation and recruitment to the histone pre-mRNA. Moreover, recent and older findings reveal multiple connections between the nuclear organization of histone genes, their transcription and 3' end processing as well as the control of cell proliferation. PMID:26895140

  12. Regulation of AU-Rich Element RNA Binding Proteins by Phosphorylation and the Prolyl Isomerase Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhong-Jian; Malter, James S.

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR), AU-rich element (ARE) containing mRNAs, are predominantly controlled at the post-transcriptional level. Regulation appears to rely on a variable and dynamic interaction between mRNA target and ARE-specific binding proteins (AUBPs). The AUBP-ARE mRNA recognition is directed by multiple intracellular signals that are predominantly targeted at the AUBPs. These include (but are unlikely limited to) methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and isomerization. These regulatory events ultimately affect ARE mRNA location, abundance, translation and stability. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of phosphorylation and its impact on conformation of the AUBPs, interaction with ARE mRNAs and highlight the role of Pin1 mediated prolyl cis-trans isomerization in these biological process. PMID:25874604

  13. Mechanism and regulation of the nonsense-mediated decay pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hug, Nele; Longman, Dasa; Cáceres, Javier F.

    2016-01-01

    The Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway selectively degrades mRNAs harboring premature termination codons (PTCs) but also regulates the abundance of a large number of cellular RNAs. The central role of NMD in the control of gene expression requires the existence of buffering mechanisms that tightly regulate the magnitude of this pathway. Here, we will focus on the mechanism of NMD with an emphasis on the role of RNA helicases in the transition from NMD complexes that recognize a PTC to those that promote mRNA decay. We will also review recent strategies aimed at uncovering novel trans-acting factors and their functional role in the NMD pathway. Finally, we will describe recent progress in the study of the physiological role of the NMD response. PMID:26773057

  14. Chromatin Remodeling Inactivates Activity Genes and Regulates Neural Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kelly K.; Hemberg, Martin; Reddy, Naveen C.; Cho, Ha Y.; Guthrie, Arden N.; Oldenborg, Anna; Heiney, Shane A.; Ohmae, Shogo; Medina, Javier F.; Holy, Timothy E.; Bonni, Azad

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcription influences neuronal connectivity, but the roles and mechanisms of inactivation of activity-dependent genes have remained poorly understood. Genome-wide analyses in the mouse cerebellum revealed that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex deposits the histone variant H2A.z at promoters of activity-dependent genes, thereby triggering their inactivation. Purification of translating mRNAs from synchronously developing granule neurons (Sync-TRAP) showed that conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 impairs inactivation of activity-dependent genes when neurons undergo dendrite pruning. Chd4 knockout or expression of NuRD-regulated activity genes impairs dendrite pruning. Imaging of behaving mice revealed hyperresponsivity of granule neurons to sensorimotor stimuli upon Chd4 knockout. Our findings define an epigenetic mechanism that inactivates activity-dependent transcription and regulates dendrite patterning and sensorimotor encoding in the brain. PMID:27418512

  15. Posttranscriptional gene regulation by long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2013-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells transcribe a vast number of noncoding RNA species. Among them, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been widely implicated in the regulation of gene transcription. However, examples of posttranscriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs are emerging. Through extended base-pairing, lncRNAs can stabilize or promote the translation of target mRNAs, while partial base-pairing facilitates mRNA decay or inhibits target mRNA translation. In the absence of complementarity, lncRNAs can suppress precursor mRNA splicing and translation by acting as decoys of RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs and can compete for microRNA-mediated inhibition leading to increased expression of the mRNA. Through these regulatory mechanisms, lncRNAs can elicit differentiation, proliferation, and cytoprotective programs, underscoring the rising recognition of lncRNA roles in human disease. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of posttranscriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs identified until now. PMID:23178169

  16. METABOLISM Wnt Signaling Regulates Hepatic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjun; Fergusson, Maria M.; Wu, J. Julie; Rovira, Ilsa I.; Liu, Jie; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lu, Teng; Bao, Jianjun; Han, Donghe; Sack, Michael N.; Finkel, Toren

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of the Wnt pathway has been extensively characterized in embryogenesis, differentiation, and stem cell biology but not in mammalian metabolism. Here, using in vivo gain- and loss-of-function models, we demonstrate an important role for Wnt signaling in hepatic metabolism. In particular, β-Catenin, the downstream mediator of canonical Wnt signaling, altered serum glucose concentrations and regulated hepatic glucose production. β-catenin also modulated hepatic insulin signaling. Furthermore, β-catenin interacted with the transcription factor FoxO1 in livers from mice under starved conditions. The interaction of FoxO1 with β-catenin regulated the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the two rate-limiting enzymes in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Moreover, starvation induced the hepatic expression of mRNAs encoding different Wnt isoforms. In addition, nutrient deprivation appeared to favor the association of β-catenin with FoxO family members, rather than with members of the T cell factor of transcriptional activators. Notably, in a model of diet-induced obesity, hepatic deletion of β-catenin improved overall metabolic homeostasis. These observations implicate Wnt signaling in the modulation of hepatic metabolism and raise the possibility that Wnt signaling may play a similar role in the metabolic regulation of other tissues. PMID:21285411

  17. Estrogen Regulation of MicroRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Carolyn M

    2009-01-01

    Women outlive men, but life expectancy is not influenced by hormone replacement (estrogen + progestin) therapy. Estrogens appear to protect brain, cardiovascular tissues, and bone from aging. Estrogens regulate genes directly through binding to estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα and ERβ) that are ligand-activated transcription factors and indirectly by activating plasma membrane-associated ER which, in turns, activates intracellular signaling cascades leading to altered gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (19-25 nucleotides), naturally-occurring, non-coding RNA molecules that base-pair with the 3’ untranslated region of target mRNAs. This interaction either blocks translation of the mRNA or targets the mRNA transcript to be degraded. The human genome contains ~ 700-1,200 miRNAs. Aberrant patterns of miRNA expression are implicated in human diseases including breast cancer. Recent studies have identified miRNAs regulated by estrogens in human breast cancer cells, human endometrial stromal and myometrial smooth muscle cells, rat mammary gland, and mouse uterus. The decline of estradiol levels in postmenopausal women has been implicated in various age-associated disorders. The role of estrogen-regulated miRNA expression, the target genes of these miRNAs, and the role of miRNAs in aging has yet to be explored. PMID:19881910

  18. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lafzi, Atefeh; Kazan, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation. PMID:27186987

  19. Dense spermatozoa in stallion ejaculates contain lower concentrations of mRNAs encoding the sperm specific calcium channel 1, ornithine decarboxylase antizyme 3, aromatase, and estrogen receptor alpha than less dense spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ing, N H; Forrest, D W; Love, C C; Varner, D D

    2014-07-15

    Stallions are unique among livestock in that, like men, they commonly receive medical treatment for subfertility. In both species, about 15% of individuals have normal semen parameters but are subfertile, indicating a need for novel analyses of spermatozoa function. One procedure for improving fertilizing capability of stallions and men is isolation of dense spermatozoa from an ejaculate for use in artificial insemination. In the current study, dense and less dense spermatozoa were purified by density gradient centrifugation from individual ejaculates from seven reproductively normal adult stallions. The RNA isolated from the spermatozoa seemed to be naturally fragmented to an average length of 250 bases, consistent with reports of spermatozoa RNA from other species. The DNAse treatment of RNA prepared from spermatozoa removed any genomic DNA contamination, as assessed by PCR with intron spanning primers for the protamine 1 (PRM1) gene. Concentrations of seven mRNAs in spermatozoa, correlated with the fertility of men and bulls, were quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in dense and less dense spermatozoa. Concentrations of four mRNAs were two- to four-fold lower in dense spermatozoa compared with less dense spermatozoa: Encoding the spermatozoa-specific calcium channel (P < 0.03), ornithine decarboxylase antizyme 3 (P < 0.02), aromatase (P < 0.02), and estrogen receptor alpha (P < 0.08). In contrast, concentrations of three other mRNAs, encoding PRM1 and heat shock proteins HSPA8 and DNAJC4, were not different (P > 0.1). These results identify new differences in mRNA concentrations in populations of spermatozoa with dissimilar densities. PMID:24857629

  20. Variation of transferrin mRNA concentration in the rabbit mammary gland during the pregnancy-lactation-weaning cycle and in cultured mammary cells. A comparison with the other major milk protein mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Puissant, C; Bayat-Sarmadi, M; Devinoy, E; Houdebine, L M

    1994-05-01

    The concentration of transferrin mRNA was evaluated during pregnancy and lactation in rabbit mammary gland and liver using northern blot and dot blot assays. Transferrin mRNA was present in the virgin rabbit mammary gland and its concentration increased as pregnancy proceeded, with a major enhancement after day 15. A high concentration was reached 3 days after parturition, with no additional increase during lactation and with a marked decline after weaning. During the same period, the concentration of transferrin mRNA showed only a very weak variation in liver. This mRNA was six times more abundant in mammary gland than in liver of lactating rabbit. The accumulation of transferrin mRNA in the mammary gland was concomitant with the accumulation of alpha s1-, beta-, kappa-casein and WAP (whey acidic protein) mRNAs. The concentration of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA, taken as a non-inducible control mRNA, declined progressively during pregnancy to reach its lower level in lactation. These observations suggest that casein, WAP and transferrin mRNAs are subjected to a similar control mechanism in vivo, at least in the second half of pregnancy and during lactation. Experiments carried out in vitro using isolated rabbit epithelial mammary cells cultured on collagen I gel indicated that transferrin mRNA was abundant and only weakly inducible by the lactogenic hormones insulin, cortisol and prolactin, as opposed to caseins and WAP mRNAs. R5020, an analogue of progesterone, inhibited at most very slightly the accumulation of alpha s1-casein mRNA in the presence of prolactin and it did not reduce the expression of transferrin gene.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8180682

  1. The ribosome as a missing link in prebiotic evolution II: Ribosomes encode ribosomal proteins that bind to common regions of their own mRNAs and rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Root-Bernstein, Meredith

    2016-05-21

    We have proposed that the ribosome may represent a missing link between prebiotic chemistries and the first cells. One of the predictions that follows from this hypothesis, which we test here, is that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) must have encoded the proteins necessary for ribosomal function. In other words, the rRNA also functioned pre-biotically as mRNA. Since these ribosome-binding proteins (rb-proteins) must bind to the rRNA, but the rRNA also functioned as mRNA, it follows that rb-proteins should bind to their own mRNA as well. This hypothesis can be contrasted to a "null" hypothesis in which rb-proteins evolved independently of the rRNA sequences and therefore there should be no necessary similarity between the rRNA to which rb-proteins bind and the mRNA that encodes the rb-protein. Five types of evidence reported here support the plausibility of the hypothesis that the mRNA encoding rb-proteins evolved from rRNA: (1) the ubiquity of rb-protein binding to their own mRNAs and autogenous control of their own translation; (2) the higher-than-expected incidence of Arginine-rich modules associated with RNA binding that occurs in rRNA-encoded proteins; (3) the fact that rRNA-binding regions of rb-proteins are homologous to their mRNA binding regions; (4) the higher than expected incidence of rb-protein sequences encoded in rRNA that are of a high degree of homology to their mRNA as compared with a random selection of other proteins; and (5) rRNA in modern prokaryotes and eukaryotes encodes functional proteins. None of these results can be explained by the null hypothesis that assumes independent evolution of rRNA and the mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins. Also noteworthy is that very few proteins bind their own mRNAs that are not associated with ribosome function. Further tests of the hypothesis are suggested: (1) experimental testing of whether rRNA-encoded proteins bind to rRNA at their coding sites; (2) whether tRNA synthetases, which are also known to bind to their

  2. Preschool Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska State Dept. of Health and Human Services, Lincoln.

    Published by the Department of Health and Human Services, as required by Nebraska law, this guide details regulations for the physical well-being, safety, and protection of children and defines the minimum levels of acceptable services to be provided in Nebraska preschools. The first section of the guide lists specific preschool regulations,…

  3. RNA-binding proteins and translational regulation in axons and growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Hörnberg, Hanna; Holt, Christine

    2013-01-01

    RNA localization and regulation play an important role in the developing and adult nervous system. In navigating axons, extrinsic cues can elicit rapid local protein synthesis that mediates directional or morphological responses. The mRNA repertoire in axons is large and dynamically changing, yet studies suggest that only a subset of these mRNAs are translated after cue stimulation, suggesting the need for a high level of translational regulation. Here, we review the role of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) as local regulators of translation in developing axons. We focus on their role in growth, guidance, and synapse formation, and discuss the mechanisms by which they regulate translation in axons. PMID:23734093

  4. Regulation of Pol III Transcription by Nutrient and Stress Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Moir, Robyn D.; Willis, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase III (pol III) is responsible for ~15% of total cellular transcription through the generation of small structured RNAs such as tRNA and 5S RNA. The coordinate synthesis of these molecules with ribosomal protein mRNAs and rRNA couples the production of ribosomes and their tRNA substrates and balances protein synthetic capacity with the growth requirements of the cell. Ribosome biogenesis in general and pol III transcription in particular is known to be regulated by nutrient availability, cell stress and cell cycle stage and is perturbed in pathological states. High throughput proteomic studies have catalogued modifications to pol III subunits, assembly, initiation and accessory factors but most of these modifications have yet to be linked to functional consequences. Here we review our current understanding of the major points of regulation in the pol III transcription apparatus, the targets of regulation and the signaling pathways known to regulate their function. PMID:23165150

  5. Resolving the growth-promoting and metabolic effects of growth hormone: Differential regulation of GH-IGF-I system components.

    PubMed

    Norbeck, Lindsey A; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Sheridan, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    Growth hormone regulates numerous processes in vertebrates including growth promotion and lipid mobilization. During periods of food deprivation, growth is arrested yet lipid depletion is promoted. In this study, we used rainbow trout on different nutritional regimens to examine the regulation of growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) system elements in order to resolve the growth-promoting and lipid catabolic actions of GH. Fish fasted for 2 or 6 weeks displayed significantly reduced growth compared to their fed counterparts despite elevated plasma GH, while refeeding for 2 weeks following 4 weeks of fasting partially restored growth and lowered plasma GH. Fish fasted for 6 weeks also exhausted their mesenteric adipose tissue reserves. Sensitivity to GH in the liver was reduced in fasting fish as evidenced by reduced expression of GH receptor type 1 (GHR 1) and GHR 2 mRNAs and by reduced (125)I-GH binding capacity. Expression of GHR 1 and GHR 2 mRNAs also was reduced in the gill of fasted fish. In adipose tissue, however, sensitivity to GH, as indicated by GHR 1 expression and by (125)I-GH binding capacity, increased after 6 weeks of fasting in concert with the observed lipid depletion. Fasting-associated growth retardation was accompanied by reduced expression of total IGF-I mRNA in the liver, adipose and gill, and by reduced plasma levels of IGF-I. Sensitivity to IGF-I was reduced in the gill of fasted fish as indicated by reduced expression of type 1 IGF-I receptor (IGFR 1A and IGFR 1B) mRNAs. By contrast, fasting did not affect expression of IGFR 1 mRNAs or (125)I-IGF-I binding in skeletal muscle and increased expression of IGFR 1 mRNAs and (125)I-IGF-I binding in cardiac muscle. These results indicate that nutritional state differentially regulates GH-IGF-I system components in a tissue-specific manner and that such alterations disable the growth-promoting actions of GH and promote the lipid-mobilizing actions of the hormone. PMID:17376444

  6. Regulation of RNA binding proteins in trypanosomatid protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, María Albertina; Cervini, Gabriela; Cassola, Alejandro

    2016-02-26

    Posttranscriptional mechanisms have a critical role in the overall outcome of gene expression. These mechanisms are especially relevant in protozoa from the genus Trypanosoma, which is composed by death threatening parasites affecting people in Sub-saharan Africa or in the Americas. In these parasites the classic view of regulation of transcription initiation to modulate the products of a given gene cannot be applied. This is due to the presence of transcription start sites that give rise to long polycistronic units that need to be processed costranscriptionally by trans-splicing and polyadenylation to give mature monocistronic mRNAs. Posttranscriptional mechanisms such as mRNA degradation and translational repression are responsible for the final synthesis of the required protein products. In this context, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in trypanosomes have a relevant role as modulators of mRNA abundance and translational repression by associating to the 3' untranslated regions in mRNA. Many different RBPs have been proposed to modulate cohorts of mRNAs in trypanosomes. However, the current understanding of their functions lacks a dynamic view on the different steps at which these RBPs are regulated. Here, we discuss different evidences to propose regulatory events for different RBPs in these parasites. These events vary from regulated developmental expression, to biogenesis of cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes in the nucleus, and condensation of RBPs and mRNA into large cytoplasmic granules. Finally, we discuss how newly identified posttranslational modifications of RBPs and mRNA metabolism-related proteins could have an enormous impact on the modulation of mRNA abundance. To understand these modifications is especially relevant in these parasites due to the fact that the enzymes involved could be interesting targets for drug therapy. PMID:26981203

  7. Regulation of RNA binding proteins in trypanosomatid protozoan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Romaniuk, María Albertina; Cervini, Gabriela; Cassola, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional mechanisms have a critical role in the overall outcome of gene expression. These mechanisms are especially relevant in protozoa from the genus Trypanosoma, which is composed by death threatening parasites affecting people in Sub-saharan Africa or in the Americas. In these parasites the classic view of regulation of transcription initiation to modulate the products of a given gene cannot be applied. This is due to the presence of transcription start sites that give rise to long polycistronic units that need to be processed costranscriptionally by trans-splicing and polyadenylation to give mature monocistronic mRNAs. Posttranscriptional mechanisms such as mRNA degradation and translational repression are responsible for the final synthesis of the required protein products. In this context, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in trypanosomes have a relevant role as modulators of mRNA abundance and translational repression by associating to the 3’ untranslated regions in mRNA. Many different RBPs have been proposed to modulate cohorts of mRNAs in trypanosomes. However, the current understanding of their functions lacks a dynamic view on the different steps at which these RBPs are regulated. Here, we discuss different evidences to propose regulatory events for different RBPs in these parasites. These events vary from regulated developmental expression, to biogenesis of cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes in the nucleus, and condensation of RBPs and mRNA into large cytoplasmic granules. Finally, we discuss how newly identified posttranslational modifications of RBPs and mRNA metabolism-related proteins could have an enormous impact on the modulation of mRNA abundance. To understand these modifications is especially relevant in these parasites due to the fact that the enzymes involved could be interesting targets for drug therapy. PMID:26981203

  8. Regulation of renal amino acid transporters during metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Moret, Caroline; Dave, Mital H; Schulz, Nicole; Jiang, Jean X; Verrey, Francois; Wagner, Carsten A

    2007-02-01

    The kidney plays a major role in acid-base homeostasis by adapting the excretion of acid equivalents to dietary intake and metabolism. Urinary acid excretion is mediated by the secretion of protons and titratable acids, particularly ammonia. NH(3) is synthesized in proximal tubule cells from glutamine taken up via specific amino acid transporters. We tested whether kidney amino acid transporters are regulated in mice in which metabolic acidosis was induced with NH(4)Cl. Blood gas and urine analysis confirmed metabolic acidosis. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to quantify the mRNAs of 16 amino acid transporters. The mRNA of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was quantified as positive control for the regulation and that of GAPDH, as internal standard. In acidosis, the mRNA of kidney system N amino acid transporter SNAT3 (SLC38A3/SN1) showed a strong induction similar to that of PEPCK, whereas all other tested mRNAs encoding glutamine or glutamate transporters were unchanged or reduced in abundance. At the protein level, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry demonstrated an increased abundance of SNAT3 and reduced expression of the basolateral cationic amino acid/neutral amino acid exchanger subunit y(+)-LAT1 (SLC7A7). SNAT3 was localized to the basolateral membrane of the late proximal tubule S3 segment in control animals, whereas its expression was extended to the earlier S2 segment of the proximal tubule during acidosis. Our results suggest that the selective regulation of SNAT3 and y(+)LAT1 expression may serve a major role in the renal adaptation to acid secretion and thus for systemic acid-base balance. PMID:17003226

  9. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Interferons and Their Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are low molecular weight cell-derived proteins that include the type I, II, and III IFN families. IFNs are critical for an optimal immune response during microbial infections while dysregulated expression can lead to autoimmune diseases. Given its role in disease, it is important to understand cellular mechanisms of IFN regulation. 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTRs) have emerged as potent regulators of mRNA and protein dosage and are controlled through multiple regulatory elements including adenylate uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) and microRNA (miRNA) recognition elements. These AREs are targeted by RNA-binding proteins (ARE-BPs) for degradation and/or stabilization through an ARE-mediated decay process. miRNA are endogenous, single-stranded RNA molecules ∼22 nucleotides in length that regulate mRNA translation through the miRNA-induced silencing complex. IFN transcripts, like other labile mRNAs, harbor AREs in their 3′ UTRs that dictate the turnover of mRNA. This review is a survey of the literature related to IFN regulation by miRNA, ARE-BPs, and how these complexes interact dynamically on the 3′ UTR. Additionally, downstream effects of these post-transcriptional regulators on the immune response will be discussed. Review topics include past studies, current understanding, and future challenges in the study of post-transcriptional regulation affecting IFN responses. PMID:24702117

  10. Human umbilical artery smooth muscle exhibits a 2-APB-sensitive capacitative contractile response evoked by vasoactive substances and expresses mRNAs for STIM, Orai and TRPC channels.

    PubMed

    Roldán Palomo, Ana Rocio; Martín, Pedro; Rebolledo, Alejandro; Enrique, Nicolás; Flores, Luis E; Milesi, Verónica

    2012-08-01

    After depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores the capacitative response triggers an extracellular Ca2+ influx through store-operated channels (SOCs) which refills these stores. Our objective was to explore if human umbilical artery smooth muscle presented this response and if it was involved in the mechanism of serotonin- and histamine-induced contractions. Intracellular Ca2+ depletion by a Ca(2+)-free extracellular solution followed by Ca2+ readdition produced a contraction in artery rings which was inhibited by the blocker of Orai and TRPC channels 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), suggesting a capacitative response. In presence of 2-APB the magnitude of a second paired contraction by serotonin or histamine was significantly less than a first one, likely because 2-APB inhibited store refilling by capacitative Ca2+ entry. 2-APB inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release was excluded because this blocker did not affect serotonin force development in a Ca(2+)-free solution. The PCR technique showed the presence of mRNAs for STIM proteins (1 and 2), for Orai proteins (1, 2 and 3) and for TRPC channels (subtypes 1, 3, 4 and 6) in the smooth muscle of the human umbilical artery. Hence, this artery presents a capacitative contractile response triggered by stimulation with physiological vasoconstrictors and expresses mRNAs for proteins and channels previously identified as SOCs. PMID:23185782

  11. The SMG5–SMG7 heterodimer directly recruits the CCR4–NOT deadenylase complex to mRNAs containing nonsense codons via interaction with POP2

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Belinda; Jonas, Stefanie; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a eukaryotic quality control mechanism that detects aberrant mRNAs containing nonsense codons and induces their rapid degradation. This degradation is mediated by SMG6, an NMD-specific endonuclease, as well as the SMG5 and SMG7 proteins, which recruit general mRNA decay enzymes. However, it remains unknown which specific decay factors are recruited and whether this recruitment is direct. Here, we show that SMG7 binds directly to POP2, a catalytic subunit of the CCR4–NOT deadenylase complex, and elicits deadenylation-dependent decapping and 5′-to-3′ decay of NMD targets. Accordingly, a catalytically inactive POP2 mutant partially suppresses NMD in human cells. The SMG7–POP2 interaction is critical for NMD in cells depleted of SMG6, indicating that SMG7 and SMG6 act redundantly to promote the degradation of NMD targets. We further show that UPF1 provides multiple binding sites for decapping factors. These data unveil a missing direct physical link between NMD and the general mRNA decay machinery and indicate that NMD employs diverse and partially redundant mechanisms to ensure robust degradation of aberrant mRNAs. PMID:24115769

  12. Thyroid-beta2 and the retinoid RAR-alpha, RXR-gamma and ROR-beta2 receptor mRNAs; expression profiles in mouse retina, retinal explants and neocortex.

    PubMed

    Azadi, S; Zhang, Y; Caffé, A R; Holmqvist, B; van Veen, T

    2002-05-01

    In neonatal retinal explants cultured long-term green cones are missing. Recently it was reported that thyroid hormone beta2 receptors (TR-beta2) are essential for these green cones to differentiate. Therefore transcript level of these receptors was investigated in our mouse retinal explants. However, thyroid receptors function as heterodimers with retinoid receptors (RR); so the fate of selected RRs was similarly analyzed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Loss of TR-beta2 and RR (RXR-gamma and ROR-beta2) mRNAs was observed after culturing the neonatal retina for 12 days. This indicates that these proteins are involved in determination of green cone identity. In addition, levels of the selected RR transcripts are differentially affected by short- or long-term culture. In the latter case an attached retinal pigment epithelium seems to play a protective role. Furthermore, divergent diurnal peaks of RR mRNAs are present in young as well as aged mouse retina and neocortex. This data might be relevant in the context of human ageing disorders. PMID:11997680

  13. Nucleotide modifications within bacterial messenger RNAs regulate their translation and are able to rewire the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Clementi, Nina; Faserl, Klaus; Glasner, Heidelinde; Breuker, Kathrin; Lindner, Herbert; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide modifications within RNA transcripts are found in every organism in all three domains of life. 6-methyladeonsine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and pseudouridine (Ψ) are highly abundant nucleotide modifications in coding sequences of eukaryal mRNAs, while m5C and m6A modifications have also been discovered in archaeal and bacterial mRNAs. Employing in vitro translation assays, we systematically investigated the influence of nucleotide modifications on translation. We introduced m5C, m6A, Ψ or 2′-O-methylated nucleotides at each of the three positions within a codon of the bacterial ErmCL mRNA and analyzed their influence on translation. Depending on the respective nucleotide modification, as well as its position within a codon, protein synthesis remained either unaffected or was prematurely terminated at the modification site, resulting in reduced amounts of the full-length peptide. In the latter case, toeprint analysis of ribosomal complexes was consistent with stalling of translation at the modified codon. When multiple nucleotide modifications were introduced within one codon, an additive inhibitory effect on translation was observed. We also identified the m5C modification to alter the amino acid identity of the corresponding codon, when positioned at the second codon position. Our results suggest a novel mode of gene regulation by nucleotide modifications in bacterial mRNAs. PMID:26578598

  14. LARP1 post-transcriptionally regulates mTOR and contributes to cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Mura, M; Hopkins, T G; Michael, T; Abd-Latip, N; Weir, J; Aboagye, E; Mauri, F; Jameson, C; Sturge, J; Gabra, H; Bushell, M; Willis, A E; Curry, E; Blagden, S P

    2015-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bind to and post-transcriptionally regulate the stability of mRNAs. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) is a conserved RBP that interacts with poly-A-binding protein and is known to regulate 5′-terminal oligopyrimidine tract (TOP) mRNA translation. Here, we show that LARP1 is complexed to 3000 mRNAs enriched for cancer pathways. A prominent member of the LARP1 interactome is mTOR whose mRNA transcript is stabilized by LARP1. At a functional level, we show that LARP1 promotes cell migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth and in vivo tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we show that LARP1 expression is elevated in epithelial cancers such as cervical and non-small cell lung cancers, where its expression correlates with disease progression and adverse prognosis, respectively. We therefore conclude that, through the post-transcriptional regulation of genes such as mTOR within cancer pathways, LARP1 contributes to cancer progression. PMID:25531318

  15. LARP1 post-transcriptionally regulates mTOR and contributes to cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Mura, M; Hopkins, T G; Michael, T; Abd-Latip, N; Weir, J; Aboagye, E; Mauri, F; Jameson, C; Sturge, J; Gabra, H; Bushell, M; Willis, A E; Curry, E; Blagden, S P

    2015-09-24

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bind to and post-transcriptionally regulate the stability of mRNAs. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) is a conserved RBP that interacts with poly-A-binding protein and is known to regulate 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract (TOP) mRNA translation. Here, we show that LARP1 is complexed to 3000 mRNAs enriched for cancer pathways. A prominent member of the LARP1 interactome is mTOR whose mRNA transcript is stabilized by LARP1. At a functional level, we show that LARP1 promotes cell migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth and in vivo tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we show that LARP1 expression is elevated in epithelial cancers such as cervical and non-small cell lung cancers, where its expression correlates with disease progression and adverse prognosis, respectively. We therefore conclude that, through the post-transcriptional regulation of genes such as mTOR within cancer pathways, LARP1 contributes to cancer progression. PMID:25531318

  16. Introduction to Bioinformatics Resources for Post-transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Quattrone, Alessandro; Dassi, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Untranslated regions (UTRs) and, to a lesser extent, coding sequences of mRNAs are involved in defining the fate of the mature transcripts through the modulation of three primary control processes, mRNA localization, degradation and translation; the action of trans-factors such as RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) combined with the presence of defined sequence and structural cis-elements ultimately determines translation levels. Identifying functional regions in UTRs and uncovering post-transcriptional regulators acting upon these regions is thus of paramount importance to understand the spectrum of regulatory possibilities for any given mRNA. This tasks can now be approached computationally, to reduce the space of testable hypotheses and to drive experimental validation.This chapter focuses on presenting databases and tools allowing to study the various aspects of post-transcriptional regulation, including motif search (sequence and secondary structure), prediction of regulatory networks (e.g., RBP and ncRNA binding sites), profiling of the mRNAs translational state, and other aspects of this level of gene expression regulation. Two analysis pipelines are also presented as practical examples of how the described tools could be integrated and effectively employed. PMID:26463374

  17. Ribosome profiling reveals the rhythmic liver translatome and circadian clock regulation by upstream open reading frames

    PubMed Central

    Janich, Peggy; Arpat, Alaaddin Bulak; Castelo-Szekely, Violeta; Lopes, Maykel; Gatfield, David

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian gene expression displays widespread circadian oscillations. Rhythmic transcription underlies the core clock mechanism, but it cannot explain numerous observations made at the level of protein rhythmicity. We have used ribosome profiling in mouse liver to measure the translation of mRNAs into protein around the clock and at high temporal and nucleotide resolution. We discovered, transcriptome-wide, extensive rhythms in ribosome occupancy and identified a core set of approximately 150 mRNAs subject to particularly robust daily changes in translation efficiency. Cycling proteins produced from nonoscillating transcripts revealed thus-far-unknown rhythmic regulation associated with specific pathways (notably in iron metabolism, through the rhythmic translation of transcripts containing iron responsive elements), and indicated feedback to the rhythmic transcriptome through novel rhythmic transcription factors. Moreover, estimates of relative levels of core clock protein biosynthesis that we deduced from the data explained known features of the circadian clock better than did mRNA expression alone. Finally, we identified uORF translation as a novel regulatory mechanism within the clock circuitry. Consistent with the occurrence of translated uORFs in several core clock transcripts, loss-of-function of Denr, a known regulator of reinitiation after uORF usage and of ribosome recycling, led to circadian period shortening in cells. In summary, our data offer a framework for understanding the dynamics of translational regulation, circadian gene expression, and metabolic control in a solid mammalian organ. PMID:26486724

  18. Regulation of poly(A) RNA retention in the nucleus as a survival strategy of plants during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Niedojadło, Janusz; Dełeńko, Konrad; Niedojadło, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    Last finding indicates that post-transcriptional processes are significant in low-oxygen conditions, but their nature is poorly understood. Here, we localized poly(A) RNA and mRNA coding proteins involved and not involved with resistance to hypoxia in Lupinus luteus and Arabidopsis thaliana during submergence and after recovery of aerobic conditions. We showed a strong nuclear accumulation of poly(A) RNA and 6 of 7 studied mRNAs with a concurrent strong reduction in RNA polymerase II transcription during hypoxia. In this study, the nucleus did not accumulate mRNA of the ADH1 (alcohol dehydrogenase 1) gene, which is a core hypoxia gene. The RNA accumulation in the nucleus is among the mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation that prevents translation. However re-aeration was accompanied by a strong increase in the amount of the mRNAs in the cytoplasm and a simultaneous decrease in nuclear mRNAs. This finding indicates that the nucleus is a storage site for those of mRNAs which are not involved in the response to hypoxia for use by the plants after the hypoxic stress. In this study, the highest intensity of RNA accumulation occurred in Cajal bodies (CBs); the intensity of accumulation was inversely correlated with transcription. Under hypoxia, ncb-1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with a complete absence of CBs died sooner than wild type (WT), accompanied by a strong reduction in the level of poly(A) RNA in the nucleus. These results suggest that the CBs not only participate in the storage of the nuclear RNA, but they also could take part in its stabilization under low-oxygen conditions. PMID:27002417

  19. A test for enhancement of cytotype regulation in Drosophila melanogaster by the transposase-encoding P element ∆2-3.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Peter J; Simmons, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Transposable P elements are regulated in the germ line by piRNAs, which are small RNAs that associate with the Piwi class of proteins. This regulation, called the P cytotype, is enhanced by genetic interactions between P elements that are primary sources of these RNAs and other P elements. The enhanced regulation is thought to reflect amplification of the primary piRNAs by cleavage of mRNAs derived from the other P elements through a mechanism called the ping-pong cycle. We tested the transposase-encoding P element known as ∆2-3 for its ability to enhance cytotype regulation anchored in P elements inserted at the telomere of the left arm of the X chromosome (TP elements). The ∆2-3 P element lacks the intron between exons 2 and 3 in the structurally complete P element (CP). Unlike the CP element, it does not markedly enhance cytotype regulation anchored in TP elements, nor does it transmit transposase activity through the egg cytoplasm. However, mRNAs from both the CP and ∆2-3 elements are maternally deposited in embryos. These observations suggest that maternally transmitted CP mRNA enhances cytotype regulation by participating in the ping-pong cycle and that it encodes the P transposase in the embryonic germ line, whereas maternally transmitted ∆2-3 mRNA does not, possibly because it is not efficiently directed into the primordial embryonic germ line. Strong transposon regulation may, therefore, require ping-pong cycling with maternally inherited mRNAs in the embryo. PMID:23925475

  20. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates intestinal epithelial barrier function by modulating the expression levels of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lan; Rao, Jaladanki N.; Cao, Shan; Liu, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jennifer; Liu, Yulan; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells line the intestinal mucosa and form an important barrier to a wide array of noxious substances in the lumen. Disruption of the barrier integrity occurs commonly in various pathologies. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) control diverse biological processes, but little is known about the role of lncRNAs in regulation of the gut permeability. Here we show that the lncRNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins. SPRY4-IT1 silencing led to dysfunction of the epithelial barrier in cultured cells by decreasing the stability of mRNAs encoding TJ proteins claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin, and JAM-1 and repressing their translation. In contrast, increasing the levels of SPRY4-IT1 in the intestinal mucosa protected the gut barrier in mice exposed to septic stress by increasing the abundance of TJ proteins. SPRY4-IT1 directly interacted with TJ mRNAs, and this process was enhanced through the association with the RNA-binding protein HuR. Of interest, the intestinal mucosa from patients with increased gut permeability exhibited a decrease in the levels of SPRY4-IT1. These findings highlight a novel role for SPRY4-IT1 in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier and define a mechanism by which SPRY4-IT1 modulates TJ expression by altering the stability and translation of TJ mRNAs. PMID:26680741

  1. The EJC Binding and Dissociating Activity of PYM Is Regulated in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sanjay; Obrdlik, Ales; Marchand, Virginie; Ephrussi, Anne

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA processing events in the nucleus influence the fate of transcripts in the cytoplasm. The multi-protein exon junction complex (EJC) associates with mRNAs concomitant with splicing in the nucleus and plays important roles in export, translation, surveillance and localization of mRNAs in the cytoplasm. In mammalian cells, the ribosome associated protein PYM (HsPYM) binds the Y14-Mago heterodimer moiety of the EJC core, and disassembles EJCs, presumably during the pioneer round of translation. However, the significance of the association of the EJC with mRNAs in a physiological context has not been tested and the function of PYM in vivo remains unknown. Here we address PYM function in Drosophila, where the EJC core proteins are genetically required for oskar mRNA localization during oogenesis. We provide evidence that the EJC binds oskar mRNA in vivo. Using an in vivo transgenic approach, we show that elevated amounts of the Drosophila PYM (DmPYM) N-terminus during oogenesis cause dissociation of EJCs from oskar RNA, resulting in its mislocalization and consequent female sterility. We find that, in contrast to HsPYM, DmPYM does not interact with the small ribosomal subunit and dismantles EJCs in a translation-independent manner upon over-expression. Biochemical analysis shows that formation of the PYM-Y14-Mago ternary complex is modulated by the PYM C-terminus revealing that DmPYM function is regulated in vivo. Furthermore, we find that whereas under normal conditions DmPYM is dispensable, its loss of function is lethal to flies with reduced y14 or mago gene dosage. Our analysis demonstrates that the amount of DmPYM relative to the EJC proteins is critical for viability and fertility. This, together with the fact that the EJC-disassembly activity of DmPYM is regulated, implicates PYM as an effector of EJC homeostasis in vivo. PMID:24967911

  2. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Catalase Isozyme Expression in Cotton Seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W; Trelease, RN

    1991-01-01

    We reported previously that expression of the five tetrameric catalase isozymes during postgerminative growth of cotton seedings was a consequence of interactions between two subunits (SU 1 and SU 2) temporally synthesized from two distinct catalase genes. In this study, we focused on the regulation of the expression of these two catalase subunits during the changeover from glyoxysomal to leaf-type peroxisomal metabolism. The steady-state level of glyoxysomal SU 1 protein (present in 12-hour-old seeds) increased through day 3 and then declined linearly through day 6, whereas SU 2 protein (first detected in 24-hour-old seeds) increased continuously through day 6. The time courses for steady-state levels of the mRNAs encoding these two subunits revealed two clearly separated peaks: the first at day 1 (SU 1) and the other at day 4 (SU 2). Accumulation of these mRNAs preceded the accumulation of their corresponding proteins by at least 24 hours, suggesting temporal, pretranslational regulation of synthesis of both subunits. Results from run-on transcriptional assays with isolated nuclei, however, revealed that transcripts encoding both subunits were synthesized together on days 1 through 5. Hence, it appears that the accumulations of SU 1 and SU 2 mRNAs are controlled primarily at the post-transcriptional level, which has not been reported for catalase or any other eukaryotic peroxisomal enzymes. The accumulation of SU 1 mRNA is not light dependent, whereas the accumulation of SU 2 mRNA, which directs synthesis of the predominant subunit comprising the leaf-type peroxisomal isozyme, occurs only after exposure of seedlings to light. PMID:12324611

  3. The Ccr4-Not complex is a key regulator of eukaryotic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Collart, Martine A

    2016-07-01

    The Ccr4-Not complex is a multisubunit complex present in all eukaryotes that contributes to regulate gene expression at all steps, from production of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in the nucleus to their degradation in the cytoplasm. In the nucleus it influences the post-translational modifications of the chromatin template that has to be remodeled for transcription, it is present at sites of transcription and associates with transcription factors as well as with the elongating polymerase, it interacts with the factors that prepare the new transcript for export to the cytoplasm and finally is important for nuclear quality control and influences mRNA export. In the cytoplasm it is present in polysomes where mRNAs are translated and in RNA granules where mRNAs will be redirected upon inhibition of translation. It influences mRNA translatability, and is needed during translation, on one hand for co-translational protein interactions and on the other hand to preserve translation that stalls. It is one of the relevant players during co-translational quality control. It also interacts with factors that will repress translation or induce mRNA decapping when recruited to the translating template. Finally, Ccr4-Not carries deadenylating enzymes and is a key player in mRNA decay, generic mRNA decay that follows normal translation termination, co-translational mRNA decay of transcripts on which the ribosomes stall durably or which carry a non-sense mutation and finally mRNA decay that is induced by external signaling for a change in genetic programming. Ccr4-Not is a master regulator of eukaryotic gene expression. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:438-454. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1332 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26821858

  4. Intrinsic noise in post-transcriptional gene regulation by small non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ya; Liu, Wangheng; Li, Anbang; Yang, Lijian; Zhan, Xuan

    2009-07-01

    Small non-coding RNA (sRNA) plays very important role in the post transcriptional regulation in various organisms. In complex regulatory networks, highly significant relative fluctuations in RNAs copy numbers can not be neglected due to very small copy number of individual RNA molecules. Here we consider two simple regulation schemes, where one is single target gene regulated by a sRNA and the other is two target mRNAs (mRNA(R) and mRNA(T)) regulated by one sRNA. The Fano factor (a measure of the relative size of the internal fluctuations) formulae of RNA molecules in the post transcriptional regulation are theoretically derived by using of the Langevin theory. For single target gene regulated by a sRNA, it is shown that the intrinsic noise of both mRNA and sRNA approaches the bare Poissonian limit in the regimen of both target RNA silencing and surviving. However, the strong anti-correlation between the fluctuations of two components result in a large intrinsic fluctuations in the level of RNA molecules in the regimen of crossover. For two target mRNAs regulated by one sRNA, in the regimen of crossover, it is found that, with the increasing of transcription rate of target mRNA(T), the maximal intrinsic fluctuation of RNA molecules is shifted from sRNA to target mRNA(R), and then to target mRNA(T). The intrinsic noise intensity of target mRNA(R) is determined by both the transcriptional rate of itself and that of sRNA, and independent of the transcriptional rate of the other target mRNA(T). PMID:19403234

  5. Regulation of Runx2 by Histone Deacetylases in Bone.

    PubMed

    Vishal, Mohanakrishnan; Ajeetha, Ramachandran; Keerthana, Rajendran; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis involves a cascade of processes wherein mesenchymal stem cells differentiate towards osteoblasts, strictly controlled by a number of regulatory factors. Runx2 protein is a key transcription factor which serves as a master regulator for osteogenesis by activating the promoters of various osteoblastic genes. Runx2 is regulated by several cofactors, including the histone deacetylase enzymes known as HDACs. HDACs are a family of proteins that regulate gene expression and/or activity through the mechanism of deacetylation and they can be divided into four classes, namely classes I, II, III and IV HDACs based on their sequence identity and nuclear or cytoplasmic localization. Knockout studies of all classes of HDACs showed their specific developmental roles. Evidence has proved Runx2 to be a repressible target of HDACs and this interplay is found to be a crucial factor controlling osteoblast differentiation. Further, another level of osteogenic regulation involves microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small, non-coding endogenous molecules capable of gene silencing by partial or complete complementary binding of their seed sequences to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of target mRNAs. In this study, the recent developments on identifying the function of HDACs on Runx2 expression/activity and the impact of miRNAs on HDACs in regulation of osteogenesis are reviewed. PMID:27072566

  6. Voltage regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rossetti, N.

    1986-12-09

    This patent describes a prior art integrated circuit voltage regulator having an unregulated voltage input terminal and a regulated voltage output terminal, and further comprising: a first transistor having an emitter, a collector and a base, the first transistor having a first base-emitter voltage characteristic, the collector of the first transistor being connected through a first resistor to a current source. The current source is derived from the unregulated voltage, the emitter of the first transistor being connected through a second resistor to a reference voltage; and a second transistor having an emitter, a collector and a base, the second transistor having a second base-emitter voltage characteristic, the base of the second transistor being connected to the collector of the first transistor. The collector of the second transistor is connected to the current source, the emitter of the second transistor being connected to the reference voltage. The regulated output of the voltage regulator is provided at the collector of the second transistor and the regulated voltage output is a function of the first base-emitter voltage characteristic of the first transistor plus the quantity comprising the difference between the first base-emitter voltage characteristic of the first transistor and the second base-emitter voltage characteristic of the second transistor, times the ratio of the value of resistance of the first resistor and the value of resistance of the second resistor. The improvement described here comprises: a third transistor having a collector, an emitter and a base.

  7. Down-regulation of laminin-5 in breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K. J.; Kwan, C. P.; Nagasaki, K.; Zhang, X.; O'Hare, M. J.; Kaelin, C. M.; Burgeson, R. E.; Pardee, A. B.; Sager, R.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laminin-5 (ln-5), a large heterotrimeric glycoprotein consisting of an alpha 3, beta 3, and gamma 2 chain, is a component of epithelial cell basement membranes that functions as a ligand of the alpha 3 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 4 integrins to regulate cell adhesion, migration, and morphogenesis. The ln-5 chains show tissue-specific patterns of regulation in tumors derived from different tissues. For example, ln-5 is often up-regulated in gliomas, gastric carcinomas, and squamous carcinomas and down-regulated in prostate and basal cell carcinomas. Ln-5 expression patterns may represent useful tumor markers and help to elucidate the role of ln-5 in tumor progression in different tissue types. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have studied ln-5 expression patterns in the breast. mRNA levels were examined in tumor and normal breast epithelial cell lines, tissue samples, and immunomagnetically sorted primary cultures using differential display, Northern blotting, and hybridization arrays. Protein levels were examined by immunoprecipitation. Gene integrity was assessed by Southern blotting of representative cell types. RESULTS: Ln-5 alpha 3, beta 3, and gamma 2 mRNA expression was found to be markedly down-regulated in a panel of breast tumor cell lines when compared with normal breast epithelial cells. Ln-5 mRNA was expressed at relatively high levels in MCF-10A immortal normal breast epithelial cells, long-term cultures of normal breast cells, and sorted primary cultures of normal breast luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells. Reduced, but detectable, levels of ln-5 tended to be expressed in cell lines derived from early-stage breast tumors, whereas expression was generally not detected in cell lines derived from later-stage tumors. In breast tumor tissue specimens, expression of ln alpha 3 and beta 3 mRNAs tended to be reduced relative to levels observed in adjacent nontumor tissue, whereas in gamma 2 levels were elevated in specimens with increased amounts of

  8. GRSDB2 and GRS_UTRdb: databases of quadruplex forming G-rich sequences in pre-mRNAs and mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kikin, Oleg; Zappala, Zachary; D’Antonio, Lawrence; Bagga, Paramjeet S.

    2008-01-01

    G-quadruplex motifs in the RNA play significant roles in key cellular processes and human disease. While sequences capable of forming G-quadruplexes in the pre-mRNA are involved in regulation of polyadenylation and splicing events in mammalian transcripts, the G-quadruplex motifs in the UTRs may help regulate mRNA expression. GRSDB2 is a second-generation database containing information on the composition and distribution of putative Quadruplex-forming G-Rich Sequences (QGRS) mapped in ∼29 000 eukaryotic pre-mRNA sequences, many of which are alternatively processed. The data stored in the GRSDB2 is based on computational analysis of NCBI Entrez Gene entries with the help of an improved version of the QGRS Mapper program. The database allows complex queries with a wide variety of parameters, including Gene Ontology terms. The data is displayed in a variety of formats with several additional computational capabilities. We have also developed a new database, GRS_UTRdb, containing information on the composition and distribution patterns of putative QGRS in the 5′- and 3′-UTRs of eukaryotic mRNA sequences. The goal of these experiments has been to build freely accessible resources for exploring the role of G-quadruplex structure in regulation of gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The databases can be accessed at the G-Quadruplex Resource Site at: http://bioinformatics.ramapo.edu/GQRS/. PMID:18045785

  9. NORM regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  10. An ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase mediated response to DNA damage down-regulates the mRNA-binding potential of THOC5

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sheetal; Tran, Doan Duy Hai; Klebba-Faerber, Sabine; Kardinal, Christian; Whetton, Anthony D.; Tamura, Teruko

    2011-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, transcription is blocked by inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity. The regulation of a preexisting pool of mRNAs, therefore, plays a key role in DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, or inhibition of differentiation. THOC5 is a member of the THO complex and plays a role in the export of a subset of mRNA, which plays an important role in hematopoiesis and maintaining primitive cells. Since three serine residues in the PEST domain of THOC5 have been shown to be directly phosphorylated by ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, we examined the THOC5-dependent mRNA export under DNA damage. We show here that DNA damage drastically decreased the cytoplasmic pool of a set of THOC5-dependent mRNAs and impaired the THOC5/mRNA complex formation. The mRNP complex formed with nonphosphorylation mutant (S307/312/314A) THOC5, but not with a C-terminal deletion mutant after DNA damage, suggesting that the C-terminal domain of THOC5, but not its phosphorylation in the PEST domain, is necessary for the regulation of the mRNA-binding potency of THOC5. The cytoplasmic THOC5-dependent mRNAs were recovered by treatment with ATM kinase-specific or p53-specific siRNA, as well as by treatment with ATM kinase inhibitor, KU55933, under DNA damage conditions, suggesting that the ATM–kinase–p53 pathway is involved in this response to the DNA damage. Furthermore, the treatment with KU55933 blocked DNA damage-induced THOC5mRNP complex dissociation, indicating that activation of ATM kinase suppresses the ability of THOC5 to bind to its target mRNAs. PMID:21937706

  11. Transcriptional regulation of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong Gui; Meech, Robyn; McKinnon, Ross A; Mackenzie, Peter I

    2014-11-01

    Glucuronidation is an important metabolic pathway for many small endogenous and exogenous lipophilic compounds, including bilirubin, steroid hormones, bile acids, carcinogens and therapeutic drugs. Glucuronidation is primarily catalyzed by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A and two subfamilies, including nine functional UGT1A enzymes (1A1, 1A3-1A10) and 10 functional UGT2 enzymes (2A1, 2A2, 2A3, 2B4, 2B7, 2B10, 2B11, 2B15, 2B17 and 2B28). Most UGTs are expressed in the liver and this expression relates to the major role of hepatic glucuronidation in systemic clearance of toxic lipophilic compounds. Hepatic glucuronidation activity protects the body from chemical insults and governs the therapeutic efficacy of drugs that are inactivated by UGTs. UGT mRNAs have also been detected in over 20 extrahepatic tissues with a unique complement of UGT mRNAs seen in almost every tissue. This extrahepatic glucuronidation activity helps to maintain homeostasis and hence regulates biological activity of endogenous molecules that are primarily inactivated by UGTs. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue-specific UGT expression has been the subject of a large number of studies over the last two decades. These studies have shown that the constitutive and inducible expression of UGTs is primarily regulated by tissue-specific and ligand-activated transcription factors (TFs) via their binding to cis-regulatory elements (CREs) in UGT promoters and enhancers. This review first briefly summarizes published UGT gene transcriptional studies and the experimental models and tools utilized in these studies, and then describes in detail the TFs and their respective CREs that have been identified in the promoters and/or enhancers of individual UGT genes. PMID:25336387

  12. Responsiveness of Trichomonas vaginalis to iron concentrations: evidence for a post-transcriptional iron regulation by an IRE/IRP-like system.

    PubMed

    Torres-Romero, J C; Arroyo, R

    2009-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis has high iron-dependency, favoring its growth and multiplication in culture. Iron also regulates some of the trichomonal virulence properties by yet unknown mechanisms. Iron is an essential but potentially toxic metal for the majority of organisms. Thus, its concentration must be tightly regulated within the cell. In mammals, the iron homeostasis is mainly regulated at the post-transcriptional level by a well known mechanism mediated by the binding of iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) to hairpin-loop structures, dubbed iron-responsive elements (IREs), localized in the untranslated regions (UTRs) of target mRNAs. The knowledge of iron regulation in T. vaginalis is still very limited. An iron-responsive promoter and other regulatory elements in the 5'-UTR of the ap65-1 gene were identified as a mechanism for the positive transcriptional regulation of trichomonad genes by iron. Recently, two IRE-like hairpin-loop structures in mRNAs of differentially iron-regulated TVCP4 and TVCP12 cysteine proteinases, as well as IRP-like trichomonad proteins were identified in T. vaginalis, suggesting the existence in this protozoan of a post-transcriptional iron regulatory mechanism by an IRE/IRP-like system. The responsiveness of T. vaginalis to distinct iron concentrations was examined here. Also, the comparison of the atypical IRE-like sequences of T. vaginalis with the consensus IRE and other putative IRE sequences present in parasite and bacteria mRNAs suggest that these trichomonad IRE-like sequences might be the ancestral forms of the RNA stem-loop structures of the IRE/IRP system. PMID:19539055

  13. The Cell Cycle Regulator CCDC6 Is a Key Target of RNA-Binding Protein EWS

    PubMed Central

    Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Larsson, Erik; Nabhani, Schafiq; Borkhardt, Arndt; Hoell, Jessica I

    2015-01-01

    Genetic translocation of EWSR1 to ETS transcription factor coding region is considered as primary cause for Ewing sarcoma. Previous studies focused on the biology of chimeric transcription factors formed due to this translocation. However, the physiological consequences of heterozygous EWSR1 loss in these tumors have largely remained elusive. Previously, we have identified various mRNAs bound to EWS using PAR-CLIP. In this study, we demonstrate CCDC6, a known cell cycle regulator protein, as a novel target regulated by EWS. siRNA mediated down regulation of EWS caused an elevated apoptosis in cells in a CCDC6-dependant manner. This effect was rescued upon re-expression of CCDC6. This study provides evidence for a novel functional link through which wild-type EWS operates in a target-dependant manner in Ewing sarcoma. PMID:25751255

  14. Switch-like regulation of tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA processing patterns revealed by customized fluorescence reporters

    PubMed Central

    Kuroyanagi, Hidehito

    2013-01-01

    Alternative processing of precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs), including alternative transcription start sites, alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation, is the major source of protein diversity and plays crucial roles in development, differentiation and diseases in higher eukaryotes. It is estimated from microarray analyses and deep sequencing of mRNAs from synchronized worms that up to 25% of protein-coding genes in Caenorhabditis elegans undergo alternative pre-mRNA processing and that many of them are subject to developmental regulation. Recent progress in visualizing the alternative pre-mRNA processing patterns in living worms with custom-designed fluorescence reporters has enabled genetic analyses of the regulatory mechanisms for alternative processing events of interest in vivo. Expression of the tissue-specific isoforms of actin depolymerising factor (ADF)/cofilin, UNC-60A and UNC-60B, is regulated by a combination of alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation of pre-mRNA from a single gene unc-60. We recently found that muscle-specific splicing regulators ASD-2 and SUP-12 cooperatively switch the pre-mRNA processing patterns of the unc-60 gene in body wall muscles. Here I summarize the bichromatic fluorescence reporter system utilized for visualizing the tissue-specific alternative processing patterns of the unc-60 pre-mRNA. I also discuss the model for the coordinated regulation of the UNC-60B-type pre-mRNA processing in body wall muscles by ASD-2 and SUP-12. PMID:24778931

  15. Food deprivation explains effects of mouthbrooding on ovaries and steroid hormones, but not brain neuropeptide and receptor mRNAs, in an African cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Carpenter, Russ E.; Lee, Malinda; Maruska, Karen P.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2012-01-01

    Feeding behavior and reproduction are coordinately regulated by the brain via neurotransmitters, circulating hormones, and neuropeptides. Reduced feeding allows animals to engage in other behaviors important for fitness, including mating and parental care. Some fishes cease feeding for weeks at a time in order to provide care to their young by brooding them inside the male or female parent’s mouth. Maternal mouthbrooding is known to impact circulating hormones and subsequent reproductive cycles, but neither the full effects of food deprivation nor the neural mechanisms are known. Here we ask what effects mouthbrooding has on several physiological processes including gonad and body mass, brain neuropeptide and receptor gene expression, and circulating steroid hormones in a mouthbrooding cichlid species, Astatotilapia burtoni. We ask whether any observed changes can be explained by food deprivation, and show that during mouthbrooding, ovary size and circulating levels of androgens and estrogens match those seen during food deprivation. Levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) mRNA in the brain were low in food-deprived females compared to controls and in mouthbrooding females compared to gravid females. Levels of mRNA encoding two peptides involved in regulating feeding, hypocretin and cholecystokinin, were increased in the brains of food-deprived females. Brain mRNA levels of two receptors, GnRH Receptor 2 and NPY receptor Y8c, were elevated in mouthbrooding females compared to the fed condition, but NPY receptor Y8b mRNA was differently regulated by mouthbrooding. These results suggest that many, but not all, of the characteristic physiological changes that occur during mouthbrooding are consequences of food deprivation. PMID:22561338

  16. Acidic Digestion in a Teleost: Postprandial and Circadian Pattern of Gastric pH, Pepsin Activity, and Pepsinogen and Proton Pump mRNAs Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yúfera, Manuel; Moyano, Francisco J.; Astola, Antonio; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Two different modes for regulation of stomach acid secretion have been described in vertebrates. Some species exhibit a continuous acid secretion maintaining a low gastric pH during fasting. Others, as some teleosts, maintain a neutral gastric pH during fasting while the hydrochloric acid is released only after the ingestion of a meal. Those different patterns seem to be closely related to specific feeding habits. However, our recent observations suggest that this acidification pattern could be modified by changes in daily feeding frequency and time schedule. The aim of this study was to advance in understanding the regulation mechanisms of stomach digestion and pattern of acid secretion in teleost fish. We have examined the postprandial pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and mRNA expression for pepsinogen and proton pump in white seabream juveniles maintained under a light/dark 12/12 hours cycle and receiving only one morning meal. The pepsin activity was analyzed according to the standard protocol buffering at pH 2 and using the actual pH measured in the stomach. The results show how the enzyme precursor is permanently available while the hydrochloric acid, which activates the zymogen fraction, is secreted just after the ingestion of food. Results also reveal that analytical protocol at pH 2 notably overestimates true pepsin activity in fish stomach. The expression of the mRNA encoding pepsinogen and proton pump exhibited almost parallel patterns, with notable increases during the darkness period and sharp decreases just before the morning meal. These results indicate that white seabream uses the resting hours for recovering the mRNA stock that will be quickly used during the feeding process. Our data clearly shows that both daily illumination pattern and feeding time are involved at different level in the regulation of the secretion of digestive juices. PMID:22448266

  17. His-154 is involved in the linkage of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae L-A double-stranded RNA virus Gag protein to the cap structure of mRNAs and is essential for M1 satellite virus expression.

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, A; Ribas, J C; Wickner, R B; Sonenberg, N

    1994-01-01

    The coat protein (Gag) of the double-stranded RNA virus L-A was previously shown to form a covalent bond with the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs. Here, we identify the linkage as a phosphoroimidazole bond between the alpha phosphate of the cap structure and a nitrogen in the Gag protein His-154 imidazole side chain. Mutations of His-154 abrogate the ability of Gag to bind to the cap structure, without affecting cap recognition, in vivo virus particle formation from an L-A cDNA clone, or in vitro specific binding and replication of plus-stranded single-stranded RNA. However, genetic analyses demonstrate that His-154 is essential for M1 satellite virus expression. Images PMID:8139566

  18. Glucocorticoids Regulate Tristetraprolin Synthesis and Posttranscriptionally Regulate Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inflammatory Signaling▿

    PubMed Central

    Smoak, Kathleen; Cidlowski, John A.

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are used to treat various inflammatory disorders, but the mechanisms underlying these actions are incompletely understood. The zinc finger protein tristetraprolin (TTP) destabilizes several proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs by binding to AU-rich elements within their 3′ untranslated regions, targeting them for degradation. Here we report that glucocorticoids induce the synthesis of TTP mRNA and protein in A549 lung epithelial cells and in rat tissues. Dexamethasone treatment leads to a sustained induction of TTP mRNA expression that is abrogated by RU486. Glucocorticoid induction of TTP mRNA is also blocked by actinomycin D but not by cycloheximide, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism which has been confirmed by transcription run-on experiments. The most widely characterized TTP-regulated gene is the AU-rich tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) gene. Dexamethasone represses TNF-α mRNA in A549 cells and decreases luciferase expression of a TNF-α 3′ untranslated region reporter plasmid in an orientation-dependent manner. Small interfering RNAs to TTP significantly prevent this effect, and a cell line stably expressing a short-hairpin RNA to TTP conclusively establishes that TTP is critical for dexamethasone inhibition of TNF-α mRNA expression. These studies provide the molecular evidence for glucocorticoid regulation of human TTP and reflect a novel inductive anti-inflammatory signaling pathway for glucocorticoids that acts via posttranscriptional mechanisms. PMID:16982682

  19. Involvement of GATA transcription factors in the regulation of endogenous bovine interferon-tau gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hanako; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Kim, Min-Su; Muroi, Yoshikage; Ideta, Atsushi; Aoyagi, Yoshito; Nakajima, Hiromi; Takahashi, Masashi; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko

    2009-12-01

    Expression of interferon-tau (IFNT), necessary for pregnancy establishment in ruminant ungulates, is regulated in a temporal and spatial manner. However, molecular mechanisms by which IFNT gene transcription is regulated in this manner have not been firmly established. In this study, DNA microarray/RT-PCR analysis between bovine trophoblast CT-1 and Mardin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells was initially performed, finding that transcription factors GATA2, GATA3, and GATA6 mRNAs were specific to CT-1 cells. These mRNAs were also found in Days 17, 20, and 22 (Day 0 = day of estrus) bovine conceptuses. In examining other bovine cell lines, ovary cumulus granulosa (oCG) and ear fibroblast (EF) cells, GATA2 and GATA3, but not GATA6, were found specific to the bovine trophoblast cells. In transient transfection analyses using the upstream region (-631 to +59 bp) of bovine IFNT gene (bIFNT, IFN-tau-c1), over-expression of GATA2/GATA3 did not affect the transcription of bIFNT-reporter construct in human choriocarcinoma JEG3 cells. Transfection of GATA2, GATA3, ETS2, and/or CDX2, however, was effective in the up-regulation of the bIFNT construct transfected into bovine oCG and EF cells. One Point mutation studies revealed that among six potential GATA binding sites located on the upstream region of the bIFNT gene, the one next to ETS2 site exhibited reduced luciferase activity. In CT-1 cells, endogenous bIFNT gene transcription was up-regulated by over-expression of GATA2 or GATA3, but down-regulated by siRNA specific to GATA2 mRNA. These data suggest that GATA2/3 is involved in trophoblast-specific regulation of bIFNT gene transcription. PMID:19598245

  20. The Protein Zfand5 Binds and Stabilizes mRNAs with AU-rich Elements in Their 3′-Untranslated Regions*

    PubMed Central

    He, Guoan; Sun, Dongxu; Ou, Zhiying; Ding, Aihao

    2012-01-01

    AU-rich elements (AREs) in the 3′-UTR of unstable transcripts play a vital role in the regulation of many inflammatory mediators. To identify novel ARE-dependent gene regulators, we screened a human leukocyte cDNA library for candidates that enhanced the activity of a luciferase reporter bearing the ARE sequence from TNF (ARETNF). Among 171 hits, we focused on Zfand5 (zinc finger, AN1-type domain 5), a 23-kDa protein containing two zinc finger domains. Zfand5 expression was induced in macrophages in response to IFNγ and Toll-like receptor ligands. Knockdown of Zfand5 in macrophages decreased expression of ARE class II transcripts TNF and COX2, whereas overexpression stabilized TNF mRNA by suppressing deadenylation. Zfand5 specifically bound to ARETNF mRNA and competed with tristetraprolin, a protein known to bind and destabilize class II ARE-containing RNAs. Truncation studies indicated that both zinc fingers of Zfand5 contributed to its mRNA-stabilizing function. These findings add Zfand5 to the growing list of RNA-binding proteins and suggest that Zfand5 can enhance ARE-containing mRNA stability by competing with tristetraprolin for mRNA binding. PMID:22665488

  1. More than cell dust: microparticles isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of brain injured patients are messengers carrying mRNAs, miRNAs, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Patz, Silke; Trattnig, Christa; Grünbacher, Gerda; Ebner, Birgit; Gülly, Christian; Novak, Alexandra; Rinner, Beate; Leitinger, Gerd; Absenger, Markus; Tomescu, Oana A; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Fasching, Ulrike; Wissa, Sonja; Archelos-Garcia, Juan; Schäfer, Ute

    2013-07-15

    Microparticles are cell-derived, membrane-sheathed structures that are believed to shuttle proteins, mRNA, and miRNA to specific local or remote target cells. To date best described in blood, we now show that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains similar structures that can deliver RNAs and proteins to target cells. These are, in particular, molecules associated with neuronal RNA granules and miRNAs known to regulate neuronal processes. Small RNA molecules constituted 50% of the shuttled ribonucleic acid. Using microarray analysis, we identified 81 mature miRNA molecules in CSF microparticles. Microparticles from brain injured patients were more abundant than in non-injured subjects and contained distinct genetic information suggesting that they play a role in the adaptive response to injury. Notably, miR-9 and miR-451 were differentially packed into CSF microparticles derived from patients versus non-injured subjects. We confirmed the transfer of genetic material from CSF microparticles to adult neuronal stem cells in vitro and a subsequent microRNA-specific repression of distinct genes. This first indication of a regulated transport of functional genetic material in human CSF may facilitate the diagnosis and analysis of cerebral modulation in an otherwise inaccessible organ. PMID:23360174

  2. Poly(A)-binding proteins: structure, domain organization, and activity regulation.

    PubMed

    Eliseeva, I A; Lyabin, D N; Ovchinnikov, L P

    2013-12-01

    RNA-binding proteins are of vital importance for mRNA functioning. Among these, poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) are of special interest due to their participation in virtually all mRNA-dependent events that is caused by their high affinity for A-rich mRNA sequences. Apart from mRNAs, PABPs interact with many proteins, thus promoting their involvement in cellular events. In the nucleus, PABPs play a role in polyadenylation, determine the length of the poly(A) tail, and may be involved in mRNA export. In the cytoplasm, they participate in regulation of translation initiation and either protect mRNAs from decay through binding to their poly(A) tails or stimulate this decay by promoting mRNA interactions with deadenylase complex proteins. This review presents modern notions of the role of PABPs in mRNA-dependent events; peculiarities of regulation of PABP amount in the cell and activities are also discussed. PMID:24490729

  3. A search for small noncoding RNAs in Staphylococcus aureus reveals a conserved sequence motif for regulation

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Thomas; Chevalier, Clément; Cros, Marie-Josée; Boisset, Sandrine; Fechter, Pierre; Noirot, Céline; Schrenzel, Jacques; François, Patrice; Vandenesch, François; Gaspin, Christine; Romby, Pascale

    2009-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis of the intergenic regions of Staphylococcus aureus predicted multiple regulatory regions. From this analysis, we characterized 11 novel noncoding RNAs (RsaA‐K) that are expressed in several S. aureus strains under different experimental conditions. Many of them accumulate in the late-exponential phase of growth. All ncRNAs are stable and their expression is Hfq-independent. The transcription of several of them is regulated by the alternative sigma B factor (RsaA, D and F) while the expression of RsaE is agrA-dependent. Six of these ncRNAs are specific to S. aureus, four are conserved in other Staphylococci, and RsaE is also present in Bacillaceae. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis indicated that RsaE regulates the synthesis of proteins involved in various metabolic pathways. Phylogenetic analysis combined with RNA structure probing, searches for RsaE‐mRNA base pairing, and toeprinting assays indicate that a conserved and unpaired UCCC sequence motif of RsaE binds to target mRNAs and prevents the formation of the ribosomal initiation complex. This study unexpectedly shows that most of the novel ncRNAs carry the conserved C−rich motif, suggesting that they are members of a class of ncRNAs that target mRNAs by a shared mechanism. PMID:19786493

  4. Pseudouridine profiling reveals regulated mRNA pseudouridylation in yeast and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Carlile, Thomas M.; Rojas-Duran, Maria F.; Zinshteyn, Boris; Shin, Hakyung; Bartoli, Kristen M.; Gilbert, Wendy V.

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modification of RNA nucleosides occurs in all living organisms. Pseudouridine, the most abundant modified nucleoside in non-coding RNAs1, enhances the function of transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA by stabilizing RNA structure2–8. mRNAs were not known to contain pseudouridine, but artificial pseudouridylation dramatically affects mRNA function – it changes the genetic code by facilitating non-canonical base pairing in the ribosome decoding center9,10. However, without evidence of naturally occurring mRNA pseudouridylation, its physiological was unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of pseudouridylation in yeast and human RNAs using Pseudo-seq, a genome-wide, single-nucleotide-resolution method for pseudouridine identification. Pseudo-seq accurately identifies known modification sites as well as 100 novel sites in non-coding RNAs, and reveals hundreds of pseudouridylated sites in mRNAs. Genetic analysis allowed us to assign most of the new modification sites to one of seven conserved pseudouridine synthases, Pus1–4, 6, 7 and 9. Notably, the majority of pseudouridines in mRNA are regulated in response to environmental signals, such as nutrient deprivation in yeast and serum starvation in human cells. These results suggest a mechanism for the rapid and regulated rewiring of the genetic code through inducible mRNA modifications. Our findings reveal unanticipated roles for pseudouridylation and provide a resource for identifying the targets of pseudouridine synthases implicated in human disease11–13. PMID:25192136

  5. Xrn1/Pacman affects apoptosis and regulates expression of hid and reaper

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Joseph A.; Jones, Christopher I.; Towler, Benjamin P.; Pashler, Amy L.; Grima, Dominic P.; Hebbes, Stephen; Crossman, Samuel H.; Zabolotskaya, Maria V.; Newbury, Sarah F.

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is a highly conserved cellular process that is crucial for tissue homeostasis under normal development as well as environmental stress. Misregulation of apoptosis is linked to many developmental defects and diseases such as tumour formation, autoimmune diseases and neurological disorders. In this paper, we show a novel role for the exoribonuclease Pacman/Xrn1 in regulating apoptosis. Using Drosophila wing imaginal discs as a model system, we demonstrate that a null mutation in pacman results in small imaginal discs as well as lethality during pupation. Mutant wing discs show an increase in the number of cells undergoing apoptosis, especially in the wing pouch area. Compensatory proliferation also occurs in these mutant discs, but this is insufficient to compensate for the concurrent increase in apoptosis. The phenotypic effects of the pacman null mutation are rescued by a deletion that removes one copy of each of the pro-apoptotic genes reaper, hid and grim, demonstrating that pacman acts through this pathway. The null pacman mutation also results in a significant increase in the expression of the pro-apoptotic mRNAs, hid and reaper, with this increase mostly occurring at the post-transcriptional level, suggesting that Pacman normally targets these mRNAs for degradation. Our results uncover a novel function for the conserved exoribonuclease Pacman and suggest that this exoribonuclease is important in the regulation of apoptosis in other organisms. PMID:25836675

  6. Nuclear m(6)A Reader YTHDC1 Regulates mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wen; Adhikari, Samir; Dahal, Ujwal; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Hao, Ya-Juan; Sun, Bao-Fa; Sun, Hui-Ying; Li, Ang; Ping, Xiao-Li; Lai, Wei-Yi; Wang, Xing; Ma, Hai-Li; Huang, Chun-Min; Yang, Ying; Huang, Niu; Jiang, Gui-Bin; Wang, Hai-Lin; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2016-02-18

    The regulatory role of N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) and its nuclear binding protein YTHDC1 in pre-mRNA splicing remains an enigma. Here we show that YTHDC1 promotes exon inclusion in targeted mRNAs through recruiting pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF3 (SRp20) while blocking SRSF10 (SRp38) mRNA binding. Transcriptome assay with PAR-CLIP-seq analysis revealed that YTHDC1-regulated exon-inclusion patterns were similar to those of SRSF3 but opposite of SRSF10. In vitro pull-down assay illustrated a competitive binding of SRSF3 and SRSF10 to YTHDC1. Moreover, YTHDC1 facilitates SRSF3 but represses SRSF10 in their nuclear speckle localization, RNA-binding affinity, and associated splicing events, dysregulation of which, as the result of YTHDC1 depletion, can be restored by reconstitution with wild-type, but not m(6)A-binding-defective, YTHDC1. Our findings provide the direct evidence that m(6)A reader YTHDC1 regulates mRNA splicing through recruiting and modulating pre-mRNA splicing factors for their access to the binding regions of targeted mRNAs. PMID:26876937

  7. Differential and tissue-specific regulation of the multiple rat c-erbA messenger RNA species by thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Hodin, R A; Lazar, M A; Chin, W W

    1990-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) has been shown to regulate the level of its receptor in a number of tissues and cell lines. Recently, proteins encoded by the protooncogene c-erbA have been identified as T3 receptors. In the rat, four c-erbA gene products have been isolated, three of which, r-erbA alpha-1, r-erbA beta-1, and r-erbA beta-2, encode biologically active T3 receptors; the fourth, r-erbA alpha-2, may play an inhibitory role in T3 action. The present work examines the molecular nature of T3 receptor autoregulation using probes specific for each c-erbA mRNA. Rats were rendered hypothyroid with propylthiouracil and then treated with either saline or T3. Northern blot analyses reveal marked tissue-specific and differential regulation of the multiple c-erbA mRNAs by T3. In the pituitary the levels of r-erbA beta-1 mRNA increase, whereas the levels of the pituitary-specific r-erbA beta-2 mRNA decrease with T3 treatment. In heart, kidney, liver, and brain the levels of r-erbA beta-1 are unaffected by thyroidal status. The levels of both r-erbA alpha mRNAs decrease with T3 treatment in all tissues examined except for the brain, where there is no change. In addition, we find that changes in the mRNAs encoding specific subpopulations of T3 receptors do not always parallel changes in total nuclear T3 binding. Differential regulation of the specific c-erbA mRNA species could have important consequences for T3 action. PMID:2153150

  8. Mechanisms of regulation of mature miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Towler, Benjamin P; Jones, Christopher I; Newbury, Sarah F

    2015-12-01

    miRNAs are short RNA molecules of ∼22-nt in length that play important roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. miRNAs normally function as negative regulators of mRNA expression by binding complementary sequences in the 3'-UTR of target mRNAs and causing translational repression and/or target degradation. Much research has been undertaken to enhance understanding of the biogenesis, function and targeting of miRNAs. However, until recently, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the levels of mature miRNAs themselves have been largely overlooked. Although it has generally been assumed that miRNAs are stable molecules, recent evidence indicates that the stability of specific mature miRNAs can be regulated during key cellular and developmental processes in certain cell types. Here we discuss the current knowledge of the mechanisms by which mature miRNAs are regulated in the cell and the factors that contribute to the control of their stability. PMID:26614662

  9. Quantifying negative feedback regulation by micro-RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shangying; Raghavachari, Sridhar

    2011-10-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in post-transcriptional gene regulation by pairing with target mRNAs to repress protein production. It has been shown that over one-third of human genes are targeted by miRNA. Although hundreds of miRNAs have been identified in mammalian genomes, the function of miRNA-based repression in the context of gene regulation networks still remains unclear. In this study, we explore the functional roles of feedback regulation by miRNAs. In a model where repression of translation occurs by sequestration of mRNA by miRNA, we find that miRNA and mRNA levels are anti-correlated, resulting in larger fluctuation in protein levels than theoretically expected assuming no correlation between miRNA and mRNA levels. If miRNA repression is due to a catalytic suppression of translation rates, we analytically show that the protein fluctuations can be strongly repressed with miRNA regulation. We also discuss how either of these modes may be relevant for cell function.

  10. Identification of microRNA-regulated pathways using an integration of microRNA-mRNA microarray and bioinformatics analysis in CD34+ cells of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Yang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Liu, Li; Chang, Chun-Kang; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microRNA (miRNA) and targeted mRNA on signal transduction is not fully understood in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Here, we tried to identify the miRNAs-regulated pathways through a combination of miRNA and mRNA microarray in CD34+ cells from MDS patients. We identified 34 differentially expressed miRNAs and 1783 mRNAs in MDS. 25 dysregulated miRNAs and 394 targeted mRNAs were screened by a combination of Pearson's correlation analysis and software prediction. Pathway analysis showed that several pathways such as Notch, PI3K/Akt might be regulated by those miRNA-mRNAs pairs. Through a combination of Pathway and miRNA-Gene or GO-Network analysis, miRNAs-regulated pathways, such as miR-195-5p/DLL1/Notch signaling pathway, were identified. Further qRT-PCR showed that miR-195-5p was up-regulated while DLL1 was down-regulated in patients with low-grade MDS compared with normal controls. Luciferase assay showed that DLL1 was a direct target of miR-195-5p. Overexpression of miR-195-5p led to increased cell apoptosis and reduced cell growth through inhibition of Notch signaling pathway. In conclusion, alteration expression of miRNAs and targeted mRNAs might have an important impact on cancer-related cellular pathways in MDS. Inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by miR-195-5p-DLL1 axis contributes to the excess apoptosis in low-grade MDS. PMID:27571714

  11. Identification of microRNA-regulated pathways using an integration of microRNA-mRNA microarray and bioinformatics analysis in CD34+ cells of myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Yang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Liu, Li; Chang, Chun-Kang; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microRNA (miRNA) and targeted mRNA on signal transduction is not fully understood in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Here, we tried to identify the miRNAs-regulated pathways through a combination of miRNA and mRNA microarray in CD34+ cells from MDS patients. We identified 34 differentially expressed miRNAs and 1783 mRNAs in MDS. 25 dysregulated miRNAs and 394 targeted mRNAs were screened by a combination of Pearson’s correlation analysis and software prediction. Pathway analysis showed that several pathways such as Notch, PI3K/Akt might be regulated by those miRNA-mRNAs pairs. Through a combination of Pathway and miRNA-Gene or GO-Network analysis, miRNAs-regulated pathways, such as miR-195-5p/DLL1/Notch signaling pathway, were identified. Further qRT-PCR showed that miR-195-5p was up-regulated while DLL1 was down-regulated in patients with low-grade MDS compared with normal controls. Luciferase assay showed that DLL1 was a direct target of miR-195-5p. Overexpression of miR-195-5p led to increased cell apoptosis and reduced cell growth through inhibition of Notch signaling pathway. In conclusion, alteration expression of miRNAs and targeted mRNAs might have an important impact on cancer-related cellular pathways in MDS. Inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by miR-195-5p-DLL1 axis contributes to the excess apoptosis in low-grade MDS. PMID:27571714

  12. Identification of mRNAs coding for mammalian-type melanin-concentrating hormone and its receptors in the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini.

    PubMed

    Mizusawa, Kanta; Amiya, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Takabe, Souichirou; Amano, Masafumi; Breves, Jason P; Fox, Bradley K; Grau, E Gordon; Hyodo, Susumu; Takahashi, Akiyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuromodulator, synthesized in the hypothalamus, that regulates both appetite and energy homeostasis in mammals. MCH was initially identified in teleost fishes as a pituitary gland hormone that induced melanin aggregation in chromatophores in the skin; however, this function of MCH has not been observed in other vertebrates. Recent studies suggest that MCH is involved in teleost feeding behavior, spurring the hypothesis that the original function of MCH in early vertebrates was appetite regulation. The present study reports the results of cDNAs cloning encoding preproMCH and two MCH receptors from an elasmobranch fish, Sphyrna lewini, a member of Chondrichthyes, the earliest diverged class in gnathostomes. The putative MCH peptide is composed of 19 amino acids, similar in length to the mammalian MCH. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that MCH is expressed in the hypothalamus in S. lewini MCH cell bodies and fibers were identified by immunochemistry in the hypothalamus, but not in the pituitary gland, suggesting that MCH is not released via the pituitary gland into general circulation. MCH receptor genes mch-r1 and mch-r2 were expressed in the S. lewini hypothalamus, but were not found in the skin. These results indicate that MCH does not have a peripheral function, such as a melanin-concentrating effect, in the skin of S. lewini hypothalamic MCH mRNA levels were not affected by fasting, suggesting that feeding conditions might not affect the expression of MCH in the hypothalamus. PMID:22884735

  13. Differential Expression and Internal Feedback Regulation of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase, 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase, and Ethylene Receptor Genes in Tomato Fruit during Development and Ripening1

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuka, Akira; Murachi, Shiho; Okunishi, Hironori; Shiomi, Shinjiro; Nakano, Ryohei; Kubo, Yasutaka; Inaba, Akitsugu

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the feedback regulation of ethylene biosynthesis in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit with respect to the transition from system 1 to system 2 ethylene production. The abundance of LE-ACS2, LE-ACS4, and NR mRNAs increased in the ripening fruit concomitant with a burst in ethylene production. These increases in mRNAs with ripening were prevented to a large extent by treatment with 1-methylcyclopropene (MCP), an ethylene action inhibitor. Transcripts for the LE-ACS6 gene, which accumulated in preclimacteric fruit but not in untreated ripening fruit, did accumulate in ripening fruit treated with MCP. Treatment of young fruit with propylene prevented the accumulation of transcripts for this gene. LE-ACS1A, LE-ACS3, and TAE1 genes were expressed constitutively in the fruit throughout development and ripening irrespective of whether the fruit was treated with MCP or propylene. The transcripts for LE-ACO1 and LE-ACO4 genes already existed in preclimacteric fruit and increased greatly when ripening commenced. These increases in LE-ACO mRNA with ripening were also prevented by treatment with MCP. The results suggest that in tomato fruit the preclimacteric system 1 ethylene is possibly mediated via constitutively expressed LE-ACS1A and LE-ACS3 and negatively feedback-regulated LE-ACS6 genes with preexisting LE-ACO1 and LE-ACO4 mRNAs. At the onset of the climacteric stage, it shifts to system 2 ethylene, with a large accumulation of LE-ACS2, LE-ACS4, LE-ACO1, and LE-ACO4 mRNAs as a result of a positive feedback regulation. This transition from system 1 to system 2 ethylene production might be related to the accumulated level of NR mRNA. PMID:9847103

  14. Differential regulation of oligodendrocyte markers by glucocorticoids: Post-transcriptional regulation of both proteolipid protein and myelin basic protein and transcriptional regulation of glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Cole, R.; Chiappelli, F.; De Vellis, J. )

    1989-09-01

    During neonatal development glucocorticoids potentiate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelinogenesis by regulating the expression of myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase. The actual locus at which hydrocortisone exerts its developmental influence on glial physiology is, however, not well understood. Gycerol phosphate dehydrogenase is glucocorticoid-inducible in oligodendrocytes at all stages of development both in vivo and in vitro. In newborn rat cerebral cultures, between 9 and 15 days in vitro, a 2- to 3-fold increase in myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein mRNA levels occurs in oligodendrocytes within 12 hr of hydrocortisone treatment. Immunostaining demonstrates that this increase in mRNAs is followed by a 2- to 3-fold increase in the protein levels within 24 hr. In vitro transcription assays performed with oligodendrocyte nuclei show an 11-fold increase in the transcriptional activity of glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase in response to hydrocortisone but no increase in transcription of myelin basic protein or proteolipid protein. These results indicate that during early myelinogeneis, glucocorticoids influence the expression of key oligodendroglial markers by different processes: The expression of glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase is regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas the expression of myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein is modulated via a different, yet uncharacterized, mechanism involving post-transcriptional regulation.

  15. Subgenomic mRNA regulation by a distal RNA element in a (+)-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G; Slowinski, V; White, K A

    1999-01-01

    Subgenomic (sg) mRNAs are synthesized by (+)-strand RNA viruses to allow for efficient translation of products encoded 3' in their genomes. This strategy also provides a means for regulating the expression of such products via modulation of sg mRNA accumulation. We have studied the mechanism by which sg mRNAs levels are controlled in tomato bushy stunt virus, a small (+)-strand RNA virus which synthesizes two sg mRNAs during infections. Neither the viral capsid nor movement proteins were found to play any significant role in modulating the accumulation levels of either sg mRNA. Deletion analysis did, however, identify a 12-nt-long RNA sequence located approximately 1,000 nt upstream from the site of initiation of sg mRNA2 synthesis that was required specifically for accumulation of sg mRNA2. Further analysis revealed a potential base-pairing interaction between this sequence and a sequence located just 5' to the site of initiation for sg mRNA2 synthesis. Mutant genomes in which this interaction was either disrupted or maintained were analyzed and the results indicated a positive correlation between the predicted stability of the base-pairing interaction and the efficiency of sg mRNA2 accumulation. The functional significance of the long-distance interaction was further supported by phylogenetic sequence analysis which revealed conservation of base-pairing interactions of similar stability and relative position in the genomes of different tombusviruses. It is proposed that the upstream sequence represents a cis-acting RNA element which facilitates sg mRNA accumulation by promoting efficient synthesis of sg mRNA2 via a long-distance RNA-RNA interaction. PMID:10199571

  16. A Bidirectional SF2/ASF- and SRp40-Dependent Splicing Enhancer Regulates Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 rev, env, vpu, and nef Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Caputi, Massimo; Freund, Marcel; Kammler, Susanne; Asang, Corinna; Schaal, Heiner

    2004-01-01

    The integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome is transcribed in a single pre-mRNA that is alternatively spliced into more than 40 mRNAs. We characterized a novel bidirectional exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) that regulates the expression of the HIV-1 env, vpu, rev, and nef mRNAs. The ESE is localized downstream of the vpu-, env-, and nef-specific 3′ splice site no. 5. SF2/ASF and SRp40 activate the ESE and are required for efficient 3′ splice site usage and binding of the U1 snRNP to the downstream 5′ splice site no. 4. U1 snRNP binding to the 5′ splice site no. 4 is required for splicing of the rev and nef mRNAs and to increase expression of the partially spliced env mRNA. Finally, our results indicate that this ESE is necessary for the recruitment of the U1 snRNP to the 5′ splice site no. 4, even when the 5′ splice site and the U1 snRNA have been mutated to obtain a perfect complementary match. The ESE characterized here is highly conserved in most viral subtypes. PMID:15163745