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Sample records for pulp stem cells

  1. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  2. Pulp stem cells: implication in reparative dentin formation.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova-Nakov, Sasha; Baudry, Anne; Harichane, Yassine; Kellermann, Odile; Goldberg, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Many dental pulp stem cells are neural crest derivatives essential for lifelong maintenance of tooth functions and homeostasis as well as tooth repair. These cells may be directly implicated in the healing process or indirectly involved in cell-to-cell diffusion of paracrine messages to resident (pulpoblasts) or nonresident cells (migrating mesenchymal cells). The identity of the pulp progenitors and the mechanisms sustaining their regenerative capacity remain largely unknown. Taking advantage of the A4 cell line, a multipotent stem cell derived from the molar pulp of mouse embryo, we investigated the capacity of these pulp-derived precursors to induce in vivo the formation of a reparative dentin-like structure upon implantation within the pulp of a rodent incisor or a first maxillary molar after surgical exposure. One month after the pulp injury alone, a nonmineralized fibrous matrix filled the mesial part of the coronal pulp chamber. Upon A4 cell implantation, a mineralized osteodentin was formed in the implantation site without affecting the structure and vitality of the residual pulp in the central and distal parts of the pulp chamber. These results show that dental pulp stem cells can induce the formation of reparative dentin and therefore constitute a useful tool for pulp therapies. Finally, reparative dentin was also built up when A4 progenitors were performed by alginate beads, suggesting that alginate is a suitable carrier for cell implantation in teeth. PMID:24698687

  3. Allogenic banking of dental pulp stem cells for innovative therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Chaubron, Franck; De Vos, John; Cuisinier, Frédéric J

    2015-01-01

    Medical research in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapy has brought encouraging perspectives for the use of stem cells in clinical trials. Multiple types of stem cells, from progenitors to pluripotent stem cells, have been investigated. Among these, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are mesenchymal multipotent cells coming from the dental pulp, which is the soft tissue within teeth. They represent an interesting adult stem cell source because they are recovered in large amount in dental pulps with non-invasive techniques compared to other adult stem cell sources. DPSCs can be obtained from discarded teeth, especially wisdom teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons. To shift from promising preclinical results to therapeutic applications to human, DPSCs must be prepared in clinical grade lots and transformed into advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP). As the production of patient-specific stem cells is costly and time-consuming, allogenic biobanking of clinical grade human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed DPSC lines provides efficient innovative therapeutic products. DPSC biobanks represent industrial and therapeutic innovations by using discarded biological tissues (dental pulps) as a source of mesenchymal stem cells to produce and store, in good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, DPSC therapeutic batches. In this review, we discuss about the challenges to transfer biological samples from a donor to HLA-typed DPSC therapeutic lots, following regulations, GMP guidelines and ethical principles. We also present some clinical applications, for which there is no efficient therapeutics so far, but that DPSCs-based ATMP could potentially treat. PMID:26328017

  4. Influence of different types of pulp treatment during isolation in the obtention of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Viña-Almunia, Jose; Borras, Consuelo; Gambini, Juan; El Alamy, Marya; Viña, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Different methods have been used in order to isolate dental pulp stem cells. The aim of this study was to study the effect of different types of pulp treatment during isolation, under 3% O2 conditions, in the time needed and the efficacy for obtaining dental pulp stem cells. Material and Methods One hundred and twenty dental pulps were used to isolate dental pulp stem cells treating the pulp tissue during isolation using 9 different methods, using digestive, disgregation, or mechanical agents, or combining them. The cells were positive for CD133, Oct4, Nestin, Stro-1, CD34 markers, and negative for the hematopoietic cell marker CD-45, thus confirming the presence of mesenchymal stem cells. The efficacy of dental pulp stem cells obtention and the minimum time needed to obtain such cells comparing the 9 different methods was analyzed. Results Dental pulp stem cells were obtained from 97 of the 120 pulps used in the study, i.e. 80.8% of the cases. They were obtained with all the methods used except with mechanical fragmentation of the pulp, where no enzymatic digestion was performed. The minimum time needed to isolate dental pulp stem cells was 8 hours, digesting with 2mg/ml EDTA for 10 minutes, 4mg/ml of type I collagenase, 4mg/ml of type II dispase for 40 minutes, 13ng/ml of thermolysine for 40 minutes and sonicating the culture for one minute. Conclusions Dental pulp stem cells were obtained in 97 cases from a series of 120 pulps. The time for obtaining dental pulp stem cells was reduced maximally, without compromising the obtention of the cells, by combining digestive, disgregation, and mechanical agents. Key words:Dental pulp stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, isolation method. PMID:26946201

  5. Dental pulp stem cell (DPSC) isolation, characterization, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Federico; Spelat, Renza; Baheney, Chelsea S

    2014-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) have been proposed as an alternative to pluripotent stem cells to study multilineage differentiation in vitro and for therapeutic application. Standard culture media for isolation and expansion of stem cells includes animal sera or animal-derived matrix components (e.g., Matrigel(®)). However, animal-derived reagents raise significant concerns with respect to the translational ability of these cells due to the possibility of infection and/or severe immune reaction. For these reasons clinical grade substitutes to animal components are needed in order for stem cells to reach their full therapeutic potential. In this chapter we detail a method for isolation and proliferation of DPSC in a chemically defined medium containing a low percentage of human serum. We demonstrate that in this defined culture medium a 1.25 % human serum component sufficiently replaces fetal bovine serum. This method allows for isolation of a morphologically and phenotypically uniform population of DPSCs from dental pulp tissue. DPSCs represent a rapidly proliferating cell population that readily differentiates into the osteoblastic, neuronal, myocytic, and hepatocytic lineages. This multilineage capacity of these DPSCs suggests that they may have a more broad therapeutic application than lineage-restricted adult stem cell populations such as mesenchymal stem cells. Further the culture protocol presented here makes these cells more amenable to human application than current expansion techniques for other pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cell lines or induced pluripotent stem cells). PMID:25173163

  6. Purified Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Promote Osteogenic Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Mabuchi, Y; Toriumi, H; Ebine, T; Niibe, K; Houlihan, D D; Morikawa, S; Onizawa, K; Kawana, H; Akazawa, C; Suzuki, N; Nakagawa, T; Okano, H; Matsuzaki, Y

    2016-02-01

    Human dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (hDPSCs) are attractive candidates for regenerative therapy because they can be easily expanded to generate colony-forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) on plastic and the large cell numbers required for transplantation. However, isolation based on adherence to plastic inevitably changes the surface marker expression and biological properties of the cells. Consequently, little is currently known about the original phenotypes of tissue precursor cells that give rise to plastic-adherent CFU-Fs. To better understand the in vivo functions and translational therapeutic potential of hDPSCs and other stem cells, selective cell markers must be identified in the progenitor cells. Here, we identified a dental pulp tissue-specific cell population based on the expression profiles of 2 cell-surface markers LNGFR (CD271) and THY-1 (CD90). Prospectively isolated, dental pulp-derived LNGFR(Low+)THY-1(High+) cells represent a highly enriched population of clonogenic cells--notably, the isolated cells exhibited long-term proliferation and multilineage differentiation potential in vitro. The cells also expressed known mesenchymal cell markers and promoted new bone formation to heal critical-size calvarial defects in vivo. These findings suggest that LNGFR(Low+)THY-1(High+) dental pulp-derived cells provide an excellent source of material for bone regenerative strategies. PMID:26494655

  7. Dentin regeneration using deciduous pulp stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y; Wang, X Y; Wang, Y M; Liu, X Y; Zhang, C M; Hou, B X; Wang, S L

    2012-07-01

    Reparative dentin formation is essential for maintaining the integrity of dentin structure during disease or trauma. In this study, we investigated stem/progenitor cell-based tissue engineering for dentin regeneration in a large animal model. Porcine deciduous pulp stem/progenitor cells (PDPSCs) were mixed with a beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold for dentin regeneration. Different concentrations of PDPSCs were tested to determine the optimal density for dentin regeneration. Aliquots of 5×10(5) PDPSCs in 1 mL resulted in the highest number of cells attached to the scaffold and the greatest alkaline phosphatase activity. We labeled PDPSCs with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and used the optimal cell numbers mixed with β-TCP to repair pulp chamber roof defects in the premolars of swine. Four weeks after transplantation, GFP-positive PDPSCs were observed in PDPSC-embedded scaffold constructs. At 16 weeks after transplantation, the PDPSCs mixed with β-TCP significantly regenerated the dentin-like structures and nearly completely restored the pulp chamber roof defects. This study demonstrated that the PDPSC/scaffold construct was useful in direct pulp-capping and provides pre-clinical evidence for stem/progenitor cell-based dentin regeneration. PMID:22660968

  8. A Novel Combinatorial Therapy With Pulp Stem Cells and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Total Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Takeuchi, Norio; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Ishizaka, Ryo; Utunomiya, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of deep caries with pulpitis is a major challenge in dentistry. Stem cell therapy represents a potential strategy to regenerate the dentin-pulp complex, enabling conservation and restoration of teeth. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pulp stem cell transplantation as a prelude for the impending clinical trials. Clinical-grade pulp stem cells were isolated and expanded according to good manufacturing practice conditions. The absence of contamination, abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype, and tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse ensured excellent quality control. After autologous transplantation of pulp stem cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a dog pulpectomized tooth, regenerated pulp tissue including vasculature and innervation completely filled in the root canal, and regenerated dentin was formed in the coronal part and prevented microleakage up to day 180. Transplantation of pulp stem cells with G-CSF yielded a significantly larger amount of regenerated dentin-pulp complex compared with transplantation of G-CSF or stem cells alone. Also noteworthy was the reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and apoptotic cells and the significant increase in neurite outgrowth compared with results without G-CSF. The transplanted stem cells expressed angiogenic/neurotrophic factors. It is significant that G-CSF together with conditioned medium of pulp stem cells stimulated cell migration and neurite outgrowth, prevented cell death, and promoted immunosuppression in vitro. Furthermore, there was no evidence of toxicity or adverse events. In conclusion, the combinatorial trophic effects of pulp stem cells and G-CSF are of immediate utility for pulp/dentin regeneration, demonstrating the prerequisites of safety and efficacy critical for clinical applications. PMID:23761108

  9. HEMA inhibits migration of dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Drake W.; Wu, Hongkun; Oh, Ju-Eun; Fakhar, Camron; Kang, Mo K.; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Park, No-Hee; Kim, Reuben H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cell migration is an important step in pulpal wound healing. Although components in the resin-based dental materials are known to have adverse effects on pulp wound healing including proliferation and mineralization, their effects on cell migration have been scarcely examined. Here, we investigated effects of 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) on migration of dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in vitro. Methods Cell viability was assessed using MTT assay, and cell migration was evaluated using wound scratch assay and transwell migration assay at non-cytotoxic doses. Western blotting was used to examine pathways associated with migration such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Results There were no drastic changes in the cell viability below 3mM HEMA. When DPSC were treated with HEMA at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.5mM, cell migration was diminished. HEMA-treated DPSC exhibited the loss of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in a dose-dependent manner. The HEMA-mediated inhibition of cell migration was associated with phosphorylation of p38 but not GSK3, ERK or JNK pathways. When we inhibited the p38 signaling pathway using a p38 inhibitor, migration of DPSC was suppressed. Conclusion HEMA inhibits migration of dental pulp cells in vitro, suggesting that poor pulpal wound healing under resin-based dental materials may be due, in part, to inhibition of cell migration by HEMA. PMID:23953290

  10. In Vivo Experiments with Dental Pulp Stem Cells for Pulp-Dentin Complex Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunil; Shin, Su-Jung; Song, Yunjung; Kim, Euiseong

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many studies have examined the pulp-dentin complex regeneration with DPSCs. While it is important to perform research on cells, scaffolds, and growth factors, it is also critical to develop animal models for preclinical trials. The development of a reproducible animal model of transplantation is essential for obtaining precise and accurate data in vivo. The efficacy of pulp regeneration should be assessed qualitatively and quantitatively using animal models. This review article sought to introduce in vivo experiments that have evaluated the potential of dental pulp stem cells for pulp-dentin complex regeneration. According to a review of various researches about DPSCs, the majority of studies have used subcutaneous mouse and dog teeth for animal models. There is no way to know which animal model will reproduce the clinical environment. If an animal model is developed which is easier to use and is useful in more situations than the currently popular models, it will be a substantial aid to studies examining pulp-dentin complex regeneration. PMID:26688616

  11. Human dental pulp stem cells: Applications in future regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Pravin D; Jethmalani, Yogita D

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are pluripotent cells, having a property of differentiating into various types of cells of human body. Several studies have developed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various human tissues, peripheral blood and body fluids. These cells are then characterized by cellular and molecular markers to understand their specific phenotypes. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are having a MSCs phenotype and they are differentiated into neuron, cardiomyocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, liver cells and β cells of islet of pancreas. Thus, DPSCs have shown great potentiality to use in regenerative medicine for treatment of various human diseases including dental related problems. These cells can also be developed into induced pluripotent stem cells by incorporation of pluripotency markers and use for regenerative therapies of various diseases. The DPSCs are derived from various dental tissues such as human exfoliated deciduous teeth, apical papilla, periodontal ligament and dental follicle tissue. This review will overview the information about isolation, cellular and molecular characterization and differentiation of DPSCs into various types of human cells and thus these cells have important applications in regenerative therapies for various diseases. This review will be most useful for postgraduate dental students as well as scientists working in the field of oral pathology and oral medicine. PMID:26131314

  12. Challenges of stem cell-based pulp and dentin regeneration: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, GEORGE T.-J.; AL-HABIB, MEY; GAUTHIER, PHILIPPE

    2013-01-01

    There are two types of approaches to regenerate tissues: cell-based and cell-free. The former approach is to introduce exogenous cells into the host to regenerate tissues, and the latter is to use materials other than cells in an attempt to regenerate tissues. There has been a significant advancement in stem cell-based pulp and dentin regeneration research in the past few years. Studies in small and large animals have demonstrated that pulp/dentin-like tissues can be regenerated partially or completely in the root canal space with apical openings of 0.7-3.0 mm using dental pulp stem cells, including stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) and subpopulations of pulp stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ADMSCs) have also been shown to regenerate pulp-like tissue. In contrast, the cell-free approach has not produced convincing evidence on pulp regeneration. However, one crucial concept has not been considered nor defined in the field of pulp/dentin regeneration and that is the critical size defect of dentin and pulp. Without such consideration and definition, it is difficult to predict or anticipate the extent of cell-free pulp regeneration that would occur. By reasoning, cell-free therapy is unlikely to regenerate an organ/tissue after total loss. Similarly, after a total loss of pulp, it is unlikely to regenerate without using exogenously introduced cells. A cell homing approach may provide a limited amount of tissue regeneration. Although stem cell-based pulp/dentin regeneration has shown great promise, clinical trials are difficult to launch at present. This article will address several issues that challenge and hinder the clinical applications of pulp/dentin regeneration which need to be overcome before stem cell-based pulp/dentin regeneration can occur in the clinic. PMID:23914150

  13. EFFECT OF SOMATOSTATIN ON DENTAL PULP STEM CELLS.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, D; Avantaggiato, A; Candotto, V; Cura, F; Gaudio, R M; Scapoli, L; Palmieri, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent stem cells with the potential to differentiate into various cell types. For this reason, they have been proposed as an alternative source for mesenchymal stem cells. Somatostatin is a peptide hormone with an inhibitory effect on several endogenous hormones. The aim of our study is to investigate whether somatostatin can promote or inhibit differentiation of DPSCs in osteoblasts and bone tissue. DPSCs were extracted from third molars of healthy subjects, and were treated with somatostatin at the concentration of 100 ng/ml for 24 and 48 h. Gene expression in treated DPSCs was compared with untreated cells (control) in order to check the effect of somatostatin on stem cell differentiation. After 24 h of treatment many genes investigated were down-regulated in treated DPSCs vs untreated DPSCs. Significantly up-regulated gene (Fold change > 2) was the Bone Morphogenetic Protein BMP4. On the contrary somatostatin induced the over-expression of bone related genes after 48 h of treatment (i.e. BMPR1B and BMPR2). TGFB family genes and their receptors were also significantly up-regulated after 48 h of treatment. Somatostatin demonstrated to promote the self-renewal of DPSCs: in our experiments somatostatin mainly acted on TGFB family genes. Further studies are needed to explore this new way of creating bone tissue. PMID:26511170

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Dental Pulp: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro

    2016-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells of dental pulp (DPSCs) were isolated and characterized for the first time more than a decade ago as highly clonogenic cells that were able to generate densely calcified colonies. Now, DPSCs are considered to have potential as stem cell source for orthopedic and oral maxillofacial reconstruction, and it has been suggested that they may have applications beyond the scope of the stomatognathic system. To date, most studies have shown that, regardless of their origin in third molars, incisors, or exfoliated deciduous teeth, DPSCs can generate mineralized tissue, an extracellular matrix and structures type dentin, periodontal ligament, and dental pulp, as well as other structures. Different groups worldwide have designed and evaluated new efficient protocols for the isolation, expansion, and maintenance of clinically safe human DPSCs in sufficient numbers for various therapeutics protocols and have discussed the most appropriate route of administration, the possible contraindications to their clinical use, and the parameters to be considered for monitoring their clinical efficacy and proper biological source. At present, DPSC-based therapy is promising but because most of the available evidence was obtained using nonhuman xenotransplants, it is not a mature technology. PMID:26779263

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Dental Pulp: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Martínez, Edgar; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro

    2016-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells of dental pulp (DPSCs) were isolated and characterized for the first time more than a decade ago as highly clonogenic cells that were able to generate densely calcified colonies. Now, DPSCs are considered to have potential as stem cell source for orthopedic and oral maxillofacial reconstruction, and it has been suggested that they may have applications beyond the scope of the stomatognathic system. To date, most studies have shown that, regardless of their origin in third molars, incisors, or exfoliated deciduous teeth, DPSCs can generate mineralized tissue, an extracellular matrix and structures type dentin, periodontal ligament, and dental pulp, as well as other structures. Different groups worldwide have designed and evaluated new efficient protocols for the isolation, expansion, and maintenance of clinically safe human DPSCs in sufficient numbers for various therapeutics protocols and have discussed the most appropriate route of administration, the possible contraindications to their clinical use, and the parameters to be considered for monitoring their clinical efficacy and proper biological source. At present, DPSC-based therapy is promising but because most of the available evidence was obtained using nonhuman xenotransplants, it is not a mature technology. PMID:26779263

  16. Angiogenic Properties of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bronckaers, Annelies; Hilkens, Petra; Fanton, Yanick; Struys, Tom; Gervois, Pascal; Politis, Constantinus; Martens, Wendy; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels, is a key process in tissue engineering. If blood supply cannot be established rapidly, there is insufficient oxygen and nutrient transport and necrosis of the implanted tissue will occur. Recent studies indicate that the human dental pulp contains precursor cells, named dental pulp stem cells (hDPSC) that show self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity. Since these cells can be easily isolated, cultured and cryopreserved, they represent an attractive stem cell source for tissue engineering. Until now, only little is known about the angiogenic abilities and mechanisms of the hDPSC. In this study, the angiogenic profile of both cell lysates and conditioned medium of hDPSC was determined by means of an antibody array. Numerous pro-and anti-angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and endostatin were found both at the mRNA and protein level. hDPSC had no influence on the proliferation of the human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), but were able to significantly induce HMEC-1 migration in vitro. Addition of the PI3K-inhibitor LY294002 and the MEK-inhibitor U0126 to the HMEC-1 inhibited this effect, suggesting that both Akt and ERK pathways are involved in hDPSC-mediated HMEC-1 migration. Antibodies against VEGF also abolished the chemotactic actions of hDPSC. Furthermore, in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, hDPSC were able to significantly induce blood vessel formation. In conclusion, hDPSC have the ability to induce angiogenesis, meaning that this stem cell population has a great clinical potential, not only for tissue engineering but also for the treatment of chronic wounds, stroke and myocardial infarctions. PMID:23951091

  17. Angiogenic properties of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bronckaers, Annelies; Hilkens, Petra; Fanton, Yanick; Struys, Tom; Gervois, Pascal; Politis, Constantinus; Martens, Wendy; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels, is a key process in tissue engineering. If blood supply cannot be established rapidly, there is insufficient oxygen and nutrient transport and necrosis of the implanted tissue will occur. Recent studies indicate that the human dental pulp contains precursor cells, named dental pulp stem cells (hDPSC) that show self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity. Since these cells can be easily isolated, cultured and cryopreserved, they represent an attractive stem cell source for tissue engineering. Until now, only little is known about the angiogenic abilities and mechanisms of the hDPSC. In this study, the angiogenic profile of both cell lysates and conditioned medium of hDPSC was determined by means of an antibody array. Numerous pro-and anti-angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and endostatin were found both at the mRNA and protein level. hDPSC had no influence on the proliferation of the human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), but were able to significantly induce HMEC-1 migration in vitro. Addition of the PI3K-inhibitor LY294002 and the MEK-inhibitor U0126 to the HMEC-1 inhibited this effect, suggesting that both Akt and ERK pathways are involved in hDPSC-mediated HMEC-1 migration. Antibodies against VEGF also abolished the chemotactic actions of hDPSC. Furthermore, in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, hDPSC were able to significantly induce blood vessel formation. In conclusion, hDPSC have the ability to induce angiogenesis, meaning that this stem cell population has a great clinical potential, not only for tissue engineering but also for the treatment of chronic wounds, stroke and myocardial infarctions. PMID:23951091

  18. JAB1 accelerates odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Min; Zhang, Ye; Shen, Qijie; Xing, Jing; Lu, Xiaohui; Huang, Dan; Cao, Peipei; Shen, Shuling; Zheng, Ke; Zhang, Jinlong; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Feng, Xingmei

    2016-06-01

    Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) is a multifunctional protein that participates in the control of cell proliferation and the stability of multiple proteins. JAB1 regulates several key proteins, and thereby produces varied effects on cell cycle progression, genome stability and cell survival. Some studies have shown that the loss of JAB1 in osteochondral progenitor cells severely impairs embryonic limb development in mice. However, the biological significance of JAB1 activity in the odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the role of JAB1, a key player in tooth development, in reparative dentin formation, especially odontogenic differentiation. We found that increased expression of JAB1 promoted odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The role of JAB1 in the odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs was further confirmed by knocking down JAB1. Our findings provide novel insights on odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:26989054

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell characteristics of dental pulp and periodontal ligament stem cells after in vivo transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Li, Kun; Li, Bei; Gao, Li-Na; Chen, Fa-Ming; Jin, Yan

    2014-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human postnatal dental pulp and periodontal ligament (PDL) tissues can give rise to multilineage differentiation in vitro and generate related dental tissues in vivo. However, the cell properties of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and PDL stem cells (PDLSCs) after in vivo implantation remain largely unidentified. In this study, cells were re-isolated from in vivo-generated dental pulp-like and PDL-like tissues (termed re-DPCs and re-PDLCs, respectively) as a result of ectopic transplantation of human DPSC and PDLSC sheets. The cell characteristics in terms of colony-forming ability, cell surface antigens and multi-differentiation potentials were all evaluated before and after implantation. It was found that re-DPCs and re-PDLCs were of human and mesenchymal origin and positive for MSC markers such as STRO-1, CD146, CD29, CD90 and CD105; and, to some extent, re-DPCs could maintain their colony forming abilities. Moreover, both cell types were able to form mineral deposits and differentiate into adipocytes and chondrocytes; however, quantitative analysis and related gene expression determination showed that the osteo-/chondro-differentiation capabilities of re-DPCs and re-PDLCs were significantly reduced compared to those of DPSCs and PDLSCs, respectively (P < 0.05); re-PDLCs showed a greater reduction potential than re-DPCs. We conclude that DPSCs and PDLSCs may maintain their MSC characteristics after in vivo implantation and, compared to PDLSCs, DPSCs appear much more stable under in vivo conditions. These findings provide additional cellular and molecular evidence that supports expanding the use of dental tissue-derived stem cells in cell therapy and tissue engineering. PMID:24824581

  20. Immunomic Screening of Cell Surface Molecules on Undifferentiated Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyo-In; Lee, Tae-Hyung; Kang, Kyung-Jung; Ryu, Chun-Jeih; Jang, Young-Joo

    2015-08-15

    Human adult dental pulp tissue is a source of adult stem cells that have a potential to differentiate into various tissues, although the primary cell suspensions cultured from pulp tissue are mixtures of both stem cell and nonstem cell populations with heterogeneous phenotypes and various differentiation efficiencies. Therefore, cell surface protein markers on dental pulp stem cells are critical for detection and purification of stem cell populations. Yet, little is known about the cell surface molecules that are specifically associated with the undifferentiated and progenitor state of human adult dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Presently, cell surface proteins expressed on hDPSCs were assessed by screening surface molecules specifically expressed on dentinogenic progenitors. Using a decoy immunization strategy, a set of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was generated against undifferentiated pulp progenitor cells. Forty-five hybridomas produced MAbs that interacted weakly, if at all, to differentiated pulp cells. Of these, 19 MAbs (18 IgG, 1 IgM) recognized surface molecules on undifferentiated hDPSCs. By multicolor flow cytometric analysis, 40%-60% of newly identified MAb-positive cells were demonstrated to be positive for the CD44 and CD90 mesenchymal markers. When MAb-positive cells were sorted from the heterogeneous pulp cell suspension, mineralization efficiency was increased three to five times compared with MAb-negative cells. The results suggest that the decoy immunization is an efficient method for isolation of MAbs against dentinogenic progenitors. These MAbs will be helpful for identification and enrichment of hDPSCs for efficient dentin regeneration. PMID:25919113

  1. Characterization of stem and progenitor cells in the dental pulp of erupted and unerupted murine molars

    PubMed Central

    Balic, Anamaria; Aguila, H. Leonardo; Caimano, Melissa J.; Francone, Victor P.; Mina, Mina

    2010-01-01

    In the past few years there have been significant advances in the identification of putative stem cells also referred to as “mesenchymal stem cells” (MSC) in dental tissues including the dental pulp. It is thought that MSC in dental pulp share certain similarities with MSC isolated from other tissues. However, cells in dental pulp are still poorly characterized. This study focused on the characterization of progenitor and stem cells in dental pulps of erupted and unerupted mice molars. Our study showed that dental pulps from unerupted molars contain a significant number of cells expressing CD90+/CD45-, CD117+/CD45-, Sca-1+/CD45- and little if any CD45+ cells. Our in vitro functional studies showed that dental pulp cells from unerupted molars displayed extensive osteo-dentinogenic potential but were unable to differentiate into chondrocytes and adipocytes. Dental pulp from erupted molars displayed a reduced number of cells, contained higher percentage of CD45+ and lower percentage of cells expressing CD90+/CD45-, CD117+/CD45- as compared to unerupted molars. In vitro functional assays demonstrated the ability of a small fraction of cells to differentiate into odontoblasts, osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. There was a significant reduction in the osteo-dentinogenic potential of the pulp cells derived from erupted molars compared to unerupted molars. Furthermore, the adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of pulp cells from erupted molars was dependent on a long induction period and infrequent. Based on these findings we propose that the dental pulp of the erupted molars contain a small population of multipotent cells, whereas the dental pulp of the unerupted molars does not contain multipotent cells but is enriched in osteo-dentinogenic progenitors engaged in the formation of coronal and radicular odontoblasts. PMID:20193787

  2. Spontaneous Differentiation of Dental Pulp stem cells on Dental polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bherwani, Aneel; Suarato, Giulia; Qin, Sisi; Chang, Chung-Cheh; Akhavan, Aaron; Spiegel, Joseph; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Simon, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    Dental pulp stem cells were plated on two dentally relevant materials i.e. PMMA commonly used for denture and Titanium used for implants. In both cases, we probed for the role of surface interaction and substrate morphology. Different films of PMMA were spun cast directly onto Si wafers; PMMA fibers of different diameters were electro spun onto some of these substrates. Titanium metal was evaporated onto Si surfaces using an electron beam evaporator. In addition, on some surfaces, P4VP nanofibers were spun cast. DPSC were grown in alpha-MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 0.2mM L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, 2mm glutamine and 10mM beta-glycerol phosphate either with or without 10nM dexamethasone. After 21 days samples were examined using confocal microscopy of cells and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX). In the case of Titanium biomineralization was observed independent of dexamethasone, where the deposits were templated along the fibers. Minimal biomineralization was observed on flat Titanium and PMMA samples. Markers of osteogenesis and specific signaling pathways are being evaluated by RT-PCR, which are up regulated on each surface, to understand the fundamental manner in which surfaces interact with cell differentiation.

  3. Regenerative potential of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells harvested from high caries patient's teeth.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ramesh; Gopal, Sushruth; Masood, Huda; Vivek, Purushottam; Deb, Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp are known to contains stem cells or dentinogenic progenitors that are responsible for dentin repair. Dental pulp Stem cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous teeth (SHED) represent a population of postnatal stem cells capable of extensive proliferation and multipotential or multilineage differentiations. This potential for tissue regeneration has become the current basis for dental pulp stem cell banking. Here, we have attempted to develop a protocol for harvesting stem cells from patients with High Caries tooth, which are most often electively discarded. We have characterized the stem cells with mesenchymal stem cell markers and have compared their potential to grow in culture, doubling times, and differentiate into different lineages, with normal bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We observed that the MSCs from dental pulp grew faster, with lower doubling time, and had equal efficiency in differentiating to various lineages, when subjected to standard directed differentiation protocols. This paper establishes that discarded High Carries Tooth can be a good source for regenerative medicine and also could be a potential source for MSCs and dental pulp MSC banking. PMID:24459811

  4. Electroporation for Transfection and Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, Bakr M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Target gene delivery is needed to induce cellular differentiation or a specific therapeutic effect. Electroporation is a relatively safe and simple technique to deliver nucleic acids to the cell that acts by rendering cells transiently permeable using short periods of high voltage. In stem cell research, human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCS) are highly accessible, and they exhibit broad differentiation potential. Until now, no studies have attempted to optimize electroporation parameters for DPSCs with respect to transfection efficiency and viability. In this study, we aimed to optimize transfection of DPSCs through varying different electroporation parameters, including voltage, mode of pulsation, and the number of pulses. As positive control, we used commonly utilized the chemical transfection reagents Lipofectamine 2000 and FuGene 6. In addition, we used our newly optimized transfection conditions to transfect hDPSCs with a functional chondrogenic transgene. We obtained higher transfection efficiency and cell viability with these electroporation conditions compared to controls. The highest transfection efficiency (63.81±4.72%) was achieved with 100 V, 20 msec, one-pulse square-wave condition. Among chemical transfection groups, FuGene 6 showed the highest cell viability at all tested transfection ratios, while Lipofectamine 2000 showed the highest transfection efficiency (19.23±3.19%) using 1:1 DNA (μg):Lipofectamine (μL). Transfected DPSCs functionally expressed the transforming growth factor β-3 chondrogenic transgene on the mRNA level as detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and on the protein level as detected by Western blot analysis. An increase in various chondrogenic markers was also found when studying mRNA expression in transfected cells. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate optimal electroporation and chemical transfection reagent conditions for hDPSCs, and, subsequently, we provide proof of concept for

  5. Biomimetic extracellular matrix mediated somatic stem cell differentiation: applications in dental pulp tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world's population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues. PMID:25954205

  6. [Comparison of sorting of fluorescently and magnetically labelled dental pulp stem cells].

    PubMed

    Kerényi, Farkas; Tarapcsák, Szabolcs; Hrubi, Edit; Baráthne, Szabó Ágnes; Hegedüs, Viktória; Balogh, Sára; Bágyi, Kinga; Varga, Gábor; Hegedüs, Csaba

    2016-03-01

    Stem cells are present in many tissues, such as dental pulp. Stem cells can be easily isolated from dental pulp because third molars are often removed from patients. Stem cells could be separated from the tissue derived heterogeneous cell population. There are two main methods to separate a cell type from the other ones: the fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and the magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). The aim of this study was to compare these methods' effect on cell surviving and population growth after sorting on dental pulp cells. The anti-STRO-1 antibody was used as primary antibody to specifically label stem cells. Two secondary antibodies were used: magnetic or fluorescent labelled. We sorted the cells by MACS or by FACS or by combination of both (MACS-FACS). Our results show that the effectivity of MACS and FACS sorting are comparable while of MACS-FACS was significantly higher (MACS 79.53 ± 5.78%, FACS 88.27 ± 3.70%, MACS-FACS 98.43 ± 0.67%). The cell surviving and the post-sorting population growth, on the contrary, are very different. The cell population is growing on first week after MACS but after FACS did not. Moreover, after MACS-FACS, on first week the cell number of population decreased. Taken together, our results suggest to use MACS instead of FACS, at least in case of sorting dental pulp stem cells with anti-STRO-1 antibody. PMID:27188159

  7. Effects of hTERT immortalization on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ikbale, El-Ayachi; Goorha, Sarita; Reiter, Lawrence T; Miranda-Carboni, Gustavo A

    2016-03-01

    These data relate to the differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) and DPSC immortalized by constitutively expressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) through both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages (i.e. to make bone producing and fat producing cells from these dental pulp stem cells). The data augment another study to characterize immortalized DPSC for the study of neurogenetic "Characterization of neurons from immortalized dental pulp stem cells for the study of neurogenetic disorders" [1]. Two copies of one typical control cell line (technical replicates) were used in this study. The data represent the differentiation of primary DPSC into osteoblast cells approximately 60% more effectively than hTERT immortalized DPSC. Conversely, both primary and immortalized DPSC are poorly differentiated into adipocytes. The mRNA expression levels for both early and late adipogenic and osteogenic gene markers are shown. PMID:26958627

  8. Effects of hTERT immortalization on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ikbale, El-Ayachi; Goorha, Sarita; Reiter, Lawrence T.; Miranda-Carboni, Gustavo A.

    2016-01-01

    These data relate to the differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) and DPSC immortalized by constitutively expressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) through both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages (i.e. to make bone producing and fat producing cells from these dental pulp stem cells). The data augment another study to characterize immortalized DPSC for the study of neurogenetic “Characterization of neurons from immortalized dental pulp stem cells for the study of neurogenetic disorders” [1]. Two copies of one typical control cell line (technical replicates) were used in this study. The data represent the differentiation of primary DPSC into osteoblast cells approximately 60% more effectively than hTERT immortalized DPSC. Conversely, both primary and immortalized DPSC are poorly differentiated into adipocytes. The mRNA expression levels for both early and late adipogenic and osteogenic gene markers are shown. PMID:26958627

  9. Genome-wide transcriptomic alterations induced by ethanol treatment in human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs).

    PubMed

    Khalid, Omar; Kim, Jeffrey J; Duan, Lewei; Hoang, Michael; Elashoff, David; Kim, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from adult dental pulp are multipotent mesenchymal stem cells that can be directed to differentiate into osteogenic/odontogenic cells and also trans-differentiate into neuronal cells. The utility of DPSC has been explored in odontogenic differentiation for tooth regeneration. Alcohol abuse appears to lead to periodontal disease, tooth decay and mouth sores that are potentially precancerous. Persons who abuse alcohol are at high risk of having seriously deteriorated teeth, gums and compromised oral health in general. It is currently unknown if alcohol exposure has any impact on adult stem cell maintenance, stem cell fate determination and plasticity, and stem cell niche environment. Here we provide detailed experimental methods, analysis and information associated with our data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under GSE57255. Our data provide transcriptomic changes that are occurring by EtOH treatment of DPSCs at 24-hour and 48-hour time point. PMID:25045622

  10. Characterization of p75 neurotrophin receptor expression in human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenru; Kremer, Karlea L; Kaidonis, Xenia; Ludlow, Victoria E; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Xie, Jianling; Proud, Christopher G; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-10-01

    Human adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) are a heterogeneous stem cell population, which are able to differentiate down neural, chondrocyte, osteocyte and adipocyte lineages. We studied the expression pattern of p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75NTR), a marker of neural stem cells, within human DPSC populations from eight donors. p75NTR are expressed at low levels (<10%) in DPSC. Importantly, p75(+) DPSC represent higher expression levels of SOX1 (neural precursor cell marker), SOX2 (cell pluripotency marker) and nestin (neural stem cell marker) in comparison to p75(-) DPSC. Our results suggest that p75(+) hDPSC may denote a subpopulation with greater neurogenic potential. PMID:27469433

  11. Imperative role of dental pulp stem cells in regenerative therapies: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Ramchandra; Gupta, Manish; Aggarwal, Avanti; Sharma, Deepak; Sarin, Anurag; Kola, Mohammed Zaheer

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive cells that can differentiate and regenerate organs in different parts of the body such as heart, bones, muscles and nervous system. This has been a field of great clinical interest with immense possibilities of using the stem cells in regeneration of human organ those are damaged due to disease, developmental defects and accident. The knowledge of stem cell technology is increasing quickly in all medical specialties and in dental field too. Stem cells of dental origin appears to hold the key to various cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine, but most avenues are in experimental stages and many procedures are undergoing standardization and validation. Long-term preservation of SHED cells or DPSC is becoming a popular consideration, similar to the banking of umbilical cord blood. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are the adult multipotent cells that reside in the cell rich zone of the dental pulp. The multipotent nature of these DPSCs may be utilized in both dental and medical applications. A systematic review of the literature was performed using various internet based search engines (PubMed, Medline Plus, Cochrane, Medknow, Ebsco, Science Direct, Hinari, WebMD, IndMed, Embase) using keywords like "dental pulp stem cells", "regeneration", "medical applications", "tissue engineering". DPSCs appears to be a promising innovation for the re-growth of tissues however, long term clinical studies need to be carried out that could establish some authentic guidelines in this perspective. PMID:24665194

  12. Imperative Role of Dental Pulp Stem Cells in Regenerative Therapies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Ramchandra; Gupta, Manish; Aggarwal, Avanti; Sharma, Deepak; Sarin, Anurag; Kola, Mohammed Zaheer

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive cells that can differentiate and regenerate organs in different parts of the body such as heart, bones, muscles and nervous system. This has been a field of great clinical interest with immense possibilities of using the stem cells in regeneration of human organ those are damaged due to disease, developmental defects and accident. The knowledge of stem cell technology is increasing quickly in all medical specialties and in dental field too. Stem cells of dental origin appears to hold the key to various cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine, but most avenues are in experimental stages and many procedures are undergoing standardization and validation. Long-term preservation of SHED cells or DPSC is becoming a popular consideration, similar to the banking of umbilical cord blood. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are the adult multipotent cells that reside in the cell rich zone of the dental pulp. The multipotent nature of these DPSCs may be utilized in both dental and medical applications. A systematic review of the literature was performed using various internet based search engines (PubMed, Medline Plus, Cochrane, Medknow, Ebsco, Science Direct, Hinari, WebMD, IndMed, Embase) using keywords like “dental pulp stem cells”, “regeneration”, “medical applications”, “tissue engineering”. DPSCs appears to be a promising innovation for the re-growth of tissues however, long term clinical studies need to be carried out that could establish some authentic guidelines in this perspective. PMID:24665194

  13. Comparison of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, synovial fluid, adult dental pulp, and exfoliated deciduous tooth pulp.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Y; Koyama, N; Nakao, K; Osawa, K; Ikeno, M; Yamanaka, S; Okubo, Y; Fujimura, K; Bessho, K

    2016-01-01

    Populations of pluripotent stem cells were isolated from bone marrow, synovial fluid, adult dental pulp, and exfoliated deciduous teeth and their multipotentiality properties compared. Osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic differentiation potentials were examined. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and synovial fluid-derived cells (SFCs) showed the highest levels of osteogenesis as expressed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (0.54±0.094 U/mg protein and 0.57±0.039 U/mg protein, respectively; P=0.60) and by osteocalcin (BGLAP; determined by real-time RT-PCR). SFCs showed the highest levels of chondrogenesis as expressed by ALP activity (1.75±0.097 U/mg protein) and of COL2A1 and COL10A1 by real-time PCR. In terms of adipogenesis, lipid vesicles were observed in the BMMSCs and SFCs. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) exhibited neurogenesis potential, as shown by increases in expression of class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) on RT-PCR. Variability was found in the differentiation potential corresponding to the tendency of the original tissue to differentiate. It is suggested that the cell type should be selected depending on the regenerative treatment regimen. PMID:26235629

  14. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) differentiation study by confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H.; Collart-Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative medicine brings a huge application for Mesenchymal stem cells such as Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label free , real time and high spatial resolution imaging technique is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800-3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and 960 cm-1 peak (phosphate PO4 3-) were collected. In Dental Pulp Stem Cells 21st day differentiated in buffer solution, phosphate peaks ν1 PO4 3- (first vibrational mode) at 960cm-1 and ν2 PO4 3- at 430cm-1 and ν4 PO4 3- at 585cm-1 are obviously present. Confocal Raman microscopy enables the detection of cell differentiation and it can be used to investigate clinical stem cell research.

  15. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  16. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  17. Dental pulp stem cells. Biology and use for periodontal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ashri, Nahid Y; Ajlan, Sumaiah A; Aldahmash, Abdullah M

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Normal and Deep Carious Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Yan, Wenjuan; Liu, Ying; Xu, Shuaimei; Wu, Buling

    2014-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), precursor cells of odontoblasts, are ideal seed cells for tooth tissue engineering and regeneration. Our previous study has demonstrated that stem cells exist in dental pulp with deep caries and are called carious dental pulp stem cells (CDPSCs). The results indicated that CDPSCs had a higher proliferative and stronger osteogenic differentiation potential than DPSCs. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the biological differences between DPSCs and CDPSCs are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular features of DPSCs and CDPSCs by comparing the proteomic profiles using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Our results revealed that there were 18 protein spots differentially expressed between DPSCs and CDPSCs in a narrow pH range of 4 to 7. These differently expressed proteins are mostly involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, cell cytoskeleton and motility. In addition, our results suggested that CDPSCs had a higher expression of antioxidative proteins that might protect CDPSCs from oxidative stress. This study explores some potential proteins responsible for the biological differences between DPSCs and CDPSCs and expands our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of mineralization of DPSCs in the formation of the dentin-pulp complex. PMID:24809979

  19. Adult human dental pulp stem cells promote blood-brain barrier permeability through vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression.

    PubMed

    Winderlich, Joshua N; Kremer, Karlea L; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising new treatment option for stroke. Intravascular administration of stem cells is a valid approach as stem cells have been shown to transmigrate the blood-brain barrier. The mechanism that causes this effect has not yet been elucidated. We hypothesized that stem cells would mediate localized discontinuities in the blood-brain barrier, which would allow passage into the brain parenchyma. Here, we demonstrate that adult human dental pulp stem cells express a soluble factor that increases permeability across an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. This effect was shown to be the result of vascular endothelial growth factor-a. The effect could be amplified by exposing dental pulp stem cell to stromal-derived factor 1, which stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression. These findings support the use of dental pulp stem cell in therapy for stroke. PMID:26661186

  20. Epigenetic modulation of dental pulp stem cells: implications for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Duncan, H F; Smith, A J; Fleming, G J P; Cooper, P R

    2016-05-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) offer significant potential for use in regenerative endodontics, and therefore, identifying cellular regulators that control stem cell fate is critical to devising novel treatment strategies. Stem cell lineage commitment and differentiation are regulated by an intricate range of host and environmental factors of which epigenetic influence is considered vital. Epigenetic modification of DNA and DNA-associated histone proteins has been demonstrated to control cell phenotype and regulate the renewal and pluripotency of stem cell populations. The activities of the nuclear enzymes, histone deacetylases, are increasingly being recognized as potential targets for pharmacologically inducing stem cell differentiation and dedifferentiation. Depending on cell maturity and niche in vitro, low concentration histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) application can promote dedifferentiation of several post-natal and mouse embryonic stem cell populations and conversely increase differentiation and accelerate mineralization in DPSC populations, whilst animal studies have shown an HDACi-induced increase in stem cell marker expression during organ regeneration. Notably, both HDAC and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors have also been demonstrated to dramatically increase the reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for use in regenerative therapeutic procedures. As the regulation of cell fate will likely remain the subject of intense future research activity, this review aims to describe the current knowledge relating to stem cell epigenetic modification, focusing on the role of HDACi on alteration of DPSC phenotype, whilst presenting the potential for therapeutic application as part of regenerative endodontic regimens. PMID:26011759

  1. Hard tissue formation of STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuechao; Walboomers, X Frank; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Bian, Zhuan; Fan, Mingwen; Jansen, John A

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine hard tissue formation of STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp-derived stem cells, seeded into a calcium phosphate ceramic scaffold, and implanted subcutaneously in mice. Previously, STRO-1 selection was used to obtain a mesenchymal stem cell progenitor subpopulation from primary dental pulp-derived stem cells. In the current study, these cells were cultured with three different media: "BMP-plus" medium containing dexamethasone and 100 ng/mL of rhBMP-2, "odontogenic" medium containing dexamethasone, and "control" medium without supplements. The cell-scaffold complexes were cultured in these media for 1, 4, or 8 days before implantation. Histological analysis demonstrated that the cultures with BMP-plus and 4 days of culture gave the highest percentage of hard tissue formation per implant (36 +/- 9% of pore area). Real-time PCR confirmed these results. In conclusion, STRO-1-selected dental pulp stem cells show effective hard tissue formation in vivo, and a short in vitro culture period and addition of BMP-2 can enhance this effect. PMID:18652538

  2. Effect of isolation methodology on stem cell properties and multilineage differentiation potential of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hilkens, P; Gervois, P; Fanton, Y; Vanormelingen, J; Martens, W; Struys, T; Politis, C; Lambrichts, I; Bronckaers, A

    2013-07-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are an attractive alternative mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) source because of their isolation simplicity compared with the more invasive methods associated with harvesting other MSC sources. However, the isolation method to be favored for obtaining DPSC cultures remains under discussion. This study compares the stem cell properties and multilineage differentiation potential of DPSCs obtained by the two most widely adapted isolation procedures. DPSCs were isolated either by enzymatic digestion of the pulp tissue (DPSC-EZ) or by the explant method (DPSC-OG), while keeping the culture media constant throughout all experiments and in both isolation methods. Assessment of the stem cell properties of DPSC-EZ and DPSC-OG showed no significant differences between the two groups with regard to proliferation rate and colony formation. Phenotype analysis indicated that DPSC-EZ and DPSC-OG were positive for CD29, CD44, CD90, CD105, CD117 and CD146 expression without any significant differences. The multilineage differentiation potential of both stem cell types was confirmed by using standard immuno(histo/cyto)chemical staining together with an in-depth ultrastructural analysis by means of transmission electron microscopy. Our results indicate that both DPSC-EZ and DPSC-OG could be successfully differentiated into adipogenic, chrondrogenic and osteogenic cell types, although the adipogenic differentiation of both stem cell populations was incomplete. The data suggest that both the enzymatic digestion and outgrowth method can be applied to obtain a suitable autologous DPSC resource for tissue replacement therapies of both bone and cartilage. PMID:23715720

  3. Cell proliferation-inducing protein 52/mitofilin is a surface antigen on undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyo-In; Lee, Tae-Hyong; Jang, Young-Joo

    2015-06-01

    Dental pulp is a soft tissue located inside the hard part of a tooth and it contains a stem cell population that can regenerate damaged dentin and/or pulp itself. Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells that have the potential to be differentiated into a variety of cell types. Although cells cultured primarily from pulp tissue show heterogeneous phenotypes and variable efficiency in their dentinogenic differentiation, proper selection markers, which are specific to hDPSCs, are essential for the osteo/dentinogenic study of human dental pulp cells. We had previously screened a set of undifferentiation-specific cell surface antibodies of hDPSCs through decoy immunization. In this study, we show that one of these surface monoclonal antibodies, 3C4, is bound to intact pulp cells in a highly undifferentiation-specific manner. The surface antigen protein bound specifically to 3C4 antibody was identified through direct immunoprecipitation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as the cell proliferation-inducing protein 52/Mitofilin, which is a protein of the inner mitochondrial membrane and is a possible antagonist to maintaining mitochondrial activation during differentiation. The expression of mitofilin/3C4 antigen dramatically decreased during differentiation, and the depletion of mitofilin/3C4 antigen induced the expression of osteogenic/dentinogenic markers earlier than during normal differentiation. The 3C4-positive cells isolated by a magnetic-activated cell sorting system were differentiated with a higher efficiency than 3C4-negative cells. These results indicate that finding mitochondria-related stem cell markers is valuable to be able to identify and isolate primitive stem cells. PMID:25590652

  4. Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 identifies human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Noriaki; Murata, Satoko; Fukushima, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Yoshihito; Yanagita, Takeshi; Yanagita, Emmy; Ono, Mitsuaki; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoo; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2012-03-10

    Embryonic stem cell-associated antigens are expressed in a variety of adult stem cells as well as embryonic stem cells. In the present study, we investigated whether stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 can be used to isolate dental pulp (DP) stem cells. DP cells showed plastic adherence, specific surface antigen expression, and multipotent differentiation potential, similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). SSEA-4+ cells were found in cultured DP cells in vitro as well as in DP tissue in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that 45.5% of the DP cells were SSEA-4+. When the DP cells were cultured in the presence of all-trans-retinoic acid, marked downregulation of SSEA-3 and SSEA-4 and the upregulation of SSEA-1 were observed. SSEA-4+ DP cells showed a greater telomere length and a higher growth rate compared to ungated and SSEA-4- cells. A clonal assay demonstrated that 65.5% of the SSEA-4+ DP cells had osteogenic potential, and the SSEA-4+ clonal DP cells showed multilineage differentiation potential toward osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and neurons in vitro. In addition, the SSEA-4+ DP cells had the capacity to form ectopic bone in vivo. Thus, our results suggest that SSEA-4 is a specific cell surface antigen that can be used to identify DP stem cells. PMID:22266579

  5. Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells into Dopaminergic Neuron-like Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chun, So Young; Soker, Shay; Jang, Yu-Jin; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the potential of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons in vitro as an autologous stem cell source for Parkinson's disease treatment. The hDPSCs were expanded in knockout-embryonic stem cell (KO-ES) medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on gelatin-coated plates for 3-4 days. Then, the medium was replaced with KO-ES medium without LIF to allow the formation of the neurosphere for 4 days. The neurosphere was transferred into ITS medium, containing ITS (human insulin-transferrin-sodium) and fibronectin, to select for Nestin-positive cells for 6-8 days. The cells were then cultured in N-2 medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), FGF-8b, sonic hedgehog-N, and ascorbic acid on poly-l-ornithine/fibronectin-coated plates to expand the Nestin-positive cells for up to 2 weeks. Finally, the cells were transferred into N-2/ascorbic acid medium to allow for their differentiation into dopaminergic neurons for 10-15 days. The differentiation stages were confirmed by morphological, immunocytochemical, flow cytometric, real-time PCR, and ELISA analyses. The expressions of mesenchymal stem cell markers were observed at the early stages. The expressions of early neuronal markers were maintained throughout the differentiation stages. The mature neural markers showed increased expression from stage 3 onwards. The percentage of cells positive for tyrosine hydroxylase was 14.49%, and the amount was 0.526 ± 0.033 ng/mL at the last stage. hDPSCs can differentiate into dopaminergic neural cells under experimental cell differentiation conditions, showing potential as an autologous cell source for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26839468

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Struys, T; Ketkar-Atre, A; Gervois, P; Leten, C; Hilkens, P; Martens, W; Bronckaers, A; Dresselaers, T; Politis, C; Lambrichts, I; Himmelreich, U

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in stem cell research have shown the promising nature of mesenchymal stem cells as plausible candidates for cell-based regenerative medicine. Many studies reported the use of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), which possess self-renewal capacity, high proliferation potential, and the ability to undergo multilineage differentiation. Together with this therapeutic approach, development of effective, noninvasive and nontoxic imaging techniques for visualizing and tracking the cells in vivo is crucial for the evaluation and improvement of stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most powerful diagnostic imaging techniques currently available for in vivo diagnosis and has been proposed as the most attractive modality for monitoring stem cell migration. The aim of this study was to investigate the labeling efficiency of hDPSCs using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles in order to allow visualization using in vitro and in vivo MRI without influencing cellular metabolism. MRI and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed optimal uptake with low SPIO concentrations of 15 µg/ml in combination with 0.75 µg/ml poly-L-lysine (PLL) resulting in more than 13 pg iron/cell and an in vitro detection limit of 50 labeled cells/µl. Very low SPIO concentrations in the culture medium resulted in extremely high labeling efficiency not reported before. For these conditions, tetrazolium salt assays showed no adverse effects on cell viability. Furthermore, in vivo MRI was performed to detect labeled hDPSCs transplanted into the brain of Rag 2-γ C immune-deficient mice. Transplanted cells did not show any signs of tumorgenecity or teratoma formation during the studied time course. We have reported on a labeling and imaging strategy to visualize human dental pulp stem cells in vivo using MRI. These data provide a solid base to allow cell tracking in future regenerative studies in the brain longitudinally. PMID:23050936

  7. Single CD271 marker isolates mesenchymal stem cells from human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Ruth; Lee, Hye-Lim; Hong, Christine; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising tool in regenerative medicine due to their capacity to differentiate into multiple lineages. In addition to MSCs isolated from bone marrow (BMSCs), adult MSCs are isolated from craniofacial tissues including dental pulp tissues (DPs) using various stem cell surface markers. However, there has been a lack of consensus on a set of surface makers that are reproducibly effective at isolating putative multipotent dental mesenchymal stem cells (DMSCs). In this study, we used different combinations of surface markers (CD51/CD140α, CD271, and STRO-1/CD146) to isolate homogeneous populations of DMSCs from heterogeneous dental pulp cells (DPCs) obtained from DP and compared their capacity to undergo multilineage differentiation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting revealed that 27.3% of DPCs were CD51(+)/CD140α(+), 10.6% were CD271(+), and 0.3% were STRO-1(+)/CD146(+). Under odontogenic conditions, all three subsets of isolated DMSCs exhibited differentiation capacity into odontogenic lineages. Among these isolated subsets of DMSCs, CD271(+) DMSCs demonstrated the greatest odontogenic potential. While all three combinations of surface markers in this study successfully isolated DMSCs from DPCs, the single CD271 marker presents the most effective stem cell surface marker for identification of DMSCs with high odontogenic potential. Isolated CD271(+) DMSCs could potentially be utilized for future clinical applications in dentistry and regenerative medicine. PMID:26674422

  8. Dynamic hydrostatic pressure promotes differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, V; Damek-Poprawa, M; Nicoll, S B; Akintoye, S O

    2009-09-01

    The masticatory apparatus absorbs high occlusal forces, but uncontrolled parafunctional or orthodontic forces damage periodontal ligament (PDL), cause pulpal calcification, pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Morphology and functional differentiation of connective tissue cells can be controlled by mechanical stimuli but effects of uncontrolled forces on intra-pulpal homeostasis and ability of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to withstand direct external forces are unclear. Using dynamic hydrostatic pressure (HSP), we tested the hypothesis that direct HSP disrupts DPSC survival and odontogenic differentiation. DPSCs from four teenage patients were subjected to HSP followed by assessment of cell adhesion, survival and recovery capacity based on odontogenic differentiation, mineralization and responsiveness to bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). HSP down-regulated DPSC adhesion and survival but promoted differentiation by increasing mineralization, in vivo hard tissue regeneration and BMP-2 responsiveness despite reduced cell numbers. HSP-treated DPSCs displayed enhanced odontogenic differentiation, an indication of favorable recovery from HSP-induced cellular stress. PMID:19555657

  9. Dynamic Hydrostatic Pressure Promotes Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, V; Damek-Poprawa, M.; Nicoll, S. B.; Akintoye, S.O.

    2009-01-01

    The masticatory apparatus absorbs high occlusal forces, but uncontrolled parafunctional or orthodontic forces damage periodontal ligament (PDL), cause pulpal calcification, pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Morphology and functional differentiation of connective tissue cells can be controlled by mechanical stimuli but effects of uncontrolled forces on intra-pulpal homeostasis and ability of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to withstand direct external forces are unclear. Using dynamic hydrostatic pressure (HSP), we tested the hypothesis that direct HSP disrupts DPSC survival and odontogenic differentiation. DPSCs from four teenage patients were subjected to HSP followed by assessment of cell adhesion, survival and recovery capacity based on odontogenic differentiation, mineralization and responsiveness to bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). HSP down-regulated DPSC adhesion and survival but promoted differentiation by increasing mineralization, in vivo hard tissue regeneration and BMP-2 responsiveness despite reduced cell numbers. HSP-treated DPSCs displayed enhanced odontogenic differentiation, an indication of favorable recovery from HSP-induced cellular stress. PMID:19555657

  10. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering. PMID:26880982

  11. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering. PMID:26880982

  12. Confocal Raman microscopy to monitor extracellular matrix during dental pulp stem cells differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Hamideh; Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.

    2015-07-01

    Regenerative medicine brings promising applications for mesenchymal stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a noninvasive technique, is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800 to 3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and the 960 cm-1 peak (ν1 PO43-) were collected (to image cells and phosphate, respectively), and the ratio of two peaks 1660 over 1690 cm-1 (amide I bands) to measure the collagen cross-linking has been calculated. Raman spectra of DPSCs after 21 days differentiation reveal several phosphate peaks: ν1 (first stretching mode) at 960 cm-1, ν2 at 430 cm-1, and ν4 at 585 cm-1 and collagen cross-linking can also be calculated. Confocal Raman microscopy enables monitoring osteogenic differentiation in vitro and can be a credible tool for clinical stem cell based research.

  13. Derivation and growth characteristics of dental pulp stem cells from patients of different ages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zhou, Jian; Xu, Chong-Tao; Zhang, Jie; Jin, Yan-Jiao; Sun, Geng-Lin

    2015-10-01

    The dental pulp contains a relatively low number of stem cells; however, it is considered to be a promising source of stem cells for use in regenerative therapy. To date, it has remained elusive whether there are certain differences in the dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) from donors of different ages. In the present study, DPSC lines were derived using teeth from children, adolescents, adults and aged donors. The derivation efficiency, the proliferative and apoptotic rate, cell marker expression and the differentiation capacity were investigated and compared among these DPSC lines. The derivation efficacy was decreased with increasing donor age. Although a large part of cell surface markers was expressed in all DPSC lines, the expression of CD29 was downregulated in the DPSCs from aged teeth. In addition, the doubling time of DPSCs from aged teeth was prolonged and the number of apoptotic cells was increased with the propagation. These DPSCs were able to differentiate into a neuronal linage, which positively expressed the neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin and microtubule‑associated protein 2, as well as into an osteogenic lineage, which positively expressed CD45; however, these DPSCs from aged teeth were completely or partially deprived of differentiation capacity. By contrast, DPSCs from younger teeth displayed significantly higher vitality and a higher potential for use in dental regenerative medicine. PMID:26239849

  14. Proliferation rate of stem cells derived from human dental pulp and identification of differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Muhammad Fawwaz; Abdullah, Siti Fadilah; Omar, Nor Shamsuria; Mahmood, Zuliani; Fazliah Mohd Noor, Siti Noor; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Mokhtar, Khairani Idah

    2014-05-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) obtained from the dental pulp of human extracted tooth were cultured and characterized to confirm that these were mesenchymal stem cells. The proliferation rate was assessed using AlamarBlue® cell assay. The differentially expressed genes in SHED and DPSCs were identified using the GeneFishing™ technique. The proliferation rate of SHED (P < 0.05) was significantly higher than DPSCs while SHED had a lower multiplication rate and shorter population doubling time (0.01429, 60.57 h) than DPSCs (0.00286, 472.43 h). Two bands were highly expressed in SHED and three bands in DPSCs. Sequencing analysis showed these to be TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 1 (TIMP1), and ribosomal protein s8, (RPS8) in SHED and collagen, type I, alpha 1, (COL1A1), follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1), lectin, galactoside-binding, soluble, 1, (LGALS1) in DPSCs. TIMP1 is involved in degradation of the extracellular matrix, cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic function and RPS8 is involved as a rate-limiting factor in translational regulation; COL1A1 is involved in the resistance and elasticity of the tissues; FSTL1 is an autoantigen associated with rheumatoid arthritis; LGALS1 is involved in cell growth, differentiation, adhesion, RNA processing, apoptosis and malignant transformation. This, along with further protein expression analysis, holds promise in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:24375868

  15. Glycometabolic reprogramming associated with the initiation of human dental pulp stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linyan; Cheng, Li; Wang, Huning; Pan, Hongying; Yang, Hui; Shao, Meiying; Hu, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Glycometabolism, particularly mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and glycolysis, plays a central role in cell life activities. Glycometabolism can be reprogrammed to maintain the stemness or to induce the differentiation of stem cells, thereby regulating tissue repair and regeneration. However, research on the glycometabolism of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) remains scarce. Here, we investigated the relationship between glycometabolic reprogramming and initiation of hDPSC differentiation. We found the differentiation of hDPSCs commenced on day 3 when cells were cultured in mineralized medium. When cell differentiation commenced, mitochondria became elongated with well-developed cristae, and the oxygen consumption rate of mitochondria was enhanced, manifested as an increase in basal respiration, mitochondrial ATP production, and maximal respiration. Interestingly, glycolytic enzyme activities, glycolysis capacity, and glycolysis reserve were also upregulated at this time to match the powerful bioenergetic demands. More importantly, hDPSCs derived from different donors or cultured in various oxygen environments showed similar glycometabolic changes when they began to differentiate. Thus, glycometabolic reprogramming accompanies initiation of hDPSC differentiation and could potentially play a role in the regulation of dental pulp repair. PMID:26634800

  16. Effect of uncontrolled freezing on biological characteristics of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli; Rattan, Vidya

    2015-12-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) hold great promise as a source of adult stem cells for utilization in regenerative medicine. Successful storage and post thaw recovery of DPSCs without loss of function is a key issue for future clinical application. Most of the cryopreservation methods use controlled rate freezing and vapor phase nitrogen to store stem cells. But these methods are both expensive and laborious. In this study, we isolated DPSCs from a patient undergoing impacted mandibular third molar extraction. We adopted eight different methods of cryopreservation at -80 °C for long term storage of the DPSC aliquots. Various parameters like proliferation, cell death, cell cycle, retention of stemness markers and differentiation potential were studied post cryopreservation period of 1 year. We observed successful recovery of stem cells in every method and a significant difference in proliferation potential and cell death between samples stored by different methods. However, post thaw, all cells retained their stemness markers. All DPSCs stored by different methods were able to differentiate into osteoblast like cells, adipocytes and neural cells. Based on these parameters we concluded that uncontrolled freezing at a temperature of -80 °C is as effective as controlled freezing using ethanol vessels and other cryopreservation methods. To the best of our knowledge, our study provides the first proof of concept that long term storage in uncontrolled freezing of cells at -80 °C in 10 % DMSO does not affect the revival capacity of hDPSCs. This implies that DPSCs may be used successfully for tissue engineering and cell based therapeutics even after long term, uncontrolled cryopreservation. PMID:25663639

  17. Exosomes from Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Suppress Carrageenan-Induced Acute Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pivoraitė, Ugnė; Jarmalavičiūtė, Akvilė; Tunaitis, Virginijus; Ramanauskaitė, Giedrė; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Kašėta, Vytautas; Biziulevičienė, Genė; Venalis, Algirdas; Pivoriūnas, Augustas

    2015-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to examine the effects of human dental pulp stem cell-derived exosomes on the carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in mice. Exosomes were purified by differential ultracentrifugation from the supernatants of stem cells derived from the dental pulp of human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) cultivated in serum-free medium. At 1 h post-carrageenan injection, exosomes derived from supernatants of 2 × 10(6) SHEDs were administered by intraplantar injection to BALB/c mice; 30 mg/kg of prednisolone and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Edema was measured at 6, 24, and 48 h after carrageenan injection. For the in vivo imaging experiments, AngioSPARK750, Cat B 750 FAST, and MMPSense 750 FAST were administered into the mouse tail vein 2 h post-carrageenan injection. Fluorescence images were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h after edema induction by IVIS Spectrum in vivo imaging system. Exosomes significantly reduced the carrageenan-induced edema at all the time points studied (by 39.5, 41.6, and 25.6% at 6, 24, and 48 h after injection, respectively), to similar levels seen with the positive control (prednisolone). In vivo imaging experiments revealed that, both exosomes and prednisolone suppress activities of cathepsin B and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) at the site of carrageenan-induced acute inflammation, showing more prominent effects of prednisolone at the early stages, while exosomes exerted their suppressive effects gradually and at later time points. Our study demonstrates for the first time that exosomes derived from human dental pulp stem cells suppress carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in mice. PMID:25903966

  18. Modulation of Dental Pulp Stem Cell Odontogenesis in a Tunable PEG-Fibrinogen Hydrogel System

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiqi; Pandya, Mirali; Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Rosa, Vinicius; Tong, Huei Jinn; Seliktar, Dror; Toh, Wei Seong

    2015-01-01

    Injectable hydrogels have the great potential for clinical translation of dental pulp regeneration. A recently developed PEG-fibrinogen (PF) hydrogel, which comprises a bioactive fibrinogen backbone conjugated to polyethylene glycol (PEG) side chains, can be cross-linked after injection by photopolymerization. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of this hydrogel, which allows tuning of its mechanical properties, as a scaffold for dental pulp tissue engineering. The cross-linking degree of PF hydrogels could be controlled by varying the amounts of PEG-diacrylate (PEG-DA) cross-linker. PF hydrogels are generally cytocompatible with the encapsulated dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), yielding >85% cell viability in all hydrogels. It was found that the cell morphology of encapsulated DPSCs, odontogenic gene expression, and mineralization were strongly modulated by the hydrogel cross-linking degree and matrix stiffness. Notably, DPSCs cultured within the highest cross-linked hydrogel remained mostly rounded in aggregates and demonstrated the greatest enhancement in odontogenic gene expression. Consistently, the highest degree of mineralization was observed in the highest cross-linked hydrogel. Collectively, our results indicate that PF hydrogels can be used as a scaffold for DPSCs and offers the possibility of influencing DPSCs in ways that may be beneficial for applications in regenerative endodontics. PMID:26124841

  19. The Role of ORAI1 in the Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sohn, S; Park, Y; Srikanth, S; Arai, A; Song, M; Yu, B; Shin, K-H; Kang, M K; Wang, C; Gwack, Y; Park, N-H; Kim, R H

    2015-11-01

    Pulp capping, or placing dental materials directly onto the vital pulp tissues of affected teeth, is a dental procedure that aims to regenerate reparative dentin. Several pulp capping materials are clinically being used, and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) released from these materials is known to mediate reparative dentin formation. ORAI1 is an essential pore subunit of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), which is a major Ca(2+) influx pathway in most nonexcitable cells. Here, we evaluated the role of ORAI1 in mediating the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). During the odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs, the expression of ORAI1 increased in a time-dependent manner. DPSCs knocked down with ORAI1 shRNA (DPSC/ORAI1sh) or overexpressed with dominant negative mutant ORAI1(E106Q) (DPSC/E106Q) exhibited the inhibition of Ca(2+) influx and suppression of odontogenic differentiation and mineralization as demonstrated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/staining as well as alizarin red S staining when compared with DPSCs of their respective control groups (DPSC/CTLsh and DPSC/CTL). The gene expression for odontogenic differentiation markers such as osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) was also suppressed. When DPSC/CTL or DPSC/E106Q cells were subcutaneously transplanted into nude mice, DPSC/CTL cells induced mineralized tissue formation with significant increases in ALP and DMP1 staining in vivo, whereas DPSC/E106Q cells did not. Collectively, our data showed that ORAI1 plays critical roles in the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of DPSCs by regulating Ca(2+) influx and that ORAI1 may be a therapeutic target to enhance reparative dentin formation. PMID:26403672

  20. Dental pulp stem cells suppress the proliferation of lymphocytes via transforming growth factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Ding, Gang; Niu, Jianyi; Liu, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) possess self-renewal capability, multi-lineage differentiation potential, and can generate a dentin-pulp-like tissue in vivo, which is promising for tooth regeneration. To enlarge the cells resource of DPSCs and explore the feasibility of DPSCs-mediated immune therapy, it is prerequisite to investigate the immunological properties of DPSCs and the underlying mechanisms. Human DPSCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and cultured. Then we used lymphocytes proliferation assays, cytokines detection, Transwell cultures, neutralization experiments, and flow cytometry to examine the in vitro immune characteristics of DPSCs. We found that DPSCs failed to stimulate allogeneic T cells proliferation and suppressed T cells proliferation, B cells proliferation, and mixed lymphocyte reaction. In addition, DPSCs could up-regulate IL-10, down-regulate the production of IL-2, IL-17, and IFN-γ, and did not affect the production of IL-6. Monoclonal antibody against transforming growth factor-β1 restored the T cells proliferation inhibited by DPSCs. Moreover, the population of regulatory T cells increased significantly and T-helper 17 cells decreased significantly in peripheral blood mononuclear cells co-cultured with DPSCs. These data confirmed that DPSCs are low immunogenic, could inhibit the proliferation of lymphocytes, regulate the production of cytokines in vitro, and the secretion of transforming growth factor-β1 may be involved in this event. PMID:25605036

  1. Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells. A promising epithelial-like cell source.

    PubMed

    Garzón, I; Martin-Piedra, M A; Alaminos, M

    2015-05-01

    Several models of tissue-engineered human skin based on three-dimensional (3D) co-culture techniques have been proposed to the date. However, normal skin biopsies are not always available, especially in patients with a high percentage of skin affected by deep burning, and the generation of large amounts of cultured keratinocytes may take very long time, with an associated risk for the patients' survival. For those reasons, the search of alternative cell sources for tissue reconstruction is a clinical need. In this context, Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells (HDPSC) have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages by the appropriate differentiation conditions, but skin epidermis differentiation has not been demonstrated so far. Here, we hypothesize that HDPSC may have pluripotent differentiation capability, and may be able to differentiate into skin epithelial keratinocytes in culture using organotypic 3D models based on the interaction with the subjacent dermal fibroblasts. By using HDPSC, the problems associated to the donor site availability and the proliferation capability of the epithelial cells could be solved. The rapid accessibility to these cells could be translated to a more immediate generation of a bioengineered human skin substitute for the future clinical treatment. PMID:25764965

  2. Dental pulp stem cells: function, isolation and applications in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Shakesheff, Kevin M; White, Lisa J

    2015-11-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are a promising source of cells for numerous and varied regenerative medicine applications. Their natural function in the production of odontoblasts to create reparative dentin support applications in dentistry in the regeneration of tooth structures. However, they are also being investigated for the repair of tissues outside of the tooth. The ease of isolation of DPSCs from discarded or removed teeth offers a promising source of autologous cells, and their similarities with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) suggest applications in musculoskeletal regenerative medicine. DPSCs are derived from the neural crest and, therefore, have a different developmental origin to BMSCs. These differences from BMSCs in origin and phenotype are being exploited in neurological and other applications. This review briefly highlights the source and functions of DPSCs and then focuses on in vivo applications across the breadth of regenerative medicine. PMID:24850632

  3. Human dental pulp stem cells derived from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease demonstrate hepatic-like differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y K; Huang, Anderson H C; Chan, Anthony W S; Lin, L M

    2016-06-01

    Reviewing the literature, hepatic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease has not been studied. This study is aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that hDPSCs from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease could possess potential hepatic differentiation. Forty vital extracted teeth with disease recruited for hDPSCs isolation, stem cell characterization and hepatic differentiation were randomly and equally divided into group A (liquid nitrogen-stored dental pulp tissues) and group B (freshly derived dental pulp tissues). Samples of hDPSCs isolated from groups A and B but without hepatic growth factors formed negative controls. A well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma cell line was employed as a positive control. All the isolated hDPSCs from groups A and B showed hepatic-like differentiation with morphological change from a spindle-shaped to a polygonal shape and normal karyotype. Differentiated hDPSCs and the positive control expressed hepatic metabolic function genes and liver-specific genes. Glycogen storage of differentiated hDPSCs was noted from day 7 of differentiation-medium culture. Positive immunofluorescence staining of low-density lipoprotein and albumin was observed from day 14 of differentiation-medium culture; urea production in the medium was noted from week 6. No hepatic differentiation was observed for any of the samples of the negative controls. We not only demonstrated the feasibility of hepatic-like differentiation of hDPSCs from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease but also indicated that the differentiated cells possessed normal karyotype and were functionally close to normal hepatic-like cells. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23950016

  4. Polymeric vs hydroxyapatite-based scaffolds on dental pulp stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Khojasteh, Arash; Motamedian, Saeed Reza; Rad, Maryam Rezai; Shahriari, Mehrnoosh Hasan; Nadjmi, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) on four commercially available scaffold biomaterials. METHODS: hDPSCs were isolated from human dental pulp tissues of extracted wisdom teeth and established in stem cell growth medium. hDPSCs at passage 3-5 were seeded on four commercially available scaffold biomaterials, SureOss (Allograft), Cerabone (Xenograft), PLLA (Synthetic), and OSTEON II Collagen (Composite), for 7 and 14 d in osteogenic medium. Cell adhesion and morphology to the scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cell proliferation and differentiation into osteogenic lineage were evaluated using DNA counting and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, respectively. RESULTS: All scaffold biomaterials except SureOss (Allograft) supported hDPSC adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. hDPSCs seeded on PLLA (Synthetic) scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and attachment as indicated with both SEM and DNA counting assay. Evaluating the osteogenic differentiation capability of hDPSCs on different scaffold biomaterials with ALP activity assay showed high level of ALP activity on cells cultured on PLLA (Synthetic) and OSTEON II Collagen (Composite) scaffolds. SEM micrographs also showed that in the presence of Cerabone (Xenograft) and OSTEON II Collagen (Composite) scaffolds, the hDPSCs demonstrated the fibroblastic phenotype with several cytoplasmic extension, while the cells on PLLA scaffold showed the osteoblastic-like morphology, round-like shape. CONCLUSION: PLLA scaffold supports adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs. Hence, it may be useful in combination with hDPSCs for cell-based reconstructive therapy. PMID:26640621

  5. Interferon-gamma improves impaired dentinogenic and immunosuppressive functions of irreversible pulpitis-derived human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Soichiro; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Ma, Lan; Tanaka, Yosuke; Tomoda, Erika; Aijima, Reona; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Kukita, Toshio; Shi, Songtao; Nishimura, Fusanori; Yamaza, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Clinically, irreversible pulpitis is treated by the complete removal of pulp tissue followed by replacement with artificial materials. There is considered to be a high potential for autologous transplantation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in endodontic treatment. The usefulness of DPSCs isolated from healthy teeth is limited. However, DPSCs isolated from diseased teeth with irreversible pulpitis (IP-DPSCs) are considered to be suitable for dentin/pulp regeneration. In this study, we examined the stem cell potency of IP-DPSCs. In comparison with healthy DPSCs, IP-DPSCs expressed lower colony-forming capacity, population-doubling rate, cell proliferation, multipotency, in vivo dentin regeneration, and immunosuppressive activity, suggesting that intact IP-DPSCs may be inadequate for dentin/pulp regeneration. Therefore, we attempted to improve the impaired in vivo dentin regeneration and in vitro immunosuppressive functions of IP-DPSCs to enable dentin/pulp regeneration. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) treatment enhanced in vivo dentin regeneration and in vitro T cell suppression of IP-DPSCs, whereas treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha did not. Therefore, these findings suggest that IFN-γ may be a feasible modulator to improve the functions of impaired IP-DPSCs, suggesting that autologous transplantation of IFN-γ-accelerated IP-DPSCs might be a promising new therapeutic strategy for dentin/pulp tissue engineering in future endodontic treatment. PMID:26775677

  6. Interferon-gamma improves impaired dentinogenic and immunosuppressive functions of irreversible pulpitis-derived human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Soichiro; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Ma, Lan; Tanaka, Yosuke; Tomoda, Erika; Aijima, Reona; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Kukita, Toshio; Shi, Songtao; Nishimura, Fusanori; Yamaza, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Clinically, irreversible pulpitis is treated by the complete removal of pulp tissue followed by replacement with artificial materials. There is considered to be a high potential for autologous transplantation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in endodontic treatment. The usefulness of DPSCs isolated from healthy teeth is limited. However, DPSCs isolated from diseased teeth with irreversible pulpitis (IP-DPSCs) are considered to be suitable for dentin/pulp regeneration. In this study, we examined the stem cell potency of IP-DPSCs. In comparison with healthy DPSCs, IP-DPSCs expressed lower colony-forming capacity, population-doubling rate, cell proliferation, multipotency, in vivo dentin regeneration, and immunosuppressive activity, suggesting that intact IP-DPSCs may be inadequate for dentin/pulp regeneration. Therefore, we attempted to improve the impaired in vivo dentin regeneration and in vitro immunosuppressive functions of IP-DPSCs to enable dentin/pulp regeneration. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) treatment enhanced in vivo dentin regeneration and in vitro T cell suppression of IP-DPSCs, whereas treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha did not. Therefore, these findings suggest that IFN-γ may be a feasible modulator to improve the functions of impaired IP-DPSCs, suggesting that autologous transplantation of IFN-γ-accelerated IP-DPSCs might be a promising new therapeutic strategy for dentin/pulp tissue engineering in future endodontic treatment. PMID:26775677

  7. Therapeutic Potential of Dental Pulp Stem Cell Secretome for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nermeen El-Moataz Bellah; Murakami, Masashi; Hirose, Yujiro; Nakashima, Misako

    2016-01-01

    The secretome obtained from stem cell cultures contains an array of neurotrophic factors and cytokines that might have the potential to treat neurodegenerative conditions. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common human late onset and sporadic neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of secretome derived from dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to reduce cytotoxicity and apoptosis caused by amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. We determined whether DPSCs can secrete the Aβ-degrading enzyme, neprilysin (NEP), and evaluated the effects of NEP expression in vitro by quantitating Aβ-degrading activity. The results showed that DPSC secretome contains higher concentrations of VEGF, Fractalkine, RANTES, MCP-1, and GM-CSF compared to those of bone marrow and adipose stem cells. Moreover, treatment with DPSC secretome significantly decreased the cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide by increasing cell viability compared to nontreated cells. In addition, DPSC secretome stimulated the endogenous survival factor Bcl-2 and decreased the apoptotic regulator Bax. Furthermore, neprilysin enzyme was detected in DPSC secretome and succeeded in degrading Aβ1–42 in vitro in 12 hours. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that DPSCs may serve as a promising source for secretome-based treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27403169

  8. Therapeutic Potential of Dental Pulp Stem Cell Secretome for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nermeen El-Moataz Bellah; Murakami, Masashi; Hirose, Yujiro; Nakashima, Misako

    2016-01-01

    The secretome obtained from stem cell cultures contains an array of neurotrophic factors and cytokines that might have the potential to treat neurodegenerative conditions. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common human late onset and sporadic neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of secretome derived from dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to reduce cytotoxicity and apoptosis caused by amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. We determined whether DPSCs can secrete the Aβ-degrading enzyme, neprilysin (NEP), and evaluated the effects of NEP expression in vitro by quantitating Aβ-degrading activity. The results showed that DPSC secretome contains higher concentrations of VEGF, Fractalkine, RANTES, MCP-1, and GM-CSF compared to those of bone marrow and adipose stem cells. Moreover, treatment with DPSC secretome significantly decreased the cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide by increasing cell viability compared to nontreated cells. In addition, DPSC secretome stimulated the endogenous survival factor Bcl-2 and decreased the apoptotic regulator Bax. Furthermore, neprilysin enzyme was detected in DPSC secretome and succeeded in degrading Aβ 1-42 in vitro in 12 hours. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that DPSCs may serve as a promising source for secretome-based treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27403169

  9. Characterization of neurons from immortalized dental pulp stem cells for the study of neurogenetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Urraca, Nora; Memon, Rawaha; El-Iyachi, Ikbale; Goorha, Sarita; Valdez, Colleen; Tran, Quynh T; Scroggs, Reese; Miranda-Carboni, Gustavo A; Donaldson, Martin; Bridges, Dave; Reiter, Lawrence T

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge to the study and treatment of neurogenetic syndromes is accessing live neurons for study from affected individuals. Although several sources of stem cells are currently available, acquiring these involve invasive procedures, may be difficult or expensive to generate and are limited in number. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent stem cells that reside deep the pulp of shed teeth. To investigate the characteristics of DPSCs that make them a valuable resource for translational research, we performed a set of viability, senescence, immortalization and gene expression studies on control DPSC and derived neurons. We investigated the basic transport conditions and maximum passage number for primary DPSCs. We immortalized control DPSCs using human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and evaluated neuronal differentiation potential and global gene expression changes by RNA-seq. We show that neurons from immortalized DPSCs share morphological and electrophysiological properties with non-immortalized DPSCs. We also show that differentiation of DPSCs into neurons significantly alters gene expression for 1305 transcripts. Here we show that these changes in gene expression are concurrent with changes in protein levels of the transcriptional repressor REST/NRSF, which is known to be involved in neuronal differentiation. Immortalization significantly altered the expression of 183 genes after neuronal differentiation, 94 of which also changed during differentiation. Our studies indicate that viable DPSCs can be obtained from teeth stored for ≥72 h, these can then be immortalized and still produce functional neurons for in vitro studies, but that constitutive hTERT immortalization is not be the best approach for long term use of patient derived DPSCs for the study of disease. PMID:26599327

  10. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Stimulated by the Calcium Phosphate Porous Granules

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sunyoung; Won, Jong-Eun; Kim, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    Effects of three-dimensional (3D) calcium phosphate (CaP) porous granules on the growth and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were examined for dental tissue engineering. hDPSCs isolated from adult human dental pulps were cultured for 3-4 passages, and populated on porous granules. Cell growth on the culture dish showed an ongoing increase for up to 21 days, whereas the growth on the 3D granules decreased after 14 days. This reduction in proliferative potential on the 3D granules was more conspicuous under the osteogenic medium conditions, indicating that the 3D granules may induce the odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs. Differentiation behavior on the 3D granules was confirmed by the increased alkaline phosphatase activity, up-regulation of odontoblast-specific genes, including dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and greater level of dentin sialoprotein synthesis by western blot. Moreover, the cellular mineralization, as assessed by Alizarin red S and calcium quantification, was significantly higher in the 3D CaP granules than in the culture dish. Taken all, the 3D CaP porous granules should be useful for dental tissue engineering in combination with hDPSCs by providing favorable 3D substrate conditions for cell growth and odontogenic development. PMID:21772958

  11. Human dental pulp stem cells cultured in serum-free supplemented medium

    PubMed Central

    Bonnamain, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Sergent-Tanguy, Solène; Huet, Pascal; Bienvenu, Géraldine; Naveilhan, Philippe; Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence show that human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) could provide a source of adult stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative pathologies. In this study, DPSCs were expanded and cultured with a protocol generally used for the culture of neural stem/progenitor cells. Methodology: DPSC cultures were established from third molars. The pulp tissue was enzymatically digested and cultured in serum-supplemented basal medium for 12 h. Adherent (ADH) and non-adherent (non-ADH) cell populations were separated according to their differential adhesion to plastic and then cultured in serum-free defined N2 medium with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Both ADH and non-ADH populations were analyzed by FACS and/or PCR. Results: FACS analysis of ADH-DPSCs revealed the expression of the mesenchymal cell marker CD90, the neuronal marker CD56, the transferrin receptor CD71, and the chemokine receptor CXCR3, whereas hematopoietic stem cells markers CD45, CD133, and CD34 were not expressed. ADH-DPSCs expressed transcripts coding for the Nestin gene, whereas expression levels of genes coding for the neuronal markers β-III tubulin and NF-M, and the oligodendrocyte marker PLP-1 were donor dependent. ADH-DPSCs did not express the transcripts for GFAP, an astrocyte marker. Cells of the non-ADH population that grew as spheroids expressed Nestin, β-III tubulin, NF-M and PLP-1 transcripts. DPSCs that migrated out of the spheroids exhibited an odontoblast-like morphology and expressed a higher level of DSPP and osteocalcin transcripts than ADH-DPSCs. Conclusion: Collectively, these data indicate that human DPSCs can be expanded and cultured in serum-free supplemented medium with EGF and bFGF. ADH-DPSCs and non-ADH populations contained neuronal and/or oligodendrocyte progenitors at different stages of commitment and, interestingly, cells from spheroid structures seem to be more engaged into the odontoblastic lineage than the ADH

  12. The relationship between cell proliferation and differentiation and mapping of putative dental pulp stem/progenitor cells during mouse molar development by chasing BrdU-labeling.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuko; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Ohshima, Hayato

    2012-04-01

    Human dental pulp contains adult stem cells. Our recent study demonstrated the localization of putative dental pulp stem/progenitor cells in the rat developing molar by chasing 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeling. However, there are no available data on the localization of putative dental pulp stem/progenitor cells in the mouse molar. This study focuses on the mapping of putative dental pulp stem/progenitor cells in addition to the relationship between cell proliferation and differentiation in the developing molar using BrdU-labeling. Numerous proliferating cells appeared in the tooth germ and the most active cell proliferation in the mesenchymal cells occurred in the prenatal stages, especially on embryonic Day 15 (E15). Cell proliferation in the pulp tissue dramatically decreased in number by postnatal Day 3 (P3) when nestin-positive odontoblasts were arranged in the cusped areas and disappeared after postnatal Week 1 (P1W). Root dental papilla included numerous proliferating cells during P5 to P2W. Three to four intraperitoneal injections of BrdU were given to pregnant ICR mice and revealed slow-cycling long-term label-retaining cells (LRCs) in the mature tissues of postnatal animals. Numerous dense LRCs postnatally decreased in number and reached a plateau after P1W when they mainly resided in the center of the dental pulp, associating with blood vessels. Furthermore, numerous dense LRCs co-expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers such as STRO-1 and CD146. Thus, dense LRCs in mature pulp tissues were believed to be dental pulp stem/progenitor cells harboring in the perivascular niche surrounding the endothelium. PMID:22370596

  13. Demineralized Dentin Matrix Induces Odontoblastic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guolin; Xu, Guoquan; Gao, Zhenhua; Liu, Zhenhai; Xu, Junji; Wang, Jinsong; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Songlin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and the potential of complexes with DPSCs and DDM for mineralized tissue formation. Stem cells derived from the dental pulp of healthy pigs aged 18 months were isolated and cultured. DPSCs were incubated with alpha-minimum essential medium treated with DDM extract at 1 mg/ml (DDM1) or 10 mg/ml (DDM10). The concentrations of 3 growth factors in DDM extract was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Adhesion of DPSCs on DDM and hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate (HA-TCP) surfaces was observed using scanning electron microscopy. Cell proliferation was evaluated with cell counting kit-8 and migration by Transwell migration assays. Odontoblastic differentiation was assessed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and alizarin red staining, ALP activity and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of markers of ALP, runt-related transcription factor 2, type I collagen, dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein-1, osteonectin and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP). Finally, DPSCs were combined with DDM and placed subcutaneously in nude mice for 12 weeks; DPSCs combined with HA-TCP and DDM alone served as controls. DDM could promote DPSC adhesion, migration and odontoblastic differentiation. Mineralized tissue formation was observed with the DPSC and DDM combination and the DPSC and HA-TCP combination. The mineralized tissue of the DPSC + DDM combination stained positive for DSPP, similar to the dentin tissue. These results indicate that DDM induces DPSC odontoblastic differentiation, suggesting applications for dentin regeneration. PMID:26569105

  14. Differentiation and Behavior of Dental Pulp Stem Cells in Hydrogel Scaffolds of Various Stiffnesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Divya; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Simon, Marcia

    2011-03-01

    Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs) are known to differentiate in bone, dentine, or nerve tissue through different environment signals. This work investigates whether differentiation could occur in the absence of chemical induction and through mechanical stimuli only. For this study, we chose enzymatically cross-linked gelatin hydrogels as our substrates. Rheological studies carried out by oscillatory shear rheometry indicated that the modulus of the hardest hydrogel was of the order of 8kPa where as the medium and the softest hydrogel had modulus of the order of 1kPa and 100Pa respectively. DPSC were then plated on all three substrates and cultured with and without dexamethasone induction media. After 21 days of incubation, SEM analysis indicated that the cells cultured in the induction media produced biomineralized deposits on hard, medium as well as soft hydrogels. On the other hand, the cells cultured without the induction media also produced large amounts of biomineralized deposits.The modulus of the cells was also measured using AFM. En mass cell migration was also studied to determine the average velocity of migration of DPSCs. We also investigated whether stem cells that are induced to differentiate by their scaffold environment would continue to differentiate and biomineralize when removed from the inducing scaffold.

  15. Chronic Inflammation and Angiogenic Signaling Axis Impairs Differentiation of Dental-Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Michael; Chun, Crystal; Strojny, Chelsee; Narayanan, Raghuvaran; Bartholomew, Amelia; Sundivakkam, Premanand; Alapati, Satish

    2014-01-01

    Dental-pulp tissue is often exposed to inflammatory injury. Sequested growth factors or angiogenic signaling proteins that are released following inflammatory injury play a pivotal role in the formation of reparative dentin. While limited or moderate angiogenesis may be helpful for dental pulp maintenance, the induction of significant level of angiogenesis is probably highly detrimental. Hitherto, several studies have addressed the effects of proinflammatory stimuli on the survival and differentiation of dental-pulp stem cells (DPSC), in vitro. However, the mechanisms communal to the inflammatory and angiogenic signaling involved in DPSC survival and differentiation remain unknown. Our studies observed that short-term exposure to TNF-α (6 and 12 hours [hrs]) induced apoptosis with an upregulation of VEGF expression and NF-κB signaling. However, long-term (chronic) exposure (14 days) to TNF-α resulted in an increased proliferation with a concomitant shortening of the telomere length. Interestingly, DPSC pretreated with Nemo binding domain (NBD) peptide (a cell permeable NF-κB inhibitor) significantly ameliorated TNF-α- and/or VEGF-induced proliferation and the shortening of telomere length. NBD peptide pretreatment significantly improved TNF-α-induced downregulation of proteins essential for differentiation, such as bone morphogenic proteins (BMP)-1 & 2, BMP receptor isoforms-1&2, trasnforming growth factor (TGF), osteoactivin and osteocalcin. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB signaling markedly increased the mineralization potential, a process abrogated by chronic exposure to TNF-α. Thus, our studies demonstrated that chronic inflammation mediates telomere shortening via NF-κB signaling in human DPSC. Resultant chromosomal instability leads to an emergence of increased proliferation of DPSC, while negatively regulating the differentiation of DPSC, in vitro. PMID:25427002

  16. Potential dental pulp revascularization and odonto-/osteogenic capacity of a novel transplant combined with dental pulp stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Jin; Zhao, Yin-Hua; Zhao, Ya-Juan; Liu, Nan-Xia; Lv, Xin; Li, Qiang; Chen, Fa-Ming; Zhang, Min

    2015-08-01

    Our aim is to investigate the cytobiological effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and to explore the ectopic and orthotopic possibilities of dental pulp revascularization and pulp-dentin complex regeneration along the root canal cavities of the tooth by using a novel tissue-engineered transplant composed of cell-sheet fragments of DPSCs and PRF granules. Canine DPSCs were isolated and characterized by assaying their colony-forming ability and by determining their cell surface markers and osteogenic/adipogenic differentiation potential. The biological effects of autologous PRF on DPSCs, including cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and odonto-/osteogenic gene expression, were then investigated and quantified. A novel transplant consisting of cell-sheet fragments of DPSCs and PRF granules was adopted to regenerate pulp-dentin-like tissues in the root canal, both subcutaneously in nude mice and in the roots of canines. PRF promoted the proliferation of DPSCs in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced the differentiation of DPSCs to odonto-/osteoblastic fates by increasing the expression of the Alp, Dspp, Dmp1 and Bsp genes. Transplantation of the DPSC/PRF construct led both to a favorable regeneration of homogeneous and compact pulp-like tissues with abundantly distributed blood capillaries and to the deposition of regenerated dentin along the intracanal walls at 8 weeks post-operation. Thus, the application of DPSC/PRF tissue constructs might serve as a potential therapy in regenerative endodontics for pulp revitalization or revascularization. PMID:25797716

  17. miR-152 induces human dental pulp stem cell senescence by inhibiting SIRT7 expression.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shensheng; Ran, Shujun; Liu, Bin; Liang, Jingping

    2016-04-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs) have potential applications in regenerative medicine. The molecular mechanisms underlying HDPSC senescence are not completely understood. Here, we investigated the significance of miR-152 in HDPSC senescence. We show that miR-152 is upregulated during HDPSC senescence and its overexpression in early passaged HDPSCs induced senescence. Sirtuin 7 (SIRT7) was identified as a target of miR-152. SIRT7 was downregulated in senescent HDPSCs, whereas miR-152 inhibition upregulated SIRT7 and suppressed the senescent phenotype and SIRT7 overexpression rescued miR-152-induced senescence. Our results demonstrate that the miR-152/SIRT7 axis plays a key role in the regulation of HDPSC senescence and provide a candidate target to improve the functional and therapeutic potential of HDPSCs. PMID:26991832

  18. A novel stem cell source for vasculogenesis in ischemia: subfraction of side population cells from dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Iohara, Koichiro; Zheng, Li; Wake, Hiroaki; Ito, Masataka; Nabekura, Junichi; Wakita, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Into, Takeshi; Matsushita, Kenji; Nakashima, Misako

    2008-09-01

    Cell therapy with stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to stimulate vasculogenesis as a potential treatment for ischemic disease is an exciting area of research in regenerative medicine. EPCs are present in bone marrow, peripheral blood, and adipose tissue. Autologous EPCs, however, are obtained by invasive biopsy, a potentially painful procedure. An alternative approach is proposed in this investigation. Permanent and deciduous pulp tissue is easily available from teeth after extraction without ethical issues and has potential for clinical use. We isolated a highly vasculogenic subfraction of side population (SP) cells based on CD31 and CD146, from dental pulp. The CD31(-);CD146(-) SP cells, demonstrating CD34+ and vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (VEGFR2)/Flk1+, were similar to EPCs. These cells were distinct from the hematopoietic lineage as CD11b, CD14, and CD45 mRNA were not expressed. They showed high proliferation and migration activities and multilineage differentiation potential including vasculogenic potential. In models of mouse hind limb ischemia, local transplantation of this subfraction of SP cells resulted in successful engraftment and an increase in the blood flow including high density of capillary formation. The transplanted cells were in proximity of the newly formed vasculature and expressed several proangiogenic factors, such as VEGF-A, G-CSF, GM-CSF, and MMP3. Conditioned medium from this subfraction showed the mitogenic and antiapoptotic activity on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In conclusion, subfraction of SP cells from dental pulp is a new stem cell source for cell-based therapy to stimulate angiogenesis/vasculogenesis during tissue regeneration. PMID:18583536

  19. Comparative analysis of proliferation and differentiation potentials of stem cells from inflamed pulp of deciduous teeth and stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shi; Diao, Shu; Wang, Jinsong; Ding, Gang; Yang, Dongmei; Fan, Zhipeng

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells isolated from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) are highly capable of proliferation and differentiation, and they represent good cell sources for mesenchymal stem cell- (MSC-) mediated dental tissue regeneration, but the supply of SHEDs is limited. A previous study found that stem cells could be isolated from inflamed tissues, but it is unknown whether primary dental pulp diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis might contain stem cells with appropriate tissue regeneration capacity. In this study, we aimed to isolate stem cells from both inflamed pulps of deciduous teeth (SCIDs) and SHEDs from Chinese children and to compare their proliferation and differentiation potentials. Our results showed that SCIDs were positive for cell surface markers, including CD105, CD90, and CD146, and they had high proliferation ability and osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation potentials. There was no significant difference in proliferation and differentiation potentials between SCIDs and SHEDs. The mRNA of inflammatory factors, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, was expressed at similar levels in SCIDs and SHEDs, but SCIDs secreted more TNF-α protein. In conclusion, our in vitro results showed that SCIDs have proliferation and differentiation potentials similar to those of SHEDs. Thus, SCIDs represent a new potentially applicable source for MSC mediated tissue regeneration. PMID:25045714

  20. Comparative Analysis of Proliferation and Differentiation Potentials of Stem Cells from Inflamed Pulp of Deciduous Teeth and Stem Cells from Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shi; Diao, Shu; Wang, Jinsong; Ding, Gang; Yang, Dongmei; Fan, Zhipeng

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells isolated from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) are highly capable of proliferation and differentiation, and they represent good cell sources for mesenchymal stem cell- (MSC-) mediated dental tissue regeneration, but the supply of SHEDs is limited. A previous study found that stem cells could be isolated from inflamed tissues, but it is unknown whether primary dental pulp diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis might contain stem cells with appropriate tissue regeneration capacity. In this study, we aimed to isolate stem cells from both inflamed pulps of deciduous teeth (SCIDs) and SHEDs from Chinese children and to compare their proliferation and differentiation potentials. Our results showed that SCIDs were positive for cell surface markers, including CD105, CD90, and CD146, and they had high proliferation ability and osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation potentials. There was no significant difference in proliferation and differentiation potentials between SCIDs and SHEDs. The mRNA of inflammatory factors, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, was expressed at similar levels in SCIDs and SHEDs, but SCIDs secreted more TNF-α protein. In conclusion, our in vitro results showed that SCIDs have proliferation and differentiation potentials similar to those of SHEDs. Thus, SCIDs represent a new potentially applicable source for MSC mediated tissue regeneration. PMID:25045714

  1. Effect of dentin treatment on proliferation and differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minjeong; Pang, Nan-Sim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is an excellent bactericidal agent, but it is detrimental to stem cell survival, whereas intracanal medicaments such as calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) promote the survival and proliferation of stem cells. This study evaluated the effect of sequential NaOCl and Ca[OH]2 application on the attachment and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Materials and Methods DPSCs were obtained from human third molars. All dentin specimens were treated with 5.25% NaOCl for 30 min. DPSCs were seeded on the dentin specimens and processed with additional 1 mg/mL Ca[OH]2, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment, file instrumentation, or a combination of these methods. After 7 day of culture, we examined DPSC morphology using scanning electron microscopy and determined the cell survival rate with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. We measured cell adhesion gene expression levels after 4 day of culture and odontogenic differentiation gene expression levels after 4 wk using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results DPSCs did not attach to the dentin in the NaOCl-treated group. The gene expression levels of fibronectin-1 and secreted phosphoprotein-1 gene in both the Ca[OH]2- and the EDTA-treated groups were significantly higher than those in the other groups. All Ca[OH]2-treated groups showed higher expression levels of dentin matrix protein-1 than that of the control. The dentin sialophosphoprotein level was significantly higher in the groups treated with both Ca[OH]2 and EDTA. Conclusions The application of Ca[OH]2 and additional treatment such as EDTA or instrumentation promoted the attachment and differentiation of DPSCs after NaOCl treatment. PMID:26587415

  2. MEF2 Transcription Factor Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shuling; Huang, Dan; Feng, Guijuan; Zhu, Linhe; Zhang, Ye; Cao, Peipei; Zheng, Ke; Zhang, Dongmei; Feng, Xingmei

    2016-08-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) is a member of the MADS-box family. It controls the expression of genes that are critical for biological processes such as proliferation, cell death, and differentiation. Some studies have shown that MEF2 expression is enhanced in osteogenic progenitor cells established from bone marrow stromal cells with other types of mesenchymal progenitor cells. However, the effect of MEF2 on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) is unclear. In this study, we investigate the effect of MEF2 on regulating osteogenic differentiation and proliferation of DPSCs. We find that MEF2 is stably expressed in DPSCs, and the expression is increased time-dependently along with cell osteogenic differentiation. MEF2 expression also increases the alkaline phosphatase (ALP), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) activity, and enhances mineralization in DPSCs. SB202190, inhibitor of p38, blocks the p38/MEF2 pathway and osteogenic differentiation. In addition, MEF2 overexpression inhibits DPSC proliferation. In summary, our data indicate that MEF2 not only regulates DPSCs as an inhibitor of cell proliferation but is also a promoter of osteogenic differentiation through the p38/MEF2 signaling pathway. PMID:27459583

  3. Dental pulp stem cells as a multifaceted tool for bioengineering and the regeneration of craniomaxillofacial tissues

    PubMed Central

    Aurrekoetxea, Maitane; Garcia-Gallastegui, Patricia; Irastorza, Igor; Luzuriaga, Jon; Uribe-Etxebarria, Verónica; Unda, Fernando; Ibarretxe, Gaskon

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells, or DPSC, are neural crest-derived cells with an outstanding capacity to differentiate along multiple cell lineages of interest for cell therapy. In particular, highly efficient osteo/dentinogenic differentiation of DPSC can be achieved using simple in vitro protocols, making these cells a very attractive and promising tool for the future treatment of dental and periodontal diseases. Among craniomaxillofacial organs, the tooth and salivary gland are two such cases in which complete regeneration by tissue engineering using DPSC appears to be possible, as research over the last decade has made substantial progress in experimental models of partial or total regeneration of both organs, by cell recombination technology. Moreover, DPSC seem to be a particularly good choice for the regeneration of nerve tissues, including injured or transected cranial nerves. In this context, the oral cavity appears to be an excellent testing ground for new regenerative therapies using DPSC. However, many issues and challenges need yet to be addressed before these cells can be employed in clinical therapy. In this review, we point out some important aspects on the biology of DPSC with regard to their use for the reconstruction of different craniomaxillofacial tissues and organs, with special emphasis on cranial bones, nerves, teeth, and salivary glands. We suggest new ideas and strategies to fully exploit the capacities of DPSC for bioengineering of the aforementioned tissues. PMID:26528190

  4. Enhanced chondrogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells using nanopatterned PEG-GelMA-HA hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Cameron L; Janebodin, Kajohnkiart; Yuan, Alex E; Dennis, James E; Reyes, Morayma; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-11-01

    We have examined the effects of surface nanotopography and hyaluronic acid (HA) on in vitro chondrogenesis of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Ultraviolet-assisted capillary force lithography was employed to fabricate well-defined nanostructured scaffolds of composite PEG-GelMA-HA hydrogels that consist of poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA), methacrylated gelatin (GelMA), and HA. Using this microengineered platform, we first demonstrated that DPSCs formed three-dimensional spheroids, which provide an appropriate environment for in vitro chondrogenic differentiation. We also found that DPSCs cultured on nanopatterned PEG-GelMA-HA scaffolds showed a significant upregulation of the chondrogenic gene markers (Sox9, Alkaline phosphatase, Aggrecan, Procollagen type II, and Procollagen type X), while downregulating the pluripotent stem cell gene, Nanog, and epithelial-mesenchymal genes (Twist, Snail, Slug) compared with tissue culture polystyrene-cultured DPSCs. Immunocytochemistry showed more extensive deposition of collagen type II in DPSCs cultured on the nanopatterned PEG-GelMA-HA scaffolds. These findings suggest that nanotopography and HA provide important cues for promoting chondrogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:24749806

  5. Enhanced Chondrogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Using Nanopatterned PEG-GelMA-HA Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Cameron L.; Janebodin, Kajohnkiart; Yuan, Alex E.; Dennis, James E.

    2014-01-01

    We have examined the effects of surface nanotopography and hyaluronic acid (HA) on in vitro chondrogenesis of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Ultraviolet-assisted capillary force lithography was employed to fabricate well-defined nanostructured scaffolds of composite PEG-GelMA-HA hydrogels that consist of poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA), methacrylated gelatin (GelMA), and HA. Using this microengineered platform, we first demonstrated that DPSCs formed three-dimensional spheroids, which provide an appropriate environment for in vitro chondrogenic differentiation. We also found that DPSCs cultured on nanopatterned PEG-GelMA-HA scaffolds showed a significant upregulation of the chondrogenic gene markers (Sox9, Alkaline phosphatase, Aggrecan, Procollagen type II, and Procollagen type X), while downregulating the pluripotent stem cell gene, Nanog, and epithelial–mesenchymal genes (Twist, Snail, Slug) compared with tissue culture polystyrene-cultured DPSCs. Immunocytochemistry showed more extensive deposition of collagen type II in DPSCs cultured on the nanopatterned PEG-GelMA-HA scaffolds. These findings suggest that nanotopography and HA provide important cues for promoting chondrogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:24749806

  6. Clonal Heterogeneity in the Neuronal and Glial Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Young, Fraser I.; Telezhkin, Vsevolod; Youde, Sarah J.; Langley, Martin S.; Stack, Maria; Kemp, Paul J.; Waddington, Rachel J.; Sloan, Alastair J.; Song, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity presents an important challenge to the development of cell-based therapies where there is a fundamental requirement for predictable and reproducible outcomes. Transplanted Dental Pulp Stem/Progenitor Cells (DPSCs) have demonstrated early promise in experimental models of spinal cord injury and stroke, despite limited evidence of neuronal and glial-like differentiation after transplantation. Here, we report, for the first time, on the ability of single cell-derived clonal cultures of murine DPSCs to differentiate in vitro into immature neuronal-like and oligodendrocyte-like cells. Importantly, only DPSC clones with high nestin mRNA expression levels were found to successfully differentiate into Map2 and NF-positive neuronal-like cells. Neuronally differentiated DPSCs possessed a membrane capacitance comparable with primary cultured striatal neurons and small inward voltage-activated K+ but not outward Na+ currents were recorded suggesting a functionally immature phenotype. Similarly, only high nestin-expressing clones demonstrated the ability to adopt Olig1, Olig2, and MBP-positive immature oligodendrocyte-like phenotype. Together, these results demonstrate that appropriate markers may be used to provide an early indication of the suitability of a cell population for purposes where differentiation into a specific lineage may be beneficial and highlight that further understanding of heterogeneity within mixed cellular populations is required. PMID:27313623

  7. The Experimental Study of the Performance of Nano-Thin Polyelectrolyte Shell for Dental Pulp Stem Cells Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Grzeczkowicz, A; Granicka, L H; Maciejewska, I; Strawski, M; Szklarczyk, M; Borkowska, M

    2015-12-01

    Carious is the most frequent disease of mineralized dental tissues which might result in dental pulp inflammation and mortality. In such cases an endodontic treatment is the only option to prolong tooth functioning in the oral cavity; however, in the cases of severe pulpitis, especially when complicated with periodontal tissue inflammation, the endodontic treatment might not be enough to protect against tooth loss. Thus, keeping the dental pulp viable and/or possibility of the reconstruction of a viable dental pulp complex, appears to become a critical factor for carious and/or pulp inflammation treatment. The nowadays technologies, which allow handling dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), seem to bring us closer to the usage of dental stem cells for tooth tissues reconstruction. Thus, DPSC immobilized within nano-thin polymeric shells, allowing for a diffusion of produced factors and separation from bacteria, may be considered as a cover system supporting technology of dental pulp reconstruction. The DPSC were immobilized using a layer-by-layer technique within nano-thin polymeric shells constructed and modified by nanostructure involvement to ensure the layers stability and integrity as well as separation from bacterial cells. The cytotoxity of the material used for membrane production was assessed on the model of adherent cells. The performance of DPSC nano-coating was assessed in vitro. Membrane coatings showed no cytotoxicity on the immobilized cells. The presence of coating shell was confirmed with flow cytometry, atomic force microscopy and visualized with fluorescent microscopy. The transfer of immobilized DPSC within the membrane system ensuring cells integrity, viability and protection from bacteria should be considered as an alternative method for dental tissues transportation and regeneration. PMID:26682375

  8. An Optimized Injectable Hydrogel Scaffold Supports Human Dental Pulp Stem Cell Viability and Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T. D.; Kefi, A.; Sun, S.; Cho, M.; Alapati, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. HyStem-C™ is a commercially available injectable hydrogel composed of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), hyaluronan (HA), and gelatin (Gn). These components can be mechanically tuned to enhance cell viability and spreading. Methods. The concentration of PEGDA with an added disulfide bond (PEGSSDA) was varied from 0.5 to 8.0% (w/v) to determine the optimal concentration for injectable clinical application. We evaluated the cell viability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) embedded in 2% (w/v) PEGSSDA-HA-Gn hydrogels. Volume ratios of HA : Gn from 100 : 0 to 25 : 75 were varied to encourage hDPSC spreading. Fibronectin (Fn) was added to our model to determine the effect of extracellular matrix protein concentration on hDPSC behavior. Results. Our preliminary data suggests that the hydrogel gelation time decreased as the PEGSSDA cross-linker concentration increased. The PEGSSDA-HA-Gn was biocompatible with hDPSCs, and increased ratios of HA : Gn enhanced cell viability for 14 days. Additionally, cell proliferation with added fibronectin increased significantly over time at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 μg/mL in PEGDA-HA-Gn hydrogels, while cell spreading significantly increased at Fn concentrations of 0.1 μg/mL. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that PEG-based injectable hydrogels maintain hDPSC viability and facilitate cell spreading, mainly in the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. PMID:27294191

  9. In vitro osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose-hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Durante, Sandra; Mazzotti, Antonio; Dicarlo, Manuela; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Orsini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from human dental pulp have been considered as an alternative source of adult stem cells in tissue engineering because of their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Recently, polysaccharide based hydrogels have become especially attractive as matrices for the repair and regeneration of a wide variety of tissues and organs. The incorporation of inorganic minerals as hydroxyapatite nanoparticles can modulate the performance of the scaffolds with potential applications in tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to verify the osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) cultured on a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Human DPSCs were seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel and on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel for 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 days. Cell viability assay and ultramorphological analysis were carried out to evaluate biocompatibility and cell adhesion. Real Time PCR was carried out to demonstrate the expression of osteogenic and odontogenic markers. Results showed a good adhesion and viability in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel, while a low adhesion and viability was observed in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel. Real Time PCR data demonstrated a temporal up-regulation of osteogenic and odontogenic markers in dental pulp stem cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. In conclusion, our in vitro data confirms the ability of DPSCs to differentiate toward osteogenic and odontogenic lineages in presence of a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Taken together, our results provide evidence that DPSCs and carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel could be considered promising candidates for dental pulp complex and periodontal tissue engineering. PMID:26578970

  10. ReNCell VM conditioned medium enhances the induction of dental pulp stem cells into dopaminergic like cells.

    PubMed

    Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2016-03-01

    Among the debilitating diseases, neurological related diseases are the most challenging ones to be treated using cell replacement therapies. Recently, dental pulp stem cells (SHED) were found to be most suitable cell choice for neurological related diseases as evidenced with many preclinical studies. To enhance the neurological potential of SHED, we recapitulated one of the pharmacological therapeutic tools in cell replacement treatment, we pre-conditioned dental pulp stem cells (SHED) with culture medium of ReNCell VM, an immortalized neuron progenitor cell, prior to neurogenesis induction and investigated whether this practice enhances their neurogenesis potential especially towards dopaminergic neurons. We hypothesed that the integration of pharmacological practices such as co-administration of various drugs, a wide range of doses and duration as well as pre-conditioning into cell replacement may enhance the efficacy of stem cell therapy. In particular, pre-conditioning is shown to be involved in the protective effect from some membrano-tropic drugs, thereby improving the resistance of cell structures and homing capabilities. We found that cells pre-treated with ReNCell VM conditioned medium displayed bipolar structures with extensive branches resembling putative dopaminergic neurons as compared to non-treated cells. Furthermore, many neuronal related markers such as NES, NR4A2, MSI1, and TH were highly expressed (fold changes > 2; p < 0.05) in pre-treated cells. Similar observations were detected at the protein level. The results demonstrate for the first time that SHED pre-conditioning enhances neurological potential and we suggest that cells should be primed to their respective environment prior to transplantation. PMID:25322895

  11. Dental Pulp Stem Cell Differentiation on Poly-4-vinyl-pyridine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarato, Giulia; Bherwani, Aneel; Chang, Chung-Chueh; Rafailovich, Miriam; Simon, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    In the regeneration of a natural tissue, the mechanics and the chemical properties of the artificial substrate play a critical role. In this study, the influence of poly-4-vinyl-pyridine scaffold morphology on dental pulp stem cell differentiation was analyzed. Cells were plated on spun cast films and electrospun fibers with diameters ranging from nano to micrometers. Confocal microscopy showed the presence of various cell morphologies: on microfibers cells conform precisely to the main axis of elongation, while on nanometric scaffolds they result spread and in contact with several fibers. Even if the surface chemistry was identical, a great variation in the curvature was present. From day 9 of incubation, spontaneous biomineralization in the absence of induction agents occurred only on the fibrous structures. The SEM revealed template deposits directly on the microfibers, while on the nanofibers large spherical islands were also present. EDAX determined hydroxyl apatite nature of the deposits. RT-PCR indicated upregulation of osteogenic markers, confirming differentiation. SEM also revealed the presence of ECM fibers covering the polymer structure, which may enhance the expression of focal adhesion sites on the cell membrane.

  12. Repeated lipopolysaccharide stimulation promotes cellular senescence in human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs).

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingmei; Feng, Guijuan; Xing, Jing; Shen, Biyu; Tan, Wei; Huang, Dan; Lu, Xiaohui; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Jinlong; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2014-05-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are a type of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characterized by multi-lineage differentiation making it an attractive choice for tissue regeneration. However, before DPSCs can be used for cell-based therapy, we have to understand their biological properties in response to intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). DPSCs were therefore stimulated with LPS and senescence was evaluated by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining, with cell number and cell-cycle arrest being examined by BrdU assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The morphology of DPSCs was characterized by their flat shape, increased size and increased SA-β-gal activity after repeated stimulation (3 or 6 times) with LPS. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) staining showed that the number of ROS-stained cells and the DCFH fluorescent level were higher in the LPS-treated DPSCs compared with those in the untreated DPSCs. Protein and mRNA expression levels of γ-H2A.X and p16(INK4A) were also increased in DPSCs with repeated LPS stimulation. We found that the LPS bound with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and that TLR4 signaling accounted for p16(INK4A) expression. Further results indicated that the senescence of DPSCs stimulated repeatedly with LPS was reversed by p16(INK4A) short interfering RNA. The DNA damage response and p16(INK4A) pathways might be the main mediators of DPSC senescence induced by repeated LPS stimulation. Thus, DPSCs tend to undergo senescence after repeated activation, implying that DPSC senescence starts after many inflammatory challenges. Ultimately, these findings should lead to a better understanding of DPSC-based clinical therapy. PMID:24676500

  13. Mechanosensitivity of dental pulp stem cells is related to their osteogenic maturity.

    PubMed

    Kraft, David C E; Bindslev, Dorthe A; Melsen, Birte; Abdallah, Basem M; Kassem, Moustapha; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2010-02-01

    For engineering bone tissue, mechanosensitive cells are needed for bone (re)modelling. Local bone mass and architecture are affected by mechanical loading, which provokes a cellular response via loading-induced interstitial fluid flow. We studied whether human dental pulp-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PDSCs) portraying mature (PDSC-mature) or immature (PDSC-immature) bone cell characteristics are responsive to pulsating fluid flow (PFF) in vitro. We also assessed bone formation by PDSCs on hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate granules after subcutaneous implantation in mice. Cultured PDSC-mature exhibited higher osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase gene expression and activity than PDSC-immature. Pulsating fluid flow (PFF) stimulated nitric oxide production within 5 min by PDSC-mature but not by PDSC-immature. In PDSC-mature, PFF induced prostaglandin E(2) production, and cyclooxygenase 2 gene expression was higher than in PDSC-immature. Implantation of PDSC-mature resulted in more osteoid deposition and lamellar bone formation than PDSC-immature. We conclude that PDSCs with a mature osteogenic phenotype are more responsive to pulsating fluid shear stress than osteogenically immature PDSCs and produce more bone in vivo. These data suggest that PDSCs with a mature osteogenic phenotype might be preferable for bone tissue engineering to restore, for example, maxillofacial defects, because they might be able to perform mature bone cell-specific functions during bone adaptation to mechanical loading in vivo. PMID:20156262

  14. Nanofibrous spongy microspheres enhance odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Rong; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Jin, Xiaobing; Hu, Jiang; Gupte, Melanie J; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2015-09-16

    Dentin regeneration is challenging due to its complicated anatomical structure and the shortage of odontoblasts. In this study, a novel injectable cell carrier, nanofibrous spongy microspheres (NF-SMS), is developed for dentin regeneration. Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(l-lactic acid)-block-poly(l-lysine) are synthesized and fabricated into NF-SMS using self-assembly and thermally induced phase separation techniques. It is hypothesized that NF-SMS with interconnected pores and nanofibers can enhance the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), compared to nanofibrous microspheres (NF-MS) without pore structure and conventional solid microspheres (S-MS) with neither nanofibers nor pore structure. During the first 9 d in culture, hDPSCs proliferate significantly faster on NF-SMS than on NF-MS or S-MS (p < 0.05). Following in vitro odontogenic induction, all the examined odontogenic genes (alkaline phosphatase content, osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, collagen 1, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP)), calcium content, and DSPP protein content are found significantly higher in the NF-SMS group than in the control groups. Furthermore, 6 weeks after subcutaneous injection of hDPSCs and microspheres into nude mice, histological analysis shows that NF-SMS support superior dentin-like tissue formation compared to NF-MS or S-MS. Taken together, NF-SMS have great potential as an injectable cell carrier for dentin regeneration. PMID:26138254

  15. Differential expression of basal microRNAs' patterns in human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vasanthan, Punitha; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Musa, Sabri; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2015-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate translation of mRNA into protein and play a crucial role for almost all biological activities. However, the identification of miRNAs from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), especially from dental pulp, is poorly understood. In this study, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were characterized in terms of their proliferation and differentiation capacity. Furthermore, 104 known mature miRNAs were profiled by using real-time PCR. Notably, we observed 19 up-regulated miRNAs and 29 significantly down-regulated miRNAs in DPSCs in comparison with bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs). The 19 up-regulated miRNAs were subjected to ingenuity analysis, which were composed into 25 functional networks. We have chosen top 2 functional networks, which comprised 10 miRNA (hsa-miR-516a-3p, hsa-miR-125b-1-3p, hsa-miR-221-5p, hsa-miR-7, hsa-miR-584-5p, hsa-miR-190a, hsa-miR-106a-5p, hsa-mir-376a-5p, hsa-mir-377-5p and hsa-let-7f-2-3p). Prediction of target mRNAs and associated biological pathways regulated by each of this miRNA was carried out. We paid special attention to hsa-miR-516a-3p and hsa-miR-7-5p as these miRNAs were highly expressed upon validation with qRT-PCR analysis. We further proceeded with loss-of-function analysis with these miRNAs and we observed that hsa-miR-516a-3p knockdown induced a significant increase in the expression of WNT5A. Likewise, the knockdown of hsa-miR-7-5p increased the expression of EGFR. Nevertheless, further validation revealed the role of WNT5A as an indirect target of hsa-miR-516a-3p. These results provide new insights into the dynamic role of miRNA expression in DPSCs. In conclusion, using miRNA signatures in human as a prediction tool will enable us to elucidate the biological processes occurring in DPSCs. PMID:25475098

  16. Differential expression of basal microRNAs’ patterns in human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasanthan, Punitha; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Musa, Sabri; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate translation of mRNA into protein and play a crucial role for almost all biological activities. However, the identification of miRNAs from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), especially from dental pulp, is poorly understood. In this study, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were characterized in terms of their proliferation and differentiation capacity. Furthermore, 104 known mature miRNAs were profiled by using real-time PCR. Notably, we observed 19 up-regulated miRNAs and 29 significantly down-regulated miRNAs in DPSCs in comparison with bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs). The 19 up-regulated miRNAs were subjected to ingenuity analysis, which were composed into 25 functional networks. We have chosen top 2 functional networks, which comprised 10 miRNA (hsa-miR-516a-3p, hsa-miR-125b-1-3p, hsa-miR-221-5p, hsa-miR-7, hsa-miR-584-5p, hsa-miR-190a, hsa-miR-106a-5p, hsa-mir-376a-5p, hsa-mir-377-5p and hsa-let-7f-2-3p). Prediction of target mRNAs and associated biological pathways regulated by each of this miRNA was carried out. We paid special attention to hsa-miR-516a-3p and hsa-miR-7-5p as these miRNAs were highly expressed upon validation with qRT-PCR analysis. We further proceeded with loss-of-function analysis with these miRNAs and we observed that hsa-miR-516a-3p knockdown induced a significant increase in the expression of WNT5A. Likewise, the knockdown of hsa-miR-7-5p increased the expression of EGFR. Nevertheless, further validation revealed the role of WNT5A as an indirect target of hsa-miR-516a-3p. These results provide new insights into the dynamic role of miRNA expression in DPSCs. In conclusion, using miRNA signatures in human as a prediction tool will enable us to elucidate the biological processes occurring in DPSCs. PMID:25475098

  17. Factors secreted from dental pulp stem cells show multifaceted benefits for treating experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Jun; Takahashi, Nobunori; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshioka, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Masaya; Hibi, Hideharu; Ishigro, Naoki; Ueda, Minoru; Furukawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and chronic inflammation, which lead to the progressive destruction of cartilage and bone in the joints. Numerous studies have reported that administrations of various types of MSCs improve arthritis symptoms in animal models, by paracrine mechanisms. However, the therapeutic effects of the secreted factors alone, without the cell graft, have been uncertain. Here, we show that a single intravenous administration of serum-free conditioned medium (CM) from human deciduous dental pulp stem cells (SHED-CM) into anti-collagen type II antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), markedly improved the arthritis symptoms and joint destruction. The therapeutic efficacy of SHED-CM was associated with an induction of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in the CAIA joints and the abrogation of RANKL expression. SHED-CM specifically depleted of an M2 macrophage inducer, the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 (ED-Siglec-9), exhibited a reduced ability to induce M2-related gene expression and attenuate CAIA. SHED-CM also inhibited the RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that SHED-CM provides multifaceted therapeutic effects for treating CAIA, including the ED-Siglec-9-dependent induction of M2 macrophage polarization and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Thus, SHED-CM may represent a novel anti-inflammatory and reparative therapy for RA. PMID:26603475

  18. The effect of scaffold architecture on odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Ma, Haiyun; Jin, Xiaobing; Hu, Jiang; Liu, Xiaohua; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the superiority of nanofibrous (NF) poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds in supporting the osteogenic differentiation of a few cell types and bone regeneration. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether NF-PLLA scaffolds are advantageous for the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) over solid-walled (SW) PLLA scaffolds. The vitro studies demonstrated that, compared with SW scaffolds, NF scaffolds enhanced attachment and proliferation as well as odontogenic differentiation of human DPSCs. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expression of odontogenic genes of human DPSCs was increased on NF scaffolds compared with that on SW scaffolds. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on the NF scaffolds as demonstrated by von Kossa staining, calcium content measurement and scanning electron microscopy. Consistent with the in vitro studies, NF scaffolds promoted odontogenic differentiation and hard tissue formation compared with SW scaffolds after 8 weeks of ectopic transplantation in nude mice as confirmed by von Kossa staining, Masson’s trichrome staining and immunohistochemical staining for dentin sialoprotein. In conclusion, NF-PLLA scaffolds enhanced the odontogenic differentiation of human DPSCs and mineralization both in vitro and in vivo, and are promising scaffolds for dentin regeneration. PMID:21663962

  19. Effects of extracts of Salvadora persica on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Fahimeh sadat; Moezizadeh, Maryam; Javand, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Efficacy of an ideal antimicrobial agent depends on its ability to eliminate microorganisms while causing minimal toxicity to host cells. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ethanolic and water extracts of Salvadora persica (SP) on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, the effects of seven concentrations of ethanolic and water extracts of SP (ranging from 5.75 mg/ml to 0.08 mg/ml) on hDPSCs were evaluated using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Water extract of SP only had cytotoxic effect at 5.75 mg/ml concentration; and caused significant cell proliferation at 1.43-0.08 mg/ml concentrations at 24 h (P < 0.05). At 48 h, only 0.17 and 0.08 mg/ml concentrations caused significant cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Ethanolic extract of SP at 5.75-1.43 mg/ml concentrations showed severe cytotoxic effects at 24 and 48 h. Other concentrations had no significant effects on cells (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The highest concentrations of both water and ethanolic extracts of SP had cytotoxic effects on hDPSCs. Water extract of SP has favorable effects on cell proliferation at specific concentrations in a time-dependent manner. PMID:26180418

  20. Zinc-modified titanium surface enhances osteoblast differentiation of dental pulp stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yusa, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Osamu; Takano, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Masayuki; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element that plays an important role in differentiation of osteoblasts and bone modeling. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the osteoblast differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on zinc-modified titanium (Zn-Ti) that releases zinc ions from its surface. Based on real-time PCR, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Western blot analysis data, we investigated osteoblast differentiation of DPSCs cultured on Zn-Ti and controls. DPSCs cultured on Zn-Ti exhibited significantly up-regulated gene expression levels of osteoblast-related genes of type I collagen (Col I), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), ALP, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osteopontin (OPN), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF A), as compared with controls. We also investigated extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization by Alizarin Red S (ARS) staining and found that Zn-Ti significantly promoted ECM mineralization when compared with controls. These findings suggest that the combination of Zn-Ti and DPSCs provides a novel approach for bone regeneration therapy. PMID:27387130

  1. Zinc-modified titanium surface enhances osteoblast differentiation of dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yusa, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Osamu; Takano, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Masayuki; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element that plays an important role in differentiation of osteoblasts and bone modeling. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the osteoblast differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on zinc-modified titanium (Zn-Ti) that releases zinc ions from its surface. Based on real-time PCR, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Western blot analysis data, we investigated osteoblast differentiation of DPSCs cultured on Zn-Ti and controls. DPSCs cultured on Zn-Ti exhibited significantly up-regulated gene expression levels of osteoblast-related genes of type I collagen (Col I), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), ALP, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osteopontin (OPN), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF A), as compared with controls. We also investigated extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization by Alizarin Red S (ARS) staining and found that Zn-Ti significantly promoted ECM mineralization when compared with controls. These findings suggest that the combination of Zn-Ti and DPSCs provides a novel approach for bone regeneration therapy. PMID:27387130

  2. Transcriptome changes during TNF-α promoted osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Ke; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Fan

    2016-08-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), due to the ease of isolation and their capacities of multi-lineage differentiation, are considered as attractive resources for regenerative medicine. In a previous study, we showed that TNF-α promoted the osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs via the NF-κB signaling pathway. However, the mechanisms of such differentiation were largely unknown. Here, we examined the gene expression profiles between undifferentiated, partially differentiated and fully differentiated DPSCs induced by TNF-α by performing the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq). Our results revealed a continuous transition of the transcriptome changes during TNF-α promoted osteogenic differentiation of DPSC. Bioinformatics analysis revealed a relatively general to specific transformation of the involved signaling pathways from the early to late stages of differentiation. Gene regulatory network analysis highlighted novel, key genes that are essential for osteogenic differentiation at different time points. These results were further validated by quantitative RT-PCR, confirming the high reliability of the RNA-Seq. Our data therefore will not only provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms that drive the osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs, but also promote the studies of bone tissue engineering that utilizes DPSCs as a crucial resource. PMID:27237976

  3. The role of lysyl oxidase-like 2 in the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Hyang; Park, Hye-Jeong; Park, Eui-Kyun; Kwon, Tae-Geon; Shin, Hong-In; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2013-06-01

    Adult human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are a unique population of precursor cells those are isolated from postnatal dental pulp and have the ability to differentiate into a variety of cell types utilized for the formation of a reparative dentin-like complex. Using LC-MS/MS proteomics approaches, we identified the proteins secreted from the differentiating hDPSCs in mineralization media. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) was identified as a protein that was down-regulated in the hDPSCs that differentiate into odontoblast-like cells. The role of LOXL2 has not been studied in dental pulp stem cells. LOXL2 mRNA levels were reduced in differentiating hDPSCs, whereas the levels of other LOX family members including LOX, LOXL1, LOXL3, and LOXL4, are increased. The protein expression and secretion levels of LOXL2 were also decreased during odontogenic differentiation. Recombinant LOXL2 protein treatment to hDPSCs resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the early differentiation and the mineralization accompanying with the lower levels of odontogenic markers such as DSPP, DMP-1 and ALP. These results suggest that LOXL2 has a negative effect on the differentiation of hDPSCs and blocking LOXL2 can promote the hDPSC differentiation to odontoblasts. PMID:23677379

  4. The Comparison of the Immunologic Properties of Stem Cells Isolated from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth, Dental Pulp, and Dental Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Selin; Zibandeh, Noushin; Genc, Deniz; Ozcan, Elif Merve; Goker, Kamil; Akkoc, Tunc

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To compare the effects of various mesenchymal stem cells, those isolated from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), and dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs), on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Method. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from three sources in the orofacial region. Characterization and PCR analyses were performed. Lymphocytes were isolated from healthy peripheral venous blood. Lymphocytes were cocultured with stem cells in the presence and absence of IFN-γ and stimulated with anti-CD2, anti-CD3, and anti-CD28 for 3 days. Then, lymphocyte proliferation, the number of CD4+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells, and the levels of Fas/Fas ligand, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ in the culture supernatant were measured. Results. The DFSCs exhibited an enhanced differentiation capacity and an increased number of CD4+FoxP3+ T lymphocytes and suppressed the proliferation and apoptosis of PBMCs compared with SHEDs and DPSCs. The addition of IFN-γ augmented the proliferation of DFSCs. Furthermore, the DFSCs suppressed IL-4 and IFN-γ cytokine levels and enhanced IL-10 levels compared with the other cell sources. Conclusion. These results suggest that IFN-γ stimulates DFSCs by inducing an immunomodulatory effect on the PBMCs of healthy donors while suppressing apoptosis and proliferation and increasing the number of CD4+FoxP3+ cells. PMID:26770205

  5. Effect of Aminated Mesoporous Bioactive Glass Nanoparticles on the Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kang, Min-Sil; Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous bioactive nanoparticles (MBNs) have been developed as promising additives to various types of bone or dentin regenerative material. However, biofunctionality of MBNs as dentin regenerative additive to dental materials have rarely been studied. We investigated the uptake efficiency of MBNs-NH2 with their endocytosis pathway and the role of MBNs-NH2 in odontogenic differentiation to clarify inherent biofunctionality. MBNs were fabricated by sol-gel synthesis, and 3% APTES was used to aminate these nanoparticles (MBNs-NH2) to reverse their charge from negative to positive. To characterize the MBNs-NH2, TEM, XRD, FTIR, zeta(ξ)-potential measurements, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis were performed. After primary cultured rat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs) were incubated with various concentrations of MBNs-NH2, stem cell viability (24 hours) with or without differentiated media, internalization of MBNs-NH2 in rDPSCs (~4 hours) via specific endocytosis pathway, intra or extracellular ion concentration and odontoblastic differentiation (~28 days) were investigated. Incubation with up to 50 μg/mL of MBNs-NH2 had no effect on rDPSCs viability with differentiated media (p>0.05). The internalization of MBNs-NH2 in rDPSCs was determined about 92% after 4 hours of incubation. Uptake was significantly decreased with ATP depletion and after 1 hour of pre-treatment with the inhibitor of macropinocytosis (p<0.05). There was significant increase of intracellular Ca and Si ion concentration in MBNs-NH2 treated cells compared to no-treated counterpart (p<0.05). The expression of odontogenic-related genes (BSP, COL1A, DMP-1, DSPP, and OCN) and the capacity for biomineralization (based on alkaline phosphatase activity and alizarin red staining) were significantly upregulated with MBNs-NH2. These results indicate that MBNs-NH2 induce odontogenic differentiation of rDPSCs and may serve as a potential dentin regenerative additive to dental material for promoting

  6. Effect of Aminated Mesoporous Bioactive Glass Nanoparticles on the Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kang, Min-Sil; Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous bioactive nanoparticles (MBNs) have been developed as promising additives to various types of bone or dentin regenerative material. However, biofunctionality of MBNs as dentin regenerative additive to dental materials have rarely been studied. We investigated the uptake efficiency of MBNs-NH2 with their endocytosis pathway and the role of MBNs-NH2 in odontogenic differentiation to clarify inherent biofunctionality. MBNs were fabricated by sol-gel synthesis, and 3% APTES was used to aminate these nanoparticles (MBNs-NH2) to reverse their charge from negative to positive. To characterize the MBNs-NH2, TEM, XRD, FTIR, zeta(ξ)-potential measurements, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis were performed. After primary cultured rat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs) were incubated with various concentrations of MBNs-NH2, stem cell viability (24 hours) with or without differentiated media, internalization of MBNs-NH2 in rDPSCs (~4 hours) via specific endocytosis pathway, intra or extracellular ion concentration and odontoblastic differentiation (~28 days) were investigated. Incubation with up to 50 μg/mL of MBNs-NH2 had no effect on rDPSCs viability with differentiated media (p>0.05). The internalization of MBNs-NH2 in rDPSCs was determined about 92% after 4 hours of incubation. Uptake was significantly decreased with ATP depletion and after 1 hour of pre-treatment with the inhibitor of macropinocytosis (p<0.05). There was significant increase of intracellular Ca and Si ion concentration in MBNs-NH2 treated cells compared to no-treated counterpart (p<0.05). The expression of odontogenic-related genes (BSP, COL1A, DMP-1, DSPP, and OCN) and the capacity for biomineralization (based on alkaline phosphatase activity and alizarin red staining) were significantly upregulated with MBNs-NH2. These results indicate that MBNs-NH2 induce odontogenic differentiation of rDPSCs and may serve as a potential dentin regenerative additive to dental material for promoting

  7. Biophysical characterization of low-frequency ultrasound interaction with dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low-intensity ultrasound is considered an effective non-invasive therapy to stimulate hard tissue repair, in particular to accelerate delayed non-union bone fracture healing. More recently, ultrasound has been proposed as a therapeutic tool to repair and regenerate dental tissues. Our recent work suggested that low-frequency kilohertz-range ultrasound is able to interact with dental pulp cells which could have potential to stimulate dentine reparative processes and hence promote the viability and longevity of teeth. Methods In this study, the biophysical characteristics of low-frequency ultrasound transmission through teeth towards the dental pulp were explored. We conducted cell culture studies using an odontoblast-like/dental pulp cell line, MDPC-23. Half of the samples underwent ultrasound exposure while the other half underwent ‘sham treatment’ where the transducer was submerged into the medium but no ultrasound was generated. Ultrasound was applied directly to the cell cultures using a therapeutic ultrasound device at a frequency of 45 kHz with intensity settings of 10, 25 and 75 mW/cm2 for 5 min. Following ultrasound treatment, the odontoblast-like cells were detached from the culture using a 0.25% Trypsin/EDTA solution, and viable cell numbers were counted. Two-dimensional tooth models based on μ-CT 2D images of the teeth were analyzed using COMSOL as the finite element analysis platform. This was used to confirm experimental results and to demonstrate the potential theory that with the correct combination of frequency and intensity, a tooth can be repaired using small doses of ultrasound. Frequencies in the 30 kHz–1 MHz range were analyzed. For each frequency, pressure/intensity plots provided information on how the intensity changes at each point throughout the propagation path. Spatial peak temporal average (SPTA) intensity was calculated and related to existing optimal spatial average temporal average (SATA) intensity deemed effective

  8. In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells in injectable thermo-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yantian; Zhang, Fengli; Fu, Qiang; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zejian; Qi, Nianmin

    2016-09-01

    Injectable thermo-sensitive hydrogels have a potential application in bone tissue engineering for their sensitivities and minimal invasive properties. Human dental pulp stem cells have been considered a promising tool for tissue reconstruction. The objective of this study was to investigate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells in injectable thermo-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel in vitro. The chitosan /β-glycerophosphate hydrogel and chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel were prepared using the sol-gel method. The injectability of chitosan /β-glycerophosphate hydrogel and chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel was measured using a commercial disposable syringe. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the inner structure of hydrogels. Then dental pulp stem cells were seeded in chitosan /β-glycerophosphate hydrogel and chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel, respectively. The growth of dental pulp stem cells was periodically observed under an inverted microscope. The proliferation of dental pulp stem cells was detected by using an Alamar Blue kit, while cell apoptosis was determined by using a Live/Dead Viability/Cytotoxicity kit. The osteogenic differentiations of dental pulp stem cells in chitosan /β-glycerophosphate hydrogel and chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel were evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity assay and mRNA expression of osteogenesis gene for 21 days in osteogenic medium. The results indicated that there was no significant difference between chitosan /β-glycerophosphate hydrogel and chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel in injectability. Cells within the chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel displayed a typical adherent cell morphology and rapid proliferation with high cellular viability after 14 days of culture. Dental pulp stem cells seeded in chitosan

  9. Dental Stem Cell Migration on Pulp Ceiling Cavities Filled with MTA, Dentin Chips, or Bio-Oss

    PubMed Central

    Lymperi, Stefania; Taraslia, Vasiliki; Tsatsoulis, Ioannis N.; Samara, Athina; Velentzas, Athanasios D.; Agrafioti, Anastasia; Anastasiadou, Ema; Kontakiotis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    MTA, Bio-Oss, and dentin chips have been successfully used in endodontics. The aim of this study was to assess the adhesion and migration of dental stem cells on human pulp ceiling cavities filled with these endodontic materials in an experimental model, which mimics the clinical conditions of regenerative endodontics. Cavities were formed, by a homemade mold, on untouched third molars, filled with endodontic materials, and observed with electron microscopy. Cells were seeded on cavities' surface and their morphology and number were analysed. The phenomenon of tropism was assessed in a migration assay. All three materials demonstrated appropriate microstructures for cell attachment. Cells grew on all reagents, but they showed a differential morphology. Moreover, variations were observed when comparing cells numbers on cavity's filling versus the surrounding dentine disc. The highest number of cells was recorded on dentin chips whereas the opposite was true for Bio-Oss. This was confirmed in the migration assay where a statistically significant lower number of cells migrated towards Bio-Oss as compared to MTA and dentin chips. This study highlights that MTA and dentin chips have a greater potential compared to Bio-Oss regarding the attraction of dental stem cells and are good candidates for bioengineered pulp regeneration. PMID:26146613

  10. Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Gingival Fibroblasts Seeded into Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Have the Same Ability in Attracting Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Woloszyk, Anna; Buschmann, Johanna; Waschkies, Conny; Stadlinger, Bernd; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.

    2016-01-01

    Neovascularization is one of the most important processes during tissue repair and regeneration. Current healing approaches based on the use of biomaterials combined with stem cells in critical-size bone defects fail due to the insufficient implant vascularization and integration into the host tissues. Therefore, here we studied the attraction, ingrowth, and distribution of blood vessels from the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane into implanted silk fibroin scaffolds seeded with either human dental pulp stem cells or human gingival fibroblasts. Perfusion capacity was evaluated by non-invasive in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging while the number and density of blood vessels were measured by histomorphometry. Our results demonstrate that human dental pulp stem cells and gingival fibroblasts possess equal abilities in attracting vessels within silk fibroin scaffolds. Additionally, the prolonged in vitro pre-incubation period of these two cell populations favors the homogeneous distribution of vessels within silk fibroin scaffolds, which further improves implant survival and guarantees successful healing and regeneration. PMID:27148078

  11. Isolation of dental pulp stem cells from a single donor and characterization of their ability to differentiate after 2 years of cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Reem S.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.; Alnabaheen, May S.; Ashri, Nahid Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the viability and differentiation capacity of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from single donors after two years of cryopreservation. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between October 2010 and February 2014 in the Stem Unit, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Seventeen teeth extracted from 11 participants were processed separately to assess the minimum tissue weight needed to yield cells for culturing in vitro. Cell stemness was evaluated before passage 4 using the colony forming unit assay, immunofluorescence staining, and bi-lineage differentiation. Dental pulp stem cells were cryopreserved for 2 years. Post-thaw DPSCs were cultured until senescence and differentiated toward osteogenic, odontogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. Results: Viable cells were isolated successfully from 6 of the 11 participants. Three of these 6 cultured cell lines were identified as DPSCs. A minimum of 0.2 g of dental pulp tissue was required for successful isolation of viable cells from a single donor. Post-thaw DPSCs successfully differentiated towards osteogenic, odontogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. The post-thaw DPSCs were viable in vitro up to 70 days before senescence. There was no significant difference between the cells. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this investigation, viable cells from dental pulp tissue were isolated successfully from the same donor using a minimum of 2 extracted teeth. Not all isolated cells from harvested dental pulp tissue had the characteristics of DPSCs. Post-thaw DPSCs maintained their multi-lineage differentiation capacity. PMID:27146619

  12. Stem cell-based pulp tissue engineering: variables enrolled in translation from the bench to the bedside, a systematic review of literature.

    PubMed

    Conde, M C M; Chisini, L A; Demarco, F F; Nör, J E; Casagrande, L; Tarquinio, S B C

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell-based therapy (SC-BT) is emerging as an alternative for endodontic therapies. The interaction between stem cells and scaffolds plays a crucial role in the generation of a 'friendly cell' microenvironment. The aim of this systematic review was to explore techniques applied to regenerate the pulp-dentine complex tissue using SC-BT. An electronic search into the SciVerse Scopus (SS), ISI Web Science (IWS) and Entrez PubMed (EP) using specific keywords was performed. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were predetermined. The search yielded papers, out of which full-text papers were included in the final analyses. Data extraction pooled the results in four main topics: (a) influence of the chemical properties of the scaffolds over cell behaviour; (b) influence of the physical characteristics of scaffolds over cell behaviour; (c) strategies applied to improve the stem cell/scaffold interface; and (d) influence of cue microenvironment on stem cell differentiation towards odontoblast-like cells and pulp-like tissue formation. The relationship between the scaffolds, the environment and the growth factors released from dentine are critical for de novo pulp tissue regeneration. The preconditioning of dentine walls with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was imperative for successful pulp-dentine complex regeneration. An analyses of the grouped results revealed that pulp regeneration was an attainable goal. PMID:26101143

  13. Elucidating the cellular actions of demineralised dentine matrix extract on a clonal dental pulp stem cell population in orchestrating dental tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi P; Colombo, John S; Ayre, Wayne Nishio; Sloan, Alastair J

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive growth factors identified within the extracellular matrix of dentine have been proposed roles in regulating the naturally inherent regenerative dentine formation seen in teeth in response to trauma and infection, which may also be harnessed for novel clinical treatments in augmenting mineralised tissue repair. This study examined the specific biological action of demineralised dentine matrix extract on a clonal population of dental pulp stem cells in stimulating the prerequisite stages of wound healing associated with mineralised tissue repair. A clonal dental pulp stem cell population with sustained proliferative capacity and multi-potentiality towards osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages was isolated from the pulp of human third molars. Dentine was collected from human healthy teeth, powdered and treated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to obtain a solubilised DDM protein extract. The influence of DDM on the DPSC clonal population was assessed in vitro. Exposure of cells to proteolytically degraded DDM or unsupplemented media served as controls. Compared to controls, DDM stimulated cell expansion, reduced apoptotic marker caspase 3, increased cell survival marker Akt1 and enhanced mineralised matrix deposition as determined by mineral deposition and increased expression of bone-related markers, alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin. Dental pulp stem cells successfully migrated into collagen gels supplemented with demineralised dentine matrix, with cells remaining viable and expanding in numbers over a 3-day period. Collectively, the results provide evidence that soluble proteins extracted from dentine matrix are able to exert a direct biological effect on dental pulp stem cells in promoting mineralised tissue repair mechanisms. PMID:26019808

  14. Decreasing NF-κB Expression Enhances Odontoblastic Differentiation and Collagen Expression in Dental Pulp Stem Cells Exposed to Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Hozhabri, Neda S. T.; Benson, M. Douglas; Vu, Michael D.; Patel, Rinkesh H.; Martinez, Rebecca M.; Nakhaie, Fatemeh N.; Kim, Harry K. W.; Varanasi, Venu G.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory response in the dental pulp can alter the collagen matrix formation by dental pulp stem cells and lead to a delay or poor healing of the pulp. This inflammatory response is mediated by cytokines, including interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. In this study, it is hypothesized that suppressing the actions of these inflammatory cytokines by knocking down the activity of transcription factor Nuclear Factor–κB will lead to dental pulp stem cell differentiation into odontoblasts and the production of collagen. Here, the role of Nuclear Factor–κB signaling and its reduction was examined during odontogenic behavior in the presence of these cytokines. The results showed a significant increase in Nuclear Factor–κB gene expression and p65 protein expression by interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Nuclear Factor–κB activation in the presence of these cytokines decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner by a Nuclear Factor–κB inhibitor (MG132) and p65 siRNA. Down-regulation of Nuclear Factor–κB activity also enhanced the gene expression of the odontoblastic markers (dentin sialophosphoprotein, Nestin, and alkaline phosphatase) and displayed an odontoblastic cell morphology indicating the promotion of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells. Finally, dental pulp stem cells exposed to reduced Nuclear Factor–κB activity resulted in a significant increase in collagen (I)-α1 expression in the presence of these cytokines. In conclusion, a decrease in Nuclear Factor-κB in dental pulp stem cells in the presence of inflammatory cytokines enhanced odontoblastic differentiation and collagen matrix formation. PMID:25629155

  15. Comparative Analysis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Umbilical Cord, Dental Pulp, and Menstrual Blood as Sources for Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Huaijuan; Sang, Yunxia; Zhang, Fengli; Liu, Zhaoqing; Qi, Nianmin; Chen, Yantian

    2016-01-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) based therapy has been considered as a promising tool for tissue repair and regeneration, the optimal cell source remains unknown. Umbilical cord (UC), dental pulp (DP), and menstrual blood (MB) are easily accessible sources, which make them attractive candidates for MSCs. The goal of this study was to compare the biological characteristics, including morphology, proliferation, antiapoptosis, multilineage differentiation capacity, and immunophenotype of UC-, DP-, and MB-MSCs in order to provide a theoretical basis for clinical selection and application of these cells. As a result, all UC-, DP-, and MB-MSCs have self-renewal capacity and multipotentiality. However, the UC-MSCs seemed to have higher cell proliferation ability, while DP-MSCs may have significant advantages for osteogenic differentiation, lower cell apoptosis, and senescence. These differences may be associated with the different expression level of cytokines, including vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor, and hepatocyte growth factor in each of the MSCs. Comprehensively, our results suggest DP-MSCs may be a desired source for clinical applications of cell therapy. PMID:26880954

  16. Comparative Analysis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Umbilical Cord, Dental Pulp, and Menstrual Blood as Sources for Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Huaijuan; Sang, Yunxia; Zhang, Fengli; Liu, Zhaoqing; Qi, Nianmin; Chen, Yantian

    2016-01-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) based therapy has been considered as a promising tool for tissue repair and regeneration, the optimal cell source remains unknown. Umbilical cord (UC), dental pulp (DP), and menstrual blood (MB) are easily accessible sources, which make them attractive candidates for MSCs. The goal of this study was to compare the biological characteristics, including morphology, proliferation, antiapoptosis, multilineage differentiation capacity, and immunophenotype of UC-, DP-, and MB-MSCs in order to provide a theoretical basis for clinical selection and application of these cells. As a result, all UC-, DP-, and MB-MSCs have self-renewal capacity and multipotentiality. However, the UC-MSCs seemed to have higher cell proliferation ability, while DP-MSCs may have significant advantages for osteogenic differentiation, lower cell apoptosis, and senescence. These differences may be associated with the different expression level of cytokines, including vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor, and hepatocyte growth factor in each of the MSCs. Comprehensively, our results suggest DP-MSCs may be a desired source for clinical applications of cell therapy. PMID:26880954

  17. Donor-matched comparison of dental pulp stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Alge, Daniel L.; Zhou, Dan; Adams, Lyndsey L.; Wyss, Brandon K.; Shadday, Matthew D.; Woods, Erik J.; Chu, T.M. Gabriel; Goebel, W. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) have drawn much interest for the regeneration of mineralized tissues, and several studies have compared DPSC to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC). However, conflicting results, possibly due to donor-associated variability, have been published and the regenerative potential of DPSC is currently unclear. In the present study we have sought to address this problem using a donor-matched experimental design to robustly compare the biological properties of DPSC and BMMSC. All experiments were performed using cells isolated from a single adult Sprague-Dawley rat. Our results show that DPSC and BMMSC had similar morphologies and flow cytometry profiles, were capable of forming colonies in vitro, and were capable of osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic differentiation. However, quantitative comparisons revealed that DPSC had a faster population doubling time and a higher percentage of stem/progenitor cells in the population as determined by clonogenic assays. Furthermore, while both cell populations formed mineral in vitro, DPSC had significantly higher alkaline phosphatase activity than BMMSC after three weeks in osteogenic medium. These data show several key differences between DPSC and BMMSC and support the possibility of using DPSC for mineralized tissue regeneration. PMID:19842108

  18. Effects of decellularized matrices derived from periodontal ligament stem cells and SHED on the adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Zhu, Shaoyue; Xu, Jianguang; Yuan, Changyong; Gong, Ting; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-04-01

    A major bottleneck to the therapeutic applications of dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) are their limited proliferative capacity ex vivo and tendency to undergo senescence. This may be partly due to the sub-optimal in vitro culture milieu, which could be improved by an appropriate extracellular matrix substratum. This study therefore examined decellularized matrix (DECM) from stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC), as potential substrata for DPSC culture. Both SHED-DECM and PDLSC-DECM promoted rapid adhesion and spreading of newly-seeded DPSC compared to bare polystyrene (TCPS), with vinculin immunocytochemistry showing expression of more focal adhesions by newly-adherent DPSC cultured on DECM versus TCPS. Culture of DPSC on SHED-DECM and PDLSC-DECM yielded higher proliferation of cell numbers compared to TCPS. The qRT-PCR data showed significantly higher expression of nestin by DPSC cultured on DECM versus the TCPS control. Osteogenic differentiation of DPSC was enhanced by culturing on PDLSC-DECM and SHED-DECM versus TCPS, as demonstrated by alizarin red S staining for mineralized calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase assay and qRT-PCR analysis of key osteogenic marker expression. Hence, both SHED-DECM and PDLSC-DECM could enhance the ex vivo culture of DPSC under both non-inducing and osteogenic-inducing conditions. PMID:26796232

  19. Assessment of the Tumorigenic Potential of Spontaneously Immortalized and hTERT-Immortalized Cultured Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ryan; Urraca, Nora; Skobowiat, Cezary; Hope, Kevin A.; Miravalle, Leticia; Chamberlin, Reed; Donaldson, Martin; Seagroves, Tiffany N.

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) provide an exciting new avenue to study neurogenetic disorders. DPSCs are neural crest-derived cells with the ability to differentiate into numerous tissues including neurons. The therapeutic potential of stem cell-derived lines exposed to culturing ex vivo before reintroduction into patients could be limited if the cultured cells acquired tumorigenic potential. We tested whether DPSCs that spontaneously immortalized in culture acquired features of transformed cells. We analyzed immortalized DPSCs for anchorage-independent growth, genomic instability, and ability to differentiate into neurons. Finally, we tested both spontaneously immortalized and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized DPSC lines for the ability to form tumors in immunocompromised animals. Although we observed increased colony-forming potential in soft agar for the spontaneously immortalized and hTERT-immortalized DPSC lines relative to low-passage DPSC, no tumors were detected from any of the DPSC lines tested. We noticed some genomic instability in hTERT-immortalized DPSCs but not in the spontaneously immortalized lines tested. We determined that immortalized DPSC lines generated in our laboratory, whether spontaneously or induced, have not acquired the potential to form tumors in mice. These data suggest cultured DPSC lines that can be differentiated into neurons may be safe for future in vivo therapy for neurobiological diseases. Significance This study demonstrated that immortalized dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) do not form tumors in animals and that immortalized DPSCs can be differentiated into neurons in culture. These results lend support to the use of primary and immortalized DPSCs for future therapeutic approaches to treatment of neurobiological diseases. PMID:26032749

  20. Influence of poly-L-lactic acid scaffold's pore size on the proliferation and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Conde, Cristian Muniz; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Casagrande, Luciano; Alcazar, José Carlos; Nör, Jacques Eduardo; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA)-based scaffold's pore size on the proliferation and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). The scaffolds were prepared in pulp chambers of 1-mm-thick tooth slices from third molars using salt crystals (150-250 µm or 251-450 µm) as porogen. DPSC (1x105 cells) were seeded in the scaffolds with different pore sizes, and cultured in 24-well plates. The cell proliferation was evaluated using the WST-1 assay after 3-21 days. Furthermore, RT-PCR was used to assess the differentiation of the DPSCs into odontoblasts, using markers of odontoblastic differentiation (DSPP, DSP-1 and MEPE). RNA from human odontoblasts was used as control. Cell proliferation rate was similar in both scaffolds except at the 14th day period, in which the cells seeded in the scaffolds with larger pores showed higher proliferation (p<0.05). After 21 days DPSCs seeded in both evaluated scaffolds were able of expressing odontoblastic markers DMP-1, DSPP and MEPE. In summary, both scaffolds tested in this study allowed the proliferation and differentiation of DPSCs into odontoblast-like cells. PMID:25831096

  1. Injectable calcium phosphate with hydrogel fibers encapsulating induced pluripotent, dental pulp and bone marrow stem cells for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Chi; Li, Chunyan; Weir, Michael D; Wang, Ping; Reynolds, Mark A; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPSC-MSCs), dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and bone marrow MSCs (hBMSCs) are exciting cell sources in regenerative medicine. However, there has been no report comparing hDPSCs, hBMSCs and hiPSC-MSCs for bone engineering in an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel injectable CPC containing hydrogel fibers encapsulating stem cells for bone engineering, and (2) compare cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow (BM-hiPSC-MSCs) and from foreskin (FS-hiPSC-MSCs), and hBMSCs in CPC for the first time. The results showed that the injection did not harm cell viability. The porosity of injectable CPC was 62%. All four types of cells proliferated and differentiated down the osteogenic lineage inside hydrogel fibers in CPC. hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited high alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor, collagen I, and osteocalcin gene expressions. Cell-synthesized minerals increased with time (p<0.05), with no significant difference among hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs (p>0.1). Mineralization by hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs inside CPC at 14d was 14-fold that at 1d. FS-hiPSC-MSCs were inferior in osteogenic differentiation compared to the other cells. In conclusion, hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs are similarly and highly promising for bone tissue engineering; however, FS-hiPSC-MSCs were relatively inferior in osteogenesis. The novel injectable CPC with cell-encapsulating hydrogel fibers may enhance bone regeneration in dental, craniofacial and orthopedic applications. PMID:27612810

  2. Phenotypic and Proteomic Characteristics of Human Dental Pulp Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells from a Natal, an Exfoliated Deciduous, and an Impacted Third Molar Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Gurler; Aksoy, Ayca; Duruksu, Gokhan; Gacar, Gulcin; Karaoz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    The level of heterogeneity among the isolated stem cells makes them less valuable for clinical use. The purpose of this study was to understand the level of heterogeneity among human dental pulp derived mesenchymal stem cells by using basic cell biology and proteomic approaches. The cells were isolated from a natal (NDPSCs), an exfoliated deciduous (stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous (SHED)), and an impacted third molar (DPSCs) tooth of three different donors. All three stem cells displayed similar features related to morphology, proliferation rates, expression of various cell surface markers, and differentiation potentials into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. Furthermore, using 2DE approach coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF, we have generated a common 2DE profile for all three stem cells. We found that 62.3 ± 7% of the protein spots were conserved among the three mesenchymal stem cell lines. Sixty-one of these conserved spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. Classification of the identified proteins based on biological function revealed that structurally important proteins and proteins that are involved in protein folding machinery are predominantly expressed by all three stem cell lines. Some of these proteins may hold importance in understanding specific properties of human dental pulp derived mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:25379041

  3. RAC1 regulate tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated impaired osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guijuan; Shen, Qijie; Lian, Min; Gu, Zhifeng; Xing, Jing; Lu, Xiaohui; Huang, Dan; Li, Liren; Huang, Shen; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Jinlong; Shi, Jiahai; Zhang, Dongmei; Feng, Xingmei

    2015-09-01

    Human dental pulp contains a rapidly proliferative subpopulation of precursor cells termed dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) that show self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, including neurogenic, chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic. We previously reported that tomuor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) (10 ng/mL) triggered osteogenic differentiation of human DPSCs via the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway. While previous studies showed that cells treated with TNF-α at higher concentrations showed decreased osteogenic differentiation capability. In this study we analyze the function of TNF-α (100 ng/mL) on osteogenic differentiation of human DPSCs for the first time and identify the underlying molecule mechanisms. Our data revealed that TNF-α with higher concentration significantly reduced mineralization and the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Further, we revealed that TNF-α could suppress the osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs via increasing the expression of RAC1, which could activate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and liberate β-catenin to translocate into the nucleus. Genetic silencing of RAC1 expression using siRNA restored osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Our findings may provide a potential approach to bone regeneration in inflammatory microenvironments. PMID:26219349

  4. A computer-designed scaffold for bone regeneration within cranial defect using human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeon Kwon, Doo; Seon Kwon, Jin; Hun Park, Seung; Hun Park, Ji; Hee Jang, So; Yun Yin, Xiang; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Ho Kim, Jae; Hyun Min, Byoung; Hee Lee, Jun; Kim, Wan-Doo; Suk Kim, Moon

    2015-01-01

    A computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold offer several potential advantages such as ease of customized manufacture and in vivo safety. In this work, we firstly used a computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate neo-bone within cranial bone defects. The hDPSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers and served as an abundant source of stem cells with a high proliferation rate. In addition, hDPSCs showed a phenotype of differentiated osteoblasts in the presence of osteogenic factors (OF). We used solid freeform fabrication (SFF) with biodegradable polyesters (MPEG-(PLLA-co-PGA-co-PCL) (PLGC)) to fabricate a computer-designed scaffold. The SFF technology gave quick and reproducible results. To assess bone tissue engineering in vivo, the computer-designed, circular PLGC scaffold was implanted into a full-thickness cranial bone defect and monitored by micro-computed tomography (CT) and histology of the in vivo tissue-engineered bone. Neo-bone formation of more than 50% in both micro-CT and histology tests was observed at only PLGC scaffold with hDPSCs/OF. Furthermore, the PLGC scaffold gradually degraded, as evidenced by the fluorescent-labeled PLGC scaffold, which provides information to tract biodegradation of implanted PLGC scaffold. In conclusion, we confirmed neo-bone formation within a cranial bone defect using hDPSCs and a computer-designed PLGC scaffold. PMID:26234712

  5. Assessment of the Tumorigenic Potential of Spontaneously Immortalized and hTERT-Immortalized Cultured Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ryan; Urraca, Nora; Skobowiat, Cezary; Hope, Kevin A; Miravalle, Leticia; Chamberlin, Reed; Donaldson, Martin; Seagroves, Tiffany N; Reiter, Lawrence T

    2015-08-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) provide an exciting new avenue to study neurogenetic disorders. DPSCs are neural crest-derived cells with the ability to differentiate into numerous tissues including neurons. The therapeutic potential of stem cell-derived lines exposed to culturing ex vivo before reintroduction into patients could be limited if the cultured cells acquired tumorigenic potential. We tested whether DPSCs that spontaneously immortalized in culture acquired features of transformed cells. We analyzed immortalized DPSCs for anchorage-independent growth, genomic instability, and ability to differentiate into neurons. Finally, we tested both spontaneously immortalized and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized DPSC lines for the ability to form tumors in immunocompromised animals. Although we observed increased colony-forming potential in soft agar for the spontaneously immortalized and hTERT-immortalized DPSC lines relative to low-passage DPSC, no tumors were detected from any of the DPSC lines tested. We noticed some genomic instability in hTERT-immortalized DPSCs but not in the spontaneously immortalized lines tested. We determined that immortalized DPSC lines generated in our laboratory, whether spontaneously or induced, have not acquired the potential to form tumors in mice. These data suggest cultured DPSC lines that can be differentiated into neurons may be safe for future in vivo therapy for neurobiological diseases. PMID:26032749

  6. In vitro osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and human dental pulp stem cells on poly-L-lysine-treated titanium-6-aluminium-4-vanadium.

    PubMed

    Galli, Daniela; Benedetti, Laura; Bongio, Matilde; Maliardi, Valentina; Silvani, Giulia; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Ronzoni, Flavio; Conte, Silvio; Benazzo, Francesco; Graziano, Antonio; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; De Angelis, Maria Gabriella Cusella

    2011-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) titanium-6-aluminium-4-vanadium (Ti6Al4V) is a widely used biomaterial for orthopedic prosthesis and dental implants; thanks to its very high-mechanical strength and resistance to corrosion. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are responsible for bone regeneration following colonization of prosthesis or dental implants. Both hMSCs and hDPSCs have lower ability to colonize this biomaterial in comparison with tissue culture-treated plastic. Both hMSCs and hDPSCs show lack of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation when grown on Ti6Al4V. This signal is restored in the presence of poly-L-lysine (poly-L-lys). Poly-L-lys has been used as part of organoapatite or together with zinc and calcium ions. Our results suggest that poly-L-lys alone induces FAK activation through β1-INTEGRIN, because the presence of β1-INTEGRIN blocking antibody avoided FAK autophosphorylation. Presence of poly-L-lys also increases expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes in hMSCs and hDPSCs grown on Ti6Al4V. PMID:21370441

  7. Immature Dental Pulp Stem Cells Showed Renotropic and Pericyte-Like Properties in Acute Renal Failure in Rats.

    PubMed

    Barros, Michele A; Martins, João Flávio Panattoni; Maria, Durvanei Augusto; Wenceslau, Crisitiane Valverde; De Souza, Dener Madeiro; Kerkis, Alexandre; Câmara, Niels Olsen S; Balieiro, Julio Cesar C; Kerkis, Irina

    2015-10-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common renal disease that can lead to high mortality. Recovery from ARF occurs with the replacement of necrotic tubular cells by functional tubular epithelial cells and the normalization of microvascular endothelial cell function in the peritubular capillaries. Conventional therapeutic techniques are often ineffective against ARF. Hence, stem cell therapies, which act through multiple trophic and regenerative mechanisms, are encouraging. We investigated the homing of human immature dental pulp stem cells (IDPSCs) after endovenous (EV) or intraperitoneal (IP) injection, in immunocompetent Wistar rats with ARF induced by intramuscular injection of glycerol, without the use of immunosuppression. The cells, which had been cryopreserved for 6 years, were CD105(+), CD73(+), CD44(+), and partly, STRO-1(+) and CD146(+), and presented unaltered mesoderm differentiation potential. The presence of these cells in the tubular region of the kidney and in the peritubular capillaries was demonstrated. These cells accelerate tubular epithelial cell regeneration through significant increase of Ki-67-immunoreactive cells in damaged kidney. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that IDPSCs home to the kidneys (EV 34.10% and IP 33.25%); a lower percentage of cells was found in the liver (EV 19.05% and IP 9.10%), in the muscles (EV 6.30% and IP 1.35%), and in the lungs (EV 2.0% and IP 1.85%). After infusion into rat, these cells express pericyte markers, such as CD146(+), STRO-1(+), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF(+)). We found that IDPSCs demonstrate renotropic and pericyte-like properties and contributed to restore renal tubule structure in an experimental rat ARF model. PMID:26858898

  8. Immature Dental Pulp Stem Cells Showed Renotropic and Pericyte-Like Properties in Acute Renal Failure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Michele A.; Martins, João Flávio Panattoni; Maria, Durvanei Augusto; Wenceslau, Crisitiane Valverde; De Souza, Dener Madeiro; Kerkis, Alexandre; Câmara, Niels Olsen S.; Balieiro, Julio Cesar C.; Kerkis, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common renal disease that can lead to high mortality. Recovery from ARF occurs with the replacement of necrotic tubular cells by functional tubular epithelial cells and the normalization of microvascular endothelial cell function in the peritubular capillaries. Conventional therapeutic techniques are often ineffective against ARF. Hence, stem cell therapies, which act through multiple trophic and regenerative mechanisms, are encouraging. We investigated the homing of human immature dental pulp stem cells (IDPSCs) after endovenous (EV) or intraperitoneal (IP) injection, in immunocompetent Wistar rats with ARF induced by intramuscular injection of glycerol, without the use of immunosuppression. The cells, which had been cryopreserved for 6 years, were CD105+, CD73+, CD44+, and partly, STRO-1+ and CD146+, and presented unaltered mesoderm differentiation potential. The presence of these cells in the tubular region of the kidney and in the peritubular capillaries was demonstrated. These cells accelerate tubular epithelial cell regeneration through significant increase of Ki-67-immunoreactive cells in damaged kidney. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that IDPSCs home to the kidneys (EV 34.10% and IP 33.25%); a lower percentage of cells was found in the liver (EV 19.05% and IP 9.10%), in the muscles (EV 6.30% and IP 1.35%), and in the lungs (EV 2.0% and IP 1.85%). After infusion into rat, these cells express pericyte markers, such as CD146+, STRO-1+, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF+). We found that IDPSCs demonstrate renotropic and pericyte-like properties and contributed to restore renal tubule structure in an experimental rat ARF model. PMID:26858898

  9. Effect of low-level laser irradiation on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Ivana Maria; Ginani, Fernanda; Mota-Filho, Haroldo Gurgel; Henriques, Águida Cristina Gomes; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão

    2015-12-01

    A positive effect of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the proliferation of some cell types has been observed, but little is known about its effect on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). The aim of this study was to identify the lowest energy density able to promote the proliferation of DPSCs and to maintain cell viability. Human DPSCs were isolated from two healthy third molars. In the third passage, the cells were irradiated or not (control) with an InGaAlP diode laser at 0 and 48 h using two different energy densities (0.5 and 1.0 J/cm²). Cell proliferation and viability and mitochondrial activity were evaluated at intervals of 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after the first laser application. Apoptosis- and cell cycle-related events were analyzed by flow cytometry. The group irradiated with an energy density of 1.0 J/cm² exhibited an increase of cell proliferation, with a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) compared to the control group at 72 and 96 h. No significant changes in cell viability were observed throughout the experiment. The distribution of cells in the cell cycle phases was consistent with proliferating cells in all three groups. We concluded that LLLI, particularly a dose of 1.0 J/cm², contributed to the growth of DPSCs and maintenance of its viability. This fact indicates this therapy to be an important future tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine involving stem cells. PMID:26341379

  10. MMP2-cleavage of DMP1 generates a bioactive peptide promoting differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cell.

    PubMed

    Chaussain, Catherine; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Huet, Eric; Floris, Caroline; Ravindran, Sriram; Hao, Jianjun; Menashi, Suzanne; George, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) plays a regulatory role in dentin mineralization and can also function as a signaling molecule. MMP-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-2) is a predominant protease in the dentin matrix that plays a prominent role in tooth formation and a potential role during the carious process. The possibility that MMP-2 can cleave DMP1 to release biologically active peptides was investigated in this study. DMP1, both in the recombinant form and in its native state within the dentin matrix, was shown to be a substrate for MMP-2. Proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 produced two major peptides, one that contains the C-terminal region of the protein known to carry both the ASARM (aspartic acid and serine rich domain) domain involved in biomineralization and the DNA binding site of DMP1. In vitro experiments with recombinant N- and C-terminal polypeptides mimicking the MMP-2 cleavage products of DMP1 demonstrated an effect of the C-polypeptide on the differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells to a putative odontoblast phenotype. In vivo implantation of this peptide in a rat injured pulp model induced a rapid formation of a homogeneous dentin bridge covered by a palisade of orientated cells expressing dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and DMP1, attesting an efficient repair process. These data suggest that a peptide generated through the proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 can regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal cells during dentinogenesis and thus sustain reparative dentin formation in pathological situations such as carious decay. In addition, these data open a new therapeutic possibility of using this peptide to regenerate dentin after an injury. PMID:19908197

  11. Ectopic Hard Tissue Formation by Odonto/Osteogenically In Vitro Differentiated Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seunghye; Song, Je Seon; Jeon, Mijeong; Shin, Dong Min; Kim, Seong-Oh; Lee, Jae Ho

    2015-07-01

    There have been many attempts to use the pulp tissue from human deciduous teeth for dentin or bone regeneration. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of deciduous teeth pulp stem cells (DTSCs) on their in vivo hard tissue-forming potential. DTSCs were isolated from extracted deciduous teeth using the outgrowth method. These cells were exposed to odonto/osteogenic stimuli for 4 and 8 days (Day 4 and Day 8 groups, respectively), while cells in the control group were cultured in normal medium. The in vitro differentiated DTSCs and the control DTSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice with macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate and sacrificed at 8 weeks post-implantation. The effect of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation was evaluated using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The in vivo effect was evaluated by qualitative RT-PCR, assessment of ALP activity, histologic analysis, and immunohistochemical staining. The amount of hard tissue was greater in Day 4 group than Day 8 group (p = 0.014). However, Day 8 group generated lamellar bone-like structure, which was immunonegative to anti-human dentin sialoprotein with significantly low expression level of DSPP compared with the control group (p = 0.008). This study demonstrates that odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs enhances the formation of bone-like tissue, instead of dentin-like tissue, when transplanted subcutaneously using MBCP as a carrier. The odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs may be an effective modification that enhances in vivo bone formation by DTSCs. PMID:25894066

  12. MMP2-CLEAVAGE OF DMP1 GENERATES A BIOACTIVE PEPTIDE PROMOTING DIFFERENTIATION OF DENTAL PULP STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Chaussain, Catherine; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Huet, Eric; Floris, Caroline; Ravindran, Sriram; Hao, Jianjun; Menashi, Suzanne; George, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) plays a regulatory role in dentin mineralization and can also function as a signaling molecule. MMP-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-2) is a predominant protease in the dentin matrix that plays a prominent role in tooth formation and a potential role during the carious process. The possibility that MMP-2 can cleave DMP1 to release biologically active peptides was investigated in this study. DMP1, both in the recombinant form and in its native state within the dentin matrix, was shown to be a substrate for MMP-2. Proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 produced two major peptides, one that contains the C-terminal region of the protein known to carry both the ASARM (aspartic acid and serine rich domain) domain involved in biomineralization and the DNA binding site of DMP1. In vitro experiments with recombinant N- and C-terminal polypeptides mimicking the MMP-2 cleavage products of DMP1 demonstrated an effect of the C-polypeptide on the differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells to a putative odontoblast phenotype. In vivo implantation of this peptide in a rat injured pulp model induced a rapid formation of a homogeneous dentin bridge covered by a palisade of orientated cells expressing dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and DMP1, attesting an efficient repair process. These data suggest that a peptide generated through the proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 can regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal cells during dentinogenesis and thus sustain reparative dentin formation in pathological situations such as carious decay. In addition, these data open a new therapeutic possibility of using this peptide to regenerate dentin after an injury. PMID:19908197

  13. Dental pulp-derived stem cell conditioned medium reduces cardiac injury following ischemia-reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Shibata, Rei; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Masaya; Hibi, Hideharu; Tanigawa, Tohru; Ueda, Minoru; Murohara, Toyoaki; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) can regenerate various tissues. We investigated the impact of SHED-conditioned medium (SHED-CM) on myocardial injury in a mouse model of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to myocardial ischemia followed by reperfusion. SHED-CM was intravenously injected at 5 min after reperfusion. Administration of SHED-CM reduced myocardial infarct size as well as decreased apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine levels, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-β, in the myocardium following I/R. In cultured cardiac myocytes, SHED-CM significantly suppressed apoptosis under hypoxia/serum-deprivation and reduced LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Furthermore, anti-apoptotic action of SHED-CM was stronger than bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC)-CM or adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)-CM in cardiac myocytes. SHED-CM contains a higher concentration of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) than BMSC-CM and ADSC-CM, and neutralization of HGF attenuated the inhibitory actions of SHED-CM on apoptosis in cardiac myocytes. Finally, WT mice were intravenously treated with an HGF-depleted SHED-CM, followed by myocardial I/R. HGF depletion significantly attenuated the inhibitory actions of SHED-CM on myocardial infarct size and apoptosis after I/R. SHED-CM protects the heart from acute ischemic injury because it suppresses inflammation and apoptosis. SHED-CM could be a useful treatment option for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:26542315

  14. In Vivo Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Embedded in an Injectable In Vivo-Forming Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja Yong; Park, Seung Hun; Park, Ji Hoon; Lee, Bo Keun; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Bong; Kim, Jae Ho; Min, Byoung Hyun; Kim, Moon Suk

    2016-08-01

    In this study, human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are examined as a cellular source for bone tissue engineering using an in vivo-forming hydrogel. The hDPSCs are easily harvested in large quantities from extracted teeth. The stemness of harvested hDPSCs indicates their relative tolerance to ex vivo manipulation in culture. The in vitro osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs is characterized using Alizarin Red S (ARS), von Kossa (VK), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. The solution of hDPSCs and a methoxy polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone block copolymer (PC) is easily prepared by simple mixing at room temperature and in no more than 10 s it forms in vivo hydrogels after subcutaneous injection into rats. In vivo osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs in the in vivo-forming hydrogel is confirmed by micro-computed tomography (CT), histological staining, and gene expression. Micro-CT analysis shows evidence of significant tissue-engineered bone formation in hDPSCs-loaded hydrogel in the presence of osteogenic factors. Differentiated osteoblasts in in vivo-forming hydrogel are identified by ARS and VK staining and are found to exhibit characteristic expression of genes like osteonectin, osteopontin, and osteocalcin. In conclusion, hDPSCs embedded in an in vivo-forming hydrogel may provide benefits as a noninvasive formulation for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:27074749

  15. Regeneration of dental pulp/dentine complex with a three-dimensional and scaffold-free stem-cell sheet-derived pellet.

    PubMed

    Na, Sijia; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Fang; Wang, Weiqi; Ding, Yin; Li, Dechao; Jin, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Dental pulp/dentine complex regeneration is indispensable to the construction of biotissue-engineered tooth roots and represents a promising approach to therapy for irreversible pulpitis. We used a tissue-engineering method based on odontogenic stem cells to design a three-dimensional (3D) and scaffold-free stem-cell sheet-derived pellet (CSDP) with the necessary physical and biological properties. Stem cells were isolated and identified and stem cells from root apical papilla (SCAPs)-based CSDPs were then fabricated and examined. Compact cell aggregates containing a high proportion of extracellular matrix (ECM) components were observed, and the CSDP culture time was prolonged. The expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), dentine sialoprotein (DSPP), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and runt-related gene 2 (RUNX2) mRNA was higher in CSDPs than in cell sheets (CSs), indicating that CSDPs have greater odonto/osteogenic potential. To further investigate this hypothesis, CSDPs and CSs were inserted into human treated dentine matrix fragments (hTDMFs) and transplanted into the subcutaneous space in the backs of immunodeficient mice, where they were cultured in vivo for 6 weeks. The root space with CSDPs was filled entirely with a dental pulp-like tissue with well-established vascularity, and a continuous layer of dentine-like tissue was deposited onto the existing dentine. A layer of odontoblast-like cells was found to express DSPP, ALP and BSP, and human mitochondria lined the surface of the newly formed dentine-like tissue. These results clearly indicate that SCAP-CSDPs with a mount of endogenous ECM have a strong capacity to form a heterotopic dental pulp/dentine complex in empty root canals; this method can be used in the fabrication of bioengineered dental roots and also provides an alternative treatment approach for pulp disease. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23365018

  16. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition with Valproic Acid Downregulates Osteocalcin Gene Expression in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Osteoblasts: Evidence for HDAC2 Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Francesca; la Noce, Marcel; Tirino, Virginia; Naddeo, Pasqualina; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; De Rosa, Alfredo; Laino, Luigi; Altucci, Lucia; Papaccio, Gianpaolo

    2014-01-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells, are of great interest for cell-based tissue engineering strategies because they can differentiate into a variety of tissue-specific cells, above all, into osteoblasts. In recent years, epigenetic studies on stem cells have indicated that specific histone alterations and modifying enzymes play essential roles in cell differentiation. However, although several studies have reported that valproic acid (VPA)—a selective inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDAC)—enhances osteoblast differentiation, data on osteocalcin expression—a late-stage marker of differentiation—are limited. We therefore decided to study the effect of VPA on dental pulp stem cell differentiation. A low concentration of VPA did not reduce cell viability, proliferation, or cell cycle profile. However, it was sufficient to significantly enhance matrix mineralization by increasing osteopontin and bone sialoprotein expression. In contrast, osteocalcin levels were decreased, an effect induced at the transcriptional level, and were strongly correlated with inhibition of HDAC2. In fact, HDAC2 silencing with shRNA produced a similar effect to that of VPA treatment on the expression of osteoblast-related markers. We conclude that VPA does not induce terminal differentiation of osteoblasts, but stimulates the generation of less mature cells. Moreover, specific suppression of an individual HDAC by RNA interference could enhance only a single aspect of osteoblast differentiation, and thus produce selective effects. PMID:24105979

  17. Multiwall carbon nanotubes/polycaprolactone scaffolds seeded with human dental pulp stem cells for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Flores-Cedillo, M L; Alvarado-Estrada, K N; Pozos-Guillén, A J; Murguía-Ibarra, J S; Vidal, M A; Cervantes-Uc, J M; Rosales-Ibáñez, R; Cauich-Rodríguez, J V

    2016-02-01

    Conventional approaches to bone regeneration rarely use multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) but instead use polymeric matrices filled with hydroxyapatite, calcium phosphates and bioactive glasses. In this study, we prepared composites of MWCNTs/polycaprolactone (PCL) for bone regeneration as follows: (a) MWCNTs randomly dispersed on PCL, (b) MWCNTs aligned with an electrical field to determine if the orientation favors the growing of human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs), and (c) MWCNTs modified with β-glycerol phosphate (BGP) to analyze its osteogenic potential. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of MWCNTs and BGP on PCL, whereas the increase in crystallinity by the addition of MWCNTs to PCL was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. A higher elastic modulus (608 ± 4.3 MPa), maximum stress (42 ± 6.1 MPa) and electrical conductivity (1.67 × 10(-7) S/m) were observed in non-aligned MWCNTs compared with the pristine PCL. Cell viability at 14 days was similar in all samples according to the live/dead assay, but the 21 day cell proliferation, measured by MTT was higher in MWCNTs aligned with BGP. Von Kossa and Alizarin red showed larger amounts of mineral deposits on MWCNTs aligned with BGP, indicating that at 21 days, this scaffold promotes osteogenic differentiation of HDPSCs. PMID:26704552

  18. Effect of low-level diode laser on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, Fahimeh S.; Torshabi, Maryam; Mojahedi Nasab, Masoud; Khosraviani, Keikhosro; Khojasteh, Arash

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed the effect of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). DPSCs were exposed to 810 nm laser light (0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 J cm-2) for 7 d (60 s daily). The negative control group (cells in regular medium) and positive control group (cells in osteogenic medium (OM)) were not lased. One group of cells in OM was irradiated with laser operated at 0.2 J cm-2. Cell viability was evaluated at 24 h and one week after the last day of laser irradiation using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and alizarin Red S staining. Cell proliferation was not affected by laser irradiation at 24 h except in one group (cells in OM exposed to laser at 0.2 J cm-2). However, one week after the last day of laser irradiation, it was significantly increased in groups exposed to laser at 0.1 or 0.2 J cm-2 and decreased in groups containing OM (P  <  0.05). Osteoblast marker expression was observed in groups containing OM. LLLI at 0.2 J cm-2 dramatically enhanced cell differentiation. Laser at 0.3 J cm-2 increased bone sialoprotein (BSP) and decreased alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Mineralized nodules were only observed in groups containing OM. Considering these findings, LLLI may be used as a novel approach for preconditioning of DPSCs in vitro prior to bone tissue engineering.

  19. Fighting for territories: time-lapse analysis of dental pulp and dental follicle stem cells in co-culture reveals specific migratory capabilities.

    PubMed

    Schiraldi, C; Stellavato, A; D'Agostino, A; Tirino, V; d'Aquino, R; Woloszyk, A; De Rosa, A; Laino, L; Papaccio, G; Mitsiadis, T A

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell migration is a critical step during the repair of damaged tissues. In order to achieve appropriate cell-based therapies for tooth and periodontal ligament repair it is necessary first to understand the dynamics of tissue-specific stem cell populations such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) and dental follicle stem cells (DFSC). Using time-lapse imaging, we analysed migratory and proliferative capabilities of these two human stem cell lines in vitro. When cultured alone, both DPSC and DFSC exhibited low and irregular migration profiles. In co-cultures, DFSC, but not DPSC, spectacularly increased their migration activity and velocity. DFSC rapidly surrounded the DPSC, thus resembling the in vivo developmental process, where follicle cells encircle both dental epithelium and pulp. Cell morphology was dependent on the culture conditions (mono-culture or co-culture) and changed over time. Regulatory genes involved in dental cell migration and differentiation such as TWIST1, MSX1, RUNX2, SFRP1 and ADAM28, were also evaluated in co-cultures. MSX1 up-regulation indicates that DPSC and DFSC retain their odontogenic potential. However, DPSC lose their capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts in the presence of DFSC, as suggested by RUNX2 up-regulation and TWIST1 down-regulation. In contrast, the unchanged levels of SFRP1 expression suggest that DFSC retain their potential to form periodontal tissues even in the presence of DPSC. These findings demonstrate that stem cells behave differently according to their environment, retain their genetic memory, and compete with each other to acquire the appropriate territory. Understanding the mechanisms involved in stem cell migration may lead to new therapeutic approaches for tooth repair. PMID:23180452

  20. A standardized procedure to obtain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from minimally manipulated dental pulp and Wharton's jelly samples.

    PubMed

    Ducret, M; Fabre, H; Degoult, O; Atzeni, G; McGuckin, C; Forraz, N; Mallein-Gerrin, F; Perrier-Groult, E; Fargues, J C

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem/stromalcells (MSCs) has emerged as an effectivemethod to treat diseased or damagedorgans and tissues, and hundreds of clinicaltrials using MSCs are currently under way todemonstrate the validity of such a therapeuticapproach. However, most MSCs used for clinicaltrials are prepared in research laboratorieswith insufficient manufacturing quality control.In particular, laboratories lack standardizedprocedures for in vitro isolation of MSCs fromtissue samples, resulting in heterogeneouspopulations of cells and variable experimentaland clinical results.MSCs are now referred to as Human CellularTissue-based Products or Advanced TherapyMedicinal Products, and guidelines fromthe American Code of Federal Regulation ofthe Food and Drug Administration (21 CFRPart 1271) and from the European MedicinesAgency (European Directive 1394/2007) definerequirements for appropriate production ofthese cells. These guidelines, commonly called"Good Manufacturing Practices" (GMP),include recommendations about laboratorycell culture procedures to ensure optimal reproducibility,efficacy and safety of the finalmedicinal product. In particular, the Food andDrug Administration divides ex vivo culturedcells into "minimally" and "more than minimally"manipulated samples, in function of theuse or not of procedures "that might alter thebiological features of the cells". Today, minimalmanipulation conditions have not beendefined for the collection and isolation ofMSCs (Torre et al. 2015)(Ducret et al. 2015).Most if not all culture protocols that have beenreported so far are unsatisfactory, becauseof the use of xeno- or allogeneic cell culturemedia, enzymatic treatment and long-termcell amplification that are known to alter thequality of MSCs.The aim of this study was to describe a standardizedprocedure for recovering MSCs withminimal handling from two promising sources,the dental pulp (DP) and the Wharton's jelly(WJ) of the umbilical cord. The quality and

  1. Neurogenic maturation of human dental pulp stem cells following neurosphere generation induces morphological and electrophysiological characteristics of functional neurons.

    PubMed

    Gervois, Pascal; Struys, Tom; Hilkens, Petra; Bronckaers, Annelies; Ratajczak, Jessica; Politis, Constantinus; Brône, Bert; Lambrichts, Ivo; Martens, Wendy

    2015-02-01

    Cell-based therapies are emerging as an alternative treatment option to promote functional recovery in patients suffering from neurological disorders, which are the major cause of death and permanent disability. The present study aimed to differentiate human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) toward functionally active neuronal cells in vitro. hDPSCs were subjected to a two-step protocol. First, neuronal induction was acquired through the formation of neurospheres, followed by neuronal maturation, based on cAMP and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) signaling. At the ultrastructural level, it was shown that the intra-spheral microenvironment promoted intercellular communication. hDPSCs grew out of the neurospheres in vitro and established a neurogenic differentiated hDPSC culture (d-hDPSCs) upon cAMP and NT-3 signaling. d-hDPSCs were characterized by the increased expression of neuronal markers such as neuronal nuclei, microtubule-associated protein 2, neural cell adhesion molecule, growth-associated protein 43, synapsin I, and synaptophysin compared with nondifferentiated hDPSCs. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that the secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and nerve growth factor differed between d-hDPSCs and hDPSCs. d-hDPSCs acquired neuronal features, including multiple intercommunicating cytoplasmic extensions and increased vesicular transport, as shown by the electron microscopic observation. Patch clamp analysis demonstrated the functional activity of d-hDPSCs by the presence of tetrodotoxin- and tetraethyl ammonium-sensitive voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels, respectively. A subset of d-hDPSCs was able to fire a single action potential. The results reported in this study demonstrate that hDPSCs are capable of neuronal commitment following neurosphere formation, characterized by distinct morphological and electrophysiological properties of functional neuronal cells. PMID:25203005

  2. Human amniotic fluid-derived and dental pulp-derived stem cells seeded into collagen scaffold repair critical-size bone defects promoting vascularization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The main aim of this study is to evaluate potential human stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells and amniotic fluid stem cells, combined with collagen scaffold to reconstruct critical-size cranial bone defects in an animal model. Methods We performed two symmetric full-thickness cranial defects on each parietal region of rats and we replenished them with collagen scaffolds with or without stem cells already seeded into and addressed towards osteogenic lineage in vitro. After 4 and 8 weeks, cranial tissue samples were taken for histological and immunofluorescence analysis. Results We observed a new bone formation in all of the samples but the most relevant differences in defect correction were shown by stem cell–collagen samples 4 weeks after implant, suggesting a faster regeneration ability of the combined constructs. The presence of human cells in the newly formed bone was confirmed by confocal analysis with an antibody directed to a human mitochondrial protein. Furthermore, human cells were found to be an essential part of new vessel formation in the scaffold. Conclusion These data confirmed the strong potential of bioengineered constructs of stem cell–collagen scaffold for correcting large cranial defects in an animal model and highlighting the role of stem cells in neovascularization during skeletal defect reconstruction. PMID:23688855

  3. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  4. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. They serve as a repair ... body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances in vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    D' Alimonte, I; Nargi, E; Mastrangelo, F; Falco, G; Lanuti, P; Marchisio, M; Miscia, S; Robuffo, I; Capogreco, M; Buccella, S; Caputi, S; Caciagli, F; Tetè, S; Ciccarelli, R

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), isolated from dental tissues, are largely studied for future application in regenerative dentistry. In this study, we used MSC obtained from human dental pulp (DPSC) of normal impacted third molars that, when cultured in lineage-specific inducing media, differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes (evaluated by Alizarin Red S and Red Oil O stainings, respectively), thus showing a multipotency. We confirmed that DPSC, grown under undifferentiating conditions, are negative for hematopoietic (CD45, CD31, CD34, CD144) and positive for mesenchymal (CD29, CD90, CD105, CD166, CD146, STRO-1) markers, that underwent down-regulation when cells were grown in osteogenic medium for 3 weeks. In this condition, they also exhibit an increase in the expression of osteogenic markers (RUNX-2, alkaline phosphatase) and extracellular calcium deposition, whereas the expression of receptors (VEGFR-1 and -2) for vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) and related VEGF binding proteins was similar to that found in undifferentiated DPSC. Exposure of DPSC growing under undifferentiating or osteogenic conditions to VEGF-A165 peptide (10-40 ng/ml) for 8 days dose- and time-dependently increased the number of proliferating cells without inducing differentiation towards endothelial lineage, as evaluated by the lack of expression of specific markers (CD31, CD34, CD144). Additionally, exposure of DPSC cultured in osteogenic medium to VEGF-A165 for a similar period enhanced cell differentiation towards osteoblasts as evaluated after 14 and 21 days by Alizarin Red S staining and alkaline phosphatase activity quantification. These findings may have clinical implications possibly facilitating tissue repair and remodeling. PMID:21382274

  6. STRO-1 selected rat dental pulp stem cells transfected with adenoviral-mediated human bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene show enhanced odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuechao; van der Kraan, Peter M; van den Dolder, Juliette; Walboomers, X Frank; Bian, Zhuan; Fan, Mingwen; Jansen, John A

    2007-11-01

    Dental pulp stem cells harbor great potential for tissue-engineering purposes. However, previous studies have shown variable results, and some have reported only limited osteogenic and odontogenic potential.Because bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-established agents to induce bone and dentin formation,in this study STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp-derived stem cells were transfected with the adenoviral mediated human BMP-2 gene. Subsequently, the cells were evaluated for their odontogenic differentiation ability in medium not containing dexamethasone or other stimuli. Cultures were investigated using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and evaluated for cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase(ALP) activity, and calcium content. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for gene expression of Alp, osteocalcin, collagen type I, bone sialoprotein, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1. Finally, an oligo-microarray was used to profile the expression of odontogenesis-related genes. Results of ALP activity, calcium content, and real-time PCR showed that only BMP2-transfected cells had the ability to differentiate into the odontoblast phenotype and to produce a calcified extracellular matrix. SEM and oligo-microarray confirmed these results. In contrast, the non-transfected cells represented a less differentiated cell phenotype. Based on our results, we concluded that the adenovirus can transfect STRO-1 selected cells with high efficacy. After BMP2 gene transfection, these cells had the ability to differentiate into odontoblast phenotype, even without the addition of odontogenic supplements to the medium. PMID:17824831

  7. Effects of Perivitelline Fluid Obtained from Horseshoe Crab on The Proliferation and Genotoxicity of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Marahaini; Mohd Ali, Khadijah; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Azlina, Ahmad; Omar, Nor Shamsuria; Chatterji, Anil; Mokhtar, Khairani Idah

    2015-01-01

    Objective Perivitelline fluid (PVF) of the horseshoe crab embryo has been reported to possess an important role during embryogenesis by promoting cell proliferation. This study aims to evaluate the effect of PVF on the proliferation, chromosome aberration (CA) and mutagenicity of the dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Materials and Methods This is an in vitro experimental study. PVF samples were collected from horseshoe crabs from beaches in Malaysia and the crude extract was prepared. DPSCs were treated with different concentrations of PVF crude extract in an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay (cytotoxicity test). We choose two inhibitory concentrations (IC50 and IC25) and two PVF concentrations which produced more cell viability compared to a negative control (100%) for further tests. Quantitative analysis of the proliferation activity of PVF was studied using the AlamarBlue®assay for 10 days. Population doubling times (PDTs) of the treatment groups were calculated from this assay. Genotoxicity was evaluated based on the CA and Ames tests. Statistical analysis was carried out using independent t test to calculate significant differences in the PDT and mitotic indices in the CA test between the treatment and negative control groups. Significant differences in the data were P<0.05. Results A total of four PVF concentrations retrieved from the MTT assay were 26.887 mg/ml (IC50), 14.093 mg/ml (IC25), 0.278 mg/ml (102% cell viability) and 0.019 mg/ml (102.5% cell viability). According to the AlamarBlue®assay, these PVF groups produced comparable proliferation activities compared to the negative (untreated) control. PDTs between PVF groups and the negative control were insignificantly different (P>0.05). No significant aberrations in chromosomes were observed in the PVF groups and the Ames test on the PVF showed the absence of significant positive results. Conclusion PVF from horseshoe crabs produced insignificant proliferative

  8. Behaviour of dental pulp stem cells on different types of innovative mesoporous and nanoporous silicon scaffolds with different functionalizations of the surfaces.

    PubMed

    Marrelli, M; Falisi, G; Apicella, A; Apicella, D; Amantea, M; Cielo, A; Bonanome, L; Palmieri, F; Santacroce, L; Giannini, S; Di Fabrizio, E; Rastelli, C; Gargari, M; Cuda, G; Paduano, F; Tatullo, M

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are stem cells found in the dental pulp. The ability of DPSCs to differentiate towards odontoblastic and osteoblastic phenotype was reported first in the literature, then in the following years, numerous studies on odontogenesis were carried out, starting from mesenchymal stem cells isolated from tissues of dental and oral origin. The aim of this research was to evaluate the behaviour of DPSCs grown on silicon nanoporous and mesoporous matrices and differentiated towards the osteogenic phenotype, but also to investigate the use of DPSCs in pilot studies focused on the biological compatibility of innovative dental biomaterials. Twenty-eight silicon samples were created with standardized procedures. These scaffolds were divided into samples made of silicon bulk, nanoporous silicon, mesoporous silicon, nanoporous silicon functionalized with (3-Aminopropyl) Trimethoxysilane (APTMS) and methanol (MeOH), nanoporous silicon functionalized with (3-Aminopropyl) Trimethoxysilane (APTMS)/toluene, mesoporous silicon functionalized with (3-Aminopropyl) Trimethoxysilane (APTMS) and methanol (MeOH) andmesoporous silicon functionalized with (3-Aminopropyl) Trimethoxysilane (APTMS)/toluene. DPSC proliferation on the tested silicon scaffolds was analyzed at 3 and 5 days. The assay showed that DPSCs proliferated better on mesoporous scaffolds functionalized with APTMS/toluene compared to a silicon one. These results show that the functionalization of silicon scaffold with APTMS/toluene supports the growth of DPSCs and could be used for future applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26753666

  9. Effects of Non-Collagenous Proteins, TGF-β1, and PDGF-BB on Viability and Proliferation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Fahimeh Sadat

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The dentin matrix servers as a reservoir of growth factors, sequestered during dentinogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess the viability and proliferation of dental pulp stem cells in the presence of dentin matrix-derived non-collagenous proteins and two growth factors; platelet-derived growth factor BB and transforming growth factor beta 1. Material and Methods The dental pulp cells were isolated and cultured. The dentin proteins were extracted and purified. The MTT assay was performed for assessment of cell viability and proliferation in the presence of different concentrations of dentin proteins and growth factors during 24 - 72 h post-treatment. Results The cells treated with 250 ng/mL dentin proteins had the best viability and proliferation ability in comparison with other concentrations (P < 0.05). The MTT assay demonstrated that cells cultured with 5 ng/mL platelet-derived growth factor BB had the highest viability at each time point as compared to other groups (P < 0.05). However, in presence of platelet-derived growth factor BB alone and in combination with transforming growth factor beta 1 and dentin proteins (10 ng/mL), significant higher viability was seen at all time points (P < 0.05). The least viability and proliferation at each growth factor concentration was seen in cells treated with combination of transforming growth factor beta 1 and dentin proteins at 72 h (P < 0.05). Conclusions The results indicated that the triple combination of growth factors and matrix-derived non-collagenous proteins (especially at 10 ng/mL concentration) has mitogenic effect on dental pulp stem cells. PMID:27099698

  10. Secreted factors from dental pulp stem cells improve glucose intolerance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by increasing pancreatic β-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Izumoto-Akita, Takako; Tsunekawa, Shin; Yamamoto, Akihito; Uenishi, Eita; Ishikawa, Kota; Ogata, Hidetada; Iida, Atsushi; Ikeniwa, Makoto; Hosokawa, Kaori; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Maekawa, Ryuya; Yamauchi, Yuichiro; Seino, Yusuke; Hamada, Yoji; Hibi, Hideharu; Arima, Hiroshi; Ueda, Minoru; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many studies have reported that stem cell transplantation promotes propagation and protection of pancreatic β-cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice without the differentiation of transplanted cells into pancreatic β-cells, suggesting that the improvement is due to a paracrine effect of the transplanted cells. We investigated the effects of factors secreted by dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) on β-cell function and survival. Research design and methods Conditioned medium from SHED (SHED-CM) was collected 48 h after culturing in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). The insulin levels in SHED-CM and serum-free conditioned media from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-CM) were undetectable. STZ-induced diabetic male C57B/6J mice were injected with DMEM as a control, SHED-CM, exendin-4 (Ex-4), or BM-CM for 14 days. Mouse pancreatic β-cell line MIN6 cells were incubated with different concentrations of STZ with SHED-CM, DMEM, Ex-4, or BM-CM for 6 h. Results Administration of 1 mL of SHED-CM twice a day improved glucose intolerance in STZ-induced diabetic mice and the effect continued for 20 days after the end of treatment. SHED-CM treatment increased pancreatic insulin content and β-cell mass through proliferation and an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test revealed enhanced insulin secretion. Incubation of MIN6 cells (a mouse pancreatic β-cell line) with SHED-CM enhanced insulin secretion in a glucose concentration-dependent manner and reduced STZ-induced cell death, indicating that the amelioration of hyperglycemia was caused by the direct effects of SHED-CM on β-cell function and survival. These effects were more pronounced than with the use of Ex-4, a conventional incretin-based drug, and BM-CM, which is a medium derived from other stem cells. Conclusions These findings suggest that SHED-CM provides direct protection and encourages the propagation of β-cells

  11. Activation of p38, p21, and NRF-2 Mediates Decreased Proliferation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Cultured under 21% O2

    PubMed Central

    El Alami, Marya; Viña-Almunia, Jose; Gambini, Juan; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Siow, Richard C.M.; Peñarrocha, Miguel; Mann, Giovanni E.; Borrás, Consuelo; Viña, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Summary High rates of stem cell proliferation are important in regenerative medicine and in stem cell banking for clinical use. Ambient oxygen tensions (21% O2) are normally used for in vitro culture, but physiological levels in vivo range between 3% and 6% O2. We compared proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) cultured under 21% versus 3% O2. The rate of hDPSC proliferation is significantly lower at 21% O2 compared to physiological oxygen levels due to enhanced oxidative stress. Under 21% O2, increased p38 phosphorylation led to activation of p21. Increased generation of reactive oxygen species and p21 led to activation of the NRF-2 signaling pathway. The upregulation of NRF-2 antioxidant defense genes under 21% O2 may interact with cell-cycle-related proteins involved in regulating cell proliferation. Activation of p38/p21/NRF-2 in hDPSCs cultured under ambient oxygen tension inhibits stem cell proliferation and upregulates NRF-2 antioxidant defenses. PMID:25358785

  12. Priming Dental Pulp Stem Cells With Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Increases Angiogenesis of Implanted Tissue-Engineered Constructs Through Hepatocyte Growth Factor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Caroline; Rochefort, Gael Y; Bascetin, Rumeyza; Ying, Hanru; Lesieur, Julie; Sadoine, Jérémy; Beckouche, Nathan; Berndt, Sarah; Novais, Anita; Lesage, Matthieu; Hosten, Benoit; Vercellino, Laetitia; Merlet, Pascal; Le-Denmat, Dominique; Marchiol, Carmen; Letourneur, Didier; Nicoletti, Antonino; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Poliard, Anne; Salmon, Benjamin; Muller, Laurent; Chaussain, Catherine; Germain, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineering strategies based on implanting cellularized biomaterials are promising therapeutic approaches for the reconstruction of large tissue defects. A major hurdle for the reliable establishment of such therapeutic approaches is the lack of rapid blood perfusion of the tissue construct to provide oxygen and nutrients. Numerous sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) displaying angiogenic potential have been characterized in the past years, including the adult dental pulp. Establishment of efficient strategies for improving angiogenesis in tissue constructs is nevertheless still an important challenge. Hypoxia was proposed as a priming treatment owing to its capacity to enhance the angiogenic potential of stem cells through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. The present study aimed to characterize additional key factors regulating the angiogenic capacity of such MSCs, namely, dental pulp stem cells derived from deciduous teeth (SHED). We identified fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) as a potent inducer of the release of VEGF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by SHED. We found that FGF-2 limited hypoxia-induced downregulation of HGF release. Using three-dimensional culture models of angiogenesis, we demonstrated that VEGF and HGF were both responsible for the high angiogenic potential of SHED through direct targeting of endothelial cells. In addition, FGF-2 treatment increased the fraction of Stro-1+/CD146+ progenitor cells. We then applied in vitro FGF-2 priming to SHED before encapsulation in hydrogels and in vivo subcutaneous implantation. Our results showed that FGF-2 priming is more efficient than hypoxia at increasing SHED-induced vascularization compared with nonprimed controls. Altogether, these data demonstrate that FGF-2 priming enhances the angiogenic potential of SHED through the secretion of both HGF and VEGF. PMID:26798059

  13. The effect of calcium phosphate composite scaffolds on the osteogenic differentiation of rabbit dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ling E; Feng, Lin; Liu, Hong-Chen; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Shi, Zhan-Ping; Wang, Jun-Cheng; Luo, Wei; Lv, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the effects of the two calcium phosphate composite scaffolds on the attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of rabbit dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). One nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly (l-lactide) (nHAC/PLA), imitating the composition and the micro-structure characteristics of the natural bone, was made by Beijing Allgens Medical Science & Technology Co., Ltd. (China). The other beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), being fully interoperability globular pore structure, was provided by Shanghai Bio-lu Biomaterials Co, Ltd. (China). We compared the absorption water rate and the protein adsorption rate of two scaffolds and the characterization of DPSCs cultured on the culture plate and both scaffolds under osteogenic differentiation media (ODM) treatment. The constructs were then implanted subcutaneously into the back of severely combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice for 8 and 12 weeks to compare their bone formation capacity. The results showed that the ODM-treated DPSCs expressed osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), type I collagen (COLI) and osteopontin (OPN) by immunofluorescence staining. Positive alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, calcium deposition and calcium nodules were also observed on the ODM-treated DPSCs. The absorption water rate and protein adsorption rate of nHAC/PLA was significantly higher than β-TCP. The initial attachment of DPSCs seeded onto nHAC/PLA was significantly higher than that onto β-TCP; and the proliferation rate of the cells was also significantly higher than that of β-TCP on 1, 3, and 7 days of cell culture. The ALP activity, calcium/phosphorus content and mineral formation of DPSCs + β-TCP were significantly higher than DPSCs + nHAC/LA. When implanted into the back of SCID mice, nHAC/PLA alone had no new bone formation, newly formed mature bone and osteoid were only observed in β-TCP alone, DPSCs + nHAC/PLA and DPSCs + β-TCP, and this three

  14. Nano-Structured Gelatin/Bioactive Glass Hybrid Scaffolds for the Enhancement of Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Tiejun; Liu, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Tooth decay is one of the most common chronic disorders throughout the world. Regenerating decayed dentin/pulp structure requires the design of novel scaffolding materials that mimic the architecture of natural dental extracellular matrix (ECM) and provide suitable environments for the attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and biomineralization of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). In this work, we developed an approach to prepare three-dimensional (3D) nano-fibrous gelatin/silica bioactive glass (NF-gelatin/SBG) hybrid scaffolds that mimic the nano-structured architecture and chemical composition of natural dental ECM. This approach involved the combination of a thermally induced phase separation, sol-gel, and porogen leaching process, and synthesized hybrid scaffolds possessing natural ECM-like architecture, high porosity, well-defined pore size and interconnectivity, and improved mechanical strength. An in vitro cell culture study showed that human DPSCs had a significantly higher proliferation rate on NF-gelatin/SBG scaffolds compared to NF-gelatin scaffolds under the same conditions. Furthermore, the integration of SBG into the hybrid scaffold significantly promoted the differentiation and biomineralization of the human DPSCs. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expressions of marker genes for odontogenic differentiation (Col I, ALP, OCN, DSPP and DMP-1) were all significantly higher in the NF-gelatin/SBG than in the NF-gelatin group. Those results were further confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and von Kossa staining, as evidenced by greater ECM secretion and mineral deposition in the hybrid scaffold. In summary, the biomimetic NF-gelatin/SBG hybrid scaffolds provide an excellent environment for the growth and differentiation of human DPSCs and are promising candidates for dentin/pulp tissue regeneration. PMID:24098854

  15. Tetracycline-regulated expression of OLIG2 gene in human dental pulp stem cells lead to mouse sciatic nerve regeneration upon transplantation.

    PubMed

    Askari, N; Yaghoobi, M M; Shamsara, M; Esmaeili-Mahani, S

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies have indicated dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) potency to differentiate into several types of cell lineages. Oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2) plays an important role in the oligodendrogenic pathway. In this study, a tetracycline (Tet)-inducible system expressing OLIG2 gene was transfected into human DPSCs to direct their differentiation toward oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Following induction, the expression of stage-specific markers was studied by Reverse Transcription quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry and western blotting. In the following, the cells were transplanted into the mouse model of local sciatic demyelination damage by lysolecithin. Recovery of lysolecithin-induced lesions in sciatic nerve was studied by treadmill exercise, von Frey filament test and hind paw withdrawal in response to a thermal stimulus. Improvement of behavioral symptoms was efficiently observed from the second week to the sixth week post-transplantation. Our findings showed that exogenous expression of the OLIG2 gene by a Tet-regulated system could be used as an efficient way to induce the differentiation of DPSCs into functional oligodendrocytes. Meanwhile, the DPSC-derived OPCs have relevant therapeutic potential in the animal model of sciatic nerve injury and therefore might represent a valuable tool for stem cell-based therapy in inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the peripheral and central nervous systems (CNSs). PMID:26254831

  16. An In vivo Model for Short-Term Evaluation of the Implantation Effects of Biomolecules or Stem Cells in the Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda-Pinheiro, Sally; Marchadier, Arnaud; Donãs, Patricio; Septier, Dominique; Benhamou, Laurent; Kellermann, Odile; Goldberg, Michel; Poliard, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The continuously growing rodent incisor is a widely used model to investigate odontogenesis and mineralized tissue formation. This study focused on evaluating the mouse mandibular incisor as an experimental biological tool for analyzing in vivo the capacity of odontoblast-like progenitors or bioactive molecules to contribute to reparative dentinogenesis. We describe here a surgical procedure allowing direct access to the forming part of the incisor dental pulp Amelogenin peptide A+4 adsorbed on agarose beads, or dental pulp progenitor cells were implanted in the pulp following this procedure. After 10 days A+4 induced the formation of an osteodentin occluding almost the totality of the pulp compartment. Implantation of progenitor cells leads to formation of islets of osteodentin-like structures located centrally in the pulp. These pilot studies validate the incisor as an experimental model to test the capacity of progenitor cells or bioactive molecules to induce the formation of reparative dentin. PMID:19088885

  17. Comparative analysis of cardiovascular development related genes in stem cells isolated from deciduous pulp and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Loo, Zhang Xin; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2014-01-01

    Human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) and adipose stem cells (ASC) were suggested as alternative cell choice for cardiac regeneration. However, the true functionability of these cells toward cardiac regeneration is yet to be discovered. Hence, this study was carried out to investigate the innate biological properties of these cell sources toward cardiac regeneration. Both cells exhibited indistinguishable MSCs characteristics. Human stem cell transcription factor arrays were used to screen expression levels in SHED and ASC. Upregulated expression of transcription factor (TF) genes was detected in both sources. An almost equal percentage of >2-fold changes were observed. These TF genes fall under several cardiovascular categories with higher expressions which were observed in growth and development of blood vessel, angiogenesis, and vasculogenesis categories. Further induction into cardiomyocyte revealed ASC to express more significantly cardiomyocyte specific markers compared to SHED during the differentiation course evidenced by morphology and gene expression profile. Despite this, spontaneous cellular beating was not detected in both cell lines. Taken together, our data suggest that despite being defined as MSCs, both ASC and SHED behave differently when they were cultured in a same cardiomyocytes culture condition. Hence, vigorous characterization is needed before introducing any cell for treating targeted diseases. PMID:25548778

  18. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells differentiate to osteoblast and chondroblast lineages upon incubation with conditioned media from dental pulp stem cell-derived osteoblasts and auricle cartilage chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Carbone, A; Valente, M; Annacontini, L; Castellani, S; Di Gioia, S; Parisi, D; Rucci, M; Belgiovine, G; Colombo, C; Di Benedetto, A; Mori, G; Lo Muzio, L; Maiorella, A; Portincasa, A; Conese, M

    2016-01-01

    The potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (ADSCs) to differentiate into either osteoblasts or chondrocytes is controversial. In this study we investigated the multicapacity potential of ADSCs to differentiate towards adipocyte, osteoblast, and chondrocyte lineages when cells are seeded onto plastic in comparison with incubation with conditioned media (CM) obtained from differentiated cell types.ADSCs, obtained from liposuctions, were characterized for mesenchymal and hematopoietic markers by cytofluorimetry. Their differentiation capacity towards adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes was investigated by histochemistry methods (Oil-Red-O staining, Safranin O and Alizarin Red staining, respectively). Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and dedifferentiated auricle derived-chondrocytes were differentiated towards osteoblastic and chondrocytic lineages respectively, and the CM obtained from these cultures was used to induce differentiation of ADSCs. ADSCs were positive for mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD105, CD73, CD44), but not for hematopoietic lineage markers (CD14, CD34, CD45) and this behavior was conserved from the isolation up to the fifth passage. While ADSCs were readily differentiated in adipocytes, they were not towards chondrocytes and osteoblastic lineages, a behavior different from that of bone marrow-derived MSCs that differentiated into the three lineages at two weeks post-induction. Only ADSCs treated with CM from cultured chondrocytes and DPSCs, produced glycosaminoglycans and mineralized matrix. These results indicate that ADSCs need growth/morphogenic factor supplementation from the tissue environment to be appropriately differentiated to mesodermic lineages. PMID:27049081

  19. The odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells on nanofibrous poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Xiaohua; Jin, Xiaobing; Ma, Haiyun; Hu, Jiang; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on nanofibrous (NF)-poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Highly porous NF-PLLA scaffolds which mimic the architecture of collagen type I fibers were fabricated by the combination of a phase-separation technique and a porogen-leaching method. The human DPSCs were then seeded onto the scaffolds and cultured in different media for odontogenic differentiation: "Control" medium without supplements; "DXM" medium containing 10(-8)M dexamethasone (DXM), 50 microgml(-1) ascorbic acid and 5mM beta-glycerophosphate; "BMP-7+DXM" medium containing 10(-8)M DXM, 50 microgml(-1) ascorbic acid, 5mM beta-glycerophosphate plus 50 ngml(-1) bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7). For odontogenic differentiation study in vitro, alkaline phosphatase activity quantification, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, scanning electron microscopy, von Kossa staining and calcium content quantification were carried out. While both "DXM" medium and "BMP-7+DXM" medium induced the DPSCs to odontoblast-like cells, the "BMP-7+DXM" medium had greater inducing capacity than the "DXM" medium. Consistent with the in vitro studies, the "BMP-7+DXM" group presented more extracellular matrix and hard tissue formation than the "DXM" group after 8 weeks of ectopic implantation in nude mice. Differentiation of DPSCs into odontoblast-like cells was identified by the positive immunohistochemical staining for dentin sialoprotein. In conclusion, odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs can be achieved on NF-PLLA scaffolds both in vitro and in vivo; the combination of BMP-7 and DXM induced the odontogenic differentiation more effectively than DXM alone. The NF-PLLA scaffold and the combined odontogenic inductive factors provide excellent environment for DPSCs to regenerate dental pulp and dentin. PMID:20406702

  20. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Hydrogel Scaffolds Derived from Decellularized Bone Extracellular Matrix and Collagen Type I

    PubMed Central

    White, Lisa J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on hydrogel scaffolds derived from bone extracellular matrix (bECM) in comparison to those seeded on collagen I (Col-I), one of the main components of dental pulp ECM. Methods DPSCs isolated from human third molars were characterized for surface marker expression and odontogenic potential prior to seeding into bECM or Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. The cells were then seeded onto bECM and Col-I hydrogel scaffolds and cultured under basal conditions or with odontogenic and growth factor (GF) supplements. DPSCs cultivated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) with and without supplements were used as controls. Gene expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and mineral deposition was observed by Von Kossa staining. Results When DPSCs were cultured on bECM hydrogels, the mRNA expression levels of DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE genes were significantly upregulated with respect to those cultured on Col-I scaffolds or TCPS in the absence of extra odontogenic inducers. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on bECM hydrogel scaffolds as demonstrated by Von Kossa staining. Moreover, DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE mRNA expressions of DPSCs cultured on bECM hydrogels were further upregulated by the addition of GFs or osteo/odontogenic medium compared to Col-I treated cells in the same culture conditions. Significance These results demonstrate the potential of the bECM hydrogel scaffolds to stimulate odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:26882351

  1. High dose of TNF-α suppressed osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenjie; Fang, Zhixiu; Zhao, Lei; Chen, Jing; Li, Yuanteng; Liu, Guangyun

    2015-10-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were a clonogenic, highly proliferative cells capable of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation including chondrocytes, adipocytes, neural cells and osteoblasts, which make it an attractive choice for bone regeneration and repair of craniofacial defects. Recent studies showed that tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) may affect osteoclastogenesis and bone formation. However, the effect and mechanism of TNF-α on DPSCs is not clear. In this study, we found that low dose TNF-α promoted mineralization and high dose TNF-α suppressed osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Levels of ALP, Osteopontin, Osteocalcin, Osterix and Runx2 were up-regulated in DPSCs treated with TNF-α at low concentration, while down-regulated in DPSCs treated with TNF-α at high concentration. Blockade of Wnt/β-catenin signaling reversed the inhibitory effect observed on osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs treated with TNF-α at high concentration. In addition, we did not detect any proliferative effect of TNF-α on DPSCs by cell cycle and cell counts analysis. In summary, our data suggested that high concentration TNF-α suppressed mineralization and mineralization-related gene expressions through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling in DPSCs. Our findings may provide a foundation for autologous transplantation of DPSCs. PMID:26115593

  2. Connexin43-containing gap junctions potentiate extracellular Ca²⁺-induced odontoblastic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells via Erk1/2.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiting; He, Haitao; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Ping; Tan, Yinghui

    2015-10-15

    Extracellular Ca(2+) can promote dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) expression and odontoblastic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Gap junctions mediated by connexin43 (Cx43) allow diffusion of small molecules (such as Ca(2+)) among cells to regulate cell-to-cell communications. However, it is unclear whether Cx43 is required for the Ca(2+)-induced cell differentiation. Here, we found that the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) through L-type Ca(2+) channels increases intracellular free Ca(2+) levels to promote DSPP expression. Cx43 overexpression potentiated the extracellular Ca(2+)-induced DSPP expression via Erk1/2. Flow cytometry analyses showed that Cx43 increased the percentage of p-Erk1/2 positive cells in response to Ca(2+), indicating that Cx43 in DPSCs possibly acts as a traditional gap junction channel, which permits the sharing of signals among coupled cells to make more DPSCs respond to Ca(2+). Furthermore, inhibition of Cx43 function and gap junction communication decreased Ca(2+)-induced the expression of DSPP, suggesting that cell-to-cell contacts are required for Cx43 to promote the Ca(2+)-induced cell differentiation. Similarly, the study performed on DPSCs cultured at low-density and high-density revealed that intercellular contacts are required to potentiate Erk1/2 activity and DSPP expression. In total, this study indicates that Cx43 increases Ca(2+)-induced DSPP expression and odontoblastic differentiation of DPSCs via Erk1/2 through gap junction-mediated cell-to-cell contacts. PMID:26376117

  3. A comparison of the in vitro mineralisation and dentinogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue, bone marrow and dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Davies, O G; Cooper, P R; Shelton, R M; Smith, A J; Scheven, B A

    2015-07-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies provide a biological basis for the regeneration of mineralised tissues. Stem cells isolated from adipose tissue (ADSCs), bone marrow (BMSCs) and dental pulp (DPSCs) have the capacity to form mineralised tissue. However, studies comparing the capacity of ADSCs with BMSCs and DPSCs for mineralised tissue engineering are lacking, and their ability to regenerate dental tissues has not been fully explored. Characterisation of the cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR for MSC markers indicated that they were immunophenotypically similar. Alizarin red (AR) staining and micro-computed tomography (µCT) analyses demonstrated that the osteogenic potential of DPSCs was significantly greater than that of BMSCs and ADSCs. Scanning electron microscopy and AR staining showed that the pattern of mineralisation in DPSC cultures differed from ADSCs and BMSCs, with DPSC cultures lacking defined mineralised nodules and instead forming a diffuse layer of low-density mineral. Dentine matrix components (DMCs) were used to promote dentinogenic differentiation. Their addition to cultures resulted in increased amounts of mineral deposited in all three cultures and significantly increased the density of mineral deposited in BMSC cultures, as determined by µCT analysis. Addition of DMCs also increased the relative gene expression levels of the dentinogenic markers dentine sialophosphoprotein and dentine matrix protein 1 in ADSC and BMSC cultures. In conclusion, DPSCs show the greatest potential to produce a comparatively high volume of mineralised matrix; however, both dentinogenesis and mineral volume was enhanced in ADSC and BMSC cultures by DMCs, suggesting that these cells show promise for regenerative dental therapies. PMID:24997523

  4. Early transplantation of human immature dental pulp stem cells from baby teeth to golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs: Local or systemic?

    PubMed Central

    Kerkis, Irina; Ambrosio, Carlos E; Kerkis, Alexandre; Martins, Daniele S; Zucconi, Eder; Fonseca, Simone AS; Cabral, Rosa M; Maranduba, Carlos MC; Gaiad, Thais P; Morini, Adriana C; Vieira, Natassia M; Brolio, Marina P; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo A; Miglino, Maria A; Zatz, Mayana

    2008-01-01

    Background The golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs represent the best available animal model for therapeutic trials aiming at the future treatment of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have obtained a rare litter of six GRMD dogs (3 males and 3 females) born from an affected male and a carrier female which were submitted to a therapeutic trial with adult human stem cells to investigate their capacity to engraft into dogs muscles by local as compared to systemic injection without any immunosuppression. Methods Human Immature Dental Pulp Stem Cells (hIDPSC) were transplanted into 4 littermate dogs aged 28 to 40 days by either arterial or muscular injections. Two non-injected dogs were kept as controls. Clinical translation effects were analyzed since immune reactions by blood exams and physical scores capacity of each dog. Samples from biopsies were checked by immunohistochemistry (dystrophin markers) and FISH for human probes. Results and Discussion We analyzed the cells' ability in respect to migrate, engraftment, and myogenic potential, and the expression of human dystrophin in affected muscles. Additionally, the efficiency of single and consecutive early transplantation was compared. Chimeric muscle fibers were detected by immunofluorescence and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) using human antibodies and X and Y DNA probes. No signs of immune rejection were observed and these results suggested that hIDPSC cell transplantation may be done without immunosuppression. We showed that hIDPSC presented significant engraftment in GRMD dog muscles, although human dystrophin expression was modest and limited to several muscle fibers. Better clinical condition was also observed in the dog, which received monthly arterial injections and is still clinically stable at 25 months of age. Conclusion Our data suggested that systemic multiple deliveries seemed more effective than local injections. These findings open important avenues for further

  5. Osteogenesis from Dental Pulp Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Conditioned Medium Including Melatonin within a Mixture of Hyaluronic, Butyric, and Retinoic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Margherita; Basoli, Valentina; Santaniello, Sara; Cruciani, Sara; Delitala, Alessandro Palmerio; Pinna, Roberto; Milia, Egle; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Fontani, Vania; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Muggironi, Roberta; Pigliaru, Gianfranco; Ventura, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) have shown relevant potential for cell therapy in the orthopedic and odontoiatric fields. The optimization of their osteogenic potential is currently a major challenge. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF A) has been recently reported to act as a major conductor of osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, we attempted to prime endogenous VEGF A expression without the need for viral vector mediated gene transfer technologies. We show that hDPSCs exposure to a mixture of hyaluronic, butyric, and retinoic acids (HA + BU + RA) induced the transcription of a gene program of osteogenesis and the acquirement of an osteogenic lineage. Such response was also elicited by cell exposure to melatonin, a pleiotropic agent that recently emerged as a remarkable osteogenic inducer. Interestingly, the commitment to the osteogenic fate was synergistically enhanced by the combinatorial exposure to a conditioned medium containing both melatonin and HA + BU + RA. These in vitro results suggest that in vivo osteogenesis might be improved and further studies are needed. PMID:26880937

  6. Use Electrospinning to Introduce Graphene into Poly(4-Vinylpridine) (P4VP) Polymer Fibers and Their Biocompatibility with Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linxi; Chang, Chung-Chueh; Rafailovich, Miriam

    Graphene-polymer composite materials have been popularized in tissue engineering due to the outstanding thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of graphene. Most of the current studies, however, focus on 2-D structured films which hardly represent the real conditions of scaffolds in vivo environment and dispersion of graphene in polymer matrix has always been challenging since the graphene tends to aggregate. In our study, we have successfully introduced graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) into poly(4-vinphylpridine) (P4VP) matrix and fabricated nano- and micro-scale size fibers by using electrospinning technique. SEM and TEM reveal uniform defect-free fiber structures and good dispersion of graphene; DSC and AFM indicate the enhancement of physical properties. The biocompatibility of the electrospun 3-D scaffolds with dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) has been examined. Our results show that the cells can accelerate proliferation to respond to the existence of GNPs. SEM with EDAX reveals a deposition of mineralized calcium matrix on the fibers after 35-day incubation, which has possibly been caused by cell differentiation induced by fibrous scaffolds. Electrospinning Nano- and Mirco-scale size Poly(4-vinphylpridine) Fibers Loaded with Graphene Nano Platelets (GNPs).

  7. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xufang; Jiang, Hongwei; Gong, Qimei; Fan, Chen; Huang, Yihua; Ling, Junqi

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.

  8. MEPE-Derived ASARM Peptide Inhibits Odontogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Impairs Mineralization in Tooth Models of X-Linked Hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Khaddam, Mayssam; Naji, Jiar; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Baroukh, Brigitte; Letourneur, Franck; Lesieur, Julie; Decup, Franck; Le Denmat, Dominique; Nicoletti, Antonino; Poliard, Anne; Rowe, Peter S.; Huet, Eric; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Linglart, Agnès; McKee, Marc D.; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome) cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif) peptide − a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization − derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein) and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated) derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential therapeutic

  9. Types of Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... stem cells blog from the International Society for Stem Cell Research. Learn About Stem Cells From Lab to You ...

  10. Human dental pulp stem cells transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nicola, F C; Rodrigues, L P; Crestani, T; Quintiliano, K; Sanches, E F; Willborn, S; Aristimunha, D; Boisserand, L; Pranke, P; Netto, C A

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a disabling condition resulting in deficits of sensory and motor functions, and has no effective treatment. Considering that protocols with stem cell transplantation and treadmill training have shown promising results, the present study evaluated the effectiveness of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats with experimental spinal cord injury. Fifty-four Wistar rats were spinalized using NYU impactor. The rats were randomly distributed into 5 groups: Sham (laminectomy with no SCI, n=10); SCI (laminectomy followed by SCI, n=12); SHEDs (SCI treated with SHEDs, n=11); TT (SCI treated with treadmill training, n=11); SHEDs+TT (SCI treated with SHEDs and treadmill training; n=10). Treatment with SHEDs alone or in combination with treadmill training promoted functional recovery, reaching scores of 15 and 14, respectively, in the BBB scale, being different from the SCI group, which reached 11. SHEDs treatment was able to reduce the cystic cavity area and glial scar, increase neurofilament. Treadmill training alone had no functional effectiveness or tissue effects. In a second experiment, the SHEDs transplantation reduced the TNF-α levels in the cord tissue measured 6 h after the injury. Contrary to our hypothesis, treadmill training either alone or in combination, caused no functional improvement. However, SHEDs showed to be neuroprotective, by the reduction of TNF-α levels, the cystic cavity and the glial scar associated with the improvement of motor function after SCI. These results provide evidence that grafted SHEDs might be an effective therapy to spinal cord lesions, with possible anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27509306

  11. Human dental pulp stem cells transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats after traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, F.C.; Rodrigues, L.P.; Crestani, T.; Quintiliano, K.; Sanches, E.F.; Willborn, S.; Aristimunha, D.; Boisserand, L.; Pranke, P.; Netto, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a disabling condition resulting in deficits of sensory and motor functions, and has no effective treatment. Considering that protocols with stem cell transplantation and treadmill training have shown promising results, the present study evaluated the effectiveness of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats with experimental spinal cord injury. Fifty-four Wistar rats were spinalized using NYU impactor. The rats were randomly distributed into 5 groups: Sham (laminectomy with no SCI, n=10); SCI (laminectomy followed by SCI, n=12); SHEDs (SCI treated with SHEDs, n=11); TT (SCI treated with treadmill training, n=11); SHEDs+TT (SCI treated with SHEDs and treadmill training; n=10). Treatment with SHEDs alone or in combination with treadmill training promoted functional recovery, reaching scores of 15 and 14, respectively, in the BBB scale, being different from the SCI group, which reached 11. SHEDs treatment was able to reduce the cystic cavity area and glial scar, increase neurofilament. Treadmill training alone had no functional effectiveness or tissue effects. In a second experiment, the SHEDs transplantation reduced the TNF-α levels in the cord tissue measured 6 h after the injury. Contrary to our hypothesis, treadmill training either alone or in combination, caused no functional improvement. However, SHEDs showed to be neuroprotective, by the reduction of TNF-α levels, the cystic cavity and the glial scar associated with the improvement of motor function after SCI. These results provide evidence that grafted SHEDs might be an effective therapy to spinal cord lesions, with possible anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27509306

  12. Differential Neuronal Plasticity of Dental Pulp Stem Cells From Exfoliated Deciduous and Permanent Teeth Towards Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Debanjana; Kanafi, Mohammad; Bhonde, Ramesh; Gupta, Pawan; Datta, Indrani

    2016-09-01

    Based on early occurrence in chronological age, stem-cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) has been reported to possess better differentiation-potential toward certain cell-lineage in comparison to stem-cells from adult teeth (DPSCs). Whether this same property between them extends for the yield of functional central nervous system neurons is still not evaluated. Hence, we aim to assess the neuronal plasticity of SHED in comparison to DPSCs toward dopaminergic-neurons and further, if the difference is reflected in a differential expression of sonic-hedgehog (SHH)-receptors and basal-expressions of tyrosine-hydroxylase [TH; through cAMP levels]. Human SHED and DPSCs were exposed to midbrain-cues [SHH, fibroblast growth-factor8, and basic fibroblast growth-factor], and their molecular, immunophenotypical, and functional characterization was performed at different time-points of induction. Though SHED and DPSCs spontaneously expressed early-neuronal and neural-crest marker in their naïve state, only SHED expressed a high basal-expression of TH. The upregulation of dopaminergic transcription-factors Nurr1, Engrailed1, and Pitx3 was more pronounced in DPSCs. The yield of TH-expressing cells decreased from 49.8% to 32.16% in SHED while it increased from 8.09% to 77.47% in DPSCs. Dopamine release and intracellular-Ca(2+) influx upon stimulation (KCl and ATP) was higher in induced DPSCs. Significantly lower-expression of SHH-receptors was noted in naïve SHED than DPSCs, which may explain the differential neuronal plasticity. In addition, unlike DPSCs, SHED showed a down-regulation of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) upon exposure to SHH; possibly another contributor to the lesser differentiation-potential. Our data clearly demonstrates for the first time that DPSCs possess superior neuronal plasticity toward dopaminergic-neurons than SHED; influenced by higher SHH-receptor and lower basal TH expression. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2048-2063, 2016. © 2016

  13. Effects of a discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on the viability and proliferation of undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-na; Watson, Devon; Thames, Kyle; Primus, Carolyn M; Bergeron, Brian E; Jiao, Kai; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A; Cutler, Christopher W; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2015-01-01

    Discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement has been formulated to overcome the timely problem of tooth discoloration reported in the clinical application of bismuth oxide-containing hydraulic cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the viability and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing the cellular responses with commercially available calcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate; WMTA) after different aging periods. Cell viability and proliferation were examined using assays that examined plasma membrane integrity, leakage of cytosolic enzyme, caspase-3 activity for early apoptosis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial metabolic activity and intracellular DNA content. Results of the six assays indicated that both Quick-Set2 and WMTA were initially cytotoxic to hDPSCs after setting for 24 h, with Quick-Set2 being comparatively less cytotoxic than WMTA at this stage. After two aging cycles, the cytotoxicity profiles of the two hydraulic cements were not significantly different and were much less cytotoxic than the positive control (zinc oxide-eugenol cement). Based on these results, it is envisaged that any potential beneficial effect of the discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on osteogenesis by differentiated hDPSCs is more likely to be revealed after outward diffusion and removal of its cytotoxic components. PMID:26617338

  14. Effects of a discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on the viability and proliferation of undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li-na; Watson, Devon; Thames, Kyle; Primus, Carolyn M.; Bergeron, Brian E.; Jiao, Kai; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A.; Cutler, Christopher W.; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2015-01-01

    Discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement has been formulated to overcome the timely problem of tooth discoloration reported in the clinical application of bismuth oxide-containing hydraulic cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the viability and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing the cellular responses with commercially available calcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate; WMTA) after different aging periods. Cell viability and proliferation were examined using assays that examined plasma membrane integrity, leakage of cytosolic enzyme, caspase-3 activity for early apoptosis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial metabolic activity and intracellular DNA content. Results of the six assays indicated that both Quick-Set2 and WMTA were initially cytotoxic to hDPSCs after setting for 24 h, with Quick-Set2 being comparatively less cytotoxic than WMTA at this stage. After two aging cycles, the cytotoxicity profiles of the two hydraulic cements were not significantly different and were much less cytotoxic than the positive control (zinc oxide–eugenol cement). Based on these results, it is envisaged that any potential beneficial effect of the discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on osteogenesis by differentiated hDPSCs is more likely to be revealed after outward diffusion and removal of its cytotoxic components. PMID:26617338

  15. Cytotoxic Effects of Various Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Formulations, Calcium-Enriched Mixture and a New Cement on Human Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaberiansari, Zahra; Naderi, Seddigheh; Tabatabaei, Fahimeh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This in vitro study compared the cytotoxic effects of three commercially available MTA formulations naming ProRoot MTA (PMTA), Angelus MTA (AMTA), and Root MTA (RMTA), with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and a new nanohybrid MTA (NMTA) on human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC). Methods and Materials: Four disc-shaped specimens of each material were prepared. After completion of setting, 2 different (neat and 1/2) elutes of the test materials were made. Then in each cavity of a 96-well plate, 3000 cells were seeded and incubated in a humidified incubator with 5% CO2 and 95% air at 37°C for 24 h. After this period, the culture medium of each well was replaced with 200 μL of test material elutes. Plain culture medium was used as the negative control and distilled water as the positive control group. Cell viability was assessed using 2, 5-diphenyl-SH-tetrazelium bromide colorimetric assay, aka Mosmann’s tetrazolium toxicity (MTT) assay, at three time intervals (24, 48, and 72 h after mixing). Data were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test (P=0.05). Results: After 24 h, the viability of cells in neat concentration had no significant differences (P>0.05) except for the NMTA. However, CEM and AMTA, at 1/2 concentration exerted significant proliferative effects on cells. At 48 and 72-h intervals, significant proliferation of DPSCs was seen in all samples, except for the NMTA which exerted toxic effects on cells. Conclusion: All of the three commercial MTAs and CEM cement showed comparative biocompatibility. However, NMTA had cytotoxic effects on DPSCs at all the time intervals. PMID:25386208

  16. Conditioned medium from the stem cells of human dental pulp improves cognitive function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mita, Tsuneyuki; Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Hattori, Hisashi; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Hibi, Hideharu; Ueda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease characterized by a decline in cognitive abilities and the appearance of β-amyloid plaques in the brain. Although the pathogenic mechanisms associated with AD are not fully understood, activated microglia releasing various neurotoxic factors, including pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress mediators, appear to play major roles. Here, we investigated the therapeutic benefits of a serum-free conditioned medium (CM) derived from the stem cells of human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) in a mouse model of AD. The intranasal administration of SHEDs in these mice resulted in substantially improved cognitive function. SHED-CM contained factors involved in multiple neuroregenerative mechanisms, such as neuroprotection, axonal elongation, neurotransmission, the suppression of inflammation, and microglial regulation. Notably, SHED-CM attenuated the pro-inflammatory responses induced by β-amyloid plaques, and generated an anti-inflammatory/tissue-regenerating environment, which was accompanied by the induction of anti-inflammatory M2-like microglia. Our data suggest that SHED-CM may provide significant therapeutic benefits for AD. PMID:26210934

  17. p16(INK4A) mediates age-related changes in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human dental pulp through the DNA damage and stress response.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingmei; Xing, Jing; Feng, Guijuan; Huang, Dan; Lu, Xiaohui; Liu, Suzhe; Tan, Wei; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human dental pulp (DP-MSCs) are characterized by self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation, which play important roles in regenerative medicine. Autologous transfers, as non-immunogenic, constitute the safest approach in cellular transplantations. However, their use may be limited by age-related changes. In the study, we compared DP-MSCs isolated from human in five age groups: 5-12 y, 12-20 y, 20-35 y, 35-50 y, and >50 y. We tested the effect of age on proliferation, differentiation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), cell cycle and programmed cell death. DP-MSCs showed characteristics of senescence as a function of age. Meanwhile, the expression of p16(INK4A) and γ-H2A.X significantly increased with age, whereas heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) was decreased in the senescent DP-MSCs. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) staining showed the number of ROS-stained cells and the DCFH fluorescent level were higher in the aged group. Further we examined the senescence of DP-MSCs after modulating p16(INK4A) signaling. The results indicated the dysfunction of DP-MSCs was reversed by p16(INK4A) siRNA. In summary, our study indicated p16(INK4A) pathway may play a critical role in DP-MSCs age-related changes and the DNA damage response (DDR) and stress response may be the main mediators of DP-MSCs senescence induced by excessive activation of p16(INK4A) signaling. PMID:25304494

  18. Hexosamine-Induced TGF-β Signaling and Osteogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Are Dependent on N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase V

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Jane; Yao, Chung-Chen; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Young, Tai-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Glycans of cell surface glycoproteins are involved in the regulation of cell migration, growth, and differentiation. N-acetyl-glucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V) transfers N-acetyl-d-glucosamine to form β1,6-branched N-glycans, thus playing a crucial role in the biosynthesis of glycoproteins. This study reveals the distinct expression of GnT-V in STRO-1 and CD-146 double-positive dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Furthermore, we investigated three types of hexosamines and their N-acetyl derivatives for possible effects on the osteogenic differentiation potential of DPSCs. Our results showed that exogenous d-glucosamine (GlcN), N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc), d-mannosamine (ManN), and acetyl-d-mannosamine (ManNAc) promoted DPSCs' early osteogenic differentiation in the absence of osteogenic supplements, but d-galactosamine (GalN) or N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNAc) did not. Effects include the increased level of TGF-β receptor type I, activation of TGF-β signaling, and increased mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation marker genes. The hexosamine-treated DPSCs showed an increased mineralized matrix deposition in the presence of osteogenic supplements. Moreover, the level of TGF-β receptor type I and early osteogenic differentiation were abolished in the DPSCs transfected with siRNA for GnT-V knockdown. These results suggest that GnT-V plays a critical role in the hexosamine-induced activation of TGF-β signaling and subsequent osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:26583147

  19. Functionalization of polycaprolactone scaffolds with hyaluronic acid and β-TCP facilitates migration and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jonas; Kraft, David Christian Evar; Lysdahl, Helle; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Chen, Muwan; Kristiansen, Asger Albæk; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Bünger, Cody Eric

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we sought to assess the osteogenic potential of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on three different polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds. The backbone structure of the scaffolds was manufactured by fused deposition modeling (PCL scaffold). The composition and morphology was functionalized in two of the scaffolds. The first underwent thermal induced phase separation of PCL infused into the pores of the PCL scaffold. This procedure resulted in a highly variable micro- and nanostructured porous (NSP), interconnected, and isotropic tubular morphology (NSP-PCL scaffold). The second scaffold type was functionalized by dip-coating the PCL scaffold with a mixture of hyaluronic acid and β-TCP (HT-PCL scaffold). The scaffolds were cylindrical and measured 5 mm in height and 10 mm in diameter. They were seeded with 1×10(6) human DPSCs, a cell type known to express bone-related markers, differentiate into osteoblasts-like cells, and to produce a mineralized bone-like extracellular matrix. DPSCs were phenotypically characterized by flow cytometry for CD90(+), CD73(+), CD105(+), and CD14(-). DNA, ALP, and Ca(2+) assays and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for genes involved in osteogenic differentiation were analyzed on day 1, 7, 14, and 21. Cell viability and distribution were assessed on day 1, 7, 14, and 21 by fluorescent-, scanning electron-, and confocal microscopy. The results revealed that the DPSCs expressed relevant gene expression consistent with osteogenic differentiation. The NSP-PCL and HT-PCL scaffolds promoted osteogenic differentiation and Ca(2+) deposition after 21 days of cultivation. Different gene expressions associated with mature osteoblasts were upregulated in these two scaffold types, suggesting that the methods in which the scaffolds promote osteogenic differentiation, depends on functionalization approaches. However, only the HT-PCL scaffold was also able to support cell proliferation and cell migration resulting in

  20. Functionalization of Polycaprolactone Scaffolds with Hyaluronic Acid and β-TCP Facilitates Migration and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, David Christian Evar; Lysdahl, Helle; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Chen, Muwan; Kristiansen, Asger Albæk; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Bünger, Cody Eric

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we sought to assess the osteogenic potential of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on three different polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds. The backbone structure of the scaffolds was manufactured by fused deposition modeling (PCL scaffold). The composition and morphology was functionalized in two of the scaffolds. The first underwent thermal induced phase separation of PCL infused into the pores of the PCL scaffold. This procedure resulted in a highly variable micro- and nanostructured porous (NSP), interconnected, and isotropic tubular morphology (NSP-PCL scaffold). The second scaffold type was functionalized by dip-coating the PCL scaffold with a mixture of hyaluronic acid and β-TCP (HT-PCL scaffold). The scaffolds were cylindrical and measured 5 mm in height and 10 mm in diameter. They were seeded with 1×106 human DPSCs, a cell type known to express bone-related markers, differentiate into osteoblasts-like cells, and to produce a mineralized bone-like extracellular matrix. DPSCs were phenotypically characterized by flow cytometry for CD90+, CD73+, CD105+, and CD14−. DNA, ALP, and Ca2+ assays and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for genes involved in osteogenic differentiation were analyzed on day 1, 7, 14, and 21. Cell viability and distribution were assessed on day 1, 7, 14, and 21 by fluorescent-, scanning electron-, and confocal microscopy. The results revealed that the DPSCs expressed relevant gene expression consistent with osteogenic differentiation. The NSP-PCL and HT-PCL scaffolds promoted osteogenic differentiation and Ca2+ deposition after 21 days of cultivation. Different gene expressions associated with mature osteoblasts were upregulated in these two scaffold types, suggesting that the methods in which the scaffolds promote osteogenic differentiation, depends on functionalization approaches. However, only the HT-PCL scaffold was also able to support cell proliferation and cell migration resulting in even cell

  1. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufang; Jiang, Hongwei; Gong, Qimei; Fan, Chen; Huang, Yihua; Ling, Junqi

    2014-08-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration. PMID:25019990

  2. Regeneration of mandibular ameloblastoma defect with the help of autologous dental pulp stem cells and buccal pad of fat stromal vascular fraction

    PubMed Central

    Manimaran, K.; Sharma, Rohini; Sankaranarayanan, S.; Perumal, S. Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is benign odontogenic tumor, which is locally aggressive in behavior. Till date, the treatment of choice is resection and reconstruction using a variety of modalities. Inadequate resection may lead to many complications such as bone deformity and dysfunction. This report is about a 14-year-old male with ameloblastoma treated with autologous dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and evidence of bone regeneration. Marsupialization was performed; tooth was extracted and sent for DPSC cultivation. On the day of surgery, SVF was processed from buccal pad of fat, and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) was prepared from patient's peripheral blood. During the procedure, labial plate resection and curating of tumor lining were done. After which, a mesh packed with SyboGraft T-plug, prepared SVF, DPSCs, and PRF were placed over lingual cortex and pressure dressing was done. After the 1st month of surgery the postoperative course was uneventful, the wound shrinkage led to exposure of mesh in the intraoral region. Removal of exposed mesh was done. The correction surgery with removal of part of mesh and primary closure was achieved with SyboGraft plug, SVF and PRF. Enhanced bone formation was seen in post-operative OPG and CT Scan after 10th month. In this article, we propose an innovative approach to manage these cases by using a combination of autologous DPSC and buccal pad of fat SVF to regenerate a mandibular defect left by the resection of an ameloblastoma with 1.5 year follow-up. We were able to demonstrate bone regeneration using this technique with no recurrence of tumor.

  3. Regeneration of mandibular ameloblastoma defect with the help of autologous dental pulp stem cells and buccal pad of fat stromal vascular fraction.

    PubMed

    Manimaran, K; Sharma, Rohini; Sankaranarayanan, S; Perumal, S Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is benign odontogenic tumor, which is locally aggressive in behavior. Till date, the treatment of choice is resection and reconstruction using a variety of modalities. Inadequate resection may lead to many complications such as bone deformity and dysfunction. This report is about a 14-year-old male with ameloblastoma treated with autologous dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and evidence of bone regeneration. Marsupialization was performed; tooth was extracted and sent for DPSC cultivation. On the day of surgery, SVF was processed from buccal pad of fat, and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) was prepared from patient's peripheral blood. During the procedure, labial plate resection and curating of tumor lining were done. After which, a mesh packed with SyboGraft T-plug, prepared SVF, DPSCs, and PRF were placed over lingual cortex and pressure dressing was done. After the 1(st) month of surgery the postoperative course was uneventful, the wound shrinkage led to exposure of mesh in the intraoral region. Removal of exposed mesh was done. The correction surgery with removal of part of mesh and primary closure was achieved with SyboGraft plug, SVF and PRF. Enhanced bone formation was seen in post-operative OPG and CT Scan after 10(th) month. In this article, we propose an innovative approach to manage these cases by using a combination of autologous DPSC and buccal pad of fat SVF to regenerate a mandibular defect left by the resection of an ameloblastoma with 1.5 year follow-up. We were able to demonstrate bone regeneration using this technique with no recurrence of tumor. PMID:27563616

  4. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signals Inversely Regulate Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Activity to Control Human Dental Pulp Stem Cell Quiescence, Propagation, and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vandomme, Jerome; Touil, Yasmine; Ostyn, Pauline; Olejnik, Cecile; Flamenco, Pilar; El Machhour, Raja; Segard, Pascaline; Masselot, Bernadette; Bailliez, Yves; Formstecher, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remain quiescent until activated in response to severe dental pulp damage. Once activated, they exit quiescence and enter regenerative odontogenesis, producing reparative dentin. The factors and signaling molecules that control the quiescence/activation and commitment to differentiation of human DPSCs are not known. In this study, we determined that the inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling commonly activates DPSCs and promotes their exit from the G0 phase of the cell cycle as well as from the pyronin Ylow stem cell compartment. The inhibition of these two pathways, however, inversely determines DPSC fate. In contrast to p38 MAPK inhibitors, IGF-1R inhibitors enhance dental pulp cell sphere-forming capacity and reduce the cells' colony-forming capacity without inducing cell death. The inverse cellular changes initiated by IGF-1R and p38 MAPK inhibitors were accompanied by inverse changes in the levels of active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) factor, inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3, and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein, a marker of early odontoblast differentiation. Our data suggest that there is cross talk between the IGF-1R and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in DPSCs and that the signals provided by these pathways converge at STAT3 and inversely regulate its activity to maintain quiescence or to promote self-renewal and differentiation of the cells. We propose a working model that explains the possible interactions between IGF-1R and p38 MAPK at the molecular level and describes the cellular consequences of these interactions. This model may inspire further fundamental study and stimulate research on the clinical applications of DPSC in cellular therapy and tissue regeneration. PMID:24266654

  5. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signals inversely regulate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity to control human dental pulp stem cell quiescence, propagation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vandomme, Jerome; Touil, Yasmine; Ostyn, Pauline; Olejnik, Cecile; Flamenco, Pilar; El Machhour, Raja; Segard, Pascaline; Masselot, Bernadette; Bailliez, Yves; Formstecher, Pierre; Polakowska, Renata

    2014-04-15

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remain quiescent until activated in response to severe dental pulp damage. Once activated, they exit quiescence and enter regenerative odontogenesis, producing reparative dentin. The factors and signaling molecules that control the quiescence/activation and commitment to differentiation of human DPSCs are not known. In this study, we determined that the inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling commonly activates DPSCs and promotes their exit from the G0 phase of the cell cycle as well as from the pyronin Y(low) stem cell compartment. The inhibition of these two pathways, however, inversely determines DPSC fate. In contrast to p38 MAPK inhibitors, IGF-1R inhibitors enhance dental pulp cell sphere-forming capacity and reduce the cells' colony-forming capacity without inducing cell death. The inverse cellular changes initiated by IGF-1R and p38 MAPK inhibitors were accompanied by inverse changes in the levels of active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) factor, inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3, and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein, a marker of early odontoblast differentiation. Our data suggest that there is cross talk between the IGF-1R and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in DPSCs and that the signals provided by these pathways converge at STAT3 and inversely regulate its activity to maintain quiescence or to promote self-renewal and differentiation of the cells. We propose a working model that explains the possible interactions between IGF-1R and p38 MAPK at the molecular level and describes the cellular consequences of these interactions. This model may inspire further fundamental study and stimulate research on the clinical applications of DPSC in cellular therapy and tissue regeneration. PMID:24266654

  6. Stem Cell Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... stem cells? What are the potential uses of human stem cells and the obstacles that must be overcome before ... two kinds of stem cells from animals and humans: embryonic stem cells and non-embryonic "somatic" or "adult" stem cells . ...

  7. Learn About Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF) Download an introduction to stem cells and stem cell research. Stem Cell Glossary Stem cell terms to know. ... ISSCR Get Involved Media © 2015 International Society for Stem Cell Research Terms of Use Disclaimer Privacy Policy

  8. Interaction of Substrate Mechanics with Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs) differentiation to generate a scaffold for Bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailovich, Miriam; Bhatnagar, Divya; Bherwani, Aneel; Simon, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    This work investigates the interaction of the substrate mechanics with the differentiation in the absence of chemical induction and only resulting from the stimuli of the substrate mechanics and chemistry. We chose enzymatically cross-linked gelatin hydrogels substrates of different stiffness varying from 8KPa to 100Pa. DPSCs were cultured and differentiated on the substrates for 7, 14 and 21 days with and without dexamethasone induction media. SEM and EDX analysis after 21 days indicate that cells produced a sheet of biomineralized deposits, several tenths of mm thick on the hard substrate irrespective of chemical induction. Modulli of the cells was independent of the induction and stiffness of the hydrogels. RT-PCR assays indicated that cells expressed more osteocalcin when cultured in non-induction media and harder substrate. The shape of the deposits was more uniform and in close packing on the harder substrate with a higher Ca:P ratio. On soft substrate the deposits were more flat with less Ca:P ratio. Further experiments indicated that conformational change due to the crosslinking of gelatin could be the reason for biomineralization.

  9. Stem cell glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Makoto

    2011-09-01

    Glycolipids are compounds containing one or more monosaccharide residues bound by a glycosidic linkage to a hydrophobic moiety. Because of their expression patterns and the intracellular localization patterns, glycolipids, including stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEA-3, SSEA-4, and possibly SSEA-1) and gangliosides (e.g., GD3, GD2, and A2B5 antigens), have been used as marker molecules of stem cells. In this review, I will introduce glycolipids expressed in pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic-like stem cells, amniotic stem cells, and multilineage-differentiating stress enduring cells), multipotent stem cells (neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, fetal liver multipotent progenitor cells, and hematopoietic stem cells), and cancer stem cells (brain cancer stem cells and breast cancer stem cells), and discuss their availability as biomarkers for identifying and isolating stem cells. PMID:21161592

  10. Adult stem cell-based apexogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Shu, Li-Hong; Yan, Ming; Dai, Wen-Yong; Li, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Guang-Dong; Yu, Jin-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Generally, the dental pulp needs to be removed when it is infected, and root canal therapy (RCT) is usually required in which infected dental pulp is replaced with inorganic materials (paste and gutta percha). This treatment approach ultimately brings about a dead tooth. However, pulp vitality is extremely important to the tooth itself, since it provides nutrition and acts as a biosensor to detect the potential pathogenic stimuli. Despite the reported clinical success rate, RCT-treated teeth are destined to be devitalized, brittle and susceptible to postoperative fracture. Recently, the advances and achievements in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have inspired novel biological approaches to apexogenesis in young patients suffering from pulpitis or periapical periodontitis. This review mainly focuses on the benchtop and clinical regeneration of root apex mediated by adult stem cells. Moreover, current strategies for infected pulp therapy are also discussed here. PMID:25332909

  11. Adult stem cell-based apexogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Shu, Li-Hong; Yan, Ming; Dai, Wen-Yong; Li, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Guang-Dong; Yu, Jin-Hua

    2014-06-26

    Generally, the dental pulp needs to be removed when it is infected, and root canal therapy (RCT) is usually required in which infected dental pulp is replaced with inorganic materials (paste and gutta percha). This treatment approach ultimately brings about a dead tooth. However, pulp vitality is extremely important to the tooth itself, since it provides nutrition and acts as a biosensor to detect the potential pathogenic stimuli. Despite the reported clinical success rate, RCT-treated teeth are destined to be devitalized, brittle and susceptible to postoperative fracture. Recently, the advances and achievements in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have inspired novel biological approaches to apexogenesis in young patients suffering from pulpitis or periapical periodontitis. This review mainly focuses on the benchtop and clinical regeneration of root apex mediated by adult stem cells. Moreover, current strategies for infected pulp therapy are also discussed here. PMID:25332909

  12. Regenerative Endodontics in light of the stem cell paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Vinicius; Botero, Tatiana M.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells play a critical role in development and in tissue regeneration. The dental pulp contains a small sub-population of stem cells that are involved in the response of the pulp to caries progression. Specifically, stem cells replace odontoblasts that have undergone cell death as a consequence of the cariogenic challenge. Stem cells also secrete factors that have the potential to enhance pulp vascularization and provide the oxygen and nutrients required for the dentinogenic response that is typically observed in teeth with deep caries. However, the same angiogenic factors that are required for dentin regeneration may ultimately contribute to the demise of the pulp by enhancing vascular permeability and interstitial pressure. Recent studies focused on the biology of dental pulp stem cells revealed that the multipotency and angiogenic capacity of these cells could be exploited therapeutically in dental pulp tissue engineering. Collectively, these findings suggest new treatment paradigms in the field of Endodontics. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential impact of dental pulp stem cells to Regenerative Endodontics. PMID:21726222

  13. Stem Cell Transplantation for Pulpal Regeneration: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Fawzy El-Sayed, Karim M; Jakusz, Kimberley; Jochens, Arne; Dörfer, Christof; Schwendicke, Falk

    2015-10-01

    For treating pulpal pathological conditions, pulpal regeneration through transplanted stem/progenitor cells might be an alternative to conventional root canal treatment. A number of animal studies demonstrated beneficial effects of stem/progenitor cell transplantation for pulp-dentin complex regeneration, that is, pulpal tissue, neural, vascular, and dentinal regeneration. We systematically reviewed animal studies investigating stem/progenitor cell-mediated pulp-dentin complex regeneration. Studies quantitatively comparing pulp-dentin complex regeneration after transplantation of stem/progenitor cells versus no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls in intraoral in vivo teeth animal models were analyzed. The following outcomes were investigated: regenerated pulp area per root canal total area, capillaries per total surface, regenerated dentinal area per total defect area, and nerves per total surface. PubMed and EMBASE were screened for studies published until July 2014. Cross-referencing and hand searching were used to identify further articles. Standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. To assess possible bias, SYRCLE's risk of bias tool for animal studies was used. From 1364 screened articles, five studies (representing 64 animals) were included in the quantitative analysis. Risk of bias of all studies was high. Stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps showed significantly larger regenerated pulp area per root canal total area (SMD [95% CI]: 2.28 [0.35-4.21]) and regenerated dentin area per root canal total area (SMD: 6.91 [5.39-8.43]) compared with no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls. Only one study reported on capillaries per or nerves per total surface and found both significantly increased in stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps compared with controls. Stem/progenitor cell transplantation seems to enhance pulp-dentin complex regeneration in animal models

  14. Current Applications and Future Prospects of Stem Cells in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Sharmila; Sivamurthy, Gautham

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are defined as clonogenic, unspecialized cells capable of both selt-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation, contributing to regenerating specific tissues. For years, restorative treatments have exploited the lifelong regenerative potential of dental pulp stem cells to give rise to tertiary dentine, which is therapeutically employed for direct and indirect pulp capping. Current applications of stem cells in endodontic research have revealed their potential to continue root development in necrotic immature teeth and transplanted/replanted teeth. Successful application of pulp revascularization is highlighted here with support of a clinical case report. This article also discusses the role of dental stem cells as a promising tool for regeneration of individual tissue types like dentine, pulp and even an entire functional tooth. PMID:26506811

  15. Human umbilical cord and dental pulp-derived mesenchymal stem cells: biological characteristics and potential roles in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Chen, Lei; Xue, Ting; Yu, Jing; Liu, Jie; Ji, Yazhong; Cheng, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have a wide application in cell‑based therapies and tissue engineering. In the present study, the differentiation, survivin (SVV)‑modified effects and molecular basis of human umbilical cord‑derived MSCs (HUMSCs) and dental pulp‑derived stem cells (DPSCs) were investigated. The HUMSCs were found to differentiate into adipocytes more readily than the DPSCs and the HUMSCs and DPSCs were each able to differentiate into osteoblasts and chondroblasts. Following modification of the MSCs by SVV, the secretion of SVV in the modified HUMSCs was significantly higher compared with that in the modified DPSCs. In vivo, survival of the SVV‑modified DPSCs was observed at 4 and 14 days after intrastriatal transplantation, as was the expression of SVV and differentiation into astrocytes. The gene expression profiles of the control and modified HUMSCs and DPSCs were compared using RNA sequencing and an association was observed between gene expression and variability in cell line function. These findings provide novel information regarding the differences between HUMSCs and DPSCs and insight into optimal cell sources for therapeutic applications. PMID:25591506

  16. Investigation of modified platelet-rich plasma (mPRP) in promoting the proliferation and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells from deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Wen, J; Li, H T; Li, S H; Li, X; Duan, J M

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) have great potential to treat various dental-related diseases in regenerative medicine. They are usually maintained with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in vitro. Modified platelet-rich plasma (mPRP) would be a safe alternative to 10% FBS during SHEDs culture. Therefore, our study aimed to compare the proliferation and differentiation of SHEDs cultured in mPRP and FBS medium to explore an optimal concentration of mPRP for SHEDs maintenance. Platelets were harvested by automatic blood cell analyzer and activated by repeated liquid nitrogen freezing and thawing. The platelet-related cytokines were examined and analyzed by ELISA. SHEDs were extracted and cultured with different concentrations of mPRP or 10% FBS medium. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was measured. Mineralization factors, RUNX2 and OCN, were measured by real-time PCR. SHEDs were characterized with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) markers including vimentin, CD44, and CD105. mPRP at different concentrations (2, 5, 10, and 20%) enhanced the growth of SHEDs. Moreover, mPRP significantly stimulated ALP activity and promoted expression of RUNX2 and OCN compared with 10% FBS. mPRP could efficiently facilitate proliferation and differentiation of SHEDs, and 2% mPRP would be an optimal substitute for 10% FBS during SHEDs expansion and differentiation in clinical scale manufacturing. PMID:27599200

  17. Extracellular Ca2+ Promotes Odontoblastic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells via BMP2-Mediated Smad1/5/8 and Erk1/2 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiting; Hu, Jing; Zhang, Gang; Qi, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Li, Pengfei; Zeng, Yong; Zhao, Wenfeng; Tan, Yinghui

    2015-09-01

    Ca(2+) is the main element of many pulp capping materials that are used to promote the regeneration of tertiary dentin, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not clear. In this study, we found that Ca(2+) increased the expression of the odontoblastic differentiation marker gene DSPP and promoted odontoblastic differentiation and mineralization of DPSCs, but inhibited ALP activity. Ca(2+) increases the expression of endogenous BMP2, which activates the Smad1/5/8 pathway and promotes the Smad1-Runx2 and Runx2-DSPP interaction in DPSCs. Inhibition of Smad1/5/8 with dorsomorphin partially blocked Runx2 activity; however, inhibition of the BMP2 receptor with Noggin nearly fully suppressed Runx2 activity. These results indicate that Ca(2+) promotes cell differentiation mainly via BMP2-mediated Smad-dependent and Smad-independent pathways. We then determined that the phosphorylation level of Erk1/2, but not JNK or p38, was significantly increased as a result of Ca(2+) stimulation. Blockage of Erk1/2 was found to inhibit Runx2 activity, indicating that Ca(2+) triggers the Erk1/2 pathway, which subsequently regulates Runx2 activity. In addition, inhibition of Erk1/2 differentially attenuated the phosphorylation levels of Smad1/5/8 and Smad2/3. Collectively, this study demonstrates that Ca(2+) activates the BMP2-mediated Smad1/5/8 and Erk1/2 pathways in DPSCs and that Smad1/5/8 and Erk1/2 signaling converge at Runx2 to control the odontoblastic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:25656933

  18. LPS induces pulp progenitor cell recruitment via complement activation.

    PubMed

    Chmilewsky, F; Jeanneau, C; Laurent, P; About, I

    2015-01-01

    Complement system, a major component of the natural immunity, has been recently identified as an important mediator of the dentin-pulp regeneration process through STRO-1 pulp cell recruitment by the C5a active fragment. Moreover, it has been shown recently that under stimulation with lipoteichoic acid, a complex component of the Gram-positive bacteria cell wall, human pulp fibroblasts are able to synthesize all proteins required for complement activation. However, Gram-negative bacteria, which are also involved in tooth decay, are known as powerful activators of complement system and inflammation. Here, we investigated the role of Gram-negative bacteria-induced complement activation on the pulp progenitor cell recruitment using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of all Gram-negative bacteria. Our results show that incubating pulp fibroblasts with LPS induced membrane attack complex formation and C5a release in serum-free fibroblast cultures. The produced C5a binds to the pulp progenitor cells' membrane and induces their migration toward the LPS stimulation chamber, as revealed by the dynamic transwell migration assays. The inhibition of this migration by the C5aR-specific antagonist W54011 indicates that the pulp progenitor migration is mediated by the interaction between C5a and C5aR. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a direct interaction between the recruitment of progenitor pulp cells and the activation of complement system generated by pulp fibroblast stimulation with LPS. PMID:25359783

  19. Quality evaluation of dissolving pulp fabricated from banana plant stem and its potential for biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Das, Atanu Kumar; Nakagawa-Izumi, Akiko; Ohi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-20

    The study was conducted to evaluate the quality of dissolving pulp of Musa sapientum L. (banana) plant stem and its potential for biorefinery. Introduction of pre-hydrolysis prior to any alkaline pulping process helps to reduce the content of hemicellulose and consequently produce acceptably high content of cellulose pulp. Water pre-hydrolysis was done at 150°C for 90min. The amount of lignin, xylan and glucan in the extracted pre-hydrolysis liquor (PHL) was 1.6, 4.9 and 1.6%, respectively. Pulping of pre-extracted chips was done following soda-AQ, alkaline sulfite and kraft process. The ratio of chip to liquor was 1:7 for both pre-hydrolysis and pulping. The kraft pulping process with 20% active alkali and 25% sulfidity at 150°C for 90min showed the best result. The lowest kappa number was 26.2 with a considerable pulp yield of 32.7%. The pulp was bleached by acidic NaClO2 and the consistency was 10% based on air-dried pulp. The lowest amount of 7% NaClO2 was used for the bleaching sequence of D0ED1ED2. After D0ED1ED2 bleaching, the pulp showed that α-cellulose, brightness and ash were 91.9, 77.9 and 1.6% respectively. The viscosity was 19.9cP. Hence, there is a possibility to use banana plant stem as a raw material for dissolving grade pulp and other bioproducts. PMID:27178917

  20. Stem cells supporting other stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Leatherman, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cell therapies are increasingly prevalent for the treatment of damaged or diseased tissues, but most of the improvements observed to date are attributed to the ability of stem cells to produce paracrine factors that have a trophic effect on existing tissue cells, improving their functional capacity. It is now clear that this ability to produce trophic factors is a normal and necessary function for some stem cell populations. In vivo adult stem cells are thought to self-renew due to local signals from the microenvironment where they live, the niche. Several niches have now been identified which harbor multiple stem cell populations. In three of these niches – the Drosophila testis, the bulge of the mammalian hair follicle, and the mammalian bone marrow – one type of stem cell has been found to produce factors that contribute to the maintenance of a second stem cell population in the shared niche. In this review, I will examine the architecture of these three niches and discuss the molecular signals involved. Together, these examples establish a new paradigm for stem cell behavior, that stem cells can promote the maintenance of other stem cells. PMID:24348512

  1. Stem cell biobanks.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Silvana

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells contribute to innate healing and harbor a promising role for regenerative medicine. Stem cell banking through long-term storage of different stem cell platforms represents a fundamental source to preserve original features of stem cells for patient-specific clinical applications. Stem cell research and clinical translation constitute fundamental and indivisible modules catalyzed through biobanking activity, generating a return of investment. PMID:20560026

  2. Stem cells, a resource for patients and dentists.

    PubMed

    Paglia, L

    2016-06-01

    The first document of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, "Policy on Stem Cells", published in 2008, was aimed at providing dentists with information about the possible use of dental stem cells of their patients. Stem cells constantly differentiate and create new specialised cells to replace the dead ones and to repair and regenerate tissues. Adult stem cells can be found in every tissue, however stem cells from cord blood (isolated at birth) and from bone marrow, contained within human bones, are the most studied because they are quite simple to isolate and preserve. Recently, stem cells are also collected from the dental pulp, a tissue rich in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which can be considered a personal biological treasure. Dental pulp stem cells were identified and isolated for the first time in 2000, and they were classified according to their clonogenic ability and proliferative potential. Although often discarded, dental pulp taken from third molars germs is an easily accessible source of MSC. Since 2000, four types of MSC derived from the dental pulp have been identified: Human Exfoliated Deciduous Stem Cells (SHED), Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (PDLSC), Apical Papillae Stem Cells (SCAP) and Dental Follicle Progenitor Cells (DFPC). Particularly, stem cells obtained by deciduous teeth offer many advantages: they are readily available, grow more rapidly than those from other sources, the isolation process does not require to sacrifice the tooth, and they can be obtained with little or no trauma for the patient. In addition, the current technology for cryopreservation of stem cells is reliable and tested. In the future, it will be possible to improve the times of cryopreservation and to lower costs. In the meantime, we can already advise our patient not to "throw away" the treasure contained in the teeth to be extracted. In conclusion, dentistry may contribute, also from this point of view, to the patient's current and future well-being.We just

  3. Mapping of BrdU label-retaining dental pulp cells in growing teeth and their regenerative capacity after injuries.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuko; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Suzuki, Hironobu; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Jung, Han-Sung; Honda, Masaki J; Ishii, Yumiko; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Ohshima, Hayato

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that human dental pulp contains adult stem cells. A pulse of the thymidine analog BrdU given to young animals at the optimal time could clarify where slow-cycling long-term label-retaining cells (LRCs), putative adult stem cells, reside in the pulp tissue. This study focuses on the mapping of LRCs in growing teeth and their regenerative capacity after tooth injuries. Two to seven peritoneal injections of BrdU into pregnant Wistar rats revealed slow-cycling long-term dense LRCs in the mature tissues of born animals. Numerous dense LRCs were postnatally decreased in number and reached a plateau at 4 weeks after birth when they mainly resided in the center of the dental pulp, associating with blood vessels. Mature dental pulp cells were stained with Hoechst 33342 and sorted into (<0.76%) side population cells using FACS, which included dense LRCs. Some dense LRCs co-expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers such as STRO-1 or CD146. Tooth injuries caused degeneration of the odontoblast layer, and newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells contained LRCs. Thus, dense LRCs in mature pulp tissues were supposed to be dental pulp stem cells possessing regenerative capacity for forming newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells. The present study proposes the new hypothesis that both granular and dense LRCs are equipped in the dental pulp and that the dense LRCs with proliferative capacity play crucial roles in the pulpal healing process following exogenous stimuli in cooperation with the granular LRCs. PMID:20676671

  4. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Ben; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Scott, Robert A.H.; Leadbeater, Wendy; Scheven, Ben A.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs) and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs), MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC), adipose tissues (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC), together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment. PMID:25752437

  5. Stem Cell Research.

    PubMed

    Trounson, Alan; Kolaja, Kyle; Petersen, Thomas; Weber, Klaus; McVean, Maralee; Funk, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have great potential in basic research and are being slowly integrated into toxicological research. This symposium provided an overview of the state of the field, stem cell models, described allogenic stem cell treatments and issues of immunogenicity associated with protein therapeutics, and tehn concentrated on stem cell uses in regenerative medicine focusing on lung and testing strategies on engineered tissues from a pathologist's perspective. PMID:25899720

  6. Information on Stem Cell Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Information on Stem Cell Research Research @ NINDS Stem Cell Highlights Submit a hESC ... found here: Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells NINDS Stem Cell Research on Campus The Intramural Research Program of NINDS ...

  7. Characterization of canine dental pulp cells and their neuroregenerative potential.

    PubMed

    Naito, Eiji; Kudo, Daichi; Sekine, Shin-ichiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Kobatake, Yui; Tamaoki, Naritaka; Inden, Masatoshi; Iida, Kazuki; Ito, Yusuke; Hozumi, Isao; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Maeda, Sadatoshi; Kamishina, Hiroaki

    2015-11-01

    Dental pulp cells (DPCs) of various species have been studied for their potentials of differentiation into functional neurons and secretion of neurotrophic factors. In canine, DPCs have only been studied for cell surface markers and differentiation, but there is little direct evidence for therapeutic potentials for neurological disorders. The present study aimed to further characterize canine DPCs (cDPCs), particularly focusing on their neuroregenerative potentials. It was also reported that superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles were useful for labeling of MSCs and tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our data suggested that cDPCs hold higher proliferation capacity than bone marrow stromal cells, the other type of mesenchymal stem cells which have been the target of intensive research. Canine DPCs constitutively expressed neural markers, suggesting a close relationship to the nervous system in their developmental origin. Canine DPCs promoted neuritogenesis of PC12 cells, most likely through secretion of neurotrophic factors. Furthermore, SPIO nanoparticles could be effectively transported to cDPCs without significant cytotoxicity and unfavorable effects on neuritogenesis. SPIO-labeled cDPCs embedded in agarose spinal cord phantoms were successfully visualized with a magnetic resonance imaging arousing a hope for noninvasive cell tracking in transplantation studies. PMID:26170225

  8. Plant stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis. PMID:22404469

  9. Toward 'SMART' stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T

    2008-01-01

    Stem cell research is at the heart of regenerative medicine, which holds great promise for the treatment of many devastating disorders. However, in addition to hurdles posed by well-publicized ethical issues, this emerging field presents many biological challenges. What is a stem cell? How are embryonic stem cells different from adult stem cells? What are the physiological bases for therapeutically acceptable stem cells? In this editorial review, I will briefly discuss these superficially simple but actually rather complex issues that surround this fascinating cell type. The goal of this special issue on stem cells in Gene Therapy is to review some fundamental and critical aspects of current stem cell research that have translational potential. PMID:18046429

  10. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... based therapies Cell culture Cell division Chromosome Clone Cloning Cord blood stem cells Culture medium Differentiation Directed ... Pluripotent Polar body Preimplantation Proliferation Regenerative medicine Reproductive cloning Signals Somatic cell Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) ...

  11. Chitosan-collagen biomembrane embedded with calcium-aluminate enhances dentinogenic potential of pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Rosseto, Hebert Luís; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Scheffel, Débora Salles; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2016-01-01

    The development of biomaterials capable of driving dental pulp stem cell differentiation into odontoblast-like cells able to secrete reparative dentin is the goal of current conservative dentistry. In the present investigation, a biomembrane (BM) composed of a chitosan/collagen matrix embedded with calcium-aluminate microparticles was tested. The BM was produced by mixing collagen gel with a chitosan solution (2:1), and then adding bioactive calcium-aluminate cement as the mineral phase. An inert material (polystyrene) was used as the negative control. Human dental pulp cells were seeded onto the surface of certain materials, and the cytocompatibility was evaluated by cell proliferation and cell morphology, assessed after 1, 7, 14 and 28 days in culture. The odontoblastic differentiation was evaluated by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, total protein production, gene expression of DMP-1/DSPP and mineralized nodule deposition. The pulp cells were able to attach onto the BM surface and spread, displaying a faster proliferative rate at initial periods than that of the control cells. The BM also acted on the cells to induce more intense ALP activity, protein production at 14 days, and higher gene expression of DSPP and DMP-1 at 28 days, leading to the deposition of about five times more mineralized matrix than the cells in the control group. Therefore, the experimental biomembrane induced the differentiation of pulp cells into odontoblast-like cells featuring a highly secretory phenotype. This innovative bioactive material can drive other protocols for dental pulp exposure treatment by inducing the regeneration of dentin tissue mediated by resident cells. PMID:27119587

  12. Optimizing stem cell culture.

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-11-01

    Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. In the past few years, major efforts have been made to define more precisely the medium composition in which stem cells grow or differentiate. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such as serum or feeder cell layers by recombinant cytokines or growth factors. Another example is the control of the oxygen pressure. For many years cell cultures have been done under atmospheric oxygen pressure which is much higher than the one experienced by stem cells in vivo. A consequence of cell metabolism is that cell culture conditions are constantly changing. Therefore, the development of high sensitive monitoring processes and control algorithms is required for ensuring cell culture medium homeostasis. Stem cells also sense the physical constraints of their microenvironment. Rigidity, stiffness, and geometry of the culture substrate influence stem cell fate. Hence, nanotopography is probably as important as medium formulation in the optimization of stem cell culture conditions. Recent advances include the development of synthetic bioinformative substrates designed at the micro- and nanoscale level. On going research in many different fields including stem cell biology, nanotechnology, and bioengineering suggest that our current way to culture cells in Petri dish or flasks will soon be outdated as flying across the Atlantic Ocean in the Lindbergh's plane. PMID:20803548

  13. Differentiation capacity of BrdU label-retaining dental pulp cells during pulpal healing following allogenic transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kotaro; Ishikawa, Yuko; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Kenmotsu, Shin-Ichi; Ohshima, Hayato

    2011-08-01

    Our recent study has demonstrated the localization of putative dental pulp stem cells in the developing molar by chasing 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeling. However, their differentiation capacity subsequent to the tooth transplantation remains to be elucidated. This study aims to clarify the differentiation capacity of BrdU label-retaining dental pulp cells and their relationship to cell proliferation and apoptosis during pulpal healing following allogenic transplantation in mice. Following extraction of the mouse molar in BrdU-labeled animals, the roots and pulp floor were resected and immediately allo-grafted into the sublingual region in non-labeled animals, and vice versa. In the labeled transplants, label-retaining cells (LRCs) were increased in number and committed in nestin-positive newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells, whereas they were not committed in osteoblast-like cells. In the labeled host, on the contrary, LRCs were committed in neither odontoblast- nor osteoblast-like cells, although they were transiently increased in number and finally disappeared in the pulp tissue of the transplants. Interestingly, numerous apoptotic cells appeared in the pulp tissue including LRCs during the experimental period. These results suggest that transplanted LRCs maintain their proliferative and differentiation capacity in spite of extensive apoptosis occurring in the transplant, whereas transiently increased host-derived LRCs finally disappear in the pulp chamber following apoptosis. PMID:21878732

  14. Stress and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties and functions of stem cells make them particularly susceptible to stresses and also lead to their regulation by stress. Stem cell division must respond to the demand to replenish cells during normal tissue turnover as well as in response to damage. Oxidative stress, mechanical stress, growth factors, and cytokines signal stem cell division and differentiation. Many of the conserved pathways regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are also stress-response pathways. The long life span and division potential of stem cells create a propensity for transformation (cancer) and specific stress responses such as apoptosis and senescence act as antitumor mechanisms. Quiescence regulated by CDK inhibitors and a hypoxic niche regulated by FOXO transcription factor function to reduce stress for several types of stem cells to facilitate long-term maintenance. Aging is a particularly relevant stress for stem cells, because repeated demands on stem cell function over the life span can have cumulative cell-autonomous effects including epigenetic dysregulation, mutations, and telomere erosion. In addition, aging of the organism impairs function of the stem cell niche and systemic signals, including chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:23799624

  15. Dental stem cell patents.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Frerich, Bernhard; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A complex human tissue harbors stem cells that are responsible for its maintenance or repair. These stem cells have been isolated also from dental tissues such as the periodontal ligament, dental papilla or dental follicle and they may offer novel applications in dentistry. This following review summarizes patents about dental stem cells for dental tissue engineering and considers their value for regenerative dentistry. PMID:19149737

  16. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  17. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. PMID:20370314

  18. The leukemic stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Craig T.

    2007-01-01

    Malignant stem cells have recently been described as the source of several types of human cancer. These unique cell types are typically rare and possess properties that are distinct from most other tumor cells. The properties of leukemic stem cells indicate that current chemotherapy drugs will not be effective. The use of current cytotoxic agents is not effective in leukemia because the agents target both the leukemic and normal stem cell populations. Consequently, new strategies are required that specifically and preferentially target the malignant stem cell population, while sparing normal stem cells. Several well known agents are lethal for the leukemic stem cell in preclinical testing. They include parthenolide, commonly known as feverfew, and TDZD-8. They have undergone various levels of preclinical development, but have not been used in patients as yet in the cancer setting. These drugs and combinations of existing therapies that target the leukemic stem cell population may provide a cure in this disease. This article summarizes recent findings in the leukemic stem cell field and discusses new directions for therapy. PMID:17336250

  19. Stem Cell Separation Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Beili; Murthy, Shashi K.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy and translational stem cell research require large-scale supply of stem cells at high purity and viability, thus leading to the development of stem cell separation technologies. This review covers key technologies being applied to stem cell separation, and also highlights exciting new approaches in this field. First, we will cover conventional separation methods that are commercially available and have been widely adapted. These methods include Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), Magnet-activated cell sorting (MACS), pre-plating, conditioned expansion media, density gradient centrifugation, field flow fractionation (FFF), and dielectrophoresis (DEP). Next, we will introduce emerging novel methods that are currently under development. These methods include improved aqueous two-phase system, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), and various types of microfluidic platforms. Finally, we will discuss the challenges and directions towards future breakthroughs for stem cell isolation. Advancing stem cell separation techniques will be essential for clinical and research applications of stem cells. PMID:23505616

  20. Genetic Comparison of Stemness of Human Umbilical Cord and Dental Pulp.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chung-Min; Kim, Hyunok; Song, Je Seon; Choi, Byung-Jai; Kim, Seong-Oh; Jung, Han-Sung; Moon, Seok-Jun; Choi, Hyung-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on gene expression patterns and functions in human umbilical cord (UC) and dental pulp (DP) containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). DP tissues were collected from 25 permanent premolars. UC tissue samples were obtained from three newborns. Comparative gene profiles were obtained using cDNA microarray analysis and the expression of tooth development-associated and MSC-related genes was assessed by the quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Genes related to cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and immune responses were expressed at higher levels in UC, whereas genes related to growth factor and receptor activity and signal transduction were more highly expressed in DP. Although UC and DP tissues exhibited similar expression of surface markers for MSCs, UC showed higher expression of CD29, CD34, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and CD166. qRT-PCR analysis showed that CD146, CD166, and MYC were expressed 18.3, 8.24, and 1.63 times more highly in UC, whereas the expression of CD34 was 2.15 times higher in DP. Immunohistochemical staining revealed significant differences in the expression of genes (DSPP, DMP1, and CALB1) related to odontogenesis and angiogenesis in DP. DP and UC tissue showed similar gene expression, with the usual MSC markers, while they clearly diverged in their differentiation capacity. PMID:27087814

  1. Genetic Comparison of Stemness of Human Umbilical Cord and Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chung-Min; Kim, Hyunok; Song, Je Seon; Choi, Byung-Jai; Kim, Seong-Oh; Jung, Han-Sung; Moon, Seok-Jun; Choi, Hyung-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on gene expression patterns and functions in human umbilical cord (UC) and dental pulp (DP) containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). DP tissues were collected from 25 permanent premolars. UC tissue samples were obtained from three newborns. Comparative gene profiles were obtained using cDNA microarray analysis and the expression of tooth development-associated and MSC-related genes was assessed by the quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Genes related to cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and immune responses were expressed at higher levels in UC, whereas genes related to growth factor and receptor activity and signal transduction were more highly expressed in DP. Although UC and DP tissues exhibited similar expression of surface markers for MSCs, UC showed higher expression of CD29, CD34, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and CD166. qRT-PCR analysis showed that CD146, CD166, and MYC were expressed 18.3, 8.24, and 1.63 times more highly in UC, whereas the expression of CD34 was 2.15 times higher in DP. Immunohistochemical staining revealed significant differences in the expression of genes (DSPP, DMP1, and CALB1) related to odontogenesis and angiogenesis in DP. DP and UC tissue showed similar gene expression, with the usual MSC markers, while they clearly diverged in their differentiation capacity. PMID:27087814

  2. Optimization of treatment with recombinant FGF-2 for proliferation and differentiation of human dental stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Hyung; Kim, Won-Tae; Ryu, Chun Jeih; Jang, Young-Joo

    2015-08-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2) is widely used to modulate the proliferation and differentiation of certain cell types. An expression and purification system for recombinant human FGF-2 in Escherichia coli was established for the purpose of securing a continuous supply of this protein. The purified recombinant FGF-2 significantly increased the population of human embryonic stem cells. The optimal concentrations of FGF-2 for cell proliferative induction in various adult stem cells including human dental pulp stem cells, full term human periodontal ligament stem cells, human gingival fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, and osteogenic oseosarcoma were established in a dose-dependent manner. When cells were treated with recombinant FGF-2 for 6 days before osteogenic induction, the mRNA expression of the bone markers was upregulated in cells originated from human dental pulp tissue, indicating that pretreatment with FGF-2 during culture increase stem cell/progenitor population and osteogenic potential. PMID:25789782

  3. Establishment of in vitro culture system for evaluating dentin-pulp complex regeneration with special reference to the differentiation capacity of BrdU label-retaining dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Ohshima, Hayato

    2014-09-01

    We have proposed the new hypothesis that dental pulp stem cells play crucial roles in the pulpal healing process following exogenous stimuli in cooperation with progenitors. This study aimed to establish an in vitro culture system for evaluating dentin-pulp complex regeneration with special reference to the differentiation capacity of slow-cycling long-term label-retaining cells (LRCs). Three intraperitoneal injections of BrdU were given to pregnant ICR mice to map LRCs in the mature tissues of born animals. The upper bilateral first molars of 3-week-old mice were extracted and divided into two pieces and cultured for 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days using the Trowel's method. We succeeded in establishing an in vitro culture system for evaluating dentin-pulp complex regeneration, where most odontoblasts were occasionally degenerated and lost nestin immunoreactivity because of the separation of cell bodies from cellular processes in the dentin matrix by the beginning of in vitro culture. Numerous dense LRCs mainly resided in the center of the dental pulp associating with blood vessels throughout the experimental periods. On postoperative days 1-3, the periphery of the pulp tissue including the odontoblast layer showed degenerative features. By Day 7, nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged along the pulp-dentin border and dense LRCs were committed in the odontoblast-like cells. These results suggest that dense LRCs in the center of the dental pulp associating with blood vessels were supposed to be dental pulp stem/progenitor cells possessing regenerative capacity for forming newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells. PMID:24562869

  4. Stem cells in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Ogliari, Karolyn Sassi; Marinowic, Daniel; Brum, Dario Eduardo; Loth, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical research have shown that stem cell therapy could be a promising therapeutic option for many diseases in which current medical treatments do not achieve satisfying results or cure. This article describes stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications in dermatology today. PMID:24770506

  5. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Tuthill, Mark

    2010-01-01

    More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications. PMID:24198516

  7. Application of Stem Cell Technology in Dental Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruoxue; Lengner, Chistopher

    2013-01-01

    Significance In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the isolation and characterization of dental tissue-derived stem cells and address the potential of these cell types for use in regenerative cell transplantation therapy. Recent Advances Looking forward, platforms for the delivery of stem cells via scaffolds and the use of growth factors and cytokines for enhancing dental stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are discussed. Critical Issues We aim to understand the developmental origins of dental tissues in an effort to elucidate the molecular pathways governing the genesis of somatic dental stem cells. The advantages and disadvantages of several dental stem cells are discussed, including the developmental stage and specific locations from which these cells can be purified. In particular, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth may act as a very practical and easily accessibly reservoir for autologous stem cells and hold the most value in stem cell therapy. Dental pulp stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells should also be considered for their triple lineage differentiation ability and relative ease of isolation. Further, we address the potentials and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cells as a cell source in dental regenerative. Future Directions From an economical and a practical standpoint, dental stem cell therapy would be most easily applied in the prevention of periodontal ligament detachment and bone atrophy, as well as in the regeneration of dentin-pulp complex. In contrast, cell-based tooth replacement due to decay or other oral pathology seems, at the current time, an untenable approach. PMID:24527351

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have two features: the ability to differentiate along different lineages and the ability of self-renewal. Two major types of stem cells have been described, namely, embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are obtained from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and are associated with tumorigenesis, and the use of human ESCs involves ethical and legal considerations. The use of adult mesenchymal stem cells is less problematic with regard to these issues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation. MSCs can be isolated from a variety of tissues, such as umbilical cord, endometrial polyps, menses blood, bone marrow, adipose tissue, etc. This is because the ease of harvest and quantity obtained make these sources most practical for experimental and possible clinical applications. Recently, MSCs have been found in new sources, such as menstrual blood and endometrium. There are likely more sources of MSCs waiting to be discovered, and MSCs may be a good candidate for future experimental or clinical applications. One of the major challenges is to elucidate the mechanisms of differentiation, mobilization, and homing of MSCs, which are highly complex. The multipotent properties of MSCs make them an attractive choice for possible development of clinical applications. Future studies should explore the role of MSCs in differentiation, transplantation, and immune response in various diseases. PMID:21396235

  9. Autophagy in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jun-Lin; Simon, Anna Katharina; Prescott, Mark; Menendez, Javier A.; Liu, Fei; Wang, Fen; Wang, Chenran; Wolvetang, Ernst; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Zhang, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved cellular process by which cytoplasmic components are sequestered in autophagosomes and delivered to lysosomes for degradation. As a major intracellular degradation and recycling pathway, autophagy is crucial for maintaining cellular homeostasis as well as remodeling during normal development, and dysfunctions in autophagy have been associated with a variety of pathologies including cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and neurodegenerative disease. Stem cells are unique in their ability to self-renew and differentiate into various cells in the body, which are important in development, tissue renewal and a range of disease processes. Therefore, it is predicted that autophagy would be crucial for the quality control mechanisms and maintenance of cellular homeostasis in various stem cells given their relatively long life in the organisms. In contrast to the extensive body of knowledge available for somatic cells, the role of autophagy in the maintenance and function of stem cells is only beginning to be revealed as a result of recent studies. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the current understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of autophagy in embryonic stem cells, several tissue stem cells (particularly hematopoietic stem cells), as well as a number of cancer stem cells. We discuss how recent studies of different knockout mice models have defined the roles of various autophagy genes and related pathways in the regulation of the maintenance, expansion and differentiation of various stem cells. We also highlight the many unanswered questions that will help to drive further research at the intersection of autophagy and stem cell biology in the near future. PMID:23486312

  10. P16/p53 expression and telomerase activity in immortalized human dental pulp cells

    PubMed Central

    Egbuniwe, Obi; Idowu, Bernadine D; Funes, Juan M; Grant, Andrew D; Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Residing within human dental pulp are cells of an ectomesenchymal origin that have the potential to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells. These cells have a limited growth potential owing to the effects of cell senescence. This study examines the effects of immortalizing odontoblast-like cells on cell proliferation and mineralization by comparing transformed dental pulp stem cells (tDPSCs) and non-transformed dental pulp stem cells (nDPSCs). Results With the exogenous expression of hTERT, tDPSCs maintained a continued expression of odontogenic markers for cell proliferation and mineralization (ALP, COL-1, DMP-1, DSPP, OCN and OPN), as did nDPSCs. Oncoprotein expression was seen in both groups except for a noted absence of p16 in the tDPSCs. nDPSCs also showed lower levels of total ALP and DNA activity in comparison to tDPSCs when assayed, as well as low telomerase activity readings. Methods Using a retroviral vector, exogenous human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) was expressed in tDPSCs. Both cell groups were cultured, and their telomerase activities were determined using a telomerase quantification assay. Also examined, were the expression of genes involved in proliferation and mineralization, such as human alkaline phosphatase (ALP), β-actin, collagen I (col-1), core binding factor (cbfa)-1, dentin matrix protein (DMP-1), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), GAPDH, hTERT, osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN) as well as oncoproteins involved in senescence (p16, p21 and p53) using RT-PCR. DNA and alkaline phosphate activity was also assayed in both cell groups. Conclusion These results indicate maintenance of odontoblast-like differentiation characteristics after retroviral transformation with hTERT and suggest a possible link with a reduced p16 expression. PMID:22067611

  11. The effects of cryopreservation on cells isolated from adipose, bone marrow and dental pulp tissues.

    PubMed

    Davies, O G; Smith, A J; Cooper, P R; Shelton, R M; Scheven, B A

    2014-10-01

    The effects of cryopreservation on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) phenotype are not well documented; however this process is of increasing importance for regenerative therapies. This study examined the effect of cryopreservation (10% dimethyl-sulfoxide) on the morphology, viability, gene-expression and relative proportion of MSC surface-markers on cells derived from rat adipose, bone marrow and dental pulp. Cryopreservation significantly reduced the number of viable cells in bone marrow and dental pulp cell populations but had no observable effect on adipose cells. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated significant increases in the relative expression of MSC surface-markers, CD90 and CD29/CD90 following cryopreservation. sqRT-PCR analysis of MSC gene-expression demonstrated increases in pluripotent markers for adipose and dental pulp, together with significant tissue-specific increases in CD44, CD73-CD105 following cryopreservation. Cells isolated from different tissue sources did not respond equally to cryopreservation with adipose tissue representing a more robust source of MSCs. PMID:25127874

  12. Epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Lyle, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    It is likely that adult epithelial stem cells will be useful in the treatment of diseases, such as ectodermal dysplasias, monilethrix, Netherton syndrome, Menkes disease, hereditary epidermolysis bullosa, and alopecias. Additionally, other skin problems such as burn wounds, chronic wounds, and ulcers will benefit from stem cell-related therapies. However, there are many questions that need to be answered before this goal can be realized. The most important of these questions is what regulates the adhesion of stem cells to the niche versus migration to the site of injury. We have started to identify the mechanisms involved in this decision-making process. PMID:21618097

  13. Odontoblasts: Specialized hard-tissue-forming cells in the dentin-pulp complex.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Okiji, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Odontoblasts are specialized cells that produce dentin and exhibit unique morphological characteristics; i.e., they extend cytoplasmic processes into dentinal tubules. While osteoblasts, which are typical hard-tissue-forming cells, are generated from mesenchymal stem cells during normal and pathological bone metabolism, the induction of odontoblasts only occurs once during tooth development, and odontoblasts survive throughout the lives of healthy teeth. During the differentiation of odontoblasts, signaling molecules from the inner enamel epithelium are considered necessary for the differentiation of odontoblast precursors, i.e., peripheral dental papilla cells. If odontoblasts are destroyed by severe external stimuli, such as deep caries, the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells into odontoblast-like cells is induced. Various bioactive molecules, such as non-collagenous proteins, might be involved in this process, although the precise mechanisms responsible for odontoblast differentiation have not been fully elucidated. Recently, our knowledge about the other functional activities of odontoblasts (apart from dentin formation) has increased. For example, it has been suggested that odontoblasts might act as nociceptive receptors, and surveillance cells that detect the invasion of exogenous pathogens. The regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex has recently gained much attention as a promising future treatment modality that could increase the longevity of pulpless teeth. Finally, congenital dentin anomalies, which are concerned with the disturbance of odontoblast functions, are summarized. PMID:27131345

  14. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  15. Plant Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Greb, Thomas; Lohmann, Jan U

    2016-09-12

    Among the trending topics in the life sciences, stem cells have received a fair share of attention in the public debate - mostly in connection with their potential for biomedical application and therapies. While the promise of organ regeneration and the end of cancer have captured our imagination, it has gone almost unnoticed that plant stem cells represent the ultimate origin of much of the food we eat, the oxygen we breathe, as well the fuels we burn. Thus, plant stem cells may be ranked among the most important cells for human well-being. Research by many labs in the last decades has uncovered a set of independent stem cell systems that fulfill the specialized needs of plant development and growth in four dimensions. Surprisingly, the cellular and molecular design of these systems is remarkably similar, even across diverse species. In some long-lived plants, such as trees, plant stem cells remain active over hundreds or even thousands of years, revealing the exquisite precision in the underlying control of proliferation, self-renewal and differentiation. In this minireview, we introduce the basic features of the three major plant stem cell systems building on these facts, highlight their modular design at the level of cellular layout and regulatory underpinnings and briefly compare them with their animal counterparts. PMID:27623267

  16. Responses of BrdU label-retaining dental pulp cells to allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxilla.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Noriko; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Nakagawa, Eizo; Tani-Ishii, Nobuyuki; Ohshima, Hayato

    2011-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that a pulse of BrdU given to prenatal animals reveals the existence of slow-cycling long-term label-retaining cells (LRCs), putative adult stem or progenitor cells, which reside in the dental pulp. This study aims to clarify responses of LRCs to allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxilla using prenatal BrdU-labeling, in situ hybridization for osteopontin and periostin, and immunohistochemistry for BrdU, nestin, and osteopontin. The upper-right first molars were allografted in the original socket between BrdU-labeled and non-labeled mice or between GFP transgenic and wild-type mice. Tooth transplantation caused degeneration of the odontoblast layer, resulting in the disappearance of nestin-positive reactions in the dental pulp. On postoperative days 5-7, tertiary dentin formation commenced next to the preexisting dentin where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged in the successful cases. In BrdU-labeled transplanted teeth, dense LRCs were maintained in the center of the dental pulp beneath the odontoblast-like cells including LRCs, whereas LRCs disappeared in the area surrounding the bone-like tissue. In contrast, LRCs were not recognized in the pulp chamber of non-labeled transplants through the experimental period. Tooth transplantation using GFP mice demonstrated that the donor cells constituted the dental pulp of the transplant except for endothelial cells and some migrated cells, and the periodontal tissue was replaced by host-derived cells except for epithelial cell rests of Malassez. These results suggest that the maintenance of BrdU label-retaining dental pulp cells play a role in the regeneration of odontoblast-like cells in the process of pulpal healing following tooth transplantation. PMID:21986880

  17. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to reality. However, as somatic cells might have accumulated various chromosomal abnormalities, including aneuploidies throughout their lives, the resulting IPSCs might no longer carry the perfect blueprint for the tissue to be generated, or worse, become at risk of adopting a malignant fate. In this review, we discuss the contribution of aneuploidy to healthy tissues and how aneuploidy can lead to disease. Furthermore, we review the differences between how somatic cells and stem cells respond to aneuploidy. PMID:27354891

  18. Manufacturing of dental pulp cell-based products from human third molars: current strategies and future investigations

    PubMed Central

    Ducret, Maxime; Fabre, Hugo; Degoul, Olivier; Atzeni, Gianluigi; McGuckin, Colin; Forraz, Nico; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Farges, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, mesenchymal cell-based products have been developed to improve surgical therapies aimed at repairing human tissues. In this context, the tooth has recently emerged as a valuable source of stem/progenitor cells for regenerating orofacial tissues, with easy access to pulp tissue and high differentiation potential of dental pulp mesenchymal cells. International guidelines now recommend the use of standardized procedures for cell isolation, storage and expansion in culture to ensure optimal reproducibility, efficacy and safety when cells are used for clinical application. However, most dental pulp cell-based medicinal products manufacturing procedures may not be fully satisfactory since they could alter the cells biological properties and the quality of derived products. Cell isolation, enrichment and cryopreservation procedures combined to long-term expansion in culture media containing xeno- and allogeneic components are known to affect cell phenotype, viability, proliferation and differentiation capacities. This article focuses on current manufacturing strategies of dental pulp cell-based medicinal products and proposes a new protocol to improve efficiency, reproducibility and safety of these strategies. PMID:26300779

  19. Manufacturing of dental pulp cell-based products from human third molars: current strategies and future investigations.

    PubMed

    Ducret, Maxime; Fabre, Hugo; Degoul, Olivier; Atzeni, Gianluigi; McGuckin, Colin; Forraz, Nico; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Farges, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, mesenchymal cell-based products have been developed to improve surgical therapies aimed at repairing human tissues. In this context, the tooth has recently emerged as a valuable source of stem/progenitor cells for regenerating orofacial tissues, with easy access to pulp tissue and high differentiation potential of dental pulp mesenchymal cells. International guidelines now recommend the use of standardized procedures for cell isolation, storage and expansion in culture to ensure optimal reproducibility, efficacy and safety when cells are used for clinical application. However, most dental pulp cell-based medicinal products manufacturing procedures may not be fully satisfactory since they could alter the cells biological properties and the quality of derived products. Cell isolation, enrichment and cryopreservation procedures combined to long-term expansion in culture media containing xeno- and allogeneic components are known to affect cell phenotype, viability, proliferation and differentiation capacities. This article focuses on current manufacturing strategies of dental pulp cell-based medicinal products and proposes a new protocol to improve efficiency, reproducibility and safety of these strategies. PMID:26300779

  20. Mesenchymal Dental Pulp Cells Attenuate Dentin Resorption in Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y.; Chen, M.; He, L.; Marão, H.F.; Sun, D.M.; Zhou, J.; Kim, S.G.; Song, S.; Wang, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Dentin in permanent teeth rarely undergoes resorption in development, homeostasis, or aging, in contrast to bone that undergoes periodic resorption/remodeling. The authors hypothesized that cells in the mesenchymal compartment of dental pulp attenuate osteoclastogenesis. Mononucleated and adherent cells from donor-matched rat dental pulp (dental pulp cells [DPCs]) and alveolar bone (alveolar bone cells [ABCs]) were isolated and separately cocultured with primary rat splenocytes. Primary splenocytes readily aggregated and formed osteoclast-like cells in chemically defined osteoclastogenesis medium with 20 ng/mL of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and 50 ng/mL of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Strikingly, DPCs attenuated osteoclastogenesis when cocultured with primary splenocytes, whereas ABCs slightly but significantly promoted osteoclastogenesis. DPCs yielded ~20-fold lower RANKL expression but >2-fold higher osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression than donor-matched ABCs, yielding a RANKL/OPG ratio of 41:1 (ABCs:DPCs). Vitamin D3 significantly promoted RANKL expression in ABCs and OPG in DPCs. In vivo, rat maxillary incisors were atraumatically extracted (without any tooth fractures), followed by retrograde pulpectomy to remove DPCs and immediate replantation into the extraction sockets to allow repopulation of the surgically treated root canal with periodontal and alveolar bone–derived cells. After 8 wk, multiple dentin/root resorption lacunae were present in root dentin with robust RANKL and OPG expression. There were areas of dentin resoprtion alternating with areas of osteodentin formation in root dentin surface in the observed 8 wk. These findings suggest that DPCs of the mesenchymal compartment have an innate ability to attenuate osteoclastogenesis and that this innate ability may be responsible for the absence of dentin resorption in homeostasis. Mesenchymal attenuation of dentin resorption may have implications in internal

  1. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research. PMID:21044008

  2. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2009-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  3. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2002-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  4. Catalyzing stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Willemse, Lisa; Lyall, Drew; Rudnicki, Michael

    2008-09-01

    In 2001, the Stem Cell Network was the first of its kind, a bold initiative to forge and nurture pan-Canadian collaborations involving researchers, engineers, clinicians and private and public sector partners. Canada's broad and deep pool of stem cell talent proved to be a fertile ground for such an initiative, giving rise to a strong, thriving network that, 7 years later, can list innovative cell expansion and screening technologies, early-phase clinical trials for stroke, pulmonary hypertension, muscular dystrophy and cornea replacement, and leading discourse on ethical, legal and social issues among its accomplishments. As it moves into its second and final phase of funding, the Stem Cell Network continues to push boundaries and has set its sights on overcoming the obstacles that impede the transfer of research findings to clinical applications, commercial products and public policy. PMID:18729799

  5. Redefining the potential applications of dental stem cells: An asset for future

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Shalu; Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Sandeep; Arora, Sapna Panjwani

    2012-01-01

    Recent exciting discoveries isolated dental stem cells from the pulp of the primary and permanent teeth, from the periodontal ligament, and from associated healthy tissues. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) represent a kind of adult cell colony which has the potent capacity of self-renewing and multilineage differentiation. Stem cell-based tooth engineering is deemed as a promising approach to the making of a biological tooth (bio-tooth) or engineering of functional tooth structures. Dental professionals have the opportunity to make their patients aware of these new sources of stem cells that can be stored for future use as new therapies are developed for a range of diseases and injuries. The aim of this article is to review and understand how dental stem cells are being used for regeneration of oral and conversely nonoral tissues. A brief review on banking is also done for storing of these valuable stem cells for future use. PMID:23716933

  6. The role of dental stem cells in regeneration

    PubMed Central

    MAXIM, MONICA ANGELA; SORITAU, OLGA; BACIUT, MIHAELA; BRAN, SIMION; BACIUT, GRIGORE

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells that have the capacity of rising multiple cell types. A rich source of mesenchymal stem cells is represented by the dental tissues: the periodontal ligament, the dental pulp, the apical papilla, the dental follicle and the deciduous teeth. The aim of this review is to characterize the main dental- derived mesenchymal stem cell population, and to show their important role in tissue regeneration based on their properties : the multi-potency, the high proliferation rate, the differentiation in multiple cell lineages, the high cell viability and the positive expression for mesenchymal cell markers. Tissue regeneration or de novo’ formation of craniofacial structures is the future of regenerative medicine, offering a solution for congenital malformations, traumas and other diseases. PMID:26733745

  7. Odontoblastic inductive potential of epithelial cells derived from human deciduous dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Park, Ji-Won; Seo, You-Mi; Kim, Ha Hoon; Lee, Gene; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2016-06-01

    For the dentin regeneration, dental epithelial cells are indispensible and must possess odontoblastic induction capability. Epithelial cell-like stem cells were recently identified in human deciduous dental pulp (DPESCs). However, their cellular characteristics remain poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to characterize DPESCs compared to HAT-7 ameloblastic cells. Expression levels of ameloblast-specific markers [odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (Odam), matrix metalloproteinase (Mmp)-20, amelogenin, and ameloblastin] were detected in DPESCs. Co-culturing odontoblastic MDPC-23 cells with DPESCs increased expression of odontoblast differentiation markers (Dmp1 and Dspp) from days 4 to 10, while the expression of bone sialoprotein rapidly decreased. MDPC-23 cells cultured in DPESC-conditioned medium (CM) showed increased Dspp promoter activity compared with control MDPC-23 cultures. Mineralization was first observed in the CM groups from day 4 and proceeded rapidly until day 14, whereas mineralized nodules were found from day 7 in control media-cultured cells. In conclusion, DPESCs in human deciduous pulp possess ameloblast-like characteristics and differentiation properties, and substances derived from DPESCs promote odontoblastic differentiation. Thus, our results indicate that DPESCs can be a realistic epithelial source for use in odontoblastic induction and dentin formation of dental mesenchymal cells. PMID:27098651

  8. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  9. Dentin barrier test with transfected bovine pulp-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, G; Schuster, U; Thonemann, B; Barth, M; Esterbauer, S

    2001-02-01

    Growth kinetics of SV40 large T-antigen-transfected bovine pulp-derived cells on dentin were investigated. These cells were used in a dentin barrier test device, and the system was evaluated by testing a set of dental filling materials. Cells (120 cells/mm2) were seeded on dentin slices and incubated for up to 21 days. Cell proliferation was recorded using MTT assay. For cytotoxicity tests 3500 cells/mm2 were seeded on dentin discs, which were then incorporated into the dentin barrier test device. After 72 h preincubation test materials were applied. After a 24 h exposure with or without perfusion of the pulpal part of the test device, cell survival was evaluated using MTT assay. The cells revealed similar growth kinetics on dentin slices and on tissue culture plates. In cytotoxicity tests the cells were more sensitive toward the test materials than previously used three-dimensional cultures of human foreskin fibroblasts and as anticipated from clinical experience. Further improvement is expected by using three-dimensional cultures of pulp-derived cells. PMID:11491647

  10. Laser biomodulation on stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Li, Yan; Li, Xue-Feng; Tan, Li-Ling; Liu, Songhao

    2001-08-01

    Stem cells are views from the perspectives of their function, evolution, development, and cause. Counterintuitively, most stem cells may arise late in development, to act principally in tissue renewal, thus ensuring an organisms long-term survival. Surprisingly, recent reports suggest that tissue-specific adult stem cells have the potential to contribute to replenishment of multiple adult tissues. Stem cells are currently in the news for two reasons: the successful cultivation of human embryonic stem cell lines and reports that adult stem cells can differentiate into developmentally unrelated cell types, such as nerve cells into blood cells. The spotlight on stem cells has revealed gaps in our knowledge that must be filled if we are to take advantage of their full potential for treating devastating degenerative diseases such as Parkinsons's disease and muscular dystrophy. We need to know more about the intrinsic controls that keep stem cells as stem cells or direct them along particular differentiation pathways. Such intrinsic regulators are, in turn, sensitive to the influences of the microenvironment, or niche, where stem cells normally reside. Both intrinsic and extrinsic signals regular stem cell fate and some of these signals have now been identified. Vacek et al and Wang et al have studied the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro. There experiments show there is indeed the effect of low intensity laser on the haemopoietic stem cells in vitro, and the present effect is the promotion of haemopoietic stem cells proliferation. In other words, low intensity laser irradiation can act as an extrinsic signal regulating stem cell fate. In this paper, we study how low intensity laser can be used to regulate stem cell fate from the viewpoint of collective phototransduction.