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Sample records for pulmonary heart disease

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension and Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Roth, Todd S; Aboulhosn, Jamil A

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) is a frequent complication in adults with congenital heart disease. Regardless of etiology, the optimal treatment strategy for this difficult population is challenging. The new frontier of targeted PAH therapies has demonstrated improved functional capacity in the various phenotypes of PAH-CHD, with work currently in progress scrutinizing outcomes. In those who fail conventional medical therapy, heart and heart-lung (block) transplantation become the final therapeutic options, with the role of ventricular assist devices and the total artificial heart still under investigation in this group. PMID:27443136

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. PMID:26471823

  3. Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, I; Suteu, Carmen; Blesneac, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common congenital malformations and account for about eight cases per 1000 births and are often associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Increased shear stress and the excess flow through the pulmonary vascular bed due to a systemic-to-pulmonary shunt lead to the development of pulmonary vascular disease and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Without surgical repair approximately 30% of patients develop pulmonary vascular disease. Eisenmenger syndrome represents the extreme end of pulmonary arterial hypertension with congenital heart disease. We summarized the current therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension; conventional treatments including calcium channel blockers, anticoagulation, digitalis, diuretics, and new treatment: prostacyclin, bosentan, sildenafil, ambrisentan. Preliminary data of new therapies are encouraging with disease significantly improved natural history, but there is need for more evidence-based data. PMID:18333354

  4. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease. PMID:26886381

  5. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J A; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E B

    2009-12-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  6. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, D. D.; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T.; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  7. Pulmonary artery denervation for treatment of a patient with pulmonary hypertension secondary to left heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) predicts poor outcome in patients with left heart disease. A 62-year-old man was referred for heart failure associated with ischemic cardiomyopathy. He received a diagnosis of combined postcapillary and precapillary PH secondary to left heart disease on the basis of hemodynamic parameters. After the pulmonary artery denervation procedure was performed, hemodynamic parameters were markedly improved, which resulted in a significant increase in functional capacity. PMID:27252851

  8. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy. PMID:25650280

  9. [Telemedicine for heart failure, diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Christiansen, St; Klötzer, J-P

    2016-03-01

    It is generally believed that telemedicine has a tremendous potential to improve health care. This publication reviews the current knowledge available on telemedical concepts for heart failure, diabetes and chronic pulmonary diseases, discusses existing difficulties, and suggests how such concepts could best be used in the near future. PMID:27111954

  10. Epidemiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Guha, Ashrith; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Park, Myung H

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the setting of left side heart disease is associated with adverse outcomes. The exact prevalence of PH in the different pathologies that affect the left ventricle, however, is difficult to access with the current literature. The lack of a standard definition of PH in older studies, the different modalities to assess pulmonary artery pressures and the varying disease severity, all account for the great variability in the reported prevalence of PH. PH can accompany heart failure (HF) with reduced (HFrEF) or preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) as well as mitral and aortic valve disease; in any of these instances it is important to recognize whether the elevation of pulmonary pressures is driven by elevated left ventricular pressures only (isolated post-capillary PH) or if there is an accompanying remodeling component in the pulmonary arterioles (combined post-capillary and pre-capillary PH). The objective of this review is to describe the definitions, prevalence and the risk factors associated with the development of PH in the setting of HFrEF, HFpEF and valvular heart disease. PMID:27402130

  11. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. Personal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has changed dramatically with the development of targeted therapy with selective pulmonary vasodilators. The number of adult Japanese patients with PAH associated with CHD is increasing. It is important to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of these patients, and to achieve this, a register of adult Japanese patients with PAH associated with CHD should be established. At the World Symposium in Nice, France, in 2013, the consensus was reached that patients with a pulmonary resistance of < 4 Wood Units (WU)·m(2) have operable disease, and patients with a pulmonary resistance of > 8 WU·m(2) have inoperable disease. However, these criteria are conservative. Some patients with a pulmonary resistance of > 8 WU·m(2) and a good response to a pulmonary vasodilator test have operable disease and a favorable clinical course long after repair of CHD. The criteria determining operability in patients with PAH associated with CHD in the era of pulmonary vasodilators should be established using data obtained from patient registers and/or multicenter studies. The optimal management of Eisenmenger syndrome should also be established using data obtained from patient registers. Prospective studies should be conducted to determine the life expectancy of patients with Eisenmenger syndrome in the era of targeted therapy. A relatively mild increase in pulmonary resistance may result in failure of a Fontan circulation. The effects of pulmonary vasodilators on the long-term prognosis of patients who have undergone the Fontan operation are still unclear. PMID:25787791

  12. Pulmonary vascular resistance in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, N J; Shinebourne, E A; Scallan, M J; Sopwith, T A; Denison, D M

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary and systemic blood flow and pulmonary vascular resistance were measured in 21 children with congenital heart disease. Blood flow was calculated by the direct Fick method, using measurements of metabolic gas exchange obtained by remote respiratory mass spectrometry. The observations showed that the administration of oxygen caused an appreciable fall in pulmonary vascular resistance in 16 of the 21 children studied and that this fall would not have been appreciated from a study of pulmonary arterial pressure alone as it was masked by a corresponding rise in blood flow. In 10 of 14 children, in whom superior vena caval blood was also sampled, the rise in flow was largely due to an increase in intracardiac left to right shunt. It was accompanied by widening of the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, perhaps due to imperfect gas equilibration within the lung. PMID:6515594

  13. Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zangiabadi, Amirmasoud; De Pasquale, Carmine G.; Sajkov, Dimitar

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic lung disease (CLD), including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. Development of PH is associated with poor prognosis and may progress to right heart failure, however, in the majority of the patients with CLD, PH is mild to moderate and only a small number of patients develop severe PH. The pathophysiology of PH in CLD is multifactorial and includes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, small vessel destruction, and fibrosis. The effects of PH on the right ventricle (RV) range between early RV remodeling, hypertrophy, dilatation, and eventual failure with associated increased mortality. The golden standard for diagnosis of PH is right heart catheterization, however, evidence of PH can be appreciated on clinical examination, serology, radiological imaging, and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment of PH in CLD focuses on management of the underlying lung disorder and hypoxia. There is, however, limited evidence to suggest that PH-specific vasodilators such as phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, and prostanoids may have a role in the treatment of patients with CLD and moderate-to-severe PH. PMID:25165714

  14. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Yu, Yanan; Li, Bing; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Haixia; Zhao, Yijun; Shen, Chunti; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets. PMID:27221156

  15. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, YE; ZHANG, YINGYING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; YU, YANAN; LI, BING; WANG, PENGQIAN; LI, HAIXIA; ZHAO, YIJUN; SHEN, CHUNTI; WANG, ZHONG

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets. PMID:27221156

  16. Adult congenital heart disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension: the Texas Adult Congenital Heart Program experience.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Wayne J; Parekh, Dhaval R; Safdar, Zeenat

    2011-11-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a common structural defect of the heart or major blood vessels. Patients with adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) have medical needs that are distinct from those of pediatric patients with CHD, and the transition into adult health care is important for management of the patient with ACHD. A large proportion of patients with CHD develop diseases and complications associated with the long-term stress of intracardiac shunts. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a significant complication of some CHD lesions. The treatment of these patients remains challenging due to their combined heart and lung disease, and multidisciplinary care is ofen necessitated for a variety of secondary conditions. A number of treatment options are available for the management of PAH associated with CHD, including prostanoids, phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors, and endothelin receptor antagonists. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of such ACHD patients with PAH. PMID:22104452

  17. Can pulmonary vasodilator therapy expand the operative indications for congenital heart disease?

    PubMed

    Inai, Kei

    2015-01-01

    The operability of congenital heart disease with left to right shunt depends on the severity of the pulmonary vascular disease induced by the increased pulmonary blood flow. Although some recommendations exist regarding operative indications according to pathological, hemodynamic, and epidemiological factors, the evidence underlying these recommendations is not conclusive. Recently, oral pulmonary vasodilator therapy has been reported to improve outcomes in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and this therapy also appears to be effective in patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension, including those with postoperative pulmonary hypertension and Eisenmenger syndrome. It is expected that the availability of novel pulmonary vasodilator therapy will expand the operative indications in patients with congenital heart disease with left to right shunt, but there is currently insufficient evidence to definitively determine this. A multicenter double-blind study should be conducted to further examine this issue. PMID:25787792

  18. Pulmonary heart disease: The heart-lung interaction and its impact on patient phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Forfia, Paul R.; Vaidya, Anjali; Wiegers, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary heart disease (PHD) refers to altered structure or function of the right ventricle occurring in association with abnormal respiratory function. Although nearly always associated with some degree of PH, the degree, nature, severity, and causality of PH in relation to the PHD is not necessarily linear and direct. Abnormal gas exchange is a fundamental underpinning of PHD, affecting pulmonary vascular, cardiac, renal, and neurohormonal systems. Direct and indirect effects of chronic respiratory disease can disrupt the right ventricular-pulmonary arterial (RV-PA) interaction and, likewise, factors such as sympathetic nervous system activation, altered blood viscosity, and salt and water retention can function in a feedback loop to further influence RV-PA function. Left heart function may also be affected, especially in those with pre-existing left heart disease. Thus, the physiologic interactions between abnormal respiratory and cardiovascular function are complex, with PHD representing a heterogeneous end organ effect of an integrated multisystem process. In this review, we propose to separate PHD into two distinct entities, “Type I” and “Type II” PHD. Type I PHD is most common, and refers to subjects with chronic respiratory disease (CRD) where the perturbations in respiratory function dominate over more mild cardiac and circulatory disruptions. In contrast, Type II PHD refers to the smaller subset of patients with more severe pulmonary vascular and right heart dysfunction, whom often present in a fashion similar to patients with PAH. Phenotypic differences are not made by PA pressure alone, but instead by differences in the overall physiology and clinical syndrome. Thus, key differences can be seen in symptomatology, physical signs, cardiac imaging, hemodynamics, and the cardiovascular and gas exchange responses to exercise. Such key baseline differences in the overall physiologic phenotype are likely critical to predicting response to PH specific

  19. Postpartum Acute Pulmonary Oedema with Sub clinical Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    R, Padmaja; Gande, Sri Krishna Padma Challa Rao

    2015-02-01

    Acute dyspnea with pulmonary oedema in postpartum is uncommon but life-threatening event. Contributing factors for pulmonary oedema include, administration of tocolytics, underlying cardiac disease, iatrogenic fluid overload and preeclampsia acounting 0.08% of pregnancies. Pulmonary embolism, amniotic fluid embolism, pneumonia, aspiration and pulmonary oedema are some of the potentially devastating conditions that should be considered by the attending physician. Here, we report a case of postpartum acute pulmonary oedema referred to causality after an emergency caesarean section in a private hospital. No matter what the underlying pathology, prompt administration and appropriate resuscitation is always the first priority. Only after the patient has been stabilized attention must be turned to diagnosis and specific treatment. A diagnosis of severe Mitral Stenosis, probably of rheumatic origin was made after stabilizing the patient. PMID:25859501

  20. Factors affecting regional pulmonary blood flow in chronic ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pistolesi, M.; Miniati, M.; Bonsignore, M.; Andreotti, F.; Di Ricco, G.; Marini, C.; Rindi, M.; Biagini, A.; Milne, E.N.; Giuntini, C.

    1988-07-01

    To assess the effect of left heart disease on pulmonary blood flow distribution, we measured mean pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures, cardiac output, pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary blood volume, and arterial oxygen tension before and after treatment in 13 patients with longstanding ischemic heart failure and pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was evaluated by a radiographic score, and regional lung perfusion was quantified on a lung scan by the upper to lower third ratio (U:L ratio) of pulmonary blood flow per unit of lung volume. In all cases, redistribution of lung perfusion toward the apical regions was observed; this pattern was not affected by treatment. After treatment, pulmonary vascular pressures, resistance, and edema were reduced, while pulmonary blood volume did not change. At this time, pulmonary vascular resistance showed a positive correlation with the U:L ratio (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01), whereas no correlation was observed between U:L ratio and wedge pressure, pulmonary edema, or arterial oxygen tension. Hence, redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, in these patients, reflects chronic structural vascular changes prevailing in the dependent lung regions.

  1. Bronchial compression due to stent placement in pulmonary artery in a child with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Mónica; Beleña, José; Cabeza, Raúl; Beltrán, María

    2005-12-01

    Congenital heart disease, such as transposition of the great vessels (TGV), requires surgical procedures which can lead to important complications. We report on a case of bronchial obstruction following placement of a pulmonary artery stent in a 4-year-old boy who had undergone a Rastelli procedure to correct TGV, ventricular septal defect and pulmonary stenosis. There are many complications that can arise as a consequence of intravascular stents in heart surgery, as well as many causes of bronchial compression. However we have not found any report which describes bronchial compression as a direct consequence of endovascular stent. PMID:16324040

  2. Rare combination of congenital heart disease and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuki; Miyamoto, Takashi; Yoshitake, Shuichi; Naito, Yuji; Kobayashi, Tomio

    2015-10-01

    Here, we describe a case of total anomalous pulmonary venous return with coarctation of the aorta that was diagnosed as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis at autopsy in a male infant. Surgical repair was performed at 1 day of age, but the infant died on postoperative day 51 due to respiratory insufficiency without any evidence of pulmonary venous obstruction. He had been unexpectedly diagnosed with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and pulmonary hypoplasia on autopsy. Congenital pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a serious condition with a high mortality rate, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with a clinical picture of pulmonary venous obstruction, because most patients are unable to survive without proper treatment. In this report, we address specific issues that should be discussed in such cases based on our recent experience. PMID:26310609

  3. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Congenital Heart Disease and Eisenmenger Syndrome: Current Practice in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Frank, David B.; Hanna, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an uncommon but serious disease characterized by severe pulmonary vascular disease and significant morbidity and mortality. PAH associated with congenital heart disease (APAH-CHD) is one etiology of PAH that has innate characteristics delineating it from other forms of PAH. The patient with APAH-CHD presents with unique challenges consisting of not only pulmonary vascular disease but also the complexity of the cardiac lesion. Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) represents the severe end of the spectrum for disease in APAH-CHD. Over time, systemic-to-pulmonary shunting through cardiac defects increases pulmonary vascular resistance to levels significant enough to reverse shunting across the defect. Historically, ES patients have been reported to have better outcomes than IPAH despite similarities in pulmonary vascular disease. However, recent studies are challenging this notion. Nonetheless, APAH-CHD survival has improved with the advent of modern PAH targeted therapies. New therapeutic options have allowed us to reconsider the dogma of inoperability in APAH-CHD patients with unrepaired defects. Certainly advances have been made, however, investigators must continue to advance the field through controlled clinical trials in both adult and pediatric APAH-CHD patients. PMID:25604592

  4. Ubiquitous monitoring system for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Il Hyung; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Hee Chan

    2007-01-01

    The Purpose of this paper is to report a code division multiple access (CDMA) based wireless device that is able to measure pulse oxygen saturation(SpO2) and Electrocardiogram(ECG) during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart disease patients' daily life at home. Global Positioning System (GPS) and a specific database system are also included in this device to trace patient's location. Unlike the pre-reported devices using wireless network like Bluetooth or Zigbee which has a limited connection area, the developed system enables the literally ubiquitous service in reporting the patient's data to their doctors at any time and any place using the CDMA-based cellular phone network. PMID:18002798

  5. Assessment of operability of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Myers, Patrick O; Tissot, Cécile; Beghetti, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a common complication of congenital heart disease, and is now predominantly among patients with uncorrected left-to-right shunts. A growing population is characterized by persistent or recurrent PAH after surgical or interventional correction of left-to-right shunts; the latter having a worse prognosis than other forms of PAH associated with congenital heart disease. New treatments for PAH have been shown to be effective in improving PAH exercise capacity and hemodynamics, raising the hope for making previously inoperable congenital heart defects operable and shifting the framework for the assessment of operability. This review focuses on current methods for assessing operability in PAH associated with congenital heart disease, and the possibility of "treat-and-repair" vs. "repair-and-treat" strategies for patients with inoperable or borderline PAH. PMID:24225339

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ischemic heart disease comorbidity: overview of mechanisms and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Campo, Gianluca; Pavasini, Rita; Malagù, Michele; Mascetti, Susanna; Biscaglia, Simone; Ceconi, Claudio; Papi, Alberto; Contoli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    In the last few years, many studies focused their attention on the relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), showing that these diseases are mutually influenced. Many different biological processes such as hypoxia, systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, heightened platelet reactivity, arterial stiffness and right ventricle modification interact in the development of the COPD-IHD comorbidity, which therefore deserves special attention in early diagnosis and treatment. Patients with COPD-IHD comorbidity have a worst outcome, when compared to patients with only COPD or only IHD. These patients showed a significant increase on risk of adverse events and of hospital readmissions for recurrent myocardial infarction, heart failure, coronary revascularization, and acute exacerbation of COPD. Taken together, these complications determine a significant increase in mortality. In most cases death occurs for cardiovascular cause, soon after an acute exacerbation of COPD or a cardiovascular adverse event. Recent data regarding incidence, mechanisms and prognosis of this comorbidity, along with the development of new drugs and interventional approaches may improve the management and long-term outcome of COPD-IHD patients. The aim of this review is to describe the current knowledge on COPD-IHD comorbidity. Particularly, we focused our attention on underlying pathological mechanisms and on all treatment and strategies that may improve and optimize the clinical management of COPD-IHD patients. PMID:25645653

  7. Targeting the Mevalonate Cascade as a New Therapeutic Approach in Heart Disease, Cancer and Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Behzad; Wiechec, Emmilia; Ande, Sudharsana R; Sharma, Pawan; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Post, Martin; Freed, Darren H.; Hashemi, Mohammad; Shojaei, Shahla; Zeki, Amir A.; Ghavami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    The cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, also known as the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, is an essential cellular pathway that is involved in diverse cell functions. The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGCR) is the rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to MVA. Given its role in cholesterol and isoprenoid biosynthesis, the regulation of HMGCR has been intensely investigated. Because all cells require a steady supply of MVA, both the sterol (i.e. cholesterol) and non-sterol (i.e. isoprenoid) products of MVA metabolism exert coordinated feedback regulation on HMGCR through different mechanisms. The proper functioning of HMGCR as the proximal enzyme in the MVA pathway is essential under both normal physiologic conditions and in many diseases given its role in cell cycle pathways and cell proliferation, cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism, cell cytoskeletal dynamics and stability, cell membrane structure and fluidity, mitochondrial function, proliferation, and cell fate. The blockbuster statin drugs (‘statins’) directly bind to and inhibit HMGCR, and their use for the past thirty years has revolutionized the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular diseases, in particular coronary heart disease. Initially thought to exert their effects through cholesterol reduction, recent evidence indicates that statins also have pleiotropic immunomodulatory properties independent of cholesterol lowering. In this review we will focus on the therapeutic applications and mechanisms involved in the MVA cascade including Rho GTPase and Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling, statin inhibition of HMGCR, geranylgeranyltransferase (GGTase) inhibition, and farnesyltransferase (FTase) inhibition in cardiovascular disease, pulmonary diseases (e.g. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cancer. PMID:24582968

  8. Miliary nodules due to secondary pulmonary hemosiderosis in rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Gyanendra; Agarwal, Ritesh; Rohit, Manoj Kumar; Mahesh, Venkat; Vasishta, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-02-28

    Pulmonary hemosiderosis is defined as the clinical and functional consequence of iron overload of the lungs, which usually occurs due to recurrent intra-alveolar bleeding. It can manifest as miliary mottling and should be entertained in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with miliary nodules on chest radiography, especially those with mitral stenosis. The management of secondary pulmonary hemosiderosis secondary to valvular heart disease includes valvuloplasty and/or valve replacement. The radiological opacities may disappear with successful treatment of the underlying valvular disease in many patients. However, they may persist with no physiological impairment to the patient. Here, we present a 32-year-old man with mitral stenosis who presented with fever and miliary shadows on chest radiography, which was ultimately diagnosed as secondary pulmonary hemosiderosis. PMID:21390194

  9. Multimodality imaging in congenital heart disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    D'Alto, Michele; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Budts, Werner; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Di Salvo, Giovanni; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Festa, Pierluigi; Scognamiglio, Giancarlo; Rea, Gaetano; Ait Ali, Lamia; Li, Wei; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2016-06-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The present review aims to discuss the clinical applications of invasive and non-invasive diagnostic modalities and to describe the strengths and weaknesses of each technique. Chest radiograph is an inexpensive investigation providing information on pulmonary arterial and hilar dilatation, pruning of peripheral pulmonary arteries and cardiomegaly. Transthoracic two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is the most widely used imaging tool. It provides information on cardiac anatomy and an estimate of haemodynamics and biventricular remodelling and function. In addition, echocardiography is valuable in assessing prognosis and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. Structural and functional changes associated with CHD-PAH, mainly affecting the right ventricle and pulmonary circulation, may represent an ideal target for evaluation with cardiac magnetic resonance. This non-invasive imaging modality has a low biological impact. CT plays an important role for patients with limited echocardiographic windows and those who are unable to undergo MRI (claustrophobia, poor compliance, presence of a pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator). It is the modality of choice for detailed assessment of pulmonary vessel obstruction or thrombosis. Finally, heart catheterisation remains the gold standard for diagnosing and confirming PAH in patients with CHD and for shunt evaluation. The diagnostic assessment of CHD-PAH requires great expertise and a deep knowledge of both CHD and PAH pathophysiology and should take place in a tertiary centre, where multiple data can be appropriately integrated and applied clinically. PMID:27013702

  10. The Effects and Mechanism of Atorvastatin on Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Guo, Yi-Zhan; Zhang, Yi-Tao; Xue, Jiao-Jie; Chen, Zhi-Chong; Cheng, Shi-Yao; Ou, Mao-De; Cheng, Kang-Lin; Zeng, Wei-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (PH-LHD) is one of the most common forms of PH, termed group 2 PH. Atorvastatin exerts beneficial effects on the structural remodeling of the lung in ischemic heart failure. However, few studies have investigated the effects of atorvastatin on PH due to left heart failure induced by overload. Methods Group 2 PH was induced in animals by aortic banding. Rats (n = 20) were randomly divided into four groups: a control group (C), an aortic banding group (AOB63), an atorvastatin prevention group (AOB63/ATOR63) and an atorvastatin reversal group (AOB63/ATOR50-63). Atorvastatin was administered for 63 days after banding to the rats in the AOB63/ATOR63 group and from days 50 to 63 to the rats in the AOB63/ATOR50-63 group. Results Compared with the controls, significant increases in the mean pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary arteriolar medial thickening, biventricular cardiac hypertrophy, wet and dry weights of the right middle lung, percentage of PCNA-positive vascular smooth muscle cells, inflammatory infiltration and expression of RhoA and Rho-kinase II were observed in the AOB63 group, and these changes concomitant with significant decreases in the percentage of TUNEL-positive vascular smooth muscle cells. Treatment of the rats in the AOB63/ATOR63 group with atorvastatin at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day significantly decreased the mean pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary arteriolar medial thickness, inflammatory infiltration, percentage of PCNA-positive cells and pulmonary expression of RhoA and Rho-kinase II and significantly augmented the percentage of TUNEL-positive cells compared with the AOB63 group. However, only a trend of improvement in pulmonary vascular remodeling was detected in the AOB63/ATOR50-63 group. Conclusions Atorvastatin prevents pulmonary vascular remodeling in the PH-LHD model by down-regulating the expression of RhoA/Rho kinase, by inhibiting the

  11. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G D; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar; Adatia, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD. PMID:27076908

  12. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces

    PubMed Central

    del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G.; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G. D.; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S.; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD. PMID:27076908

  13. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries: role in lung and heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Mathieu-Costello, O.

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary capillaries have extremely thin walls to allow rapid exchange of respiratory gases across them. Recently it has been shown that the wall stresses become very large when the capillary pressure is raised, and in anaesthetised rabbits, ultrastructural damage to the walls is seen at pressures of 40 mm Hg and above. The changes include breaks in the capillary endothelial layer, alveolar epithelial layer, and sometimes all layers of the wall. The strength of the thin part of the capillary wall can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries results in a high-permeability form of oedema, or even frank haemorrhage, and is apparently the mechanism of neurogenic pulmonary oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. It also explains the exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage that occurs in all racehorses. Several features of mitral stenosis are consistent with stress failure. Overinflation of the lung also leads to stress failure, a common cause of increased capillary permeability in the intensive care environment. Stress failure also occurs if the type IV collagen of the capillary wall is weakened by autoantibodies as in Goodpasture's syndrome. Neutrophil elastase degrades type IV collagen and this may be the starting point of the breakdown of alveolar walls that is characteristic of emphysema. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries is a hitherto overlooked and potentially important factor in lung and heart disease.

  14. Pulmonary vascular disease in different types of congenital heart disease. Implications for interpretation of lung biopsy findings in early childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, S G

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular structure was studied by analysing serial reconstructions of the arterial pathways and random sections of tissue in the lungs of 16 children who died with different types of congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Cases of ventricular septal defect showed an appreciable increase in muscularity of both preacinar and intra-acinar (respiratory unit) arteries, and intimal proliferation was infrequent and mild. By contrast, cases of transposition of the great arteries with ventricular septal defect and atrioventricular septal defect showed an increase in preacinar muscularity, a short heavily muscularised arterial segment containing intimal proliferation at the entrance to the acinus, whereas the intra-acinar arteries beyond showed only a moderate increase in muscularity. In these children who were less than 1 year of age an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance was due to strategically placed small areas of intimal proliferation and not to widespread obliterative pulmonary vascular disease. The study demonstrated and explained differences in the appearance of the peripheral pulmonary arteries in different types of congenital heart disease, which help interpret the findings of lung biopsies. Images PMID:6498033

  15. Animal models related to congenital heart disease and clinical research in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Loukanov, Tsvetomir; Geiger, Ralf; Agrawal, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    There are several animal models for studying human pulmonary hypertension (PH). An increased flow model in pigs was developed at the University Hospital in Heidelberg in order to simulate congenital heart disease. The high pulmonary blood flow is achieved by installation of a Blalock-Taussig anastomosis. In order to further improve this model by adding a pressure component, the left pulmonary artery is ligated. An acute model, which is used at the Innsbruck Medical University, addresses another disease entity. Human meconium is placed deeply into the trachea of the pigs in order to induce an acute respiratory distress syndrome-like response in the lungs. Animals were randomly assigned to four treatment groups. Inhaled iloprost, due to its pulmonary and intrapulmonary selectivity, was the only substance that significantly reduced intrapulmonary shunt volumes. In humans, PH encompasses multiple disease subtypes. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) accounts for only 6% of PH cases, however, all existing treatments are indicated only for PAH. This means that for 94% of patients with PH, no specific medication is available. Therefore, huge efforts have been made to better understand the pathophysiology of PH and to detect new signalling pathways that may allow new compounds to be developed that will ultimately improve the prognosis of PAH and non-PAH PH patients. Promising new substances include riociguat, a stimulator of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), as well as cinaciguat, a sGC activator, and an elastase inhibitor. Riociguat (BAY 63-2521) is an oral agent that targets the intact/native form of sGC. It enhances the sensitivity of sGC to low levels of bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) and is also capable of stimulating native sGC independently of NO. Thus, unlike phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, the effect of riociguat is not limited by low NO levels. In a multicentre open-label phase II study, riociguat exerted strong and significant effects on pulmonary

  16. Severe heart failure, dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis in coeliac disease: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Banani; Shava, Upender; Srivastava, Anshu; Kapoor, Aditya

    2014-05-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory, multi-system disorder with protean manifestations which has been linked to various auto-immune-mediated disorders. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a rare extra-intestinal manifestation that is being recognised increasingly in patients with CD. Two cases of CD are described, an 18-year-old boy and a 13-year-old girl, both of whom presented with rapid onset of congestive heart failure and severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Upper limb venous thrombosis and recurrent haemoptysis secondary to pulmonary haemosiderosis in the second case were the other unusual features. The importance of CD screening of patients with DCM and pulmonary haemosiderosis is emphasised. PMID:24090525

  17. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  18. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  19. Correlations of lung morphology, pulmonary vascular resistance, and outcome in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, A; Busst, C M; Haworth, S G; Hislop, A A; Knight, W B; Corrin, B; Shinebourne, E A

    1988-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular resistance was measured in air, oxygen, and after administration of vasodilators in 14 children with pulmonary hypertension and congenital heart disease. Lung morphology was examined by light microscopy and assessed quantitatively. In this selected group of patients (a) medial muscle thickness of greater than 20% in the intra-acinar arteries and Heath-Edwards changes of I or II were significantly associated with perioperative death from pulmonary complications after cardiac surgery; (b) children with lower percentage medial muscle thickness had a higher baseline resistance (r = -0.84) associated with Heath-Edwards grade III or higher changes (most of these patients were not offered corrective surgery); (c) when the lowest pulmonary vascular resistance was less than 3 units, Heath-Edwards grading was I or II (n = 4). When the pulmonary vascular resistance was greater than 6 units, however, there was no direct correlation with Heath-Edwards grading (n = 9). Four patients with a resistance of greater than 6 units had only grade I or II changes. Three had a medial muscle thickness above 20%, and were among those who died at or soon after operation. It is concluded that (a) patients with a lowest pulmonary vascular resistance of greater than 6 units have a bad prognosis whatever their lung morphology; and (b) some patients with Heath-Edwards grade I or II will have a high resistance (this group has a high medial muscle mass and a poor prognosis and would not be detected by Heath-Edwards grading alone). PMID:3370183

  20. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  1. Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in patiens with heart failure and chronic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Temporelli, Pier Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of chronic heart failure (CHF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are well known. Each of these conditions has an important impact on quality of life and functional status and on healthcare consumption. Through shared risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms CHF and COPD coexist more frequently than expected from the respective populations observed by the pulmonologist or cardiologist. This has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. Several registry-based studies and post-hoc analyses of large randomized controlled trials evaluating COPD as a comorbidity in CHF outpatients have highlighted the negative prognostic impact of the comorbidity in terms of constraint in use of recommended treatments. Among them, the cardiopulmonary rehabilitation may play a significant role. Even in these patients, in fact, a rehabilitative approach focused on physical training programs can positively impact functional autonomy, exercise tolerance and quality of life. PMID:27374050

  2. Surgical strategies for patients with congenital heart disease and severe pulmonary hypertension in low/middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Sachin; Keshri, Vikas Kumar; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Juneja, Rajnish; Saxena, Anita; Kothari, Shyam Sunder; Airan, Balram

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss specific surgical strategies that are used in patients with congenital heart disease and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Our own experience, with the use of unidirectional valved patches in managing these patients, is also discussed in detail. PMID:27326218

  3. Evolving hybrid approaches: the preservation of the 'neglected' pulmonary valve function in patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Bacha, Emile; Stellin, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The involvement of the hemodynamic expertise in the operating room led to the development of new strategies aimed to improve both early and long-term outcome of patients with congenital heart disease. During the last decade, with the aim of preserving the pulmonary valve function, we embarked on a new surgical approach, which combines surgical and interventional techniques, which are performed in the operating room. We believe that the preservation of the pulmonary valve function can be extended to any patients with classic tetralogy of Fallot and other selected patients with congenital pulmonary valve hypoplasia and dysfunction. PMID:26950198

  4. Prevalence and profile of congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension in Down syndrome in a pediatric cardiology service

    PubMed Central

    Mourato, Felipe Alves; Villachan, Lúcia Roberta R.; Mattos, Sandra da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequence and profile of congenital heart defects in Down syndrome patients referred to a pediatric cardiologic center, considering the age of referral, gender, type of heart disease diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography and its association with pulmonary hypertension at the initial diagnosis. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with retrospective data collection of 138 patients with Down syndrome from a total of 17,873 records. Descriptive analysis of the data was performed, using Epi-Info version 7. RESULTS: Among the 138 patients with Down syndrome, females prevailed (56.1%) and 112 (81.2%) were diagnosed with congenital heart disease. The most common lesion was ostium secundum atrial septal defect, present in 51.8%, followed by atrioventricular septal defect, in 46.4%. Ventricular septal defects were present in 27.7%, while tetralogy of Fallot represented 6.3% of the cases. Other cardiac malformations corresponded to 12.5%. Pulmonary hypertension was associated with 37.5% of the heart diseases. Only 35.5% of the patients were referred before six months of age. CONCLUSIONS: The low percentage of referral until six months of age highlights the need for a better tracking of patients with Down syndrome in the context of congenital heart disease, due to the high frequency and progression of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25119745

  5. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with heart disease? What do my cholesterol and triglyceride numbers mean? How can I lower my cholesterol? ... weight Know your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides) You can reduce your chances of getting heart ...

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in children with congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD, PPHVD-CHD). Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Kozlik-Feldmann, Rainer; Hansmann, Georg; Bonnet, Damien; Schranz, Dietmar; Apitz, Christian; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) is a complex disease that presents with a broad spectrum of morphological and haemodynamic findings of varying severity. Recently, the aspect of paediatric pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PPHVD) has been introduced to expand the understanding of the full spectrum of pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Evaluation and treatment of PAH-CHD/PPHVD-CHD can be divided into in different topics. First, defining criteria for operability and initiation of advanced therapies preoperatively and postoperatively is an unresolved issue. Second, management of Eisenmenger syndrome is still an important question, with recent evidence on the severity of the disease and a more rapidly progressive course than previously described. Third, the Fontan circulation with no subpulmonary ventricle requires a distinct discussion, definition and classification since even a mild rise in pulmonary vascular resistance may lead to the so-called failing Fontan situation. Patients with CHD and single-ventricle physiology (Fontan/total cavopulmonary anastomosis) require a particularly stepwise and individualised approach. This consensus statement is on the current evidence for the most accurate evaluation and treatment of increased pulmonary artery pressure and resistance, as well as ventricular dysfunction, in children with congenital heart defects, and provides according practical recommendations. To optimise preoperative and postoperative management in patients with PAH-CHD, diagnostic and treatment algorithms are provided. PMID:27053697

  7. Repair of congenital heart disease with associated pulmonary hypertension in children: what are the minimal investigative procedures? Consensus statement from the Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Task Forces, Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Standardization of the diagnostic routine for children with congenital heart disease associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-CHD) is crucial, in particular since inappropriate assignment to repair of the cardiac lesions (e.g., surgical repair in patients with elevated pulmonary vascular resistance) may be detrimental and associated with poor outcomes. Thus, members of the Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute decided to conduct a survey aimed at collecting expert opinion from different institutions in several countries, covering many aspects of the management of PAH-CHD, from clinical recognition to noninvasive and invasive diagnostic procedures and immediate postoperative support. In privileged communities, the vast majority of children with congenital cardiac shunts are now treated early in life, on the basis of noninvasive diagnostic evaluation, and have an uneventful postoperative course, with no residual PAH. However, a small percentage of patients (older at presentation, with extracardiac syndromes or absence of clinical features of increased pulmonary blood flow, thus suggesting elevated pulmonary vascular resistance) remain at a higher risk of complications and unfavorable outcomes. These patients need a more sophisticated diagnostic approach, including invasive procedures. The authors emphasize that decision making regarding operability is based not only on cardiac catheterization data but also on the complete diagnostic picture, which includes the clinical history, physical examination, and all aspects of noninvasive evaluation. PMID:25006452

  8. Repair of congenital heart disease with associated pulmonary hypertension in children: what are the minimal investigative procedures? Consensus statement from the Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Task Forces, Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Antonio Augusto; Barst, Robyn J; Haworth, Sheila Glennis; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Ivy, Dunbar; Kashour, Tarek; Kumar, Krishna; Harikrishnan, S; D'Alto, Michele; Thomaz, Ana Maria; Zorzanelli, Leína; Aiello, Vera D; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Santana, Maria Virginia T; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Banjar, Hanaa; Tamimi, Omar; Heath, Alexandra; Flores, Patricia C; Diaz, Gabriel; Sandoval, Julio; Kothari, Shyam; Moledina, Shahin; Gonçalves, Rilvani C; Barreto, Alessandra C; Binotto, Maria Angélica; Maia, Margarida; Al Habshan, Fahad; Adatia, Ian

    2014-06-01

    Standardization of the diagnostic routine for children with congenital heart disease associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-CHD) is crucial, in particular since inappropriate assignment to repair of the cardiac lesions (e.g., surgical repair in patients with elevated pulmonary vascular resistance) may be detrimental and associated with poor outcomes. Thus, members of the Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute decided to conduct a survey aimed at collecting expert opinion from different institutions in several countries, covering many aspects of the management of PAH-CHD, from clinical recognition to noninvasive and invasive diagnostic procedures and immediate postoperative support. In privileged communities, the vast majority of children with congenital cardiac shunts are now treated early in life, on the basis of noninvasive diagnostic evaluation, and have an uneventful postoperative course, with no residual PAH. However, a small percentage of patients (older at presentation, with extracardiac syndromes or absence of clinical features of increased pulmonary blood flow, thus suggesting elevated pulmonary vascular resistance) remain at a higher risk of complications and unfavorable outcomes. These patients need a more sophisticated diagnostic approach, including invasive procedures. The authors emphasize that decision making regarding operability is based not only on cardiac catheterization data but also on the complete diagnostic picture, which includes the clinical history, physical examination, and all aspects of noninvasive evaluation. PMID:25006452

  9. Non-invasive estimation of pulmonary vascular resistance in patients of pulmonary hypertension in congenital heart disease with unobstructed pulmonary flow

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Arindam; Sarkar, Achyut; Ahmed, Imran; Naveen Chandra, GS; Patil, Shailesh Kumar; Kundu, Chanchal Kumar; Arora, Rahul; Samanta, Ajanta

    2014-01-01

    Context: Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) is a critical and essential parameter during the assessment and selection of modality of treatment in patients with congenital heart disease accompanied by pulmonary arterial hypertension. Aim: The present study was planned to evaluate non-invasive echocardiographic parameters to assess pulmonary vascular resistance. Settings and Design: This prospective observational study included 44 patients admitted in the cardiology and pediatric cardiology ward of our institution for diagnostic or pre-operative catheter based evaluation of pulmonary arterial pressure and PVR. Materials and Methods: Detailed echocardiographic evaluation was carried out including tricuspid regurgitation velocity (TRV) and velocity time integral of the right-ventricular outflow tract (VTIRVOT). These parameters were correlated with catheter-based measurements of PVR. Results: The TRV/VTIRVOT ratio correlated well with PVR measured at catheterization (PVRcath) (r = 0.896, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.816 to 0.9423, P < 0.001). Using the Bland-Altman analysis, PVR measurements derived from Doppler data showed satisfactory limits of agreement with catheterization estimated PVR. For a PVR of 6 Wood units (WU), a TRV/VTIRVOT value of 0.14 provided a sensitivity of 96.67% and a specificity of 92.86% (area under the curve 0.963, 95% confidence interval 0.858 to 0.997) and for PVR of 8 WU a TRV/VTIRVOT value of 0.17 provided a sensitivity of 79.17% and a specificity of 95% (area under the curve 0. 0.923, 95% confidence interval 0.801 to 0.982). Conclusions: Doppler-derived ratio of TRV/VTIRVOT is a simple, non-invasive index, which can be used to estimate PVR. PMID:24987253

  10. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Cineangiography in the Demonstration of Central Pulmonary Arteries in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Karuna; Sharma, Sanjiv; Kumar, Krishan; Rajani, Mira

    1996-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) for central pulmonary artery pathology in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) and right ventricular outflow obstruction. Methods: We compared contrast-enhanced CT and cine pulmonary arteriography in 24 patients with CCHD to assess central pulmonary arteries including the confluence. Both investigations were interpreted by a cardiac radiologist in a double-blinded manner at an interval of 3 weeks. Angiography was used as the gold standard for comparison. Results: The sensitivity for visualization of main pulmonary artery (MPA), right pulmonary artery (RPA), left pulmonary artery (LPA), and confluence on CT was 94%, 100%, 92.8%, and 92.8%, respectively. Diagnostic specificity for the same entities was 28.5%, 100%, 80%, and 50%, respectively. The positive predictive value for each was 76.2%, 100%, 94.1%, and 72.2%, respectively. The low specificity of CT in the evaluation of the MPA and the confluence is perhaps due to distorted right ventricular outflow anatomy in CCHD. Large aortopulmonary collaterals in this region were mistaken for the MPA in some patients with pulmonary atresia. Conclusion: CT is a useful, relatively noninvasive, imaging technique for the central pulmonary arteries in selected patients. It can supplement diagnostic information from angiography but cannot replace it. LPA demonstration on axial images alone is inadequate.

  11. Fractal correlation property of heart rate variability in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Tatiana D; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Fereira, Celso; Pitta, Fábio O; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo; Valenti, Vitor E; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2011-01-01

    Background It was reported that autonomic nervous system function is altered in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We evaluated short- and long-term fractal exponents of heart rate variability (HRV) in COPD subjects. Patients and methods We analyzed data from 30 volunteers, who were divided into two groups according to spirometric values: COPD (n = 15) and control (n = 15). For analysis of HRV indices, HRV was recorded beat by beat with the volunteers in the supine position for 30 minutes. We analyzed the linear indices in the time (SDNN [standard deviation of normal to normal] and RMSSD [root-mean square of differences]) and frequency domains (low frequency [LF], high frequency [HF], and LF/HF), and the short- and long-term fractal exponents were obtained by detrended fluctuation analysis. We considered P < 0.05 to be a significant difference. Results COPD patients presented reduced levels of all linear exponents and decreased short-term fractal exponent (alpha-1: 0.899 ± 0.18 versus 1.025 ± 0.09, P = 0.026). There was no significant difference between COPD and control groups in alpha-2 and alpha-1/alpha-2 ratio. Conclusion COPD subjects present reduced short-term fractal correlation properties of HRV, which indicates that this index can be used for risk stratification, assessment of systemic disease manifestations, and therapeutic procedures to monitor those patients. PMID:21311690

  12. Carvedilol, Bisoprolol, and Metoprolol Use in Patients With Coexistent Heart Failure and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Hu, Yu-Wen; Hung, Man-Hsin; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Chou, Kun-Ta; Yang, Kuang-Yao; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Beta (β)-blockers are under-prescribed in patients with heart failure (HF) and concurrent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to concerns about adverse pulmonary effects and a poor understanding of the effects of these drugs. We aimed to evaluate the survival effects of β-blockers in patients with coexistent HF and COPD. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we conducted a nationwide population-based study. Patients with coexistent HF and COPD diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 were enrolled. Doses of the 3 β-blockers proven to be beneficial to HF (carvedilol, bisoprolol, and metoprolol) during the study period were extracted. The primary endpoint was cumulative survival. Patients were followed until December 31, 2009. The study included 11,558 subjects, with a mean follow-up period of 4.07 years. After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities, and severity of HF and COPD, bisoprolol use showed a dose–response survival benefit [low dose: adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.59–0.97, P = 0.030; high dose: adjusted HR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.26–0.63, P < 0.001] compared with nonusers, whereas no survival difference was observed for carvedilol or metoprolol. Compared with patients with HF alone, this special HF + COPD cohort received significantly fewer targeted β-blockers (108.8 vs 137.3 defined daily doses (DDDs)/person-year, P < 0.001) and bisoprolol (57.9 vs 70.8 DDDs/person-year, P < 0.001). In patients with coexisting HF and COPD, this study demonstrated a dose–response survival benefit of bisoprolol use, but not of carvedilol or metoprolol use. PMID:26844454

  13. Carvedilol, Bisoprolol, and Metoprolol Use in Patients With Coexistent Heart Failure and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Hu, Yu-Wen; Hung, Man-Hsin; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Chou, Kun-Ta; Yang, Kuang-Yao; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-02-01

    Beta (β)-blockers are under-prescribed in patients with heart failure (HF) and concurrent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to concerns about adverse pulmonary effects and a poor understanding of the effects of these drugs. We aimed to evaluate the survival effects of β-blockers in patients with coexistent HF and COPD. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we conducted a nationwide population-based study. Patients with coexistent HF and COPD diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 were enrolled. Doses of the 3 β-blockers proven to be beneficial to HF (carvedilol, bisoprolol, and metoprolol) during the study period were extracted. The primary endpoint was cumulative survival. Patients were followed until December 31, 2009. The study included 11,558 subjects, with a mean follow-up period of 4.07 years. After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities, and severity of HF and COPD, bisoprolol use showed a dose-response survival benefit [low dose: adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.59-0.97, P = 0.030; high dose: adjusted HR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.26-0.63, P < 0.001] compared with nonusers, whereas no survival difference was observed for carvedilol or metoprolol. Compared with patients with HF alone, this special HF + COPD cohort received significantly fewer targeted β-blockers (108.8 vs 137.3 defined daily doses (DDDs)/person-year, P < 0.001) and bisoprolol (57.9 vs 70.8 DDDs/person-year, P < 0.001). In patients with coexisting HF and COPD, this study demonstrated a dose-response survival benefit of bisoprolol use, but not of carvedilol or metoprolol use. PMID:26844454

  14. Congenital heart disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension in South America (2013 Grover Conference series).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Antonio Augusto; Flores, Patricia C; Diaz, Gabriel F; Mesquita, Sonia M F

    2014-09-01

    South America is a territory of 17,819,100 km(2), where ∼388 million people live in 13 countries. In the region, access to medical assistance (e.g., for treatment of cardiovascular disorders) is relatively easy in metropolitan areas but difficult in remote places such as the Andes and the Amazon. Altitudes up to ∼6,700 m influence the prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In tertiary centers, CHD is now treated earlier in life but remains an important etiology of PAH. In adolescents and adults with PAH assisted at institutions devoted to treatment of cardiovascular disorders, the relative frequency of PAH-CHD (∼50%-60%) is even higher than that of idiopathic PAH. In one big tertiary center in São Paulo, Brazil, the prevalence of advanced PAH in children and adults with CHD is 1.2% and 4.2%, respectively. In young patients with cardiac septal defects (aged up to 2 years), pulmonary vascular abnormalities are a matter of concern in the decision about operability in 4.9% of cases. Access to specific PAH drugs is not uniform in South America, being unrealistic in remote places. In big cities, there are real possibilities for management of complex CHD, neonatal disorders, and even cardiac transplantation. Research activities have been implemented at clinical, translational, and basic levels. However, because of social and economic inequalities and political issues, access to best standards of medical care remains a problem in the region as a whole. PMID:25621150

  15. Short-term outcomes in heart failure patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the community

    PubMed Central

    O’Kelly, Noel; Robertson, William; Smith, Jude; Dexter, Jonathan; Carroll-Hawkins, Collette; Ghosh, Sudip

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish the short term outcomes of heart failure (HF) patients in the community who have concurrent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: We evaluated 783 patients (27.2%) with left ventricular systolic dysfunction under the care of a regional nurse-led community HF team between June 2007 and June 2010 through a database analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and one patients (12.9%) also had a diagnosis of COPD; 94% of patients were treated with loop diuretics, 83% with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, 74% with β-blockers; 10.6% with bronchodilators; and 42% with aldosterone antagonists. The mean age of the patients was 77.9 ± 5.7 years; 43% were female and mean New York Heart Association class was 2.3 ± 0.6. The mean follow-up was 28.2 ± 2.9 mo. β-blocker utilization was markedly lower in patients receiving bronchodilators compared with those not taking bronchodilators (overall 21.7% vs 81%, P < 0.001). The 24-mo survival was 93% in patients with HF alone and 89% in those with both comorbidities (P = not significant). The presence of COPD was associated with increased risk of HF hospitalization [hazard ratio (HR): 1.56; 95% CI: 1.4-2.1; P < 0.001] and major adverse cardiovascular events (HR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.03-1.75; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: COPD is a common comorbidity in ambulatory HF patients in the community and is a powerful predictor of worsening HF. It does not however appear to affect short-term mortality in ambulatory HF patients. PMID:22451854

  16. [Complementary treatment of acute heart failure in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or anemia].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Recio Iglesias, Jesús; Grau Amorós, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anemia are comorbidities with a high prevalence and impact in heart failure (HF). The presence of these comorbidities considerably worsens the prognosis of HF. Diabetic patients have a higher likelihood of developing symptoms of HF and both the treatment of diabetes and that of acute HF are altered by the coexistence of both entities. The glycemic targets in patients with acute HF are not well-defined, but could show a U-shaped relationship. Stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with HF could also have a deleterious effect on the medium-term prognosis. The inter-relationship between COPD and HF hampers diagnosis due to the overlap between the symptoms and signs of both entities and complementary investigations. The treatment of acute HF is also altered by the presence of COPD. Anemia is highly prevalent and is often the direct cause of decompensated HF, the most common cause being iron deficiency anemia. Iron replacement therapy, specifically intravenous forms, has helped to improve the prognosis of acute HF. PMID:24930086

  17. Effect of dual pulmonary vasodilator therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monfredi, Oliver; Heward, Elliot; Griffiths, Linda; Condliffe, Robin; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are managed according to evidence-based treatment guidelines. Methods and results In this single-centre retrospective analysis, we examined outcomes of patients with PAH caused by congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) with respect to exercise capacity and survival of adults treated with either bosentan or sildenafil monotherapy or bosentan-sildenafil dual therapy between January 2007 and January 2014. Of the 82 patients analysed, 29 had Down syndrome; 54 (65.8%) received bosentan monotherapy, 16 (19.5%) sildenafil monotherapy and 12 (14.6%) dual therapy. Mean treatment duration was 2.5 years for all patients and 4.1 years for 38 patients treated for ≥2 years. Pooled patient and treatment data showed initial improvement followed by stabilisation in mean 6 min walk distance (6MWD). For Down and non-Down patients, mean 6MWD increased and then stabilised on bosentan monotherapy. Mean 6MWD of patients on dual therapy at the time of analysis was 246.3 m before PAH-specific therapy initiation, 211.9 m immediately prior to addition of a second therapy and 214.4 m at last visit while on dual therapy. 1, 2 and 3-year survival rates for all patients from time of treatment initiation were 96%, 87% and 80%, respectively. Conclusions For the majority of patients, monotherapy with a PAH-specific medication provided improved and sustained exercise benefits. For the small percentage of patients who required it, add-on therapy appeared to prevent further deterioration in exercise capacity but did not improve 6MWD. PMID:27099763

  18. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... occlusive disease is an extremely rare disease that causes high blood pressure in the lung arteries ( pulmonary hypertension ). ... In most cases, the cause of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is ... arteries directly connected to the right side of the heart. The ...

  19. Salvia miltiorrhiza injection on pulmonary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Huang, Yuhong; Zhao, Caiyan; Qin, Xiude; Zhu, Qinghua; Chen, Sheng; Qu, Jinglai

    2014-01-01

    Cor pulmonale (pulmonary heart disease) is a chronic progressive complicated disease for which treatment needs to be sustained all the time, creating a great financial burden on individuals and society. In order to improve the life quality of cor pulmonale patients and decrease the dosage and quantity of the routine treatment, in China, TCM is often administered to patients with cor pulmonale. The results of many clinical trials have indicated that Salvia miltiorrhiza and complex Salvia miltiorrhiza injection may be an alternative medicine for cor pulmonale. With the purpose to prove whether Salvia miltiorrhiza and complex Salvia miltiorrhiza benefit the cor pulmonale patients, respectively, we carried out a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Salvia miltiorrhiza and complex Salvia miltiorrhiza injection in cor pulmonale patients. Overall, 2,715 patients were identified from 35 randomized controlled trials. The meta-analysis used I(2) test for heterogeneity and chose random or fixed model according to heterogeneity of included studies. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by total effectiveness rate, partial pressure of oxygen ( PaO 2) and carbon dioxide ( PaCO 2), hemorheology, mPAP and adverse effects. Compared with routine medicine treatment alone, routine medicine treatment plus Salvia miltiorrhiza or complex Salvia miltiorrhiza injection showed better outcomes: A significantly higher clinical effectiveness rate ratio (p < 0.001), increase in PaO 2 (p < 0.001) and decrease in PaCO 2 (p < 0.001), improvement in hemorheology (p < 0.001), and alleviation in mPAP (p < 0.05). There is no obvious adverse effect reported. In summary, there are some evidences suggesting that Salvia miltiorrhiza or complex Salvia miltiorrhiza injection are active in cor pulmonale, however, the results were limited by the methodological flaws of the included studies. Long-term and high quality clinical trials are needed to provide more conclusive evidence for the future

  20. The role of heart rate variability in assessing the evolution of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Handa, Ramona; Poanta, Laura; Rusu, D; Albu, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (CPOD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Cardiovascular involvement is the most common complication of the disease. Abnormalities of autonomic system, caused by this involvement, can lead to cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. An important tool in assessing the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is the measurement of heart rate variability (HRV). In this article we systematically review the literature that addresses the role of heart rate variability as a maker of clinical evolution in patients with COPD. We focused on correlations between heart rate variability and pulmonary, muscular, cognitive and functional impairment. Heart rate variability has proven an important tool in assessing the cardiac function, the respiratory function, the muscular force, the cognitive capacity and the life quality of these patients. Until recently the problem of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in patients with COPD could be identified only by invasive measures. At present the simple measuring of HRV is used as a noninvasive method in assessing the cardiac problems of these patients. HRV can be correlated with the severity of the disease, knowing that a dysfunction in autonomic nervous system can lead to potential fatal arrhythmias. Understanding the role of HRV in the evolution of COPD could be important in clinical practice and should be used more frequently. PMID:22788096

  1. Assessment of Pulmonary Artery Stiffness of Repaired Congenital Heart Disease Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Namheon; Banerjee, Rajit; Taylor, Michael; Hor, Kan

    2012-10-01

    Surgical correction or palliation of congenital heart disease (CHD) often requires augmenting the main pulmonary artery (MPA) with non-native material or placing a cylindrical graft. The degree to which this intervention affects PA compliance is largely unknown. In this study, the MPA stiffness characteristics were assessed by its compliance, distensibility, and pressure-strain modulus. Coregistered velocity encoded phase-contrast MRI and cardiac catheterization data were available for a cohort of repaired CHD patients (n=8) and controls (n=3). All patients were repaired with either an RV-PA conduit or a RV outflow tract patch. We measured the MPA area change by MRI and MPA pressure during the cath. The measurements were taken through or just distal to the conduit. The MPA compliance and distensibility for the patients were significantly lower than the controls: compliance (9.8±10.8 vs 28.3±7.7mm^2/mmHg, p<0.05), distensibility (2.2±1.5 vs 6.6±2.1%Area change/mmHg, p=0.05). The patients had a significantly higher pressure-strain modulus (152.3±116.4mmHg, p<0.05) than the controls (35.8±10.6mmHg). The abnormally elevated PA stiffness due to the rigidity of the conduit or patch material may cause a compliance mismatch resulting in high stress levels contributing to the observed progressive PA dilatation. This may be a factor in the progressive RV dilatation seen in this cohort of repaired CHD patients.

  2. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women. Coronary heart ...

  3. Palliative Senning in the Treatment of Congenital Heart Disease with Severe Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    da Penha, Juliano Gomes; Zorzanelli, Leina; Barbosa-Lopes, Antonio Augusto; Atik, Edimar; Miana, Leonardo Augusto; Tanamati, Carla; Caneo, Luiz Fernando; Miura, Nana; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Jatene, Marcelo Biscegli

    2015-01-01

    Background Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is the most common cyanotic cardiopathy, with an incidence ranging between 0.2 and 0.4 per 1000 live births. Many patients not treated in the first few months of life may progress with severe pulmonary vascular disease. Treatment of these patients may include palliative surgery to redirect the flow at the atrial level. Objective Report our institutional experience with the palliative Senning procedure in children diagnosed with TGA and double outlet right ventricle with severe pulmonary vascular disease, and to evaluate the early and late clinical progression of the palliative Senning procedure. Methods Retrospective study based on the evaluation of medical records in the period of 1991 to 2014. Only patients without an indication for definitive surgical treatment of the cardiopathy due to elevated pulmonary pressure were included. Results After one year of follow-up there was a mean increase in arterial oxygen saturation from 62.1% to 92.5% and a mean decrease in hematocrit from 49.4% to 36.3%. Lung histological analysis was feasible in 16 patients. In 8 patients, pulmonary biopsy grades 3 and 4 were evidenced. Conclusion The palliative Senning procedure improved arterial oxygen saturation, reduced polycythemia, and provided a better quality of life for patients with TGA with ventricular septal defect, severe pulmonary hypertension, and poor prognosis. PMID:26559982

  4. [Clinicopathogenetic features of coronary heart disease combined with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and efficiency of therapy with trimetazidin].

    PubMed

    Kolomoets, N M; Baksheev, V I; Uvaĭsova, K U

    2008-01-01

    Based on retrospective analysis of 2446 in-patient cards, autopsy protocols, outpatient medical documentation, prevalence and features of clinical manifestation of cardiorespiratory pathology (CRP): coronary heart disease (CHD) combined with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)--1 stage of study, and also (after randomization and forming of main and control groups), efficiency of myocardial cytoprotector trimetazidin (TMZ) at its long-term use (1 year) in combined therapy (2 stage of study): 135 CHD patients (stable exertional angina functional class II-III: 92 and 43 persons respectively) with COPD of medium severe (111 persons) and severe course (24 persons), were studied. It is shown that CRP is prevailed in elder age groups (after 45 years) and noticed in 56.7% CHD patients. More sevenre course with great risk of myocardial infarction with Q wave (twice, p < 0.001), prolongation of painless ischemia (62.4+/-11.5 min/day vs. 22.8+/-11.1 min/day), inclination to complicated rhythm disturbances (38 vs. 21.9, p < 0.05) and earlier clinical manifestations of heart failure (4.3+/-0.6 years earlier, p < 0.001) is typical for CHD with COPD vs. patients without pulmonary pathology. In one year after beginning of treatment with TMZ (35 mg) number of weekly pain attacks was decreased in patients of 1st group vs. 2nd group (at the average -50.8% -29.3% vs. +12.5% +16.6% respectively); significant (p < 0.05) decrease in duration of painless myocardial ischemia was registered. Decrease in number of supraventricular and ventricular extrasystoles (42.7+/-1.48 vs. 20.5+/-1.07 cases in a day, a < 0.0001), significant (p < 0.05) increase in ejection fraction and decrease in left ventricle end-diastolic volume (12.2+/-0.4% E 12.2+/-0.3% respectively), in dimensions of left (10.9+/-0.03%) and right (8.8+/-0.9%) atrium, in risk of development of acute coronary syndrome were noticed in the patients of main group received TMZ. Thus, long-term (not less then 1 year) use of TMZ

  5. The Diastolic Pulmonary Gradient (DPG) does not Predict Survival in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension due to Left Heart Disease (PH-LHD)

    PubMed Central

    Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Leary, Peter J; Selby, Van N; De Marco, Teresa A; Cappola, Thomas P; Felker, Michael G; Russell, Stuart D.; Kasper, Edward K.; Tedford, Ryan J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate if diastolic pulmonary gradient (DPG) can predict survival in patients with pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (PH-LHD). Background Patients with combined post- and pre-capillary PH-LHD have worse prognosis than those with passive pulmonary hypertension. The transpulmonary gradient (TPG) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) have commonly been used to identify high-risk patients. However, these parameters have significant shortcomings and do not always correlate with pulmonary vasculature remodeling. Recently, it has been suggested that DPG may be better marker, yet its prognostic ability in patients with cardiomyopathy has not been fully assessed. Methods A retrospective cohort of 1236 patients evaluated for unexplained cardiomyopathy at Johns Hopkins Hospital was studied. All patients underwent right heart catheterization and were followed until death, cardiac transplantation or the end of the study period (mean time 4.4 years). The relationships between DPG, TPG or PVR and survival in subjects with PH-LHD (n=469) were evaluated with Cox Proportional Hazards Regression and Kaplan Meier analyses. Results DPG was not significantly associated with mortality (HR 1.02; p=0.10) in PH-LHD whereas elevated TPG and PVR predicted death (HR 1.02, p=0.046 and HR 1.11, p=0.002, respectively). Similarly, DPG did not differentiate survivors from non-survivors at any selected cutpoints including a DPG of 7mmHg. Conclusions In this retrospective study of patients with cardiomyopathy and PH-LHD, an elevated DPG was not associated with worse survival. PMID:25453535

  6. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE WITH INCREASED PULMONARY BLOOD FLOW: LESSONS FROM THE NEONATAL LAMB

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases associated with increased pulmonary blood flow commonly lead to the development of pulmonary hypertension. However, most patients who undergo histological evaluation have advanced pulmonary hypertension, and therefore it has been difficult to investigate aberrations in signaling cascades that precede the development of overt vascular remodeling. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role played by oxidative and nitrosative stress in the lung and their impact on the signaling pathways that regulate vasodilation, vessel growth and vascular remodeling in the neonatal lung exposed to increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:22293025

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000091.htm Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common lung disease. Having COPD ...

  8. The Relationship of Metabolic Syndrome with Stress, Coronary Heart Disease and Pulmonary Function - An Occupational Cohort-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Nowobilski, Roman; Dropinski, Jerzy; Kotula-Horowitz, Katarzyna; Laskowicz, Bartosz; Stanisz, Andrzej; Lelakowski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Higher levels of stress impact the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease. The association between MetS, impaired pulmonary function and low level of physical activity is still pending assessment in the subjects exposed to stress. The study aimed to examine whether higher levels of stress might be related to MetS and the plaque presence, as well as whether MetS might affect pulmonary function. Design and Methods The study embraced 235 police officers (mean age 40.97 years) from the south of Poland. The anthropometrics and biochemical variables were measured; MetS was diagnosed using the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Computed tomography coronary angiography of coronary arteries, exercise ECG, measurements of brachial flow-mediated dilation, and carotid artery intima-media thickness were completed. In order to measure the self-perception of stress, 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) was applied. Pulmonary function and physical activity levels were also addressed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to determine the relationships between: 1/ incidence of coronary plaque and MetS per se, MetS components and the number of classical cardiovascular risk factors, 2/ perceived stress and MetS, 3/ MetS and pulmonary function parameters. Results Coronary artery atherosclerosis was less associated with MetS (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.24–5.52; p = 0.011) than with a co-existence of classical cardiovascular risk factors (OR = 5.67, 95% CI 1.07–29.85, p = 0.03; for 3 risk factors and OR = 9.05; 95% CI 1.24–66.23, p = 0.02; for 6 risk factors, respectively). Perceived stress increased MetS prevalence (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03–1.13; p = 0.03), and impacted coronary plaque prevalence (OR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.001–1.10; p = 0.04). Leisure-time physical activity reduced the chances of developing MetS (OR = 0.98 95% CI 0.96–0.99; p = 0.02). MetS subjects had significantly lower values of certain

  9. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  10. Medication regimen complexity and readmissions after hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Karam, Nada; Bradford, Chad; Lor, Kajua B; Barnett, Mitchell; Ha, Michelle; Rizos, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Readmission rate is increasingly being viewed as a key indicator of health system performance. Medication regimen complexity index scores may be predictive of readmissions; however, few studies have examined this potential association. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether medication regimen complexity index is associated with all-cause 30-day readmission after admission for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: This study was an institutional review board–approved, multi-center, case–control study. Patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were randomly selected for inclusion. Patients were excluded if they discharged against medical advice or expired during their index visit. Block randomization was utilized for equal representation of index diagnosis and site. Discharge medication regimen complexity index scores were compared between subjects with readmission versus those without. Medication regimen complexity index score was then used as a predictor in logistic regression modeling for readmission. Results: Seven hundred and fifty-six patients were randomly selected for inclusion, and 101 (13.4%) readmitted within 30 days. The readmission group had higher medication regimen complexity index scores than the no-readmission group (p < 0.01). However, after controlling for demographics, disease state, length of stay, site, and medication count, medication regimen complexity index was no longer a significant predictor of readmission (odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.97–1.01) or revisit (odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02). Conclusion: There is little evidence to support the use of medication regimen complexity index in readmission prediction when other measures are available. Medication regimen complexity index may lack

  11. PULMONARY ARTERIAL DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH RIGHT-SIDED CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY AND CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE IN ZOO MAMMALS HOUSED AT 2,100 M ABOVE SEA LEVEL.

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, Carles; Martínez, Liliana Sofía; Rosas-Rosas, Arely G; Parás, Alberto; Martínez, Osvaldo; Hernández, Alejandra; Garner, Michael M

    2015-12-01

    Subacute and chronic mountain sickness of humans and the related brisket disease of cattle are characterized by right-sided congestive heart failure in individuals living at high altitudes as a result of sustained hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Adaptations to high altitude and disease resistance vary among species, breeds, and individuals. The authors conducted a retrospective survey of right-sided cardiac hypertrophy associated with pulmonary arterial hypertrophy or arteriosclerosis in zoo mammals housed at Africam Safari (Puebla, México), which is located at 2,100 m above sea level. Seventeen animals with detailed pathology records matched the study criterion. Included were 10 maras (Dolichotis patagonum), 2 cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus oedipus), 2 capybaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris), and 1 case each of Bennet's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus), nilgai antelope (Boselaphus tragocamelus), and scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah). All had right-sided cardiac hypertrophy and a variety of arterial lesions restricted to the pulmonary circulation and causing arterial thickening with narrowing of the arterial lumen. Arterial lesions most often consisted of medial hypertrophy or hyperplasia of small and medium-sized pulmonary arteries. All maras also had single or multiple elevated plaques in the pulmonary arterial trunk consisting of fibrosis, accompanied by chondroid metaplasia in some cases. Both antelopes were juvenile and died with right-sided congestive heart failure associated with severe pulmonary arterial lesions. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of cardiac and pulmonary arterial disease in zoo mammals housed at high altitudes. PMID:26667539

  12. Delineating the angiogenic gene expression profile before pulmonary vascular remodeling in a lamb model of congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Fratz, Sohrab; Hou, Yali; Lu, Qing; Görlach, Agnes; Hess, John; Schreiber, Christian; Datar, Sanjeev A.; Oishi, Peter; Nechtman, John; Podolsky, Robert; She, Jin-Xiong; Fineman, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Disordered angiogenesis is implicated in pulmonary vascular remodeling secondary to congenital heart diseases (CHD). However, the underlying genes are not well delineated. We showed previously that an ovine model of CHD with increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF, Shunt) has an “angiogenesis burst” between 1 and 4 wk of age. Thus we hypothesized that the increased PBF elicited a proangiogenic gene expression profile before onset of vessel growth. To test this we utilized microarray analysis to identify genes that could be responsible for the angiogenic response. Total RNA was isolated from lungs of Shunt and control lambs at 3 days of age and hybridized to Affymetrix gene chips for microarray analyses (n = 8/group). Eighty-nine angiogenesis-related genes were found to be upregulated and 26 angiogenesis-related genes downregulated in Shunt compared with control lungs (cutting at 1.2-fold difference, P < 0.05). We then confirmed upregulation of proangiogenic genes FGF2, Angiopoietin2 (Angpt2), and Birc5 at mRNA and protein levels and upregulation of ccl2 at mRNA level in 3-day Shunt lungs. Furthermore, we found that pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) isolated from fetal lambs exhibited increased expression of FGF2, Angpt2, Birc5, and ccl2 and enhanced angiogenesis when exposed to elevated shear stress (35 dyn/cm2) compared with cells exposed to more physiological shear stress (20 dyn/cm2). Finally, we demonstrated that blocking FGF2, Angpt2, Birc5, or ccl2 signaling with neutralizing antibodies or small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreased the angiogenic response induced by shear stress. In conclusion, we have identified a “proangiogenic” gene expression profile in a lamb model of CHD with increased PBF that precedes onset of pulmonary vascular remodeling. Our data indicate that FGF2, Angpt2, Birc5, and ccl2 may play important roles in the angiogenic response. PMID:20978110

  13. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart disease is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Congenital heart disease (CHD) can describe a number of different problems affecting the heart. It is the most common ...

  14. Heart rate recovery is an important predictor of outcomes in patients with connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Minai, Omar A; Nguyen, Quyen; Mummadi, Srinivas; Walker, Esteban; McCarthy, Kevin; Dweik, Raed A

    2015-09-01

    Reduced heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise is associated with increased mortality in cardiac and pulmonary diseases. We sought to evaluate the association between HRR after the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and outcomes in patients with connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary hypertension (CTD-PH). Data were obtained by review of the medical records. HRR was defined as the difference in heart rate at the end of the 6MWT and after 1 minute (HRR1), 2 minutes (HRR2), and 3 minutes (HRR3) of rest. All patients with pulmonary hypertension and a diagnosis of systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or mixed connective tissue disease who underwent the 6MWT between August 1, 2009, and October 30, 2011, were included (n = 66). By Kaplan-Meier analysis, HRR1, HRR2, and HRR3 at different cutoff points were all good predictors, with HRR1 of <16 being the best predictor of time to clinical worsening (log-rank P < 0.0001), hospitalization (log-rank P = 0.0001), and survival (log-rank P < 0.003). By proportional hazards regression, patients with HRR1 of <16 were at increased risk of clinical worsening (hazard ratio [HR]: 6.4 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.6-19.2]; P < 0.0001], hospitalization (HR: 6.6 [95% CI: 2.4-23]; P < 0.0001), and death (HR: 4.5 [95% CI: 1.6-15.7]; P = 0.003). Patients in the highest tercile (HRR1 of ≥19) were unlikely to have a clinical worsening event (HR: 0.1 [95% CI: 0.04-0.5]; P = 0.001], to be hospitalized (HR: 0.1 [95% CI: 0.02-0.5]; P = 0.001), or to die (HR: 0.3 [95% CI: 0.07-0.9]; P = 0.04]. In conclusion, in patients with CTD-PH, abnormal HRR1 (defined as HRR1 of <16) after the 6MWT is a strong predictor of clinical worsening, time to clinical worsening, survival, and hospitalization. PMID:26401258

  15. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. In fact, coronary heart disease (CHD)—the most common type of heart ... heart information http://womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/heart-disease.html New Heart Guidelines Released; Talk to ...

  16. Insight into Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Congenital Heart Disease (PAH-CHD): Classification and Pharmacological Management from a Pediatric Cardiological Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Chen; Dai, Zen-Kong

    2015-01-01

    Compared with adult patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH), pulmonary vascular disease is characterized by complex heterogeneity in pediatric patients. The Nice PH classification does not completely characterize or individualize any subgroup of pediatric PH. This is in contrast to the Panama classification, in which prenatal and fetal origins of many pulmonary vascular diseases in neonates and children, perinatal pulmonary vascular maladaptation, prenatal and postnatal pulmonary vascular mal-development, and pulmonary vascular hypoplasia are included. Currently, the updated treatment algorithm for adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including PAH associated with congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) and idiopathic PAH, etc. has been reported. It has been suggested to treat FC III patients with Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) with bosentan. However, there is no evidence-based treatment algorithm for children with PAH-CHD. Moreover, it is necessary to develop a more comprehensive algorithm in which multiple specific pediatric risk factors are determined, and the critical goal of treatment should be to permit normal activities without the need to self-limit in children with PAH-CHD. Together, the beneficial data on specific-target pharmacologic interventions are still quite preliminary, and large trials are warranted. Specifically, the extrapolation of the other forms of the disease, such as ES, should be undertaken carefully. PMID:27122915

  17. Building consensus for provision of breathlessness rehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Man, William D-C; Chowdhury, Faiza; Taylor, Rod S; Evans, Rachael A; Doherty, Patrick; Singh, Sally J; Booth, Sara; Thomason, Davey; Andrews, Debbie; Lee, Cassie; Hanna, Jackie; Morgan, Michael D; Bell, Derek; Cowie, Martin R

    2016-08-01

    The study aimed to gain consensus on key priorities for developing breathlessness rehabilitation services for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Seventy-four invited stakeholders attended a 1-day conference to review the evidence base for exercise-based rehabilitation in COPD and CHF. In addition, 47 recorded their views on a series of statements regarding breathlessness rehabilitation tailored to the needs of both patient groups. A total of 75% of stakeholders supported symptom-based rather than disease-based rehabilitation for breathlessness with 89% believing that such services would be attractive for healthcare commissioners. A total of 87% thought patients with CHF could be exercised using COPD training principles and vice versa. A total of 81% felt community-based exercise training was safe for patients with severe CHF or COPD, but only 23% viewed manual-delivered rehabilitation an effective alternative to supervised exercise training. Although there was strong consensus that exercise training was a core component of rehabilitation in CHF and COPD populations, only 36% thought that this was the 'most important' component, highlighting the need for psychological and other non-exercise interventions for breathlessness. Patients with COPD and CHF face similar problems of breathlessness and disability on a background of multi-morbidity. Existing pulmonary and cardiac rehabilitation services should seek synergies to provide sufficient flexibility to accommodate all patients with COPD and CHF. Development of new services could consider adopting a patient-focused rather than disease-based approach. Exercise training is a core component, but rehabilitation should include other interventions to address dyspnoea, psychological and education needs of patients and needs of carers. PMID:27072018

  18. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ... Some people who have diabetic heart disease have no signs or symptoms of ...

  19. Noninvasive assessment of elevated pulmonary vascular resistance in children with pulmonary hypertension secondary to congenital heart disease: A comparative study between five different Doppler indices

    PubMed Central

    Roushdy, Alaa Mahmoud; Ragab, Iman; Abd el Raouf, Wessam

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) is an important hemodynamic parameter in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Noninvasive estimation of PVR represents an attractive alternative to invasive measurements. Methods The study included 175 patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to CHD. All patients underwent full echocardiographic study and invasive hemodynamic measurements. The study population was then subdivided into four subgroups. Each of the following Doppler indices was measured in one of these four subgroups: peak tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV), the ratio of the TRV to the velocity time integral of the right ventricular outflow tract (TRV/TVIRVOT), peak velocity of tricuspid annular systolic motion (TSm), heart rate corrected acceleration time and infliction time of the proximal left pulmonary artery (ATc, InTc). The data obtained was correlated with invasive PVR measurement. An ROC curve analysis was done to generate cutoff points with the highest balanced sensitivity and specificity to predict PVR > 6WU/m2. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were compared with each other to determine the most reliable cutoff point in predicting elevated PVR > 6WU/m2. Results There was a significant correlation between both the TRV and TSm and invasive measurement of PVR (r = −0.511, 0.387 and P value = 0.0002, 0.006 respectively). The TSm and TRV cutoff values were the most reliable to predict elevated PVR > 6 WU/m2. A TSm cutoff value of ⩽16.16 cm/s provided the best balanced sensitivity (85.7%) and specificity (66.7%) to determine PVRCATH > 6 WU/m2. A cutoff value less than 7.62 cm/s had 100% specificity to predict PVRCATH > 6 WU/m2. A TRV cutoff value of >3.96 m/s provided the best balanced sensitivity (66.7%) and specificity (100%) to determine PVRCATH > 6 WU/m2. Both TRV and TSm had the highest area under the ROC curve among the 5 DOPPLER indices studied. Conclusion Prediction of elevated

  20. Pulmonary artery closure in combination with patch technique for treating congenital heart disease combined with large patent ductus arteriosus: A clinical study of 9 cases

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bing; Yang, Junya; Liu, Huiruo; Jiao, Zhouyang; Zhao, Wenzeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To document clinical experience of treating congenital heart disease combined with large patent ductus arteriosus with pulmonary artery closure in combination with patch technique. Methods: Thirty-six patients (8 males and 28 females) who suffered from congenital heart disease and underwent hybrid surgery in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from October 2010 to February 2014 were selected for this study. They aged 14 to 39 years and weighed 32.20 to 61.50 kg. Diameter of arterial duct was between 10 mm and 13 mm; 28 cases were tube type, 4 cases were funnel type and four cases were window type. All patients had moderate or severe pulmonary arterial hypertension; besides, there were 28 cases of ventricular septal defect, 16 cases of atrial septal defect, eight cases of aortic insufficiency, four cases of mitral stenosis and insufficiency and four cases of infectious endocarditis. Cardz Pulmonary Bypass (CPB) was established after chest was opened along the middle line. With the help of Transesophageal echocardiography, large patent ductus arteriosus was blocked off through pulmonary artery. Pulmonary artery was cut apart after blocking of heart. Large patent ductus arteriosus on the side of pulmonary artery was strengthened with autologous pericardial patch. Results: Of 36 patients, 32 patients had patent ductus arteriosus closure device and four patients had atrial septal defect closure device. Pulmonary arteries of 36 cases were all successfully closed. Systolic pressure declined after closure ((54.86±19.23) mmHg vs (96.05±23.07) mmHg, p<0.05); average pulmonary arterial pressure also declined after closure ((39.15±14.83) mmHg vs (72.88±15.76) mmHg, p<0.05). The patients were followed up for one to fifty one months (average 11.5 months). Compared to before surgery, left atrial diameter, left ventricular diameter and pulmonary artery diameter all narrowed after surgery. Besides, clinical symptoms were relieved and cardiac

  1. Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Replacement in a Carcinoid Heart

    PubMed Central

    Loyalka, Pranav; Schechter, Michael; Nascimbene, Angelo; Raman, Ajay Sundara; Ilieascu, Cezar A.; Gregoric, Igor D.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid heart disease presents as right-sided heart failure attributable to the dysfunction of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves. Although surgical valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment when patients become symptomatic, it is associated with substantial perioperative mortality rates. We present a case of severe pulmonary valve stenosis secondary to carcinoid heart disease, treated successfully with percutaneous valve replacement. A 67-year-old man with severe pulmonary valve stenosis was referred to our center for pulmonary valve replacement. The patient had a history of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor of the small bowel with carcinoid syndrome, carcinoid heart disease, and tricuspid valve regurgitation previously treated with surgical valve replacement. Because of the patient's severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hostile chest anatomy seen on a computed tomographic scan dating from previous cardiothoracic surgery, we considered off-label percutaneous valve replacement a viable alternative to open-heart surgery. A 29-mm Edwards Sapien XT valve was successfully deployed over the native pulmonary valve. There were no adverse sequelae after the procedure, and the patient was discharged from the hospital the next day. This case report shows that percutaneous valve replacement can be a valid option in carcinoid heart disease patients who are not amenable to surgical valve replacement. PMID:27547148

  2. Challenges in the Management of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Chichra, Astha; Nguyen, Vinh Q; Gadiraju, Taraka V; Le Jemtel, Thierry H

    2016-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) commonly coexist in clinical practice. The prevalence of COPD among HFrEF patients ranges from 20 to 32 %. On the other hand; HFrEF is prevalent in more than 20 % of COPD patients. With an aging population, the number of patients with coexisting COPD and HFrEF is on rise. Coexisting COPD and HFrEF presents a unique diagnostic and therapeutic clinical conundrum. Common symptoms shared by both conditions mask the early referral and detection of the other. Beta blockers (BB), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and aldosterone antagonists have been shown to reduce hospitalizations, morbidity, and mortality in HFrEF while long-acting inhaled bronchodilators (beta-2-agonists and anticholinergics) and corticosteroids have been endorsed for COPD treatment. The opposing pharmacotherapy of BBs and beta-2-agonists highlight the conflict in prescribing BBs in COPD and beta-2-agonists in HFrEF. This has resulted in underutilization of evidence-based therapy for HFrEF in COPD patients owing to fear of adverse effects. This review aims to provide an update and current perspective on diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients with coexisting COPD and HFrEF. PMID:26780914

  3. Correlation between congenital heart disease complicated with pulmonary artery hypertension and circulating endothelial cells as well as endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Qiu, Jun; Pan, Min; Zheng, Dongdong; Su, Yamin; Wei, Meifang; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei; Zhu, Jiahua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes in the level of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in peripheral venous blood of the patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) complicated with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), and research on their effects in the onset and progress of CHD complicated with PAH. Methods: A case-control study including 30 cases of healthy controls, 15 cases of left-to-right shunt CHD without PAH, 26 cases of CHD complicated with mild PAH, and 17 cases of CHD complicated with moderate-severe PAH was performed. We used flow cytometry to measure the percentage of CECs accounting for nucleated cells in whole blood, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the level of ET-1 in serum. The differences of above-mentioned biomarkers between different groups were compared. Results: (1) The level of CECs and ET-1in the group of moderate-severe PAH was significantly higher than those in the group of mild PAH and the group of CHD without PAH. Significantly difference was also observed between the level of CECs and ET-1 in the group of mild PAH and those in the group of CHD without PAH and the control group. Meanwhile, the level of CECs and ET-1 in the group of large shunt was significantly higher than those in the group few shunt and few-medium shunt. (2) Strong positive correlations were observed between pulmonary artery systolic pressure and percentage of CECs as well as ET-1 production. Mean pulmonary artery pressure also positively correlated with percentage of CECs as well as ET-1 production. (3) Arterial partial pressure of oxygen as well as arterial oxygen saturation negatively correlated with the level of CECs, whereas the volume of left-to-right shunt positively correlated with the level of ET-1. (4) The level of CECs and ET-1 were positively correlated as well in CHD patients. Conclusions: CHD complicated with PAH is associated with increased CEC counts and ET-1 production. This study suggests that CECs

  4. Prognostic implications of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in patients with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Marcun, Robert; Stankovic, Ivan; Vidakovic, Radosav; Farkas, Jerneja; Kadivec, Sasa; Putnikovic, Biljana; Ilic, Ivan; Neskovic, Aleksandar N; Lainscak, Mitja

    2016-06-01

    Diagnosing heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is difficult due to overlapping pathophysiological pathways, risk factors and clinical presentations. We investigated the prevalence and prognostic implications of coexisting HFpEF in patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation of COPD. A total of 116 consecutive patients with an acute exacerbation of COPD were evaluated for HFpEF and followed for an average period of 22 ± 9 months for the occurrence of death from any cause. HFpEF was diagnosed in 22 (19 %) patients with COPD, who were older, and also had higher LV mass, left atrial size, and mitral E/Ea ratio than those without HFpEF (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). HFpEF was not independently associated with all-cause mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 1.07, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.44-2.62]. Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage (IV vs. I-III, HR 2.37, CI 1.23-4.59) and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels (HR 2.79, CI 1.12-6.98) were independent predictors of long-term survival. HFpEF is present in one-fifth of patients with exacerbated COPD. Non-invasively diagnosed HFpEF may not be an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. Elevated NT-proBNP levels and very severe COPD were independently associated with unfavorable overall survival. PMID:26423072

  5. Potential drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients with chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Roblek, Tina; Trobec, Katja; Mrhar, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Polypharmacy is common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but little is known about the prevalence and significance of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This study evaluates DDIs in hospitalized patients. Material and methods We retrospectively screened medical charts over a 6-month period for diagnosis of chronic HF and/or COPD. Potential DDIs were evaluated using Lexi-Interact software. Results Seven hundred and seventy-eight patients were included in the study (median age 75 years, 61% men). The median number of drugs on admission and discharge was 6 (interquartile range (IQR) 4–9) and 7 (IQR 5–), respectively (p = 0.10). We recorded 6.5 ±5.7 potential DDIs per patient on admission and 7.2 ±5.6 on discharge (p = 0.2). From admission to discharge, type-C and type-X potential DDIs increased (p < 0.05 for both). Type X interactions were rare (< 1%), with the combination of a β-blocker and a β2 agonist being the most common (64%). There were significantly more type-C and type-D potential DDIs in patients with chronic HF as compared to patients with COPD (p < 0.001). Patients with concomitant chronic HF and COPD had more type-C and type-X potential DDIs when compared to those with individual disease (p < 0.005). An aldosterone antagonist and ACE inhibitor/ARB were prescribed to 3% of chronic HF patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30 ml/(min × 1.73 m2). Conclusions The DDIs are common in patients with chronic HF and/or COPD, but only a few appear to be of clinical significance. The increase in potential DDIs from admission to discharge may reflect better guideline implementation rather than poor clinical practice. PMID:25395943

  6. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart work harder and affect its ability to pump blood. Overview How the Heart Valves Work At the ... into the atria. As the ventricles contract, they pump blood through the pulmonary and aortic valves. The pulmonary ...

  7. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  8. The Right Heart in Congenital Heart Disease, Mechanisms and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Guihaire, Julien; Haddad, François; Mercier, Olaf; Murphy, Daniel J.; Wu, Joseph C.; Fadel, Elie

    2012-01-01

    In patients with congenital heart disease, the right heart may support the pulmonary or the systemic circulation. Several congenital heart diseases primarily affect the right heart including Tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of great arteries, septal defects leading to pulmonary vascular disease, Ebstein anomaly and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. In these patients, right ventricular dysfunction leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. In this paper, our objective is to review the mechanisms and management of right heart failure associated with congenital heart disease. We will outline pearls and pitfalls in the management of congenital heart disease affecting the right heart and highlight recent advances in the field. PMID:23483726

  9. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  10. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  11. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  12. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Balance › Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English ... nervous system, body temperature, and weight. What is hypothyroidism and what are its symptoms? Hypothyroidism, also called ...

  13. Cyanotic heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or rhythms The treatment of choice for most congenital heart diseases is surgery to repair the defect . There are ... Some inherited factors may play a role in congenital heart disease. Many family members may be affected. If you ...

  14. Pulmonary nuclear medicine: Techniques in diagnosis of lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of nuclear medicine to the diagnosis of lung diseases. Topics considered include lung physiology and anatomy, radiopharmaceuticals in pulmonary medicine, pulmonary embolism, obstructive pulmonary disease, diffuse infiltrative lung disease, pneumoconioses, tumor localization scans in primary lung tumors, the interactions of heart diseases and lung diseases on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function, radionuclide imaging in pediatric lung diseases, and future possibilities in pulmonary nuclear medicine.

  15. Impact of Exercise Training in Aerobic Capacity and Pulmonary Function in Children and Adolescents After Congenital Heart Disease Surgery: A Systematic Review with Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Neto, Mansueto; Saquetto, Micheli Bernardone; da Silva e Silva, Cassio Magalhães; Conceição, Cristiano Sena; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of exercise training on aerobic capacity and pulmonary function in children and adolescents after congenital heart disease surgery. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, (from the earliest date available to January 2015) for controlled trials that evaluated the effects of exercise training on aerobic capacity and pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity) in children and adolescents after congenital heart disease surgery. Weighted mean differences and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated,, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I (2) test. Eight trials (n = 292) met the study criteria. The results suggested that exercise training compared with control had a positive impact on peak VO2. Exercise training resulted in improvement in peak VO2 weighted mean difference (3.68 mL kg(-1) min(-1), 95 % CI 1.58-5.78). The improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity after exercise training was not significant. Exercise training may improve peak VO2 in children and adolescents after congenital heart disease surgery and should be considered for inclusion in cardiac rehabilitation. Further larger randomized controlled trials are urgently needed to investigate different types of exercise and its effects on the quality of life. PMID:26396114

  16. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  17. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  18. Diurnal variation of pulmonary artery pressure in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, J S; Cunningham, D; Shapiro, L M; Park, A; Poole-Wilson, P A; Fox, K M

    1989-01-01

    Variation in pulmonary artery pressure has important consequences for the interpretation of isolated pressure measurements in patients with chronic heart failure. To investigate the nature of diurnal variation in pulmonary artery pressure in chronic heart failure, eight angina-free men (aged 50-72 years) with treated chronic heart failure caused by ischaemic heart disease underwent continuous ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure recording by a transducer tipped catheter. The mean (1 SD) daytime pulmonary artery pressure was 29.6 (5.0) mm Hg systolic and 13.7 (5.6) mm Hg diastolic. The mean change in pressure from day to night was +5.1 (3.2) mm Hg systolic and +3.8 (1.7) mm Hg diastolic; and the mean change from standing to lying +9.3 (2.3) mm Hg systolic and +6.4 (2.1) mm Hg diastolic. In six of the eight patients there was considerable rise in pulmonary artery pressure at night, but in the two patients with the most severe symptoms there was no nocturnal rise. In patients with chronic heart failure, nocturnal pulmonary artery pressure is not determined by postural change alone. But interpretation of isolated pulmonary artery pressure measurements must take the posture of the patient into account. PMID:2757872

  19. [The lung in heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Sill, V

    1990-02-01

    The effects of "hypocirculation" and "hypercirculation" of the lungs are small. Hypocirculation has an influence of the ventilation/perfusion ratio, and can thus contribute to hypocapnia. In the early stages, hypercirculation--in particular via a left-to-right shung, leads to an increase in diffusion capacity; after a course of many years, a "counter-situation" occurs. Progressive pulmonary hypertension, as is exemplified for mitral stenosis, leads to measurable restrictive and obstructive impairment of function, and possible to unspecific hyper-reaction, as also, over the long-term, to a diminishement in membrane diffusion capacity. Chronic left heart failure is characterised by interstitial oedema at the level of the alveolar and bronchial capillary beds. The results are measurable restrictions in the static volumes, and in particular of the obstruction parameters and the closing volume that involve the small airways. In the individual case, no statement as to the extent of left heart failure is possible. In the passive pulmonary hypertension phase, diffusion capacity increases; in the further course of the disease, with development of interstitial and alveolar oedema, it decreases again. In acute left heart failure, the persistance and/or extent of pulmonary oedema is not determined solely by the magnitude of the pulmonary venous pressure. Permeability oedema--brought about by mediators--would appear to be significant on the basis of animal experiments. Not infrequently, left cardiac failure leads to small pleural effusions which occur in combination with substantial atelectasia, the aetiology of which is unclear. Interpretation difficulties are caused by the clinical findings and function-analytical data obtained in patients with a combination of chronic lung disease and reducted volume storage capacity of the pulmonary circulation and of the left heart failure, a common situation in the elderly patient. Diminished pulmonary function parameters that fail to

  20. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  1. Lung beta-adrenoceptors in pulmonary hypertension. A study of biopsy specimens in children with congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, A.A.; Liberato, M.H.; Brentani, M.M.; Aiello, V.D.; Riso, A.A.; Ebaid, M. )

    1991-03-01

    Characteristics of beta-adrenoceptors were analyzed using radioligand-binding techniques with 3H-dihydroalprenolol in lung specimens from 11 children with pulmonary hypertension (median age, three years) undergoing surgical repair of congenital heart defects and four pediatric control subjects (median age, five years) undergoing thoracotomy for removal of neoplasms or cysts. Scatchard analysis of 3H-DHA binding to lung membranes showed similar values of the dissociation constant in both groups (Kd = 0.72 +/- 0.22 nM in patients vs 1.22 +/- 0.22 nM in controls; p = NS). The receptor density was significantly increased in patients in comparison with controls, with respective values of 164 +/- 19 and 95 +/- 13 fmol/mg of protein (p less than 0.025), and correlated directly with mean pulmonary arterial pressure (r = 0.82; p less than 0.0005). No significant relationship was observed between receptor number and pulmonary arterial medial thickness. Thus, the increase in receptor density in these patients may be related to adaptative changes in cells other than vascular smooth muscle.

  2. Left ventricular heart failure and pulmonary hypertension†

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, Stephan; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Wachter, Rolf; De Marco, Teresa; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    In patients with left ventricular heart failure (HF), the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction are frequent and have important impact on disease progression, morbidity, and mortality, and therefore warrant clinical attention. Pulmonary hypertension related to left heart disease (LHD) by far represents the most common form of PH, accounting for 65–80% of cases. The proper distinction between pulmonary arterial hypertension and PH-LHD may be challenging, yet it has direct therapeutic consequences. Despite recent advances in the pathophysiological understanding and clinical assessment, and adjustments in the haemodynamic definitions and classification of PH-LHD, the haemodynamic interrelations in combined post- and pre-capillary PH are complex, definitions and prognostic significance of haemodynamic variables characterizing the degree of pre-capillary PH in LHD remain suboptimal, and there are currently no evidence-based recommendations for the management of PH-LHD. Here, we highlight the prevalence and significance of PH and RV dysfunction in patients with both HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and provide insights into the complex pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary interaction in LHD, which may lead to the evolution from a ‘left ventricular phenotype’ to a ‘right ventricular phenotype’ across the natural history of HF. Furthermore, we propose to better define the individual phenotype of PH by integrating the clinical context, non-invasive assessment, and invasive haemodynamic variables in a structured diagnostic work-up. Finally, we challenge current definitions and diagnostic short falls, and discuss gaps in evidence, therapeutic options and the necessity for future developments in this context. PMID:26508169

  3. Heart disease and depression

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease and depression often go hand-in-hand. You are are more likely to feel sad or depressed after a heart attack ... heart disease. The good news is that treating depression may help improve both your mental and physical ...

  4. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000106.htm Heart disease - risk factors To use the sharing features on this ... may help you live a longer, healthier life. Risk Factors You Cannot Change Some of your heart ...

  5. Pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Saey, D; Bernard, S; Gagnon, P; Laviolette, L; Soicher, J; Maltais, F; Esgagne, P; Coats, V; Devost, A-A

    2009-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and an important worldwide cause of disability and handicap. Centered around exercise training, pulmonary rehabilitation is a global, multidisciplinary, individualized and comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. Pulmonary rehabilitation is now well recognized as an effective and key intervention in the management of several respiratory diseases particularly in COPD. Modern and effective pulmonary rehabilitation programs are global, multidisciplinary, individualized and use comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. In the last two decades interest for pulmonary rehabilitation is on the rise and a growing literature including several guidelines is now available. This review addresses the recent developments in the broad area of pulmonary rehabilitation as well as new methods to consider in the development of future and better programs. Modern literature for rationale, physiopathological basis, structure, exercise training as well challenges for pulmonary rehabilitation programs are addressed. Among the main challenges of pulmonary rehabilitation, efforts have to be devoted to improve accessibility to early rehabilitation strategies, not only to patients with COPD but to those with other chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:19776711

  6. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease that makes it difficult to empty air out of the lungs. This difficulty in ...

  7. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  8. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... or both arms, the neck, jaw, or stomach. Diagnosis Key heart tests include: Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) — ...

  9. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease » Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Explore Diabetic Heart Disease What Is... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Cardiomyopathy Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Failure Send ...

  10. The effect of pre-existing pulmonary vascular disease on the response to mechanical ventilation with PEEP following open-heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Trichet, B; Falke, K; Togut, A; Laver, M B

    1975-01-01

    The effects of mechanical ventilation with and without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on hemodynamic performance and blood-gas exchange were studied in ten patients following open-heart surgery. Ventilation at constant tidal volume (15 ml/kg body weight) with 10 cm H2O PEEP following aortic valve replacement (AVR) IN FIVE PATIENTs without pulmonary vascular disease was associated with the following significant changes: a rise in arterial Po2, a fall in the alveolar-arterial Po2 gradient when Fio2 = 1.0, decreases in calculated Qs/Qt and cardiac index. Using a similar pattern of ventilation following mitral valve replacement (MVR) in patients with elevated pulmonary vascular resistance, we found a significant decrease in cardiac index (but less than in the AVR group), a significant elevation of calculated physiologic deadspace (Vd/Vt) and no change in Qs/Qt. An hour after removal of PEEP, intravascular pressures, blood flow and blood-gas exchange values of all patients with AVR had returned to control levels; patients with MVR had persistently significantly low cardiac indices, while Vd/Vt returned to pre-PEEP values. These findings suggest that evaluation of responses to different ventilation patterns must take into account pre-existing V/Q abnormalities secondary to pulmonary vascular disease, particularly when these are secondary to chronic congestive heart failure. Following AVR, Qs/Qt changed in the same direction as cardiac index (CI) irrespective of ventilatory pattern: CI decreased and rose as CI increased. The authors conclude that with increasing severity of pulmonary vascular disease, changes in airway pressure will have an unpredictable effect on cardiac index unless the level of myocardial competence is taken into account. In the presence of ventricular failure, changes in pleural (and therefore transmural) pressures will be minimal compared with the high filling pressures and exert no influence on stroke volume. Although pulmonary venous

  11. [Hydatid disease diagnosed following a pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Menassa-Moussa, L; Braidy, C; Riachy, M; Tabet, G; Smayra, T; Haddad-Zebouni, S; Ghossain, M; Aoun, N

    2009-11-01

    Hydatidosis is a parasitic disease found worldwide, particularly in Mediterranean countries, caused by Echinococcus granulosis infection. Humans are an intermediate and accidental host in the cycle of this parasite. The hydatid pulmonary arterial embolism is extremely rare, usually arising in the heart or the liver. We report a case of hydatid pulmonary embolism explored with multidetector scanner and MRI, and confirmed at pathology of the operative specimen. To our knowledge, this is the first case of inaugural hydatid pulmonary arterial embolism found on CT scan establishing the diagnosis of the disease in a patient who had no other location of hydatid cyst. PMID:19615835

  12. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Hattab, Yousef; Alhassan, Sulaiman; Balaan, Marvin; Lega, Mark; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic smoking-related lung disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. It carries an enormous economic burden on the health care system. This results in a significant social impact on affected patients and their families. In this article, we review COPD in general, critical care management of patients presenting with acute exacerbation of COPD, and methods of prevention. PMID:26919673

  13. Acute effects of different levels of continuous positive airway pressure on cardiac autonomic modulation in chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Michel S.; Sampaio, Luciana M.M.; Lacerda, Diego; De Oliveira, Luis V.F.; Pereira, Guilherme B.; Pantoni, Camila B.F.; Thommazo, Luciana Di; Catai, Aparecida M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive ventilation may improve autonomic modulation and ventilatory parameters in severely disabled patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the physiological influence of acute treatment with different levels of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the autonomic balance of heart and respiratory responses in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Materials and methods A COPD group (n = 10), CHF group (n = 8) and healthy subjects (n = 10) were evaluated. The participants were randomized to receive three different levels of CPAP on the same day: sham ventilation (Sham), 5 cmH20 (CPAP5) and 10 cmH20 (CPAP10) for 10 min. Respiratory rate, end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate (HR), blood pressure and heart rate variability in the time and frequency domains were measured during spontaneous breathing and under the sham, CPAP5 and CPAP10 conditions. Results All groups experienced a reduction in ETCO2 values during treatment with CPAP (p < 0.05). CPAP increased SpO2 and HR in the COPD group (p < 0.05). The COPD group also had lower RMSSD values during treatment with different levels of CPAP when compared to the control group (p < 0.05). In the CHF group, CPAP5 and CPAP10 increased the SDNN value (p < 0.05). CPAP10 reduced the SDNN value in the COPD group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The findings suggest that CPAP may cause improvements in the neural control of heart rate in patients with stable COPD and CHF. For each patient, the “best CPAP level” should be defined as the best respiratory response and autonomic balance. PMID:22419931

  14. [Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Ringshausen, F C; Rademacher, J

    2016-02-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a group of biologically diverse, ubiquitous and naturally multi-drug resistant bacteria with facultative pathogenicity. Recent data suggest that their clinical significance is increasing worldwide and that susceptible individuals may be at risk for infection via contaminated surfaces and aerosols. These individuals often have a predisposition for chronic respiratory diseases, e. g. bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis and these conditions frequently share the same unspecific signs and symptoms with NTM pulmonary disease (NTM-PD). As a consequence, the diagnosis of NTM-PD, which is established based on clinical, radiological and microbiological criteria, is often delayed. Treating NTM-PD is more demanding than treating pulmonary tuberculosis as therapy is generally more tedious, toxic and expensive as well as being prone to failure. Patient and pathogen-specific factors guide the choice of an appropriate antimicrobial combination regimen, which should comply with national and international recommendations. Adverse events are common, should be anticipated and closely monitored. If infections with infrequently encountered mycobacterial species and severe or refractory disease occur, an interdisciplinary approach should be used, involving infectious disease specialists, experienced thoracic surgeons and referral to an NTM specialist center. PMID:26810111

  15. Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Women Share: Print Page Text Size: A A ... heart-and-circulation, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Women Coronary Heart Disease Sexual Health Women and ...

  16. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... very fast, but steady, heartbeat. Sick Sinus Syndrome ( SSS ) Sick sinus syndrome is not a disease, but ... the sinus node, is not working properly. In SSS , the heart rate can alternate between slow ( bradycardia ) ...

  17. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  18. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of heart disease that occurs from birth (congenital heart disease), in which the pulmonary valve does not form ... As with most congenital heart diseases, there is no known cause of ... is associated with another type of congenital heart defect ...

  19. Complete Heart Block with Diastolic Heart Failure and Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Enlarging Previously Diagnosed Thrombosed Aneurysm of Sinus of Valsalva in a Patient with History of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Thomas, Maria Joana; Daniels, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is associated with vascular aneurysms that can affect any part of the vascular tree, like ascending aorta or coronary arteries. Sinus of Valsalva is known as an anatomical dilation at the root of aorta above the aortic valve and very few cases show aneurysm at that site in patients with ADPKD. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) can present with rupture and acute heart failure and infective endocarditis or could be asymptomatic accidentally discovered during cardiac catheterization. We report a case of a 76-year-old male with a unique constellation of cardiovascular anomalies associated with ADPKD. Patient was previously diagnosed with aneurysms affecting ascending aorta, sinus of Valsalva, and coronary arteries. Several years later, he came with complete heart block which was discovered later to be secondary to enlargement of his previously diagnosed thrombosed SVA. His case was complicated with acute heart failure and pulmonary edema. Conclusion. Patients with ADPKD can present with extrarenal manifestations. In our case, aneurysm at sinus of Valsalva was progressively enlarging and presented with complete heart block. PMID:25861484

  20. Recurrent pulmonary embolism due to hydatid disease of heart. Study of 3 cases, one with intermittent tricuspid valve obstruction (atrial pseudomyxoma).

    PubMed Central

    Gilsanz, V; Campo, C; Cue, R; Estella, J; Estrada, R V; Perez-oteiza, C; Rabago, G; Rebollar, J L; Zarco, P

    1977-01-01

    Three cases of pulmonary hypertension caused by hydatid emboli from the right side of the heart are described; cardiac catheterisation was performed in 2. One case was confirmed at operation and 2 at necropsy. The pulmonary emboli were caused by hydatid vesicles in all 3 cases and in none was there pulmonary thrombosis; free scolices were found in the pulmonary alveoli in 2. In 1 patient with repeated syncopal attacks there was a pedunculated cyst in the right atrium which was though to have intermittently obstructed the tricuspid valve. Gamma radiography, angiocardiography, and necropsy suggested a mechanical cause for the pulmonary hypertenion with no vasoconstrictive element. The surgical patient was alive and well 18 months later. Images PMID:861098

  1. Anthocyanins and heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthocyanins are red, blue, and purple pigments distributed throughout nature, and in our diet. One potential health benefit of dietary anthocyanins is protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD). Evidence for beneficial effects of anthocyanins with respect to heart disease comes from epidemio...

  2. Disparate Rates of Utilization and Progression to Combined Heart Failure and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease among Asians and Pacific Islanders in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Davis, James; Tam, Elizabeth; Taira, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of the study were to compare ethnic differences in the rates of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations, and to examine ethnic differences in how quickly patients with either chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or congestive heart failure (CHF) developed both diseases. A large health plan in Hawai.i provided administrative data (2007 to 2010) on patients of Native Hawaiian, Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, and White race/ethnicity. The study found distinct patterns of health risks among the multi-ethnic population of patients with COPD, CHF, or both conditions. Native Hawaiians had the highest rates of ED visits and hospitalizations. Japanese, the largest ethnic group and relatively low health risks, were selected as the reference population. In adjusted regression models, Filipino patients with CHF developed COPD the most rapidly; 71% faster than Japanese patients. Compared to Japanese, Native Hawaiians with COPD transitioned to CHF 68% faster. The study highlights ethnic disparities in adverse events and disease progression in patients with COPD and CHF, with important implications for clinical practice. Health care providers may want to inform patients of ways to mitigate the risks. PMID:27563499

  3. Disparate Rates of Utilization and Progression to Combined Heart Failure and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease among Asians and Pacific Islanders in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Elizabeth; Taira, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to compare ethnic differences in the rates of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations, and to examine ethnic differences in how quickly patients with either chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or congestive heart failure (CHF) developed both diseases. A large health plan in Hawai.i provided administrative data (2007 to 2010) on patients of Native Hawaiian, Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, and White race/ethnicity. The study found distinct patterns of health risks among the multi-ethnic population of patients with COPD, CHF, or both conditions. Native Hawaiians had the highest rates of ED visits and hospitalizations. Japanese, the largest ethnic group and relatively low health risks, were selected as the reference population. In adjusted regression models, Filipino patients with CHF developed COPD the most rapidly; 71% faster than Japanese patients. Compared to Japanese, Native Hawaiians with COPD transitioned to CHF 68% faster. The study highlights ethnic disparities in adverse events and disease progression in patients with COPD and CHF, with important implications for clinical practice. Health care providers may want to inform patients of ways to mitigate the risks. PMID:27563499

  4. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-06-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  5. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J; Burney, Peter G J; Silverman, Edwin K; Celli, Bartolome R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with high global morbidity and mortality. COPD is characterized by poorly reversible airway obstruction, which is confirmed by spirometry, and includes obstruction of the small airways (chronic obstructive bronchiolitis) and emphysema, which lead to air trapping and shortness of breath in response to physical exertion. The most common risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking, but other environmental factors, such as exposure to indoor air pollutants - especially in developing countries - might influence COPD risk. Not all smokers develop COPD and the reasons for disease susceptibility in these individuals have not been fully elucidated. Although the mechanisms underlying COPD remain poorly understood, the disease is associated with chronic inflammation that is usually corticosteroid resistant. In addition, COPD involves accelerated ageing of the lungs and an abnormal repair mechanism that might be driven by oxidative stress. Acute exacerbations, which are mainly triggered by viral or bacterial infections, are important as they are linked to a poor prognosis. The mainstay of the management of stable disease is the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, whereas corticosteroids are beneficial primarily in patients who have coexisting features of asthma, such as eosinophilic inflammation and more reversibility of airway obstruction. Apart from smoking cessation, no treatments reduce disease progression. More research is needed to better understand disease mechanisms and to develop new treatments that reduce disease activity and progression. PMID:27189863

  7. Cavitary Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gadkowski, L. Beth; Stout, Jason E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: A pulmonary cavity is a gas-filled area of the lung in the center of a nodule or area of consolidation and may be clinically observed by use of plain chest radiography or computed tomography. Cavities are present in a wide variety of infectious and noninfectious processes. This review discusses the differential diagnosis of pathological processes associated with lung cavities, focusing on infections associated with lung cavities. The goal is to provide the clinician and clinical microbiologist with an overview of the diseases most commonly associated with lung cavities, with attention to the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of the host. PMID:18400799

  8. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Diabetes Educators JDRF American Heart Association MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Page Content On this ...

  9. Update on pulmonary hypertension complicating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Jyothula, Soma; Safdar, Zeenat

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is the hemodynamic manifestation of various pathological processes that result in elevated pulmonary artery pressures (PAP). The National Institutes of Health Registry defined pulmonary arterial hypertension as the mean PAP of more than 25 mm Hg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure or left atrial pressure equal to or less than 15 mm Hg. This definition remains the currently accepted definition of PH that is used to define PH related to multiple clinical conditions including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The estimated US prevalence of COPD by the National Health Survey in 2002 in people aged >25 was 12.1 million. There is a lack of large population-based studies in COPD to document the correct prevalence of PH and outcome. The major cause of PH in COPD is hypoxemia leading to vascular remodeling. Echocardiogram is the initial screening tool of choice for PH. This simple noninvasive test can provide an estimate of right ventricular systolic and right atrial pressures. Right heart catheterization remains the gold standard to diagnose PH. It provides accurate measurement of mean PAP and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Oxygen therapy remains the cornerstone therapeutic for hypoxemia in COPD patients. Anecdotal reports suggest utility of PDE5-inhibitors and prostacyclin to treat COPD-related PH. Large randomized clinical trials are needed before the use of these drugs can be recommended. PMID:19802350

  10. Pathophysiology of valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, YI; SUN, RONGRONG; LI, XIANCHI; LIU, MIN; CHEN, SHUANG; ZHANG, PEIYING

    2016-01-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is caused by either damage or defect in one of the four heart valves, aortic, mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary. Defects in these valves can be congenital or acquired. Age, gender, tobacco use, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and type II diabetes contribute to the risk of disease. VHD is an escalating health issue with a prevalence of 2.5% in the United States alone. Considering the likely increase of the aging population worldwide, the incidence of acquired VHD is expected to increase. Technological advances are instrumental in identifying congenital heart defects in infants, thereby adding to the growing VHD population. Almost one-third of elderly individuals have echocardiographic or radiological evidence of calcific aortic valve (CAV) sclerosis, an early and subclinical form of CAV disease (CAVD). Of individuals ages >60, ~2% suffer from disease progression to its most severe form, calcific aortic stenosis. Surgical intervention is therefore required in these patients as no effective pharmacotherapies exist. Valvular calcium load and valve biomineralization are orchestrated by the concerted action of diverse cell-dependent mechanisms. Signaling pathways important in skeletal morphogenesis are also involved in the regulation of cardiac valve morphogenesis, CAVD and the pathobiology of cardiovascular calcification. CAVD usually occurs without any obvious symptoms in early stages over a long period of time and symptoms are identified at advanced stages of the disease, leading to a high rate of mortality. Aortic valve replacement is the only primary treatment of choice. Biomarkers such as asymmetric dimethylarginine, fetuin-A, calcium phosphate product, natriuretic peptides and osteopontin have been useful in improving outcomes among various disease states. This review, highlights the current understanding of the biology of VHD, with particular reference to molecular and cellular aspects of its regulation. Current clinical questions

  11. Patient and disease characteristics associated with activation for self-management in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure and chronic renal disease: a cross-sectional survey study.

    PubMed

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Schuurmans, Marieke; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Korpershoek, Yvonne; Spruit-Bentvelzen, Lotte; Ertugrul-van der Graaf, Inge; de Wit, Niek; Trappenburg, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of chronic disease patients do not respond to self-management interventions, which suggests that one size interventions do not fit all, demanding more tailored interventions. To compose more individualized strategies, we aim to increase our understanding of characteristics associated with patient activation for self-management and to evaluate whether these are disease-transcending. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-II), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and Chronic Renal Disease (CRD). Using multiple linear regression analysis, we analyzed associations between self-management activation (13-item Patient Activation Measure; PAM-13) and a wide range of socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial determinants. Furthermore, we assessed whether the associations between the determinants and the PAM were disease-transcending by testing whether disease was an effect modifier. In addition, we identified determinants associated with low activation for self-management using logistic regression analysis. We included 1154 patients (53% response rate); 422 DM-II patients, 290 COPD patients, 223 HF patients and 219 CRD patients. Mean age was 69.6±10.9. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed 9 explanatory determinants of activation for self-management: age, BMI, educational level, financial distress, physical health status, depression, illness perception, social support and underlying disease, explaining a variance of 16.3%. All associations, except for social support, were disease transcending. This study explored factors associated with varying levels of activation for self-management. These results are a first step in supporting clinicians and researchers to identify subpopulations of chronic disease patients less likely to be engaged in self-management. Increased scientific efforts are needed to explain the greater

  12. Heart disease and women

    MedlinePlus

    ... leading killer of women over age 25. It kills nearly twice as many women in the United States as all types of cancer. Men have a greater risk for heart disease earlier in life than women. Women's risk increases after menopause. EARLY ...

  13. Recognizing Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha; Pinney, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the setting of left heart disease (LHD) or heart failure (HF) is the most common form of PH, yet its prevalence is underappreciated. Varying terminology possibly leads to misconceptions in pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. The accurate diagnosis of PH due to LHD is contingent upon hemodynamic assessment via right heart catheterization, however due to limitations in access, comprehensive echocardiography and integrative scoring systems are frequently used. When present in the setting of PH due to LHD, right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) confers a poor clinical prognosis. The management of RVD is directed towards treating underlying HF and/or valvular disease. Implantable hemodynamic monitors may offer opportunity to obtain longitudinal information to increase diagnostic accuracy as well as monitor the effect of treatment of PH in the setting of HF with and without the presence of RVD. PMID:26780235

  14. Does intravenous sildenafil clinically ameliorate pulmonary hypertension during perioperative management of congenital heart diseases in children? – A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vipul Krishen; Joshi, Saajan; Joshi, Ankur; Kumar, Gaurav; Arora, Harmeet; Garg, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary hypertension (PHT), if present, can be a significant cause of increased morbidity and mortality in children undergoing surgery for congenital heart diseases (CHD). Various techniques and drugs have been used perioperatively to alleviate the effects of PHT. Intravenous (IV) sildenafil is one of them and not many studies validate its clinical use. Aims and Objectives: To compare perioperative PaO2 – FiO2 ratio peak filling rate (PFR), systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) – systolic aortic pressure (AoP) ratio, extubation time, and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay between two groups of children when one of them is administered IV sildenafil perioperatively during surgery for CHDs. Materials and Methods: Patients with ventricular septal defects and proven PHT, <14 years of age, all American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status III, undergoing cardiac surgery, were enrolled into two groups – Group S (IV sildenafil) and Group C (control) – over a period of 14 months, starting from October 2013. Independent t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to compare the various parameters between two groups. Results: PFR was higher throughout, perioperatively, in Group S. PAP/AoP was 0.3 and 0.4 in Group S and Group C, respectively. In Group S, mean group extubation time was 7 ± 7.34 h, whereas in Group C it was 22.1 ± 10.6. Postoperative ICU stay in Group S and Group C were 42.3 ± 8.8 h and 64.4 ± 15.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: IV sildenafil, when used perioperatively, in children with CHD having PHT undergoing corrective surgery, improves not only PaO2 – FiO2 ratio and PAP – AoP ratio but also reduces extubation time and postoperative ICU stay. PMID:26440237

  15. Regional pulmonary perfusion following human heart-lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Hakim, T.S.; Dean, G.W.; Langleben, D.; Guerraty, A.; Levy, R.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in six subjects who had undergone heart-lung transplantation with consequent denervation of the cardiopulmonary axis. Two of the subjects had developed obliterative bronchiolitis, which is believed to be a form of chronic rejection. Their pulmonary function tests demonstrated airflow obstruction and their scintigraphic studies were abnormal. In the remaining four subjects without obstructive airways disease, ventilation and planar perfusion scans were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging of pulmonary perfusion in these patients revealed a layered distribution of blood flow indistinguishable from that of normal individuals. It is concluded that neurogenic mechanisms have little influence on the pattern of local pulmonary blood flow at rest.

  16. Connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yon K; Chung, Lorinda

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by vascular remodeling of pulmonary arterioles that leads to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right heart failure, and death. It is associated with connective tissue diseases, including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and mixed connective tissue disease. PAH is characterized by dyspnea on exertion and fatigue. Syncopal events suggest severe disease. Patients may present with signs of right heart failure. One- and 3-year survival rates are approximately 81% and 52%, respectively. Given the high prevalence and mortality, algorithms for screening are currently under investigation and will hopefully lead to earlier diagnosis and improved survival. PMID:25836644

  17. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Page Content On this page: ... stroke. [Top] What is the connection between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? If you have diabetes, you ...

  18. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease. PMID:24930078

  19. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorder. Alternative Names Pulmonary vaso-occlusive disease Images Respiratory system References Channick RN, Rubin LJ. Pulmonary hypertension. In: Mason RJ, Broaddus VC, Martin TR, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010: ...

  20. Income and heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Lemstra, Mark; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the unadjusted and adjusted effects of income on heart disease; its main disease intermediary, high blood pressure; and its main behavioural risk factors, smoking and physical inactivity. Design Random-digit dialing telephone survey collected through the Canadian Community Health Survey by Statistics Canada. Setting Saskatchewan. Participants A total of 27 090 residents aged 20 years and older; each health region in Saskatchewan was represented. Main outcome measures Overall, 178 variables related to demographic characteristics, socioeconomic factors, behaviour, life stress, disease intermediaries, health outcomes, and access to health care were analyzed to determine their unadjusted and adjusted effects on heart disease. Results The mean age of the sample was 52.6 years. Women represented 55.9% of the sample. Most respondents were married (52.3%) and had some postsecondary or graduate education (52.5%). The mean personal income was $23 931 and the mean household income was $37 533. All models statistically controlled for age. Five covariates independently associated with heart disease included high blood pressure, household income of $29 999 or less per year, being a daily smoker, male sex, and being physically inactive. Five covariates independently associated with high blood pressure included being overweight or obese, being a daily smoker, household income of $29 999 or less per year, male sex, and being physically inactive. Five covariates independently associated with daily smoking included being a visible minority, household income of $29 999 or less per year, not being overweight or obese, education level of less than secondary school, and male sex. Six covariates independently associated with physical inactivity included being a visible minority, being overweight or obese, education level of less than secondary school, male sex, household income of $29 999 or less per year, and being a daily smoker. Conclusion Household

  1. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  2. Diseases of pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  3. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition (PDF) Obesity (PDF) Peripheral Artery Disease (PDF) ... statistics, please contact the American Heart Association National Center, Office of Science & Medicine at statistics@heart.org . Please direct all ...

  4. Pregnancy complicated by heart disease in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Shailaja; Shrestha, Nikesh Raj; Pilgrim, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence, characteristics and maternal and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by heart disease. Design Prospective single-centre registry. Setting Tertiary care teaching hospital in eastern Nepal. Patients Pregnant women presenting to the antenatal clinic and/or labour room between 1 March 2012 and 31 March 2013. Main outcome measures Prevalence, characteristics, and maternal and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by heart disease. Results Fifty-three out of 9463 pregnancies (0.6%) were complicated by cardiac disease. Proportions of acquired, congenital and arrhythmic heart disease amounted to 89%, 9% and 2%, respectively. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) was the most frequent cardiac disease complicating pregnancy (n=47). Among 45 women with RHD continuing pregnancy until delivery, 30 (67%) were primigravidae. The predominant valvular pathology was mitral stenosis (62%), followed by mitral regurgitation (21%) and aortic regurgitation (13%). Twenty women (44%) underwent elective or emergency caesarean section. Maternal and fetal/perinatal mortality of pregnancies complicated by RHD amounted to 4% and 16%, respectively. New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III or class IV (HR 6.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 29.1, p=0.026), pulmonary hypertension (HR 9.1, 95% CI 1.6 to 51.5, p=0.012) and severe mitral stenosis (HR 7.0, 95% CI 1.4 to 34.4, p=0.017) were identified as predictors of maternal or fetal/perinatal mortality in an univariate analysis. Conclusions Rheumatic mitral stenosis was the most frequent heart disease complicating pregnancy in a consecutive cohort from a teaching hospital in Nepal. Exercise intolerance, pulmonary hypertension and severe mitral stenosis were identified as predictors of maternal or fetal/perinatal mortality. PMID:27326158

  5. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes or prediabetes ... can help prevent future health problems. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolismthe way our ...

  6. Sleep Apnea, Heart Failure, and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, Shahrokh; Javaheri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Despite the emergence of sleep apnea (SA) as a significant risk factor for heart failure (HF) mortality, data indicate that SA remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Less well established, though perhapsmore emphasized, is the role of sleep apnea in pulmonary hypertension (PH). SA occurs in approximately 50 % of HF patients, and its consequences include intermittent hypoxemia, arousal, and intrathoracic pressure swings leading to neurohormonal stimulation, oxidative stress and inflammation. While SA is also considered a cause of PH, severe PH due solely to SA is rare. Combining the results of several studies using Swan-Ganz catheters for diagnosis of PH, approximately 10 % of patients with OSA have PH. Effective treatment of SA in HF is associated with improved survival, while treatment of SA in PH is typically associated with modest hemodynamic improvement. PMID:24097114

  7. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  8. Pathophysiology and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Castro, Oswaldo L; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-02-18

    Pulmonary hypertension affects ∼10% of adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), particularly those with the homozygous genotype. An increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure, estimated noninvasively by echocardiography, helps identify SCD patients at risk for pulmonary hypertension, but definitive diagnosis requires right-heart catheterization. About half of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension patients have precapillary pulmonary hypertension with potential etiologies of (1) a nitric oxide deficiency state and vasculopathy consequent to intravascular hemolysis, (2) chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, or (3) upregulated hypoxic responses secondary to anemia, low O2 saturation, and microvascular obstruction. The remainder have postcapillary pulmonary hypertension secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Although the pulmonary artery pressure in SCD patients with pulmonary hypertension is only moderately elevated, they have a markedly higher risk of death than patients without pulmonary hypertension. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension were published recently by the American Thoracic Society. Management of adults with sickle-related pulmonary hypertension is based on anticoagulation for those with thromboembolism; oxygen therapy for those with low oxygen saturation; treatment of left ventricular failure in those with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension; and hydroxyurea or transfusions to raise the hemoglobin concentration, reduce hemolysis, and prevent vaso-occlusive events that cause additional increases in pulmonary pressure. Randomized trials have not identified drugs to lower pulmonary pressure in SCD patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Patients with hemodynamics of pulmonary arterial hypertension should be referred to specialized centers and considered for treatments known to be effective in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. There have been reports that some of these treatments

  9. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sakkijha, Husam; Idrees, Majdy M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases are common causes of pulmonary hypertension. It ranks second after the left heart disease. Both obstructive and restrictive lung diseases are know to cause pulmonary hypertension. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex, and includes factors affecting the blood vessels, airways, and lung parenchyma. Hypoxia and the inhalation of toxic materials are another contributing factors. Recent guidelines have further clarified the association between pulmonary hypertension and chronic lung disease and made general guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management. In this article, we will provide a detailed revision about the new classification and give general recommendations about the management of pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases. PMID:25076998

  10. Pulmonary function differences in patients with chronic right heart failure secondary to pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic left heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Hua; Luo, Qin; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Qing; Xi, Qun-Ying; Xue, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Zhi-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary abnormalities are found in both chronic heart failure (CHF) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The differences of pulmonary function in chronic left heart failure and chronic right heart failure are not fully understood. Material/Methods We evaluated 120 patients with stable CHF (60 with chronic left heart failure and 60 with chronic right heart failure). All patients had pulmonary function testing, including pulmonary function testing at rest and incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). Results Patients with right heart failure had a significantly lower end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PetCO2), higher end-tidal partial pressure of O2 (PetO2) and minute ventilation/CO2 production (VE/VCO2) at rest. Patients with right heart failure had a lower peak PetCO2, and a higher peak dead space volume/tidal volume (VD/VT) ratio, peak PetO2, peak VE/VCO2, and VE/VCO2 slope during exercise. Patients with right heart failure had more changes in ΔPetCO2 and ΔVE/VCO2, from rest to exercise. Conclusions Patients with right heart failure had worse pulmonary function at rest and exercise, which was due to severe ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatching, severe ventilation inefficiency, and gas exchange abnormality. PMID:24916204

  11. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. PMID:24774396

  12. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Lau, Edmund M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Girerd, Barbara; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Perros, Frederic; Nossent, Esther; Garcia, Gilles; Parent, Florence; Fadel, Elie; Soubrier, Florent; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterised by preferential remodelling of the pulmonary venules. In the current PH classification, PVOD and pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) are considered to be a common entity and represent varied expressions of the same disease. The recent discovery of biallelic mutations in the EIF2AK4 gene as the cause of heritable PVOD/PCH represents a major milestone in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of PVOD. Although PVOD and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) share a similar clinical presentation, with features of severe precapillary PH, it is important to differentiate these two conditions as PVOD carries a worse prognosis and life-threatening pulmonary oedema may occur following the initiation of PAH therapy. An accurate diagnosis of PVOD based on noninvasive investigations is possible utilising oxygen parameters, low diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide and characteristic signs on high-resolution computed tomography of the chest. No evidence-based medical therapy exists for PVOD at present and lung transplantation remains the preferred definitive therapy for eligible patients. PMID:27009171

  13. Giant high-pressure pulmonary artery aneurysm in an elderly patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sandra A; Oliveira, Hugo M; de Almeida, José R; Eiras, Eduardo; Silva, Ana Catarina; Gavina, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The authors report the case of a 74-year-old man, with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), GOLD grade 3, stable for the past two decades, who was admitted to our center with severe right heart failure. The chest radiograph showed moderate heart enlargement mainly of the right atrium and pulmonary artery, similar to previous chest radiographs in the previous 20 years. The transthoracic echocardiogram showed a pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA), dilatation of the right chambers with pulmonary artery systolic pressure of 52 mmHg, and preserved right ventricular systolic function. A thoracic computed tomography scan confirmed the presence of a giant PAA 72 mm in diameter. The patient was started on high-dose diuretics, with significant clinical improvement. After optimization of medical therapy right heart catheterization was carried out with the patient in optimal clinical condition, which revealed mild precapillary pulmonary hypertension with a mean pulmonary artery pressure of 26 mmHg. On the basis of the clinical and imaging findings a stable, giant, high-pressure, PAA was diagnosed secondary to pulmonary hypertension induced by COPD, with a 20-year follow-up without need for surgical repair, which helped in our decision to maintain medical surveillance. The recent onset of heart failure is explained by the unfavorable evolution of COPD. This case may change the attitude expressed in previous studies favoring the choice of an invasive approach to treat giant high-pressure PAAs, instead supporting the maintenance of medical treatment. PMID:26922398

  14. Heart disease and intimacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). ... document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). ...

  15. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ... of the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. Treatment of hypertension ...

  16. Impact of β-blocker selectivity on long-term outcomes in congestive heart failure patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Yoshiaki; Asai, Kuniya; Furuse, Erito; Nakamura, Shunichi; Murai, Koji; Tsukada, Yayoi Tetsuou; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is present in approximately one-third of all congestive heart failure (CHF) patients, and is a key cause of underprescription and underdosing of β-blockers, largely owing to concerns about precipitating respiratory deterioration. For these reasons, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of β-blockers on the long-term outcomes in CHF patients with COPD. In addition, we compared the effects of two different β-blockers, carvedilol and bisoprolol. Methods The study was a retrospective, non-randomized, single center trial. Acute decompensated HF patients with COPD were classified according to the oral drug used at discharge into β-blocker (n=86; carvedilol [n=52] or bisoprolol [n=34]) and non-β-blocker groups (n=46). The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality between the β-blocker and non-β-blocker groups during a mean clinical follow-up of 33.9 months. The secondary endpoints were the differences in all-cause mortality and the hospitalization rates for CHF and/or COPD exacerbation between patients receiving carvedilol and bisoprolol. Results The mortality rate was higher in patients without β-blockers compared with those taking β-blockers (log-rank P=0.039), and univariate analyses revealed that the use of β-blockers was the only factor significantly correlated with the mortality rate (hazard ratio: 0.41; 95% confidence interval: 0.17–0.99; P=0.047). Moreover, the rate of CHF and/or COPD exacerbation was higher in patients treated with carvedilol compared with bisoprolol (log-rank P=0.033). In the multivariate analysis, only a past history of COPD exacerbation significantly increased the risk of re-hospitalization due to CHF and/or COPD exacerbation (adjusted hazard ratio: 3.11; 95% confidence interval: 1.47–6.61; P=0.003). Conclusion These findings support the recommendations to use β-blockers in HF patients with COPD. Importantly, bisoprolol reduced the incidence of CHF and/or COPD

  17. Heart Valve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  18. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in adults may be related to: Valve calcification Endocarditis Rheumatic fever In children, abnormal heart murmurs may ... Problem: Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation Heart Valves and Infective Endocarditis • Risks, Signs and Symptoms • Accurate Diagnosis • Treatment Options • ...

  19. Epidemiological aspects of heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Tao, Ziqi; Wei, Peng; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the main cause of mortality in heart patients following stroke, rheumatic heart disease and myocardial infarctions. Approximately 80% of individuals succumb to CVDs, due to poor living conditions in low and middle income families and malnutrition. Infectious diseases, human immunodeficiency, tuberculosis, malaria, high blood pressure or hypertension, obesity and overweight, and nutritional disorders including smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, high salt and sugar intake, as well as other factors are responsible for CVDs and CHDs in young as well as elderly individuals. The focus of the present review are recent epidemiological aspects of CVD and CHD as well as the usefulness of a Mediterranean diet for heart patients and the prevention of heart diseases. PMID:27602082

  20. Bilateral diffuse pulmonary infiltration in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Sharif-Kashani, B; Ahmadi, Z H; Bikdeli, B; Tabarsi, P; Dorudinia, A; Shahabi, P; Raeissi, S; Shadafza, B; Estahbanati, G; Naji, A; Saliminejad, L; Bakhshayesh-Karam, M; Karimi, S; Khodadad, K; Masjedi, M-R; Gavazzi, A

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary complications are not infrequent after heart transplantation. Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor that can involve the skin as well as visceral organs. We describe a case of visceral and cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma that presented with diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltration and breathlessness 6 month after heart transplantation. Following modulation of the immunosuppressive regimen and addition of chemotherapy, the patient had an excellent response and has had an uneventful 1-year follow-up. PMID:20015115

  1. Celiac disease with pulmonary haemosiderosis and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Işikay, Sedat; Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinç, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or pulmonary haemosiderosis can be associated with several distinguished conditions. Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare, severe and fatal disease characterised by recurrent episodes of alveolar haemorrhage, haemoptysis and anaemia. Association of pulmonary haemosiderosis and celiac disease is extremely rare. We describe a case of celiac disease presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis without gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac disease. In addition, vitamin A deficiency was detected. This case suggests that celiac disease should be considered in patients with cardiomyopathy and/or pulmonary haemosiderosis regardless of the intestinal symptoms of celiac disease. PMID:23169927

  2. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Answers by Heart Fact Sheets Learn and live with our downloadable patient information sheets . Dozens of topics in a question-and-answer format that's brief, easy to follow and easy to read. ... Sodium and Salt 3 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 4 What are the Symptoms of ...

  3. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Werner; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, Simon; Martinez, Fernando J; Semigran, Marc J; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol U; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-24

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLD), including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and sarcoidosis, are associated with a high incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH), which is linked with exercise limitation and a worse prognosis. Patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are particularly prone to the development of PH. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization are the principal modalities for the diagnosis of COPD and DPLD. For discrimination between group 1 PH patients with concomitant respiratory abnormalities and group 3 PH patients (PH caused by lung disease), patients should be transferred to a center with expertise in both PH and lung diseases for comprehensive evaluation. The task force encompassing the authors of this article provided criteria for this discrimination and suggested using the following definitions for group 3 patients, as exemplified for COPD, IPF, and CPFE: COPD/IPF/CPFE without PH (mean pulmonary artery pressure [mPAP] <25 mm Hg); COPD/IPF/CPFE with PH (mPAP ≥25 mm Hg); PH-COPD, PH-IPF, and PH-CPFE); COPD/IPF/CPFE with severe PH (mPAP ≥35 mm Hg or mPAP ≥25 mm Hg with low cardiac index [CI <2.0 l/min/m(2)]; severe PH-COPD, severe PH-IPF, and severe PH-CPFE). The "severe PH group" includes only a minority of chronic lung disease patients who are suspected of having strong general vascular abnormalities (remodeling) accompanying the parenchymal disease and with evidence of an exhausted circulatory reserve rather than an exhausted ventilatory reserve underlying the limitation of exercise capacity. Exertional dyspnea disproportionate to pulmonary function tests, low carbon monoxide diffusion capacity, and rapid decline of arterial oxygenation upon exercise are typical clinical features of this subgroup with poor prognosis. Studies evaluating the effect of pulmonary arterial hypertension drugs currently not approved for group 3 PH patients should focus on

  4. Beri-Beri Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gubbay, Eric R.

    1966-01-01

    Beri-beri heart disease is a distinctive clinical entity which must be distinguished from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and other forms of heart disease in chronic alcoholics. A 27-year-old man is described who for six months before the onset of symptoms of right heart failure—admitted to hospital with dyspnea and pitting edema in the lower limbs and over the sacrum—had lived over a tavern and consumed 24 pints of beer daily. The pathophysiology of beri-beri heart disease includes right heart failure, edema and peripheral vasodilatation in the muscular bed. These features were described by Wenckebach and others as early as 1928. Within the main entity, beri-beri heart disease, a number of sub-groups with special features and prognosis such as acute pernicious beri-beri have been described. Beri-beri heart disease is due to vitamin B1 deficiency and is curable if this deficiency is corrected in time. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2aFig. 2b PMID:5940785

  5. Noninvasive identification of left-sided heart failure in a population suspected of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Wouter; Konings, Thelma C; Heymans, Martijn W; Boonstra, Anco; Bogaard, Harm Jan; van Rossum, Albert C; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton

    2015-08-01

    Exclusion of pulmonary hypertension secondary to left-sided heart disease (left heart failure (LHF)) is pivotal in the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In case of doubt, invasive measurements are recommended. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether it is possible to diagnose LHF using noninvasive parameters in a population suspected of PAH.300 PAH and 80 LHF patients attended our pulmonary hypertension clinic before August 2010, and were used to build the predictive model. 79 PAH and 55 LHF patients attended our clinic from August 2010, and were used for prospective validation.A medical history of left heart disease, S deflection in V1 plus R deflection in V6 in millimetres on ECG, and left atrial dilation or left valvular heart disease that is worse than mild on echocardiography were independent predictors of LHF. The derived risk score system showed good predictive characteristics: R(2)=0.66 and area under the curve 0.93. In patients with a risk score ≥72, there is 100% certainty that the cause of pulmonary hypertension is LHF. Using this risk score system, the number of right heart catheterisations in LHF may be reduced by 20%.In a population referred under suspicion of PAH, a predictive model incorporating medical history, ECG and echocardiography data can diagnose LHF noninvasively in a substantial percentage of cases. PMID:25837029

  6. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  7. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jamal A, Homa DH, O’Connor E, Babb SD, Caraballo RS, Singh T, et al. Current cigarette ... Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your Risk Factors Pulmonary hemodynamic profile in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Karina; Torralba, Yolanda; Blanco, Isabel; Burgos, Felip; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Rios, Jose; Roca, Josep; Barberà, Joan A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Few data are available in regards to the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the broad spectrum of COPD. This study was aimed at assessing the prevalence of PH in a cohort of COPD patients across the severity of airflow limitation, and reporting the hemodynamic characteristics at rest and during exercise. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis on COPD patients who underwent right-heart catheterization in our center with measurements obtained at rest (n=139) and during exercise (n=85). PH was defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) ≥25 mmHg and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure <15 mmHg. Exercise-induced PH (EIPH) was defined by a ratio of ΔmPAP/Δcardiac output >3. Results PH was present in 25 patients (18%). According to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classification, PH prevalence in GOLD 2 was 7% (3 patients); 25% (14 patients) in GOLD 3; and 22% (8 patients) in GOLD 4. Severe PH (mPAP ≥35 mmHg) was identified in four patients (2.8%). Arterial partial oxygen pressure was the outcome most strongly associated with PH (r=−0.29, P<0.001). EIPH was observed in 60 patients (71%) and had a similar prevalence in both GOLD 2 and 3, and was present in all GOLD 4 patients. Patients with PH had lower cardiac index during exercise than patients without PH (5.0±1.2 versus 6.7±1.4 L/min/m2, respectively; P=0.001). Conclusion PH has a similar prevalence in COPD patients with severe and very-severe airflow limitation, being associated with the presence of arterial hypoxemia. In contrast, EIPH is highly prevalent, even in moderate COPD, and might contribute to limiting exercise tolerance. PMID:26203238

  8. Being active when you have heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may also help you be more active without chest pain or ...

  9. Flying and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Macartney, F J

    1984-03-01

    Only those congenital defects carrying a very low risk of complication (either before or after surgical correction) were considered. Atrial Septal Defects--(a) Ostium primum defects should be treated with caution either before or after surgical correction because of the risk of progressive conduction disorders and mitral regurgitation. (b) Ostium secundum defects could be considered for licensing (if the defect is small) or with surgical repair if the right ventricular systolic pressure is normal. (c) Sinus venosus defects--if too small to require surgical repair, licensing may be considered provided ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring shows no evidence of arrhythmias. Surgery increases the risk of sino-atrial disease, thus licensing should be permitted only where there is no evidence of arrhythmia and adequate cardiological follow-up is possible. Ventricular Septal Defects--Subjects with very small defects not requiring surgical closure may be considered for licensing. Subjects who have had surgical closure have a risk of arrhythmias and should be carefully evaluated. Pulmonary Stenosis--If mild (either before or after surgery) may be licensed, but regular assessment perhaps including right heart catheterization is needed to demonstrate stability of the lesion. Persistent Ductus Arteriosus--Surgical closure should be recommended on diagnosis and need not affect licensing. Isolated Bicuspid Aortic Valve--Need not debar from licensing, but careful annual examination (with electrocardiogram 2-D echocardiography and fluroscopy ) is required to detect calcification, stenosis or regurgitation. Coarctation of aorta--Subjects who have had a repair before the age of 12 years may be considered for licensing after examination of other risk factors (blood pressure at rest and on exercise in particular). Those repaired over the age of 12 may be considered for restricted licensing if normotensive. These recommendations will need review in the light of further long

  10. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  11. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity and metabolic syndrome —interact to cause harmful physical changes to the heart. Third, diabetes raises the risk ... outlook. The good news is that many lifestyle changes help control multiple risk factors. For example, physical activity can lower your blood pressure, help control ...

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Brusasco, Vito; Martinez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    COPD is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The morphological basis for airflow obstruction results from a varying combination of obstructive changes in peripheral conducting airways and destructive changes in respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts, and alveoli. A reduction of vascularity within the alveolar septa has been reported in emphysema. Typical physiological changes reflect these structural abnormalities. Spirometry documents airflow obstruction when the FEV1/FVC ratio is reduced below the lower limit of normality, although in early disease stages FEV1 and airway conductance are not affected. Current guidelines recommend testing for bronchoreversibility at least once and the postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC be used for COPD diagnosis; the nature of bronchodilator response remains controversial, however. One major functional consequence of altered lung mechanics is lung hyperinflation. FRC may increase as a result of static or dynamic mechanisms, or both. The link between dynamic lung hyperinflation and expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing has been demonstrated. Hyperinflation may increase the load on inspiratory muscles, with resulting length adaptation of diaphragm. Reduction of exercise tolerance is frequently noted, with compelling evidence that breathlessness and altered lung mechanics play a major role. Lung function measurements have been traditionally used as prognostic indices and to monitor disease progression; FEV1 has been most widely used. An increase in FVC is also considered as proof of bronchodilatation. Decades of work has provided insight into the histological, functional, and biological features of COPD. This has provided a clearer understanding of important pathobiological processes and has provided additional therapeutic options. PMID:24692133

  13. Improving Outcomes for Pulmonary Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Ivan M.; Blaisdell, Carol J.; Abman, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of improving lung health through lung disease research, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a workshop of multidisciplinary experts for the following purpose: (1) to review the current scientific knowledge underlying the basis for treatment of adults and children with pulmonary vascular diseases (PVDs); (2) to identify gaps, barriers, and emerging scientific opportunities in translational PVD research and the means to capitalize on these opportunities; (3) to prioritize new research directions that would be expected to affect the clinical course of PVDs; and (4) to make recommendations to the NHLBI on how to fill identified gaps in adult and pediatric PVD clinical research. Workshop participants reviewed experiences from previous PVD clinical trials and ongoing clinical research networks with other lung disorders, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive lung disease, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as well. Bioinformatics experts discussed strategies for applying cutting-edge health information technology to clinical studies. Participants in the workshop considered approaches in the following broad concept areas: (1) improved phenotyping to identify potential subjects for appropriate PVD clinical studies; (2) identification of potential new end points for assessing key outcomes and developing better-designed PVD clinical trials; and (3) the establishment of priorities for specific clinical research needed to advance care of patients with various subsets of PVDs from childhood through adulthood. This report provides a summary of the objectives and recommendations to the NHLBI concentrating on clinical research efforts that are needed to better diagnose and treat PVDs. PMID:22335936

  14. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: Guidelines From the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Abman, Steven H; Hansmann, Georg; Archer, Stephen L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Adatia, Ian; Chung, Wendy K; Hanna, Brian D; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Raj, J Usha; Cornfield, David; Stenmark, Kurt R; Steinhorn, Robin; Thébaud, Bernard; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Kuehne, Titus; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Friedberg, Mark K; Earing, Michael; Barst, Robyn J; Keller, Roberta L; Kinsella, John P; Mullen, Mary; Deterding, Robin; Kulik, Thomas; Mallory, George; Humpl, Tilman; Wessel, David L

    2015-11-24

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26534956

  15. Heart Rate Variability and Arrhythmic Burden in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Witte, C; Meyer Zur Heide Genannt Meyer-Arend, J U; Andrié, R; Schrickel, J W; Hammerstingl, C; Schwab, J O; Nickenig, G; Skowasch, D; Pizarro, C

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that sudden cardiac death constitutes a major cause of mortality in pulmonary hypertension (PH). As validated method to evaluate cardiac autonomic system dysfunction, alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) are predictive of arrhythmic events, particularly in left ventricular disease. Here, we sought to determine the clinical value of HRV assessment in PH. Sixty-four patients were allocated to different PH-subgroups in this prospectively conducted trial: 25 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), 11 patients with chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH), and 28 patients with COPD-induced PH. All patients underwent 24-h Holter electrocardiogram for HRV assessment by time- and frequency-domain analysis. Arrhythmic burden was evaluated by manual analysis and complementary automatic measurement of premature atrial and ventricular contractions. The results were compared to 31 healthy controls. The PAH patients offered a significantly higher mean heart rate (78.6 ± 10.4 bpm vs. 70.1 ± 10.3 bpm, p = 0.04), a higher burden of premature ventricular contractions (p < 0.01), and decreases in HRV (SDNN: p < 0.01; SDANN: p < 0.01; very low frequency: p < 0.01; low frequency/high frequency ratio: p < 0.01; total power: p = 0.02). In CTEPH patients, only the amount of premature ventricular contractions differed from controls (p < 0.01), whereas in COPD both premature atrial contraction count and frequency-domain-based HRV manifested significant differences. In conclusion, PAH appears to be primarily affected by HRV alterations and ventricular arrhythmic burden, indicating a high risk for malignant arrhythmic events. PMID:27241509

  16. ALOHA to women's heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Kimberly J

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the American Heart Association, ALOHA program. ALOHA is a multidisciplinary approach to helping lay people and clinicians determine the best course of action for managing cardiac risk factors in women. ALOHA, an acronym that stands for designated interventions based on individualized assessment of patients, along with the Framingham risk assessment calculator, allows health care providers with their patients to individualize treatment for heart disease and management of risk factors. PMID:16699352

  17. [Adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Grabitz, R G; Kaemmerer, H; Mohr, F-W

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a few decades ago, today most patients with congenital heart disease reach adulthood after intervention or reparative surgery. As complete correction is generally not possible, a patient population with great complexity and a particular challenge to medical management is rising and a regular follow-up is mandatory. The aim of care is the timely recognition of residual or associated problems. Frequency and intensity of follow-up examinations depend on type and complexity of the lesion. The standard repertoire at follow-up consists of a specific history, clinical examination, ECG, Holter-monitoring, exercise tests, and echocardiography. Depending on the indication, cardio-MRI, CT scan, and sophisticated cardiac catheterization may become necessary. Long-term complications like rhythm disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, or heart failure are frequent, despite optimal care. Acute complications like arrhythmias, infective endocarditis, cerebral events, cerebral abscesses, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding have to be recognized early and treated appropriately. Additional focus has to be placed on counseling and management of noncardiac disease and surgery, pregnancy and delivery, exercise at work and in private life, driving, and insurance issues. Training and certification of physicians as well as the establishment of specialized centers will help to ensure high quality health care for the affected patient population. PMID:23318541

  18. The resistance-compliance product of the pulmonary circulation varies in health and pulmonary vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hadinnapola, Charaka; Li, Qiuju; Su, Li; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Toshner, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) is traditionally used to describe pulmonary hemodynamic characteristics. However, it does not take into account pulmonary artery compliance (Ca) or pulsatile flow. The product of PVR and Ca is known as RC time. Previous studies assert that the PVR-Ca relationship is fixed and RC time is constant between health and disease states. We hypothesized that RC time was not constant in health and pulmonary vascular disease. Right heart catheterizations performed in Papworth Hospital over a 6 year period were analyzed. Subjects were divided into those with normal pulmonary hemodynamics (NPH group; n = 156) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH group; n = 717). RC time and the right ventricle (RV) oscillatory power fraction were calculated. RC time for the NPH group (0.47 ± 0.13 sec) is significantly lower than the PAH group (0.56 ± 0.16 sec; P < 0.0001). The RV oscillatory power fraction is lower in the NPH group (P < 0.0001). RC time correlates inversely with the RV oscillatory power fraction in each group. We conclude, there is an inverse relationship between PVR and Ca, however, this relationship is not always fixed. Consequently, RC time is significantly lower in health compared to disease with elevated pulmonary artery pressures. PAH leads to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. PMID:25902784

  19. Combination of lung ultrasound (a comet-tail sign) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in differentiating acute heart failure from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma as cause of acute dyspnea in prehospital emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We studied the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (the presence of a comet-tail sign), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and clinical assessment (according to the modified Boston criteria) in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma)-related acute dyspnea in the prehospital setting. Methods Our prospective study was performed at the Center for Emergency Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia, between July 2007 and April 2010. Two groups of patients were compared: a HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 129) and a pulmonary (asthma/COPD)-related acute dyspnea group (n = 89). All patients underwent lung ultrasound examinations, along with basic laboratory testing, rapid NT-proBNP testing and chest X-rays. Results The ultrasound comet-tail sign has 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 100% negative predictive value (NPV) and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of HF. NT-proBNP (cutoff point 1,000 pg/mL) has 92% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 86% NPV and 90% PPV. The Boston modified criteria have 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 80% NPV and 90% PPV. In comparing the three methods, we found significant differences between ultrasound sign and (1) NT-proBNP (P < 0.05) and (2) Boston modified criteria (P < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound sign and NT-proBNP has 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% NPV and 100% PPV. With the use of ultrasound, we can exclude HF in patients with pulmonary-related dyspnea who have positive NT-proBNP (> 1,000 pg/mL) and a history of HF. Conclusions An ultrasound comet-tail sign alone or in combination with NT-proBNP has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating acute HF-related from COPD/asthma-related causes of acute dyspnea in the prehospital emergency setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01235182. PMID:21492424

  1. Evaluation of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Francesca; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana

    2016-03-01

    The clinical approach to adults with congenital heart diseases (ACHDs) is unique in cardiovascular medicine because these patients encompass a broad range of presentations. Each patient, despite having similar diagnosis, will be anatomically and physiologically unlike others within ACHD population, in relation to the type of repair, age at repair, associated defects, with specific long-term risk factors and complications. Furthermore, as many patients will not complain of symptoms, clinical evaluation and diagnostic testing must also be based on the underlying main diagnostic category, with complete standardized lesion-specific clinical protocols, investigating all known risk factors specific for each congenital heart disease and performed as part of screening for significant long-term complications. The first part of this review will focus on clinical history, physical examination, and the most important diagnostic testing in ACHD population. The second part of the article will focus on some clinical issues we have to face in our daily practice, such as heart failure, cyanosis, and pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, as survival rates of ACHD population continue to improve and patients with this condition live longer, we will briefly report on a new clinical concern regarding the impact of acquired morbidities like coronary artery disease that appear to be of greater importance in defining outcome in older patients with ACHD. PMID:26957402

  2. Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders Overall, Asian American adults are less likely ... Disease Death Rates per 100,000 (2013) Asians/Pacific Islanders Non-Hispanic White Asians/Pacific Islanders /Non- ...

  3. The heart and pulmonary circulation at high altitudes: healthy highlanders and chronic mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Penaloza, Dante; Arias-Stella, Javier

    2007-03-01

    More than 140 million people worldwide live >2500 m above sea level. Of them, 80 million live in Asia, and 35 million live in the Andean mountains. This latter region has its major population density living above 3500 m. The primary objective of the present study is to review the physiology, pathology, pathogenesis, and clinical features of the heart and pulmonary circulation in healthy highlanders and patients with chronic mountain sickness. A systematic review of worldwide literature was undertaken, beginning with the pioneering work done in the Andes several decades ago. Original articles were analyzed in most cases and English abstracts or translations of articles written in Chinese were reviewed. Pulmonary hypertension in healthy highlanders is related to a delayed postnatal remodeling of the distal pulmonary arterial branches. The magnitude of pulmonary hypertension increases with the altitude level and the degree of exercise. There is reversal of pulmonary hypertension after prolonged residence at sea level. Chronic mountain sickness develops when the capacity for altitude adaptation is lost. These patients have moderate to severe pulmonary hypertension with accentuated hypoxemia and exaggerated polycythemia. The clinical picture of chronic mountain sickness differs from subacute mountain sickness and resembles other chronic altitude diseases described in China and Kyrgyzstan. The heart and pulmonary circulation in healthy highlanders have distinct features in comparison with residents at sea level. Chronic mountain sickness is a public health problem in the Andean mountains and other mountainous regions around the world. Therefore, dissemination of preventive and therapeutic measures is essential. PMID:17339571

  4. [Tobacco and morphology: pulmonary diseases].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Lina

    2007-01-01

    Tobacco is implicated in multisystemic carcinogenesis through more than fifty identified carcinogenic metabolites that produce mutations responsible for alterations in cell cycle, immune response and endocrine regulation. Is one of nine risk factors identified in one third of cancer deaths together with obesity, sedentary, alcohol consumption, sexual promiscuity, drug addiction, and open and closed air contamination. Answering for cardiovascular diseases as the first cause of death in civilized world, tobacco is also pointed as the major factor implicated in the development of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), RB-ILD (respiratory bronchiolitis and interstitial lung disease), DIP (desquamative interstitial pneumonia), bronchiolitis and bronchiolocentric interstitial fibrosis, Langerhans cells histiocytosis, eosinophilic pneumonia, sarcoidosis, epidermoid metaplasia in respiratory epithelium and lung cancer. The chronic tobacco induced inflammatory state is the basis for the acquisition of genetic alterations dependent on the tobacco contaminants. PMID:17632677

  5. Non-infectious Pulmonary Diseases and HIV.

    PubMed

    Triplette, M; Crothers, K; Attia, E F

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary complications remain among the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality for individuals with HIV despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and improvement in its efficacy and availability. The prevalence of non-infectious pulmonary diseases is rising in this population, reflecting both an increase in smoking and the independent risk associated with HIV. The unique mechanisms of pulmonary disease in these patients remain poorly understood, and direct effects of HIV, genetic predisposition, inflammatory pathways, and co-infections have all been implicated. Lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary hypertension are the most prevalent non-infectious pulmonary diseases in persons with HIV, and the risk of each of these diseases is higher among HIV-infected (HIV+) persons than in the general population. This review discusses the latest advances in the literature on these important complications of HIV infection. PMID:27121734

  6. Biomarkers and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, R-R; Lu, L; Liu, M; Cao, Y; Li, X-C; Liu, H; Wang, J; Zhang, P-Y

    2014-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) results from the impaired ability of heart to fill or pump out blood. HF is a common health problem with a multitude of causes and affects ~30 million people worldwide. Since ageing is a major risk factor for HF and as several treatment options are currently available to prolong the patients' survival, the number of affected patients is expected to grow. Even though traditional methods of assessment have been in use for managing HF, these are limited by time consuming and costly subjective interpretation and also by their invasive nature. Comparatively, biomarkers offer an objective and biologically relevant information that in conjunction with the patients' clinical findings provides optimal picture regarding the status of the HF patient and thus helps in diagnosis and prognosis. The current gold standard biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of HF are B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP). Additional novel biomarkers (e.g., mid-regional pro atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), mid-regional pro adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), troponins, soluble ST2 (sST2), growth differentiation factor (GDF)-15 and galectin-3) can potentially identify different pathophysiological processes such as myocardial insult, inflammation and remodeling as the causes for the development and progression of HF. Different biomarkers of HF not only reflect the underlying mechanisms/pathways of HF and also its progression and also point specific therapy options. A multi-biomarker approach for personalized medical care is not too far fetched and such approach can greatly enhance diagnosis, prognostication, and therapy guidance for HF. In this review we describe the current status of HF biomarkers in clinical use and in laboratory research and the efforts aimed at the identification of novel biomarkers for HF. PMID:25339488

  7. Histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution decreases mortality and morbidity in high-risk patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with complex congenital heart disease: an 11-year experience from a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Li, X.W.; Lin, Y.Z.; Lin, H.; Huang, J.B.; Tang, X.M.; Long, X.M.; Lu, W.J.; Wen, Z.K.; Liang, J.; Li, D.Y.; Zhao, X.F.

    2016-01-01

    Cardioplegic reperfusion during a long term ischemic period interrupts cardiac surgery and also increases cellular edema due to repeated solution administration. We reviewed the clinical experiences on myocardial protection of a single perfusion with histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) for high-risk patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with complex congenital heart disease. This retrospective study included 101 high-risk patients undergoing arterial switch operation between March 2001 and July 2012. We divided the cohort into two groups: HTK group, myocardial protection was carried out with one single perfusion with HTK solution; and St group, myocardial protection with conventional St. Thomas' crystalloid cardioplegic solution. The duration of cardiopulmonary bypass did not differ between the two groups. The mortality, morbidity, ICU stay, post-operative hospitalization time, and number of transfusions in HTK group were lower than those in St group (P<0.05). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that HTK is a statistically significant independent predictor of decreased early mortality and morbidity (P<0.05). In conclusion, HTK solution seems to be an effective and safe alternative to St. Thomas' solution for cardioplegic reperfusion in high-risk patients with complex congenital heart disease. PMID:27191607

  8. Giant pulmonary hamartoma causing acute right heart failure.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Heman M N; Page, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Giant pulmonary hamartomas are rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old female patient with a giant chondroid hamartoma in the lower lobe of the right lung presenting with acute right heart failure. To the best of our knowledge such a unique presentation has not been previously described in the literature. PMID:24384217

  9. Pulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium malmoense.

    PubMed

    Alberts, W M; Chandler, K W; Solomon, D A; Goldman, A L

    1987-06-01

    Mycobacterium malmoense was isolated from pulmonary material from 4 patients. Two patients had repeatedly positive smears and cultures along with roentgenographic progression of pulmonary disease in the absence of another pathogen. These 2 patients therefore meet the criteria for diagnosis of pulmonary mycobacteriosis. Isolation of the organism may represent colonization in a third patient, and M. malmoense has been isolated from a fourth patient on 2 occasions. It is not yet definite, however, that the pulmonary process is due to mycobacterial disease. Although uncommon, pulmonary disease caused by this organism has been reported from Europe. Only 1 prior case of pulmonary disease caused by M. malmoense, however, has been reported in the United States. PMID:3592410

  10. Pulmonary hypertension and the right ventricle—thinking outside the box (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 1)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Third International Right Heart Failure Summit (Boston, MA) convened a group of international clinical and scientific experts in pulmonary vascular disease and right heart disease to explore cutting-edge developments in the mechanisms and clinical management of right-sided cardiovascular disease. The symposium was organized into three distinct sessions, the first of which was titled “Pulmonary Hypertension and the Right Ventricle—Thinking outside the Box” and will be the focus of this review. Three internationally renowned experts in pulmonary hypertension and right heart disease—Drs. Stuart Rich, Sean Gaine, and Harm Bogaard—each delivered provocative lectures. The first lecture, by Dr. Rich, was titled “Current Classification for Pulmonary Hypertension—Why Are We Ignoring the Structural Basis of the Disease?” Rich focused on the current classification system of pulmonary hypertension and provided a unique historical perspective. He also addressed the need to evolve the prevailing conceptual framework of our approach to pulmonary vascular diseases and right ventricular dysfunction, including the future design of pulmonary hypertension clinical trials. Dr. Gaine delivered the second lecture, titled “Treatment Algorithm for Pulmonary Hypertension: Tunnel Vision of our Current Approach.” Gaine emphasized the tripartite model of pulmonary hypertension management, namely, supportive measures, pharmacologic therapy, and rescue therapy. Specifically, he detailed how each of these entities is changing as our understanding of the unmet needs in the field of pulmonary hypertension is becoming increasingly apparent. Finally, Dr. Bogaard provided a lecture titled “Treating Right Heart Failure: Why Does the Art of Medicine Lead the Science?” Bogaard provided a stimulating review of cutting-edge translational research of right ventricular function and dysfunction. In particular, he described a variety of molecular and cellular changes that

  11. Menopause and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. It’s a natural phase of a woman’s life cycle,” Dr. Goldberg said. “It’s important for women, as ... emphasizes: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish and nuts, while limiting red meat ...

  12. Pulmonary manifestations revealing Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    PubMed

    Goupil de Bouillé, J; de Muret, A; Diot, E; Dumont, P; Plantier, L; Diot, P; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, mainly involving cervical nodes. We present the case of a patient with a pulmonary form of Rosai-Dorfman disease without peripheral or intra-thoracic lymph nodes, characterized by the presence of pulmonary nodules and cysts associated with bilateral pleural effusions. PMID:26422575

  13. Pulmonary hypertension during acute respiratory diseases in infants

    PubMed Central

    Bardi-Peti, Luiza; Ciofu, Eugen Pascal

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives:The study was undertaken to assess whether previously healthy infants with acute respiratory diseases develop elevated pulmonary artery pressures and to identify which type of disease is associated with pulmonary hypertension. Material and Methods:We performed 2D and Doppler echocardiography in 137 infants, aged between 1 and 12 month, from November 2007 to December 2009. 75 infants had acute respiratory diseases (49 bronchiolitis, 16 interstitial pneumonia, 3 bronchopneumonia, 6 episodic wheezing, 1 lobar pneumonia) and 62 were in the control group. We excluded children with congenital heart diseases and other conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension. The method of time to peak velocity corrected for heart rate was used to estimate pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). We analysed 2 age-subgroups: 1-2 months and 2-12 months. A Student’s t-test for independent samples was used to compare the mean values of variables. Outcomes:Increased mean pulmonary pressures (>25mmHg) were measured in 18 infants with respiratory diseases, with the next distribution: 14 bronchiolitis, 2 bronchopneumonia, 1 episodic wheezing, 1 interstitial pneumonia. The values were categorized as mild-moderate pulmonary hypertension. Mean PAP were significantly increased in subjects with clinically bronchoobstructive disease (bronchiolitis, episodic wheezing, bronchopneumonia) vs. control (p=0.05 in first age-subgroup and<0.001 in second age-subgroup). In infants with bronchoobstructive disease hospitalization was significantly longer in patients with pulmonary hypertension vs. normal PAP (p= 0.04 in first age-subgroup and 0.005 in second age-subgroup). In patients with bronchoobstructive diseases, mean PAPm and PAPs were significantly increased in subjects with a moderate/severe episode of wheezing at admission vs. a mild episode (p=0.02). Mean PAPm and PAPs were increased in subjects with interstitial pneumonia vs. control, but without statistic significance

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension in Parenchymal Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsangaris, Iraklis; Tsaknis, Georgios; Anthi, Anastasia; Orfanos, Stylianos E.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) has been extensively investigated, although it represents a less common form of the pulmonary hypertension (PH) family, as shown by international registries. Interestingly, in types of PH that are encountered in parenchymal lung diseases such as interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and many other diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, some of which are very common, the available data is limited. In this paper, we try to browse in the latest available data regarding the occurrence, pathogenesis, and treatment of PH in chronic parenchymal lung diseases. PMID:23094153

  15. Systemic and Pulmonary Vascular Remodelling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Esquerre, Mariana; López-Sánchez, Marta; Escobar, Ignacio; Huertas, Daniel; Penín, Rosa; Molina-Molina, María; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Santos, Salud

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is associated with subclinical systemic atherosclerosis and pulmonary vascular remodelling characterized by intimal hyperplasia and luminal narrowing. We aimed to determine differences in the intimal thickening of systemic and pulmonary arteries in COPD subjects and smokers. Secondary aims include comparisons with a non-smokers group; determining the clinical variables associated with systemic and pulmonary intimal thickening, and the correlations between systemic and pulmonary remodelling changes. Methods All consecutive subjects undergoing lung resection were included and divided into 3 groups: 1) COPD, 2) smokers, and 3) non-smokers. Sections of the 5th intercostal artery and muscular pulmonary arteries were measured by histo-morphometry. Four parameters of intimal thickening were evaluated: 1) percentage of intimal area (%IA), 2) percentage of luminal narrowing, 3) intimal thickness index, and 4) intima-to-media ratio. Results In the adjusted analysis, the systemic arteries of COPD subjects showed greater intimal thickening (%IA) than those of smokers (15.6±1.5% vs. 14.2±1.6%, p = 0.038). In the pulmonary arteries, significant differences were observed for %IA between the 2 groups (37.3±2.2% vs. 29.3±2.3%, p = 0.016). Among clinical factors, metabolic syndrome, gender and COPD status were associated with the systemic intimal thickening, while only COPD status was associated with pulmonary intimal thickening. A correlation between the %IA of the systemic and pulmonary arteries was observed (Spearman’s rho = 0.46, p = 0.008). Conclusions Greater intimal thickening in systemic and pulmonary arteries is observed in COPD patients than in smokers. There is a correlation between systemic and pulmonary vascular remodelling in the overall population. PMID:27046203

  16. Stable Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard; Rumana, Umme

    2016-01-01

    Classical angina refers to typical substernal discomfort triggered by effort or emotions, relieved with rest or nitroglycerin. The well-accepted pathogenesis is an imbalance between oxygen supply and demand. Goals in therapy are improvement in quality of life by limiting the number and severity of attacks, protection against future lethal events, and measures to lower the burden of risk factors to slow disease progression. New pathophysiological data, drugs, as well as conceptual and technological advances have improved patient care over the past decade. Behavioral changes to improve diets, increase physical activity, and encourage adherence to cardiac rehabilitation programs, are difficult to achieve but are effective. PMID:26567972

  17. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159387.html Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans Better control of risk factors such as smoking, ... new study reports. Federal researchers found that fewer Americans over 40 have coronary heart disease. The rate ...

  18. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  19. Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... recommendations on Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography . These recommendations are for adult men and women ...

  20. MedlinePlus: Heart Diseases--Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Tests Cholesterol Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Heart-Health Screenings (American Heart Association) hs-CRP Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease ...

  1. Pulmonary Capillary Hemangiomatosis and Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, Neal F; Dodson, Mark W; Elliott, Charles Gregory

    2016-09-01

    This article provides an overview of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH), two disorders that challenge clinicians, radiologists, and pathologists because they often mimic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The article reviews the features that differentiate PVOD and PCH from PAH. The article also describes the overlap of PVOD and PCH, highlighted by recent reports of families diagnosed with PVOD or PCH caused by EIF2AK4 mutations. In addition, the article outlines current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of PVOD and PCH. PMID:27514598

  2. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents National Symbol The centerpiece of The Heart Truth ® is The Red Dress ® which was introduced ...

  3. Endothelial mitochondria and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sean Michael

    2010-10-01

    The endothelium is vital to the proper functioning in the heart, in particular due to its production of nitric oxide (NO) which regulates vascular tone. Damage to the endothelium contributes to the development of atherosclerosis, and hence to possible myocardial infarction and subsequent heart failure. Like most cells, endothelial cells contain mitochondria, despite their having relatively little dependence on oxidative phosphorylation for ATP production. However, endothelial mitochondria are centrally involved in maintaining the fine regulatory balance between mitochondrial calcium concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and NO. This raises the question of whether damage to endothelial mitochondria would have repercussions in terms of the development of heart disease. In fact, increasingly nuanced techniques enabling restricted transgenic expression of antioxidant proteins in mice has demonstrated that mitochondrial ROS do contribute to endothelial damage. New pharmaceutical approaches designed to target protective molecules such as ROS scavengers to the mitochondria promise to be effective in preventing heart disease. As well as protecting cardiomyocytes, these drugs may have the added benefit of preventing damage to the endothelial mitochondria. However, much remains to be done in understanding the contribution that mitochondria make to endothelial function. PMID:20558442

  4. Current applications of lasers in heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Garrett; Chan, Ming C.; Mason, Dean T.

    1993-03-01

    Although the laser has been in existence for abut 30 years, its application in heart disease has only been examined in the past decade. Much attention has been given its exciting potential in treating coronary artery disease. Transmitted through a catheter comprised of one or more thin optical fibers which can be threaded nonsurgically into the coronary artery, the laser can ablate atherosclerotic plaque that obstructs the artery and diminishes blood flow to the myocardium. In clinical studies, the laser can treat some obstructive lesions that are not suitable for balloon angioplasty (i.e., long and diffuse lesions, very tight stenoses, ostial lesions, calcified lesions). In patients who failed balloon angioplasty due to severe dissection or abrupt closure, the laser may seal up the dissections and restore antegrade blood flow. In addition, the laser may have other applications and treatment modalities that are still under investigation. It may ablate ectopic ventricular foci, or terminate supraventricular tachyrhythmia by destroying the heart's abnormal conduction pathways. It can cut the hypertrophied septum that is associated with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, or create a channel in the atrial septum as a palliative procedure in newborns with transposition of the great vessels. It may provide a wider orifice for blood flow within the heart in infants with pulmonary outflow obstruction and in adults with aortic valvular stenosis. It is also capable of fusing small thin-walled blood vessels together. Further, a more intriguing possibility is its use to bore several tiny channels in the myocardium to allow oxygenated blood from within the ventricular chamber to perfuse the ischemic heart tissue.

  5. The Impact of Immunosenescence on Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Michelle A.; Chotirmall, Sanjay H.

    2015-01-01

    The global population is aging with significant gains in life expectancy particularly in the developed world. Consequently, greater focus on understanding the processes that underlie physiological aging has occurred. Key facets of advancing age include genomic instability, telomere shortening, epigenetic changes, and declines in immune function termed immunosenescence. Immunosenescence and its associated chronic low grade systemic “inflamm-aging” contribute to the development and progression of pulmonary disease in older individuals. These physiological processes predispose to pulmonary infection and confer specific and unique clinical phenotypes observed in chronic respiratory disease including late-onset asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. Emerging concepts of the gut and airway microbiome further complicate the interrelationship between host and microorganism particularly from an immunological perspective and especially so in the setting of immunosenescence. This review focuses on our current understanding of the aging process, immunosenescence, and how it can potentially impact on various pulmonary diseases and the human microbiome. PMID:26199462

  6. Mechanics and Function of the Pulmonary Vasculature: Implications for Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Right Ventricular Function

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Steven; Scott, Devon; Hunter, Kendall; Tan, Wei; Shandas, Robin; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between cardiac function and the afterload against which the heart muscle must work to circulate blood throughout the pulmonary circulation is defined by a complex interaction between many coupled system parameters. These parameters range broadly and incorporate system effects originating primarily from three distinct locations: input power from the heart, hydraulic impedance from the large conduit pulmonary arteries, and hydraulic resistance from the more distal microcirculation. These organ systems are not independent, but rather, form a coupled system in which a change to any individual parameter affects all other system parameters. The result is a highly nonlinear system which requires not only detailed study of each specific component and the effect of disease on their specific function, but also requires study of the interconnected relationship between the microcirculation, the conduit arteries, and the heart in response to age and disease. Here, we investigate systems-level changes associated with pulmonary hypertensive disease progression in an effort to better understand this coupled relationship. PMID:23487595

  7. Pulmonary disease in gestational trophoblastic neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    McNair, O. M.; Polk, O. D.

    1992-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasms can present as pulmonary nodules without significant disease of the reproductive organs. This article describes a case of metastatic gestational trophoblastic disease to the lungs. This entity must be considered in the differential diagnosis in any female of reproductive age who presents with multiple pulmonary nodules. Thoracotomy has a limited role in the initial evaluation of patients with this disease. However, it may be needed in patients who have evidence of persistent pulmonary disease, despite appropriate therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1324326

  8. The role of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in the management of pulmonary vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Butrous, Ghazwan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE) can be used as therapeutic agents for various diseases such as dementia, depression, schizophrenia and erectile dysfunction in men, as well as congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, other inflammatory diseases, diabetes and various other conditions. In this review we will concentrate on one type of PDE, mainly PDE5 and its role in pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:25780785

  9. Dual stent migration to the heart and pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniyam, Nivas; Garg, Jalaj; Rawat, Naveen; Chugh, Savneek; Mittal, Varun; Baby, Banessaa; Aronow, Wilbert S; Lehrman, Stuart G

    2014-01-01

    The practice of intravascular stenting largely grew out of the concept of stenting the coronaries in acute myocardial infarction. According to the recent United States Renal Data System data registry, there has been a significant increase in endovascular intervention (1.8-fold increase-from 52,380 to 98,148) with a 2.2-fold increase in stent deployment in hemodialysis access (3792-8514). With the increasing use of endovascular stents in the management of dialysis access stenosis, the incidence of stent-related complications has increased significantly. Stent-related complications include stent restenosis, thrombosis (narrowing of the vessel lumen and being a nidus for thombus formation), stent shortening, stent fracture, stent infection, and stent migration. Physiologic variation in the diameter of veins due to respiration, which along with the geometry of the stent, can lead to a shortening lengthening of the stent-resulting in poor wall contact or high-speed impact of shock; in the case of trauma, mechanical bucking can result in tortuous blood vessels thereby resulting in stent migration (however proving this association was not the aim of this article). We report a case of a 44-year-old female with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis, with stent placement to treat a compromised arteriovenous graft. There have been many cases of stent migration in the past; however, this is the first case of dual stent migration to the heart and pulmonary artery from an unusual (lower extremity) arteriovenous graft location. PMID:23567791

  10. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: differential diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Charalampopoulos, Athanasios; Ramjug, Sheila; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; O’Toole, Laurence; Swift, Andrew; Kiely, David G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The most common cause of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to left heart disease (LHD) was previously rheumatic mitral valve disease. However, with the disappearance of rheumatic fever and an aging population, nonvalvular LHD is now the most common cause of group 2 PH in the developed world. In this review, we examine the challenge of investigating patients who have PH and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-pEF), where differentiating between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and PH-LHD can be difficult, and also discuss the entity of combined precapillary and postcapillary PH. Given the proven efficacy of targeted therapy for the treatment of PAH, there is increasing interest in whether these treatments may benefit selected patients with PH associated with HF-pEF, and we review current trial data. PMID:27162611

  11. Pulmonary Atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... to repair the defect. Return to main topic: Congenital Heart Disease See on other sites: MedlinePlus https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001091.htm Pulmonary atresia American Heart Association www. ...

  12. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: a distinct disease entity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Irene

    2015-06-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a distinct subtype of pulmonary hypertension (PH). One disease hypothesis is that CTEPH results from the non-resolution of venous thromboembolism. CTEPH is characterised by the presence of obstructive fibrotic thromboembolic material in the major pulmonary vessels, with concomitant microvascular arteriopathy, resulting in progressive PH. The clinical presentation of CTEPH is similar to pulmonary arterial hypertension with nonspecific symptoms, but it is distinguished from pulmonary arterial hypertension by the presence of mismatched segmental defects on the ventilation/perfusion scan. The exact prevalence and incidence of CTEPH are unknown, but are thought to have been underestimated in the past. CTEPH is unique among the subgroups of PH in that it is potentially curable with pulmonary endarterectomy, a surgical intervention intended to remove the occlusive material from the pulmonary vasculature. However, in some patients the obstructions are technically inaccessible or the risk/benefit ratios are unfavourable, making the condition inoperable. It is thought that the involvement of the smaller, more distal vessels is a target for medical treatment. Untreated, CTEPH may result in right heart failure and death. The pathophysiological mechanisms which cause CTEPH are complex and have not yet been fully elucidated. PMID:26028636

  13. Hydatid disease of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Calamai, G.; Perna, A. M.; Venturini, A.

    1974-01-01

    Calamai, G., Perna, A. M., and Venturini, A. (1974).Thorax, 29, 451-458. Hydatid disease of the heart: report of five cases and review of the literature. The world literature on the surgical treatment of echinococcosis of the heart is reviewed. Few cases are surgically treated, although the disease has been known for a long time. Localization to the liver and lungs is the most frequent. Cardiopulmonary bypass techniques make possible surgical treatment of hydatid cyst of the heart. The present paper is concerned with five cases operated upon between 1959 and 1969, three males and two females, their ages ranging from 13 to 46 years. A preoperative diagnosis was made in each case. One case was operated upon under cardiopulmonary bypass. The need for cardiopulmonary bypass on a stand-by basis is emphasized. The localization of the hydatid cyst was in the left ventricular wall (three cases), right ventricular wall (one case), and multiple (one case). The frequency of cardiac echinococcosis ranges between 0·5% and 2% according to various authors. Diagnosis is achieved with the aid of laboratory tests, radiology, and angiography; but the presence of the disease must be suspected in all patients who come from endemic areas. Surgical therapy is mandatory. Due to the growth characteristics of the cyst itself, the danger of damaging the ventricular wall at operation is increased; thus it is essential to have cardiopulmonary bypass facilities immediately available. Images PMID:4277513

  14. Thyroid Disease and the Heart.

    PubMed

    Klein, Irwin; Danzi, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid hormones have an intimate relationship with cardiac function. Some of the most significant clinical signs and symptoms of thyroid disease are the cardiac manifestations. In both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, the characteristic physiological effects of thyroid hormone can be understood from the actions at the molecular and cellular level. Here we explore topics from the metabolism and cellular effects of thyroid hormone to special considerations related to statin and amiodarone therapy for the alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism that accompany heart disease. PMID:26792255

  15. Living with Heart Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Congenital Heart Defects Endocarditis Heart Murmur How the Heart Works Mitral Valve ... your doctor if you have symptoms of infective endocarditis (IE). Symptoms of this heart infection include fever, ...

  16. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  17. A rabbit pulmonary vein myocyte isolation method based on simultaneous heart and pulmonary vein perfusion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Miao-Miao; Zhang, Liang-Pin; Yang, Shu-Lin; Yao, Ke-Jun; Song, Yuan-Long

    2016-02-25

    Myocytes in the pulmonary veins (PV) play a pivotal role in the development of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). It is therefore important to understand physiological characteristics of these cells. Studies on these cells are, however, markedly impeded by the fact that single PV myocytes are very difficult to obtain due to lack of effective isolation methods. In this study, we described a novel PV myocyte isolation method. The key aspect of this method is to establish a combination of retrograde heart perfusion (via the aorta) and anterograde PV perfusion (via the pulmonary artery). With this simultaneous perfusion method, a better perfusion of the PV myocytes can be obtained. As results, the output and viability of single myocytes isolated by simultaneous heart and PV perfusion method were increased compared with those in conventional retrograde heart perfusion method. PMID:26915322

  18. Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common monogenetic disorder with high associated morbidity and mortality. The pulmonary complications of SCD are of particular importance, as acute chest syndrome and pulmonary hypertension have the highest associated mortality rates within this population. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of clinically significant pulmonary manifestations of SCD, including acute chest syndrome, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension in adult and pediatric patients. Clinicians should be vigilant in screening and treating such comorbidities to improve patient outcomes. PMID:22447965

  19. The heart and pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vandecasteele, Els H; De Pauw, Michel; Brusselle, Guy; Decuman, Saskia; Piette, Yves; De Keyser, Filip; Smith, V

    2016-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease characterized by vasculopathy and progressive fibrosis of the skin and visceral organs (gastrointestinal tract, heart, kidneys and lungs). Although the prevalence is low, SSc is a disease with high morbidity and mortality. Since pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with SSc (SSc-PAH) and clinically evident cardiac involvement is associated with increased mortality, the cardiac complications and PAH in SSc are reviewed. Both diffuse cutaneous (DcSSc) and limited cutaneous (LcSSc) subgroups are at risk for cardiac involvement and SSc-PAH. Cardiac involvement can be divided in pericardial involvement, myocardial involvement and rhythm disturbances and mostly occurs asymptomatically. However, when symptomatic, it is associated with a poor prognosis. Screening for asymptomatic cardiac involvement should be considered in SSc in order to initiate treatment in an early stage. However, there are no randomized controlled trials on treatment options for cardiac involvement in SSc. SSc-PAH is a devastating complication of SSc, which can develop early in DcSSc and LcSSc. Screening for PAH should be performed since screening leads to earlier diagnosis and earlier treatment is associated with a better prognosis. Today, screening is performed by clinical judgement and echocardiography. Recently the DETECT algorithm, a 2-step screening algorithm is proposed in a SSc-subgroup at increased risk for PAH, but further validation is needed. Despite current treatment options with prostacyclins, endothelin-1 receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors, mortality remains high. Several promising new treatment options for PAH are evaluated in phase II and III clinical trials. PMID:27075793

  20. Gemcitabine-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity: A Case Report of Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Célia; Jary, Marine; Kim, Stefano; Moltenis, Mélanie; Degano, Bruno; Manzoni, Philippe; Nguyen, Thierry; Genet, Bruno; Rabier, Marie-Blanche Valnet; Heyd, Bruno; Borg, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gemcitabine is a chemotherapeutic agent frequently used by for the treatment of several malignancies both in the adjuvant and metastatic setting. Although myelosuppression is the most adverse event of this therapy, gemcitabine might induce severe pulmonary toxicities. We describe a case of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) related to gemcitabine. CASE PRESENTATION The patient was an 83-year-old man with a metastatic pancreatic cancer who was treated by gemcitabine as first-line therapy. He was in good health and received no other chemotherapy. A dose of 1000 mg/m2 of gemcitabine was administered over a 30-minute intravenous infusion on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. After a period of 6 months, a complete response was observed. Nevertheless, the patient developed a severe dyspnea, with arterial hypoxemia and very low lung diffusion for carbon monoxide. A CT scan showed diffuse ground glass opacities with septal lines, bilateral pleural effusion, and lymph node enlargement. On echocardiography, there was a suspicion of pulmonary hypertension with elevated systolic pulmonary artery pressure and normal left ventricular pressures. Right heart catheterization confirmed pulmonary hypertension and normal pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. Diagnosis of PVOD was made, and a gemcitabine-induced toxicity was suspected. A symptomatic treatment was started. At last follow-up, patient was in functional class I with near-normal of CT scan, arterial blood gases, and echocardiography. A gemcitabine-induced PVOD is the more likely diagnosis. PMID:26380562

  1. Critical congenital heart disease screening

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A.; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  2. Critical congenital heart disease screening.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  3. Health in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Judith A A E; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of cardiac surgery, the prospects for children born with a cardiac defect have improved spectacularly. Many reach adulthood and the population of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing and ageing. However, repair of congenital heart disease does not mean cure. Many adults with congenital heart disease encounter late complications. Late morbidity can be related to the congenital heart defect itself, but may also be the consequence of the surgical or medical treatment or longstanding alterations in hemodynamics, neurodevelopment and psychosocial development. This narrative review describes the cardiac and non-cardiac long-term morbidity in the adult population with congenital heart disease. PMID:27451323

  4. The impact of arteriovenous fistula creation in pulmonary hypertension: measurement of pulmonary pressures by right heart catheterization in a patient with respiratory failure following arteriovenous fistula creation.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, Dimitrios; Theti, Davinder; Pau, Vasanti; Banerjee, Debasish; Jones, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is frequent in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) and carries a high mortality. While it has been suggested that arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) may exacerbate PHT in HD patients, it has also been observed that creating AVF in patients with chronic lung disease and normal renal function may lead to improved exercise tolerance. Most of the observations regarding HD patients using echocardiography demonstrated that temporary closure of AVF improved pulmonary pressures. We present the case of a 45-year-old patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on HD who experienced respiratory failure following AVF formation and underwent right heart catheterization. Severe PHT was diagnosed but transient occlusion of the fistula failed to improve the PHT. This case supports the theory that fistula creation does not exacerbate pre-existing PHT and that AVF can be the access of choice in patients with known chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22360582

  5. Progressive wheeze: atrial myxoma masquerading as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Aish; Apps, Andrew; Liong, Wei Chuen; Firoozan, Soroosh

    2015-01-01

    Atrial myxoma, the commonest primary cardiac neoplasm, presents with symptoms of heart failure, embolic phenomena or constitutional upset. We present an atypical case, with wheeze and symptomatic exacerbations typical of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. With no early clinical evidence of heart failure, the patient was managed with inhaled steroids and bronchodilators, with little relief. Only when the patient was in extremis requiring intubation, due to respiratory failure, did clinical evidence of left heart failure become apparent, with echocardiography demonstrating a massive left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve annulus. Following successful surgical resection, the patient's symptoms fully abated. This case highlights the importance of considering cardiac wheeze in those initially managed as obstructive airway disease not responding in a typical fashion to initial bronchodilator therapy, and particularly in those with rapidly progressive symptoms. Such patients should be referred early for cardiac imaging. The excellent prognosis and quick recovery after timely surgical resection of a myxoma are also highlighted. PMID:26206781

  6. [PULMONARY COMPLICATIONS IN CHILDREN, OPERATED ON FOR INBORN HEART FAILURES IN THE ARTIFICIAL BLOOD CIRCULATION ENVIRONMENT].

    PubMed

    Moshkivska, L V; Nastenko, E A; Golovenko, O S; Lazoryshynets, V V

    2015-11-01

    The risk factors of pulmonary complications occurrence were analyzed in children, operated on for inborn heart failures in atrificial blood circulation environment. Pulmonary complications rate and the risk factors of their occurrence were analyzed. PMID:26939427

  7. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about African-Americans and stroke at our Power To End Stroke website This content was last reviewed July 2015. ... Attack • Heart Failure (HF) • Heart Valve Problems and Disease • High Blood ...

  8. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000775.htm Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease To use the ... often develops over time. You may have early signs or symptoms long before you have serious heart ...

  9. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease. PMID:27226153

  10. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers during development and in adult life can cause either embryonic lethality or congenital heart diseases, and influences the response of adult hearts to pathological stresses. In this review, we describe current body of literature on the role of several common histone methylations and their modifying enzymes in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases. PMID:25942538

  11. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Congenital Heart Defects Endocarditis Heart Murmur How the Heart Works Mitral Valve ... This rare but serious infection is called infective endocarditis . The germs can enter the bloodstream through needles, ...

  12. Pulmonary complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Ruby A; Musallam, Khaled M; Mroueh, Salman; Abboud, Miguel R

    2011-01-01

    The pulmonary complications of sickle cell disease are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease and has a multifactorial etiology. Hydroxyurea (HU), stem cell transplantation (SCT) and chronic transfusions are known to prevent the recurrence of ACS. Careful management of patients admitted for pain crises and surgery including use of incentive spirometry is critical in preventing this complication. Pulmonary hypertension is well known to be associated with sickle cell disease and patients with pulmonary hypertension have increased mortality. Asthma is also commonly seen in patients with sickle cell disease and is associated with a more complicated course. Chronic lung disease develops in a significant proportion of patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:21973051

  13. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease presenting with thrombosis of pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, D. S.; Scalzetti, E. M.; Katzenstein, A. L.; Kohman, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension. An unusual case presenting with thrombosis of the right pulmonary artery and serological evidence of autoimmunity is reported. Images PMID:7638821

  14. Acute effects of riociguat in borderline or manifest pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Staehler, Gerd; Grünig, Ekkehard; Halank, Michael; Mitrovic, Veselin; Unger, Sigrun; Mueck, Wolfgang; Frey, Reiner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Schermuly, Ralph T.; Behr, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Riociguat is the first oral soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (PH). This pilot study assessed the impact of a single dose of riociguat on hemodynamics, gas exchange, and lung function in patients with PH associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adults with COPD-associated borderline or manifest PH (pulmonary vascular resistance > 270 dyn·s·cm−5, mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 23 mmHg, ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] to forced vital capacity < 70%, and partial pressure of oxygen and carbon dioxide in arterial blood > 50 and ≤ 55 mmHg, respectively) received riociguat 1 or 2.5 mg during right heart catheterization. Twenty-two patients completed the study (11 men, 11 women, aged 56–82 years; 1-mg group: n = 10 [mean FEV1: 43.1%]; 2.5-mg group: n = 12 [mean FEV1: 41.2%]). Riociguat caused significant improvements (P < 0.01) from baseline in mean pulmonary artery pressure (1 mg: −3.60 mmHg [−11.44%]; 2.5 mg: −4.83 mmHg [−14.76%]) and pulmonary vascular resistance (1 mg: −58.32 dyn·s·cm−5 [−15.35%]; 2.5 mg: −123.8 dyn·s·cm−5 [−32.96%]). No relevant changes in lung function or gas exchange were observed. Single doses of riociguat were well tolerated and showed promising hemodynamic effects without untoward effects on gas exchange or lung function in patients with COPD-associated PH. Placebo-controlled studies of chronic treatment with riociguat are warranted. PMID:26064454

  15. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular diseases--'cardiopulmonary continuum'].

    PubMed

    Batura-Gabryel, Halina; Grabicki, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by persistent airflow limitation and extrapulmonary comorbidities, which contribute to the overall severity. Some risk factors, with tobacco smoking as the most serious one, lead to a chronic, systemic inflammation that plays the main role in the pathogenesis of COPD and comorbidities, including cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The course of COPD is diverse; it depends on pathologies in the respiratory system and on other organ dysfunctions. CVDs are the most commonly recognised comorbidities in COPD patients. The severity and natural course of COPD, as well as quality of the patient's life, are influenced by them. CVDs are frequently the reason for hospitalisation and may lead to death. They are also an important prognostic factor. Comorbidities may prolong exacerbation of COPD. On the other hand, COPD is an independent risk factor of CVD. The prevalence of COPD is high in patients suffering from coronary artery disease, and airflow limitation is a major risk factor for chronic heart failure. These complex interactions between heart and lung can be denoted as 'cardiopulmonary continuum'. These dependencies are not recognised in detail. Currently research is being done, which attempts to explain these complicated relations. For many years COPD and CVD were not connected. Today it is known that patients suffering from COPD must be provided comprehensive care. It is necessary to monitor the risk of CVD and their influence on the COPD course. Careful and proper treatment of all diseases is essential. An interdisciplinary team with good cooperation should prepare a plan of COPD treatment with simultaneous therapy of comorbidities. PMID:25339571

  16. Transplantation in end-stage pulmonary hypertension (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 3).

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha

    2014-12-01

    The Third International Right Heart Summit was organized for the purpose of bringing an interdisciplinary group of expert physician-scientists together to promote dialogue involving emerging concepts in the unique pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, and therapies of pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and right heart failure (RHF). This review summarizes key ideas addressed in the section of the seminar entitled "Transplantation in End-Stage Pulmonary Hypertension." The first segment focused on paradigms of recovery for the failing right ventricle (RV) within the context of lung-alone versus dual-organ heart-lung transplantation. The subsequent 2-part section was devoted to emerging concepts in RV salvage therapy. A presentation of evolving cell-based therapy for the reparation of diseased tissue was followed by a contemporary perspective on the role of mechanical circulatory support in the setting of RV failure. The final talk highlighted cutting-edge research models utilizing stem cell biology to repair diseased tissue in end-stage lung disease-a conceptual framework within which new therapies for PVD have potential to evolve. Together, these provocative talks provided a novel outlook on how the treatment of PVD and RHF can be approached. PMID:25610607

  17. The genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Alice M; Stockley, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease caused by the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental influences. There is increasing evidence that genes link to disease pathogenesis and heterogeneity by causing variation in protease anti-protease systems, defence against oxidative stress and inflammation. The main methods of genomic research for complex disease traits are described, together with the genes implicated in COPD thus far, their roles in disease causation and the future for this area of investigation. PMID:17054776

  18. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed. PMID:26218181

  19. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  20. Liver diseases in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Majid; Vakilian, Farveh; Amin, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a growing public health concern as a consequence of the ageing of the population and the improved survival of patients with HF. HF is defined as impaired organ perfusion and/or high filling pressure. It is a systemic and chronic disease and as such involves many organs, not least the liver and kidney. The complex vascular system of the liver and its high metabolic activity render it vulnerable to circulation disturbances and trigger many molecular and haemodynamic changes in patients. There are many studies describing the impact of liver disease on patient outcomes. Hepatic dysfunction is commonly seen in HF patients and is closely correlated with a poor outcome. Knowledge about the mechanisms and impacts of liver disease in HF helps us to know the stage of the disease and treat it properly. Moreover, many drugs and toxins that are metabolised in the liver and contribute to drug interactions should also be taken into account when prescribing medication for HF patients. In light of the above-mentioned points, the authors have compiled this review on congestive hepatopathy with the aim of providing physicians and cardiologists with a succinct and useful guide on the role of the liver in HF. PMID:27326014

  1. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease mimicking lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the features and clinical implications of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNB) in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease manifesting as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. Among a cohort of 388 patients with NTM pulmonary disease, 14 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected lung cancer were included in our study. Two chest radiologists evaluated CT features, including lesion type (nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation), morphologic features (margin, degree of enhancement, calcification), and presence of accompanying findings suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease (bronchiectasis with clustered centrilobular nodules or upper-lobe cavitary lesions) by consensus. Diagnostic procedures for microbiologic diagnosis of NTM disease and clinical outcome were reviewed. Incidence of NTM pulmonary disease presenting as solitary nodule/mass (n = 8) or mass-like consolidation (n = 6) was 3.6% (14 of 388). Most lesions were detected incidentally during routine health check-up or evaluation of other disease (11 of 14, 79%). Lesions typically showed poor contrast-enhancement (9 of 12) and internal calcification (6 of 14). No lesions had CT features suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease. All 4 lesions for which PET/CT imaging was performed showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose uptake simulating malignant lesions (mean, 4.9; range, 3.6–7.8). PCNB revealed mycobacterial histology in 6 of 11 specimens and positive culture results were obtained for 7 of 7 specimens. NTM pulmonary disease may present as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. CT features and PCNB are important to diagnose NTM disease mimicking lung cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:27367996

  2. [Pulmonary manifestations of connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Rehbock, B

    2015-03-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are responsible for about 25% of all deaths due to interstitial lung disease; therefore, an early identification of patients with pulmonary manifestation changes the management. Detection, differential diagnostic classification and staging of the pneumological pattern of findings are largely based on high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT). The main differential diagnostic challenges are interstitial manifestations which present with radiological-histopathological phenotypes of interstitial pneumonia. The most common form of interstitial pulmonary reaction form of connective tissue diseases is the nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) pattern. In rheumatoid arthritis, a usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern is dominant. Uncharacteristic reactions of airways and pleura can be the leading symptom or present as accompanying findings. A serious complication is pulmonary hypertension. Drug-induced lung lesions can present with similar HR-CT morphology as connective tissue diseases and can only be differentiated in the temporal and clinical context. PMID:25693496

  3. Transplantation in end-stage pulmonary hypertension (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 3)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Third International Right Heart Summit was organized for the purpose of bringing an interdisciplinary group of expert physician-scientists together to promote dialogue involving emerging concepts in the unique pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, and therapies of pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and right heart failure (RHF). This review summarizes key ideas addressed in the section of the seminar entitled “Transplantation in End-Stage Pulmonary Hypertension.” The first segment focused on paradigms of recovery for the failing right ventricle (RV) within the context of lung-alone versus dual-organ heart-lung transplantation. The subsequent 2-part section was devoted to emerging concepts in RV salvage therapy. A presentation of evolving cell-based therapy for the reparation of diseased tissue was followed by a contemporary perspective on the role of mechanical circulatory support in the setting of RV failure. The final talk highlighted cutting-edge research models utilizing stem cell biology to repair diseased tissue in end-stage lung disease—a conceptual framework within which new therapies for PVD have potential to evolve. Together, these provocative talks provided a novel outlook on how the treatment of PVD and RHF can be approached. PMID:25610607

  4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Prevalence and Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes data on chronic pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence and deaths across the U.S. for the time periods 1997-2009 and 1979-2007, respectively. COPD, also known as chronic lung disease, may be partly caused or exacerbated by environmental exposures such as ...

  5. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  6. Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Grünig, Ekkehard

    2012-05-28

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a group of distinct disorders that includes idiopathic PAH (IPAH), familial PAH and PAH associated with other conditions (APAH) such as connective tissue disease (CTD-APAH) or congenital heart disease. PAH is characterized by increased pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. If left untreated, PAH can lead to right heart failure and premature death. CTD-APAH represents an important clinical subgroup of APAH that has a higher risk of death than IPAH. The European treatment guidelines advocate the use of PAH-targeted therapies including bosentan, ambrisentan, sildenafil, inhaled iloprost, intravenous epoprostenol (I-A recommendations), tadalafil or treprostinil (I-B recommendations) for patients in WHO functional class II-III. Not all randomized clinical studies of the approved PAH-targeted therapies have included patients with CTD-APAH. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical characteristics of CTD-APAH and discuss the approved pharmacological treatments, with a focus on data specific to this subgroup where possible. PMID:22621693

  7. Coconut Atrium in Long-Standing Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Takahisa; Idei, Yuka; Otsui, Kazunori; Iwata, Sachiyo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ozawa, Toru; Domoto, Koji; Takei, Asumi; Inamoto, Shinya; Inoue, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Rheumatic valvular heart disease Symptoms: Breathlessness and leg edema Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Medical treatment for heart failure Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Complete calcification of the left atrium (LA) is called “coconut atrium”, which decreases the compliance of LA, leading to the elevation of LA pressure that is transmitted to the right-side of the heart. The pathogenesis of LA calcification in patients with rheumatic heart disease is unknown; however, possible mechanisms include chronic strain force in the atrial wall and inflammation. We report here a patient with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease with coconut atrium. Case Report: A 76-year-old man presented with breathlessness and leg edema due to right-sided heart failure. He was diagnosed with rheumatic fever at 8 years of age. Mitral commissurotomy and the mitral and aortic valve replacement were previously performed to treat mitral and aortic valvular stenosis. The profile view of the chest X-ray indicated a diffuse calcified outline of the LA wall. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hyper-tension and dilatation of both atria. Moreover, computed tomography showed nearly circumferential calcification of the LA wall. Despite intense medical treatment, he succumbed to heart failure. An autopsy demonstrated that the LA was markedly dilated, its wall was calcified, and its appearance was similar to the surface of an atherosclerotic aorta. Microscopic examination revealed intensive calcification in the endocardium. Minimal accumulation of inflammatory cells was noted. Although slight fibrosis was observed, the cardiac musculature was preserved. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that identifies the histological changes of LA calcification associated with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease. PMID:25819539

  8. High-altitude disorders: pulmonary hypertension: pulmonary vascular disease: the global perspective.

    PubMed

    Pasha, M A Qadar; Newman, John H

    2010-06-01

    Globally, it is estimated that > 140 million people live at a high altitude (HA), defined as > 2,500 m (8,200 ft), and that countless others sojourn to the mountains for work, travel, and sport. The distribution of exposure to HA is worldwide, including 35 million in the Andes and > 80 million in Asia, including China and central Asia. HA stress primarily is due to the hypoxia of low atmospheric pressure, but dry air, intense solar radiation, extreme cold, and exercise contribute to acute and chronic disorders. The acute disorders are acute mountain sickness (also known as soroche), HA cerebral edema, and HA pulmonary edema (HAPE). Of these, HAPE is highly correlated with acute pulmonary hypertension. The first chronic syndrome described in HA dwellers in Peru was chronic mountain sickness (Monge disease), which has a large component of relative hypoventilation and secondary erythrocytosis. The prevalence of chronic mountain sickness in HA dwellers ranges from 1.2% in native Tibetans to 5.6% in Chinese Han; 6% to 8% in male residents of La Paz, Bolivia; and 15.6% in the Andes. Subacute mountain sickness is an exaggerated pulmonary hypertensive response to HA hypoxia occurring over months, most often in infants and very young children. Chronic pulmonary hypertension with heart failure but without hypoventilation is seen in Asia. Not only does HA pulmonary hypertension exact health consequences for the millions affected, but also the mechanisms of disease relate to pulmonary hypertension associated with multiple other disorders. Genetic understanding of these disorders is in its infancy. PMID:20522576

  9. Pediatric Tubular Pulmonary Heart Valve from Decellularized Engineered Tissue Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Jay M.; Syedain, Zeeshan H.; Haynie, Bee H.T.; Tranquillo, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric patients account for a small portion of the heart valve replacements performed, but a pediatric pulmonary valve replacement with growth potential remains an unmet clinical need. Herein we report the first tubular heart valve made from two decellularized, engineered tissue tubes attached with absorbable sutures, which can meet this need, in principle. Engineered tissue tubes were fabricated by allowing ovine dermal fibroblasts to replace a sacrificial fibrin gel with an aligned, cell-produced collagenous matrix, which was subsequently decellularized. Previously, these engineered tubes became extensively recellularized following implantation into the sheep femoral artery. Thus, a tubular valve made from these tubes may be amenable to recellularization and, ideally, somatic growth. The suture line pattern generated three equi-spaced “leaflets” in the inner tube, which collapsed inward when exposed to back pressure, per tubular valve design. Valve testing was performed in a pulse duplicator system equipped with a secondary flow loop to allow for root distention. All tissue-engineered valves exhibited full leaflet opening and closing, minimal regurgitation (< 5%), and low systolic pressure gradients (< 2.5 mmHg) under pulmonary conditions. Valve performance was maintained under various trans-root pressure gradients and no tissue damage was evident after 2 million cycles of fatigue testing. PMID:26036175

  10. Imaging the heart in pulmonary hypertension: an update.

    PubMed

    Grünig, Ekkehard; Peacock, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Noninvasive imaging of the heart plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary hypertension (PH), and several well-established techniques are available for assessing performance of the right ventricle, the key determinant of patient survival. While right heart catheterisation is mandatory for establishing a diagnosis of PH, echocardiography is the most important screening tool for early detection of PH. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is also a reliable and practical tool that can be used as part of the diagnostic work-up. Echocardiography can measure a range of haemodynamic and anatomical variables (e.g. pericardial effusion and pulmonary artery pressure), whereas CMRI provides complementary information to echocardiography via high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging. Together with echocardiography and CMRI, techniques such as high-resolution computed tomography and positron emission tomography may also be valuable for screening, monitoring and follow-up assessments of patients with PH, but their clinical relevance has yet to be established. Technological advances have produced new variants of echocardiography, CMRI and positron emission tomography, and these permit closer examination of myocardial architecture, motion and deformation. Integrating these new tools into clinical practice in the future may lead to more precise noninvasive determination of diagnosis, risk and prognosis for PH. PMID:26621979

  11. Psychosocial factors in coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. P., Jr.; Chaplan, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relationship between job satisfaction and coronary heart disease is explored for blue and white collar groups, different personalities and physiological risk factors. Differences found among administrators, engineers and scientists with regard to variables associated with heart disease are in terms of physiology, personality, reported job stress, and smoking.

  12. Arrhythmias in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Robert M.; Tseng, Zian H.

    2014-01-01

    Late after surgical repair of complex congenital heart disease, atrial arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity, and ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death are a major cause of mortality. The six cases in this article highlight common challenges in the management of arrhythmias in the adult congenital heart disease population. PMID:25197326

  13. Right heart catheterisation: best practice and pitfalls in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Stephan; Preston, Ioana R

    2015-12-01

    Right heart catheterisation (RHC) plays a central role in identifying pulmonary hypertension (PH) disorders, and is required to definitively diagnose pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Despite widespread acceptance, there is a lack of guidance regarding the best practice for performing RHC in clinical practice. In order to ensure the correct evaluation of haemodynamic parameters directly measured or calculated from RHC, attention should be drawn to standardising procedures such as the position of the pressure transducer and catheter balloon inflation volume. Measurement of pulmonary arterial wedge pressure, in particular, is vulnerable to over- or under-wedging, which can give rise to false readings. In turn, errors in RHC measurement and data interpretation can complicate the differentiation of PAH from other PH disorders and lead to misdiagnosis. In addition to diagnosis, the role of RHC in conjunction with noninvasive tests is widening rapidly to encompass monitoring of treatment response and establishing prognosis of patients diagnosed with PAH. However, further standardisation of RHC is warranted to ensure optimal use in routine clinical practice. PMID:26621978

  14. Indications for Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siân Pincott, E; Burch, M

    2011-01-01

    In this review we have looked at indications for cardiac transplantation in congenital heart disease. An outline of the general principles of the use of transplant as a management strategy both as a first line treatment and following other surgical interventions is discussed. We explore the importance of the timing of patient referral and the evaluations undertaken, and how the results of these may vary between patients with congenital heart disease and patients with other causes of end-stage heart failure. The potential complications associated with patients with congenital heart disease need to be both anticipated and managed appropriately by an experienced team. Timing of transplantation in congenital heart disease is difficult to standardize as the group of patients is heterogeneous. We discuss the role and limitations of investigations such as BNP, 6 minute walk, metabolic exercise testing and self estimated physical functioning. We also discuss the suitability for listing. It is clear that congenital heart patients should not be considered to be at uniform high risk of death at transplant. Morbidity varies greatly in the congenital patient population with the failing Fontan circulation having a far higher risk than a failing Mustard circulation. However the underlying issue of imbalance between donor organ supply and demand needs to be addressed as transplant teams are finding themselves in the increasingly difficult situation of supporting growing numbers of patients with a diverse range of pathologies with declining numbers of donor organs. PMID:22548027

  15. Pulmonary manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaude, Gajanan S.

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may cause, trigger or exacerbate many pulmonary diseases. The physiological link between GERD and pulmonary disease has been extensively studied in chronic cough and asthma. A primary care physician often encounters patients with extra esophageal manifestations of GERD in the absence of heartburn. Patients may present with symptoms involving the pulmonary system; noncardiac chest pain; and ear, nose and throat disorders. Local irritation in the esophagus can cause symptoms that vary from indigestion, like chest discomfort and abdominal pain, to coughing and wheezing. If the gastric acid reaches the back of the throat, it may cause a bitter taste in the mouth and/or aspiration of the gastric acid into the lungs. The acid can cause throat irritation, postnasal drip and hoarseness, as well as recurrent cough, chest congestion and lung inflammation leading to asthma and/or bronchitis/ pneumonia. This clinical review examines the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of pulmonary manifestations of GERD. It also reviews relevant clinical information concerning GERD-related chronic cough and asthma. Finally, a potential management strategy for GERD in pulmonary patients is discussed. PMID:19641641

  16. Evaluation of Hydatid Disease of the Heart with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kotoulas, Grigoris K.; Magoufis, George L.; Gouliamos, Athanasios D.; Athanassopoulou, Alexandra K.; Roussakis, Arcadios C.; Koulocheri, Dimitra P.; Kalovidouris, Angelos; Vlahos, Labros

    1996-05-15

    Two patients with cardiac involvement of hydatid disease are presented: one with hydatid cyst of the interventricular septum and pulmonary arteries and the other with multiple pulmonary cysts associated with intracardiac and pericardial cysts. The ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide a global view of cardiac anatomy in any plane with high contrast between flowing blood and soft tissue ensures it an important role in the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of hydatid disease of the heart.

  17. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  18. [Pulmonary complications in adult sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Maître, B; Mekontso-Dessap, A; Habibi, A; Bachir, D; Parent, F; Godeau, B; Galacteros, F

    2011-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autosomal genetic condition which represents the most frequent genetic disease in Île-de-France and Caribbean islands. The main clinical manifestations can be divided into infectious disease, hemolytic anemia and vaso-occlusive events. Pulmonary complications represent 20 to 30% of mortality due to sickle cell and can be divided into acute and chronic events. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is an acute lung injury often preceded by a vaso-occlusive crisis and triggered by different factors including: hypoventilation, pulmonary infectious disease and vascular occlusions. These occlusions can be secondary to fat embolism, thrombosis or sickling. Treatment is mainly supportive combining oxygen supplementation adequate hydration analgesia and sedation. Exchange transfusion may be indicated in severe forms of ACS, characterized by a right ventricular dysfunction and acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary hypertension is the most serious chronic complication. Its frequency is estimated at 6% in adult patients and is more often described in patients with venous ulcers and higher levels of chronic hemolysis. Prognosis is poor with 12.5% of patients dying in the first two years following diagnosis irrespective of the actual pulmonary artery pressure level. There are currently limited data on the effects of any treatment modality. Other respiratory complications such as sleep disorders and nocturnal hypoxemia, infiltrative lung disease and exertional dyspnea are described and should be considered. PMID:21402228

  19. Pulmonary hypertension complicating connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Joseph P; Belperio, John A; Saggar, Rajeev; Fishbein, Michael C; Saggar, Rajan

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may complicate connective tissue disease (CTD), particularly systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma), and markedly increases mortality. More than 70% of cases of PH complicating CTD occur in SSc, which is the major focus of this article. Pulmonary complications (i.e., interstitial lung disease [ILD] and PH) are the leading causes of scleroderma-related deaths. "Isolated" PH (i.e., without ILD) complicates SSc in 7.5 to 20% of cases; secondary PH may also occur in patients with SSc-associated ILD. Several clinical markers and specific autoantibody profiles have been associated with PH in SSc. The role of PH-specific therapy is controversial, as prognosis and responsiveness to therapy are worse in SSc-associated PH compared with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We discuss medical therapies for CTD-associated PH and the role of lung transplantation for patients failing medical therapy. PMID:24037627

  20. Heart Disease Detection Using Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González S., A.; Acosta P., J. L.; Sandoval M., M.

    2004-09-01

    We develop a wavelet based method to obtain standardized gray-scale chart of both healthy hearts and of hearts suffering left ventricular hypertrophy. The hypothesis that early bad functioning of heart can be detected must be tested by comparing the wavelet analysis of the corresponding ECD with the limit cases. Several important parameters shall be taken into account such as age, sex and electrolytic changes.

  1. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  2. Vasculopathy and pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Potoka, Karin P; Gladwin, Mark T

    2015-02-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in the gene encoding the β-chain of hemoglobin. Deoxygenation causes the mutant hemoglobin S to polymerize, resulting in rigid, adherent red blood cells that are entrapped in the microcirculation and hemolyze. Cardinal features include severe painful crises and episodic acute lung injury, called acute chest syndrome. This population, with age, develops chronic organ injury, such as chronic kidney disease and pulmonary hypertension. A major risk factor for developing chronic organ injury is hemolytic anemia, which releases red blood cell contents into the circulation. Cell free plasma hemoglobin, heme, and arginase 1 disrupt endothelial function, drive oxidative and inflammatory stress, and have recently been referred to as erythrocyte damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (eDAMPs). Studies suggest that in addition to effects of cell free plasma hemoglobin on scavenging nitric oxide (NO) and generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), heme released from plasma hemoglobin can bind to the toll-like receptor 4 to activate the innate immune system. Persistent intravascular hemolysis over decades leads to chronic vasculopathy, with ∼10% of patients developing pulmonary hypertension. Progressive obstruction of small pulmonary arterioles, increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, decreased cardiac output, and eventual right heart failure causes death in many patients with this complication. This review provides an overview of the pathobiology of hemolysis-mediated endothelial dysfunction and eDAMPs and a summary of our present understanding of diagnosis and management of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease, including a review of recent American Thoracic Society (ATS) consensus guidelines for risk stratification and management. PMID:25398989

  3. Vasculopathy and pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Potoka, Karin P.

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in the gene encoding the β-chain of hemoglobin. Deoxygenation causes the mutant hemoglobin S to polymerize, resulting in rigid, adherent red blood cells that are entrapped in the microcirculation and hemolyze. Cardinal features include severe painful crises and episodic acute lung injury, called acute chest syndrome. This population, with age, develops chronic organ injury, such as chronic kidney disease and pulmonary hypertension. A major risk factor for developing chronic organ injury is hemolytic anemia, which releases red blood cell contents into the circulation. Cell free plasma hemoglobin, heme, and arginase 1 disrupt endothelial function, drive oxidative and inflammatory stress, and have recently been referred to as erythrocyte damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (eDAMPs). Studies suggest that in addition to effects of cell free plasma hemoglobin on scavenging nitric oxide (NO) and generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), heme released from plasma hemoglobin can bind to the toll-like receptor 4 to activate the innate immune system. Persistent intravascular hemolysis over decades leads to chronic vasculopathy, with ∼10% of patients developing pulmonary hypertension. Progressive obstruction of small pulmonary arterioles, increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, decreased cardiac output, and eventual right heart failure causes death in many patients with this complication. This review provides an overview of the pathobiology of hemolysis-mediated endothelial dysfunction and eDAMPs and a summary of our present understanding of diagnosis and management of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease, including a review of recent American Thoracic Society (ATS) consensus guidelines for risk stratification and management. PMID:25398989

  4. "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of ... Articles "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease / Women and Heart Disease / Blood Pressure ...

  5. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease? Some people ... have diabetic heart disease (DHD) may have no signs or symptoms of heart disease. This is called “ ...

  6. Coronary heart disease at altitude.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J K

    1994-01-01

    In the past, it has been assumed that some basic physiologic responses to altitude, exposure in coronary patients are comparable to those in normal young subjects. In fact there are similar changes in sympathetic activation, heart rate, and blood pressure early after ascent, with decrements in plasma volume, cardiac output, and stroke volume as acclimatization proceeds. These responses are described, and experience with coronary patients is reviewed. During the 1st 2 to 3 days at altitude, coronary patients are at greatest risk of untoward events. Gradual rather than abrupt ascent, a moderate degree of physical conditioning, early limitation of activity to a level tolerated at low altitude for somewhat less), and attention to blood pressure control all appear to have protective effects. Ascent to moderate altitude appears to entail little risk in coronary patients who are asymptomatic or have moderate exercise tolerance, provided that the above precautions are observed and that activity does not exceed levels at lower altitude. If activity is to be increased, pre-ascent treadmill exercise testing or Holter monitor data secured under conditions comparable to those anticipated at altitude may provide reasonable guidelines. For coronary patients previously evaluated and known to be in a high-risk category, indications for ascent should be examined more critically, and precautionary measures should be more rigorous. Advice for patients with known coronary disease who may desire to trek at very high altitude must involve individual evaluation, and guidelines remain elusive. PMID:7888800

  7. Lipoproteins, nutrition, and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Ernst J

    2002-02-01

    This article reviews the current status of our knowledge of lipoproteins, nutrition, and coronary heart disease (CHD). Special emphasis is placed on CHD risk assessment, dietary intervention studies, diet-gene interactions, and current dietary guidelines and the contributions of my laboratory to these areas. CHD remains a major cause of death and disability, and risk factors include age, sex, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, elevated serum LDL cholesterol, and low HDL cholesterol. Emerging independent risk factors include elevated serum concentrations of lipoprotein(a), remnant lipoproteins, and homocysteine. The cornerstone of CHD prevention is lifestyle modification. Dietary intervention studies support the concepts that restricting saturated fat and cholesterol and increasing the intake of essential fatty acids, especially n - 3 fatty acids, reduces CHD risk. The variability in LDL-cholesterol response to diet is large, related in part to APOE and APOA4 genotype. The use of antioxidants in intervention studies has not been shown to reduce CHD risk. Compliance with dietary recommendations remains a major problem, and directly altering the food supply may be the most effective way to ensure compliance. The available data indicate that the recommendation to use fats, oils, and sugars sparingly for CHD prevention should be modified to a recommendation to use animal, dairy, and hydrogenated fats; tropical oils; egg yolks; and sugars sparingly and to increase the use of vegetables, fruit, and whole grains. PMID:11815309

  8. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation.

  9. Ischaemic heart disease in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Bondagji, Nabeel S.

    2012-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in pregnancy, particularly myocardial infarction (MI), is a rare yet potentially fatal condition for the mother and the foetus. With delays in the age of conception, the changes in some social habits among females including cigarette and shisha smoking in addition to an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus, IHD may represent a real hazard among pregnant women in the near future. The difficulty in the diagnosis emerges from the similarity of the signs and symptoms of ischaemia and infarct to some of the physiological adaptations that occur in a normal pregnancy. The physiological changes that are normal in pregnancy may aggravate pre-existing disease and may unmask some underlying unrecognized coronary vascular changes; therefore, the diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and careful assessment of the underlying risk factors. The management of IHD always requires a multidisciplinary team approach. The management of each patient should be individualized according to the clinical condition, the risk factors, and the availability of the necessary support. Pregnancy after MI may be an acceptable and reasonably safe option provided the cited criteria are met. A systematic PubMed search was performed to identify all published data including cases reports, small series and systematic reviews in the existing literature. These publications were comprised of both retrospective and cross sectional population studies to maximize the number of cases considered in order to reach conclusions and make recommendations based on the best available evidence considering the rare occurrence of this event. The epidemiology, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment, and prognosis of IHD in pregnancy are the subjects of the present review. PMID:23960678

  10. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  11. Mechanical analysis of ovine and pediatric pulmonary artery for heart valve stent design.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, M S; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Bogers, A J J C; Hoerstrup, S P; Baaijens, F P T

    2013-08-01

    Transcatheter heart valve replacement is an attractive and promising technique for congenital as well as acquired heart valve disease. In this procedure, the replacement valve is mounted in a stent that is expanded at the aimed valve position and fixated by clamping. However, for this technique to be appropriate for pediatric patients, the material properties of the host tissue need to be determined to design stents that can be optimized for this particular application. In this study we performed equibiaxial tensile tests on four adult ovine pulmonary artery walls and compared the outcomes with one pediatric pulmonary artery. Results show that the pediatric pulmonary artery was significantly thinner (1.06 ± 0.36 mm (mean ± SD)) than ovine tissue (2.85 ± 0.40 mm), considerably stiffer for strain values that exceed the physiological conditions (beyond 50% strain in the circumferential and 60% in the longitudinal direction), more anisotropic (with a significant difference in stiffness between the longitudinal and circumferential directions beyond 60% strain) and presented stronger non-linear stress-strain behavior at equivalent strains (beyond 26% strain) compared to ovine tissue. These discrepancies suggest that stents validated and optimized using the ovine pre-clinical model might not perform satisfactorily in pediatric patients. The material parameters derived from this study may be used to develop stent designs for both applications using computational models. PMID:23849135

  12. Pulmonary disease following intravesical BCG treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Kesten, S; Title, L; Mullen, B; Grossman, R

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that has been used in the treatment of malignant disease for over 20 years and for the treatment of bladder cancer since 1976. Major complications of this treatment are infrequent. We report two cases of systemic illness with pulmonary manifestations after treatment with intravesical BCG. Images PMID:2218978

  13. Hemodynamic assessment and acute pulmonary vasoreactivity testing in the evaluation of children with pulmonary vascular disease. Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Apitz, Christian; Hansmann, Georg; Schranz, Dietmar

    2016-05-01

    Invasive assessment of haemodynamics (ventricular, pulmonary) and testing of acute vasoreactivity in the catheterisation laboratory remain the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease. However, these measurements and the interpretation thereof are challenging due to the heterogeneous aetiology of PH in childhood and potentially confounding factors in the catheterisation laboratory. Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with congenital heart disease who have a cardiovascular shunt need to undergo a completely different catheterisation approach than those with idiopathic PAH lacking an anatomical cardiovascular defect. Diagnostic cardiac catheterisation of children with suspected PH usually includes right and left heart catheterisation, particularly for the initial assessment (ie, at the time of diagnosis), and should be performed in experienced centres only. Here, we present graded consensus recommendations for the invasive evaluation of children with PH including those with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease and/or ventricular dysfunction. Based on the limited published studies and our own experience we suggest a structured catheterisation protocol and two separate definitions of positive acute vasoreactivity testing (AVT): (1) AVT to assess prognosis and indication for specific PH therapy, and (2) AVT to assess operability of PAH associated with congenital heart disease. The protocol and the latter definitions may help in the systematic assessment of these patients and the interpretation of the obtained data. Beyond an accurate diagnosis in the individual patient, such a structured approach may allow systematic decision making for the initiation of a specific treatment and may assist in estimating disease progression and individual prognosis. PMID:27053694

  14. A consensus approach to the classification of pediatric pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: Report from the PVRI Pediatric Taskforce, Panama 2011

    PubMed Central

    del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Abman, Steven; Diaz, Gabriel; Freudenthal, Alexandra Heath; Freudenthal, Franz; Harikrishnan, S.; Haworth, Sheila G.; Ivy, Dunbar; Lopes, Antonio A.; Raj, J. Usha; Sandoval, Julio; Stenmark, Kurt; Adatia, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Current classifications of pulmonary hypertension have contributed a great deal to our understanding of pulmonary vascular disease, facilitated drug trials, and improved our understanding of congenital heart disease in adult survivors. However, these classifications are not applicable readily to pediatric disease. The classification system that we propose is based firmly in clinical practice. The specific aims of this new system are to improve diagnostic strategies, to promote appropriate clinical investigation, to improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis, physiology and epidemiology, and to guide the development of human disease models in laboratory and animal studies. It should be also an educational resource. We emphasize the concepts of perinatal maladaptation, maldevelopment and pulmonary hypoplasia as causative factors in pediatric pulmonary hypertension. We highlight the importance of genetic, chromosomal and multiple congenital malformation syndromes in the presentation of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. We divide pediatric pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease into 10 broad categories. PMID:21874158

  15. Pulmonary manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms are examples of variable extraintestinal manifestations of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These complications of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) seem to be underrecognized by both pulmonary physicians and gastroenterologists. The objective of the present review was to gather and summarize information on this particular matter, on the basis of available up-to-date literature. Tracheobronchial involvement is the most prevalent respiratory presentation, whereas IBD-related interstitial lung disease is less frequent. Latent and asymptomatic pulmonary involvement is not unusual. Differential diagnosis should always consider infections (mainly tuberculosis) and drug-induced lung pathology. The common link between intestinal disease and lung pathology is unknown, but many hypotheses have been proposed. It is speculated that environmental pollution, common immunological mechanisms and predisposing genetic factors may play a role. PMID:26788078

  16. Pulmonary manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Sebastian; Piotrowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-10

    Bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms are examples of variable extraintestinal manifestations of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These complications of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) seem to be underrecognized by both pulmonary physicians and gastroenterologists. The objective of the present review was to gather and summarize information on this particular matter, on the basis of available up-to-date literature. Tracheobronchial involvement is the most prevalent respiratory presentation, whereas IBD-related interstitial lung disease is less frequent. Latent and asymptomatic pulmonary involvement is not unusual. Differential diagnosis should always consider infections (mainly tuberculosis) and drug-induced lung pathology. The common link between intestinal disease and lung pathology is unknown, but many hypotheses have been proposed. It is speculated that environmental pollution, common immunological mechanisms and predisposing genetic factors may play a role. PMID:26788078

  17. Implantation of Total Artificial Heart in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Iki; Morales, David S. L.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with end-stage heart failure (HF), a total artificial heart (TAH) may be implanted as a bridge to cardiac transplant. However, in congenital heart disease (CHD), the malformed heart presents a challenge to TAH implantation. In the case presented here, a 17 year-old patient with congenital transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) experienced progressively worsening HF due to his congenital condition. He was hospitalized multiple times and received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). However, his condition soon deteriorated to end-stage HF with multisystem organ failure. Due to the patient's grave clinical condition and the presence of complex cardiac lesions, the decision was made to proceed with a TAH. The abnormal arrangement of the patient's ventricles and great arteries required modifications to the TAH during implantation. With the TAH in place, the patient was able to return home and regain strength and physical well-being while awaiting a donor heart. He was successfully bridged to heart transplantation 5 months after receiving the device. This report highlights the TAH is feasible even in patients with structurally abnormal hearts, with technical modification. PMID:25078059

  18. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding. PMID:22723532

  19. [Indications for surgery for valvular heart disease].

    PubMed

    Halbach, Marcel; Wahlers, Thorsten; Baldus, Stephan; Rudolph, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Due to the demographic change, chronic valvular heart disease becomes increasingly important - especially age-related primary diseases of the aortic and mitral valve as well as secondary diseases of the mitral and tricuspid valve caused by other age-related cardiac disorders. Medical treatment is limited to symptom relief by use of diuretics. Specific drugs or drugs with a prognostic benefit are not available. Thus, valve repair or replacement are the key options for treatment of relevant valvular heart disease. While open heart surgery was the only approach for a long time, interventional, catheter-based therapies have evolved in the last decade. This article describes up-to-date recommendations on indications for surgery for the most prevalent valvular heart diseases in adults - aortic stenosis, and aortic, mitral and tricuspid regurgitation). PMID:26583817

  20. Inapparent pulmonary vascular disease in an ex-heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli Incalzi, R.; Ludovico Maini, C.; Giuliano Bonetti, M.; Campioni, P.; Pistelli, R.; Fuso, L.

    1986-04-01

    A severe pulmonary vascular derangement, usually reported in drug addicts, was diagnosed in a 28-year-old asymptomatic ex-heroin user by means of fortuitously performed pulmonary perfusion imaging. Neither physical findings nor pulmonary function tests, aroused suspicion of the diagnosis. A search for asymptomatic pulmonary vascular disease probably should be undertaken in drug addicts.

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: clinical integrative physiology.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Webb, Katherine; Neder, J Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral airway dysfunction, inhomogeneous ventilation distribution, gas trapping, and impaired pulmonary gas exchange are variably present in all stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This article provides a cogent physiologic explanation for the relentless progression of activity-related dyspnea and exercise intolerance that all too commonly characterizes COPD. The spectrum of physiologic derangements that exist in smokers with mild airway obstruction and a history compatible with COPD is examined. Also explored are the perceptual and physiologic consequences of progressive erosion of the resting inspiratory capacity. Finally, emerging information on the role of cardiocirculatory impairment in contributing to exercise intolerance in patients with varying degrees of airway obstruction is reviewed. PMID:24507837

  2. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive and interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Charlotte U; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Hilberg, Ole; Simonsen, Ulf

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge on PH in relation to COPD and ILD from a clinical perspective with emphasis on diagnosis, biomarkers, prevalence, impact, treatment, and practical implications. PH in COPD and ILD is associated with a poor prognosis, and is considered one of the most frequent types of PH. However, the prevalence of PH among patients with COPD and ILD is not clear. The diagnosis of PH in chronic lung disease is often established by echocardiographic screening, but definitive diagnosis requires right heart catheterization, which is not systematically performed in clinical practice. Given the large number of patients with chronic lung disease, biomarkers to preclude or increase suspicion of PH are needed. NT-proBNP may be used as a rule-out test, but biomarkers with a high specificity for PH are still required. It is not known whether specific treatment with existent drugs effective in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is beneficial in lung disease related PH. Studies investigating existing PAH drugs in animal models of lung disease related PH have indicated a positive effect, and so have case reports and open label studies. However, treatment with systemically administered pulmonary vasodilators implies the risk of worsening the ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with lung disease. Inhaled vasodilators may be better suited for PH in lung disease, but new treatment modalities are also required. PMID:23849967

  3. [Pulmonary involvement in connective tissue disease].

    PubMed

    Bartosiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The connective tissue diseases are a variable group of autoimmune mediated disorders characterized by multiorgan damage. Pulmonary complications are common, usually occur after the onset of joint symptoms, but can also be initially presenting complaint. The respiratory system may be involved in all its component: airways, vessels, parenchyma, pleura and respiratory muscles. Lung involvement is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in the connective tissue diseases. Clinical course is highly variable - can range from mild to rapidly progressive, some processes are reversible, while others are irreversible. Thus, the identification of reversible disease , and separately progressive disease, are important clinical issues. The frequency, clinical presentation, prognosis and responce to therapy are different, depending on the pattern of involvement as well as on specyfic diagnostic method used to identify it. High- resolution computed tompography plays an important role in identifying patients with respiratory involvement. Pulmonary function tests are a sensitive tool detecting interstitial lung disease. In this article, pulmonary lung involvement accompanying most frequently apperaing connective tissue diseases - rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, Sjögrens syndrome and mixed connective tissue disaese are reviewed. PMID:27421127

  4. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure , and/or diabetic cardiomyopathy . Initially, your doctor may recommend one or more of the following tests. Blood Pressure Measurement To measure your blood pressure, your doctor or nurse will use some type of a gauge, a stethoscope (or electronic sensor), ...

  5. Pulmonary Pressures and Death in Heart Failure: A Community Study

    PubMed Central

    Bursi, Francesca; McNallan, Sheila M.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Nkomo, Vuyisile T.; Lam, Carolyn S.P.; Weston, Susan A.; Jiang, Ruoxiang; Roger, Véronique L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine among community patients with heart failure (HF), whether pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) assessed by Doppler echocardiography was associated with death and improved risk prediction over established factors, using the integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Background While several studies have focused on idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, less is known about pulmonary hypertension among patients with HF, particularly on its prognostic value in the community. Methods Olmsted County residents with HF between 2003 and 2010 prospectively underwent assessment of ejection fraction (EF), diastolic function, and PASP by Doppler echocardiography. Results PASP was recorded in 1049 of 1153 patients (mean age 76±13, 51% women). Median PASP was 48 mmHg (25th-75th percentile, 37.0-58.0). There were 489 deaths after a follow-up of 2.7±1.9 years. There was a strong positive graded association between PASP and mortality. Increasing PASP was associated with an increased risk of death (HR 1.45, 95%CI 1.13-1.85 for tertile 2; HR 2.07, 95%CI 1.62-2.64 for tertile 3, versus tertile 1), independently of age, sex, comorbidities, EF and diastolic function. Adding PASP to models including these clinical characteristics resulted in an increase in the c-statistic from 0.704 to 0.742 (p=0.007), an IDI gain of 4.2% (p<0.001), and an NRI of 14.1% (p=0.002), indicating that PASP improved prediction of death over traditional prognostic factors. All results were similar for CV death. Conclusion Among community patients with HF, PASP strongly predicts death and provides incremental and clinically relevant prognostic information independently of known predictors of outcomes. PMID:22240126

  6. Caring for infants with congenital heart disease and their families.

    PubMed

    Saenz, R B; Beebe, D K; Triplett, L C

    1999-04-01

    Congenital heart defects are classified into two broad categories: acyanotic and cyanotic lesions. The most common acyanotic lesions are ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, atrioventricular canal, pulmonary stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, aortic stenosis and coarctation of the aorta. Congestive heart failure is the primary concern in infants with acyanotic lesions. The most common cyanotic lesions are tetralogy of Fallot and transposition of the great arteries. In infants with cyanotic lesions, hypoxia is more of a problem than congestive heart failure. Suspicion of a congenital heart defect should be raised by the presence of feeding difficulties in association with tachypnea, sweating and subcostal recession, or severe growth impairment. Follow-up of infants with congenital heart disease should follow the schedule of routine care for healthy babies with some modifications, such as administration of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. More frequent follow-up is required if congestive heart failure is present. Family psychosocial issues should also be addressed. One of the main roles for the family physician is to help the parents put the diagnosis in perspective by clarifying expectations and misconceptions, and answering specific questions. PMID:10208705

  7. Meandering right pulmonary vein associated with severe and progressive "idiopathic-like" pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Sofia; Bret, Montserrat; Del Cerro, Maria Jesus

    2016-03-01

    Congenital anomalies of the pulmonary veins are rare. Meandering right pulmonary vein, considered a part of the Scimitar syndrome spectrum, is often an incidental finding during chest imaging. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl diagnosed with meandering pulmonary vein, who developed pulmonary hypertensive disease with an aggressive course, in spite of absence of hypoxia or elevated pulmonary wedge pressure. PMID:26374461

  8. Chronic Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehari, Alem; Klings, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common genetic hemolytic anemia worldwide, affects 250,000 births annually. In the United States, SCD affects approximately 100,000 individuals, most of African descent. Hemoglobin S (HbS) results from a glutamate-to-valine mutation of the sixth codon of the β-hemoglobin allele; the homozygous genotype (HbSS) is associated with the most prevalent and severe form of the disease. Other SCD genotypes include HbSC, composed of one HbS allele and one HbC (glutamate-to-lysine mutation) allele; and HbS-β-thalassemia(0) or HbS-β-thalassemia(+), composed of one HbS allele and one β-thalassemia allele with absent or reduced β-chain production, respectively. Despite advances in care, median survival remains in the fifth decade, due in large part to chronic complications of the disease. Chronic pulmonary complications in SCD are major contributors to this early mortality. Although our understanding of these conditions has improved much over the past 10 to 15 years, there remains no specific treatment for pulmonary complications of SCD. It is unclear whether conventional treatment regimens directed at non-SCD populations have equivalent efficacy in patients with SCD. This represents a critical research need. In this review, the authors review the state-of-the-art understanding of the following pulmonary complications of SCD: (1) pulmonary hypertension; (2) venous thromboembolic disease; (3) sleep-disordered breathing; (4) asthma and recurrent wheezing; and (5) pulmonary function abnormalities. This review highlights the advances as well as the knowledge gaps in this field to update clinicians and other health care providers and to garner research interest from the medical community. PMID:26836905

  9. Heart Disease Risk Factors for Children and Teenagers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women and Heart Disease Heart-smart curriculum & health games for grades K-6 at Project Heart . Heart ... sedentary activities like watching TV or playing video games? These are called sedentary activities, because there is ...

  10. Infections, atherosclerosis, and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Famularo, G; Trinchieri, V; Santini, G; De Simone, C

    2000-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the immune response is involved in atherosclerosis. Studies done over the past several years have shown an association between markers of inflammation and coronary atherosclerosis with an exacerbation of the inflammatory process during acute myocardial ischemia. Overall, these data have greatly renewed interest in the infectious theory of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Search of bibliographic databases (from January 1991 through December 1999) and manual scanning of both peer-reviewed publications and other documents were used to identify pertinent literature. Infections and coronary heart disease were indexed as key words. A large number of studies have reported an association of human coronary heart disease and certain persistent bacterial and viral infections. The association between Chlamydia pneumoniae and coronary heart disease appears quite significant although the sequence of infection and disease is uncertain. The association between Helicobacter pylori and coronary heart disease may be accounted for by residual confounding from classic risk factors. Preliminary findings indicate that this association could be due to a higher prevalence of more virulent Helicobacter strains. Infection with Cytomegalovirus appears to be associated with a greater risk of restenosis after angioplasty rather than primary atherosclerosis. Early trials of appropriate antibiotic therapy in subjects with recent acute myocardial infarction have been encouraging. A causal relationship between infections and coronary heart disease is still elusive. Improved studies involving prospective collection of data are required to demonstrate such an association with potential implications for public health worldwide. PMID:10920505

  11. FastStats: Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Pacific Islander Population Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population Health of Hispanic or Latino ... diagnostic categories [PDF - 58 KB] Hospitalization for Congestive Heart Failure: United States, ... Association Get Email Updates To receive email ...

  12. Lyme Disease and the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension Stroke Journal of the American Heart Association Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Institution: NATIONAL ... Search Donate Circulation Institution: NATIONAL INST HEALTH LIBRARY Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Home About ...

  13. Right ventricular visualization by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Shuck, J.W.; Walder, J.; Oetgen, W.J.; Thomas, H.M.

    1985-12-01

    The right ventricle is not normally displayed by studies with thallium 201 in patients at rest, but it can be shown by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy with pressure or volume overload of the right ventricle and with right ventricular hypertrophy. We sought to determine the frequency of right ventricular demonstration by thallium 201 in 20 patients at rest, who had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease of varying severity studied at baseline. The ventricle was viewed in 11 of 20 patients (55%); these patients had significantly lower values for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and PO/sub 2/. Eight patients had catheterization of the right side of the heart; mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance were significantly higher in patients with right ventricular visualization. We conclude that thallium 201 scintigraphy frequently shows the right ventricle in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that such visualization correlates with the severity of the ventilatory defect and with pulmonary hypertension.

  14. Osteoporosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  15. Osteoporosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  16. Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuder, Rubin M.; Petrache, Irina

    2012-01-01

    The current epidemic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has produced a worldwide health care burden, approaching that imposed by transmittable infectious diseases. COPD is a multidimensional disease, with varied intermediate and clinical phenotypes. This Review discusses the pathogenesis of COPD, with particular focus on emphysema, based on the concept that pulmonary injury involves stages of initiation (by exposure to cigarette smoke, pollutants, and infectious agents), progression, and consolidation. Tissue damage entails complex interactions among oxidative stress, inflammation, extracellular matrix proteolysis, and apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Lung damage by cigarette smoke ultimately leads to self-propagating processes, resulting in macromolecular and structural alterations — features similar to those seen in aging. PMID:22850885

  17. [Pulmonary obstructive chronic disease and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    António, Carla; Gonçalves, Ana Paula; Tavares, Alcina

    2010-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a disease that can be prevented and treated, with a pulmonary component and with significant systemic effects that contribute to the severity of clinical manifestations. COPD causes a number of changes, including those which lead to exercise tolerance limitation and to a progressive deterioration of life quality of the patients. Respiratory rehabilitation (RR) represents a key part of the treatment. The benefits of RR are independent of sex, age and disease severity. At the end of the program, the patient should have acquired a life style as independent and healthy as possible. With this article the authors intend to review the benefits of physical exercise in rehabilitation of patients with COPD and the different types of training used in the respiratory rehabilitation program established for each patient. PMID:20700562

  18. Celebrities Gather to Fight Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... courtesy of NIH/NHLBI Red Dress Campaign marks steady progress The number of heart disease deaths in ... death for men and women in the United States, kills nearly 500,000 women each year. NHLBI, ...

  19. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    MedlinePlus

    ... percent of smokers begin before age 18. Middle-Aged Women: At menopause, a woman's heart disease risk ... risk of developing high blood pressure for women aged 55 is about 90 percent. Beginning at age ...

  20. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Paul; Balaji, Seshadri

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy. PMID:19898654

  1. Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 ... or Longer-Term Acute short-term effects of air pollution tend to strike people who are elderly or ...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  3. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors is likely why the rates of heart disease are coming down. These factors include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, overweight and obesity. The rates of high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol haven' ...

  4. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  5. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  6. AUTOPHAGY IN LOAD-INDUCED HEART DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongxin; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    The heart is a highly plastic organ capable of remodeling in response to changes in physiological or pathological demand. When workload increases, the heart compensates through hypertrophic growth of individual cardiomyocytes to increase cardiac output. However, sustained stress, such as occurs with hypertension or following myocardial infarction, triggers changes in sarcomeric protein composition and energy metabolism, loss of cardiomyocytes, ventricular dilation, reduced pump function, and ultimately heart failure. It has been known for some time that autophagy is active in cardiomyocytes, occurring at increased levels in disease. Yet the potential contribution of cardiomyocyte autophagy to ventricular remodeling and disease pathogenesis has only recently been explored. This latter fact stems largely from the recent emergence of tools to probe molecular mechanisms governing cardiac plasticity and to define the role of autophagic flux in the context of heart disease. In this chapter, we briefly review prominent mouse models useful in the study of load-induced heart disease and standard techniques used to assess whether a molecular or cellular event is adaptive or maladaptive. We then outline methods available for monitoring autophagic activity in the heart, providing detailed protocols for several techniques unique to working with heart and other striated muscles. PMID:19216915

  7. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is an infection often occurring in neutropenic patients and has high mortality rates. In recent years, it has been reported that the incidence of IPA has also increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of this study is to investigate the clinical and demographic characteristics and treatment responses of IPA in patients with COPD. Methods Seventy-one patients with a positive culture of Aspergillus from lower respiratory tract samples were examined retrospectively. Eleven (15.4%) of these patients, affected with grade 3 or 4 COPD, had IPA. Results Aspergillus hyphae were detected in lung biopsy in three (27.3%) out of 11 patients and defined as proven IPA; a pathological sample was not taken in the other eight (72.7%) patients, and these were defined as probable IPA. Aspergillus isolates were identified as six cases of Aspergillusfumigatus and three of Aspergillusniger in nine patients, while two isolates were not identified at species level. While five patients required intensive care unit admission, four of them received mechanical ventilation. The most common finding on chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) (respectively 63.6%, 72.7%) was infiltration. Amphotericin B was the initial drug of choice in all patients and five patients were discharged with oral voriconazole after amphotericin B therapy. Six patients (54.5%) died before treatment was completed. Conclusions IPA should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis particularly in patients with severe and very severe COPD presenting with dyspnea exacerbation, poor clinical status, and a new pulmonary infiltrate under treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics and steroids. PMID:24135224

  8. Heart Failure in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Nonpharmacologic Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    LeMond, Lisa; Mai, Tuan; Broberg, Craig S; Muralidaran, Ashok; Burchill, Luke J

    2015-11-01

    In early stages, heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains an elusive diagnosis. Many ACHD patients seem well-compensated owing to chronic physical and psychological adaptations. HF biomarkers and cardiopulmonary exercise tests are often markedly abnormal, although patients report stable health and good quality of life. Treatment differs from acquired HF. Evidence for effective drug therapy in ACHD-related HF is lacking. Residual ventricular, valvular, and vascular abnormalities contribute to HF pathophysiology, leading to an emphasis on nonpharmacologic treatment strategies. This article reviews emerging perspectives on nonpharmacologic treatment strategies, including catheter-based interventions, surgical correction, and palliative care. PMID:26471822

  9. The compliance of the porcine pulmonary artery depends on pressure and heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Kornet, L; Jansen, J R C; te Nijenhuis, F C A M; Langewouters, G J; Versprille, A

    1998-01-01

    The influence of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mean Ppa) on dynamic (Cd) and pseudo-static compliance (Cps) of the pulmonary artery was studied at a constant and a changing heart rate. Cd is the change in cross-sectional area (CSA) relative to the change in Ppa throughout a heart cycle. Cps is the change in mean CSA relative to the change in mean Ppa. If Cd is known, pulmonary blood flow can be computed from the Ppa using a windkessel model. We investigated whether Cps can be interchanged with Cd. In nine anaesthetized pigs, we determined the mean CSA and Cd of the pulmonary artery at various Ppa levels, ranging from approximately 30 to 10 mmHg, established by bleeding. Two series of measurements were carried out, one series at a spontaneously changing heart rate (n = 9) and one series at a constant heart rate (n = 6). To determine CSA a conductance method was used. Cps depended on pressure. The mean CSA versus mean Ppa curves were sigmoid and steepest in the series with the increasing heart rate (established by bleeding). The CSA versus Ppa loop during a heart cycle, giving Cd, was approximately linear and almost closed. The Cdversus mean Ppa relationship was bell shaped. Its width was smaller if the heart rate increased during the series of measurements. The pressure, where Cd was maximum, was higher at higher heart rates. Furthermore, the maximum Cd was not affected by the heart rate. Because the pulmonary artery constricts with increasing heart rate, Cps will be overestimated during procedures where heart rate increases. Cd should be determined on a beat-to-beat basis to calculate flow because it changes with mean pulmonary arterial pressure and heart rate. PMID:9769432

  10. The compliance of the porcine pulmonary artery depends on pressure and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Kornet, L; Jansen, J R; Nijenhuis, F C; Langewouters, G J; Versprille, A

    1998-11-01

    1. The influence of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mean Ppa) on dynamic (Cd) and pseudo-static compliance (Cps) of the pulmonary artery was studied at a constant and a changing heart rate. Cd is the change in cross-sectional area (CSA) relative to the change in Ppa throughout a heart cycle. Cps is the change in mean CSA relative to the change in mean Ppa. If Cd is known, pulmonary blood flow can be computed from the Ppa using a windkessel model. We investigated whether Cps can be interchanged with Cd. 2. In nine anaesthetized pigs, we determined the mean CSA and Cd of the pulmonary artery at various Ppa levels, ranging from approximately 30 to 10 mmHg, established by bleeding. Two series of measurements were carried out, one series at a spontaneously changing heart rate (n = 9) and one series at a constant heart rate (n = 6). To determine CSA a conductance method was used. 3. Cps depended on pressure. The mean CSA versus mean Ppa curves were sigmoid and steepest in the series with the increasing heart rate (established by bleeding). The CSA versus Ppa loop during a heart cycle, giving Cd, was approximately linear and almost closed. The Cd versus mean Ppa relationship was bell shaped. Its width was smaller if the heart rate increased during the series of measurements. The pressure, where Cd was maximum, was higher at higher heart rates. Furthermore, the maximum Cd was not affected by the heart rate. 4. Because the pulmonary artery constricts with increasing heart rate, Cps will be overestimated during procedures where heart rate increases. Cd should be determined on a beat-to-beat basis to calculate flow because it changes with mean pulmonary arterial pressure and heart rate. PMID:9769432

  11. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:24054776

  12. Pulmonary Vascular Complications of Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jason S.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension are two pulmonary vascular complications of liver disease. The pathophysiology underlying each disorder is distinct, but patients with either condition may be limited by dyspnea. A careful evaluation of concomitant symptoms, the physical examination, pulmonary function testing and arterial blood gas analysis, and echocardiographic, imaging, and hemodynamic studies is crucial to establishing (and distinguishing) these diagnoses. Our understanding of the pathobiology, natural history, and treatment of these disorders has advanced considerably over the past decade; however, the presence of either still increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with underlying liver disease. There is no effective medical treatment for hepatopulmonary syndrome. Although liver transplantation can resolve hepatopulmonary syndrome, there appears to be worse survival even with transplantation. Liver transplantation poses a very high risk of death in those with significant portopulmonary hypertension, where targeted medical therapies may improve functional status and allow successful transplantation in a small number of select patients. PMID:23155142

  13. Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Negewo, Netsanet A; McDonald, Vanessa M; Gibson, Peter G

    2015-11-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) often experience comorbid conditions. The most common comorbidities that have been associated with COPD include cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, metabolic disorder, osteoporosis, anxiety and depression, skeletal muscle dysfunction, cachexia, gastrointestinal diseases, and other respiratory conditions. Not only are comorbidities common but they also considerably influence disease prognosis and patients׳ health status, and are associated with poor clinical outcomes. However, perusal of literature indicates that little has been done so far to effectively assess, manage, and treat comorbidities in patients with COPD. The aim of this review is to comprehensively narrate the comorbid conditions that often coexist with COPD, along with their reported prevalence and their significant impacts in the disease management of COPD. A perspective on integrated disease management approaches for COPD is also discussed. PMID:26521102

  14. Biomarkers in Cardiology - Part 2: In Coronary Heart Disease, Valve Disease and Special Situations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality and morbidity in Brazil. Their primary and secondary preventions are a priority for the health system and require multiple approaches for increased effectiveness. Biomarkers are tools used to identify with greater accuracy high-risk individuals, establish a faster diagnosis, guide treatment, and determine prognosis. This review aims to highlight the importance of biomarkers in clinical cardiology practice and raise relevant points regarding their application and perspectives for the next few years. This document was divided into two parts. This second part addresses the application of biomarkers in coronary heart disease, valvular diseases, cardio-oncology, pulmonary embolism, and cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:26083777

  15. Pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic disorders: pulmonary vascular disease: the global perspective.

    PubMed

    Machado, Roberto F; Gladwin, Mark T

    2010-06-01

    The inherited hemoglobin disorders sickle cell disease and thalassemia are the most common monogenetic disorders worldwide. Pulmonary hypertension is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in adult patients with sickle cell disease and thalassemia, and hemolytic disorders are potentially among the most common causes of pulmonary hypertension. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic disorders is likely multifactorial, including hemolysis, impaired nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, chronic hypoxemia, chronic thromboembolic disease, chronic liver disease, and asplenia. In contrast to patients with traditional forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients with hemolytic disorders have a mild-to-moderate degree of elevation in mean pulmonary pressures, with mild elevations in pulmonary vascular resistance. The hemodynamic etiology of pulmonary hypertension in these patients is multifactorial and includes pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary venous hypertension, and pulmonary hypertension secondary to a hyperdynamic state. Currently, there are limited data on the effects of any specific treatment modality for pulmonary hypertension in patients with hemolytic disorders. It is likely that maximization of treatment of the primary hemoglobinopathy in all patients and treatment with selective pulmonary vasodilators and antiproliferative agents in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension would be beneficial. However, there is still a major need for large multinational trials of novel therapies for this patient population. PMID:20522578

  16. Heart Disease: Know Your Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... active, and choosing good nutrition. Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart - You know you should be more physically active. But are you confused, concerned, or just can't get started? This guide uses science-based information to help adults develop a safe ...

  17. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... active, and choosing good nutrition. Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart - You know you should be more physically active. But are you confused, concerned, or just can't get started? This guide uses science-based information to help adults develop a safe ...

  18. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... of transportation and lack of health insurance. Those factors can make early diagnoses and management of risks difficult, said Martha L. Daviglus, M.D., Ph.D., a cardiovascular epidemiologist at Northwestern University and University of Illinois and an American Heart ...

  19. Pulmonary disease in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Venerino; Trisolini, Rocco; Tura, Sante

    2002-03-01

    Patients with hematologic neoplasms frequently experience pulmonary disease. The possibility of a malignant involvement of the lung parenchyma is a well recognized and not unusual event, secondary spread due to lymphoproliferative disorders being the most common situation. Furthermore, the development and the advances in treatment options such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, radiation therapy and/or combined drug regimen use have significantly widened the spectrum of non-neoplastic pulmonary complications that can crop up in these patients. Infections, drug/radiation-induced toxicity, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-related complications account by now for most pulmonary problems in hematologic patients and represent a difficult challenge both in diagnostic and in therapeutic terms for the clinician. The aim of this review is to highlight the clinicopathologic spectrum of lung diseases which can occur in the setting of hematologic malignancies. A particular emphasis is devoted to the diagnostic approach, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) assuming a key role since different patterns of CT abnormalities are associated with a different yield of the available diagnostic tools and may help in narrowing the differential diagnosis. PMID:12002382

  20. Mycobacterium kansasii pulmonary diseases in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jae-Joon; Park, Young-Kil; Lew, Woo Jin; Bai, Gill-Han; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young-Soo

    2005-12-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is one of the most common cause of pulmonary diseases due to nontuberculous mycobacteria. We investigated the changing in the number of isolation of M. kansasii and the clinical characteristics of M. kansasii pulmonary disease in Korea. Through searching the database of the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis, we identified the cases of isolated M. kansasii from 1992 to 2002. The number of M. kansasii isolation had increased from once in 1992 to 62 in 2002. Fifteen patients with M. kansasii pulmonary disease were identified during the period January 1997 to December 2002. Twelve patients (80%) were male and fourteen (93%) were from highly industrialized areas. The most common symptom was a cough. Seven patients (47%) had a cavitary lesion and right upper lobe was most commonly involved. Patients responded well to isoniazid and rifampicin based regimens both bacteriologically and radiographically. In conclusion, M. kansasii isolation has increased, especially in highly industrialized areas, as well as other nontuberculous mycobacteria in Korea. PMID:16361804

  1. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases: novel vasoconstrictor pathways.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Simon C; Keane, Michael P; Gaine, Seán; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well recognised complication of chronic hypoxic lung diseases, which are among the most common causes of death and disability worldwide. Development of pulmonary hypertension independently predicts reduced life expectancy. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, long-term oxygen therapy ameliorates pulmonary hypertension and greatly improves survival, although the correction of alveolar hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension is only partial. Advances in understanding of the regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone show that chronic vasoconstriction plays a more important part in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension than previously thought, and that structural vascular changes contribute less. Trials of existing vasodilators show that pulmonary hypertension can be ameliorated and systemic oxygen delivery improved in carefully selected patients, although systemic hypotensive effects limit the doses used. Vasoconstrictor pathways that are selective for the pulmonary circulation can be blocked to reduce hypoxic pulmonary hypertension without causing systemic hypotension, and thus provide potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26895650

  2. Preconception Counseling for Women with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Lin, Min-Tai; Chen, Chun-An; Chiu, Shenn-Nan; Chiu, Hsin-Hui

    2015-01-01

    With advances that have been made over the recent decades in transcatheter and surgical interventions, most patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) can survive into adulthood. Overall, probably half of these surviving patients are female. When these female CHD patients reach childbearing age, however, pregnancy management will be a major issue. In order to meet the demands of fetal growth, the maternal cardiovascular system starts a series of adaptations beginning in early pregnancy. These adaptations include: decreased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances, decreased blood pressure, expansion of the blood volume, increased heart rate and increased cardiac output. For women with CHD, this hemodynamic alteration may increase the risks of adverse cardiovascular events as well as the fetal and neonatal complications. Therefore, proper risk stratification and effective counseling for women with CHD who are planning their pregnancies is an important undertaking. PMID:27122914

  3. Adult congenital heart disease: A paradigm of epidemiological change.

    PubMed

    Ntiloudi, Despοina; Giannakoulas, George; Parcharidou, Despοina; Panagiotidis, Theofilos; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Karvounis, Haralambos

    2016-09-01

    Increasing survival rates for patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) represent a major achievement of modern medicine. Despite incredible progress been made in diagnosis, follow-up, early treatment and management in adulthood, many patients are faced with long-term complications, such as arrhythmia, thromboembolism, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, endocarditis and/or the need for reoperation. In parallel, half of the patients are female, most of childbearing age, and, thus warrant specialist reproductive counseling and appropriate obstetric care. It is not surprising therefore, that healthcare utilization has steadily increased for CHD in recent years. Furthermore, cardiology and other medical disciplines are now faced with new challenges, namely the provision of expert care and optimal, lifelong medical surveillance for these patients. PMID:27240150

  4. [Pulmonary diseases among returning travelers].

    PubMed

    Barras, G; Michel, Y; Wagner, N; Loutan, L

    2012-05-01

    Respiratory tract infections are a frequent cause of travelers' health problems. Tropical diseases are relatively rare compared to common respiratory infections. Nevertheless, due to their potential gravity, they must be systematically considered. The differential diagnosis of tropical pathogens is wide. A targeted travel history taking into account specific epidemiological, geographical and behavioral risk factors helps focusing biological exams to identify the causative diagnosis. The chest radiography remains very helpful in this context; however, more specific exams, such as serologies are often necessary to reach a final diagnosis. PMID:22662629

  5. Design for Heart Disease Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    In this teaching and curriculum guide for community health education, a design is suggested for a course that could help prevent premature deaths due to heart disease. The course communicates facts regarding the causes of cardiovascular diseases, and outlines opportunities for attaining the degree of physical conditioning essential to prevention.…

  6. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Sep 16,2015 Plain old snoring ... evidence is very strong for the relationship between sleep apnea and hypertension and cardiovascular disease generally, so people really need to know that,” ...

  7. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion have been observed, and their importance revealed, in almost every tissue and cell type except adult cardiac myocytes. As each human heart is uniquely dependent upon mitochondria to generate massive amounts of ATP that fuel its approximately 38 million contractions per year, it seems odd that cardiac myocytes are the sole exception to the general rule that mitochondrial dynamism is important to function. Here, I briefly review the mechanisms for mitochondrial fusion and fission and examine current data that dispel the previous notion that mitochondrial fusion is dispensable in the heart. Rare and generally overlooked examples of cardiomyopathies linked either to naturally-occurring mutations or to experimentally-induced mutagenesis of mitochondrial fusion/fission genes are described. New findings from genetically targeted Drosophila and mouse models wherein mitochondrial fusion deficiency has specifically been induced in cardiac myocytes are discussed. PMID:22450031

  8. Effects of concentrated ambient particles on heart rate and blood pressure in pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Wang, Peng-Yau; Tsai, Chia-Fang; Chen, Chun-Yen; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that increased concentrations of ambient particles are associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Recent studies have revealed that particulate air pollution exposure is associated with indicators of autonomic function including heart rate, blood pressure, and heart rate variability. However, this association has not been clearly demonstrated in animal studies. To overcome the problems of wide variations in diseased animals and circadian cycles, we adopted a novel approach using a mixed-effects model to investigate whether ambient particle exposure was associated with changes in heart rate and blood pressure in pulmonary hypertensive rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with radiotelemetry devices and exposed to concentrated ambient particles generated by an air particle concentrator. The rats were held in nose-only exposure chambers for 6 hr per day for 3 consecutive days and then rested for 4 days in each week during the experimental period of 5 weeks. These animals were exposed to concentrated particles during weeks 2, 3, and 4 and exposed to filtered air during weeks 1 and 5. The particle concentrations for tested animals ranged between 108 and 338 micro g/m(3). Statistical analysis using mixed-effects models revealed that entry and exit of exposure chamber and particle exposure were associated with changes in heart rate and mean blood pressure. Immediately after particle exposure, the hourly averaged heart rate decreased and reached the lowest at the first and second hour of exposure for a decrease of 14.9 (p < 0.01) and 11.7 (p = 0.01) beats per minute, respectively. The hourly mean blood pressure also decreased after the particle exposure, with a maximal decrease of 3.3 (p < 0.01) and 4.1 (p < 0.01) mm Hg at the first and second hour of exposure. Our results indicate that ambient particles might influence blood pressure and heart rate. PMID:12573896

  9. Genetic Syndromes associated with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that genetic alterations or variations contribute considerably to the development of congenital heart disease. Many kinds of genetic tests are commercially available, and more are currently under development. Congenital heart disease is frequently accompanied by genetic syndromes showing both cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies. Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of birth defects, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during infancy and childhood. This review introduces common genetic syndromes showing various types of congenital heart disease, including Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. Although surgical techniques and perioperative care have improved substantially, patients with genetic syndromes may be at an increased risk of death or major complications associated with surgery. Therefore, risk management based on an accurate genetic diagnosis is necessary in order to effectively plan the surgical and medical management and follow-up for these patients. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches and care for the combined extra-cardiac anomalies may help to reduce mortality and morbidity accompanied with congenital heart disease. PMID:26413101

  10. Project SuperHeart: An Evaluation of a Heart Disease Intervention Program For Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Joyce W.

    1981-01-01

    An effective way to prevent coronary heart disease in later life is to concentrate on preventive measures in the early years before coronary heart disease becomes established. Project SuperHeart, a heart disease intervention program for young children, includes physical fitness and classroom activities emphasizing basic nutritional habits. (JN)

  11. Speckle Tracking Echocardiography to Evaluate for Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Rice, Jessica L; Stream, Amanda R; Fox, Daniel L; Geraci, Mark W; Vandivier, R William; Dorosz, Jennifer L; Bull, Todd M

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), increasing morbidity and mortality. Current echocardiographic measures have poor predictive value for the diagnosis of PH in COPD. Right ventricular (RV) strain obtained by speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is a measure of myocardial deformation which correlates with RV function and survival in subjects with pulmonary arterial hypertension. We hypothesized that RV strain measurements would be feasible and correlate with invasive hemodynamic measurements in patients with COPD. Retrospective analysis of RV strain values from subjects with severe COPD with echocardiogram within 48 hours of right heart catheterization was performed. First, 54 subjects were included in the analysis. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and RV strain could be estimated in 31% and 57%, respectively. Then, 61% had RV-focused apical views, and of those, RV strain could be obtained for 94%. RV free wall strain correlated with PVR (r = 0.41, p = 0.02). Subjects with pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) > 3 Wood units (WU) had less negative (worse) RV free wall strain values than those with PVR ≤ 3 WU, with a median strain of -20 (-23, -12) versus -23 (-29, -15), p < 0.05. A receiver operating characteristic curve demonstrated an RV free wall strain of > -23 to be 92% sensitive and 44% specific for identifying PVR > 3 WU (AUC 0.71). RV strain estimates are feasible in the majority of subjects with severe COPD. RV strain correlates with PVR and may improve screening for PH in subjects with COPD. PMID:26829151

  12. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Huerta, Arturo; Domingo, Rebeca; Soler, Néstor

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic disease causing increasing healthcare costs worldwide. Another respiratory disease causing high costs and morbidity is community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Because of the constant growth in the population with both diseases (CAP and COPD), analyzing their clinical characteristics is important. Several cellular factors are known to contribute to differences in clinical expression: some lead to COPD exacerbations while others lead to symptoms of pneumonia. The use of new biomarkers (procalcitonin, pro-adrenomedullin and copeptin) help to distinguish among these clinical pictures. To decrease morbidity and mortality, clinical guidelines on antibiotic therapy must be followed and this therapy should be prescribed to patients with CAP and COPD. There are also prevention measures such as the pneumococcal vaccine whose role in the prevention of pneumococcal CAP should be further studied. The present review aims to elucidate some of the above-mentioned issues. PMID:20620690

  13. [Valvular heart disease: multidetector computed tomography evaluation].

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Fernández-Pérez, G C; Tomás-Mallebrera, M; Badillo-Portugal, S; Orejas, M

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a clinical problem that has been studied with classical imaging techniques like echocardiography and MRI. Technological advances in CT make it possible to obtain static and dynamic images that enable not only a morphological but also a functional analysis in many cases. Although it is currently indicated only in patients with inconclusive findings at echocardiography and MRI or those in whom these techniques are contraindicated, multidetector CT makes it possible to diagnose stenosis or regurgitation through planimetry, to evaluate and quantify valvular calcium, and to show the functional repercussions of these phenomena on the rest of the structures of the heart. Given that multidetector CT is being increasingly used in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, we think it is interesting for radiologists to know its potential for the study of valvular disease. PMID:23246401

  14. Heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cermakova, P; Eriksdotter, M; Lund, L H; Winblad, B; Religa, P; Religa, D

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that heart failure is a risk factor for Alzheimer′s disease. Decreased cerebral blood flow and neurohormonal activation due to heart failure may contribute to the dysfunction of the neurovascular unit and cause an energy crisis in neurons. This leads to the impaired clearance of amyloid beta and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, resulting in the formation of amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this article, we will summarize the current understanding of the relationship between heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease based on epidemiological studies, brain imaging research, pathological findings and the use of animal models. The importance of atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, blood pressure and valve disease as well as the effect of relevant medications will be discussed. PMID:25041352

  15. Cardiac telocytes in normal and diseased hearts.

    PubMed

    Kostin, Sawa

    2016-07-01

    Our previous studies suggested that an important variable of the progression of contractile dysfunction to terminal heart failure is the imbalance between myocyte cell death and myocyte renewal. For this reason, preventing myocyte cell death and an increasing generation of new myocytes may represent attractive targets in the treatment of human heart failure. Prospective clues to enhance myocardial regeneration are the newly discovered cells termed telocytes, formerly called interstitial Cajal-like cells, which are believed to nurse or guide the endogenous and exogenous stem cells for activation and commitment, but they also act as supporting cells for progenitor cells migration toward injured myocardium. We have recently found that telocytes are reduced in the diseased and failing myocardium. Importantly, the imbalance between telocyte proliferation and telocyte death is responsible for the telocytes depletion in cardiac diseases leading to heart failure. We have also demonstrated that telocytes are influenced by the extracellular matrix protein composition such that the telocytes are almost absent in areas of severe fibrosis. It is plausible that the reduction in telocytes in diseased human hearts could participate in the abnormal three-dimensional spatial organization and disturbed intercellular signalling of the myocardium. Decreased telocytes in diseased hearts would also be predicted to alter the property of telocytes to maintain cardiac stem cell niche by decreasing the pool of cardiac stem cells and thereby impairing cardiac regeneration. PMID:26912117

  16. Functional Assessment for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease. Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern. Despite corrective or palliative repair of congenital heart lesions, the right ventricle, which may be the subpulmonary or systemic ventricular chamber, and the functional single ventricle are particularly vulnerable to functional impairment. Regular assessment of cardiac function constitutes an important aspect in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Echocardiography remains the most useful imaging modality for longitudinal monitoring of cardiac function. Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles. Advances in echocardiographic technologies including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography have enabled direct interrogation of myocardial deformation. In this review, the issues of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease, conventional echocardiographic and novel myocardial deformation imaging techniques, and clinical applications of these techniques in the functional assessment of congenital heart disease are discussed. PMID:24653734

  17. Pregnancy and chronic progressive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Isaiah D; Johannesson, Marie; Edenborough, Frank P; Sufian, Beth S; Kerem, Eitan

    2007-02-15

    Progressive pulmonary disease may preclude the option of pregnancy for a number of women in their child-bearing years due to the severity of the disease. For a subset of women with chronic lung disease including cystic fibrosis, pregnancy is possible, but can have a devastating effect both on the prospective mother and fetus. The potential hazards of pregnancy in cystic fibrosis or other progressive pulmonary diseases may trigger a moral conflict between physician and patient. The female patient may argue that her autonomy cannot be circumscribed and that the physician is obliged to assist her reproductive efforts. The physician can counter that his/her participation in potentially harmful interventions is not consistent with professional norms requiring adherence to the principles of beneficence and nonmaleficence. Whenever possible, the ethical conflict between physician and patient should be resolved before initiation of pregnancy. We propose that this best be done through structured negotiations between physician and patient with the goal of constructing an ethical framework for reducing the moral tension between the two. Steps in the negotiating process include defining the therapeutic alliance, information exchange, dialog, and deliberation. As part of the information exchange, it is important to discuss alternatives to pregnancy such as adoption and surrogacy, especially when there are strong contraindications to pregnancy. If negotiations reach a satisfactory conclusion for both sides, there should be a well-delineated consensual agreement to commence the pregnancy with the full support of the medical team. PMID:17110647

  18. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  19. Dust events, pulmonary diseases and immune system

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeil, Nafiseh; Gharagozloo, Marjan; Rezaei, Abbas; Grunig, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Incidences of sand storms have increased in recent years and there is evidence that these dusts can move across long distances. Sand dusts have different adverse effects on health, but one of the most important of them is pulmonary disease. After inhalation of dust, many dust particles are moved to the airways. Dust particles can be sensed by airways epithelial cells, activate macrophages, dendritic cells and innate immune cells and then initiate responses in various populations of specific immune cells such as T helper cells subsets (Th1, Th2, Th17), T cytotoxic cells and B cells. Initiation of inflammatory immune responses, activation of immune cells and releases of many cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory molecules, have variable pathologic affects on lung in different respiratory diseases. Unfortunately control of desert dusts is more difficult than control of air pollution. For prevention and treatment of respiratory diseases that are caused by desert dusts, researchers need well-designed epidemiological studies, combined with analysis of the precise composition of sand dusts, and the precise mechanisms of the immune responses. Recognizing the exact cellular and molecular immune mechanisms would be very useful to find new approaches for treatment of desert dust associated pulmonary diseases. PMID:24660118

  20. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-08-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  1. Isolated supra-cardiac partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection causing right heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Sogomonian, Robert; Alkhawam, Hassan; Zaiem, Feras; Vyas, Neil; Jolly, JoshPaul; Nguyen, James; Haftevani, Emma A. Moradoghli; Dijanic, Christopher; Lieber, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Right heart failure (RHF) has been overlooked as left heart failure has predominated. One of the many causes of RHF is partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC), an extremely rare entity in nature. Physicians should consider the unusual causes of RHF after ruling out the common causes. PMID:27124165

  2. Pulmonary Arterial Capacitance Is an Important Predictor of Mortality in Heart Failure With a Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Naamani, Nadine; Preston, Ioana R.; Paulus, Jessica K.; Hill, Nicholas S.; Roberts, Kari E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to determine the predictors of mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). BACKGROUND PH is commonly associated with HFpEF. The predictors of mortality for patients with these conditions are not well characterized. METHODS In a prospective cohort of patients with right heart catheterization, we identified 73 adult patients who had pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (PH-LHD) associated with HFpEF (left ventricular ejection fraction ≥50% by echocardiography); hemodynamically defined as a mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mm Hg and pulmonary artery wedge pressure >15 mm Hg. PH severity was classified according to the diastolic pressure gradient (DPG). Cox proportional hazards ratios were used to estimate the associations between clinical variables and mortality. Receiver-operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate the ability of hemodynamic measurements to predict mortality. RESULTS The mean age for study subjects was 69 ± 12 years and 74% were female. Patients classified as having combined post-capillary PH and pre-capillary PH (DPG ≥7) were not at increased risk of death as compared to patients with isolated post-capillary PH (DPG <7). A baseline pulmonary arterial capacitance (PAC) of <1.1 ml/mm Hg was 91% sensitive in predicting mortality, with better discriminatory ability than DPG, transpulmonary gradient, or pulmonary vascular resistance (area under the curve of 0.73, 0.50, 0.45, and 0.37, respectively). Fifty-seven subjects underwent acute vasoreactivity testing with inhaled nitric oxide. Acute vasodilator response by the Rich or Sitbon criteria was not associated with improved survival. CONCLUSIONS PAC is the best predictor of mortality in our cohort and may be useful in describing phenotypic subgroups among those with PH-LHD associated with HFpEF. Acute vasodilator testing did not predict outcome in our

  3. Computerized screening of children congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Amir A; Hancq, Joel; Dutoit, Thierry; Gharehbaghi, Arash; Kocharian, Armen; Kiani, A

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for automated screening of congenital heart diseases in children through heart sound analysis techniques. Our method relies on categorizing the pathological murmurs based on the heart sections initiating them. We show that these pathelogical murmur categories can be identified by examining the heart sound energy over specific frequency bands, which we call, Arash-Bands. To specify the Arash-Band for a category, we evaluate the energy of the heart sound over all possible frequency bands. The Arash-Band is the frequency band that provides the lowest error in clustering the instances of that category against the normal ones. The energy content of the Arash-Bands for different categories constitue a feature vector that is suitable for classification using a neural network. In order to train, and to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we use a training data-bank, as well as a test data-bank, collectively consisting of ninety samples (normal and abnormal). Our results show that in more than 94% of cases, our method correctly identifies children with congenital heart diseases. This percentage improves to 100%, when we use the Jack-Knife validation method over all the 90 samples. PMID:18718691

  4. [Intravenous arginine vasopressin for two pediatric cases of pulmonary hypertension after congenital heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Yusuke; Hara, Mariko

    2012-10-01

    We experienced two pediatric cases of severe pulmonary hypertension after congenital heart surgery. It was difficult to wean two cases from cardiopulmonary bypass for systemic hypotension concomitant with pulmonary hypertension reflactory to conventional therapy, including administration of adrenaline, nitroglycerin, milrinone, and/or inhalation of nitric oxide. In order to increase systemic arterial blood pressure and improve severe right heart failure, we administered arginine vasopressin (AVP) intravenously, which is a potent vasoconstrictor via V1 receptor. The dose of AVP was 0.0002 unit x kg(-1) x min(-1). After administration of AVP, systemic arterial pressure increased markedly and pulmonary arterial pressure decreased slightly, and we succeeded in weaning the patients from cardiopulmonary bypass. No adverse effect with AVP was found. In conclusion, administration of AVP is a therapeutic option for treating systemic hypotension concomitant with severe pulmonary hypertension in pediatric congenital heart surgery. PMID:23157099

  5. Asbestos-related pulmonary disease in boilermakers

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, R.Y.; Neale, A.V.; Robins, T.; Herman, S.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Boilermakers are skilled building tradesmen who construct, repair, and dismantle boilers. The present study reports on the evaluation of members of a Michigan boilermaker's union for the presence of signs and symptoms of chronic pulmonary disease. Study variables included standardized evaluations of chest x-ray findings, pulmonary function testing, physical examination, and respiratory symptoms. An overall participation rate of 69% was achieved. A non-participant survey identified no significant differences between participants and non-participants in dyspnea, cough, age, or smoking history. Among participants with greater than 20 years experience in the trade, the mean FVC was 91% of predicted; the FEV1 was 86% of predicted; 25% showed at least a 1/0 profusion of interstitial markings on chest x-ray; 30% had bilateral pleural abnormalities; and 52% had audible inspiratory rales on physical examination. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume at one second both decreased with years in the trade. Chest x-ray findings of interstitial fibrosis and pleural plaques were related to ten or more years in the trade, as were respiratory symptoms of pulmonary rales, wheeze, and dyspnea.

  6. Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Disease, Germany, 2009–2014

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Dirk; de Roux, Andrés; Diel, Roland; Hohmann, David; Hickstein, Lennart; Welte, Tobias; Rademacher, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed routine statutory health insurance claim data to determine prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in Germany. Documented prevalence rates of this nonnotifiable disease increased from 2.3 to 3.3 cases/100,000 population from 2009 to 2014. Prevalence showed a strong association with advanced age and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27191473

  7. Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Disease, Germany, 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Ringshausen, Felix C; Wagner, Dirk; de Roux, Andrés; Diel, Roland; Hohmann, David; Hickstein, Lennart; Welte, Tobias; Rademacher, Jessica

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed routine statutory health insurance claim data to determine prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in Germany. Documented prevalence rates of this nonnotifiable disease increased from 2.3 to 3.3 cases/100,000 population from 2009 to 2014. Prevalence showed a strong association with advanced age and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27191473

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Abad-Capa, Jorge; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have shown that the interaction between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular comorbidity is complex and bidirectional, since each of these diseases complicates the prognosis of the other. Recent advances in imaging technology have led to better characterization of cardiac chambers and allowed the relationship between certain cardiac function parameters and COPD clinical and functional variables to be explored. Although cardiac abnormalities in COPD have been mainly associated with the right ventricle, several studies have reported that the left ventricle may also be affected in this disease. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved and their clinical implications will establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with both these conditions. PMID:24816034

  9. Early origins of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Narang, Indra; Bush, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and a significant challenge for adult physicians. However, there is a misconception that COPD is a disease of only adult smokers. There is a growing body of evidence to support the hypothesis that chronic respiratory diseases such as COPD have their origins in early life. In particular, adverse maternal factors will interact with the environment in a susceptible host promoting altered lung growth and development antenatally and in early childhood. Subsequent lung injury and further gene-environment interactions may result in permanent lung injury manifest by airway obstruction predisposing to COPD. This review will discuss the currently available data regarding risk factors in early life and their role in determining the COPD phenotype. PMID:22265926

  10. [Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, C; Koczulla, R; Fehrenbach, H; Bals, R

    2006-09-01

    It is currently believed that the most important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is inflammation of the small airways caused by inhaled particles and gases. In this context, a disturbance of the physiological balance between proteases and antiproteases develops that may cause lung emphysema. Moreover, oxidative stress seems to be important, as it may enhance the inflammatory reaction. The development of emphysema may also involve a loss of alveolar cells by apoptosis. Finally, several studies have indicated that a systemic inflammation is induced by COPD that may be of relevance to the development of systemic components that are observed in COPD patients. PMID:16845536

  11. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boueiz, Adel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The explosive growth of medical literature on pulmonary hypertension (PH) has led to a steady increase in awareness of this disease within the medical community during the past decade. The recent revision of the classification of PH is presented in in the main guidelines. Group 1 PH or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous group and includes PH due to inheritable, drug-induced, and toxin-induced causes and to such underlying systemic causes as connective tissue diseases, human immunodeficiency viral infection, portal hypertension, congenital heart disease, and schistosomiasis. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune multisystem disorder, which affects over 240 persons per million in the United States.[1] Its manifestations are not confined to the skin but may also involve the lungs, kidneys, peripheral circulation, musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. The outcome of PAH associated with SSc is worse when compared to other subtypes of PAH. In this review, we summarize available information about the pulmonary vascular and cardiac manifestations of SSc with special emphasis on their prognostic implications as well as the peculiarity of their detection. PMID:25076994

  12. Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Engman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors—autoimmunity—has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. PMID:25857229

  13. Economic cycles and heart disease in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Quast, Troy; Gonzalez, Fidel

    2014-05-01

    While a considerable literature has emerged regarding the relationship between the business cycles and mortality rates, relatively little is known regarding how economic fluctuations are related to morbidity. We investigate the relationship between business cycles and heart disease in Mexico using a unique state-level dataset of 512 observations consisting of real GDP and heart disease incidence rates (overall and by age group) from 1995 to 2010. Our study is one of the first to use a state-level panel approach to analyze the relationship between the business cycle and morbidity. Further, the state and year fixed effects employed in our econometric specification reduce possible omitted variable bias. We find a general procyclical, although largely statistically insignificant, contemporaneous relationship. However, an increase in GDP per capita sustained over five years is associated with considerable increases in the incidence rates of ischemic heart disease and hypertension. This procyclical relationship appears strongest in the states with the lowest levels of development and for the oldest age groups. Our results suggest that economic fluctuations may have important lagged effects on heart disease in developing countries. PMID:24681397

  14. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or discomfort in the muscles of your feet, calves, or thighs. Symptoms that usually appear during walking ... If you have any signs of heart disease, call your health care ... to see if the symptoms go away or dismiss them as nothing. Call ...

  15. Endometriosis Linked to Heart Disease in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... epidemiologic research in reproductive medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Missmer said the study found an association between endometriosis and the risk of heart disease, but can't prove a cause-and-effect relationship. She believes this is the first study to ...

  16. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of people who have diabetes die of some type of cardiovascular disease. Diabetic women are at especially high risk for dying ... aware of my risk factors, such as being diabetic and having a family history of heart ... levels—you are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. But you can take steps to ...

  17. Gallstones Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... convincing" case that gallstones, themselves, are a risk factor for heart disease. Stein, who wasn't involved in the research, is director of the urban community cardiology program at New York University School of Medicine. He said that people with ...

  18. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, decreases apoptosis and leads to protection in the ischemic heart. Stem cell therapy augmented with gene therapy used for myogenesis has proven to be beneficial in numerous animal models of myocardial ischemia. Gene therapy coding for antioxidants, eNOS, HSP, mitogen-activated protein kinase and numerous other anti apoptotic proteins have demonstrated significant cardioprotection in animal models. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety in humans apart from symptomatic and objective improvements in cardiac function. Current research efforts are aimed at refining various gene transfection techniques and regulation of gene expression in vivo in the heart and circulation to improve clinical outcomes in patients that suffer from ischemic heart disease. In this review article we will attempt to summarize the current state of both preclinical and clinical studies of gene therapy to combat myocardial ischemic disease. PMID:20600100

  19. Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: effect of pulmonary rehabilitation in comparison with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Hiromi; Mamesaya, Nobuaki; Yamashita, Shyuji; Kida, Yoko; Kaneko, Masahiro; Sakai, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of short-term comprehensive inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE), and to compare responses with those of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who underwent an identical programme. Design Retrospective analysis of several outcome measures. Setting Pulmonary ward at a 358-bed community teaching hospital. Methods 3-week inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation programme assessed by pulmonary function tests, 6 min walk test and health-related quality of life (HRQL) using the Short Form-36 (SF-36). Results 17 patients with CPFE and 49 patients with COPD were referred to and completed the programme between March 2007 and February 2015. Age, sex, smoking status, body mass index and the Medical Research Council dyspnoea grade were comparable between groups. In the CPFE group, improvement from the start of the programme to the programme end was observed in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) (from 1.7±0.4 to 1.8±0.4, p=0.034); however, there was no significant improvement in the 6 min walk test (distance, SpO2 nadir and Borg scale on exercise). With regard to HRQL, improvement was observed in physical function (p=0.015) whereas deterioration was observed in social functioning (p=0.044). In the COPD group, significant improvement was observed after the programme in the FEV1, 6 min walk test and 4 of the 8 SF-36 subscales. There was a significant difference in changes in the 6 min walk distance: −16.6±58.4 in CPFE versus 30.2±55.6 in COPD (p=0.009). In 2 domains, there was a significant difference in SF-36 scores between groups: Δvitality, −6.3±22.4 in CPFE versus 11.3±21.1 in COPD, p=0.009; and Δsocial functioning, −18.8±34.2 in CPFE versus 5.3±35.9 in COPD, p=0.027. Conclusion Patients with COPD derived greater benefits than those with CPFE, from the relatively short periods of inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation. PMID:26933506

  20. Plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension in the absence of left ventricular heart failure: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Landzberg, Michael J.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Waxman, Aaron B.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Elevated levels of the mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone are recognized as a modifiable contributor to the pathophysiology of select cardiovascular diseases due to left heart failure. In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary vascular remodelling induces right ventricular dysfunction and heart failure in the absence of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Hyperaldosteronism has emerged as a promoter of pulmonary vascular disease in experimental animal models of PAH; however, the extent to which hyperaldosteronism is associated with PAH in patients is unknown. Thus, the central aim of the current study is to determine if hyperaldosteronism is an unrecognized component of the PAH clinical syndrome. Methods and results Plasma aldosterone levels and invasive cardiopulmonary haemodynamic measurements were obtained for 25 patients referred for evaluation of unexplained dyspnoea or pulmonary hypertension. Compared with controls (n = 5), patients with PAH (n = 18) demonstrated significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels (1200.4 ± 423.9 vs. 5959.1 ± 2817.9 pg/mL, P < 0.02), mean pulmonary artery pressure (21.4 ± 5.0 vs. 45.5 ± 10.4 mmHg, P < 0.002), and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (1.41 ± 0.6 vs. 7.3 ± 3.8 Wood units, P < 0.003) without differences in LV ejection fraction or pulmonary capillary wedge pressure between groups. Among patients not prescribed PAH-specific pharmacotherapy prior to cardiac catheterization, a subgroup of the cohort with severe pulmonary hypertension, aldosterone levels correlated positively with PVR (r = 0.72, P < 0.02) and transpulmonary gradient (r = 0.69, P < 0.02), but correlated inversely with cardiac output (r = –0.79, P < 0.005). Conclusions These data demonstrate a novel cardiopulmonary haemodynamic profile associated with hyperaldosteronism in patients: diminished cardiac output due to pulmonary vascular disease in the absence of LV heart failure. PMID:23111998

  1. Update on heart failure, heart transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Almenar, Luis; Zunzunegui, José Luis; Barón, Gonzalo; Carrasco, José Ignacio; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Comín, Josep; Barrios, Vivencio; Subirana, M Teresa; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012, 3 scientific sections-heart failure and transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology-are presented together in the same article. The most relevant development in the area of heart failure and transplantation is the 2012 publication of the European guidelines for heart failure. These describe new possibilities for some drugs (eplerenone and ivabradine); expand the criteria for resynchronization, ventricular assist, and peritoneal dialysis; and cover possibilities of percutaneous repair of the mitral valve (MitraClip(®)). The survival of children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome in congenital heart diseases has improved significantly. Instructions for percutaneous techniques and devices have been revised and modified for the treatment of atrial septal defects, ostium secundum, and ventricular septal defects. Hybrid procedures for addressing structural congenital heart defects have become more widespread. In the area of clinical cardiology studies have demonstrated that percutaneous prosthesis implantation has lower mortality than surgical implantation. Use of the CHA2DS2-VASc criteria and of new anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) is also recommended. In addition, the development of new sequencing techniques has enabled the analysis of multiple genes. PMID:24775619

  2. Respiratory Conditions Update: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Karel, Daphne J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as persistent airflow limitation due to irritant-induced chronic inflammation. A postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio of 0.7 or less is diagnostic in a patient with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of irritant exposure. Tobacco smoking is the most significant etiology, and smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. Long-acting beta2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists are first-line treatments for patients with persistently symptomatic COPD with an FEV1 of 80% or less of predicted. When COPD is uncontrolled with a long-acting bronchodilator, combination therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist-long-acting beta2-agonist or long-acting beta2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid should be prescribed. Patients with COPD and reduced exercise tolerance should undergo pulmonary rehabilitation and be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy. Other treatment options for persistently symptomatic COPD include inhaler triple therapy (ie, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, long-acting beta2-agonist, inhaled corticosteroid), phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, oxygen, and surgical interventions. PMID:27576232

  3. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described

  4. Pulmonary hypertension associated with lung diseases and hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Cuttica, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension that develops in the setting of underlying lung diseases such as COPD or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is associated with decreased functional status, worsening hypoxemia and quality of life, and increased mortality. This complication of lung disease is complex in its origin and carries a unique set of diagnostic and therapeutic issues. This review attempts to provide an overview of mechanisms associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension in COPD and IPF, touches on appropriate evaluation, and reviews the state of knowledge on treating pulmonary hypertension related to underlying lung disease. PMID:27086030

  5. Integrative Genomics of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Brian D.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disease with both environmental and genetic determinants, the most important of which is cigarette smoking. There is marked heterogeneity in the development of COPD among persons with similar cigarette smoking histories, which is likely partially explained by genetic variation. Genomic approaches such as genomewide association studies and gene expression studies have been used to discover genes and molecular pathways involved in COPD pathogenesis; however, these “first generation” omics studies have limitations. Integrative genomic studies are emerging which can combine genomic datasets to further examine the molecular underpinnings of COPD. Future research in COPD genetics will likely use network-based approaches to integrate multiple genomic data types in order to model the complex molecular interactions involved in COPD pathogenesis. This article reviews the genomic research to date and offers a vision for the future of integrative genomic research in COPD. PMID:25078622

  6. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : new pharmacotherapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Greulich, T; Koczulla, A R; Vogelmeier, C

    2012-11-01

    Data about the clinical presentation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have resulted in a new classification of the disease. The degree of airflow limitation has been amended by symptoms and exacerbation rate. The standard pharmacotherapy of stable COPD is in transition, as fixed combinations of long acting beta agonists and long acting anticholinergics are in the late stages of clinical development. On this background inhaled corticosteroids will need to be re-evaluated. Roflumilast is a recently approved therapeutic option that primarily diminishes exacerbation frequency in patients with chronic bronchitis and severe airflow obstruction (FEV(1) < 50%). In COPD patients with acute exacerbations procalcitonin levels can be used to guide antibiotic therapy. Comparable clinical outcomes can be achieved while using significantly less amounts of antibiotics. PMID:22955248

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Deborah

    As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major causes of worldwide mortality, it is important to prevent, diagnose and manage it. COPD creates a huge burden on the NHS and has a significant impact on patients. This is a problem with the increase in morbidity and mortality rates. In primary care there is a lack of knowledge, under-use of quality-assured spirometry and under-diagnosis in about half of all cases. To be able to effectively diagnose, assess and manage COPD, health professionals must understand the physiology and aetiology of the disease. COPD is similar to asthma in its presentation and physiology but management of the condition can differ. The authors therefore looked at the similarities between the two conditions and what tests one can use to make a diagnosis of COPD. PMID:27081728

  8. Treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rennard, Stephen I

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a readily diagnosable disorder that responds to treatment. Smoking cessation can reduce symptoms and prevent progression of disease. Bronchodilator therapy is key in improvement of lung function. Three classes of bronchodilators-beta agonists, anticholinergics, and theophylline-are available and can be used individually or in combination. Inhaled glucocorticoids can also improve airflow and can be combined with bronchodilators. Inhaled glucocorticoids, in addition, might reduce exacerbation frequency and severity as might some bronchodilators. Effective use of pharmacotherapy in COPD needs integration with a rehabilitation programme and successful treatment of co-morbidities, including depression and anxiety. Treatment for stable COPD can improve the function and quality of life of many patients, could reduce admissions to hospital, and has been suggested to improve survival. PMID:15337408

  9. Pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    None of the drugs currently available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are able to reduce the progressive decline in lung function which is the hallmark of this disease. Smoking cessation is the only intervention that has proved effective. The current pharmacological treatment of COPD is symptomatic and is mainly based on bronchodilators, such as selective β2-adrenergic agonists (short- and long-acting), anticholinergics, theophylline, or a combination of these drugs. Glucocorticoids are not generally recommended for patients with stable mild to moderate COPD due to their lack of efficacy, side effects, and high costs. However, glucocorticoids are recommended for severe COPD and frequent exacerbations of COPD. New pharmacological strategies for COPD need to be developed because the current treatment is inadequate. PMID:18044097

  10. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Devine, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a growing healthcare problem that is expected to worsen as the population ages and the worldwide use of tobacco products increases. Smoking cessation is the only effective means of prevention. Employers are in a unique position to help employees stop smoking. During the long asymptomatic phase, lung function nevertheless continues to decline; therefore, many patients seek medical attention only when they are at an advanced stage or when they have experienced an acute exacerbation. To help preserve patients' quality of life and reduce healthcare costs related to this chronic disease, clinicians need to accurately diagnose the condition and appropriately manage patients through the long course of their illness. This article discusses the current approach to patient management. PMID:25126252

  11. Rosai-Dorfman disease and the heart

    PubMed Central

    O'Gallagher, Kevin; Dancy, Luke; Sinha, Aish; Sado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a non-malignant pathology of histiocyte proliferation. The classical clinical presentation is with painless cervical lymphadenopathy, but extranodal involvement is frequent, occurring in approximately 40% of cases. The literature was systematically reviewed to identify reported cases of RDD with cardiac involvement. Eighteen cases were identified (3 pediatric and 15 adult). In adult cardiac RDD (cRDD), three patterns of disease were noted: an intra-cardiac mass, epicardial involvement, and pulmonary artery involvement. Reported cases suggest that surgical excision of intra-cardiac masses confers a good prognosis. PMID:26989642

  12. Mechanical circulatory support: strategies and outcomes in pediatric congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kirklin, James K; Bennett Pearce, F; Dabal, Robert J; Carlo, Waldemar F

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acute or progressive heart failure in the setting of congenital heart disease may need mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to enhance survival while awaiting cardiac transplantation. Because the majority of MCS devices are implanted after prior cardiac operations, special precautions are necessary at the time of implant. MCS in single ventricle patients usually requires ventricular and aortic cannulation, with a systemic to pulmonary artery shunt for pulmonary blood flow. Limited outcomes data is available, with less than 15% of pediatric MCS patients having congenital heart disease. The Berlin EXCOR is the only durable device currently available for infants. Neurologic complications are the major cause of mortality, and survival during support is poor for infants <5 kg. Patients post-Fontan with acute cardiac failure and/or respiratory failure are at high risk for death before transplant and should be considered for MCS therapy. Several emerging miniature continuous flow devices will soon broaden the landscape of available pediatric devices. PMID:24725719

  13. Recent updates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airways inflammation and progressive airflow limitation, is a common, preventable and treatable disease. Worldwide, COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; smoking tobacco is the most important risk factor. This translational review of recent updates in COPD care for the primary care audience, includes recommendations from the 2015 Global Initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) report on diagnosis, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, prevalence of comorbidities, management of exacerbations and the asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, with a focus on the importance and benefit of physical activity and exercise in COPD patients. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity of COPD in individual patients. Management of exacerbations includes reducing the impact of the current exacerbation and preventing development of subsequent episodes. Healthcare professionals need to be alert to comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, anxiety/depression, lung cancer, infections and diabetes, which are common in COPD patients and can have a significant impact on HRQoL and prognosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended by a number of guidelines for all symptomatic COPD patients, regardless of severity, and involves exercise training, patient education, nutritional advice and psychosocial support. At all stages of COPD, regular physical activity and exercise can aid symptom control, improve HRQoL, reduce rates of hospitalization, and improve morbidity and respiratory mortality. Healthcare professionals play a pivotal role in improving HRQoL and health-related outcomes in COPD patients to meet their specific needs and in providing appropriate diagnosis, management and advice on smoking cessation. PMID:26560514

  14. Coronary heart disease and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Karamermer, Yusuf; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2007-09-01

    The prevalence of coronary artery disease in female patients is increasing due to changing lifestyle patterns including cigarette smoking, diabetes and stress. Since women are delaying childbearing until older age, acute coronary syndrome will more frequently occur during pregnancy. Although rare, acute coronary syndrome during pregnancy often has devastating consequences. It is associated with increased maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity compared with the nonpregnant situation. Furthermore, it constitutes an important problem for the patient and the treating physician, because the selection of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches is greatly influenced not only by maternal, but also by fetal safety. PMID:19804311

  15. Pharmacogenomics of Hypertension and Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arwood, Meghan J.; Cavallari, Larisa H.; Duarte, Julio D.

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the United States, and hypertension is a predominant risk factor. Thus, effective blood pressure control is important to prevent adverse sequelae of hypertension, including heart failure, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and ischemic stroke. Over half of Americans have uncontrolled blood pressure, which may in part be explained by interpatient variability in drug response secondary to genetic polymorphism. As such, pharmacogenetic testing may be a supplementary tool to guide treatment. This review highlights the pharmacogenetics of antihypertensive response and response to drugs that treat adverse hypertension-related sequelae, particularly coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. While pharmacogenetic evidence may be more robust for the latter with respect to clinical implementation, there is increasing evidence of genetic variants that may help predict antihypertensive response. However, additional research and validation are needed before clinical implementation guidelines for antihypertensive therapy can become a reality. PMID:26272307

  16. [Diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Clodi, Martin; Säly, Christoph; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Resl, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens; Eber, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and heart failure are interacting dynamically. Patients being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease should be screened for diabetes mellitus. Enhanced cardiovascular risk stratification based on biomarkers, symptoms and classical risk factors should be performed in patients with pre-existing diabetes mellitus. PMID:27052249

  17. Rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    White, Harvey; Walsh, Warren; Brown, Alex; Riddell, Tania; Tonkin, Andrew; Jeremy, Richmond; Brieger, David; Zeitz, Chris; Kritharides, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Rates of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in Aboriginal people, Torres Strait Islanders and Māori continue to be unacceptably high. The impact of rheumatic heart disease is inequitable on these populations as compared with other Australians and New Zealanders. The associated cardiac morbidity, including the development of rheumatic valve disease, and cardiomyopathy, with possible sequelae of heart failure, development of atrial fibrillation, systemic embolism, transient ischaemic attacks, strokes, endocarditis, the need for interventions including cardiac surgery, and impaired quality of life, and shortened life expectancy, has major implications for the individual. The adverse health and social effects may significantly limit education and employment opportunities and increase dependency on welfare. Additionally there may be major adverse impacts on family and community life. The costs in financial terms and missed opportunities, including wasted young lives, are substantial. Prevention of acute rheumatic fever is dependent on the timely diagnosis and treatment of sore throats and skin infections in high-risk groups. Both Australia and New Zealand have registries for acute rheumatic fever but paradoxically neither includes all cases of chronic rheumatic heart disease many of whom would benefit from close surveillance and follow-up. In New Zealand and some Australian States there are programs to give secondary prophylaxis with penicillin, but these are not universal. Surgical outcomes for patients with rheumatic valvular disease are better for valve repair than for valve replacement. Special attention to the selection of the appropriate valve surgery and valve choice is required in pregnant women. It may be necessary to have designated surgical units managing Indigenous patients to ensure high rates of surgical repair rather than valve replacement. Surgical guidelines may be helpful. Long-term follow-up of the outcomes of surgery in

  18. Novel Therapeutic Strategies for Reducing Right Heart Failure Associated Mortality in Fibrotic Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Adegunsoye, Ayodeji; Levy, Matthew; Oyenuga, Olusegun

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic lung diseases carry a significant mortality burden worldwide. A large proportion of these deaths are due to right heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. Underlying contributory factors which appear to play a role in the mechanism of progression of right heart dysfunction include chronic hypoxia, defective calcium handling, hyperaldosteronism, pulmonary vascular alterations, cyclic strain of pressure and volume changes, elevation of circulating TGF-β, and elevated systemic NO levels. Specific therapies targeting pulmonary hypertension include calcium channel blockers, endothelin (ET-1) receptor antagonists, prostacyclin analogs, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, and rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. Newer antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory agents may exert beneficial effects on heart failure in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, right ventricle-targeted therapies, aimed at mitigating the effects of functional right ventricular failure, include β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, antioxidants, modulators of metabolism, and 5-hydroxytryptamine-2B (5-HT2B) receptor antagonists. Newer nonpharmacologic modalities for right ventricular support are increasingly being implemented. Early, effective, and individualized therapy may prevent overt right heart failure in fibrotic lung disease leading to improved outcomes and quality of life. PMID:26583148

  19. Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159330.html Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Prognosis may ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prospects for people with type 2 diabetes and heart disease may be grimmer than ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... 35 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke Improving care can save ... can reduce death among all ages. Problem Many deaths from heart disease and stroke can be prevented. ...

  1. Heart Disease Risk Factors | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents You Can Reduce Your Risk Certain traits, conditions, or habits may raise your ...

  2. Heart Rate and Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Diseases (Caliber)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-17

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Coronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  3. U.S. Heart Disease Deaths Shifting South

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157873.html U.S. Heart Disease Deaths Shifting South Cardiac health has improved in North ... In the 1970s, U.S. counties with the highest death rates from heart disease were clustered in the ...

  4. Women, Men Share Similar Symptoms of Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... history of stroke, an inactive lifestyle, history of depression and a family history of early onset heart disease. Women also ... risk factors that are more common in women -- depression, inactivity, and family history of early onset heart disease -- are not ...

  5. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Sermer, Mathew; Silversides, Candice K

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in paediatric congenital heart surgery, there are a growing number of women with congenital heart disease (CHD) reaching childbearing age. Pregnancy, however, is associated with haemodynamic stresses which can result in cardiac decompensation in women with CHD. Many women with CHD are aware of their cardiac condition prior to pregnancy, and preconception counselling is an important aspect of their care. Preconception counselling allows women to make informed pregnancy decisions, provides an opportunity for modifications of teratogenic medications and, when necessary, repair of cardiac lesions prior to pregnancy. Less commonly, the haemodynamic changes of pregnancy unmask a previously unrecognised heart lesion. In general, pregnancy outcomes are favourable for women with CHD, but there are some cardiac lesions that carry high risk for both the mother and the baby, and this group of women require care by an experienced multidisciplinary team. This review discusses preconception counselling including contraception, an approach to risk stratification and management recommendations in women with some common CHDs.

  6. [Interventional therapy of heart valve diseases: future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Figulla, H R; Lauten, A

    2015-04-01

    Transcatheter procedures have been adopted as novel treatment strategy for patients with valvular heart disease, particularly for those who are inoperable or at high risk for surgical valve procedures. Significant technological advances have resulted in an improvement of devices for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI) with downsizing of crossing profiles, reduction in the rate of paravalvular leakage and conduction abnormalities as well as a lower short- and mid-term mortality and a higher patient acceptance. In the near future, TAVI may potentially develop as first-line treatment for the majority of patients with aortic valve disease. For patients with mitral and pulmonary stenosis, balloon valvuloplasty is effective and well established and should be preferred over valve replacement, last but not least also for economic reasons. For treatment of mitral regurgitation, several transcatheter devices aiming to restore or replace mitral valve function are currently under investigation. This review summarizes the current state of interventional treatment of valvular heart disease along with implications for the future. PMID:25822420

  7. Ischemic heart disease and the Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    Lifestyle modification is primary in cardiovascular (CV) disease prevention. A major contribution is the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), defined by two of seven components. Italian investigators determined a significant decrease in peripheral arterial disease of 56 % for a high score. Multiple specific CV risk factors are also favorably modified by the MedDiet. This includes beneficial effect on inflammation, vascular endothelium, and insulin resistance. There is also evidence that coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome are decreased. Benefit appears to extend to new migrants in France. The economics of dietary adherence are favorable with decreased total lifetime health costs. Although mixed nuts appear to be a major factor in the MedDiet, special emphasis goes to extra virgin olive oil. Benefit also extends to other noncommunicable diseases with a decrease in cancer, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Further quantitation of benefit and understanding of mechanisms involved in dietary benefit is essential. PMID:24743900

  8. Contemporary treatment of amyloid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Palecek, Tomas; Fikrle, Michal; Nemecek, Eduard; Bauerova, Lenka; Kuchynka, Petr; Louch, William E; Spicka, Ivan; Rysava, Romana

    2015-01-01

    The amyloidoses represent a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein, amyloid, which is formed by insoluble extracellular fibrils in β-pleated sheets. Although cardiac involvement may occur in all types of amyloidoses, clinically relevant amyloid cardiomyopathy is a typical feature of AL amyloidosis and transthyretin-related amyloidoses. Congestive heart failure represents the commonest manifestation of amyloid heart disease. Noninvasive imaging techniques, especially echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance, play a major role in the diagnosis of amyloid cardiomyopathy; however, histological confirmation and exact typing of amyloid deposits is necessary whether in extracardiac location or directly in the myocardium. Early diagnosis of amyloid heart disease is of utmost importance as the presence and especially the severity of cardiac involvement generally drives the prognosis of affected subjects and plays a major role in determining the intensity of specific treatment, namely in AL amyloidosis. The management of patients with amyloid heart disease is complex. Loop diuretics together with aldosterone antagonists represent the basis for influencing signs of congestion. In AL amyloidosis, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is generally considered to be a front-line treatment option, if the disease is diagnosed at its early stage. The combination of mephalan with dexamethasone has been the standard therapy for severely affected individuals; however, the combinations with several novel agents including immunomodulatory drugs and bortezomibe have been tested in clinical trials with promising results. New therapeutic substances with the potential to slow or even stop the progression of transthyretin-related amyloidosis are also extensively studied. PMID:25483951

  9. [Pulmonary hemorrhage associated with celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Testa, María Eugenia; Maffey, Alberto; Colom, Alejandro; Agüero, Luis; Rogé, Ignacio; Andrewartha, María Sol; Teper, Alejandro

    2012-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a severe and potentially fatal disease characterized by recurrent episodes of alveolar hemorrhage, hemoptysis, and anemia. His association with celiac disease, described as Lane- Hamilton syndrome, could be due to the fact that both entities share a common pathogenic immune pathway. We report two patients of 13 years who consulted for hemoptysis and severe anemia that had not responded to immunosuppressive treatment with pulses of methyl prednisolone, oral meprednisone and hydroxychloroquine. Although both children highlight the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms at the time of consultation, the dosage of anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies was positive and biopsy confirmed the presence of intestinal enteropathy. It is emphasized that in patients with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms, the concomitant presence of celiac disease should be evaluated. If celiac disease is present, the incorporation of a gluten-free diet helps to control the symptoms, allows reducing the immunosuppressive treatment and improves the clinical course of both entities. PMID:22859336

  10. Development of a Comprehensive Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Moser, Richard P.; Scholl, Sarah; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States, yet a comprehensive and evidence-based heart disease knowledge assessment is currently not available. Purpose: This paper describes the two-phase development of a novel heart disease knowledge questionnaire. Methods: After review and critique of the…

  11. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  12. The Epidemiology of Coronary Heart Disease in Blacks

    PubMed Central

    Gillum, Richard F.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death among US blacks whose CHD mortality rates are among the highest in the world. Important to the advance of understanding the etiology, pathogenesis, and prevention of coronary heart disease is an examination of the epidemiology of coronary heart disease in blacks. PMID:3873545

  13. The pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hogg, James C; Timens, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the innate and adaptive inflammatory immune response to the inhalation of toxic particles and gases. Although tobacco smoking is the primary cause of this inhalation injury, many other environmental and occupational exposures contribute to the pathology of COPD. The immune inflammatory changes associated with COPD are linked to a tissue-repair and -remodeling process that increases mucus production and causes emphysematous destruction of the gas-exchanging surface of the lung. The common form of emphysema observed in smokers begins in the respiratory bronchioles near the thickened and narrowed small bronchioles that become the major site of obstruction in COPD. The mechanism(s) that allow small airways to thicken in such close proximity to lung tissue undergoing emphysematous destruction remains a puzzle that needs to be solved. PMID:18954287

  14. Skeletal Implications of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Misof, Barbara M; Moreira, Carolina A; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with numerous comorbidities, among which osteoporosis is of high significance. Low bone mass and the occurrence of fragility fractures is a common finding in patients with COPD. Typical risk factors related directly or indirectly to these skeletal complications include systemic inflammation, tobacco smoking, vitamin D deficiency, and treatment with oral or inhaled corticosteroids. In particular, treatment with glucocorticoids appears to be a strong contributor to bone changes in COPD, but does not fully account for all skeletal complications. Additional to the effects of COPD on bone mass, there is evidence for COPD-related changes in bone microstructure and material properties. This review summarizes the clinical outcomes of low bone mass and increased fracture risk, and reports on recent observations in bone tissue and material in COPD patients. PMID:26861899

  15. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Avram

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an entity that is known to complicate connective tissue diseases (CTD). PAH in CTD is a very important diagnosis which greatly affects treatment and prognosis. The most commonly affected CTD is scleroderma, although lupus, inflammatory myopathies such as poly and dermatomyositis, and mixed CTD are also associated with PAH. The manifestations of PAH have both similarities and differences when occurring in the setting of CTD as compared with idiopathic PAH. These differences are most notable in scleroderma. In this section we will discuss the features of PAH as they appear in CTDs, and in particular, scleroderma. The focus of this article is an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of PAH in CTD, and how this setting might differ from idiopathic and other forms of PAH. PMID:20160534

  16. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited. PMID:27191018

  17. Rare lung diseases II: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Waddell, Thomas K; Downey, Gregory P

    2008-01-01

    The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed. PMID:18551202

  18. Gene polymorphisms and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaodan; Yuan, Bowei; López, Elena; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    The genetic component was suggested to contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a major and growing public health burden. The present review aims to characterize the evidence that gene polymorphisms contribute to the aetiology of COPD and related traits, and explore the potential relationship between certain gene polymorphisms and COPD susceptibility, severity, lung function, phenotypes, or drug effects, even though limited results from related studies lacked consistency. Most of these studies were association studies, rather than confirmatory studies. More large-sized and strictly controlled studies are needed to prove the relationship between gene polymorphisms and the reviewed traits. More importantly, prospective confirmatory studies beyond initial association studies will be necessary to evaluate true relationships between gene polymorphisms and COPD and help individualized treatment for patients with COPD. PMID:24256364

  19. Irradiation-related ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Corn, B.W.; Trock, B.J.; Goodman, R.L. )

    1990-04-01

    An expectation for long-term survival has emerged among several groups of cancer patients treated with therapeutic irradiation (eg, Hodgkin's disease, early stage breast cancer). Therefore, the cardiovascular sequelae of thoracic irradiation have recently come under scrutiny. Animal models have demonstrated that cardiac irradiation can directly damage the myocardial microvasculature and can indirectly damage the coronary macrovasculature when coupled with cholesterol feeding. A clear association between thoracic radiotherapy and ischemic heart disease was observed among older clinical studies using radiotherapeutic techniques that are no longer optimal by today's standards. Such a relationship could not be confirmed in modern studies in which treatment factors (such as dose and volume of heart irradiated) were more carefully controlled. 56 references.

  20. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-04-15

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. PMID:26965220

  1. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. PMID:27102136

  2. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy P.; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. Methods: A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. Findings: The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. Conclusions: The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD. PMID:24171883

  3. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Shannalee R; Gay, Maresha S; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-07-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed 'developmental origins of health and disease'. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:25572405

  4. Multimodality imaging in heart valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, John B; Myerson, Saul G; Rajani, Ronak; Morgan-Hughes, Gareth J; Dweck, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart valve disease, echocardiography is the mainstay for diagnosis, assessment and serial surveillance. However, other modalities, notably cardiac MRI and CT, are used if echocardiographic imaging is suboptimal but can also give complementary information to improve assessment of the valve lesion and cardiac compensation to aid the timing of surgery and determine risk. This statement discusses the way these imaging techniques are currently integrated to improve care beyond what is possible with echocardiography alone. PMID:26977308

  5. Holography for imaging in structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan; Rotschild, Carmel

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional imaging modalities for structural heart disease interventions have become a common feature in the procedural workflow. The images acquired are usually presented on 2D displays, thereby restricting their usefulness and the ability to interact with them. Holographic images created in real time from the volumetric data which float in the air during the procedure, in front of the operator and above the patient, could provide an intuitive and interactive display for the interventionalist and improve procedure outcomes. PMID:27174119

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in infants with congenital heart defects: are leukotrienes involved?

    PubMed Central

    Serraf, A.; Gascard, J-P.; Bruniaux, J.; Labat, C.; Planche, C.

    1997-01-01

    The circulating levels of leukotriene E4 in infants with congenital heart defects, increased pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary arterial hypertension, were determined and compared with infants with decreased pulmonary blood flow (Tetralogy of Fallot). There was no correlation (r=0.38) between the pulmonary arterial pressure (56 ± 4 mmHg) and the leukotriene E4 levels (1.37 ± 0.67 ng/ml blood) measured in peripheral blood samples from the hypertensive group prior to surgery. There was considerable variation in the detectable leukotriene E4 levels in blood samples from different patients. The levels detected in the blood samples between the two groups of patients was similar. These data suggest that neither the surgical repair during cardiopulmonary bypass nor the pulmonary hypertension appeared to modify the leukotriene E4 blood levels in the small number of patients studied. PMID:18472866

  7. Voluntary exercise delays heart failure onset in rats with pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Natali, Antonio J; Fowler, Ewan D; Calaghan, Sarah C; White, Ed

    2015-08-01

    Increased physical activity is recommended for the general population and for patients with many diseases because of its health benefits but can be contraindicated if it is thought to be a risk for serious cardiovascular events. One such condition is pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). PAH and right ventricular failure was induced in rats by a single injection of monocrotaline (MCT). MCT rats with voluntary access to a running wheel ran on average 2 km/day. The time for half the animals to develop heart failure signs (median survival time) was 28 days (exercise failure group), significantly longer than sedentary animals (sedentary failure group, 23 days). The contractility of single failing myocytes in response to increasing demand (stimulation frequency) was significantly impaired compared with that in both sedentary control and exercising control myocytes. However, myocytes from exercising MCT rats, tested at 23 days (exercise + MCT group), showed responses intermediate to the control (sedentary control and exercising control) and failing (sedentary failure and exercise failure) groups. We conclude that voluntary exercise is beneficial to rats with heart failure induced by PAH, and this is evidence to support the consideration of appropriate exercise regimes for potentially vulnerable groups. PMID:26001413

  8. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Scarlata, Simone; Pennazza, Giorgio; Santonico, Marco; Pedone, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) dramatically increases with age, and COPD complicated by chronic respiratory failure may be considered a geriatric condition. Unfortunately, most cases remain undiagnosed because of atypical clinical presentation and difficulty with current respiratory function diagnostic standards. Accordingly, the disease is under-recognized and undertreated. This is expected to impact noticeably the health status of unrecognized COPD patients because a timely therapy could mitigate the distinctive and important effects of COPD on the health status. Comorbidity also plays a pivotal role in conditioning both the health status and the therapy of COPD besides having major prognostic implication. Several problems affect the overall quality of the therapy for the elderly with COPD, and current guidelines as well as results from pharmacological trials only to some extent apply to this patient. Finally, physicians of different specialties care for the elderly COPD patient: physician's specialty largely determines the kind of approach. In conclusion, COPD, in itself a complex disease, becomes difficult to identify and to manage in the elderly. Interdisciplinary efforts are desirable to provide the practicing physician with a multidisciplinary guide to the identification and treatment of COPD. PMID:24183233

  9. Pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Curtis H; Glassroth, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    The propensity of various nontuberculous mycobacteria to cause lung disease varies widely and is conditioned by host factors; infection is believed to occur from environmental sources. Nontuberculous mycobacteria pulmonary disease (PNTM) is increasing worldwide and Mycobacterium avium complex is the most common cause. PNTM usually occurs in one of three prototypical forms: hypersensitivity pneumonitis, cavitary tuberculosis-like disease or nodular bronchiectasis. PNTM has been linked in some patients to genetic variants of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene and a distinct patient phenotype. Interactions between PNTM and other comorbidities are also increasingly appreciated. Guidelines for diagnosis, emphasizing chest imaging and microbiology, have been published; speciation using molecular techniques is critical for accuracy and for treatment decisions. Clinical trials are lacking to inform treatment for many species and experience with M. avium complex and several others species serves as a guide instead. Use of multiple drugs for a period of at least 12 months following sputum conversion is the norm for most species. In vitro drug susceptibility results for many drugs may not correlate with clinical outcomes and such testing should be done on a selective basis. PMID:23234447

  10. Palliative care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Evan J; Senderovich, Helen

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the only major worldwide cause of mortality that is currently increasing in prevalence. Furthermore, COPD is incurable, and the only therapy that has been shown to increase survival is oxygen therapy in selected patients. Compared to patients with cancer, patients with COPD experience similar levels of pain, breathlessness, fatigue, depression, and anxiety and have a worse quality of life but have comparatively little access to palliative care. When these patients do receive palliative care, they tend to be referred later than patients with cancer. Many disease, patient-, and provider-related factors contribute to this phenomenon, including COPD's unpredictable course, misperceptions of palliative care among patients and physicians, and lack of advance care planning discussions outside of crisis situations. A new paradigm for palliative care would introduce palliative treatments alongside, rather than at the exclusion of disease-modifying interventions. This integrated approach would circumvent the issue of difficult prognostication in COPD, as any patient would receive individualized palliative interventions from the time of diagnosis. These points will be covered in this review, which discusses the challenges in providing palliative care to COPD patients, the strategies to mitigate the challenges, management of common symptoms, and the evidence for integrated palliative care models as well as some suggestions for future development. PMID:27481751

  11. The acute effects of low flow oxygen and isosorbide dinitrate on left and right ventricular ejection fractions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.; Caldwell, J.; Lakshminaryan, S.; Ritchie, J.L.; Kennedy, J.W.

    1983-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of low flow oxygen and isosorbide dinitrate on rest and exercise biventricular ejection fractions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and to relate these ejection fraction responses to changes in pressure and flow. Nine patients with stable, moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who had no prior history of heart failure performed supine exercise with simultaneous hemodynamic and radionuclide ventriculographic monitoring. Eight patients performed a second exercise during low flow oxygen breathing and five performed a third exercise after ingesting 10 mg oral isosorbide. Oxygen led to a decrease in exercise pulmonary artery pressure in all subjects and a decline in total pulmonary resistance in five of the seven in whom it was measured. Right ventricular ejection fraction increased 0.05 or more only in subjects who had a decrease in total pulmonary resistance. Isosorbide led to an increase in rest and exercise right and left ventricular ejection fractions with simultaneous decreases in pulmonary artery pressure, total pulmonary resistance, blood pressure and arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but without a history of right heart failure, the right ventricular systolic functional response to low flow oxygen and isosorbide at rest and exercise is, in part, determined by changes in total pulmonary resistance. The chronic relation between right ventricular ejection fraction and pulmonary hemodynamics in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remains to be evaluated.

  12. [Indications for coronarography in heart valve diseases].

    PubMed

    Rangel, A; Hernández, J; Iris, J M; Baduí, E; Chávez, E

    1996-01-01

    Among 407 patients with rheumatic heart disease studied in our department, we found 8.3% with coronary atherosclerosis: 2.7% with mitral stenosis and 2.4% with aortic stenosis, lower figures than those reported in the literature. In our patients with coronary atherosclerosis, the male to female ratio was 1.6:1. The mean age of men and women with coronary atherosclerosis were 58.9 +/- 8.48 years and 60.33 +/- 5.75 years respectively. The cumulated relative frequency curve of the age was shifted to the right in the patients with coronary atherosclerosis, compared with the age frequency curve of the patients with normal coronary arteries: 50% of the cases with coronary atherosclerosis were < or = 60 years old; on the other hand, 50% of the patients with normal coronary arteries were < 53 years old. We only discovered 3 patients younger than 50 years old with coronary atherosclerosis. In order of frequency, the coronary arteries more affected were the anterior descending, right and circumflex. The mean coronary stenosis was 75.2 +/- 21.2%. Disease of one vessel was observed more frequently. We believe that age is not a good parameter to indicate coronarography in patients with valvular heart disease. If coronarography would be performed in all patients with valvular disease > or = 30 or 40 years old, would result in a great number of normal studies, with the consequent misspend of supplies and the increased risk of complications. On the other hand, restricting the coronarography indication, would miss the diagnosis in patients that might need myocardial revascularization. To restrict or to increase the indication of coronarography in patients with valvular disease will depend of the frequency between rheumatic heart disease and associated coronary atherosclerosis, and also on the atherosclerosis risk factors present in each patient. We recommend not to use the age of the patients as an index to indicate coronarography. PMID:8768624

  13. Two case reports of Castleman disease with pulmonary involvement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Zhang, J-Q; Zhong, X-N; Liu, G-N; Li, M-H; Bai, J; He, Z-Y; Deng, J-M

    2015-03-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare reactive lymphoproliferative disorder, first identified in 1954. We recently had the opportunity to analyse the characteristics of two variations of CD with pulmonary involvement. Case 1 had localised retroperitoneal hyaline vascular type CD, while Case 2 was diagnosed as multicentric plasma cell type CD. Both patients had pulmonary symptoms and signs, including cough, dyspnoea, hypoxaemia and ventilatory dysfunction; however, they had different physiological manifestations of their pulmonary abnormalities. PMID:25686148

  14. Levosimendan in two neonates with ischemic heart failure and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    De Carolis, Maria Pia; Piastra, Marco; Bersani, Iliana; Pardeo, Manuela; Stival, Eleonora; Tempera, Alessia; Romagnoli, Costantino; Conti, Giorgio; De Rosa, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    We report the successful and safe use of levosimendan, a new calcium-sensitizing agent with positive inotropic and vasodilatory action, in 2 critically ill term newborns with acute heart failure and pulmonary hypertension in the absence of any underlying heart malformation and/or previous cardiosurgical procedures. During the neonatal period, levosimendan may represent an ideal drug for immature myocardium characterized by a higher calcium-dependent contractility than in adults. PMID:22067520

  15. The clinical presentation and management of carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dobson, R; Burgess, M I; Pritchard, D M; Cuthbertson, D J

    2014-04-15

    Carcinoid heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Although cases of carcinoid syndrome and severe carcinoid heart disease requiring urgent intervention are well described, many patients with significant carcinoid heart disease may have insidious symptoms or even be asymptomatic. As haemodynamically significant carcinoid heart disease may be clinically silent, specific and individualised considerations must be made as to the most appropriate clinical criteria and time point at which surgical valve replacement should be undertaken in patients with carcinoid heart disease. PMID:24636550

  16. Pattern of pulmonary venous blood flow in the hypoplastic left heart syndrome in the fetus

    PubMed Central

    Better, D; Apfel, H; Zidere, V; Allan, L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether restriction at the atrial septum in the newborn with hypoplastic left heart syndrome can be predicted accurately by examining the pattern of pulmonary venous flow in the fetus. A restrictive atrial septum can contribute to haemodynamic instability before surgery for this lesion and has been associated with an increased mortality.
DESIGN—Pulmonary venous pulsed Doppler tracings were compared between fetuses with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and controls. The size of the atrial septal defect on the postnatal echocardiogram was graded according to the degree of restriction. Pulsed Doppler tracings of pulmonary venous blood flow were obtained in 18 fetuses with left atrial outflow atresia and compared with 77 controls, adjusted for gestational age. Postnatal echocardiograms were available for analysis in 13 of 18 neonates.
SETTING—A tertiary referral centre for fetal cardiology and paediatric cardiac surgery.
RESULTS—Fetuses with hypoplastic left heart syndrome were different from controls in all pulmonary vein indices measured. As assessed from the postnatal echocardiogram, there were seven fetuses with a restrictive atrial septum. In these fetuses, the systolic flow velocity (p < 0.01), S/D ratio (p < 0.01), and peak reversal wave (p < 0.001) in the pulmonary vein tracing showed a good correlation with the degree of restriction.
CONCLUSIONS—The Doppler pattern of pulmonary venous flow in the fetus with hypoplastic left heart syndrome appears to be a reliable predictor of restriction of the atrial septum in the neonate. This may help in the immediate post-delivery management of these infants before surgery.


Keywords: fetus; congenital heart defects; echocardiography; risk factors PMID:10336926

  17. Injectable Tissue-Engineered Pulmonary Heart Valve Implantation Into the Pig Model: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Franziska; Salameh, Aida; Oelmann, Katja; Halling, Michelle; Dhein, Stefan; Mohr, Friedrich W.; Dohmen, Pascal M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement is currently performed in clinical trials, but is limited by the use of glutaraldehyde-treated bioprostheses. This feasibility study was performed to evaluate delivery-related tissue distortion during implantation of tissue-engineered (TE) heart valves. Material/Methods The injectable TE heart valve was mounted on a self-expanding nitinol stent (n=7) and delivered into the pulmonary position in 7 pigs, (weight 26 to 31 kg), performing a sternotomy or limited lateral thoracotomy. Prior to implantation, the injectable TE heart valves were crimped and inserted into an applicator. Positioning of the implants was guided by fluoroscopy, and after careful deployment, angiographic examination was performed to evaluate the correct delivered position. Hemodynamic measurements were performed by epicardial echocardiography. Finally, the animals were sacrificed and the injectable TE heart valves were inspected by gross examination and histological examination. Results Orthotopic deliveries of the injectable TE heart valves were all successful performed, expect in 1 where the valve migrated due to a discrepancy between pulmonary valve annulus size and injectable TE valve size. Angiographic evaluation (n=6) showed normal valve function, supported by epicardial echocardiography in which no increased flow velocity was measured, neither trans- nor paravalvular regurgitation. Histological evaluation demonstrated absence of tissue damage from the delivery process. Conclusions Transcatheter implantation of an injectable TE heart valve seems to be possible without tissue distortion due to the delivery system. PMID:26104851

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Shannalee R.; Gay, Maresha S.; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed ‘developmental origins of health and disease’. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:25572405

  19. Predictive model for the detection of pulmonary hypertension in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    PubMed Central

    MIKAWA, Shoma; MIYAGAWA, Yuichi; TODA, Noriko; TOMINAGA, Yoshinori; TAKEMURA, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) often occurs due to a left heart disease, such as myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD), in dogs and is diagnosed using Doppler echocardiography and estimated pulmonary arterial pressure. Diagnosis of PH in dogs requires expertise in echocardiography: however, the examination for PH is difficult to perform in a clinical setting. Thus, simple and reliable methods are required for the diagnosis of PH in dogs. The purpose of this study was to develop models using multiple logistic regression analysis to detect PH due to left heart disease in dogs with MMVD without echocardiography. The medical records of dogs with MMVD were retrospectively reviewed, and 81 dogs were included in this study and classified into PH and non-PH groups. Bivariate analysis was performed to compare all parameters between the groups, and variables with P values of <0.25 in bivariate analysis were included in multiple logistic regression analysis to develop models for the detection of PH. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the model included a vertebral heart scale short axis of >5.2 v, and a length of sternal contact of >3.3 v was considered suitable for the detection of PH. The predictive accuracy of this model (85.9%) was judged statistically adequate, and therefore, this model may be useful to screen for PH due to left heart disease in dogs with MMVD without echocardiography. PMID:25319513

  20. Genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Silverman, E K

    2001-01-01

    The marked variability in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in response to cigarette smoking has been known for decades, but severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (PI Z) remains the only proven genetic risk factor for COPD. With cigarette smoking, PI Z subjects tend to develop more severe pulmonary impairment at an earlier age than non-smoking PI Z individuals. However, PI Z individuals exhibit wide variability in pulmonary function impairment, even among individuals with similar smoking histories. Therefore, other genes and environmental exposures are also likely involved. The role of heterozygosity for the Z allele as a risk factor for COPD remains controversial, but accumulating evidence suggests that at least some PI MZ individuals are at increased risk of developing airflow obstruction. In individuals without alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial aggregation of COPD has been reported in several studies. To study novel genetic determinants of COPD, our research group enrolled 44 severe, early-onset COPD probands (FEV1 < 40%, age < 53 yrs, non-PI Z) and 266 of their relatives. A marked female predominance was noted among the early-onset COPD probands. In addition, increased risk to current or ex-smoking first-degree relatives of early-onset COPD probands for reduced FEV1, chronic bronchitis and spirometric bronchodilator responsiveness has been demonstrated. These data strongly support the genetic basis for the development of COPD and the potential for gene-by-environment interaction. A variety of studies have examined candidate gene loci with association studies, comparing the distribution of variants in genes hypothesized to be involved in the development of COPD in COPD patients and control subjects. For most genetic loci which have been tested, there have been inconsistent results. Genetic heterogeneity could contribute to difficulty in replicating associations between studies. In addition, case-control association studies

  1. Daily activities are sufficient to induce dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation and dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Antonio A.M.; Kümpel, Claudia; Rangueri, Rosana Chaves; Oliveira, Maurício Dalcin; Dornelles, Rodrigo Alves; Brito, Emerson Roberto; Seki, Tânia Maria; Porto, Elias F

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to measure dynamic lung hyperinflation and its influence on dyspnea perception in moderate and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients after performing activities of daily living. METHODS: We measured inspiratory capacity, sensation of dyspnea, peripheral oxygen saturation, heart rate and respiratory rate in 19 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. These measurements were taken at rest and after performing activities of daily living (e.g., going up and down a set of stairs, going up and down a ramp and sweeping and mopping a room). RESULT: The inspiratory capacity of patients at rest was significantly decreased compared to the capacity of patients after performing activities. The change in inspiratory capacity was -0.67 L after going up and down a ramp, -0.46 L after sweeping and mopping a room, and -0.55 L after climbing up and down a set of stairs. Dyspnea perception increased significantly between rest, sweeping and mopping, and going up and down a set of stairs. Dyspnea perception correlated positively with inspiratory capacity variation (r = 0.85) and respiratory rate (r = 0.37) and negatively with peripheral oxygen saturation (r = -0.28). CONCLUSION: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients exhibited reductions in inspiratory capacity and increases in dyspnea perception during commonly performed activities of daily living, which may limit physical performance in these patients. PMID:22522756

  2. Vitamin D and ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lund, B; Badskjaer, J; Lund, B; Soerensen, O H

    1978-11-01

    Vitamin D has been proposed as a risk factor of ischaemic heart disease. In 12 patients with acute myocardial infarction the major circulating vitamin D metabolite, 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol (25-HCC), did not show any fluctuations during the first 4 days after onset of symptoms. The serum 25-HCC level was then measured in 128 patients consecutively admitted because of chest pain, 53 of whom had myocardial infarction and 75 had angina pectoris. The values found did not differ from those measured in 409 normal persons. The seasonal variations of serum 25-HCC were less pronounced in heart patients than in normals, probably due to less sun exposure in the summer months. The levels of serum 25-HCC did not correlate with the concentrations of serum cholesterol, glycerides, calcium or magnesium. Low serum calcium and magnesium were observed in all patients. Serum calcium was further reduced in the course of acute myocardial infarctions while serum parathyroid hormone rose significantly. We conclude that patients with ischaemic heart disease are not ingesting or producing in their skin elevated amount of vitamin D. PMID:744575

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Domej, W; Földes-Papp, Z; Flögel, E; Haditsch, B

    2006-04-01

    The respiratory tract as the main entrance for various inhalative substances has great potential to generate reactive species directly or indirectly in excess. Thus, heavy smokers are at high risk for development, impairment and failed response to treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The article is an update regarding the influence of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species on COPD; however, we do not intend to describe ROS and RNS actions on the entire lung tissue. Here, we focus on the airways, because in human most of the described effects of ROS and RNS species are measured on respiratory epithelial cells obtained by bronchoscopy. ROS and RNS species are physiological compounds in cells and risk factors for several respiratory diseases. In general, both kinds of species are thermodynamically stabile, but their reaction behaviors in cellular environments are very different. For example, the life times of the superoxide anion radical range from micro/milliseconds up to minutes and even hours in in-vitro model systems. Oxidative stress by cigarette smoke was investigated in detail by the authors of this article. In addition, original studies by the authors on the amount of fine particulate matter and trace elements in lung biopsies after defined inhalation indicate a distortion of the equilibrium between oxidants and antioxidants. We also try to present some modern views with respect to genomic medicine for future therapeutic perspectives, although this is an upcoming sector of COPD therapy. PMID:16724946

  4. [Autoimmunity in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Urboniene, Daiva; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Sitkauskiene, Brigita

    2005-01-01

    For years, smoking induced inflammatory reaction, comprised mainly of neutrophils and macrophages, has been accepted to be the major component in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New developments in molecular and cell biology have provided scientists with new knowledge and understanding of inflammatory processes in lung. Recent reports have underlined the role of autoimmunity and T lymphocytes as a potential important factor, which takes place in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article reviews potential mechanism of T cell mediated immune response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:15827384

  5. Endothelin receptor antagonists for pulmonary hypertension in adult patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Caterina P; Machado, Roberto F; Coles, Wynona A; Sachdev, Vandana; Gladwin, Mark T; Kato, Gregory J

    2009-12-01

    Pulmonary Hypertension is a serious complication of sickle cell disease (SCD), with high morbidity and mortality. Endothelin (ET)-1, a potent vasoconstrictor elevated in SCD, acts through the ET receptors (ETR), ETR-A and ETR-B. Bosentan and ambrisentan are ETR blockers used in primary pulmonary hypertension. We report on the use of ETR blocking agents in a cohort of 14 high-risk SCD adult patients with pulmonary hypertension. Patients underwent right heart catheterization, 6-min walk test, echocardiogram, physical examination and blood work-up before starting ETR blockers. Eight patients received ETR blockers as initial therapy; six patients were already taking sildenafil. Over more than 6 months of therapy, sequential measurements of 6-min walk distance increased significantly (baseline 357 +/- 22 to 398 +/- 18 m at 5-6 months, P < 0.05). Downward trends were observed for amino-terminal brain natriuretic peptide and tricuspid regurgitant velocity. Pulmonary artery mean pressures decreased in three patients that had repeat right heart catheterization (44-38 mmHg). Adverse events were: increased serum alanine aminotransferase (2), peripheral oedema (4), rash (1), headache (3), decreased haemoglobin (2). Therapy was stopped in two patients who were switched then to the other ETR blocker agent. These data suggest preliminary evidence for the benefit of bosentan and ambrisentan in pulmonary hypertension in SCD. PMID:19775299

  6. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities

    PubMed Central

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-01-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context. PMID:23680886

  7. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease? Major Signs and Symptoms The main sign of heart valve ... legs, abdomen, and veins in the neck Other Signs and Symptoms Heart valve disease can cause chest ...

  8. Multi-vesicular pulmonary hydatid cyst, the potent underestimated factor in the formation of daughter cysts of pulmonary hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Sokouti, Mohsen; Sokouti, Babak; Shokouhi, Behrooz; Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary multi-vesicular hydatid disease (HD) with Echinococcus granulosus is rare. A 28-year-old woman presented to our center with cough and respiratory distress. Chest x-ray and computerized tomography scan revealed bilateral giant cysts with water-lily sign (ruptured hydatid cysts). The left cyst was in vicinity of heart. With thoracotomy cysts of both lungs were removed. Thousands of translucent, homogenized small daughter cysts were discovered from the left side cyst. Pathologic examinations revealed the ruptured hydatid cysts of both lungs with daughter cysts on the left lung cyst. To best of our knowledge probably this is the first report of multi-vesicular HD in lung. We suppose that the heart pulsation was effective in the formation of daughter cysts. PMID:26180389

  9. Multi-vesicular pulmonary hydatid cyst, the potent underestimated factor in the formation of daughter cysts of pulmonary hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Sokouti, Mohsen; Sokouti, Babak; Shokouhi, Behrooz; Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary multi-vesicular hydatid disease (HD) with Echinococcus granulosus is rare. A 28-year-old woman presented to our center with cough and respiratory distress. Chest x-ray and computerized tomography scan revealed bilateral giant cysts with water-lily sign (ruptured hydatid cysts). The left cyst was in vicinity of heart. With thoracotomy cysts of both lungs were removed. Thousands of translucent, homogenized small daughter cysts were discovered from the left side cyst. Pathologic examinations revealed the ruptured hydatid cysts of both lungs with daughter cysts on the left lung cyst. To best of our knowledge probably this is the first report of multi-vesicular HD in lung. We suppose that the heart pulsation was effective in the formation of daughter cysts. PMID:26180389

  10. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The golden decade. Implications for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    López-Giraldo, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Roisin, Robert; Agustí, Alvar

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous illness, which causes an important socio-economic burden. The last decade has witnessed significant advances in the understanding and knowledge of COPD with a paradigm shift in both the assessment and management of the disease. The article here reviews these changes with a particular focus on the last revision (2013) of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:24820902

  11. Group III Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Lung Disease: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Klinger, James R

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with chronic lung disease (WHO group 3) is the second leading cause of PH and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is usually moderate and correlates with severity of lung disease. In a small minority, PAP may approach that seen in WHO group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Current medications for treating PAH have not shown benefit in controlled trials of group 3 PH and their routine use is discouraged. Patients with severe group 3 PH should be considered for referral to expert centers or entry into clinical trials. PMID:27443138

  12. Environmental stress, reactivity and ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Krantz, D S; Raisen, S E

    1988-03-01

    This article provides an overview of work in two areas of biobehavioural research: the effects of environmental stress and the role of psychophysiologic reactivity in the development of ischaemic heart disease. Attention is given first to evidence that low socio-economic status, low social support, and occupational settings characterized by high demands and low levels of control over the job are associated with increased coronary risk. Also discussed is a promising animal primate model of social stress and its role in development of coronary atherosclerosis. Next, we discuss physiological responsiveness (reactivity) to emotional stress, which is being studied as a marker of processes involved in the development of cardiovascular disease. Stress and psychophysiological reactivity constitute promising targets for research on biobehavioural antecedents of coronary disease and for clinical intervention studies. However, further evidence is needed before these variables can be regarded as proven coronary risk factors. PMID:3129010

  13. Republished: drug-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cosyns, Bernard; Droogmans, Steven; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-03-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) was first described in the 1960s. Initially, associations with ergot derivatives used for migraine prevention, or with anorectic drugs, were described. Drugs used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and endocrine diseases, like hyperprolactinemia, may also induce VHD. More recently, the use of 3,4-methylendioxymetamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and benfluorexhave been found to be associated with DIVHD. Although some of these drugs were withdrawn from the market, several cases of patients requiring valve surgery even years after the cessation of therapy have been reported. DIVHD is not infrequent, may be severe, and has been described in association with several drugs. Even after drug cessation, long-term implications of this type of VHD may persist. The present review underlines the need for a careful evaluation of the associated clinical and echocardiographic risk factors to allow early recognition so as not to delay appropriate management. PMID:23417686

  14. Drug-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cosyns, Bernard; Droogmans, Steven; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) was first described in the 1960s. Initially, associations with ergot derivatives used for migraine prevention, or with anorectic drugs, were described. Drugs used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and endocrine diseases, like hyperprolactinemia, may also induce VHD. More recently, the use of 3,4-methylendioxymetamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and benfluorexhave been found to be associated with DIVHD. Although some of these drugs were withdrawn from the market, several cases of patients requiring valve surgery even years after the cessation of therapy have been reported. DIVHD is not infrequent, may be severe, and has been described in association with several drugs. Even after drug cessation, long-term implications of this type of VHD may persist. The present review underlines the need for a careful evaluation of the associated clinical and echocardiographic risk factors to allow early recognition so as not to delay appropriate management. PMID:22875739

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cerebrovascular disease: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lahousse, Lies; Tiemeier, Henning; Ikram, M Arfan; Brusselle, Guy G

    2015-11-01

    Along with the aging population, the public health burden of cerebrovascular disease is increasing. Cerebral small vessel disease and accumulation of brain pathology associate with cognitive decline and can lead to clinical outcomes, such as stroke and dementia. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a common respiratory disease among elderly. The quality of life and prognosis of patients with COPD is greatly determined by the presence of comorbidities including stroke and cognitive impairment. Despite the clinical relevance of cerebral small vessel disease, stroke and (vascular) cognitive impairment in patients with COPD, literature is scarce and underlying mechanisms are unknown. The aim of the present review is therefore to summarize current scientific knowledge, to provide a better understanding of the interplay between COPD and the aging brain and to define remaining knowledge gaps. This narrative review article 1) overviews the epidemiology of cerebral small vessel disease, stroke and cognitive impairment in patients with COPD; 2) discusses potential underlying mechanisms including aging, smoking, systemic inflammation, vasculopathy, hypoxia and genetic susceptibility; and 3) highlights areas requiring further research. PMID:26342840

  16. Pulmonary artery aneurysms in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sema; Cimen, Kadriye Akar

    2010-08-01

    Behçet's disease is the most common cause of pulmonary artery aneurysms. Pulmonary artery aneurysms are rare, but they are life-threatening because of their high tendency to rupture. However, there is also a chance that the aneurysms may completely resolve with immunosuppressive therapy. A 30-year-old man was admitted with chest pain, painful oral and genital ulcers, skin rash, weakness, and intermittent hemoptysis. He had a history of Behçet's disease for 6 years. The chest radiography showed a round opacity superior part of hilus on right. The helical thoracic computed tomography (CT) angiography demonstrated pulmonary aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. The patient was successfully treated with colchicine, corticosteroids, and cyclophosphamide. A discussion about pulmonary artery aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease is provided in this case. PMID:19693504

  17. Remote telemonitoring for patients with heart failure: might monitoring pulmonary artery pressure become routine?

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Kate; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Dierckx, Riet; Cleland, John G F; Clark, Andrew L

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure is one of the most important medical problems facing societies in developed economies and its prevalence is predicted to rise inexorably in the next few decades as longevity increases. Worsening heart failure leading to hospitalization is associated with a poor prognosis and imposes a substantial burden on health care resources and budgets. Interventions that can stabilize patients should reduce the need for hospitalization and improve prognosis. This might be facilitated by frequent self-monitoring of clinical and physiological variables by patients themselves at home. Rising pulmonary artery pressure is an early sign of cardiac decompensation that may be more sensitive than conventional methods of patient assessment and thus allow early adjustment of medical therapy to avoid hospitalizations and improve patient outcomes. Remote monitoring of pulmonary artery pressure is now possible using devices that can be implanted percutaneously. This innovative technology could become a routine part of the management of heart failure in the next few decades. PMID:24984847

  18. Haemostatic defects in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, P; Värendh, G; Lundström, N R

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of defects of the haemostatic mechanism in 41 children with cyanotic congenital heart disease concluded that such abnormalities were common and normally involved factors synthesised in the liver, that is the vitamin K dependent factors (rothrombin, factors VII and IX) and factor V. No evidence was found of activation of the coagulation or fibrinolytic systems. The defects can be explained by deficient synthesis resulting from systemic hypoxia as well as from sluggishness of the local microcirculation caused by high blood viscosity. Vitamin K parenterally had no demonstrable effect. Replacement of these factors, possibly combined with measures to improve the microcirculation, therefore, appears to be the appropriate treatment. PMID:426953

  19. Chorea, polycythaemis, and cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, P D; Prosser, R; Wells, C E

    1975-01-01

    Two cases of polycythaemic chorea are described, both of which were complicated by severe heart disease. The first was a child with patent ductus arteriosus and coarctation of the aorta causing severe cyanosis and secondary polycythaemia. Chorea began intermittently at an early age, becoming continuous by his fifth birthday. The second was a middle-aged male with tight mitral stenosis and a story of paralytic chorea in his teens. Polycythaemia rubra vera was eventually diagnosed two years after mitral valvotomy, some seven years after the onset of chorea. Images PMID:1185193

  20. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Oster, Matthew E; Kochilas, Lazaros

    2016-03-01

    Screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was added to the United States Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011. Since that time, CCHD screening with pulse oximetry has become nearly universal for newborns born in the United States. There are various algorithms in use. Although the goal of the screening program is to identify children who may have CCHD, most newborns who have a low oxygen saturation will not have CCHD. Further study is needed to determine optimal guidelines for CCHD screening in special settings such as the neonatal intensive care unit, areas in high altitude, and home births. PMID:26876122

  1. Congenital Heart Disease and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Mike John; Shapiro, Adam J; Kennedy, Marcus Peter

    2016-03-01

    Through the better understanding of the genetics and clinical associations of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), an autosomal recessive disorder of ciliary motility and mucociliary clearance, the association between PCD and heterotaxic congenital heart disease (CHD) has been established. In parallel, research into the cause of CHD has elucidated further the role of ciliary function on the development of normal cardiovascular structure. Increased awareness by clinicians regarding this elevated risk of PCD in patients with CHD will allow for more comprehensive screening and identification of cases in this high-risk group with earlier diagnosis leading to improved health outcomes. PMID:26545972

  2. Atrial Macroreentry in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Darragh J; Sanders, Prashanthan; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C

    2015-01-01

    Macroreentrant atrial tachycardia is a common complication following surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD), and is often highly symptomatic with potentially significant hamodynamic consequences. Medical management is often unsuccessful, requiring the use of invasive procedures. Cavotricuspid isthmus dependent flutter is the most common circuit but atypical circuits also exist, involving sites of surgical intervention or areas of scar related to abnormal hemodynamics. Ablation can be technically challenging, due to complex anatomy, and difficulty with catheter stability. A thorough assessment of the pa-tients status and pre-catheter ablation planning is critical to successfully managing these patients. PMID:25308809

  3. Sildenafil in heart failure with reactive pulmonary hypertension (Sildenafil HF) clinical trial (rationale and design)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we present the rationale and design of the Sildenafil HF trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02304705). We will randomize patients with heart failure and reactive pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary capillary wedge pressure > 15 mmHg, pulmonary vascular resistance > 3 Wood units) into two groups: the treatment group receiving sildenafil 20 mg 3 times a day and a matching placebo group. The duration of intervention will be 3 months. The primary outcome is 6-minute walk distance. Key features of this trial include (1) that reactive pulmonary hypertension is an inclusion criterion, (2) that patients will be enrolled regardless of left ventricular ejection fraction, and (3) that clinical stability in the 3 months preceding enrollment is not required. PMID:27252841

  4. Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Criner, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis (CB) is a common but variable phenomenon in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has numerous clinical consequences, including an accelerated decline in lung function, greater risk of the development of airflow obstruction in smokers, a predisposition to lower respiratory tract infection, higher exacerbation frequency, and worse overall mortality. CB is caused by overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus by goblet cells, which leads to worsening airflow obstruction by luminal obstruction of small airways, epithelial remodeling, and alteration of airway surface tension predisposing to collapse. Despite its clinical sequelae, little is known about the pathophysiology of CB and goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and treatment options are limited. In addition, it is becoming increasingly apparent that in the classic COPD spectrum, with emphysema on one end and CB on the other, most patients lie somewhere in the middle. It is known now that many patients with severe emphysema can develop CB, and small airway pathology has been linked to worse clinical outcomes, such as increased mortality and lesser improvement in lung function after lung volume reduction surgery. However, in recent years, a greater understanding of the importance of CB as a phenotype to identify patients with a beneficial response to therapy has been described. Herein we review the epidemiology of CB, the evidence behind its clinical consequences, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and current therapies for CB. PMID:23204254

  5. Nutrition in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Schols, A M

    2000-03-01

    Weight loss is a frequently occurring complication in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is a determining factor of functional capacity, health status, and mortality. Weight loss in COPD is a consequence of increased energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Both metabolic and mechanical inefficiency contribute to the elevated energy expenditure. A disbalance between protein synthesis and protein breakdown may cause a disproportionate depletion of fat-free mass in some patients. Nutritional support is indicated for depleted patients with COPD because it provides not only supportive care, but direct intervention through improvement in respiratory and peripheral skeletal muscle function and in exercise performance. A combination of oral nutritional supplements and exercise or anabolic stimulus appears to be the best treatment approach to obtaining significant functional improvement. Patients responding to this treatment even demonstrated a decreased mortality. Poor response was related to the effects of systemic inflammation on dietary intake and catabolism. The effectiveness of anticatabolic modulation requires further investigation. PMID:10741769

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miall-Allen, V. M.; Kemp, G. J.; Rajagopalan, B.; Taylor, D. J.; Radda, G. K.; Haworth, S. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility of studying myocardial and skeletal muscle bioenergetics using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in babies and young children with congenital heart disease. SUBJECTS: 16 control subjects aged 5 months to 24 years and 18 patients with CHD, aged 7 months to 23 years, of whom 11 had cyanotic CHD, five had cardiac failure, and two had had a Senning procedure. DESIGN: 31P MRS was carried out using a 1.9 Tesla horizontal 65 cm bore whole body magnet to study the myocardium in 10 patients and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) in 14 patients, eight of whom were exercised, together with appropriate controls. RESULTS: In hypoxaemic patients, in skeletal muscle at rest intracellular pH (pHi) was abnormally high [7.06 (SEM 0.04) v 7.04 (0.05), P < 0.01] and showed a positive correlation with haemoglobin (P < 0.03). On exercise, hypoxaemic patients fatigued more quickly but end-exercise pHi and phosphocreatine recovery were normal, implying that an equivalent but smaller amount of work had been performed. End-exercise ADP concentration was lower. On recovery, the initial rate of phosphocreatine resynthesis was low. Skeletal muscle bioenergetics were within normal limits in those in heart failure. In the myocardium, the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio was similar in controls and hypoxaemic subjects, but low in those in heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: In heart failure, the myocardial phosphocreatine/ATP ratio was reduced, as in adults, while resting skeletal muscle studies were normal. By contrast, hypoxaemic children had normal myocardial bioenergetics, but showed skeletal muscle alkalinity, and energy reserves were more readily depleted on exercise. On recovery, the initially slow phosphocreatine resynthesis rate reflects a low rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis, probably due to an inadequate oxygen supply. 31P MRS offers a safe, non-invasive method of studying myocardial and skeletal muscle bioenergetics in children as young as 5 months

  7. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have any other heart problems. Echocardiography Echo uses sound waves to create a moving picture of your heart ... the surface of your chest. The transducer sends sound waves through your chest wall to your heart. Echoes ...

  8. Anaesthesia for patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggappa, Devika Rani; Rao, G Venkateswara; Kannan, Sudheesh

    2015-01-01

    The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become a disease of public health importance. Among the various risk factors, smoking remains the main culprit. In addition to airway obstruction, the presence of intrinsic positive end expiratory pressure, respiratory muscle dysfunction contributes to the symptoms of the patient. Perioperative management of these patients includes identification of modifiable risk factors and their optimisation. Use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia improves pulmonary functions and reduces the incidence of post-operative pulmonary complications. PMID:26556916

  9. Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crişan, Alexandru F.; Oancea, Cristian; Timar, Bogdan; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Crişan, Alexandru; Tudorache, Voicu

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with multiple cognitive problems. Montreal Cognitive Assessment test (MoCA) is used to detect cognitive impairment evaluating several areas: visuospatial, memory, attention and fluency. Our study aim was to evaluate the impact of stable COPD and exacerbation (AECOPD) phases on cognitive status using MoCA questionnaire. Methods We enrolled 39 patients (pts), smokers with COPD group D (30 stable and 9 in AECOPD) and 13 healthy subjects (control group), having similar level of education and no significant differences regarding the anthropometric measurements. We analyzed the differences in MoCA score between these three groups and also the correlation between this score and inflammatory markers. Results Patients with AECOPD had a significant (p<0.001) decreased MoCA score (14.6±3.4) compared to stable COPD (20.2±2.4) and controls (24.2±5.8). The differences between groups were more accentuated for the language abstraction and attention (p<0.001) and delayed recall and orientation (p<0.001) sub-topics. No significant variance of score was observed between groups regarding visuospatial and naming score (p = 0.095). The MoCA score was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume (r = 0.28) and reverse correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = −0.57), fibrinogen (r = −0.58), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (r = −0.55) and with the partial pressure of CO2 (r = −0.47). Conclusions According to this study, COPD significantly decreases the cognitive status in advanced and acute stages of the disease. PMID:25033379

  10. [Association between function of selenium and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    An excessive oxidative stress is considered to be responsible for the development and progression of heart disease. Deficiency of trace elements with antioxidative activities is present in patients with heart disease. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase(GPx), one of the central players of the heart's antioxidant system, and it's deficiency is implicated in certain types of heart disease. Our study suggests that myocardial oxidative stress in chronic heart failure may be augmented at least in part by concomitant GPx deficiency, and that the administration of Se could rescue the exhaustion of this selenoprotein, resulting in improved left ventricular function. PMID:27455811

  11. Valvular heart disease in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zuily, Stéphane; Huttin, Olivier; Mohamed, Shirine; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Selton-Suty, Christine; Wahl, Denis

    2013-04-01

    Heart valve disease (HVD) is the most frequent cardiac manifestation in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), with prevalence of 30 %. The definition is based on the presence of thickening or vegetation of the valves (mainly mitral and aortic) as described by Libman and Sacks for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Transthoracic and/or transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE and TEE, respectively) enable early and accurate diagnosis and help avoid misdiagnosis as rheumatic valve disease. The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in SLE patients is associated with a threefold greater risk of HVD, confirming the crucial importance of these antibodies in the pathogenic process, leading to thrombotic manifestations on valves because of hypercoagulability. Natural history is characterized by worsening of HVD over time with an increased risk for stroke. APS patients undergoing valve-replacement surgery are at high risk of thrombotic and bleeding complications. Thus aPL-associated HVD has affects clinical management of APS patients. PMID:23456852

  12. The Apexcardiogram in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Howard H.

    1972-01-01

    The apexcardiogram (acg), when recorded serially in patients with acute myocardial infarction (ami), preinfarction angina (pia) and stable ischemic heart disease (ihd), appeared to reflect the abnormal patterns of contraction of the left ventricle in these conditions. Thus, paradoxical bulging (dyskinesis) of the systolic wave or increased “a” wave amplitude with gradual recovery over several weeks was found in all 60 patients with documented ami and in 18 of 20 patients with pia. Electrocardiogram changes were noted, however, in only eight of the pia patients. Changes in the acg frequently antedated ischemia in the ecg. Paradoxical bulging of the systolic wave of the acg was additionally noted in patients during the pain of angina pectoris but this promptly disappeared after the administration of nitroglycerine. Patients with classic angina often had normal resting ecg's but abnormal resting acg's. In contrast to the relatively transient abnormalities noted above, the acg remained unchanged in most patients with stable ihd during follow-up of three months to two years. Patients undergoing coronary bypass operations, however, showed immediate improvement in the acg in the postoperative period. These results suggest the acg reflects the contractile pattern of the left ventricle, and may be an indirectly recorded ventriculogram. Its enhanced sensitivity and the earlier development of changes in comparison to the ecg make this a valuable tool in the study of patients with heart disease. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:5008498

  13. Pulmonary hypertension in the intensive care unit. Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, Michael; Schranz, Dietmar; Warnecke, Gregor; Apitz, Christian; Hansmann, Georg; Miera, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Acute pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicates the course of several cardiovascular, pulmonary and other systemic diseases in children. An acute rise of RV afterload, either as exacerbating chronic PH of different aetiologies (eg, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), chronic lung or congenital heart disease), or pulmonary hypertensive crisis after corrective surgery for congenital heart disease, may lead to severe circulatory compromise. Only few clinical studies provide evidence on how to best treat children with acute severe PH and decompensated RV function, that is, acute RV failure. The specific treatment in the intensive care unit should be based on the underlying pathophysiology and not only be focused on so-called 'specific' or 'tailored' drug therapy to lower RV afterload. In addition therapeutic efforts should aim to optimise RV preload, and to achieve adequate myocardial perfusion, and cardiac output. Early recognition of patients at high risk and timely initiation of appropriate therapeutic measures may prevent the development of severe cardiac dysfunction and low cardiac output. In patients not responding adequately to pharmacotherapy, (1) novel surgical and interventional techniques, temporary mechanical circulatory support with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, (2) pumpless lung assist devices (3) and/or lung or heart-lung transplantation should be timely considered. The invasive therapeutic measures can be applied in a bridge-to-recovery or bridge-to-lung transplant strategy. This consensus statement focuses on the management of acute severe PH in the paediatric intensive care unit and provides an according treatment algorithm for clinical practice. PMID:27053699

  14. Pulmonary arterial remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is lobe dependent.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Jeremy P; McLean, Catriona A; Thompson, Bruce R; Stuart-Andrews, Christopher R; Paul, Eldho; Snell, Gregory I; Williams, Trevor J

    2013-09-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial remodeling has been demonstrated in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but it is not known whether lobar heterogeneity of remodeling occurs. Furthermore, the relationship between pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary arterial remodeling in COPD has not been established. Muscular pulmonary arterial remodeling in arteries 0.10-0.25 mm in diameter was assessed in COPD-explanted lungs and autopsy controls. Remodeling was quantified as the percentage wall thickness to vessel diameter (%WT) using digital image analysis. Repeat measures mixed-effects remodeling for %WT was performed according to lobar origin (upper and lower), muscular pulmonary arterial size (small, medium, and large), and echocardiography-based pulmonary arterial pressure (no PH, mild PH, and moderate-to-severe PH). Lobar perfusion and emphysema indices were determined from ventilation-perfusion and computed tomography scans, respectively. Overall, %WT was greater in 42 subjects with COPD than in 5 control subjects ([Formula: see text]). Within the COPD group, %WT was greater in the upper lobes ([Formula: see text]) and in the small muscular pulmonary arteries ([Formula: see text]). Lobar differences were most pronounced in medium and large arteries. Lobar emphysema index was not associated with arterial remodeling. However, there was a significant positive relationship between the lobar perfusion index and pulmonary arterial remodeling ([Formula: see text]). The presence of PH on echocardiography showed only a trend to a small effect on lower lobe remodeling. The pattern of pulmonary arterial remodeling in COPD is complicated and lobe dependent. Differences in regional blood flow partially account for the lobar heterogeneity of pulmonary arterial remodeling in COPD. PMID:24618551

  15. Alveolar surfactant homeostasis and the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2010-01-01

    The alveolar region of the lung creates an extensive epithelial surface that mediates the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide required for respiration after birth. Maintenance of pulmonary function depends on the function of type II epithelial cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant lipids and proteins, reducing the collapsing forces created at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic and acquired disorders associated with the surfactant system cause both acute and chronic lung disease. Mutations in the ABCA3, SFTPA, SFTPB, SFTPC, SCL34A2, and TERT genes disrupt type II cell function and/or surfactant homeostasis, causing neonatal respiratory failure and chronic interstitial lung disease. Defects in GM-CSF receptor function disrupt surfactant clearance, causing pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Abnormalities in the surfactant system and disruption of type II cell homeostasis underlie the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic, providing the basis for improved diagnosis and therapies of these rare lung diseases. PMID:19824815

  16. Alveolar Surfactant Homeostasis and the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar region of the lung creates an extensive epithelial surface that mediates the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide required for respiration after birth. Maintenance of pulmonary function depends on the function of type II epithelial cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant lipids and proteins, reducing the collapsing forces created at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic and acquired disorders associated with the surfactant system cause both acute and chronic lung disease. Mutations in the ABCA3, SFTPA, SFTPB, SFTPC, SCL34A2, and TERT genes disrupt type II cell function and/or surfactant homeostasis, causing neonatal respiratory failure and chronic interstitial lung disease. Defects in GM-CSF receptor function disrupt surfactant clearance, causing pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Abnormalities in the surfactant system and disruption of type II cell homeostasis underlie the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic, providing the basis for improved diagnosis and therapies of these rare lung diseases. PMID:19824815

  17. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2011 Update

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Véronique L.; Go, Alan S.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Adams, Robert J.; Berry, Jarett D.; Brown, Todd M.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Dai, Shifan; de Simone, Giovanni; Ford, Earl S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Fullerton, Heather J.; Gillespie, Cathleen; Greenlund, Kurt J.; Hailpern, Susan M.; Heit, John A.; Ho, P. Michael; Howard, Virginia J.; Kissela, Brett M.; Kittner, Steven J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Makuc, Diane M.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Marelli, Ariane; Matchar, David B.; McDermott, Mary M.; Meigs, James B.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Mussolino, Michael E.; Nichol, Graham; Paynter, Nina P.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Sorlie, Paul D.; Stafford, Randall S.; Turan, Tanya N.; Turner, Melanie B.; Wong, Nathan D.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Summary Each year, the American Heart Association (AHA), in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and other government agencies, brings together the most up-to-date statistics on heart disease, stroke, other vascular diseases, and their risk factors and presents them in its Heart Disease and Stroke Statistical Update. The Statistical Update is a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, healthcare policy makers, media professionals, the lay public, and many others who seek the best national data available on disease morbidity and mortality and the risks, quality of care, medical procedures and operations, and costs associated with the management of these diseases in a single document. Indeed, since 1999, the Statistical Update has been cited more than 8700 times in the literature (including citations of all annual versions). In 2009 alone, the various Statistical Updates were cited ≈1600 times (data from ISI Web of Science). In recent years, the Statistical Update has undergone some major changes with the addition of new chapters and major updates across multiple areas. For this year’s edition, the Statistics Committee, which produces the document for the AHA, updated all of the current chapters with the most recent nationally representative data and inclusion of relevant articles from the literature over the past year and added a new chapter detailing how family history and genetics play a role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Also, the 2011 Statistical Update is a major source for monitoring both cardiovascular health and disease in the population, with a focus on progress toward achievement of the AHA’s 2020 Impact Goals. Below are a few highlights from this year’s Update. Death Rates From CVD Have Declined, Yet the Burden of Disease Remains High The 2007 overall death rate from CVD (International Classification of Diseases 10, I00–I99) was 251.2 per 100 000. The rates were 294

  18. Vegetarianism, coronary disease risk factors and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Thorogood, M

    1994-02-01

    Recent studies of vegetarians confirm a lower risk of fatal heart disease amongst such subjects. Lipid levels are lower in vegetarians, even when the diet of comparable meat-eaters is low in fat. This may partly explain the lower mortality, but it is not clear whether the absence of meat or some other aspect of the vegetarian diet is causal in this relationship. PMID:15559026

  19. Late presentation of rheumatic heart disease: a justification for renewal of preventive methods?

    PubMed Central

    Akintunde, Adeseye Abiodun; Opadijo, Oladimeji George

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease continues to contribute greatly to the burden of cardiovascular disease in Sub-saharan Africa despite advances in medical care. Evidence suggests that the prevalence is far greater than reported. There is therefore the need to emphasize routine screening for at-risk subjects and to appropriately institute adequate therapy and other preventive measures to avert the late and awry manifestation of the disease as presented in this case. This is a case report of one of numerous cases that may eventually suffer the same fate if urgent preventive measures are not instituted. A 20-year old Nigerian woman with past history of recurrent sore throat and a 10-year history of recurrent easy fatiguability and markedly dilated left atrium and pulmonary hypertension presented when she developed severe pulmonary hypertension. A concerted action at all levels of prevention is needed to reduce the burden of this disease among the young population in developing countries. PMID:21532731

  20. [Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis as an imported disease].

    PubMed

    van Crevel, R; van der Ven, A J; Meis, J F; Kullberg, B J

    1997-06-21

    A previously healthy 44-year-old male traveller presented with a dry cough, fever and an abnormal chest X-ray after a stay in Guatemala, where he had explored bat caves. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis was diagnosed after culture of Histoplasma capsulatum from bronchial washings. A favourable response was seen upon treatment with itraconazole for six weeks. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis should be considered in a healthy traveller returning with fever from the USA or subtropical areas. PMID:9380167

  1. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions.

  2. Pulmonary artery augmentation using autologous vena cava in right heart bypass operations.

    PubMed

    Shinkawa, Takeshi; Yamagishi, Masaaki; Shuntoh, Keisuke; Koushi, Keitarou; Ogawa, Mitsugu; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2006-03-01

    We obtained good results in the right heart bypass operation concomitant with the pulmonary arterial augmentation using the vena cava in 7 patients. We report the techniques used in 2 representative patients. The techniques used were a hemi-Fontan procedure with large superior vena caval patches and a bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt with superior vena caval interposition. These techniques have advantages in that the augmented pulmonary arteries have growth potential and low thrombogenicity because the procedures can be performed without the use of prosthetic materials or xenografts, especially in cases in which it is impossible to use the autologous pericardium. PMID:16488753

  3. Smoking Cessation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, Donald P

    2015-08-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective strategy for slowing down the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reducing mortality in the approximately 50% of patients with diagnosed COPD who continue to smoke. While behavioral interventions (including simple advice) have modest efficacy in improving smoking quit rates, the combination of counseling and pharmacotherapy is more effective than either alone. When combined with even brief counseling, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion SR, and varenicline have all been shown to be effective in promoting smoking cessation and sustained abstinence in smokers with COPD to a degree comparable to that observed in the general smoking population. However, the recidivism rate is high after initial quitting so that at the end of 1 year, approximately 80% or more of patients are still smoking. Thus, new approaches to smoking cessation are needed. One approach is to combine different pharmacotherapies, for example, nicotine patch plus rapidly acting NRT (e.g., gum or nasal spray) and/or bupropion or even varenicline plus either NRT or bupropion, in a stepwise approach over a varying duration depending on the severity of nicotine dependence and nicotine withdrawal symptoms during the quit attempt, as proposed in the American College of Chest Physicians Tobacco Dependence Took Kit. Electronic (e)-cigarettes, which deliver vaporized nicotine without most of the noxious components in the smoke from burning tobacco cigarettes, also has potential efficacy as a smoking cessation aid, but their efficacy and safety as either substitutes for regular cigarettes or smoking cessation aids require additional study. This task is complicated because e-cigarettes are currently unregulated and hundreds of different brands are currently available. PMID:26238637

  4. Correlation between heart rate variability and pulmonary function adjusted by confounding factors in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Bianchim, M S; Sperandio, E F; Martinhão, G S; Matheus, A C; Lauria, V T; da Silva, R P; Spadari, R C; Gagliardi, A R T; Arantes, R L; Romiti, M; Dourado, V Z

    2016-03-01

    The autonomic nervous system maintains homeostasis, which is the state of balance in the body. That balance can be determined simply and noninvasively by evaluating heart rate variability (HRV). However, independently of autonomic control of the heart, HRV can be influenced by other factors, such as respiratory parameters. Little is known about the relationship between HRV and spirometric indices. In this study, our objective was to determine whether HRV correlates with spirometric indices in adults without cardiopulmonary disease, considering the main confounders (e.g., smoking and physical inactivity). In a sample of 119 asymptomatic adults (age 20-80 years), we evaluated forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). We evaluated resting HRV indices within a 5-min window in the middle of a 10-min recording period, thereafter analyzing time and frequency domains. To evaluate daily physical activity, we instructed participants to use a triaxial accelerometer for 7 days. Physical inactivity was defined as <150 min/week of moderate to intense physical activity. We found that FVC and FEV1, respectively, correlated significantly with the following aspects of the RR interval: standard deviation of the RR intervals (r =0.31 and 0.35), low-frequency component (r =0.38 and 0.40), and Poincaré plot SD2 (r =0.34 and 0.36). Multivariate regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, physical inactivity, and cardiovascular risk, identified the SD2 and dyslipidemia as independent predictors of FVC and FEV1 (R2=0.125 and 0.180, respectively, for both). We conclude that pulmonary function is influenced by autonomic control of cardiovascular function, independently of the main confounders. PMID:26840706

  5. Correlation between heart rate variability and pulmonary function adjusted by confounding factors in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Bianchim, M.S.; Sperandio, E.F.; Martinhão, G.S.; Matheus, A.C.; Lauria, V.T.; da Silva, R.P.; Spadari, R.C.; Gagliardi, A.R.T.; Arantes, R.L.; Romiti, M.; Dourado, V.Z.

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system maintains homeostasis, which is the state of balance in the body. That balance can be determined simply and noninvasively by evaluating heart rate variability (HRV). However, independently of autonomic control of the heart, HRV can be influenced by other factors, such as respiratory parameters. Little is known about the relationship between HRV and spirometric indices. In this study, our objective was to determine whether HRV correlates with spirometric indices in adults without cardiopulmonary disease, considering the main confounders (e.g., smoking and physical inactivity). In a sample of 119 asymptomatic adults (age 20-80 years), we evaluated forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). We evaluated resting HRV indices within a 5-min window in the middle of a 10-min recording period, thereafter analyzing time and frequency domains. To evaluate daily physical activity, we instructed participants to use a triaxial accelerometer for 7 days. Physical inactivity was defined as <150 min/week of moderate to intense physical activity. We found that FVC and FEV1, respectively, correlated significantly with the following aspects of the RR interval: standard deviation of the RR intervals (r =0.31 and 0.35), low-frequency component (r =0.38 and 0.40), and Poincaré plot SD2 (r =0.34 and 0.36). Multivariate regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, physical inactivity, and cardiovascular risk, identified the SD2 and dyslipidemia as independent predictors of FVC and FEV1 (R 2=0.125 and 0.180, respectively, for both). We conclude that pulmonary function is influenced by autonomic control of cardiovascular function, independently of the main confounders. PMID:26840706

  6. A vital role for complement in heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena; Espevik, Terje; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne; Mollnes, Tom E; Hovland, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement system is crucial for the protozoa-host interaction. Thus, complement activation appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of a diverse range of cardiac conditions. Determination of the exact role of complement in the various heart diseases will hopefully help to identify patients that might benefit from therapeutic complement intervention. PMID:25037633

  7. Pulmonary CT and MRI phenotypes that help explain chronic pulmonary obstruction disease pathophysiology and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Eric A; Lynch, David A; Barr, R Graham; van Beek, Edwin J R; Parraga, Grace

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary x-ray computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research and development has been motivated, in part, by the quest to subphenotype common chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). For thoracic CT and MRI, the main COPD research tools, disease biomarkers are being validated that go beyond anatomy and structure to include pulmonary functional measurements such as regional ventilation, perfusion, and inflammation. In addition, there has also been a drive to improve spatial and contrast resolution while at the same time reducing or eliminating radiation exposure. Therefore, this review focuses on our evolving understanding of patient-relevant and clinically important COPD endpoints and how current and emerging MRI and CT tools and measurements may be exploited for their identification, quantification, and utilization. Since reviews of the imaging physics of pulmonary CT and MRI and reviews of other COPD imaging methods were previously published and well-summarized, we focus on the current clinical challenges in COPD and the potential of newly emerging MR and CT imaging measurements to address them. Here we summarize MRI and CT imaging methods and their clinical translation for generating reproducible and sensitive measurements of COPD related to pulmonary ventilation and perfusion as well as parenchyma morphology. The key clinical problems in COPD provide an important framework in which pulmonary imaging needs to rapidly move in order to address the staggering burden, costs, as well as the mortality and morbidity associated with COPD. PMID:26199216

  8. Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Related to disease severity?

    PubMed Central

    Echave-Sustaeta, Jose M; Comeche Casanova, Lorena; Cosio, Borja G; Soler-Cataluña, Juan Jose; Garcia-Lujan, Ricardo; Ribera, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Several diseases commonly co-exist with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in elderly patients. This study aimed to investigate whether there is an association between COPD severity and the frequency of comorbidities in stable COPD patients. Patients and methods In this multicenter, cross-sectional study, patients with spirometric diagnosis of COPD attended to by internal medicine departments throughout Spain were consecutively recruited by 225 internal medicine specialists. The severity of airflow obstruction was graded using the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) and data on demographics, smoking history, comorbidities, and dyspnea were collected. The Charlson comorbidity score was calculated. Results Eight hundred and sixty-six patients were analyzed: male 93%, mean age 69.8 (standard deviation [SD] 9.7) years and forced vital capacity in 1 second 42.1 (SD 17.7)%. Even, the mean (SD) Charlson score was 2.2 (2.2) for stage I, 2.3 (1.5) for stage II, 2.5 (1.6) for stage III, and 2.7 (1.8) for stage IV (P=0.013 between stage I and IV groups), independent predictors of Charlson score in the multivariate analysis were age, smoking history (pack-years), the hemoglobin level, and dyspnea, but not GOLD stage. Conclusion COPD patients attended to in internal medicine departments show high scores of comorbidity. However, GOLD stage was not an independent predictor of comorbidity. PMID:25429213

  9. Gallstone Disease and the Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jun; Qi, Lu; Yu, Canqing; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Yiping; Yang, Ling; Shen, Jie; Wang, Shanqing; Li, Mingqiang; Liu, Yongmei; Zhang, Libo; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gallstone disease (GSD) is related to multiple cardiovascular risk factors; the present study was to prospectively examine the association between GSD and ischemic heart disease (IHD). Approach and Results We examined the association of GSD with IHD among 199,292 men and 288,081 women aged 30–79 years in the China Kadoorie Biobank study. Participants with cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline were excluded. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the association of GSD with IHD. The prevalence of self-reported GSD was 3.7% in men and 7.3% in women at baseline. During 3,431,124 person-years of follow-up between 2004 and 2013 (median, 7.2 years), we documented 10,245 incident IHD cases in men and 14,714 in women. As compared with men without GSD at baseline, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for IHD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.22) for men with GSD; the respective hazard ratio was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.20–1.34) in women and 1.23 (95% CI, 1.17–1.28) in the whole cohort. The sex difference in IHD risk associated with GSD was statistically significant (P=0.009 for interaction with sex). In addition, we found the association between GSD and IHD was stronger in non-hypertensive than hypertensive women (P<0.001 for interaction). Conclusions In this large prospective study, the presence of GSD was associated with an increased risk of incident IHD, independent of other risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Our findings suggest novel prevention strategy to mitigate heart disease through improvement of gastrointestinal health. PMID:26272939

  10. Effect of exercise training on ventilatory efficiency in patients with heart disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Prado, D.M.L.; Rocco, E.A.; Silva, A.G.; Rocco, D.F.; Pacheco, M.T.; Furlan, V.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of ventilatory efficiency in cardiopulmonary exercise testing has proven useful for assessing the presence and severity of cardiorespiratory diseases. During exercise, efficient pulmonary gas exchange is characterized by uniform matching of lung ventilation with perfusion. By contrast, mismatching is marked by inefficient pulmonary gas exchange, requiring increased ventilation for a given CO2 production. The etiology of increased and inefficient ventilatory response to exercise in heart disease is multifactorial, involving both peripheral and central mechanisms. Exercise training has been recommended as non-pharmacological treatment for patients with different chronic cardiopulmonary diseases. In this respect, previous studies have reported improvements in ventilatory efficiency after aerobic exercise training in patients with heart disease. Against this background, the primary objective of the present review was to discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in abnormal ventilatory response to exercise, with an emphasis on both patients with heart failure syndrome and coronary artery disease. Secondly, special focus was dedicated to the role of aerobic exercise training in improving indices of ventilatory efficiency among these patients, as well as to the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:27332771

  11. Effect of exercise training on ventilatory efficiency in patients with heart disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Prado, D M L; Rocco, E A; Silva, A G; Rocco, D F; Pacheco, M T; Furlan, V

    2016-06-20

    The analysis of ventilatory efficiency in cardiopulmonary exercise testing has proven useful for assessing the presence and severity of cardiorespiratory diseases. During exercise, efficient pulmonary gas exchange is characterized by uniform matching of lung ventilation with perfusion. By contrast, mismatching is marked by inefficient pulmonary gas exchange, requiring increased ventilation for a given CO2 production. The etiology of increased and inefficient ventilatory response to exercise in heart disease is multifactorial, involving both peripheral and central mechanisms. Exercise training has been recommended as non-pharmacological treatment for patients with different chronic cardiopulmonary diseases. In this respect, previous studies have reported improvements in ventilatory efficiency after aerobic exercise training in patients with heart disease. Against this background, the primary objective of the present review was to discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in abnormal ventilatory response to exercise, with an emphasis on both patients with heart failure syndrome and coronary artery disease. Secondly, special focus was dedicated to the role of aerobic exercise training in improving indices of ventilatory efficiency among these patients, as well as to the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:27332771

  12. Physiological basis of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in patients with lung or heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Louvaris, Zafeiris

    2015-01-01

    Educational Aims To illustrate the common mechanisms limiting exercise tolerance in patients with chronic lung and heart disease To highlight the impact of lung and heart disease on daily physical activity levels To outline the effects of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation on functional capacity in patients with chronic lung and heart disease To discuss an innovative tele-rehabilitation intervention using information and communications technologies to improve functional capacity in patients with chronic lung and heart disease Summary Shortness of breath associated with cardiorespiratory abnormalities and peripheral muscle discomfort are the major factors that limit exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and those with congestive heart failure (CHF). Both of these symptoms negatively impact on patients’ daily physical activity levels. In turn, poor daily physical activity is commonly associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality. Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes partially reverse muscle weakness and dysfunction and increase functional capacity in both COPD and CHF. However, benefits gained from participation in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes are regressing soon after the completion of these programmes. Moreover, several barriers limit access and uptake of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes by eligible patients. A potential solution to the underutilisation of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation is the implementation of tele-rehabilitation interventions at home using information and communications technologies. Thus, tele-rehabilitation may be useful to encourage and educate patients with COPD or CHF on how best to maintain and/or further enhance daily physical activity levels. PMID:26306112

  13. A translational preclinical model of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension: mechanistic pathways driving disease pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, Elizabeth R.; Khambata, Valerie S.; Yun Ye, Li; Cheung, Kenneth; Thomas, Matthew; Duggan, Nicholas; Jarai, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive interstitial lung disease, in which a decline in patient prognosis is frequently associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Animal models exhibiting principle pathophysiological features of IPF and PH could provide greater insight into mechanistic pathways underlying disease progression and a means for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches for intervention. Here, we describe an in vivo disease model, in which animals develop progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and associated PH, as defined by the presence of fibrotic foci adjacent to areas of alveolar injury and remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Associated changes in physiological parameters included a decline in lung function and increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) >25 mmHg. The early fibrotic pathology is associated with a profibrogenic microenvironment, elevated levels of the matrix metalloproteases, MMP‐2, MMP‐7, and MMP‐12, TIMP‐1, the chemoattractant and mitogen, PDGF‐β, and the chemokines CCL2 and CXCL12, that are associated with the recruitment of macrophages, mast cells, and fibrocytes. Principle mechanistic pathways associated with disease pathogenesis are upregulated in the lungs and pulmonary arteries, with sustained increases in gene transcripts for the profibrotic mediator TGF‐β1 and components of the TGF‐β signaling pathway; PAI‐1, Nox‐4, and HIF‐1α. Therapeutic treatment with the ALK‐5/TGF‐β RI inhibitor SB‐525334 reversed established pulmonary fibrosis and associated vascular remodeling, leading to normalization in clinically translatable physiological parameters including lung function and hemodynamic measurements of mPAP. These studies highlight the application of this model in validating potential approaches for targeting common mechanistic pathways driving disease pathogenesis. PMID:25214520

  14. [Pulmonary surfactant homeostasis associated genetic abnormalities and lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaojing; Sun, Xiuzhu; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng; Zhao, Xueming; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Huabin; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-10

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is synthesized and secreted by alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells, which is a complex compound formed by proteins and lipids. Surfactant participates in a range of physiological processes such as reducing the surface tension, keeping the balance of alveolar fluid, maintaining normal alveolar morphology and conducting host defense. Genetic disorders of the surfactant homeostasis genes may result in lack of surfactant or cytotoxicity, and lead to multiple lung diseases in neonates, children and adults, including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper has provided a review for the functions and processes of pulmonary surfactant metabolism, as well as the connection between disorders of surfactant homeostasis genes and lung diseases. PMID:27455022

  15. Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease: A Newly Recognized Cause of Severe Pulmonary Hypertension in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Williams, K; Andrie, K; Cartoceti, A; French, S; Goldsmith, D; Jennings, S; Priestnall, S L; Wilson, D; Jutkowitz, A

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well-known though poorly characterized disease in veterinary medicine. In humans, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of severe pulmonary hypertension with a mean survival time of 2 years without lung transplantation. Eleven adult dogs (5 males, 6 females; median age 10.5 years, representing various breeds) were examined following the development of severe respiratory signs. Lungs of affected animals were evaluated morphologically and with immunohistochemistry for alpha smooth muscle actin, desmin, CD31, CD3, CD20, and CD204. All dogs had pulmonary lesions consistent with PVOD, consisting of occlusive remodeling of small- to medium-sized pulmonary veins, foci of pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH), and accumulation of hemosiderophages; 6 of 11 dogs had substantial pulmonary arterial medial and intimal thickening. Ultrastructural examination and immunohistochemistry showed that smooth muscle cells contributed to the venous occlusion. Increased expression of CD31 was evident in regions of PCH indicating increased numbers of endothelial cells in these foci. Spindle cells strongly expressing alpha smooth muscle actin and desmin co-localized with foci of PCH; similar cells were present but less intensely labeled elsewhere in non-PCH alveoli. B cells and macrophages, detected by immunohistochemistry, were not co-localized with the venous lesions of canine PVOD; small numbers of CD3-positive T cells were occasionally in and around the wall of remodeled veins. These findings indicate a condition in dogs with clinically severe respiratory disease and pathologic features resembling human PVOD, including foci of pulmonary venous remodeling and PCH. PMID:26926086

  16. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:26974003

  17. Diet and cancer and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Michael A

    2014-03-11

    The modern Western diet bears little resemblance to the diet which forged the human genome over many million years. The change in basic food structure is operating to distort biology even before conception and into late years, with the epidemic of obesity and diabetes likely to lead to stroke, heart disease, and now dementia, being flagged as a consequence. In addition, mental ill health is overtaking all other burdens of ill health, and almost certainly has its roots in early disturbance of brain development. Whilst lifestyle will be playing its part, there can be little doubt that the common denominator is the aberrations in food development, predominantly in the last century. It seems it is time to reassess food policy. The principle of food production should be nutrition and human health. The globalisation of a food structure linked to such disorders and their appearance globally in response asks that steps be taken to protect other countries from making the same mistakes. PMID:24620001

  18. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    SciTech Connect

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks in the highest fish-consuming group ({approx}3 times

  19. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  20. MicroRNAs in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tanya; Rajakaruna, Cha; Caputo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a broad term which encompasses a spectrum of pathology, the most common phenotypes include atrial septal defects (ASDs), ventricular septal defects (VSDs), patent ductus arteriosus (PAD) and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). The impact of CHD is profound and it is estimated to be responsible for over 40% of prenatal deaths. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, highly conserved, non-coding RNAs which have complex roles in a variety of pathophysiological states. miRs are post-transcriptional negative regulators of gene expression. Individual miRs are known to exert effects in multiple target genes, therefore the altered expression of a single miR could influence an entire gene network resulting in complex pathological states. Recent evidences suggest a role in the dysregulation of miRs in CHD. Mouse knock out models have contributed to our knowledge base revealing specific patterns of miR expression in cardiovascular physiology and pathological states. Specific miRs necessary for embryonic cardiac development have been revealed. Dysregulation of these miRs has been shown to cause structural abnormalities in the heart and vasculature, thus furthering our understanding of the processes which result in CHD. These advances have provided new insight into the signalling pathways responsible for CHD. Furthermore, this new appreciation for miRs in the development of CHD has uncovered their potential for new therapeutic targets where modulated miR activity may reduce the burden of disease. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the cause-effect relationships of miRs in CHD and consider their potential as a therapeutic targets and biomarkers in this clinical setting. PMID:26734643

  1. A neonate with critical congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jarrett; Dawson, Emily; Williams, Paula

    2014-05-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is defined as a ductal-dependent congenital heart defect requiring surgical or percutaneous intervention via cardiac catheterization before 1 year of age. Most cases of CCHD can be diagnosed with prenatal ultrasound or fetal echocardiogram. If not prenatally diagnosed, CCHD can be stable in the newborn nursery due to persistent ductal patency, and the patient may only be diagnosed after ductal closure and development of cardiac symptoms at home. In this case, a 6-day-old female presented to the emergency department (ED) floppy with agonal respirations, poor capillary refill, and absent femoral pulses. On the day of presentation, the patient became increasingly fussy, refused feeding, and began to gasp. The patient was transported to the ED for evaluation, where a bedside echocardiogram revealed interrupted aortic arch (IAA), ventricular septal defect, minimal flow through a thread-like ductus arteriosus, and severely depressed cardiac function. IAA is very rare, with an incidence of three cases per 1 million live births. Patients require neonatal supportive care, continuous prostaglandin E1 infusion, and urgent referral for neonatal surgical repair in the first days to weeks of life. To reduce the volume of undiagnosed CCHD in the immediate newborn period, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Diseases in Newborns and Children (SACHDNC) recommended that CCHD screening via pulse oximetry be added to the recommended uniform screening panel. A positive screen results in an immediate referral for an echocardiogram. Fetal diagnosis, newborn screening, and/or careful clinical examination may have resulted in detection of IAA in our patient prior to ductal closure. PMID:24877491

  2. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential. PMID:26957336

  3. Targeting the unfolded protein response in heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C

    2016-01-01

    In neurological disease and diabetes, the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been investigated for years, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. All three branches of the UPR are involved in ischaemia/reperfusion and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease. PMID:24865516

  4. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kimberly Y; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    On March 16, 2012, the Ethics of the Heart 2012: Ethical and Policy Challenges in Pediatric and Adult Congenital Heart Disease Conference took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The first session focused on the ethics surrounding genetic testing in patients with congenital heart disease. Summarized here is the introductory presentation given by Dr Elizabeth Goldmuntz entitled "The Role of Genetic Testing in Congenital Heart Disease," followed by a case presentation given by Dr Lisa D'Alessandro. The case and the panel discussion that ensued highlight several ethical principles and challenges in this unique patient population. PMID:23799755

  5. Different approaches in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Eva Rahman; Morshed, Nabila

    2015-10-01

    Advances in drug formulation, inhalation device design and disease management are generating new opportunities for patients suffering from obstructive pulmonary diseases. This article provides a comprehensive review of the different promising pulmonary drug delivery technologies in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases, particularly with regard to the treatment of asthma and chronic pulmonary diseases (COPD), which are increasing day by day due to increasing environmental pollution and its harmful and toxic contaminants. In the recent years, a better knowledge has been gained regarding the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids and how they suppress the chronic inflammation. New etiology has been brought into light regarding the inactivity of glucocorticoids in some patients having asthma and COPDs even though the inflammatory genes are triggered by similar molecules in both the diseases. This new knowledge has given a new platform to improve glucocorticoids and their resistance also how other combination therapy can be used for these diseases. It has also led to the quest for improving and developing other alternatives such as anti-leukotriene agents, muscarinic inhibitors, combination therapy, as well as biologic immune-modulators in the treatment of the different pulmonary diseases. Several new combinations of glucocorticoids are available in the global market for the use in pulmonary diseases especially asthma although their availability fluctuates between continents. There has been several studies done regarding the variation of effectiveness of the different inhaled glucocorticoids and hence it is important to take into consideration the different delivery systems and the methods which are used to treat the patients. PMID:26172082

  6. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Heart." Managing Stress Research shows that strong emotions, such as anger, can trigger a heart attack. Learning how to manage stress , relax, and cope with problems can improve your emotional and physical health. Medicines Medicines are ...

  7. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

  8. What Are Heart Disease and Stroke?

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... may help me? ©2015, American Heart Association Multi-language Fact Sheet Topics Heart-related Conditions What is ...

  9. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population. PMID:26594349

  10. Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159330.html Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Prognosis may be ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Type 2 Heart Diseases Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  11. Heart Disease Risk Perception in College Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John S.; Grant, Melinda; Hill, Kathy L.; Brizzolara, Jeff; Belmont, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    The authors sought to assess the perception of risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) in college men and women. They surveyed 470 undergraduates from 2 major 4-year institutions who completed a questionnaire that measured perceived risks for heart disease. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents rated their risks as lower or much lower than those…

  12. Pulmonary rehabilitation for respiratory disorders other than chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Carolyn L; Fairburn, Carl; Crouch, Rebecca H

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an important therapeutic intervention that should no longer be considered suitable only for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A strong rationale exists for providing PR to persons with a broad range of respiratory disorders other than COPD. Evidence shows that PR for these patients is feasible, safe and effective. A disease-relevant approach should be undertaken, based on individual patients' needs. Further research is needed to better understand the optimal program content, duration and outcomes measures, to enable diverse patients to achieve maximal benefits of PR. PMID:24874132

  13. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary. PMID:20609317

  14. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventricle–pulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  15. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap: asthmatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic obstructive asthma?

    PubMed

    Slats, Annelies; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are different disease entities. They are both clinical diagnoses, with diagnostic tools to discriminate between one another. However, especially in older patients (>55 years) it seems more difficult to differentiate between asthma and COPD. This has led to the definition of a new phenotype called asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, our understanding of ACOS is at a very preliminary stage, as most research has involved subjects with existing diagnoses of asthma or COPD from studies with different definitions for ACOS. This has led to different and sometimes opposing results between studies on several features of ACOS, also depending on the comparison with COPD alone, asthma alone or both, which are summarized in this review.We suggest not using the term ACOS for a patient with features of both asthma and COPD, but to describe a patient with chronic obstructive airway disease as completely as possible, with regard to characteristics that determine treatment response (e.g. eosinophilic inflammation) and prognosis (such as smoking status, exacerbation rate, fixed airflow limitation, hyperresponsiveness, comorbidities). This will provide a far more clinically relevant diagnosis, and would aid in research on treatment in more homogenous groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. More research is certainly needed to develop more evidence-based definitions for this patient group and to evaluate biomarkers, which will help to further classify these patients, treat them more adequately and unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanism. PMID:26596632

  16. Pulmonary function after transverse or midline incision in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Becquemin, J P; Piquet, J; Becquemin, M H; Melliere, D; Harf, A

    1985-01-01

    Atelectasis and bronchopneumonia occur frequently in patients undergoing aorto-iliac reconstructive surgery. Transverse (T) incisions in upper abdominal surgery are thought to be followed by fewer pulmonary complications than midline incisions (M) but reports remain controversial. We studied the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications and lung dysfunction after T and M incisions for aorto-iliac surgery in 13 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and 13 control patients with normal lungs (C). For all subjects, we evaluated (1) postoperative clinical or radiological pulmonary events; (2) preoperatively and on postoperative days 2 (D2), 5 (D5), 9 (D9) and 12 (D12) - the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), vital capacity (VC), alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (AaPO2), and (3) convenience for the surgeon. Operatively, aortic exposure was excellent with both incisions. Bronchopneumonia occurred only after M in five patients (1 C, 4 COPD). In contrast with the control patients in whom no difference was found between T and M incisions, the FEV1 of COPD patients was significantly less impaired with T than with M incisions (p less than 0.005 on D2 and p less than 0.05 on D5). VC decreased similarly with both incisions on D2 but on D5 the improvement was less with M (p less than 0.005). Changes in AaPO2 were more marked on D2 and D5 for the COPD patients with M incisions. We conclude that (1) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, laparotomy with a transverse incision was associated with better postoperative lung function and fewer pulmonary complications; (2) in patients without pulmonary disease, midline and transverse incisions were equivalent. PMID:2933436

  17. Pulmonary hypertension in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Onyekwere, O C; Campbell, A; Teshome, M; Onyeagoro, S; Sylvan, C; Akintilo, A; Hutchinson, S; Ensing, G; Gaskin, P; Kato, G; Rana, S; Kwagyan, J; Gordeuk, V; Williams, J; Castro, O

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension (PHTN) in the pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD) population is not known despite its high prevalence in adult patients. Our hypothesis was that increased pulmonary artery pressures (PAPs) would be found in SCD children and adolescents, especially those with a history of pulmonary complications: acute chest syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, asthma, and reactive airway disease. Fifty-two SCD children, 23 of whom had underlying pulmonary disease, were screened for PHTN, which was defined as a tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) of at least 2.5 m/s. Twenty-four (46.15%) SCD patients had increased PAP (i.e., TRV > or =2.5 m/s), and 6 (11.5%) had significant PHTN (i.e., TRV > or =3.0 m/s). Pulmonary disease was marginally associated with PHTN (odds ratio 2.80 and confidence interval 0.88 to 8.86; p = 0.0795). As in adult SCD patients with PHTN, this complication was correlated with the degree of hemolysis as manifested by significantly higher lactate dehydrogenase and bilirubin, lower hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, and a strong association with Hb-SS phenotype. However, after statistical adjustment for age and sex, increased serum LDH was not associated with the development of PHTN. Further studies are needed to clarify the prevalence and mechanisms of PHTN in pediatric and adolescent patients with SCD. PMID:17680298

  18. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-01

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response

  19. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension in systemic sclerosis. Case presentation and review of the literature .

    PubMed

    Daraban, Ana Maria; Enache, Roxana; Predescu, L; Platon, P; Constantinescu, T; Mihai, Carina; Coman, I M; Ginghina, Carmen; Jurcuţ, Ruxandra

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Because of the similar clinical picture of dyspnea on exertion and signs of right heart failure, PVOD is difficult to distinguish from idiopathic PAH. However, the distinction is mandatory because PVOD has a worse prognosis and, more importantly, the administration of PAH specific therapy (vasodilators) can precipitate severe acute pulmonary oedema. We present a challenging case of PAH in a patient with systemic sclerosis in whom a marked decrease in functional capacity after the initiation of bosentan therapy led to the diagnosis of PVOD. Management of PVOD patients is challenging and referral for lung transplantation should be done at the moment of diagnosis. PMID:26402988

  20. Late pulmonary toxicity after treatment for Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Villani, F; De Maria, P; Bonfante, V; Viviani, S; Laffranchi, A; Dell'oca, I; Dirusso, A; Zanini, M

    1997-01-01

    The combination of mediastinal radiotherapy (RT) with chemotherapy (CT) including bleomycin is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary toxicity. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate late pulmonary effects of RT plus CT consisting of the ABVD regimen in patients suffering from early stage Hodgkin's disease. For this purpose pulmonary function was serially evaluated before, at the end and at least 1 year after therapy in 32 patients (median age 28 years) with Hodgkin's disease stages IA,B-IIA. Treatment consisted of four cycles of ABVD chemotherapy followed by mediastinal irradiation at the median dose of 36 Gy (range 30.6-43.2). At the end of treatment, resting mean pulmonary function tests showed a significant decline of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced expiratory flow at 25-75%, (FEF25-75%), total lung capacity (TLC), vital capacity (VC) and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO). The decline of TLC, VC and DLCO, indicative of a pulmonary defect of restrictive type, persisted 1 year from the end of therapy. Only seven patients developed symptoms of cough and mild shortness of breath with effort. These data confirm that RT combined with short term ABVD result in pulmonary dysfunction that does not seem to have clinical significance. PMID:9494599