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Sample records for pulsar magnetic alignment

  1. Slowly rotating pulsars and magnetic field decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.

    1997-02-01

    Two dozen long period pulsars are separated from the swarm of ordinary pulsars by an obvious gap in the P versus Sd diagram (where Sd=log˙(P)+21.0), with a plausible upper boundary for ordinary pulsars. Possible pulsar evolutionary tracks are discussed to explain the diagram in terms of previously suggested scenarios of magnetic field decay. The (P-Sd) diagram is difficult to understand if there is no magnetic field decay during the active life of pulsars. However, if the magnetic fields of neutron stars decay exponentially, almost all slowly rotating pulsars must have been injected with a very long initial spin period of about 2 seconds, which seems impossible. Based on qualitative analyses, it is concluded that magnetic fields of neutron stars decay as a power-law, with a time scale related to the initial field strengths. The plausible boundary and the gap are suggested to naturally divide pulsars with distinct magnetic "genes", ie. pulsars which were born from strongly magnetized progenitors -- such as Bp stars, and pulsars born from normal massive stars. The possibility remains open that a fraction of slowly rotating pulsars were injected with long initial spin periods, while others would have a classical pulsar evolution history. It is suggested that PSR B1849+00 was born in the supernova remnant Kes-79 with an initial period of about 2 seconds.

  2. Electromagnetic torques, precession and evolution of magnetic inclination of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanazzi, J. J.; Lai, Dong

    2015-07-01

    We present analytic calculations of the electromagnetic torques acting on a magnetic neutron star rotating in vacuum, including near-zone torques associated with the inertia of dipole and quadrupole magnetic fields. We incorporate these torques into the rotational dynamics of a rigid-body neutron star, and show that the effects of the inertial torque can be understood as a modification of the moment of inertia tensor of the star. We apply our rotational dynamics equation to the Crab pulsar, including intrinsic distortions of the star and various electromagnetic torques, to investigate the possibility that the counter-alignment of the magnetic inclination angle, as suggested by recent observations, could be explained by pulsar precession. We find that if the effective principal axis of the pulsar is nearly aligned with either the magnetic dipole axis or the rotation axis, then precession may account for the observed counter-alignment over decade time-scales. Over the spindown time-scale of the pulsar, the magnetic inclination angle always decreases.

  3. Magnetospheric Geometry in Pulsar B1929+10 from Radio/X-ray Phase Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somer, A. L.; Backer, D. C.; Halpern, J. P.; Wang, F. Y.-H.

    1998-05-01

    We have conducted a study of two rotation-powered pulsars that emit at both radio and x-ray wavelengths, PSR B0531+21 and PSR B1929+10. Using absolute phase information, we have phase-aligned x-ray and radio profiles from these pulsars. Observations were done using the Green Bank 140ft telescope, and ASCA. The 0531+21 x-ray profile is sharp and lines up well with the radio profile confirming that the x-ray emission from this pulsar is magnetospheric in origin. The 1929+10 profile is approximately sinusoidal (Wang & Halpern, ApJ 4 82, L159) with the peak of the emission arriving 67+/- 23 degrees after the maximum in the radio emission. The controversy to which the PSR B1929+10 result adds fuel, is whether this ``inter"-pulsar, is an ``aligned" or ``orthogonal" rotator - describing the alignment of the magnetic axis to the rotation axis. Do the two peaks in the radio profile (the pulse and interpulse) come from a double crossing of a thin hollow cone nearly aligned with rotation axis (as in Lyne & Manchester, 1988, MNRAS, 234, 477; Phillips, 1990, ApJL, 361, L57; Blaskiewicz et al, 1991, ApJ 370, 643), or alternatively (as in Rankin and Rathnasree, 1998 preprint) do they come from from opposite poles of an ``orthogonal" rotator where the spin axis is perpendicular to the magnetic axis? The radio to x-ray alignment we find favors the former explanation: if the x-ray hot spot is the result of return currents to the surface from the outward current that generates radio emission, then in the ``double-crossing" model, the hot spot phase is expected to lie between the main pulse and interpulse as observed.

  4. Three-dimensional analytical description of magnetized winds from oblique pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Philippov, Alexander; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2016-04-01

    Rotating neutron stars, or pulsars and magnetars, are plausibly the source of power behind many astrophysical systems, such as gamma-ray bursts, supernovae, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. In the past several years, three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations made it possible to compute pulsar spin-down luminosity from first principles and revealed that oblique pulsar winds are more powerful than aligned ones. However, what causes this enhanced power output of oblique pulsars is not understood. In this work, using time-dependent 3D magnetohydrodynamic and force-free simulations, we show that, contrary to the standard paradigm, the open magnetic flux, which carries the energy away from the pulsar, is laterally non-uniform. We argue that this non-uniformity is the primary reason for the increased luminosity of oblique pulsars. To demonstrate this, we construct simple analytic descriptions of aligned and orthogonal pulsar winds and combine them to obtain an accurate 3D description of the pulsar wind for any obliquity. Our approach describes both the warped magnetospheric current sheet and the smooth variation of pulsar wind properties outside of it. We find that the jump in magnetic field components across the current sheet decreases with increasing obliquity, which could be a mechanism that reduces dissipation in near-orthogonal pulsars. Our analytical description of the pulsar wind can be used for constructing models of pulsar gamma-ray emission, pulsar wind nebulae, neutron star powered ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and magnetar-powered core-collapse gamma-ray bursts and supernovae.

  5. Spin and Alignment Evolution of the Double Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arons, J.; Spitkovsky, A.

    The spin of the short period pulsar in PSR J07370 A B evolves in isolation under the influence of its own electromagnetic torques Not so PSR J07370B The wind from A buffets and confines the slowly rotating neutron star s magnetosphere resulting in a spindown torque which at the current epoch depends on the rotational energy loss of pulsar A M Lyutikov 2004 MNRAS 353 1095 J Arons it et al 2005 in Binary Radio Pulsars F Rasio and I Stairs eds San Francisco ASP 95 There is also a torque which acts to align the angular momentum of B with the orbital angular momentum of the binary I describe the evolutionary history of the spins including the early history of B when B s own EM torques exceeded the external torque and also discuss the constraints put on the interaction physics by eclipse models which require B s angular momentum to be strongly tipped with respect to the orbital angular momentum M Lyutikov and C Thompson 2005 ApJ 634 1223 We also discuss the small effect the interaction of A s wind with B has on the orbital evolution of the binary

  6. On magnetic pair production above fast pulsar polar caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, S.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic pair production is one of high-energy electromagnetic conversion processes important to the development of pair-photon cascades in pulsars. On the basis of current polar cap models, the properties of magnetic pair production in fast pulsars are discussed. Suppose there is a roughly dipole magnetic field at the stellar surface, the author estimate the effects on non-zero curvature of magnetic field lines upon curvature radiation from primary particles and pair production rate near the surface of pulsars.

  7. Magnetized stimulated scattering in pulsar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sincell, Mark W.; Krolik, Julian H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of stimulated scattering on a collimated high brightness temperature beam of photons traversing a relativistically streaming magnetized plasma are studied. Under the assumption that the center of the photon beam is parallel to the bulk motion, we calculate the scattering rate as a function of the angular spread of the beam and the Lorentz factor gamma. Magnetization changes the photon recoil, without which stimulated scattering has no effect. It also introduces a strong dependence on frequency and polarization: if the photon frequency matches the electron cyclotron frequency, the scattering rate of photons polarized perpendicular to the magnetic field can be substantially enhanced relative to Thomson, and if the photon frequency is much less than the cyclotron frequency, the scattering is suppressed. Applying these calculations to pulsars, we find that stimulated scattering of the radio beam in the magnetized wind believed to exist outside the light cylinder can substantially alter the spectrum and polarization state of the radio signal. We suggest that the scattering rate is so high in some pulsars that the ability of the radio signal to penetrate the pulsar magnetosphere requires modification of either the conventional model of the magnetosphere or assumptions about the effects of stimulated scattering upon a beam.

  8. ON PLASMA ROTATION AND DRIFTING SUBPULSES IN PULSARS: USING ALIGNED PULSAR B0826-34 AS A VOLTMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Van Leeuwen, J.; Timokhin, A. N. E-mail: andrey.timokhin@nasa.gov

    2012-06-20

    We derive the exact drift velocity of plasma in the pulsar polar cap, in contrast to the order-of-magnitude expressions presented by Ruderman and Sutherland and generally used throughout the literature. We emphasize that the drift velocity depends not on the absolute value, as is generally used, but on the variation of the accelerating potential across the polar cap. If we assume that drifting subpulses in pulsars are indeed due to this plasma drift, several observed subpulse-drift phenomena that are incompatible with the Ruderman and Sutherland family of models can now be explained: we show that variations of drift rate, outright drift reversals, and the connection between drift rates and mode changes have natural explanations within the frame of the 'standard' pulsar model, when derived exactly. We apply this model for drifting subpulses to the case of PSR B0826-34, an aligned pulsar with two separate subpulse-drift regions emitted at two different colatitudes. Careful measurement of the changing and reversing drift rate in each band independently sets limits on the variation of the accelerating potential drop. The derived variation is small, {approx}10{sup -3} times the vacuum potential drop voltage. We discuss the implications of this result for pulsar modeling.

  9. ARECIBO MULTI-FREQUENCY TIME-ALIGNED PULSAR AVERAGE-PROFILE AND POLARIZATION DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, Timothy H.; Rankin, Joanna M. E-mail: Joanna.Rankin@uvm.edu

    2010-01-15

    We present Arecibo time-aligned, total intensity profiles for 46 pulsars over an unusually wide range of radio frequencies and multi-frequency, polarization-angle density diagrams, and/or polarization profiles for 57 pulsars at some or all of the frequencies 50, 111/130, 430, and 1400 MHz. The frequency-dependent dispersion delay has been removed in order to align the profiles for study of their spectral evolution, and wherever possible the profiles of each pulsar are displayed on the same longitude scale. Most of the pulsars within Arecibo's declination range that are sufficiently bright for such spectral or single pulse analysis are included in this survey. The calibrated single pulse sequences and average profiles are available by web download for further study.

  10. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Pulsed γ-ray properties of Crab pulsar in a retarded dipole with a current-induced magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shan; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiang

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the Fermi observations of some γ-ray pulsars in which the phases of radio and γ-ray peaks are almost the same, we investigate the outer gap model in a retarded dipole with a current-induced magnetic field and apply it to explain pulsed γ-ray properties of the Crab pulsar. Our results show that the observed γ-ray energy-dependent light curves, which almost align with the radio light curve and phase averaged spectrum for the Crab pulsar, are reproduced well.

  12. Polar cap models of gamma-ray pulsars: Emision from single poles of nearly aligned rotators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Joseph K.; Harding, Alice K.

    1994-01-01

    We compare a new Monte Carlo simulation of polar cap models for gamma-ray pulsars with observations of sources detected above 10 MeV by the Compton Observatory (CGRO). We find that for models in which the inclination of the magnetic axis is comparable to the angular radius of the polar cap, the radiation from a single cap may exhibit a pusle with either a single broad peak as in PSR 1706-44 and PSR 1055-52, or a doubly peaked profile comparable to those observed from the Crab, Vela and Geminga pulsars. In general, double pulses are seen by observers whose line of sight penetrates into the cap interior and are due to enhanced emission near the rim. For cascades induced by culvature radiation, increased rim emission occurs even when electrons are accelerated over the entire cap, since electrons from the interior escape along magnetic field lines with less curvature and hence emit less radiation. However, we obtain better fits to the duty cycles of observed profiles if we make the empirical assumption that acceleration occurs only near the rim. In either case, the model energy spectra are consistent with most of the observed sources. The beaming factors expected from nearly aligned rotators, based on standard estimates for the cap radius, imply that their luminosities need not be as large as in the case of orthogonal rotators. However, small beam angles are also a difficutly with this model because they imply low detection probablities. In either case the polar cap radius is a critical factor, and in this context we point out that plasma loading of the field lines should make the caps larger than the usual estimates based on pure dipole fields.

  13. Revised Pulsar Spindown

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We address the issue of electromagnetic pulsar spindown by combining our experience from the two limiting idealized cases which have been studied in great extent in the past: that of an aligned rotator where ideal MHD conditions apply, and that of a misaligned rotator in vacuum. We construct a spindown formula that takes into account the misalignment of the magnetic and rotation axes, and the magnetospheric particle acceleration gaps. We show that near the death line aligned rotators spin down much slower than orthogonal ones. In order to test this approach, we use a simple Monte Carlo method to simulate the evolution of pulsars and find a good fit to the observed pulsar distribution in the P-{dot P} diagram without invoking magnetic field decay. Our model may also account for individual pulsars spinning down with braking index n < 3, by allowing the corotating part of the magnetosphere to end inside the light cylinder. We discuss the role of magnetic reconnection in determining the pulsar braking index. We show, however, that n {approx} 3 remains a good approximation for the pulsar population as a whole. Moreover, we predict that pulsars near the death line have braking index values n > 3, and that the older pulsar population has preferentially smaller magnetic inclination angles. We discuss possible signatures of such alignment in the existing pulsar data.

  14. Pulsar rotation and dispersion measures and the galactic magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Use of observations of pulsar polarization and pulse time of arrival at frequencies between 250 and 500 MHz to determine rotation and dispersion measures for 19 and 21 pulsars, respectively. These measurements have been used to calculate mean line-of-sight components of the magnetic field in the path to the pulsars. These and other observations show that there is probably no contribution to the observed rotation measure from the pulsar itself. Low-latitude, low-dispersion pulsars are observed to have strong field components, and a strong dependence of rotation-measure sign on galactic longitude has been found. The observations are consistent with a relatively uniform field of about 3.5 microgauss directed toward about l = 90 deg in the local region, but appear to be inconsistent with the helical model for the local field.

  15. Magnetic pair creation transparency in gamma-ray pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Story, Sarah A.; Baring, Matthew G. E-mail: baring@rice.edu

    2014-07-20

    Magnetic pair creation, γ → e {sup +} e {sup –}, has been at the core of radio pulsar paradigms and central to polar cap models of gamma-ray pulsars for over three decades. The Fermi gamma-ray pulsar population now exceeds 140 sources and has defined an important part of Fermi's science legacy, providing rich information for the interpretation of young energetic pulsars and old millisecond pulsars. Among the population characteristics well established is the common occurrence of exponential turnovers in their spectra in the 1-10 GeV range. These turnovers are too gradual to arise from magnetic pair creation in the strong magnetic fields of pulsar inner magnetospheres. By demanding insignificant photon attenuation precipitated by such single-photon pair creation, the energies of these turnovers for Fermi pulsars can be used to compute lower bounds for the typical altitude of GeV band emission. This paper explores such pair transparency constraints below the turnover energy and updates earlier altitude bound determinations that have been deployed in various Fermi pulsar papers. For low altitude emission locales, general relativistic influences are found to be important, increasing cumulative opacity, shortening the photon attenuation lengths, and also reducing the maximum energy that permits escape of photons from a neutron star magnetosphere. Rotational aberration influences are also explored, and are found to be small at low altitudes, except near the magnetic pole. The analysis presented in this paper clearly demonstrates that including near-threshold physics in the pair creation rate is essential to deriving accurate attenuation lengths and escape energies. The altitude bounds are typically in the range of 2-7 stellar radii for the young Fermi pulsar population, and provide key information on the emission altitude in radio quiet pulsars that do not possess double-peaked pulse profiles. The bound for the Crab pulsar is at a much higher altitude, with the

  16. Magnetic Pair Creation Transparency in Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Sarah A.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic pair creation, γ → e + e -, has been at the core of radio pulsar paradigms and central to polar cap models of gamma-ray pulsars for over three decades. The Fermi gamma-ray pulsar population now exceeds 140 sources and has defined an important part of Fermi's science legacy, providing rich information for the interpretation of young energetic pulsars and old millisecond pulsars. Among the population characteristics well established is the common occurrence of exponential turnovers in their spectra in the 1-10 GeV range. These turnovers are too gradual to arise from magnetic pair creation in the strong magnetic fields of pulsar inner magnetospheres. By demanding insignificant photon attenuation precipitated by such single-photon pair creation, the energies of these turnovers for Fermi pulsars can be used to compute lower bounds for the typical altitude of GeV band emission. This paper explores such pair transparency constraints below the turnover energy and updates earlier altitude bound determinations that have been deployed in various Fermi pulsar papers. For low altitude emission locales, general relativistic influences are found to be important, increasing cumulative opacity, shortening the photon attenuation lengths, and also reducing the maximum energy that permits escape of photons from a neutron star magnetosphere. Rotational aberration influences are also explored, and are found to be small at low altitudes, except near the magnetic pole. The analysis presented in this paper clearly demonstrates that including near-threshold physics in the pair creation rate is essential to deriving accurate attenuation lengths and escape energies. The altitude bounds are typically in the range of 2-7 stellar radii for the young Fermi pulsar population, and provide key information on the emission altitude in radio quiet pulsars that do not possess double-peaked pulse profiles. The bound for the Crab pulsar is at a much higher altitude, with the putative detection

  17. Evolution of the magnetic field structure of the Crab pulsar.

    PubMed

    Lyne, Andrew; Graham-Smith, Francis; Weltevrede, Patrick; Jordan, Christine; Stappers, Ben; Bassa, Cees; Kramer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Pulsars are highly magnetized rotating neutron stars and are well known for the stability of their signature pulse shapes, allowing high-precision studies of their rotation. However, during the past 22 years, the radio pulse profile of the Crab pulsar has shown a steady increase in the separation of the main pulse and interpulse components at 0.62° ± 0.03° per century. There are also secular changes in the relative strengths of several components of the profile. The changing component separation indicates that the axis of the dipolar magnetic field, embedded in the neutron star, is moving toward the stellar equator. This evolution of the magnetic field could explain why the pulsar does not spin down as expected from simple braking by a rotating dipolar magnetic field. PMID:24179221

  18. Pulsar Pair Cascades in a Distorted Magnetic Dipole Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a distorted neutron star dipole magnetic field on pulsar pair cascade multiplicity and pair death lines. Using a simple model for a distorted dipole field that produces an offset polar cap (PC), we derive the accelerating electric field above the PC in space-charge-limited flow. We find that even a modest azimuthally asymmetric distortion can significantly increase the accelerating electric field on one side of the PC and, combined with a smaller field line radius of curvature, leads to larger pair multiplicity. The death line for producing pairs by curvature radiation moves downward in the P-P-dot diagram, allowing high pair multiplicities in a larger percentage of the radio pulsar population. These results could have important implications for the radio pulsar population, high energy pulsed emission, and the pulsar contribution to cosmic ray positrons.

  19. The pulsar magnetic field oscillation model and the verification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Z. X.; Liang, Y.

    The characteristics of pulsar have been most commonly explained using lighthouse model However our research has demonstrated that the characteristics of pulsar can be better described using a magnetic oscillating model hereafter MO model built by analogising the reversing phenomenon of the solar magnetic field to pulsar Although the mechanism why the magnetic field can oscillate has not been known yet no observed oppositions to it MO model have been found either After comparing with the lighthouse model the MO model has the following advantages 1 The prediction of the MO model differs significantly from the prediction of the lighthouse model The MO model predicts that the geodetic precession of the spin axis in binary pulsar system may result in some slight changes of the amplitude and shape of profile but it is impossible that they disappear from our line of sight The observed results of PSR B1913 16 PSR J0737-3039 and other binary pulsar system have shown obviously such tendency 2 The lighthouse model can be ruled out by the result from calculating the micropulse of PSR B1133 16 The wheel-axis structure of the image of Crab Nebula taken by Chandra X-ray Observatory correlates precisely with the prediction of the MO model 3 The MO model is more appropriate to explain the polarization characteristics glitch the interpulse and the generation rate of the pulsar than the lighthouse model The MO model also gives satisfactory results to explain the other characteristics eg the spin-down the pulse nulling the beat and pulse

  20. Reliability of magnetic inclination angle determinations for pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. C.; Hamilton, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    We compare the recent estimates of the inclination angle alpha between the rotation and magnetic axes of 56 pulsars made by both Lyne and Manchester (1988) and Rankin (1990). Their results agree reasonably well when alpha is less than about 40 deg; however, there is no correlation between the two estimates of alpha if either estimate exceeds 40 deg. The correlation is better for pulsars with beams having more complicated core structure. Nevertheless, the differences between the two sets of estimates are large enough that use of these estimates to investigate pulsar physics is questionable. We discuss the method for determining alpha based on the Radhakrishnan and Cooke (1969) single-vector model, emphasizing its sensitivity to measurement errors. This method complements the approaches of Rankin and Lyne and Manchester and is preferable when accurate polarization data are available.

  1. Microstructure-determined pulsar dispersion measures and the problem of profile alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, T.H.; Izvekova, V.A.; Malofeev, V.M.; Shitov, I.P.; Rankin, J.M. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro AN SSSR, Fizicheskii Institut, Moscow Vermont, University, Burlington )

    1991-05-01

    Time-aligned profile measurements for two pulsars, combining data from the Arecibo, Puerto Rico, and Pushchino, USSR, observatories over a seven-octave frequency interval between 25 and 5000 MHZ are analyzed along with several new microstructure dispersion values. DMA(A) values of 2.9701 + or {minus} 0.0003, and 4.8470 + or {minus} 0.0003 pc/cu cm for PSR 0950+08 and 1113 + 16, respectively are obtained, with small departures from alignment that appear traceable to changes in a profile shape with frequency. These subtle changes in the profile form are noticeable only by virtue of the high time resolution and broad frequency coverage. It is noted that small low-frequency delays result when the sets of profiles are aligned optimally according to the best available microstructure dispersion values. 19 refs.

  2. Magnetic alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Fumiko; Kimura, Tsunehisa

    2008-04-01

    The alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers under magnetic fields are reported. Static and rotating magnetic fields were used to align cellulose fibers with sizes ranging from millimeter to nanometer sizes. Cellulose fibers of the millimeter order, which were prepared for papermaking, and much smaller fibers with micrometer to nanometer sizes prepared by the acid hydrolysis of larger ones underwent magnetic alignment. Under a rotating field, a uniaxial alignment of fibers was achieved. The alignment was successfully fixed by the photopolymerization of a UV-curable resin precursor used as matrix. A monodomain chiral nematic film was prepared from an aqueous suspension of nanofibers. Using a field modulator inserted in a homogeneous magnetic field, simultaneous alignment and patterning were achieved.

  3. Magnetic alignment of grains. [in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Roger H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews mechanisms that have been proposed to account for alignment of dust grains in diffuse clouds and in dense clouds. The mechanisms that have proved inadequate are considered, including alignment by nonmagnetic and magnetic processes. The results thus far favor the Davis-Greenstein mechanism, in which paramagnetic relaxation of spinning grains removes components of rotation perpendicular to the magnetic field. Polarization measurements showing the alignment of grains in cool dense clouds are discussed.

  4. Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stappers, Benjamin W.

    2012-04-01

    Pulsars can be considered as the ultimate time-variable source. They show variations on time-scales ranging from nanoseconds to as long as years, and they emit over almost the entire electromagnetic spectrum. The dominant modulation is associated with the rotation period, which can vary from slighty more than a millisecond to upwards of ten seconds (if we include the magnetars). Variations on time-scales shorter than the pulse period are mostly associated with emission processes and are manifested as giant pulses, microstructure and sub-pulses (to name a few). On time-scales of a rotation to a few hundred rotations are other phenomena also associated with the emission, such as nulling, moding, drifting and intermittency. By probing these and slightly longer time-scales we find that pulsars exhibit ``glitches'', which are rapid variations in spin rates. They are believed to be related to the interaction between the superfluid interior of the neutron star and the outer crust. Detailed studies of glitches can reveal much about the properties of the constituents of neutron stars-the only way to probe the physics of material at such extreme densities. Time-scales of about an hour or longer reveal that some pulsars are in binary systems, in particular the most rapidly rotating systems. Discovering and studying those binary systems provides vital clues to the evolution of massive stars, while some of the systems are also the best probes of strong-field gravity theories; the elusive pulsar-black hole binary would be the ultimate system. Pulsars are tools that allow us to probe a range of phenomena and time-scales. It is possible to measure the time of arrival of pulses from some pulsars to better than a few tens of nanoseconds over years, making them some of the most accurate clocks known. Concerning their rotation, deviations from sphericity may cause pulsars to emit gravitational waves which might then be detected by next-generation gravitational-wave detectors. Pulsars

  5. Pulsar Pair Cascades in Magnetic Fields with Offset Polar Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2012-01-01

    Neutron star magnetic fields may have polar caps (PC) that are offset from the dipole axis, through field-line sweepback near the light cylinder or non-symmetric currents within the star. The effects of such offsets on electron-positron pair cascades are investigated, using simple models of dipole magnetic fields with small distortions that shift the PCs by different amounts or directions. Using a Monte Carlo pair cascade simulation, we explore the changes in the pair spectrum, multiplicity and energy flux across the PC, as well as the trends in pair flux and pair energy flux with spin-down luminosity, L(sub sd). We also give an estimate of the distribution of heating flux from returning positrons on the PC for different offsets. We find that even modest offsets can produce significant increases in pair multiplicity, especially for pulsars that are near or beyond the pair death lines for centered PCs, primarily because of higher accelerating fields. Pair spectra cover several decades in energy, with the spectral range of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) two orders of magnitude higher than for normal pulsars, and PC offsets allow significant extension of all spectra to lower pair energies. We find that the total PC pair luminosity L(sub pair) is proportional to L(sub sd), with L(sub pair) approximates 10(exp -3) L(sub sd) for normal pulsars and L(sub pair) approximates 10(exp -2) L(sub sd) for MSPs. Remarkably, the total PC heating luminosity for even large offsets increases by less than a factor of two, even though the PC area increases by much larger factors, because most of the heating occurs near the magnetic axis.

  6. Comparing supernova remnants around strongly magnetized and canonical pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; Rea, N.; Torres, D. F.; Papitto, A.

    2014-11-01

    The origin of the strong magnetic fields measured in magnetars is one of the main uncertainties in the neutron star field. On the other hand, the recent discovery of a large number of such strongly magnetized neutron stars is calling for more investigation on their formation. The first proposed model for the formation of such strong magnetic fields in magnetars was through alpha-dynamo effects on the rapidly rotating core of a massive star. Other scenarios involve highly magnetic massive progenitors that conserve their strong magnetic moment into the core after the explosion, or a common envelope phase of a massive binary system. In this work, we do a complete re-analysis of the archival X-ray emission of the supernova remnants (SNRs) surrounding magnetars, and compare our results with all other bright X-ray emitting SNRs, which are associated with compact central objects (which are proposed to have magnetar-like B-fields buried in the crust by strong accretion soon after their formation), high-B pulsars and normal pulsars. We find that emission lines in SNRs hosting highly magnetic neutron stars do not differ significantly in elements or ionization state from those observed in other SNRs, neither averaging on the whole remnants, nor studying different parts of their total spatial extent. Furthermore, we find no significant evidence that the total X-ray luminosities of SNRs hosting magnetars, are on average larger than that of typical young X-ray SNRs. Although biased by a small number of objects, we found that for a similar age, there is the same percentage of magnetars showing a detectable SNR than for the normal pulsar population.

  7. Are pulsars born with a hidden magnetic field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Forné, Alejandro; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Pons, José A.; Font, José A.

    2016-03-01

    The observation of several neutron stars in the centre of supernova remnants and with significantly lower values of the dipolar magnetic field than the average radio-pulsar population has motivated a lively debate about their formation and origin, with controversial interpretations. A possible explanation requires the slow rotation of the protoneutron star at birth, which is unable to amplify its magnetic field to typical pulsar levels. An alternative possibility, the hidden magnetic field scenario, considers the accretion of the fallback of the supernova debris on to the neutron star as responsible for the submergence (or screening) of the field and its apparently low value. In this paper, we study under which conditions the magnetic field of a neutron star can be buried into the crust due to an accreting, conducting fluid. For this purpose, we consider a spherically symmetric calculation in general relativity to estimate the balance between the incoming accretion flow and the magnetosphere. Our study analyses several models with different specific entropy, composition, and neutron star masses. The main conclusion of our work is that typical magnetic fields of a few times 1012 G can be buried by accreting only 10-3-10-2 M⊙, a relatively modest amount of mass. In view of this result, the central compact object scenario should not be considered unusual, and we predict that anomalously weak magnetic fields should be common in very young (< few kyr) neutron stars.

  8. Magnetic alignment of the Tara tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.S.; Coleman, J.W.; Irby, J.H.; Olmstead, M.M.; Torti, R.P.

    1985-06-01

    Techniques developed for the alignment of high-energy accelerators have been applied to the alignment of the Tara tandem mirror magnetic confinement device. Tools used were: a transit/laser surveyor's system for establishing an invariant reference; optical scattering from ferromagnetic crystallites for establishing magnetic centers in the quadrupole anchor/transition modules; an electron-optical circle-generating wand for alignment of the solenoidal plug and central cell modules; and four differently configured electron emissive probes, including a 40-beam flux mapping e gun, for testing the alignment of the coils under vacuum. Procedures are outlined, and results are given which show that the magnetic axes of the individual coils in the Tara set have been made colinear with each other and with the reference to within +- 1.0 mm over the length of the machine between the anchor midplanes.

  9. On the decay of the magnetic fields of single radio pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Hartman, Jan W.; Verbunt, Frank

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the statistical evidence for the decay of the magnetic field of single radio pulsars. We perform population syntheses for different assumed values for the time scale of field decay using a Monte Carlo method. We allow for the selection effects in pulsar surveys and compare the synthesized populations with the observed pulsars. We take account of the finite scale height of the distribution in the Galaxy of free electrons, which determine the dispersion measure and hence the apparent distance of radio pulsars. Our simulations give much better agreement with the observations if the time scale for the field decay is assumed to be longer than the typical active life time of a radio pulsar. This indicates that no significant field decay occurs in single radio pulsars.

  10. MODELING PHASE-ALIGNED GAMMA-RAY AND RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Venter, C.; Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first eight gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, this population has been steadily expanding. Four of the more recent detections, PSR J0034-0534, PSR J1939+2134 (B1937+21; the first MSP ever discovered), PSR J1959+2048 (B1957+20; the first discovery of a black widow system), and PSR J2214+3000, exhibit a phenomenon not present in the original discoveries: nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray light curves (LCs). To account for the phase alignment, we explore models where both the radio and gamma-ray emission originate either in the outer magnetosphere near the light cylinder or near the polar caps. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to search for best-fit model parameters, we obtain reasonable LC fits for the first three of these MSPs in the context of 'altitude-limited' outer gap (alOG) and two-pole caustic (alTPC) geometries (for both gamma-ray and radio emission). These models differ from the standard outer gap (OG)/two-pole caustic (TPC) models in two respects: the radio emission originates in caustics at relatively high altitudes compared to the usual conal radio beams, and we allow both the minimum and maximum altitudes of the gamma-ray and radio emission regions to vary within a limited range (excluding the minimum gamma-ray altitude of the alTPC model, which is kept constant at the stellar radius, and that of the alOG model, which is set to the position-dependent null charge surface altitude). Alternatively, phase-aligned solutions also exist for emission originating near the stellar surface in a slot gap scenario ('low-altitude slot gap' (laSG) models). We find that the alTPC models provide slightly better LC fits than the alOG models, and both of these give better fits than the laSG models (for the limited range of parameters considered in the case of the laSG models). Thus, our fits imply that the phase-aligned LCs are likely of caustic origin, produced in the outer magnetosphere

  11. Modeling Phase-Aligned Gamma-Ray and Radio Millisecond Pulsar Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, C.; Johnson, T.; Harding, A.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first eight gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, this population has been steadily expanding. Four of the more recent detections, PSR J00340534, PSR J1939+2134 (B1937+21; the first MSP ever discovered), PSR J1959+2048 (B1957+20; the first discovery of a black widow system), and PSR J2214+3000, exhibit a phenomenon not present in the original discoveries: nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray light curves (LCs). To account for the phase alignment, we explore models where both the radio and gamma-ray emission originate either in the outer magnetosphere near the light cylinder or near the polar caps. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to search for best-fit model parameters, we obtain reasonable LC fits for the first three of these MSPs in the context of altitude-limited outer gap (alOG) and two-pole caustic (alTPC) geometries (for both gamma-ray and radio emission). These models differ from the standard outer gap (OG)/two-pole caustic (TPC) models in two respects: the radio emission originates in caustics at relatively high altitudes compared to the usual conal radio beams, and we allow both the minimum and maximum altitudes of the gamma-ray and radio emission regions to vary within a limited range (excluding the minimum gamma-ray altitude of the alTPC model, which is kept constant at the stellar radius, and that of the alOG model, which is set to the position-dependent null charge surface altitude). Alternatively, phase-aligned solutions also exist for emission originating near the stellar surface in a slot gap scenario (low-altitude slot gap (laSG) models). We find that the alTPC models provide slightly better LC fits than the alOG models, and both of these give better fits than the laSG models (for the limited range of parameters considered in the case of the laSG models). Thus, our fits imply that the phase-aligned LCs are likely of caustic origin, produced in the outer magnetosphere, and

  12. Aligned two-phase magnets: Permanent magnetism of the future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, R.

    1994-11-01

    Micromagnetic calculations are used to investigate coercivity and energy products of magnets consisting of an aligned hard-magnetic skeleton phase and a soft-magnetic phase with high saturation magnetization. Compared to the present-day theoretical limit of 516 kJ/cu m for single-phase Nd2Fe14B, the energy product in suitable nanostructured Sm2Fe17N3/Fe65Co35 composites is predicted to be as high as 1090 kJ/cu m. The influence of the skeleton's texture and shape is discussed, and aligned nanocrystalline two-phase magnets are compared with remanence-enhanced isotropic magnets. In particular, it is shown how the nucleation-based analytical approach breaks down in the isotropic limit. Finally, we outline conceivable processing methods and discuss potential applications of 'megajoule' magnets.

  13. Aligning Paramecium caudatum with static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M

    2006-04-15

    As they negotiate their environs, unicellular organisms adjust their swimming in response to various physical fields such as temperature, chemical gradients, and electric fields. Because of the weak magnetic properties of most biological materials, however, they do not respond to the earth's magnetic field (5 x 10(-5) Tesla) except in rare cases. Here, we show that the trajectories of Paramecium caudatum align with intense static magnetic fields >3 Tesla. Otherwise straight trajectories curve in magnetic fields and eventually orient parallel or antiparallel to the applied field direction. Neutrally buoyant immobilized paramecia also align with their long axis in the direction of the field. We model this magneto-orientation as a strictly passive, nonphysiological response to a magnetic torque exerted on the diamagnetically anisotropic components of the paramecia. We have determined the average net anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility, Deltachi(p), of a whole Paramecium: Deltachi(p) = (6.7+/- 0.7) x 10(-23) m(3). We show how the measured Deltachi(p) compares to the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibilities of the components in the cell. We suggest that magnetic fields can be exploited as a novel, noninvasive, quantitative means to manipulate swimming populations of unicellular organisms. PMID:16461406

  14. Resonant Compton Scattering in Highly-Magnetized Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadiasingh, Zorawar

    Soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars are subset of slow-rotating neutron stars, known as magnetars, that have extremely high inferred surface magnetic fields, of the order 100-1000 TeraGauss. Hard, non-thermal and pulsed persistent X-ray emission extending between 10 keV and 230 keV has been seen in a number of magnetars by RXTE, INTEGRAL, and Suzaku. In this thesis, the author considers inner magnetospheric models of such persistent hard X-ray emission where resonant Compton upscattering of soft thermal photons is anticipated to be the most efficient radiative process. This high efficiency is due to the relative proximity of the surface thermal photons, and also because the scattering becomes resonant at the cyclotron frequency. At the cyclotron resonance, the effective cross section exceeds the classical Thomson one by over two orders of magnitude, thereby enhancing the efficiency of continuum production and cooling of relativistic electrons. In this thesis, a new Sokolov and Ternov formulation of the QED Compton scattering cross section for strong magnetic fields is employed in electron cooling and emission spectra calculations. This formalism is formally correct for treating spin-dependent effects and decay rates that are important at the cyclotron resonance. The author presents electron cooling rates at arbitrary interaction points in a magnetosphere using the QED cross sections. The QED effects reduce the rates below high-field extrapolations of older magnetic Thomson results. The author also computes angle-dependent upscattering model spectra, formed using collisional integrals, for uncooled monoenergetic relativistic electrons injected in inner regions of pulsar magnetospheres. These spectra are integrated over closed field lines and obtained for different observing perspectives. The spectral cut-off energies are critically dependent on the observer viewing angles and electron Lorentz factor. It is found that electrons with energies less than

  15. Correlation between the Gamma-Ray Luminosity and the Light Cylinder Magnetic Field Strength of Fermi-LAT Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Yi, Shuxu; Hou, Xian; Li, Jian

    2015-08-01

    We analyze statistically the differences between gamma-ray loud and quiet samples of the radio pulsars that have been searched with the Fermi satellite. Among many pulsar parameters considered in this paper, our Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the distributions of magnetic field strength at the light cylinder of the two samples are the most inconsistent, but that of radio spectral index are the least discrepant. Significant correlations are found between the gamma-ray luminosity and magnetic field strength at the light cylinder of Fermi-LAT pulsars in the Second Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog of Gamma-ray pulsars, for normal pulsars and millisecond pulsars respectively. Using the above correlations, we give a list of gamma-ray pulsar candidates with their predicted gamma-ray energy flux.

  16. ENHANCED DISSIPATION RATE OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN STRIPED PULSAR WINDS BY THE EFFECT OF TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Takamoto, Makoto; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: inouety@phys.aoyama.ac.jp

    2012-08-10

    In this paper, we report on turbulent acceleration of the dissipation of the magnetic field in the post-shock region of a Poynting flux-dominated flow, such as the Crab pulsar wind nebula. We have performed two-dimensional resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of subsonic turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the shock fronts of the Poynting flux-dominated flows in pulsar winds. We find that turbulence stretches current sheets which substantially enhances the dissipation of the magnetic field, and that most of the initial magnetic field energy is dissipated within a few eddy-turnover times. We also develop a simple analytical model for turbulent dissipation of the magnetic field that agrees well with our simulations. The analytical model indicates that the dissipation rate does not depend on resistivity even in the small resistivity limit. Our findings can possibly alleviate the {sigma}-problem in the Crab pulsar wind nebulae.

  17. Signs of magnetic accretion in the young Be/X-ray pulsar SXP 1062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhsanov, N. R.

    2012-07-01

    The spin behaviour of the neutron star in the newly discovered young Be/X-ray long-period pulsar SXP 1062 is discussed. The star is observed to rotate with the period of 1062 s, and spin down at the rate ˜-2.6 × 10-12 Hz s-1. I show that all of the conventional accretion scenarios encounter major difficulties in explaining the rapid spin-down of the pulsar. These difficulties can be, however, avoided within the magnetic accretion scenario in which the neutron star is assumed to accrete from a magnetized wind. The spin-down rate of the pulsar can be explained within this scenario provided the surface magnetic field of the neutron star is B*˜ 4 × 1013 G. I show that the age of the pulsar in this case lies in the range (2-4) × 104 yr, which is consistent with observations. The spin evolution of the pulsar is briefly discussed.

  18. Inkjet printing of magnetic materials with aligned anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Han; Spencer, Jeremy; Jander, Albrecht; Nielsen, Jeffrey; Stasiak, James; Kasperchik, Vladek; Dhagat, Pallavi

    2014-05-01

    3-D printing processes, which use drop-on-demand inkjet printheads, have great potential in designing and prototyping magnetic materials. Unlike conventional deposition and lithography, magnetic particles in the printing ink can be aligned by an external magnetic field to achieve both high permeability and low hysteresis losses, enabling prototyping and development of novel magnetic composite materials and components, e.g., for inductor and antennae applications. In this work, we report an inkjet printing technique with magnetic alignment capability. Magnetic films with and without particle alignment are printed, and their magnetic properties are compared. In the alignment-induced hard axis direction, an increase in high frequency permeability and a decrease in hysteresis losses are observed. Our results suggest that unique magnetic structures with arbitrary controllable anisotropy, not feasible otherwise, may be fabricated via inkjet printing.

  19. Chandra Phase-Resolved Spectroscopy of the High-Magnetic-Field Pulsar B1509-58

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Ng, Chi-Yung

    2016-04-01

    We report on timing and spectral analysis of the young, high-magnetic-field pulsar B1509-58 using Chandra continuous-clocking mode observation. The on-pulsed X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law with a photon index of 1.16(2), which is flatter than those determined with RXTE/PCA and NuSTAR. This result supports the log-parabolic model for the broadband X-ray spectrum. With the unprecedented angular resolution of Chandra, we clearly identified off-pulsed X-ray emission from the pulsar. The spectrum is best fitted by a power law plus blackbody model. The latter component has a temperature of ~0.14 keV, which is similar to those of other young and high-magnetic-field pulsars, and lies between those of magnetars and typical rotational-powered pulsars. For the non-thermal emission of PSR B1509-58, we found that the power law component of the off-pulsed emission is significantly steeper than that of the on-pulsed one. We further divided the data into 24 phase bins and found that the photon index varies between 1.0 and 2.0 and anti-correlating with the flux. A similar correlation was also found in the Crab Pulsar, and this requires further theoretical interpretations. This work is supported by a GRF grant of Hong Kong Government under 17300215.

  20. Rapid alignment of velocity and magnetic field in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Matthaeus, W H; Pouquet, A; Mininni, P D; Dmitruk, P; Breech, B

    2008-02-29

    We show that local directional alignment of the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations occurs rapidly in magnetohydrodynamics for a variety of parameters and is seen both in direct numerical simulations and in solar wind data. The phenomenon is due to an alignment between magnetic field and gradients of either pressure or kinetic energy, and is similar to alignment of velocity and vorticity in Navier-Stokes turbulence. This rapid and robust relaxation process leads to a local weakening of nonlinear terms. PMID:18352632

  1. Testing black hole superradiance with pulsar companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, João G.

    2015-10-01

    We show that the magnetic dipole and gravitational radiation emitted by a pulsar can undergo superradiant scattering off a spinning black hole companion. We find that the relative amount of superradiant modes in the radiation depends on the pulsar's angular position relative to the black hole's equatorial plane. In particular, when the pulsar and black hole spins are aligned, superradiant modes are dominant at large angles, leading to an amplification of the pulsar's luminosity, whereas for small angles the radiation is dominantly composed of non-superradiant modes and the signal is attenuated. This results in a characteristic orbital modulation of the pulsar's luminosity, up to the percent level within our approximations, which may potentially yield a signature of superradiant scattering in astrophysical black holes and hence an important test of general relativity.

  2. Magnetic alignment of plant cell microfibrils and their anisotropic elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Sakaida, Hidetaka; Iino, Masaaki

    2010-06-01

    The magnetic alignment of microfibrils on a single regenerated plant cell surface subjected to magnetic fields and its anisotropic cell surface area expansivity modulus (area modulus) were studied. The magnetic alignment around the equator of the cell (the polar axis parallel to the magnetic field) was confirmed by a 2-dim Fourier analysis of images from a scanning electron microscope, and these were expressed by a theoretical magnetic order parameter for anisotropic relative magnetic permeability of 3×10-27, while the microfibrils near the pole did not show any such magnetic alignment. The magnetic field anisotropically stiffened the cell surface. The stiffness around the equator was greater than that around the pole. The magnetic field dependences of the area modulus agreed with the mechanical model.

  3. Mathematical modeling of the nonlinear electrodynamics effect of signal delay in the magnetic field of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapochka, M. G.; Denisov, M. M.; Denisova, I. P.; Kalenova, N. V.; Korolev, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    The paper is devoted to mathematical modeling of the nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics effect: the action of the strong magnetic field of a pulsar on the propagation of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that, due to the birefringence of the vacuum, for one normal wave, it takes more time to travel from a pulsar to a detector installed on astrophysical satellites than for the other normal wave. The delay of the pulse carried by the second normal wave relative to pulse carried by the first normal wave from the common point of origin to the satellite is calculated.

  4. Timing Behavior of the Magnetically Active Rotation-Powered Pulsar in the Supernova Remnant Kesteven 75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingstone, Margaret A.; Gavriil, Fotis P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    We report a large spin-up glitch in PSR J1846-0258 which coincided with the onset of magnetar-like behavior on 2006 May 31. We show that the pulsar experienced an unusually large glitch recovery, with a recovery fraction of Q = 5.9+/-0.3, resulting in a net decrease of the pulse frequency. Such a glitch recovery has never before been observed in a rotation-powered pulsar, however, similar but smaller glitch over-recovery has been recently reported in the magnetar AXP 4U 0142+61 and may have occurred in the SGR 1900+14. We discuss the implications of the unusual timing behavior in PSR J1846-0258 on its status as the first identified magnetically active rotation-powered pulsar.

  5. PULSAR BINARY BIRTHRATES WITH SPIN-OPENING ANGLE CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Kim, Chunglee E-mail: ckim@astro.lu.s

    2010-05-20

    One ingredient in an empirical birthrate estimate for pulsar binaries is the fraction of sky subtended by the pulsar beam: the pulsar beaming fraction. This fraction depends on both the pulsar's opening angle and the misalignment angle between its spin and magnetic axes. The current estimates for pulsar binary birthrates are based on an average value of beaming fractions for only two pulsars, i.e., PSRs B1913+16 and B1534+12. In this paper, we revisit the observed pulsar binaries to examine the sensitivity of birthrate predictions to different assumptions regarding opening angle and alignment. Based on empirical estimates for the relative likelihood of different beam half-opening angles and misalignment angles between the pulsar rotation and magnetic axes, we calculate an effective beaming correction factor, f{sub b,eff}, whose reciprocal is equivalent to the average fraction of all randomly selected pulsars that point toward us. For those pulsars without any direct beam geometry constraints, we find that f{sub b,eff} is likely to be smaller than 6, a canonically adopted value when calculating birthrates of Galactic pulsar binaries. We calculate f{sub b,eff} for PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545, applying the currently available constraints for their beam geometry. As in previous estimates of the posterior probability density function P(R) for pulsar binary birthrates R, PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545 still significantly contribute to, if not dominate, the Galactic birthrate of tight pulsar-neutron star (NS) and pulsar-white dwarf (WD) binaries, respectively. Our median posterior present-day birthrate predictions for tight PSR-NS binaries, wide PSR-NS binaries, and tight PSR-WD binaries given a preferred pulsar population model and beaming geometry are 89 Myr{sup -1}, 0.5 Myr{sup -1}, and 34 Myr{sup -1}, respectively. For long-lived PSR-NS binaries, these estimates include a weak (x1.6) correction for slowly decaying star formation in the galactic disk. For pulsars

  6. On the magnetic fields of Be/X-ray pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhsanov, N. R.; Mereghetti, S.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the possibility of explaining the properties of the Be/X-ray pulsars observed in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) within the magnetic levitation accretion scenario. This implies that their X-ray emission is powered by a wind-fed accretion on to a neutron star (NS) which captures matter from a magnetized stellar wind. The NS in this case is accreting matter from a non-Keplerian magnetically levitating disc which is surrounding its magnetosphere. This allows us to explain the observed periods of the pulsars in terms of spin equilibrium without the need of invoking dipole magnetic fields outside the usual range ˜1011-1013 G inferred from cyclotron features of Galactic high-mass X-ray binaries. We find that the equilibrium period of a NS, under certain conditions, depends strongly on the magnetization of the stellar wind of its massive companion and, correspondingly, on the magnetic field of the massive companion itself. This may help to explain why similar NSs in binaries with similar properties rotate with different periods yielding a large scatter of periods of the accretion-powered pulsar observed in SMC and our galaxy.

  7. Magnetic alignment study of rare-earth-containing liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Galyametdinov, Yury G; Haase, Wolfgang; Goderis, Bart; Moors, Dries; Driesen, Kris; Van Deun, Rik; Binnemans, Koen

    2007-12-20

    The liquid-crystalline rare-earth complexes of the type [Ln(LH)3(DOS)3]-where Ln is Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, or Yb; LH is the Schiff base N-octadecyl-4-tetradecyloxysalicylaldimine; and DOS is dodecylsulfate-exhibit a smectic A phase. Because of the presence of rare-earth ions with a large magnetic anisotropy, the smectic A phase of these liquid crystals can be easier aligned in an external magnetic field than smectic A phases of conventional liquid crystals. The magnetic anisotropy of the [Ln(LH)3(DOS)3] complexes was determined by measurement of the temperature-dependence of the magnetic susceptibility using a Faraday balance. The highest value for the magnetic anisotropy was found for the dysprosium(III) complex. The magnetic alignment of these liquid crystals was studied by time-resolved synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. Depending on the sign of the magnetic anisotropy, the director of the liquid-crystalline molecules was aligned parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. A positive value of the magnetic anisotropy (and parallel alignment) was found for the thulium(III) and the ytterbium(III) complexes, whereas a negative value of the magnetic anisotropy (and perpendicular alignment) was observed for the terbium(III) and dysprosium(III) complexes. PMID:18044875

  8. Alignment of the magnet and a positioning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Il

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac and magnets for the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) were installed in the tunnel and the beamlines. The fiducialization process was accomplished with the measurement of mechanical shape and the transfer of the coordinates to the fiducial points that are used in two laser-trackers based alignments. The reference points called the alignment network were set up on the wall inside tunnel. The linac and the beam transport magnets were aligned based on the survey results of the alignment networks. In this paper, the alignment procedure and the alignment results are presented, and an algorithm that was developed to manipulate the adjusters of the magnetsis introduced.

  9. New Pulsar Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebede, Legesse

    2015-08-01

    Standard pulsar theory is based on fields that are conserved from progenitor stars. This has limited the scope of pulsar astronomy to a kind of study very much confined to a limited type of pulsars, so called field pulsars. The large majority of pulsars are technically eliminated from statistical studies because they are either too massive, or are of very high magnetic field with no mechanism yet known which forces them to decay to very low frequency rotators in a matter of a few thousands of years. This is one distinct property of these highly magnetized pulsars. The current presentation focuses on a new source for the generation of pulsar fields namely spinning separated surface charges and it shows that pulsar fields are strictly mass dependent. Massive neutron stars are strongly magnetized ( ≥ 1018 G) and less massive ones are weakly magnetized (1011 - 1013 G). This work therefore dismisses the current belief that there have to be two classes of pulsars (field pulsars and anomalous pulsars). It leads to a decay law that provides results that are consistent with observations from these two so called distinct classes of pulsars. This work also suggests that pulsar fields should be infinitely multi-polar which helps to successfully addresses the longtime issues of pulse shape and promises that the current problem of pulsar radiation could be solvable..

  10. Going to Extremes: Pulsar Gives Insight on Ultra Dense Matter and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-12-01

    A long look at a young pulsar with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory revealed unexpectedly rapid cooling, which suggests that it contains much denser matter than previously expected. The pulsar's cool temperature and the vast magnetic web of high-energy particles that surrounds it have implications for the theory of nuclear matter and the origin of magnetic fields in cosmic objects. Animation: Layers of Chandra's 3-Color Image Animation: Layers of Chandra's 3-Color Image An international team of scientists used the Chandra data to measure the temperature of the pulsar at the center of 3C58, the remains of a star observed to explode in the year 1181. Chandra's image of 3C58 also shows spectacular jets, rings and magnetized loops of high-energy particles generated by the pulsar. "We now have strong evidence that, in slightly more than 800 years, the surface of the 3C58 pulsar has cooled to a temperature of slightly less than a million degrees Celsius," said Patrick Slane of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., and lead author on a paper describing these results in the November 20, 2004 issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "A million degrees may sound pretty hot, but for a young neutron star that's like the frozen tundra in Green Bay, Wisconsin." Optical & Chandra X-ray Composite of 3C58 Optical & Chandra X-ray Composite of 3C58 Pulsars are formed when the central core of a massive star collapses to create a dense object about 15 miles across that is composed almost entirely of neutrons. Collisions between neutrons and other subatomic particles in the interior of the star produce neutrinos that carry away energy as they escape from the star. This cooling process depends critically on the density and type of particles in the interior, so measurements of the surface temperature of pulsars provide a way to probe extreme conditions where densities are so high that our current understanding of how particles interact with one another is limited

  11. The evolution of the magnetic inclination angle as an explanation of the long term red timing-noise of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shu-Xu; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-12-01

    We study the possibility that the long term red timing-noise in pulsars originates from the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle χ. The braking torque under consideration is a combination of the dipole radiation and the current loss. We find that the evolution of χ can give rise to extra cubic and fourth-order polynomial terms in the timing residuals. These two terms are determined by the efficiency of the dipole radiation, the relative electric-current density in the pulsar tube and χ. The following observation facts can be explained with this model: (a) young pulsars have positive ddot{ν }; (b) old pulsars can have both positive and negative ddot{ν }; (c) the absolute values of ddot{ν } are proportional to -dot{ν }; (d) the absolute values of the braking indices are proportional to the characteristic ages of pulsars. If the evolution of χ is purely due to rotation kinematics, then it cannot explain the pulsars with braking index less than 3, and thus the intrinsic change of the magnetic field is needed in this case. Comparing the model with observations, we conclude that the drift direction of χ might oscillate many times during the lifetime of a pulsar. The evolution of χ is not sufficient to explain the rotation behaviour of the Crab pulsar, because the observed χ and dot{χ } are inconsistent with the values indicated from the timing residuals using this model.

  12. Thermal characterization of magnetically aligned carbonyl iron/agar composites.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Bleis, D; Vales-Pinzón, C; Freile-Pelegrín, Y; Alvarado-Gil, J J

    2014-01-01

    Composites of magnetic particles into polymeric matrices have received increasing research interest due to their capacity to respond to external magnetic or electromagnetic fields. In this study, agar from Gelidium robustum has been chosen as natural biocompatible polymer to build the matrix of the magnetic carbonyl iron particles (CIP) for their uses in biomedical fields. Heat transfer behavior of the CIP-agar composites containing different concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% w/w) of magnetically aligned and non-aligned CIP in the agar matrix was studied using photothermal radiometry (PTR) in the back-propagation emission configuration. The morphology of the CIP-agar composites with aligned and non-aligned CIP under magnetic field was also evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed a dominant effect of CIP concentration over the alignment patterns induced by the magnetic field, which agrees with the behavior of the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. Agar served as a perfect matrix to be used with CIP, and CIP-agar composites magnetically aligned at 20% CIP concentration can be considered as promising 'smart' material for hyperthermia treatments in the biomedical field. PMID:24274482

  13. On the Magnetic Field of Pulsars with Realistic Neutron Star Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belvedere, R.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed a neutron star model fulfilling global and not local charge neutrality, both in the static and in the uniformly rotating cases. The model is described by the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-Thomas-Fermi equations, in which all fundamental interactions are accounted for in the framework of general relativity and relativistic mean field theory. Uniform rotation is introduced following Hartle's formalism. We show that the use of realistic parameters of rotating neutron stars, obtained from numerical integration of the self-consistent axisymmetric general relativistic equations of equilibrium, leads to values of the magnetic field and radiation efficiency of pulsars that are very different from estimates based on fiducial parameters that assume a neutron star mass M = 1.4 M ⊙, radius R = 10 km, and moment of inertia I = 1045 g cm2. In addition, we compare and contrast the magnetic field inferred from the traditional Newtonian rotating magnetic dipole model with respect to the one obtained from its general relativistic analog, which takes into account the effect of the finite size of the source. We apply these considerations to the specific high-magnetic field pulsar class and show that, indeed, all of these sources can be described as canonical pulsars driven by the rotational energy of the neutron star, and have magnetic fields lower than the quantum critical field for any value of the neutron star mass.

  14. ON THE MAGNETIC FIELD OF PULSARS WITH REALISTIC NEUTRON STAR CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, R.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, R. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2015-01-20

    We have recently developed a neutron star model fulfilling global and not local charge neutrality, both in the static and in the uniformly rotating cases. The model is described by the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-Thomas-Fermi equations, in which all fundamental interactions are accounted for in the framework of general relativity and relativistic mean field theory. Uniform rotation is introduced following Hartle's formalism. We show that the use of realistic parameters of rotating neutron stars, obtained from numerical integration of the self-consistent axisymmetric general relativistic equations of equilibrium, leads to values of the magnetic field and radiation efficiency of pulsars that are very different from estimates based on fiducial parameters that assume a neutron star mass M = 1.4 M {sub ☉}, radius R = 10 km, and moment of inertia I = 10{sup 45} g cm{sup 2}. In addition, we compare and contrast the magnetic field inferred from the traditional Newtonian rotating magnetic dipole model with respect to the one obtained from its general relativistic analog, which takes into account the effect of the finite size of the source. We apply these considerations to the specific high-magnetic field pulsar class and show that, indeed, all of these sources can be described as canonical pulsars driven by the rotational energy of the neutron star, and have magnetic fields lower than the quantum critical field for any value of the neutron star mass.

  15. Synthesis and orientation of barium hexaferrite ceramics by magnetic alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autissier, Denis

    1990-01-01

    Particles of Ba 2Mn xZn 2- xFe 12O 22 with planar structure were prepared by chemical precipitation. They were processed by sleep casting in presence of a magnetic field. The degree of alignment was improved by a special sintering treatment. By this procedure an alignment as high as 99.9% is obtained.

  16. Magnetic Fractionation and Alignment of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. F.; Milkie, D. E.; Yodh, A. G.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2004-03-01

    We study mechanisms of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) alignment in a magnetic field. Through magnetic fractionation, we create SWNT suspensions with varying quantities of magnetic catalyst particles. The degree of tube alignment in magnetic fields up to 9 Tesla is quantified using polarized optical absorbance anisotropy. Continuous measurements of the nematic order parameter of these suspensions in variable magnetic fields provides a way to identify the origin of magnetic torques giving rise to nanotube alignment. Initial data suggests a transition from catalyst-driven to nanotube-anisotropy driven orientation as the catalyst fraction is reduced. We relate these results to observations of nanotube aggregation. This work has been supported by NSF through DMR-0203378, DMR-079909 and DGE-0221664, NASA through NAG8-2172, DARPA/ONR through N00014-01-1-0831, and SENS.

  17. Isolated pulsar spin evolution on the diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, J. P.; Lorimer, D. R.

    2010-05-01

    We look at two contrasting spin-down models for isolated radio pulsars and, accounting for selection effects, synthesize observable populations. While our goal is to reproduce all of the observable characteristics, in this paper we pay particular attention to the form of the spin period versus period derivative () diagram and its dependence on various pulsar properties. We analyse the initial spin period, the braking index, the magnetic field, various beaming models as well as the pulsar's luminosity. In addition to considering the standard magnetic dipole model for pulsar spin-down, we also consider the recent hybrid model proposed by Contopoulos and Spitkovsky. The magnetic dipole model, however, does a better job of reproducing the observed pulsar population. We conclude that random alignment angles and period-dependent luminosity distributions are essential to reproduce the observed diagram. We also consider the time decay of alignment angles and attempt to reconcile various models currently being studied. We conclude that in order to account for recent evidence for the alignment found by Weltevrede and Johnston, the braking torque on a neutron star should not depend strongly on the inclination. Our simulation code is publicly available and includes a web-based interface to examine the results and make predictions for yields of current and future surveys.

  18. Ground state alignment as a tracer of interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate a new way of studying interplanetary magnetic field -- spectropolarimetry based on ground state alignment. Ground state alignment is a new promising way of sub-gausian magnetic fields in radiation-dominated environment. The polarization of spectral lines that are pumped by the anisotropic radiation from the sun is influenced by the magnetic alignment, which happens for sub-gausian magnetic field. As a result, the linear polarization becomes an excellent tracer of the embedded magnetic field. The method is illustrated by our synthetic obser- vation of the Jupiter's Io and comet Halley. A uniform density distribution of Na was considered and polar- ization at each point was then constructed. Both spa- tial and temporal variations of turbulent magnetic field can be traced with this technique as well. Instead of sending thousands of space probes, ground state alignment allows magnetic mapping with any ground telescope facilities equipped with spectrometer and polarimeter. For remote regions like the the boundary of interstellar medium, ground state alignment provides a unique diagnostics of magnetic field, which is crucial for understanding the physical processes such as the IBEX ribbons.

  19. TOWARD A REALISTIC PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Harding, Alice

    2012-04-10

    We present the magnetic and electric field structures and the currents and charge densities of pulsar magnetospheres that do not obey the ideal condition, E {center_dot} B = 0. Since the acceleration of particles and the production of radiation require the presence of an electric field component parallel to the magnetic field, E{sub ||}, the structure of non-ideal pulsar magnetospheres is intimately related to the production of pulsar radiation. Therefore, knowledge of the structure of non-ideal pulsar magnetospheres is important because their comparison (including models for the production of radiation) with observations will delineate the physics and the parameters underlying the pulsar radiation problem. We implement a variety of prescriptions that support non-zero values for E{sub ||} and explore their effects on the structure of the resulting magnetospheres. We produce families of solutions that span the entire range between the vacuum and the (ideal) force-free electrodynamic solutions. We also compute the amount of dissipation as a fraction of the Poynting flux for pulsars of different angles between the rotation and magnetic axes and conclude that this is at most 20%-40% (depending on the non-ideal prescription) in the aligned rotator and 10% in the perpendicular one. We present also the limiting solutions with the property J = {rho}c and discuss their possible implication on the determination of the 'on/off' states of the intermittent pulsars. Finally, we find that solutions with values of J greater than those needed to null E{sub ||} locally produce oscillations, potentially observable in the data.

  20. Towards a Realistic Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Harding, Alice; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents ami charge densities of pulsar magnetospberes which do not obey the ideal condition, E(raised dot) B = O. Since the acceleration of particles and the production of radiation requires the presence of an electric field component parallel to the magnetic field, E(sub ll) the structure of non-Ideal pulsar magnetospheres is intimately related to the production of pulsar radiation. Therefore, knowledge of the structure of non-Ideal pulsar maglletospheres is important because their comparison (including models for t he production of radiation) with observations will delineate the physics and the parameters underlying the pulsar radiation problem. We implement a variety of prescriptions that support nonzero values for E(sub ll) and explore their effects on the structure of the resulting magnetospheres. We produce families of solutions that span the entire range between the vacuum and the (ideal) Force-Free Electrodynamic solutions. We also compute the amount of dissipation as a fraction of the Poynting flux for pulsars of different angles between the rotation and magnetic axes and conclude that tltis is at most 20-40% (depending on t he non-ideal prescription) in the aligned rotator and 10% in the perpendicular one. We present also the limiting solutions with the property J = pc and discuss their possible implicatioll on the determination of the "on/ off" states of the intermittent pulsars. Finally, we find that solutions with values of J greater than those needed to null E(sub ll) locally produce oscillations, potentially observable in the data.

  1. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    SciTech Connect

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-04-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 {micro}m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  2. The Electric Fields of Radio Pulsars with Asymmetric Nondipolar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, E. M.; Tsygan, A. I.

    2003-07-01

    The effect of the curvature of open magnetic field lines on the generation of electric fields in radio pulsars is considered in the framework of a Goldreich-Julian model, for both a regime with a free outflow of electrons from the neutron-star surface and the case of a small thermoemission current. An expression for the electron thermoemission current in a strong magnetic field is derived. The electric field associated with the curvature of the magnetic flux tubes is comparable to the field generated by the relativistic dragging of the inertial frames.

  3. Magnetic fields generated by r-modes in accreting millisecond pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Cuofano, Carmine; Drago, Alessandro

    2010-10-15

    In rotating neutron stars the existence of the Coriolis force allows the presence of the so-called Rossby oscillations (r-modes) which are known to be unstable to emission of gravitational waves. Here, for the first time, we introduce the magnetic damping rate in the evolution equations of r-modes. We show that r-modes can generate very strong toroidal fields in the core of accreting millisecond pulsars by inducing differential rotation. We shortly discuss the instabilities of the generated magnetic field and its long time-scale evolution in order to clarify how the generated magnetic field can stabilize the star.

  4. Torque Enhancement, Spin Equilibrium, and Jet Power from Disk-Induced Opening of Pulsar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfrey, Kyle; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of a rotating star’s magnetic field with a surrounding plasma disk lies at the heart of many questions posed by neutron stars in X-ray binaries. We consider the opening of stellar magnetic flux due to differential rotation along field lines coupling the star and disk, using a simple model for the disk-opened flux, the torques exerted on the star by the magnetosphere, and the power extracted by the electromagnetic wind. We examine the conditions under which the system enters an equilibrium spin state, in which the accretion torque is instantaneously balanced by the pulsar wind torque alone. For magnetic moments, spin frequencies, and accretion rates relevant to accreting millisecond pulsars, the spin-down torque from this enhanced pulsar wind can be substantially larger than that predicted by existing models of the disk–magnetosphere interaction, and is in principle capable of maintaining spin equilibrium at frequencies less than 1 kHz. We speculate that this mechanism may account for the non-detection of frequency increases during outbursts of SAX J1808.4-3658 and XTE J1814-338, and may be generally responsible for preventing spin-up to sub-millisecond periods. If the pulsar wind is collimated by the surrounding environment, the resulting jet can satisfy the power requirements of the highly relativistic outflows from Cir X-1 and Sco X-1. In this framework, the jet power scales relatively weakly with accretion rate, {L}{{j}}\\propto {\\dot{M}}4/7, and would be suppressed at high accretion rates only if the stellar magnetic moment is sufficiently low.

  5. CCO Pulsars as Anti-Magnetars: Evidence of Neutron Stars Weakly Magnetized at Birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.

    2008-02-01

    Our new study of the two central compact object pulsars, PSR J1210-5226 (P = 424 ms) and PSR J1852+0040 (P = 105 ms), leads us to conclude that a weak natal magnetic field shaped their unique observational properties. In the dipole spin-down formalism, the 2-sigma upper limits on their period derivatives, <2×10-16 for both pulsars, implies surface magnetic field strengths of Bs<3×1011 G and spin periods at birth equal to their present periods to three significant digits. Their X-ray luminosities exceed their respective spin-down luminosities, implying that their thermal spectra are derived from residual cooling and perhaps partly from accretion of supernova debris. For sufficiently weak magnetic fields an accretion disk can penetrate the light cylinder and interact with the magnetosphere while resulting torques on the neutron star remain within the observed limits. We propose the following as the origin of radio-quiet CCOs: the magnetic field, derived from a turbulent dynamo, is weaker if the NS is formed spinning slowly, which enables it to accrete SN debris. Accretion excludes neutron stars born with both Bs<1011 G and P>0.1 s from radio pulsar surveys, where such weak fields are not encountered except among very old (>40 Myr) or recycled pulsars. We predict that these birth properties are common, and may be attributes of the youngest detected neutron star, the CCO in Cassiopeia A, as well as an undetected infant neutron star in the SN 1987A remnant. In view of the far-infrared light echo discovered around Cas A and attributed to an SGR-like outburst, it is especially important to determine via timing whether Cas A hosts a magnetar or not. If not a magnetar, the Cas A NS may instead have undergone a one-time phase transition (corequake) that powered the light echo.

  6. Observations of Energetic High Magnetic Field Pulsars with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parent, D.; Kerr, M.; DenHartog, P. R.; Baring, M. G.; DeCesar, M. E.; Espinoza, C. M.; Harding, A. K.; Romani, R. W.; Stappers, B. W.; Watters, K.; Weltevrde, P.; Abdo, A. A.; Craig, H. A.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of gamma-ray pulsations from the high-magnetic-field rotation-powered pulsar PSR J1119.6127 using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve of PSR J1119.6127 shows a single, wide peak offset from the radio peak by 0.43 +/- 0.02 in phase. Spectral analysis suggests a power law of index 1.0 +/- 0.3(+0.4 -0.2) with an energy cut-off at 0.8 +/- 0.2(+2.0 -0.5) GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We discuss the emission models of PSR J1119.6127 and demonstrate that despite the object's high surface magnetic field--near that of magnetars -- the field strength and structure in the gamma-ray emitting zone are apparently similar to those of typical young pulsars. Additionally, we present upper limits on the gamma-ray pulsed emission for the magnetically active PSR J1846.0258 in the supernova remnant Kesteven 75 and two other energetic high-Beta pulsars, PSRs J1718.3718 and J1734.3333. We explore possible explanations for the non-detection of these three objects, including peculiarities in their emission geometry.

  7. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Rao, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the possibility that soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are powered by highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). We take a sample of SGRs and AXPs and provide the possible parameter space in mass, radius, and surface magnetic field based on their observed properties (period and its derivative) and the assumption that these sources obey the mass-radius relation derived for the B-WDs. The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. In addition, B-WDs also adequately explain the perplexing radio transient GCRT J1745-3009 as a white dwarf pulsar. Note that the radius and magnetic fields of B-WDs are neither extreme (unlike of highly magnetized neutron stars) nor ordinary (unlike of magnetized white dwarfs, yet following the Chandrasekhar's mass-radius relation (C-WDs)). In order to explain SGRs/AXPs, while the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, source of energy, the C-WDs predict large ultra-violet luminosity which is observationally constrained from a strict upper limit. Finally, we provide a set of basic differences between the magnetar and B-WD hypotheses for SGRs/AXPs.

  8. Very high energy emission as a probe of relativistic magnetic reconnection in pulsar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochol, Iwona; Pétri, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    The population of gamma-ray pulsars, including Crab observed in the TeV range, and Vela detected above 50 GeV, challenges existing models of pulsed high-energy emission. Such models should be universally applicable, yet they should account for spectral differences among the pulsars. We show that the gamma-ray emission of Crab and Vela can be explained by synchrotron radiation from the current sheet of a striped wind, expanding with a modest Lorentz factor Γ ≲ 100 in the Crab case, and Γ ≲ 50 in the Vela case. In the Crab spectrum, a new synchrotron self-Compton component is expected to be detected by the upcoming experiment CTA. We suggest that the gamma-ray spectrum directly probes the physics of relativistic magnetic reconnection in the striped wind. In the most energetic pulsars, like Crab, with dot{E}_{38}^{3/2}/P_{-2}≳ 0.002 (where dot{E} is the spin-down power, P is the pulsar period, and X = Xi × 10i in CGS units), reconnection proceeds in the radiative cooling regime and results in a soft power-law distribution of cooling particles; in less powerful pulsars, like Vela, particle energization is limited by the current sheet size, and a hard particle spectrum reflects the acceleration mechanism. A strict lower limit on the number density of radiating particles corresponds to emission close to the light cylinder, and, in units of the GJ density, it is ≳ 0.5 in the Crab wind, and κ ≳ 0.05 in the Vela wind.

  9. Remanent magnetism of sediment governs magnetofossil alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    Most bacteria navigate by reacting to different chemical signals in their surroundings, but some bacteria have another navigational tool in their arsenal—the Earth's magnetic field. Nestled inside these magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are organelles called magnetosomes, filled with tiny magnetic crystals and arranged in chains, which form nano-sized compass needles. When MTB die and degrade, these tiny crystals can remain in sediment and eventually become magnetic fossils called magnetofossils.

  10. The unusual glitch recoveries of the high-magnetic-field pulsar J1119-6127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonopoulou, D.; Weltevrede, P.; Espinoza, C. M.; Watts, A. L.; Johnston, S.; Shannon, R. M.; Kerr, M.

    2015-03-01

    Providing a link between magnetars and radio pulsars, high-magnetic-field neutron stars are ideal targets to investigate how bursting/magnetospheric activity and braking torque variations are connected to rotational glitches. The last spin-up glitch of the highly magnetized pulsar J1119-6127 back in 2007 was the first glitch in a rotationally powered radio pulsar to be accompanied by radiative changes. Moreover, it was followed by an uncommon glitch relaxation that resulted in a smaller spin-down rate relative to the prediction of the pre-glitch timing model. Here, we present four years of new radio timing observations and analyse the total of 16 years of timing data for this source. The new data uncover an ongoing evolution of the spin-down rate, thereby allowing us to exclude permanent changes in the external or internal torque as a standalone cause of the peculiar features of the glitch recovery. Furthermore, no additional variations of the radio pulse profile are detected, strengthening the association of the previously observed transient emission features with the glitching activity. A self-consistent measurement of the braking index yields a value n ≃ 2.7, indicating a trajectory in the P-dot{P} plane inclined towards the magnetars. Such a potential evolutionary link might be strengthened by a, possibly permanent, reduction of ˜15 per cent in n at the epoch of the 2007 glitch.

  11. The attenuation of gamma-ray emission in strongly-magnetized pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.; Gonthier, Peter L.

    1997-01-01

    Gamma rays from pulsars can be efficiently attenuated in their magnetospheres via the mechanism of single photon pair production and the exotic quantum electrodynamics (QED) process of photon splitting. The modeling of strongly magnetized gamma ray pulsars focusing on the escape or attenuation of photons emitted near the pole at the neutron star surface in dipole fields in a Schwarzschild metric is considered. It was found that pair production and splitting totally inhibit emission above a value of between 10 and 30 MeV in PSR 1509-58 whose surface field is inferred as being high. The principle predictions of the attenuation analysis are reviewed and the observational diagnostic capabilities of the model are considered. The diagnostics include the energy of the gamma ray turnover and the spectral polarization, which constrain the estimated polar cap size and field strength and can determine the relative strength of splitting and pair creation.

  12. Period Clustering of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars and Magnetic Field Decay in Magnetars.

    PubMed

    Colpi; Geppert; Page

    2000-01-20

    We confront theoretical models for the rotational, magnetic, and thermal evolution of an ultramagnetized neutron star, or magnetar, with available data on the anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). We argue that, if the AXPs are interpreted as magnetars, their clustering of spin periods between 6 and 12 s (observed at present in this class of objects), their period derivatives, their thermal X-ray luminosities, and the association of two of them with young supernova remnants can only be understood globally if the magnetic field in magnetars decays significantly on a timescale of the order of 104 yr. PMID:10615029

  13. Magnetic Alignment of Magnetically Biaxial Diamagnetic Rods under Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukui, Shu; Kimura, Tsunehisa

    2012-05-01

    The alignment behavior of magnetically biaxial diamagnetic rods under rotating magnetic fields is studied to elucidate the effects of particle shape and rotation speed on alignment manner. Three types of rod (ca. 1.1 mmφ × 3 mm) are prepared: (i) rod axes parallel to χ1, (ii) parallel to χ2, and (iii) parallel to χ3, where χs are the principal axes of the diamagnetic susceptibility tensor and χ1 > χ2 > χ3. The motion of the rod is recorded on video and the angles required for the comparison with simulation are measured. Simulation is performed by numerically solving a torque equation including magnetic and hydrodynamic torques. The experimental results show a good agreement with simulation results. It is shown that the χ3-axis of rod sample (ii) does not align parallel to the axis of the rotating magnetic field under most experimental conditions; this is in marked contrast to the case with magnetically uniaxial particles (χ1 = χ2 > χ3), for which the χ3-axis aligns irrespective of particle shape and/or rotation speed. This observation is interpreted in terms of magnetic energy and orientation kinetics.

  14. An Investigation of Luminous X-Ray Pulsars: Exploring Accretion Onto the Magnetized Neutron Star LMC X-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumback, McKinley

    2016-04-01

    X-ray pulsars are neutron stars in which magnetic forces dominate accretion within the magnetosphere. These systems offer unique laboratories to study magnetic accretion and the behavior of matter under extreme densities, magnetic fields, and gravitational forces. Using joint observations with NuSTAR and XMM-Newton, we observe the complete precession of the warped accretion disk around the X-ray pulsar LMC X-4, and measure the relative phase between the pulsar beam and the softer X-ray photons reprocessed by the disk. This allows us to perform tomography to explore the inner magnetized accretion flow. Additionally, we investigate the unusual flaring events observed from LMC X-4 during October and November of 2015.

  15. The effects of magnetic field, age and intrinsic luminosity on Crab-like pulsar wind nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. F.; Martín, J.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Cillis, Analia

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the time-dependent behaviour of Crab-like pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) generating a set of models using four different initial spin-down luminosities (L0 = {1, 0.1, 0.01, 0.001} × L0,Crab), eight values of magnetic fraction (η = 0.001, 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.5, 0.9, 0.99 and 0.999, i.e. from fully particle dominated to fully magnetically dominated nebulae) and three distinctive ages: 940, 3000 and 9000 years. We find that the self-synchrotron Compton (SSC) contribution is irrelevant for LSD = 0.1, 1 and 10 per cent of the Crab power, disregarding the age and the magnetic fraction. SSC only becomes relevant for highly energetic (˜70 per cent of the Crab), particle dominated nebulae at low ages (of less than a few kyr), located in a far-infrared (FIR) background with relatively low energy density. Since no pulsar other than Crab is known to have these features, these results clarify why the Crab nebula, and only it, is SSC dominated. No young PWN would be detectable at TeV energies if the pulsar's spin-down power is 0.1 per cent Crab or lower. For 1 per cent of the Crab spin-down, only particle-dominated nebulae can be detected by HESS-like telescopes when young enough (with details depending on the precise injection and environmental parameters). Above 10 per cent of the Crab's power, all PWNe are detectable by HESS-like telescopes if they are particle dominated, no matter the age. The impact of the magnetic fraction on the final spectral energy distribution is varied and important, generating order of magnitude variations in the luminosity output for systems that are otherwise the same (equal P, dot{P}, injection and environment).

  16. Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D. J.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.

    2001-07-01

    orthogonal-mode polarized components. We review effects that may enhance the probability of alignment between the spin axis and space velocity of a pulsar, and speculate that short-period, slowly moving pulsars are just the ones best-suited to producing synchrotron nebulae with such aligned structures. Previous interpretations of the compact Vela nebula as a bow-shock in a very weakly magnetized wind suffered from data of inadequate spatial resolution and less plausible physical assumptions.

  17. Magnetic alignment of nickel-coated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Chuncheng; State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, 710049 ; Li, Xiaojiao; Wang, Guizhen

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Carbon nanofibers were subjected to a two-step pretreatment, sensitization and activation. Carbon nanofibers were encapsulated by a uniform layer of nickel nanoparticles. The prepared composites are ferromagnetic and with a small value of coercivity. Upon such functionalization, the carbon nanofibers can be aligned in a relatively small external magnetic field. Highlights: {center_dot} A simple microwave-assisted procedure for the magnetic composite. {center_dot} Dense layer of nickel on pretreated carbon nanofibers. {center_dot} Ferromagnetic properties and low coercivity. {center_dot} A long-chain aligned structure under magnetic field. -- Abstract: Magnetic composites of nickel-coated carbon nanofibers have been successfully fabricated by employing a simple microwave-assisted procedure. The scanning electron microscopy images show that a complete and uniform nickel coating with mean size of 25 nm could be deposited on carbon fibers. Magnetization curves demonstrate that the prepared composites are ferromagnetic and that the coercivity is 96 Oe. The magnetic carbon nanofibers can be aligned as a long-chain structure in an external magnetic field.

  18. A New Standard Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-01-01

    In view of recent efforts to probe the physical conditions in the pulsar current sheet, we revisit the standard solution that describes the main elements of the ideal force-free pulsar magnetosphere. The simple physical requirement that the electric current contained in the current layer consists of the local electric charge moving outward at close to the speed of light yields a new solution for the pulsar magnetosphere everywhere that is ideal force-free except in the current layer. The main elements of the new solution are as follows: (1) the pulsar spindown rate of the aligned rotator is 23% larger than that of the orthogonal vacuum rotator; (2) only 60% of the magnetic flux that crosses the light cylinder opens up to infinity; (3) the electric current closes along the other 40%, which gradually converges to the equator; (4) this transfers 40% of the total pulsar spindown energy flux in the equatorial current sheet, which is then dissipated in the acceleration of particles and in high-energy electromagnetic radiation; and (5) there is no separatrix current layer. Our solution is a minimum free-parameter solution in that the equatorial current layer is electrostatically supported against collapse and thus does not require a thermal particle population. In this respect, it is one more step toward the development of a new standard solution. We discuss the implications for intermittent pulsars and long-duration gamma-ray bursts. We conclude that the physical conditions in the equatorial current layer determine the global structure of the pulsar magnetosphere.

  19. A new standard pulsar magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-01-20

    In view of recent efforts to probe the physical conditions in the pulsar current sheet, we revisit the standard solution that describes the main elements of the ideal force-free pulsar magnetosphere. The simple physical requirement that the electric current contained in the current layer consists of the local electric charge moving outward at close to the speed of light yields a new solution for the pulsar magnetosphere everywhere that is ideal force-free except in the current layer. The main elements of the new solution are as follows: (1) the pulsar spindown rate of the aligned rotator is 23% larger than that of the orthogonal vacuum rotator; (2) only 60% of the magnetic flux that crosses the light cylinder opens up to infinity; (3) the electric current closes along the other 40%, which gradually converges to the equator; (4) this transfers 40% of the total pulsar spindown energy flux in the equatorial current sheet, which is then dissipated in the acceleration of particles and in high-energy electromagnetic radiation; and (5) there is no separatrix current layer. Our solution is a minimum free-parameter solution in that the equatorial current layer is electrostatically supported against collapse and thus does not require a thermal particle population. In this respect, it is one more step toward the development of a new standard solution. We discuss the implications for intermittent pulsars and long-duration gamma-ray bursts. We conclude that the physical conditions in the equatorial current layer determine the global structure of the pulsar magnetosphere.

  20. Studies of Interstellar and Circumstellar Magnetic Field with Aligned Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.; Yan, H.

    2004-12-01

    Population of levels of the hyperfine and fine split ground state of an atom is affected by radiative transitions induced by anisotropic radiation flux. Such aligned atoms precess in the external magnetic field and this affects properties of polarized radiation arising from both scattering and absorption by atoms. As the result the degree of light polarization depends on the direction of the magnetic field. This provides a new tool for studies of astrophysical magnetic fields using optical and UV polarimetry. We provide calculations for several atoms and ions that can be used to study magnetic fields in interplanetary medium, interstellar medius, circumstellar regions and quasars.

  1. Magnetic Alignment of Block Copolymer Microdomains by Intrinsic Chain Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Zhang, Kai; O'Hern, Corey S.; Larson, Steven R.; Gopalan, Padma; Majewski, Paweł W.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-12-01

    We examine the role of intrinsic chain susceptibility anisotropy in magnetic field directed self-assembly of a block copolymer using in situ x-ray scattering. Alignment of a lamellar mesophase is observed on cooling across the disorder-order transition with the resulting orientational order inversely proportional to the cooling rate. We discuss the origin of the susceptibility anisotropy, Δ χ , that drives alignment and calculate its magnitude using coarse-grained molecular dynamics to sample conformations of surface-tethered chains, finding Δ χ ≈2 ×1 0-8. From field-dependent scattering data, we estimate that grains of ≈1.2 μ m are present during alignment. These results demonstrate that intrinsic anisotropy is sufficient to support strong field-induced mesophase alignment and suggest a versatile strategy for field control of orientational order in block copolymers.

  2. Magnetic alignment of block copolymer microdomains by intrinsic chain anisotropy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Yager, Kevin G.; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Zhang, Kai; O'Hern, Corey S.; Larson, Steven R.; Gopalan, Padma; Majewski, Pawel W.

    2015-12-18

    We examine the role of intrinsic chain susceptibility anisotropy in magnetic field directed self-assembly of a block copolymer using in situ x-ray scattering. Alignment of a lamellar mesophase is observed on cooling across the disorder-order transition with the resulting orientational order inversely proportional to the cooling rate. We discuss the origin of the susceptibility anisotropy, Δχ, that drives alignment and calculate its magnitude using coarse-grained molecular dynamics to sample conformations of surface-tethered chains, finding Δχ ≈ 2×10–8. From field-dependent scattering data, we estimate that grains of ≈ 1.2 μm are present during alignment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that intrinsic anisotropymore » is sufficient to support strong field-induced mesophase alignment and suggest a versatile strategy for field control of orientational order in block copolymers.« less

  3. Magnetic alignment of block copolymer microdomains by intrinsic chain anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Yager, Kevin G.; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Zhang, Kai; O'Hern, Corey S.; Larson, Steven R.; Gopalan, Padma; Majewski, Pawel W.

    2015-12-18

    We examine the role of intrinsic chain susceptibility anisotropy in magnetic field directed self-assembly of a block copolymer using in situ x-ray scattering. Alignment of a lamellar mesophase is observed on cooling across the disorder-order transition with the resulting orientational order inversely proportional to the cooling rate. We discuss the origin of the susceptibility anisotropy, Δχ, that drives alignment and calculate its magnitude using coarse-grained molecular dynamics to sample conformations of surface-tethered chains, finding Δχ ≈ 2×10–8. From field-dependent scattering data, we estimate that grains of ≈ 1.2 μm are present during alignment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that intrinsic anisotropy is sufficient to support strong field-induced mesophase alignment and suggest a versatile strategy for field control of orientational order in block copolymers.

  4. Beam based alignment of C-shaped quadrupole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Portmann, G.; Robin, D.

    1998-06-01

    Many storage rings have implemented a method of finding the positional offset between the electrical center of the beam position monitors (BPM) and the magnetic center of the adjacent quadrupole magnets. The algorithm for accomplishing this is usually based on modulating the current in the quadrupole magnet and finding the beam position that minimizes the orbit perturbation. When the quadrupole magnet is C-shaped, as it is for many light sources, the modulation method can produce an erroneous measurement of the magnetic center in the horizontal plane. When the current in a C-shaped quadrupole is changed, there is an additional dipole component in the vertical field. Due to nonlinearities in the hysteresis cycle of the C-magnet geometry, the beam-based alignment technique at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) deviated horizontally by .5 mm from the actual magnetic center. By modifying the technique, the offsets were measured to an accuracy of better than 50 {micro}m.

  5. Neutron star dynamos and the origins of pulsar magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Christopher; Duncan, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron star convection is a transient phenomenon and has an extremely high magnetic Reynolds number. In this sense, a neutron star dynamo is the quintessential fast dynamo. The convective motions are only mildly turbulent on scales larger than the approximately 100 cm neutrino mean free path, but the turbulence is well developed on smaller scales. Several fundamental issues in the theory of fast dynamos are raised in the study of a neutron star dynamo, in particular the possibility of dynamo action in mirror-symmetric turbulence. It is argued that in any high magnetic Reynolds number dynamo, most of the magnetic energy becomes concentrated in thin flux ropes when the field pressure exceeds the turbulent pressure at the smallest scale of turbulence. In addition, the possibilities for dynamo action during the various (pre-collapse) stages of convective motion that occur in the evolution of a massive star are examined, and the properties of white dwarf and neutron star progenitors are contrasted.

  6. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  7. Constraining compactness and magnetic field geometry of X-ray pulsars using pulse profile statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, Marja; Poutanen, Juri

    2010-07-15

    We use the statistics of 131 X-ray pulsar light curves in order to constrain the neutron star compactness and the inclination of the magnetic dipole. The X-ray pulse profiles are classified according to the number of pulses seen during one period, dividing them into two classes, single- and double-peaked. The relative fraction of pulsars in these classes is compared with the probabilities predicted by a theoretical model for different types of pencil-beam patterns. Our results show that a statistic of pulse profiles does not constrain compactness of the neutron stars. In contrast to the previous claim, the data do not require the magnetic inclination to be confined in a narrow interval but instead the magnetic dipole can have arbitrary inclinations to the rotational axis. The observed fractions of different types of light curves can be explained by taking into account the X-ray detector sensitivity (i.e. detection threshold for weak pulses), which decreases the fraction of the observed double-peaked light curves.

  8. Understanding the residual patterns of timing solutions of radio pulsars with a model of magnetic field oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Yi, Shu-Xu; Xie, Yi; Fu, Jian-Ning

    2016-06-01

    We explain some phenomena existing generally in the timing residuals: amplitude and sign of the second derivative of a pulsar's spin-frequency (ddot{ν }), some sophisticated residual patterns, which also change with the time span of data segments. The sample is taken from Hobbs et al., in which the pulsar's spin-frequency and its first derivative have been subtracted from the timing solution fitting. We first classify the timing residual patterns into different types based on the sign of ddot{ν }. Then we use the magnetic field oscillation model developed in our group to fit successfully the different kinds of timing residuals with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Finally, we simulate the spin evolution over 20 years for a pulsar with typical parameters and analyse the data with the conventional timing solution fitting. By choosing different segments of the simulated data, we find that most of the observed residual patterns can be reproduced successfully. This is the first time that the observed residual patterns are fitted by a model and reproduced by simulations with very few parameters. From the distribution of the different residual patterns in the P-dot{P} diagram, we argue that (1) a single magnetic field oscillation mode exists commonly in all pulsars throughout their lifetimes; (2) there may be a transition period over the lifetimes of pulsars, in which multiple magnetic field oscillation modes exist.

  9. Particle acceleration in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of pulsar magnetospheres and the acceleration mechanism for charged particles in the magnetosphere was studied using a pulsar model which required large acceleration of the particles near the surface of the star. A theorem was developed which showed that particle acceleration cannot be expected when the angle between the magnetic field lines and the rotation axis is constant (e.g. radial field lines). If this angle is not constant, however, acceleration must occur. The more realistic model of an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong dipole magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis was investigated. In this case, acceleration occurred at large distances from the surface of the star. The magnitude of the current can be determined using the model presented. In the case of nonaxisymmetric systems, the acceleration is expected to occur nearer to the surface of the star.

  10. Magnetic alignment in grazing and resting cattle and deer

    PubMed Central

    Begall, Sabine; Červený, Jaroslav; Neef, Julia; Vojtěch, Oldřich; Burda, Hynek

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate by means of simple, noninvasive methods (analysis of satellite images, field observations, and measuring “deer beds” in snow) that domestic cattle (n = 8,510 in 308 pastures) across the globe, and grazing and resting red and roe deer (n = 2,974 at 241 localities), align their body axes in roughly a north–south direction. Direct observations of roe deer revealed that animals orient their heads northward when grazing or resting. Amazingly, this ubiquitous phenomenon does not seem to have been noticed by herdsmen, ranchers, or hunters. Because wind and light conditions could be excluded as a common denominator determining the body axis orientation, magnetic alignment is the most parsimonious explanation. To test the hypothesis that cattle orient their body axes along the field lines of the Earth's magnetic field, we analyzed the body orientation of cattle from localities with high magnetic declination. Here, magnetic north was a better predictor than geographic north. This study reveals the magnetic alignment in large mammals based on statistically sufficient sample sizes. Our findings open horizons for the study of magnetoreception in general and are of potential significance for applied ethology (husbandry, animal welfare). They challenge neuroscientists and biophysics to explain the proximate mechanisms. PMID:18725629

  11. Highly efficient magnetic separation using five-aligned superconducting bulk magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, Hiroyuki; Miura, Takashi; Naito, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Hidemi

    2010-06-01

    We have constructed the highly efficient magnetic separation system using five-aligned superconducting bulk magnets, which has ten usable magnetic poles on both sides in open space. We applied the bulk magnet system to the magnetic separation of ferromagnetic particles (magnetite; Fe3O4) and paramagnetic ones (α-hematite Fe2O3) dispersed in water for various average particle diameters d, flow speeds VF and initial concentrations C0 of the particles. The multi-bulk magnet system has been confirmed to be effective for the magnetic separation and the efficiency of the magnetic separation per one magnetic pole has been estimated using the theoretical relation.

  12. Quantum theory of spin alignment in a circular magnetic nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Gerd; Thompson, Richard S.; Lu, Jia G.

    2015-12-01

    When electron spin and momentum couple in a solid, one generally obtains intriguing and unexpected phenomena. Metallic ferromagnetic nanotubes of cobalt with circular magnetization, which have been prepared by us and others, are a particularly interesting system. Here the spins of the conduction electrons are frustrated. They would like to align parallel to the magnetic field of the magnetization, but as the electrons move quickly around the tube the spins cannot follow the magnetization direction. In a previous short theoretical paper we solved the spin dynamics using a classical model. Here we generalize our work to a quantum mechanical model. The surprising result is that the spin of most conduction electrons is not parallel or anti-parallel to the circumferential magnetization but mostly parallel or anti-parallel to the axis of the nanotube. This result means that such a cobalt nanotube is a different ferromagnet from a cobalt film or bulk cobalt.

  13. Structural magnetic loss of vertical aligned carbon fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng

    2013-06-01

    The electromagnetic spectroscopy of vertical aligned carbon fibres (VACF) reinforced epoxy resin has been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The composite was prepared by conventional epoxy polymerization. The results indicate VACF could possess magnetic loss and the structural magnetic properties could be tailored by adjusting the forest structure. The corresponding mechanism of the structural magnetic properties is proposed by the Faradays' law of induction. The structural magnetism is further confirmed by measuring VACF reinforced Al2O3 composites in 1073 K environment. The measurement agrees well with the trend predicted by the parallel fibres model. These results represent a crucial step towards high temperature microwave absorber design and open a new avenue for realizing magnetic losses in the dielectric material.

  14. Tridimensional Burning Structures Associated with Anisotropic Thermal Conductivities in Magnetically Confined and Pulsar Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, A.; Coppi, B.; Sonnino, G.

    2015-11-01

    A surprising result of the most recent theory of the thermonuclear instability, which can take place in D-T plasmas close to ignition, is that it can develop with tridimensional structures emerging from an axisymmetric toroidal confinement configurations. These structures are helical filaments (``snakes'') that are localized radially around a given rational magnetic surface. Until now well known analyses of fusion burning processes in magnetically confined plasmas, that include the thermonuclear instability, have been carried out by 1+1/2 D transport codes and, consequently, the onset of tri-dimensional structures has not been investigated. The importance of the electron thermal conductivities anisotropy is pointed out also for the inhomogeneous thermonuclear burning of plasmas on the surface of pulsars and for the formation of the observed bright spots on some of them. Sponsored in part by the U.S. DoE.

  15. Theoretical study of alignment dynamics of magnetic oblate spheroids in rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mingyang; Song, Han; Dhagat, Pallavi; Jander, Albrecht; Walker, Travis W.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic composites containing anisotropic magnetic particles can achieve properties not possible in corresponding bulk or thin films of the magnetic material. In this work, we discuss how planar magnetic anisotropy may be achieved in a composite by aligning disk-shaped particles in an in-plane rotating magnetic field. Previous efforts have reported a simple model of aligning particles in a high-frequency rotating magnetic field. However, no complete analytic solution was proposed. Here, we provide a full analytic solution that describes the alignment dynamics of microdisks in a rotating field that covers the entire frequency range. We also provide simplified solutions at both high-frequency and low-frequency limits through asymptotic expansions for easy implementation into industrial settings. The analytic solution is confirmed by numerical simulation and shows agreement with experiments.

  16. Influence of small-scale magnetic field on the reverse positron current in the inner gaps of radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, D. P.; Goglichidze, O. A.; Tsygan, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    The reverse positron current flowing through the inner gap of an old radio pulsar in the presence of a small-scale magnetic field is found. Computations for the case of both strong and weak screening of the longitudinal electric field by the electron-positron plasma are presented.

  17. A new model for the X-ray continuum of the magnetized accreting pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinelli, Ruben; Ferrigno, Carlo; Bozzo, Enrico; Becker, Peter A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Accreting highly magnetized pulsars in binary systems are among the brightest X-ray emitters in our Galaxy. Although a number of high-quality broad-band (0.1-100 keV) X-ray observations are available, the spectral energy distribution of these sources is usually investigated by adopting pure phenomenological models rather than models linked to the physics of accretion. Aims: In this paper, a detailed spectral study of the X-ray emission recorded from the high-mass X-ray binary pulsars Cen X-3, 4U 0115+63, and Her X-1 is carried out by using BeppoSAX and joined Suzaku +NuStar data, together with an advanced version of the compmag model, which provides a physical description of the high-energy emission from accreting pulsars, including the thermal and bulk Comptonization of cyclotron and bremsstrahlung seed photons along the neutron star accretion column. Methods: The compmag model is based on an iterative method for solving second-order partial differential equations, whose convergence algorithm has been improved and consolidated during the preparation of this paper. Results: Our analysis shows that the broad-band X-ray continuum of all considered sources can be self-consistently described by the compmag model. The cyclotron absorption features (not included in the model) can be accounted for by using Gaussian components. From the fits of the compmag model to the data we inferred the physical properties of the accretion columns in all sources, finding values reasonably close to those theoretically expected according to our current understanding of accretion in highly magnetized neutron stars. Conclusions: The updated version of the compmag model has been tailored to the physical processes that are known to occur in the columns of highly magnetized accreting neutron stars and it can thus provide a better understanding of the high-energy radiation from these sources. The availability of broad-band high-quality X-ray data, such as those provided by BeppoSAX in

  18. Evidence of Fast Magnetic Field Evolution in an Accreting Millisecond Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patruno, A.

    2012-07-01

    The large majority of neutron stars (NSs) in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) have never shown detectable pulsations despite several decades of intense monitoring. The reason for this remains an unsolved problem that hampers our ability to measure the spin frequency of most accreting NSs. The accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) HETE J1900.1-2455 is an intermittent pulsar that exhibited pulsations at about 377 Hz for the first two months and then turned into a nonpulsating source. Understanding why this happened might help us to understand why most LMXBs do not pulsate. We present a seven-year coherent timing analysis of data taken with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We discover new sporadic pulsations that are detected on a baseline of about 2.5 years. We find that the pulse phases anti-correlate with the X-ray flux as previously discovered in other AMXPs. We place stringent upper limits of 0.05% rms on the pulsed fraction when pulsations are not detected and identify an enigmatic pulse phase drift of ~180° in coincidence with the first disappearance of pulsations. Thanks to the new pulsations we measure a long term spin frequency derivative whose strength decays exponentially with time. We interpret this phenomenon as evidence of magnetic field burial.

  19. Shifted magnetic alignment in vertebrates: Evidence for neural lateralization?

    PubMed

    Malkemper, E Pascal; Painter, Michael S; Landler, Lukas

    2016-06-21

    A wealth of evidence provides support for magnetic alignment (MA) behavior in a variety of disparate species within the animal kingdom, in which an animal, or a group of animals, show a tendency to align the body axis in a consistent orientation relative to the geomagnetic field lines. Interestingly, among vertebrates, MA typically coincides with the north-south magnetic axis, however, the mean directional preferences of an individual or group of organisms is often rotated clockwise from the north-south axis. We hypothesize that this shift is not a coincidence, and future studies of this subtle, yet consistent phenomenon may help to reveal some properties of the underlying sensory or processing mechanisms, that, to date, are not well understood. Furthermore, characterizing the fine structure exhibited in MA behaviors may provide key insights to the biophysical substrates mediating magnetoreception in vertebrates. Therefore, in order to determine if a consistent shift is exhibited in taxonomically diverse vertebrates, we performed a meta-analysis on published MA datasets from 23 vertebrate species that exhibited an axial north-south preference. This analysis revealed a significant clockwise shift from the north-south magnetic axis. We summarize and discuss possible competing hypotheses regarding the proximate mechanisms underlying the clockwise shifted MA and conclude that the most likely cause of such a shift would be a lateralization in central processing of magnetic information. PMID:27059891

  20. Magnetic Alignment and Charge Transport Improvement in Functional Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Pawel W.

    The realization of nanostructured functional materials by self-assembly in polymers and polymer nanocomposites is adversely affected by persisting structural defects which greatly diminish the performance of the material. The use of magnetic fields to impose long-range order is investigated in three distinct systems - ion-conducting block copolymers, semiconducting nanowire-polymer composites and lyotropic surfactant mesophases. The alignment process is quantitatively studied with X-ray scattering and microscopic methods. Time and temperature resolved data collected in situ during the magnetic experiments provide an insight into the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the process. These data together with simultaneous electrical conductivity measurements allow relating fundamental structural properties (e.g., morphology and long-range order) to transport properties (i.e., conductivity). In particular, it is demonstrated that magnetic fields offer a viable route for improvement of electric conductivity in these systems. More than an order of magnitude increase in conductivity is recorded in magnetically-annealed materials. The resulting aligned nanostructured systems are attractive for ordered solid polymer electrolyte membranes, heterojunction photovoltaic devices and generally help to understand charge transport mechanisms in anisotropic heterogeneous systems.

  1. Alignment of Iron Nanoparticles in a Magnetic Field Due to Shape Anisotropy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Rios, Orlando; Parish, Chad M

    2015-07-09

    During high magnetic field processing there is evidence for alignment of non-spherical metallic particles above the Curie temperature in alloys with negligible magneto-crystalline anisotropy. The main driving force for alignment is the magnetic shape anisotropy. Current understanding of the phenomenon is not adequate to quantify the effect of particle size, aspect ratio, temperature and the magnetic field on particle alignment. We demonstrate a Monte Carlo approach coupled with size scaling to show the conditions under which alignment is possible.

  2. Magnetically Aligned H I Fibers and the Rolling Hough Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. E.; Peek, J. E. G.; Putman, M. E.

    2014-07-01

    We present observations of a new group of structures in the diffuse Galactic interstellar medium (ISM): slender, linear H I features we dub "fibers" that extend for many degrees at high Galactic latitude. To characterize and measure the extent and strength of these fibers, we present the Rolling Hough Transform, a new machine vision method for parameterizing the coherent linearity of structures in the image plane. With this powerful new tool we show that the fibers are oriented along the interstellar magnetic field as probed by starlight polarization. We find that these low column density (NH \\scriptsize{I} ≃ 5 × 1018 cm-2) fiber features are most likely a component of the local cavity wall, about 100 pc away. The H I data we use to demonstrate this alignment at high latitude are from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array H I (GALFA-H I) Survey and the Parkes Galactic All Sky Survey. We find better alignment in the higher resolution GALFA-H I data, where the fibers are more visually evident. This trend continues in our investigation of magnetically aligned linear features in the Riegel-Crutcher H I cold cloud, detected in the Southern Galactic Plane Survey. We propose an application of the RHT for estimating the field strength in such a cloud, based on the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. We conclude that data-driven, quantitative studies of ISM morphology can be very powerful predictors of underlying physical quantities.

  3. Magnetically aligned H I fibers and the rolling hough transform

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S. E.; Putman, M. E.; Peek, J. E. G.

    2014-07-01

    We present observations of a new group of structures in the diffuse Galactic interstellar medium (ISM): slender, linear H I features we dub 'fibers' that extend for many degrees at high Galactic latitude. To characterize and measure the extent and strength of these fibers, we present the Rolling Hough Transform, a new machine vision method for parameterizing the coherent linearity of structures in the image plane. With this powerful new tool we show that the fibers are oriented along the interstellar magnetic field as probed by starlight polarization. We find that these low column density (N{sub H} {sub I}≃5×10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}) fiber features are most likely a component of the local cavity wall, about 100 pc away. The H I data we use to demonstrate this alignment at high latitude are from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array H I (GALFA-H I) Survey and the Parkes Galactic All Sky Survey. We find better alignment in the higher resolution GALFA-H I data, where the fibers are more visually evident. This trend continues in our investigation of magnetically aligned linear features in the Riegel-Crutcher H I cold cloud, detected in the Southern Galactic Plane Survey. We propose an application of the RHT for estimating the field strength in such a cloud, based on the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. We conclude that data-driven, quantitative studies of ISM morphology can be very powerful predictors of underlying physical quantities.

  4. Alignment of the magnetic circuit of the BIPM watt balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielsa, F.; Lu, Y. F.; Lavergne, T.; Kiss, A.; Fang, H.; Stock, M.

    2015-12-01

    The International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) is developing a watt balance for the forthcoming redefinition of the kilogram. An improved version of the apparatus, based on a new closed magnetic circuit is now being assembled. The new apparatus will significantly reduce the type B uncertainty due to misalignment of the magnetic circuit as this work demonstrates. We present two techniques recently developed to accurately align the magnetic field of the circuit perpendicular to the direction defined by the local acceleration of gravity. Uncertainty below 30 μrad was achieved for both techniques which fulfils the requirements for the BIPM watt balance to enable a Planck constant determination at the 1  ×  10-8 level.

  5. Structural anisotropy of magnetically aligned single wall carbon nanotube films

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B. W.; Benes, Z.; Luzzi, D. E.; Fischer, J. E.; Walters, D. A.; Casavant, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-07-31

    Thick films of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes and ropes have been produced by filtration/deposition from suspension in strong magnetic fields. We measured mosaic distributions of rope orientations in the film plane, for samples of different thicknesses. For an {approx}1 {mu}m film the full width at half maximum (FWHM) derived from electron diffraction is 25 degree sign -28 degree sign . The FWHM of a thicker film ({approx}7 {mu}m) measured by x-ray diffraction is slightly broader, 35{+-}3 degree sign . Aligned films are denser than ordinary filter-deposited ones, and much denser than as-grown material. Optimization of the process is expected to yield smaller FWHMs and higher densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  6. SIGNS OF MAGNETIC ACCRETION IN THE X-RAY PULSAR BINARY GX 301-2

    SciTech Connect

    Ikhsanov, Nazar R.; Finger, Mark H.

    2012-07-01

    Observations of the cyclotron resonance scattering feature in the X-ray spectrum of GX 301-2 suggest that the surface field of the neutron star is B{sub CRSF} {approx} 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} G. The same value has been derived in modeling the rapid spin-up episodes in terms of the Keplerian disk accretion scenario. However, the spin-down rate observed during the spin-down trends significantly exceeds the value expected in currently used spin-evolution scenarios. This indicates that either the surface field of the star exceeds 50 B{sub CRSF} or a currently used accretion scenario is incomplete. We show that the above discrepancy can be avoided if the accreting material is magnetized. The magnetic pressure in the accretion flow increases more rapidly than its ram pressure and, under certain conditions, significantly affects the accretion picture. The spin-down torque applied to the neutron star in this case is larger than that evaluated within a non-magnetized accretion scenario. We find that the observed spin evolution of the pulsar can be explained in terms of the magnetically controlled accretion flow scenario provided the surface field of the neutron star is {approx}B{sub CRSF}.

  7. Magnetic field-aligned electric potentials in nonideal plasma flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, K.; Hesse, M.; Birn, J.

    1991-01-01

    The electric field component parallel to the magnetic field arising from plasma flows which violate the frozen-in field condition of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is discussed. The quantity of interest is the potential U = integral E parallel ds where the integral is extended along field lines. It is shown that U can be directly related to magnetic field properties, expressed by Euler potentials, even when time-dependence is included. These results are applicable to earth's magnetosphere, to solar flares, to aligned-rotator models of compact objects, and to galactic rotation. On the basis of order-of-magnitude estimates, these results support the view that parallel electric fields associated with nonideal plasma flows might play an important role in cosmic particle acceleration.

  8. MAGNETARS VERSUS HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD PULSARS: A THEORETICAL INTERPRETATION OF THE APPARENT DICHOTOMY

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, Jose A.; Perna, Rosalba

    2011-11-10

    Highly magnetized neutron stars (NSs) are characterized by a bewildering range of astrophysical manifestations. Here, building on our simulations of the evolution of magnetic stresses in the NS crust and its ensuing fractures, we explore in detail, for the middle-aged and old NSs, the dependence of starquake frequency and energetics on the relative strength of the poloidal (B{sub p}) and toroidal (B{sub tor}) components. We find that, for B{sub p} {approx}> 10{sup 14} G, since a strong crustal toroidal field B{sub tor} {approx} B{sub p} is quickly formed on a Hall timescale, the initial toroidal field needs to be B{sub tor} >> B{sub p} to have a clear influence on the outbursting behavior. For initial fields B{sub p} {approx}< 10{sup 14} G, it is very unlikely that a middle-aged (t {approx} 10{sup 5} years) NS shows any bursting activity. This study allows us to solve the apparent puzzle of how NSs with similar dipolar magnetic fields can behave in a remarkably different way: an outbursting 'magnetar' with a high X-ray luminosity, or a quiet, low-luminosity, 'high-B' radio pulsar. As an example, we consider the specific cases of the magnetar 1E 2259+586 and the radio pulsar PSR J1814-1744, which at present have a similar dipolar field {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G. We determine for each object an initial magnetic field configuration that reproduces the observed timing parameters at their current age. The same two configurations also account for the differences in quiescent X-ray luminosity and for the 'magnetar/outbursting' behavior of 1E 2259+586 but not of PSR J1814-1744. We further use the theoretically predicted surface temperature distribution to compute the light curve for these objects. In the case of 1E 2259+586, for which data are available, our predicted temperature distribution gives rise to a pulse profile whose double-peaked nature and modulation level are consistent with the observations.

  9. ALIGNMENT BETWEEN FLATTENED PROTOSTELLAR INFALL ENVELOPES AND AMBIENT MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles; Davidson, Jacqueline A.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Houde, Martin; Kwon, Woojin; Looney, Leslie W.; Li Zhiyun; Matthews, Brenda; Peng Ruisheng; Vaillancourt, John E.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.

    2013-06-20

    We present 350 {mu}m polarization observations of four low-mass cores containing Class 0 protostars: L483, L1157, L1448-IRS2, and Serp-FIR1. This is the second paper in a larger survey aimed at testing magnetically regulated models for core-collapse. One key prediction of these models is that the mean magnetic field in a core should be aligned with the symmetry axis (minor axis) of the flattened young stellar object inner envelope (aka pseudodisk). Furthermore, the field should exhibit a pinched or hourglass-shaped morphology as gravity drags the field inward toward the central protostar. We combine our results for the four cores with results for three similar cores that were published in the first paper from our survey. An analysis of the 350 {mu}m polarization data for the seven cores yields evidence of a positive correlation between mean field direction and pseudodisk symmetry axis. Our rough estimate for the probability of obtaining by pure chance a correlation as strong as the one we found is about 5%. In addition, we combine together data for multiple cores to create a source-averaged magnetic field map having improved signal-to-noise ratio, and this map shows good agreement between mean field direction and pseudodisk axis (they are within 15 Degree-Sign ). We also see hints of a magnetic pinch in the source-averaged map. We conclude that core-scale magnetic fields appear to be strong enough to guide gas infall, as predicted by the magnetically regulated models. Finally, we find evidence of a positive correlation between core magnetic field direction and bipolar outflow axis.

  10. IS CALVERA A GAMMA-RAY PULSAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.

    2011-07-20

    Originally selected as a neutron star (NS) candidate in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, 1RXS J141256.0+792204 ('Calvera') was discovered to be a 59 ms X-ray pulsar in a pair of XMM-Newton observations by Zane et al. Surprisingly, their claimed detection of this pulsar in Fermi {gamma}-ray data requires no period derivative, severely restricting its dipole magnetic field strength, spin-down luminosity, and distance to small values. This implies that the cooling age of Calvera is much younger than its characteristic spin-down age. If so, it could be a mildly recycled pulsar, or the first 'orphaned' central compact object (CCO). Here we show that the published Fermi ephemeris fails to align the pulse phases of the two X-ray observations with each other, which indicates that the Fermi detection is almost certainly spurious. Analysis of additional Fermi data also does not confirm the {gamma}-ray detection. This leaves the spin-down rate of Calvera less constrained, and its place among the families of NSs uncertain. It could still be either an ordinary pulsar, a mildly recycled pulsar, or an orphaned CCO.

  11. Pair production and annihilation in strong magnetic fields. [of neutron stars and pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena occurring in the presence of strong magnetic fields are currently of great interest in high-energy astrophysics. In particular, the process of pair production by single photons in the presence of fields of order 10 to the 12th power Gauss is of importance in cascade models of pulsar gamma ray emission, and may also become significant in theories of other radiation phenomena whose sources may be neutron stars (e.g., gamma ray bursts). In addition to pair production, the inverse process of pair annihilation is greatly affected by the presence of superstrong magnetic fields. The most significant departures from annihilation processes in free space are a reduction in the total rate for annihilation into two photons, a broadening of the familiar 511-keV line for annihilation at rest, and the possibility for annihilation into a single photon which dominates the two-photon annihilation for B (10 to 13th power Gauss) The physics of these pair conversion processes, which is reviewed briefly, can become quite complex in the teragauss regime, and can involve calculations which are technically difficult to incorporate into models of emission mechanisms in neutron star magnetospheres. However, theoretical work, especially the case of pair annihilation, also suggests potential techniques for more direct measurements of field strengths near the stellar surface.

  12. Investigation of the Possibility of Using Nuclear Magnetic Spin Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, William V., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the program to investigate a "Gasdynamic fusion propulsion system for space exploration" is to develop a fusion propulsion system for a manned mission to the planet mars. A study using Deuterium and Tritium atoms are currently in progress. When these atoms under-go fusion, the resulting neutrons and alpha particles are emitted in random directions (isotropically). The probable direction of emission is equal for all directions, thus resulting in wasted energy, massive shielding and cooling requirements, and serious problems with the physics of achieving fusion. If the nuclear magnetic spin moments of the deuterium and tritium nuclei could be precisely aligned at the moment of fusion, the stream of emitted neutrons could be directed out the rear of the spacecraft for thrust and the alpha particles directed forward into an electromagnet ot produce electricity to continue operating the fusion engine. The following supporting topics are discussed: nuclear magnetic moments and spin precession in magnetic field, nuclear spin quantum mechanics, kinematics of nuclear reactions, and angular distribution of particles.

  13. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  14. Chandra Detection of the High Magnetic Field Radio Pulsar J1119-6127in the Supernova Remnant G292.2-0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Marjorie; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2003-07-01

    We report the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer detection of the X-ray counterpart of the high magnetic field, ~1600 yr old, 407 ms radio pulsar J1119-6127 associated with the supernova remnant G292.2-0.5. The powerful imaging capability of Chandra also unveiled, for the first time, a faint 3''×6'' pulsar wind nebula (PWN) at energies above ~1.2 keV. The X-ray emission from the pulsar and its associated nebula is well described by an absorbed power law model with a photon index Γ=2.2+0.6-0.3. The corresponding 0.5-10 keV unabsorbed X-ray luminosity is (5.5+10-3.3)×1032 ergs s-1 (at 6 kpc). When compared to two other pulsars with similar spin and magnetic properties, J1119-6127 stands out as being the least efficient at turning rotational kinetic energy into X-ray emission. This study shows that high magnetic field radio pulsars can be significant X-ray emitters, and Chandra is needed to study the emission properties of the pulsars and associated faint PWNs.

  15. THE LIGHT CURVE AND INTERNAL MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE MODE-SWITCHING PULSAR PSR B0943+10

    SciTech Connect

    Storch, Natalia I.; Lai, Dong; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Bogdanov, Slavko; Heinke, Craig O.

    2014-07-10

    A number of radio pulsars exhibit intriguing mode-switching behavior. Recent observations of PSR B0943+10 revealed correlated radio and X-ray mode switches, providing a new avenue for understanding this class of objects. The large X-ray pulse fraction observed during the radio-quiet phase (Q-mode) was previously interpreted as a result of changing obscuration of X-rays by dense magnetosphere plasma. We show that the large X-ray pulse fraction can be explained by including the beaming effect of a magnetic atmosphere, while remaining consistent with the dipole field geometry constrained by radio observations. We also explore a more extreme magnetic field configuration, where a magnetic dipole displaced from the center of the star produces two magnetic polar caps of different sizes and magnetic field strengths. These models are currently consistent with data in radio and X-rays and can be tested or constrained by future X-ray observations.

  16. EMISSION PATTERNS AND LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA RAYS IN THE PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE WITH A CURRENT-INDUCED MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, L.

    2011-12-20

    We study the emission patterns and light curves of gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere with a current-induced magnetic field perturbation. Based on the solution of a static dipole with the magnetic field induced by some currents (perturbation field), we derive the solutions of a static as well as a retarded dipole with the perturbation field in the Cartesian coordinates. The static (retarded) magnetic field can be expressed as the sum of the pure static (retarded) dipolar magnetic field and the static (retarded) perturbation field. We use the solution of the retarded magnetic field to investigate the influence of the perturbation field on the emission patterns and light curves, and apply the perturbed solutions to calculate the gamma-ray light curves for the case of the Vela pulsar. We find that the perturbation field induced by the currents will change the emission patterns and then the light curves of gamma rays, especially for a larger perturbation field. Our results indicate that the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) electrons (positrons) can decrease the rotation effect on the magnetosphere and makes emission pattern appear to be smoother relative to that of the pure retarded dipole, but the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) positrons (electrons) can make the emission pattern less smooth.

  17. ON THE GLOBAL STRUCTURE OF PULSAR FORCE-FREE MAGNETOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, S. A.

    2013-02-20

    The dipolar magnetic field structure of a neutron star is modified by the plasma originating in the pulsar magnetosphere. In the simplest case of a stationary axisymmetric force-free magnetosphere, a self-consistent description of the fields and currents is given by the well-known pulsar equation. Here we revise the commonly used boundary conditions of the problem in order to incorporate the plasma-producing gaps and to provide a framework for a truly self-consistent treatment of the pulsar magnetosphere. A generalized multipolar solution of the pulsar equation is found, which, as compared to the customary split monopole solution, is suggested to better represent the character of the dipolar force-free field at large distances. In particular, the outer gap location entirely inside the light cylinder implies that beyond the light cylinder the null and critical lines should be aligned and become parallel to the equator at a certain altitude. Our scheme of the pulsar force-free magnetosphere, which will hopefully be followed by extensive analytic and numerical studies, may have numerous implications for different fields of pulsar research.

  18. Unusual Pulsed X-Ray Emission from the Young, High Magnetic Field Pulsar PSR J1119--6127

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M E; Kaspi, V M; Camilo, F; Gaensler, B M; Pivovaroff, M J

    2005-08-05

    We present XMM-Newton observations of the radio pulsar PSR J1119-6127, which has an inferred age of 1,700 yr and surface dipole magnetic field strength of 4.1 x 10{sup 13} G. We report the first detection of pulsed X-ray emission from PSR J1119-6127. In the 0.5-2.0 keV range, the pulse profile shows a narrow peak with a very high pulsed fraction of (74 {+-} 14)%. In the 2.0-10.0 keV range, the upper limit for the pulsed fraction is 28% (99% confidence). The pulsed emission is well described by a thermal blackbody model with a temperature of T{infinity} = 2.4{sub -0.2}{sup +0.3} x 10{sup 6} K and emitting radius of 3.4{sub -0.3}{sup +1.8} km (at a distance of 8.4 kpc). Atmospheric models result in problematic estimates for the distance/emitting area. PSR J1119-6127 is now the radio pulsar with smallest characteristic age from which thermal X-ray emission has been detected. The combined temporal and spectral characteristics of this emission are unlike those of other radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies and challenge current models of thermal emission from neutron stars.

  19. Equilibrium spin pulsars unite neutron star populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wynn; Klus, Helen; Coe, Malcolm; Andersson, Nils

    2015-08-01

    We compare the large number of recent torque measurements of accreting pulsars with a high-mass companion to the standard model for how accretion affects the pulsar spin period. We find that many long spin period (P > 100 s) pulsars must possess either extremely weak (B < 10^10 G) or extremely strong (B > 10^14 G) magnetic fields. We argue that the strong-field solution is more compelling, in which case these pulsars are near spin equilibrium. Our results provide evidence for a fundamental link between pulsars with the slowest spin periods and strong magnetic fields around high-mass companions and pulsars with the fastest spin periods and weak fields around low-mass companions. The strong magnetic fields also connect our pulsars to magnetars and strong-field isolated radio/X-ray pulsars. The strong field and old age of our sources suggests their magnetic field penetrates into the superconducting core of the neutron star.

  20. An X-ray Pulsar with a Superstrong Magnetic Field in the Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater SGR1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Dieters, S.; Strohmayer, T.; vanParadijs, J.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Hurley, K.; Kommers, J.; Smith, I.; Frail, D.; Murakami, T.

    1998-01-01

    Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) emit multiple, brief (approximately O.1 s) intense outbursts of low-energy gamma-rays. They are extremely rare; three are known in our galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Two SGRs are associated with young supernova remnants (SNRs), and therefore most probably with neutron stars, but it remains a puzzle why SGRs are so different from 'normal' radio pulsars. Here we report the discovery of pulsations in the persistent X-ray flux of SGR1806-20, with a period of 7.47 s and a spindown rate of 2.6 x 10(exp -3) s/yr. We argue that the spindown is due to magnetic dipole emission and find that the pulsar age and (dipolar) magnetic field strength are approximately 1500 years and 8 x 10(exp 14) gauss, respectively. Our observations demonstrate the existence of 'magnetars', neutron stars with magnetic fields about 100 times stronger than those of radio pulsars, and support earlier suggestions that SGR bursts are caused by neutron-star 'crust-quakes' produced by magnetic stresses. The 'magnetar' birth rate is about one per millenium, a substantial fraction of that of radio pulsars. Thus our results may explain why some SNRs have no radio pulsars.

  1. Radio efficiency of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ren-Xin E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-03-20

    We investigate radio emission efficiency, ξ, of pulsars and report a near-linear inverse correlation between ξ and the spin-down power, E-dot , as well as a near-linear correlation between ξ and pulsar age, τ. This is a consequence of very weak, if any, dependences of radio luminosity, L, on pulsar period, P, and the period derivative, P-dot , in contrast to X-ray or γ-ray emission luminosities. The analysis of radio fluxes suggests that these correlations are not due to a selection effect, but are intrinsic to the pulsar radio emission physics. We have found that, although with a large variance, the radio luminosity of pulsars is ≈10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1}, regardless of the position in the P-- P-dot diagram. Within such a picture, a model-independent statement can be made that the death line of radio pulsars corresponds to an upper limit in the efficiency of radio emission. If we introduce the maximum value for radio efficiency into the Monte Carlo-based population syntheses we can reproduce the observed sample using the random luminosity model. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on a synthetic flux distribution reveals a high probability of reproducing the observed distribution. Our results suggest that the plasma responsible for generating radio emission is produced under similar conditions regardless of pulsar age, dipolar magnetic field strength, and spin-down rate. The magnetic fields near the pulsar surface are likely dominated by crust-anchored, magnetic anomalies, which do not significantly differ among pulsars, leading to similar conditions for generating electron-positron pairs necessary to power radio emission.

  2. Cooperative Ordering and Kinetics of Cellulose Nanocrystal Alignment in a Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    De France, Kevin J; Yager, Kevin G; Hoare, Todd; Cranston, Emily D

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are emerging nanomaterials that form chiral nematic liquid crystals above a critical concentration (C*) and additionally orient within electromagnetic fields. The control over CNC alignment is significant for materials processing and end use; to date, magnetic alignment has been demonstrated using only strong fields over extended or arbitrary time scales. This work investigates the effects of comparatively weak magnetic fields (0-1.2 T) and CNC concentration (1.65-8.25 wt %) on the kinetics and degree of CNC ordering using small-angle X-ray scattering. Interparticle spacing, correlation length, and orientation order parameters (η and S) increased with time and field strength following a sigmoidal profile. In a 1.2 T magnetic field for CNC suspensions above C*, partial alignment occurred in under 2 min followed by slower cooperative ordering to achieve nearly perfect alignment in under 200 min (S = -0.499 where S = -0.5 indicates perfect antialignment). At 0.56 T, nearly perfect alignment was also achieved, yet the ordering was 36% slower. Outside of a magnetic field, the order parameter plateaued at 52% alignment (S = -0.26) after 5 h, showcasing the drastic effects of relatively weak magnetic fields on CNC alignment. For suspensions below C*, no magnetic alignment was detected. PMID:27407001

  3. Stellar evolution and pulsars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y.

    1972-01-01

    It has been found that pulsars are rotating magnetic neutron stars, which are created during catastrophic collapses of old stars whose nuclear fuel has long since been used up. The maximum size of pulsars, based on the fastest rotation period of 33 msec, cannot exceed 100 km. The densest star the theory predicts is the neutron star. Its diameter is only 10 km. The processes producing radiation from pulsars are discussed, giving attention to a process similar to that by which a klystron operates and to a process based on a maser mechanism.

  4. Magnetars and white dwarf pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, Manuel; Coelho, Jaziel G.

    2016-07-01

    The anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are a class of pulsars understood as neutron stars (NSs) with super strong surface magnetic fields, namely B ≳ 1014G, and for that reason are known as magnetars. However, in the last years, some SGRs/AXPs with low surface magnetic fields B ˜ (1012-1013)G have been detected, challenging the magnetar description. Moreover, some fast and very magnetic white dwarfs (WDs) have also been observed, and at least one showed X-ray energy emission as an ordinary pulsar. Following this fact, an alternative model based on WDs pulsars has been proposed to explain this special class of pulsars. In this model, AXPs and SGRs as dense and magnetized WDs can have surface magnetic field B ˜ 107-1010 G and rotate very fast with frequencies Ω ˜ 1rad/s, consistent with the observed rotation periods P ˜ (2-12)s.

  5. Leveraging intrinsic chain anisotropy to align coil-coil block copolymers with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Zhang, Kai; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Larson, Steve; Majewski, Pawel; Yager, Kevin; Gopalan, Padma; O'Hern, Corey; Osuji, Chinedum

    Magnetic field alignment of block copolymers (BCPs) has typically relied on the presence of liquid crystalline or crystalline assemblies to provide sufficient magnetic anisotropy to drive alignment. Recent experiments however show that alignment is also possible in simple coil-coil BCPs. In particular, alignment of lamellae was observed in poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) (PS-P4VP) on cooling across the order-disorder transition at field strengths as low as 1 T, with alignment improving markedly with increasing field strength and decreasing cooling rate. Here we discuss the intrinsic chain anisotropy which drives the observed alignment, and its display as a net microdomain anisotropy due to chain tethering at the block interface. We use in-situ X-ray scattering to study the phase behavior and temperature-, time-, and field- dependent dynamics of magnetic alignment in coil-coil BCPs, highlighting the important roles of chain anisotropy and grain size in alignment. For the right combination of field strength and grain size, we can leverage intrinsic chain anisotropy to magnetically direct self-assembly in other coil-coil systems, including cylinder-forming poly(styrene-b-dimethylsiloxane). Field alignment of PS-P4VP with PEO and other blends provides a route to form functional materials such as nanoporous films and ion conducting polymers.

  6. Rotational Sweepback of Magnetic Field Lines in Geometrical Models of Pulsar Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyks, J.; Harding, Alice K.

    2004-01-01

    We study the rotational distortions of the vacuum dipole magnetic field in the context of geometrical models of the radio emission from pulsars. We find that at low altitudes the rotation deflects the local direction of the magnetic field by at most an angle of the order of r(sup 2 sub n), where r(sub n) = r/R(sub lc), r is the radial distance and R(sub lc) is the light cylinder radius. To the lowest (i.e. second) order in r(sub n) this distortion is symmetrical with respect to the plane containing the dipole axis and the rotation axis ((Omega, mu) plane). The lowest order distortion which is asymmetrical with respect to the (Omega, mu) plane is third order in r(sub n). These results confirm the common assumption that the rotational sweepback has negligible effect on the position angle (PA) curve. We show, however, that the influence of the sweep back on the outer boundary of the open field line region (open volume) is a much larger effect, of the order of r(sup 1/2 sub n). The open volume is shifted backwards with respect to the rotation direction by an angle delta(sub o nu) approx. 0.2 sin alpha r(sup 1/2 sub n) where alpha is the dipole inclination with respect to the rotation axis. The associated phase shift of the pulse profile Delta phi(sub o nu) approx. 0.2 r(sup 1/2 sub n) can easily exceed the shift due to combined effects of aberration and propagation time delays (approx. 2r(sub n)). This strongly affects the misalignment of the center of the PA curve and the center of the pulse profile, thereby modifying the delay radius relation. Contrary to intuition, the effect of sweepback dominates over other effects when emission occurs at low altitudes. For r(sub n) < or approx. 3 x 10(exp -3) the shift becomes negative, i.e. the center of the position angle curve precedes the profile center. With the sweepback effect included, the modified delay-radius relation predicts larger emission radii and is in much better agreement with the other methods of determining r

  7. Alignment of iron nanoparticles in a magnetic field due to shape anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Nicholson, D. M.; Eisenbach, M.; Parish, C.; Ludtka, G. M.; Rios, O.

    2015-11-01

    During high magnetic field solidification processing there is evidence for the alignment of nanoscale metallic particles with elongated morphologies that nucleate from a liquid metal. Such alignment occurs well above the Curie temperature of the particle where the magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy and exchange energy contributions are negligible. The main driving force for alignment is the magnetic shape anisotropy. Current understanding of the phenomenon is not adequate to quantify the effect of particle size, aspect ratio, temperature and the magnetic field on particle alignment. We demonstrate a Monte Carlo approach coupled with a scaling law for the dipole-dipole interaction energy as a function of the particle size to identify the conditions under which such alignment is possible.

  8. Pulsar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Pulsars are thought to emit relatively narrow radio beams, shown as green in this animation. If these beams don't sweep toward Earth, astronomers cannot detect the radio signals. Pulsar gamma-ray e...

  9. Preliminary studies on a magneto-optical procedure for aligning RHIC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.A.; Sikora, R.E.; Shea, T.J.

    1993-06-01

    Colloid dispersions of magnetite were used at SLAC and KEK to locate multipole magnet centers. We study the possible adaption of this method, to align RHIC magnets. A procedure for locating magnetic centers with respect to external fiducial markers, using electronic coordinate determination and digital TV image processing is described.

  10. Pulsar braking: magnetodipole vs. wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are good clocks in the universe. One fundamental question is that why they are good clocks? This is related to the braking mechanism of pulsars. Nowadays pulsar timing is done with unprecedented accuracy. More pulsars have braking indices measured. The period derivative of intermittent pulsars and magnetars can vary by a factor of several. However, during pulsar studies, the magnetic dipole braking in vacuum is still often assumed. It is shown that the fundamental assumption of magnetic dipole braking (vacuum condition) does not exist and it is not consistent with the observations. The physical torque must consider the presence of the pulsar magnetosphere. Among various efforts, the wind braking model can explain many observations of pulsars and magnetars in a unified way. It is also consistent with the up-to-date observations. It is time for a paradigm shift in pulsar studies: from magnetic dipole braking to wind braking. As one alternative to the magnetospheric model, the fallback disk model is also discussed.

  11. DEEP X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD RADIO PULSAR J1119-6127 AND SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.2-0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ho, W. C. G.; Weltevrede, P.; Bogdanov, S.; Shannon, R.; Gonzalez, M. E.

    2012-12-10

    High-magnetic-field radio pulsars are important transition objects for understanding the connection between magnetars and conventional radio pulsars. We present a detailed study of the young radio pulsar J1119-6127, which has a characteristic age of 1900 yr and a spin-down-inferred magnetic field of 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, and its associated supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, using deep XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures of over 120 ks from each telescope. The pulsar emission shows strong modulation below 2.5 keV with a single-peaked profile and a large pulsed fraction of 0.48 {+-} 0.12. Employing a magnetic, partially ionized hydrogen atmosphere model, we find that the observed pulse profile can be produced by a single hot spot of temperature 0.13 keV covering about one-third of the stellar surface, and we place an upper limit of 0.08 keV for an antipodal hot spot with the same area. The non-uniform surface temperature distribution could be the result of anisotropic heat conduction under a strong magnetic field, and a single-peaked profile seems common among high-B radio pulsars. For the associated remnant G292.2-0.5, its large diameter could be attributed to fast expansion in a low-density wind cavity, likely formed by a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, similar to two other high-B radio pulsars.

  12. Mechanical alignment of particles for use in fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Nellis, William J.; Maple, M. Brian

    1992-01-01

    A method for mechanically aligning oriented superconducting or permanently magnetic materials for further processing into constructs. This pretreatment optimizes the final crystallographic orientation and, thus, properties in these constructs. Such materials as superconducting fibers, needles and platelets are utilized.

  13. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields disrupt magnetic alignment of ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Burda, Hynek; Begall, Sabine; Červený, Jaroslav; Neef, Julia; Němec, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Resting and grazing cattle and deer tend to align their body axes in the geomagnetic North-South direction. The mechanism(s) that underlie this behavior remain unknown. Here, we show that extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELFMFs) generated by high-voltage power lines disrupt alignment of the bodies of these animals with the geomagnetic field. Body orientation of cattle and roe deer was random on pastures under or near power lines. Moreover, cattle exposed to various magnetic fields directly beneath or in the vicinity of power lines trending in various magnetic directions exhibited distinct patterns of alignment. The disturbing effect of the ELFMFs on body alignment diminished with the distance from conductors. These findings constitute evidence for magnetic sensation in large mammals as well as evidence of an overt behavioral reaction to weak ELFMFs in vertebrates. The demonstrated reaction to weak ELFMFs implies effects at the cellular and molecular levels. PMID:19299504

  14. Pulsed taut-wire measurement of the magnetic alignment of the ITS induction cells

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, J.G.; Burns, M.J.; Honaberger, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    The mechanical and magnetic alignment of the first eight induction-cell, solenoid magnets of the Integrated Test Stand (ITS) for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility were measured by observing the deflection of a fine, taut wire carrying a pulsed current. To achieve the required alignment (less than 0.25 mm offset and less than 5 mrad tilt), the magnet design uses quadrufilar windings and iron field-smoothing rings. After detailed measurements of each solenoid magnet, the cells are assembled and then mechanically aligned using a laser and an alignment target moved along the cell centerline. After the cells are in final position, the pulsed wire method is used to verify the magnetic alignment. The measurements show an average offset of the magnetic axes from the mechanical axis of 0. 15 mm, with a maximum offset of 0.3 mm. The average tilt of the magnetic axis was 0.7 mrad with a maximum tilt of 1.4 mrad. Tilts are corrected to less than 0.3 mrad, using dipole trim magnets assembled into each cell. Correction is limited noise.

  15. The Pulsating Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, K. H.

    2015-06-01

    Following the basic principles of a charge-separated pulsar magnetosphere, we consider the magnetosphere to be stationary in space, instead of corotating, and the electric field to be uploaded from the potential distribution on the pulsar surface, set up by the unipolar induction. Consequently, the plasma of the magnetosphere undergoes guiding center drifts of the gyromotion due to the forces transverse to the magnetic field. These forces are the electric force, magnetic gradient force, and field line curvature force. Since these plasma velocities are of drift nature, there is no need to introduce an emf along the field lines, which would contradict the {{E}\\parallel }={\\boldsymbol{E}} \\cdot {\\boldsymbol{B}} =0 plasma condition. Furthermore, there is also no need to introduce the critical field line separating the electron and ion open field lines. We present a self-consistent description where the magnetosphere is described in terms of electric and magnetic fields and also in terms of plasma velocities. The fields and velocities are then connected through the space-charge densities self-consistently. We solve the pulsar equation analytically for the fields and construct the standard steady-state pulsar magnetosphere. By considering the unipolar induction inside the pulsar and the magnetosphere outside the pulsar as one coupled system, and under the condition that the unipolar pumping rate exceeds the Poynting flux in the open field lines, plasma pressure can build up in the magnetosphere, in particular, in the closed region. This could cause a periodic opening up of the closed region, leading to a pulsating magnetosphere, which could be an alternative to pulsar beacons. The closed region can also be opened periodically by the build up of toroidal magnetic field through a positive feedback cycle.

  16. Distance Indicators of Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Distance measurements of gamma-ray pulsars are challenging questions in present pulsar studies. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi gamma-ray observatory discovered more than 100 gamma-ray pulsars including 24 new gamma-selected pulsars which nearly have no distance information. We study the relation between gamma-ray emission efficiency (η = Lγ/Ė) and pulsar parameters for young radio-selected gamma-ray pulsars with known distance information in the first gamma-ray pulsar catalog reported by Fermi/LAT. We have introduced three generation order parameters to describe gamma-ray emission properties of pulsars, and find the strong correlation of η - ζ3 a generation order parameter which reflects γ-ray photon generations in pair cascade processes induced by magnetic field absorption in pulsar magnetosphere. A good correlation of η - BLC the magnetic field at the light cylinder radius is also found. These correlations would be the distance indicators in gamma-ray pulsars to evaluate distances for gamma-selected pulsars. Distances of 25 gamma-selected pulsars are estimated, which could be tested by other distance measurement methods. Physical origin of the correlations may be also interesting for pulsar studies.

  17. PREDICTING RANGES FOR PULSARS' BRAKING INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Magalhaes, Nadja S.; Miranda, Thaysa A.; Frajuca, Carlos

    2012-08-10

    The theoretical determination of braking indices of pulsars is still an open problem. In this paper we report results of a study concerning such determination based on a modification of the canonical model, which admits that pulsars are rotating magnetic dipoles, and on data from the seven pulsars with known braking indices. In order to test the modified model, we predict ranges for the braking indices of other pulsars.

  18. Equilibrium spin pulsars unite neutron star populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wynn C. G.; Klus, H.; Coe, M. J.; Andersson, Nils

    2014-02-01

    Many pulsars are formed with a binary companion from which they can accrete matter. Torque exerted by accreting matter can cause the pulsar spin to increase or decrease, and over long times, an equilibrium spin rate is achieved. Application of accretion theory to these systems provides a probe of the pulsar magnetic field. We compare the large number of recent torque measurements of accreting pulsars with a high-mass companion to the standard model for how accretion affects the pulsar spin period. We find that many long spin period (P ≳ 100 s) pulsars must possess either extremely weak (B < 1010 G) or extremely strong (B > 1014 G) magnetic fields. We argue that the strong-field solution is more compelling, in which case these pulsars are near spin equilibrium. Our results provide evidence for a fundamental link between pulsars with the slowest spin periods and strong magnetic fields around high-mass companions and pulsars with the fastest spin periods and weak fields around low-mass companions. The strong magnetic fields also connect our pulsars to magnetars and strong-field isolated radio/X-ray pulsars. The strong field and old age of our sources suggest their magnetic field penetrates into the superconducting core of the neutron star.

  19. Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    's clearly fading as it ages, it is still more than holding its own with the younger generations." It's likely that two forms of X-ray emission are produced in J0108: emission from particles spiraling around magnetic fields, and emission from heated areas around the neutron star's magnetic poles. Measuring the temperature and size of these heated regions can provide valuable insight into the extraordinary properties of the neutron star surface and the process by which charged particles are accelerated by the pulsar. The younger, bright pulsars commonly detected by radio and X-ray telescopes are not representative of the full population of objects, so observing objects like J0108 helps astronomers see a more complete range of behavior. At its advanced age, J0108 is close to the so-called "pulsar death line," where its pulsed radiation is expected to switch off and it will become much harder, if not impossible, to observe. "We can now explore the properties of this pulsar in a regime where no other pulsar has been detected outside the radio range," said co-author Oleg Kargaltsev of the University of Florida. "To understand the properties of 'dying pulsars,' it is important to study their radiation in X-rays. Our finding that a very old pulsar can be such an efficient X-ray emitter gives us hope to discover new nearby pulsars of this class via their X-ray emission." The Chandra observations were reported by Pavlov and colleagues in the January 20, 2009, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. However, the extreme nature of J0108 was not fully apparent until a new distance to it was reported on February 6 in the PhD thesis of Adam Deller from Swinburne University in Australia. The new distance is both larger and more accurate than the distance used in the Chandra paper, showing that J0108 was brighter in X-rays than previously thought. "Suddenly this pulsar became the record holder for its ability to make X-rays," said Pavlov, "and our result became even more interesting without us

  20. On the alignment of plasma anisotropies and the magnetic field direction in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    One year's Imp 6 solar wind plasma and magnetic field data are examined to determine whether anisotropies in particle velocity distributions are aligned with the measured interplanetary magnetic field vector. Alignment of components in the analysis plane was generally found to be excellent whenever plasma parameter magnitudes were larger than determination uncertainties, although some spread exists (typical rms approximately equal to 10 deg). By assuming cylindrical symmetry about the simultaneously measured magnetic field vector during the 1-year interval under study, three-dimensional values of selected solar wind plasma thermal parameters were constructed from the two-dimensional plasma measurements, and the statistical properties of their distributions have been tabulated.

  1. Optical Polarization From Aligned Atoms As A Diagnostic Of Interstellar And Circumstellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Lazarian, A.

    2005-12-01

    Population among sublevels of the ground state of an atom is affected by radiative transitions induced by anisotropic radiation flux. Such aligned atoms precess in the external magnetic field and this affects properties of polarized radiation arising from both scattering and absorption by atoms. As the result the degree of light polarization depends on the direction of the magnetic field. This provides a perspective tool for studies of astrophysical magnetic fields using optical and UV polarimetry. We discuss the process of alignment that can be used to study magnetic fields in interplanetary medium, interstellar medium, circumstellar regions and quasars. To exemplify what atomic alignment can provide to the observers we consider synthetic data obtained with MHD simulations of comet wake.

  2. Modeling of Gamma-ray Pulsar Light Curves Using the Force-free Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2010-06-01

    Gamma-ray emission from pulsars has long been modeled using a vacuum dipole field. This approximation ignores changes in the field structure caused by the magnetospheric plasma and strong plasma currents. We present the first results of gamma-ray pulsar light-curve modeling using the more realistic field taken from three-dimensional force-free (FF) magnetospheric simulations. Having the geometry of the field, we apply several prescriptions for the location of the emission zone, comparing the light curves to observations. We find that when the emission region is chosen according to the conventional slot-gap (or two-pole caustic) prescription, the model fails to produce double-peak pulse profiles, mainly because the size of the polar cap in the FF magnetosphere is larger than the vacuum field polar cap. This suppresses caustic formation in the inner magnetosphere. The conventional outer-gap model is capable of producing only one peak under general conditions because a large fraction of open field lines does not cross the null charge surface. We propose a novel "separatrix layer" model, where the high-energy emission originates from a thin layer on the open field lines just inside of the separatrix that bounds the open flux tube. The emission from this layer generates two strong caustics on the sky map due to the effect we term "Sky Map Stagnation" (SMS). It is related to the fact that the FF field asymptotically approaches the field of a rotating split monopole, and the photons emitted on such field lines in the outer magnetosphere arrive to the observer in phase. The double-peak light curve is a natural consequence of SMS. We show that most features of the currently available gamma-ray pulsar light curves can be reasonably well reproduced and explained with the separatrix layer model using the FF field. Association of the emission region with the current sheet will guide more detailed future studies of the magnetospheric acceleration physics.

  3. The enigma of the magnetic pulsar SXP1062: a new look with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, Lidia

    2012-10-01

    SXP 1062 is an exceptional case of a young neutron star with known age in a wind-fed HMXB. A unique combination of measured spin period, its derivative, luminosity and young age makes this source a key probe for the physics of accretion and neutron star evolution. All current accretion scenarios encounter major difficulties explaining the spin-down rate of this accretion-powered pulsar. This study will allow us to construct a spin period-luminosity relation as a powerful tool for distinguishing between different accretion and evolution scenarios. The XMM-Newton observations of SXP 1062 will thus shed new light on the physics of accreting neutron stars.

  4. Liquid crystal surface alignments by using ion beam sputtered magnetic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.-Y.; Pan, R.-P.

    2007-08-13

    A method for liquid crystal surface alignment by using a one-step, ion beam bombardment of the glass substrates is demonstrated. Precoating by polyimide is not necessary. The authors show that the homeotropic alignment is achieved due to orientation of the diamagnetic nematogenic molecules by the magnetic field from the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} ferrimagnetic thin films created on the substrates by ion beam bombardment. The film exhibits a high Curie temperature well above 300 K and a compensation temperature which is the typical feature of ferrimagnetism. This is a simple, noncontact, and reliable alignment method for liquid crystal devices.

  5. Inertial spin alignment in a circular magnetic nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Gerd; Thompson, Richard S.; Lu, Jia G.

    2015-09-01

    In cobalt nanotubes with a curling magnetization, the orbital motion of the conduction electrons interacts with their spin. As the spin goes around the nanotube it cannot follow the magnetization, since with the Fermi velocity it moves too fast. Instead, we predict that the spin precesses about an axis that is almost parallel to the axis of the nanotube and that rotates with the angular velocity of the electron. Therefore, the (absolute) value of the magnetic energy of the spin | μ ṡ B | is strongly reduced. The physics of the ferromagnet is considerably modified.

  6. ALIGNMENT OF THE SCALAR GRADIENT IN EVOLVING MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sur, Sharanya; Scannapieco, Evan; Pan, Liubin E-mail: evan.scannapieco@asu.edu

    2014-07-20

    We conduct simulations of turbulent mixing in the presence of a magnetic field, grown by the small-scale dynamo. We show that the scalar gradient field, ∇C, which must be large for diffusion to operate, is strongly biased perpendicular to the magnetic field, B. This is true both early on, when the magnetic field is negligible, and at late times, when the field is strong enough to back react on the flow. This occurs because ∇C increases within the plane of a compressive motion, but B increases perpendicular to it. At late times, the magnetic field resists compression, making it harder for scalar gradients to grow and likely slowing mixing.

  7. Draping of strongly flow-aligned interplanetary magnetic field about the magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrinec, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    Many dynamic processes of the magnetosphere are directly driven by the solar wind and the occurrence of magnetic merging at the magnetopause. The location of magnetopause magnetic merging, or reconnection, is now fairly well understood when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) contains large By and Bz components in relation to the Bx component (in Geocentric Solar Magnetospheric (GSM) coordinates). However, when the IMF contains a large X-component (i.e., is closely flow-aligned), it is not yet well understood how the shocked IMF drapes about the magnetopause, and how this affects the occurrence and location of magnetic merging. In this initial study, we examine from observations how a nearly flow-aligned IMF drapes about the magnetopause. The results of this study are expected to be useful for comparisons with both analytic and global numerical models of the magnetosheath magnetic field.

  8. Alignment of high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectra using warping methods.

    PubMed

    Giskeødegård, Guro F; Bloemberg, Tom G; Postma, Geert; Sitter, Beathe; Tessem, May-Britt; Gribbestad, Ingrid S; Bathen, Tone F; Buydens, Lutgarde M C

    2010-12-17

    The peaks of magnetic resonance (MR) spectra can be shifted due to variations in physiological and experimental conditions, and correcting for misaligned peaks is an important part of data processing prior to multivariate analysis. In this paper, five warping algorithms (icoshift, COW, fastpa, VPdtw and PTW) are compared for their feasibility in aligning spectral peaks in three sets of high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) MR spectra with different degrees of misalignments, and their merits are discussed. In addition, extraction of information that might be present in the shifts is examined, both for simulated data and the real MR spectra. The generic evaluation methodology employs a number of frequently used quality criteria for evaluation of the alignments, together with PLS-DA to assess the influence of alignment on the classification outcome. Peak alignment greatly improved the internal similarity of the data sets. Especially icoshift and COW seem suitable for aligning HR-MAS MR spectra, possibly because they perform alignment segment-wise. The choice of reference spectrum can influence the alignment result, and it is advisable to test several references. Information from the peak shifts was extracted, and in one case cancer samples were successfully discriminated from normal tissue based on shift information only. Based on these findings, general recommendations for alignment of HR-MAS MRS data are presented. Where possible, observations are generalized to other data types (e.g. chromatographic data). PMID:21094376

  9. ON THE SPIN-DOWN AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE X-RAY PULSAR 1E 1207.4-5209

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V. E-mail: eric@astro.columbia.edu

    2011-06-01

    We analyze all of the archival X-ray timing data from the years 2000-2008 on the weakly magnetized central compact object (CCO) pulsar 1E 1207.4-5209 in an attempt to measure its dipole magnetic field strength via spin-down. because most of these observations were not planned for the purpose of phase-coherent timing, the resulting ephemeris is not unique, but is restricted to two comparably good timing solutions that correspond to B{sub s} = 9.9 x 10{sup 10} G or 2.4 x 10{sup 11} G, respectively, assuming dipole spin-down. One of these should be the correct value and the other one an alias. There are no spinning-up solutions. The smaller value of B{sub s} is close to the surface field of 8 x 10{sup 10} G that is measured independently from the unique absorption lines in the X-ray spectrum of 1E 1207.4-5209, assuming that the lowest-energy line at 0.7 keV is the electron-cyclotron fundamental. We suggest that 1E 1207.4-5209 has the strongest magnetic field among CCOs, which would account for the unique presence of its cyclotron absorption spectrum, while other CCOs likely have even weaker fields for which the cyclotron fundamental falls below the observable soft X-ray band.

  10. Radio Polarization Observations of the Snail: A Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in G327.1–1.1 with a Highly Ordered Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. K.; Ng, C.-Y.; Bucciantini, N.; Slane, P. O.; Gaensler, B. M.; Temim, T.

    2016-04-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are suggested to be acceleration sites of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. While the magnetic field plays an important role in the acceleration process, previous observations of magnetic field configurations of PWNe are rare, particularly for evolved systems. We present a radio polarization study of the “Snail” PWN inside the supernova remnant G327.1‑1.1 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This PWN is believed to have been recently crushed by the supernova (SN) reverse shock. The radio morphology is composed of a main circular body with a finger-like protrusion. We detected a strong linear polarization signal from the emission, which reflects a highly ordered magnetic field in the PWN and is in contrast to the turbulent environment with a tangled magnetic field generally expected from hydrodynamical simulations. This could suggest that the characteristic turbulence scale is larger than the radio beam size. We built a toy model to explore this possibility, and found that a simulated PWN with a turbulence scale of about one-eighth to one-sixth of the nebula radius and a pulsar wind filling factor of 50%–75% provides the best match to observations. This implies substantial mixing between the SN ejecta and pulsar wind material in this system.

  11. Magnetic field-aligned coupling effects on ionospheric plasma structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Vickrey, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical description of the electrical coupling and dynamics of plasma structure in the E and F regions. The scale size dependence of the electric field coupling along the magnetic field is examined for a realistic background ionosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that, while normalized potentials map reciprocally between two altitudes, the potential disturbance caused by a fixed amplitude plasma density perturbation does not. The magnitude of electrostatic potential created by structured ionization is also shown to be strongly dependent on the altitude of the structure. The role of diffusion parallel to the magnetic field in the redistribution and decay of plasma structure is illustrated.

  12. The pulsar spectral index distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, S. D.; Lorimer, D. R.; Verbiest, J. P. W.

    2013-05-01

    The flux-density spectra of radio pulsars are known to be steep and, to first order, described by a power-law relationship of the form Sν ∝ να, where Sν is the flux density at some frequency ν and α is the spectral index. Although measurements of α have been made over the years for several hundred pulsars, a study of the intrinsic distribution of pulsar spectra has not been carried out. From the result of pulsar surveys carried out at three different radio frequencies, we use population synthesis techniques and a likelihood analysis to deduce what underlying spectral index distribution is required to replicate the results of these surveys. We find that in general the results of the surveys can be modelled by a Gaussian distribution of spectral indices with a mean of -1.4 and unit standard deviation. We also consider the impact of the so-called gigahertz-peaked spectrum pulsars proposed by Kijak et al. The fraction of peaked-spectrum sources in the population with any significant turnover at low frequencies appears to be at most 10 per cent. We demonstrate that high-frequency (>2 GHz) surveys preferentially select flatter spectrum pulsars and the converse is true for lower frequency (<1 GHz) surveys. This implies that any correlations between α and other pulsar parameters (for example age or magnetic field) need to carefully account for selection biases in pulsar surveys. We also expect that many known pulsars which have been detected at high frequencies will have shallow, or positive, spectral indices. The majority of pulsars do not have recorded flux density measurements over a wide frequency range, making it impossible to constrain their spectral shapes. We also suggest that such measurements would allow an improved description of any populations of pulsars with `non-standard' spectra. Further refinements to this picture will soon be possible from the results of surveys with the Green Bank Telescope and LOFAR.

  13. Magnetic prism alignment system for measuring large-angle strabismus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, John Edward

    2014-02-01

    Prismatic measurement of large-angle strabismus requires the simultaneous use of two or more prisms for neutralization. To facilitate the clinical measurement of large-angle strabismus a new prism system was designed utilizing a flat plate and a ferrous metal surface coupled with prisms containing rare earth magnets implanted in their base and bottom surfaces. PMID:24569000

  14. Dynamics of Magnetic Field Alignment of Block Copolymers by In-Situ SAXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuji, Chinedum; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Majewski, Pawel

    2013-03-01

    The use of external fields to direct block copolymer self-assembly is well documented. Magnetic fields offer particular promise due to their space-pervasive nature and the ability to produce arbitrary alignments over truly macroscopic length scales in appropriate systems. We present here the results of in-situ SAXS studies performed using a custom superconducting magnet integrated with lab-scale x-ray scattering instruments. We consider the case of side-chain liquid crystalline diblock copolymers ordering under high magnetic fields. Despite the coincidence of the block copolymer order-disorder transition (ODT) and the LC clearing temperature in these weakly segregated materials, there is no measurable effect of the field on the ODT of the system, up to 6 T. This is in line with estimates based simply on the magnitudes of the relevant energy scales - the free energy of field interaction and the enthalpy of the isotropic-LC transition. We show that the alignment of the system is critically limited by the viscosity of the mesophase such that alignment can only be advanced by residence in a small temperature window near the ODT. This residence produces a weakly aligned system which thereafter transitions to a strongly aligned state on cooling even in the absence of the field. This work was conducted with support from NSF under DMR-0847534

  15. Magnetic Alignment in Carps: Evidence from the Czech Christmas Fish Market

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Vlastimil; Kušta, Tomáš; Němec, Pavel; Bláhová, Veronika; Ježek, Miloš; Nováková, Petra; Begall, Sabine; Červený, Jaroslav; Hanzal, Vladimír; Malkemper, Erich Pascal; Štípek, Kamil; Vole, Christiane; Burda, Hynek

    2012-01-01

    While magnetoreception in birds has been studied intensively, the literature on magnetoreception in bony fish, and particularly in non-migratory fish, is quite scarce. We examined alignment of common carps (Cyprinus carpio) at traditional Christmas sale in the Czech Republic. The sample comprised measurements of the directional bearings in 14,537 individual fish, distributed among 80 large circular plastic tubs, at 25 localities in the Czech Republic, during 817 sampling sessions, on seven subsequent days in December 2011. We found that carps displayed a statistically highly significant spontaneous preference to align their bodies along the North-South axis. In the absence of any other common orientation cues which could explain this directional preference, we attribute the alignment of the fish to the geomagnetic field lines. It is apparent that the display of magnetic alignment is a simple experimental paradigm of great heuristic potential. PMID:23227241

  16. Alignments in quasar polarizations: Pseudoscalar-photon mixing in the presence of correlated magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Nishant; Kamal, Archana; Jain, Pankaj

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the effects of pseudoscalar-photon mixing on electromagnetic radiation in the presence of correlated extragalactic magnetic fields. We model the Universe as a collection of magnetic domains and study the propagation of radiation through them. This leads to correlations between Stokes parameters over large scales and consistently explains the observed large-scale alignment of quasar polarizations at different redshifts within the framework of the big bang model.

  17. Paramagnetic alignment of small grains: A novel method for measuring interstellar magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thiem; Martin, P. G.; Lazarian, A.

    2014-07-20

    We present a novel method to measure the strength of interstellar magnetic fields using ultraviolet (UV) polarization of starlight that is in part produced by weakly aligned, small dust grains. We begin with calculating the degrees of the paramagnetic alignment of small (size a ∼ 0.01 μm) and very small (a ∼ 0.001 μm) grains in the interstellar magnetic field due to the Davis-Greenstein relaxation and resonance relaxation. To calculate the degrees of paramagnetic alignment, we use Langevin equations and take into account various interaction processes essential for the rotational dynamics of small grains. We find that the alignment of small grains is necessary to reproduce the observed polarization in the UV, although the polarization arising from these small grains is negligible at the optical and infrared (IR) wavelengths. Based on fitting theoretical models to observed extinction and polarization curves, we find that the best-fit model for the case with the peak wavelength of polarization λ{sub max} < 0.55 μm requires a higher degree of alignment of small grains than for the typical case with λ{sub max} = 0.55 μm. We interpret the correlation between the systematic increase of the UV polarization relative to maximum polarization (i.e., of p(6 μm{sup –1})/p{sub max}) with λ{sub max}{sup −1} for cases of low λ{sub max} by appealing to the higher degree of alignment of small grains. We utilize the correlation of the paramagnetic alignment of small grains with the magnetic field strength B to suggest a new way to measure B using the observable parameters λ{sub max} and p(6 μm{sup –1})/p{sub max}.

  18. On the maximum accretion luminosity of magnetized neutron stars: connecting X-ray pulsars and ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-12-01

    We study properties of luminous X-ray pulsars using a simplified model of the accretion column. The maximal possible luminosity is calculated as a function of the neutron star (NS) magnetic field and spin period. It is shown that the luminosity can reach values of the order of 1040 erg s-1 for the magnetar-like magnetic field (B ≳ 1014 G) and long spin periods (P ≳ 1.5 s). The relative narrowness of an area of feasible NS parameters which are able to provide higher luminosities leads to the conclusion that L ≃ 1040 erg s-1 is a good estimate for the limiting accretion luminosity of an NS. Because this luminosity coincides with the cut-off observed in the high-mass X-ray binaries luminosity function which otherwise does not show any features at lower luminosities, we can conclude that a substantial part of ultraluminous X-ray sources are accreting neutron stars in binary systems.

  19. A SEARCH FOR RAPIDLY SPINNING PULSARS AND FAST TRANSIENTS IN UNIDENTIFIED RADIO SOURCES WITH THE NRAO 43 METER TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Deborah; Crawford, Fronefield; Gilpin, Claire; Langston, Glen

    2013-04-15

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g., sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a different epoch with a new 800 MHz backend on the NRAO 43 m Telescope at a center frequency of 1200 MHz. Our search was sensitive to sub-millisecond pulsars in highly accelerated binary systems and to short transient pulses. No periodic or transient signals were detected from any of the target sources. We conclude that diffractive scintillation, dispersive smearing, and binary acceleration are unlikely to have prevented detection of the large majority of the sources if they are pulsars, though we cannot rule out eclipsing, nulling or intermittent emission, or radio interference as possible factors for some non-detections. Other (speculative) possibilities for what these sources might include radio-emitting magnetic cataclysmic variables or older pulsars with aligned magnetic and spin axes.

  20. Pair-eigenstates and mutual alignment of coupled molecular rotors in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ketan; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2016-05-11

    We examine the rotational states of a pair of polar (2)Σ molecules subject to a uniform magnetic field. The electric dipole-dipole interaction between the molecules creates entangled pair-eigenstates of two types. In one type, the Zeeman interaction between the inherently paramagnetic molecules and the magnetic field destroys the entanglement of the pair-eigenstates, whereas in the other type it does not. The pair-eigenstates exhibit numerous intersections, which become avoided for pair-eigenstates comprised of individual states that meet the selection rules ΔJi = 0, ± 1, ΔNi = 2n (n = 0, ±1, ±2,…), and ΔMi = 0, ± 1 imposed by the electric dipole-dipole operator. Here Ji, Ni and Mi are the total, rotational and projection angular momentum quantum numbers of molecules i = 1, 2 in the absence of the electric dipole-dipole interaction. We evaluate the mutual alignment of the pair-eigenstates and find it to be independent of the magnetic field, except for states that undergo avoided crossings, in which case the alignment of the interacting states is interchanged at the magnetic field corresponding to the crossing point. We present an analytic model which provides ready estimates of the pairwise alignment cosine that characterises the mutual alignment of the pair of coupled rotors. PMID:27126576

  1. Fluctuating neutron star magnetosphere: braking indices of eight pulsars, frequency second derivatives of 222 pulsars and 15 magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Z. W.; Tong, H.; Kou, F. F.; Ding, G. Q.

    2016-04-01

    Eight pulsars have low braking indices, which challenge the magnetic dipole braking of pulsars. 222 pulsars and 15 magnetars have abnormal distribution of frequency second derivatives, which also make contradiction with classical understanding. How neutron star magnetospheric activities affect these two phenomena are investigated by using the wind braking model of pulsars. It is based on the observational evidence that pulsar timing is correlated with emission and both aspects reflect the magnetospheric activities. Fluctuations are unavoidable for a physical neutron star magnetosphere. Young pulsars have meaningful braking indices, while old pulsars' and magnetars' fluctuation item dominates their frequency second derivatives. It can explain both the braking index and frequency second derivative of pulsars uniformly. The braking indices of eight pulsars are the combined effect of magnetic dipole radiation and particle wind. During the lifetime of a pulsar, its braking index will evolve from three to one. Pulsars with low braking index may put strong constraint on the particle acceleration process in the neutron star magnetosphere. The effect of pulsar death should be considered during the long term rotational evolution of pulsars. An equation like the Langevin equation for Brownian motion was derived for pulsar spin-down. The fluctuation in the neutron star magnetosphere can be either periodic or random, which result in anomalous frequency second derivative and they have similar results. The magnetospheric activities of magnetars are always stronger than those of normal pulsars.

  2. On the pulse-width statistics in radio pulsars - I. Importance of the interpulse emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciesiak, Krzysztof; Gil, Janusz; Ribeiro, Valério A. R. M.

    2011-06-01

    We performed Monte Carlo simulations of different properties of pulsar radio emission, such as pulsar periods, pulse widths, inclination angles and rates of occurrence of interpulse (IP) emission. We used recently available large data sets of the pulsar periods P, the pulse profile widths W and the magnetic inclination angle α. We also compiled the largest ever data base of pulsars with IP, divided into the double pole (DP-IP) and the single pole (SP-IP) cases. We identified 31 (about 2 per cent) and 13 (about 1 per cent) of the former and the latter, respectively, in the population of 1520 normal pulsars. Their distribution on the ? diagram strongly suggests a secular alignment of the magnetic axis from the originally random orientation. We derived possible parent distribution functions of important pulsar parameters by means of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov significance test using the available data sets (P, W, α and IP), different models of pulsar radio beam ρ=ρ(P) as well as different trial distribution functions of pulsar period P and the inclination angles α. The best suited parent period distribution function is the lognormal distribution, although the gamma function distribution cannot be excluded. The strongest constraint on derived model distribution functions was the requirement that the numbers of IPs generated by means of Monte Carlo simulations (both DP-IP and SP-IP cases) were exactly (within 1σ errors) at the observed level of occurrences. We found that a suitable model distribution function for the inclination angle is the complicated trigonometric function which has two local maxima, one near 0° and the other near 90°. The former and the latter imply the right rates of IP, occurrence, single pole (almost aligned rotator) and double pole (almost orthogonal rotator), respectively. It is very unlikely that the pulsar beam deviates significantly from the circular cross-section. We found that the upper limit for the average beaming factor fb

  3. Spontaneous Magnetic Alignment by Yearling Snapping Turtles: Rapid Association of Radio Frequency Dependent Pattern of Magnetic Input with Novel Surroundings

    PubMed Central

    Landler, Lukas; Painter, Michael S.; Youmans, Paul W.; Hopkins, William A.; Phillips, John B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated spontaneous magnetic alignment (SMA) by juvenile snapping turtles using exposure to low-level radio frequency (RF) fields at the Larmor frequency to help characterize the underlying sensory mechanism. Turtles, first introduced to the testing environment without the presence of RF aligned consistently towards magnetic north when subsequent magnetic testing conditions were also free of RF (‘RF off → RF off’), but were disoriented when subsequently exposed to RF (‘RF off → RF on’). In contrast, animals initially introduced to the testing environment with RF present were disoriented when tested without RF (‘RF on → RF off’), but aligned towards magnetic south when tested with RF (‘RF on → RF on’). Sensitivity of the SMA response of yearling turtles to RF is consistent with the involvement of a radical pair mechanism. Furthermore, the effect of RF appears to result from a change in the pattern of magnetic input, rather than elimination of magnetic input altogether, as proposed to explain similar effects in other systems/organisms. The findings show that turtles first exposed to a novel environment form a lasting association between the pattern of magnetic input and their surroundings. However, under natural conditions turtles would never experience a change in the pattern of magnetic input. Therefore, if turtles form a similar association of magnetic cues with the surroundings each time they encounter unfamiliar habitat, as seems likely, the same pattern of magnetic input would be associated with multiple sites/localities. This would be expected from a sensory input that functions as a global reference frame, helping to place multiple locales (i.e., multiple local landmark arrays) into register to form a global map of familiar space. PMID:25978736

  4. Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    's clearly fading as it ages, it is still more than holding its own with the younger generations." It's likely that two forms of X-ray emission are produced in J0108: emission from particles spiraling around magnetic fields, and emission from heated areas around the neutron star's magnetic poles. Measuring the temperature and size of these heated regions can provide valuable insight into the extraordinary properties of the neutron star surface and the process by which charged particles are accelerated by the pulsar. The younger, bright pulsars commonly detected by radio and X-ray telescopes are not representative of the full population of objects, so observing objects like J0108 helps astronomers see a more complete range of behavior. At its advanced age, J0108 is close to the so-called "pulsar death line," where its pulsed radiation is expected to switch off and it will become much harder, if not impossible, to observe. "We can now explore the properties of this pulsar in a regime where no other pulsar has been detected outside the radio range," said co-author Oleg Kargaltsev of the University of Florida. "To understand the properties of 'dying pulsars,' it is important to study their radiation in X-rays. Our finding that a very old pulsar can be such an efficient X-ray emitter gives us hope to discover new nearby pulsars of this class via their X-ray emission." The Chandra observations were reported by Pavlov and colleagues in the January 20, 2009, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. However, the extreme nature of J0108 was not fully apparent until a new distance to it was reported on February 6 in the PhD thesis of Adam Deller from Swinburne University in Australia. The new distance is both larger and more accurate than the distance used in the Chandra paper, showing that J0108 was brighter in X-rays than previously thought. "Suddenly this pulsar became the record holder for its ability to make X-rays," said Pavlov, "and our result became even more interesting without us

  5. Effect of magnetic field strength on the alignment of α''-Fe16N2 nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartikowati, Christina W.; Suhendi, Asep; Zulhijah, Rizka; Ogi, Takashi; Iwaki, Toru; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2016-01-01

    Aligning the magnetic orientation is one strategy to improve the magnetic performance of magnetic materials. In this study, well-dispersed single-domain core-shell α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) were aligned by vertically applying magnetic fields with various strengths to a Si wafer substrate followed by fixation with resin. X-ray diffraction indicated that the alignment of the easy c-axis of the α''-Fe16N2 crystal and the magnetic orientation of the NPs depended upon the applied magnetic field. Magnetic analysis demonstrated that increasing the magnetic field strength resulted in hysteresis loops approaching a rectangular form, implying a higher magnetic coercivity, remanence, and maximum energy product. The same tendency was also observed when a horizontal magnetic field was applied. The fixation of the easy c-axis alignment of each nanoparticle caused by Brownian rotation under the magnetic field, instead of Néel rotation, was the reason for the enhancement in the magnetic performance. These results on the alignment of the magnetic orientation of α''-Fe16N2 NPs suggest the practical application of high-performance permanent bulk magnets from well-dispersed single-domain α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 NPs.

  6. Effect of magnetic field strength on the alignment of α''-Fe16N2 nanoparticle films.

    PubMed

    Kartikowati, Christina W; Suhendi, Asep; Zulhijah, Rizka; Ogi, Takashi; Iwaki, Toru; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2016-02-01

    Aligning the magnetic orientation is one strategy to improve the magnetic performance of magnetic materials. In this study, well-dispersed single-domain core-shell α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) were aligned by vertically applying magnetic fields with various strengths to a Si wafer substrate followed by fixation with resin. X-ray diffraction indicated that the alignment of the easy c-axis of the α''-Fe16N2 crystal and the magnetic orientation of the NPs depended upon the applied magnetic field. Magnetic analysis demonstrated that increasing the magnetic field strength resulted in hysteresis loops approaching a rectangular form, implying a higher magnetic coercivity, remanence, and maximum energy product. The same tendency was also observed when a horizontal magnetic field was applied. The fixation of the easy c-axis alignment of each nanoparticle caused by Brownian rotation under the magnetic field, instead of Néel rotation, was the reason for the enhancement in the magnetic performance. These results on the alignment of the magnetic orientation of α''-Fe16N2 NPs suggest the practical application of high-performance permanent bulk magnets from well-dispersed single-domain α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 NPs. PMID:26758175

  7. Searching for Planets Around Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    suggests that long-lived supernova fallback disks may actually be much rarer than thought, or they exist only in conditions that arent compatible with planet formation.So if thats the case, what about the planets found around PSR 1257+12? This pulsar may actually be somewhat unique, in that it was born with an unusually weak magnetic field. This birth defect might have allowed it to form a fallback disk and, subsequently, planets where the sample of energetic pulsars studied here could not.CitationM. Kerr et al.2015 ApJ 809 L11 doi:10.1088/2041-8205/809/1/L11

  8. In-situ SAXS observation of magnetic field effects on block copolymer ordering and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuji, Chinedum; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Majewksi, Pawel

    2012-02-01

    The use of external fields to direct block copolymer self-assembly is well documented. Magnetic fields offer particular promise due to their space-pervasive nature and the ability to produce arbitrary alignments over truly macroscopic length scales in appropriate systems. We present here the results of in-situ SAXS studies of side-chain liquid crystalline diblock copolymers ordering under high magnetic fields and ex-situ GISAXS data on thin films. Despite the coincidence of the block copolymer order-disorder transition (ODT) and the LC clearing temperature in these weakly segregated materials, there is no measurable effect of the field on the ODT of the system, up to 6 T. This is in line with rough estimates based simply on the magnitudes of the relevant energy scales - the free energy of field interaction and the enthalpy of the isotropic-LC transition. We show that the alignment of the system is critically limited by the viscosity of the mesophase such that alignment can only be advanced by residence in a small temperature window near TODT. This residence produces a weakly aligned system which thereafter transitions to a strongly aligned state on cooling even in the absence of the field.

  9. Recycled pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Bryan Anthony

    2005-11-01

    In a survey of ~4,150 square degrees, we discovered 26 previously unknown pulsars, including 7 "recycled" millisecond or binary pulsars. The most significant discovery of this survey is PSR J1909-3744, a 2.95 ms pulsar in an extremely circular 1.5 d orbit with a low-mass white dwarf companion. Though this system is a fairly typical low-mass binary pulsar (LMBP) system, it has several exceptional qualities: an extremely narrow pulse profile and stable rotation have enabled the most precise long-term timing ever reported, and a nearly edge-on orbit gives rise to a strong Shapiro delay which has allowed the most precise measurement of the mass of a millisecond pulsar: m p = (1.438 +/- 0.024) [Special characters omitted.] . Our accurate parallax distance measurement, d p = ([Special characters omitted.] ) kpc, combined with the mass of the optically-detected companion, m c = (0.2038 +/- 0.022) [Special characters omitted.] , will provide an important calibration for white dwarf models relevant to other LMBP companions. We have detected optical counterparts for two intermediate mass binary pulsar (IMBP) systems; taken together with optical detections and non-detections of several similar systems, our results indicate that the characteristic age t = c P /2 P consistently overestimates the time since the end of mass accretion in these recycled systems. We have measured orbital decay in the double neutron star system PSR B2127+11C in the globular cluster M15. This has allowed an improved measurement of the mass of the pulsar, m p = (1.3584 +/- 0.0097) [Special characters omitted.] , and companion, m c = (1.3544 +/- 0.0097) [Special characters omitted.] , as well as a test of general relativity at the 3% level. We find that the proper motions of this pulsar as well as PSR B2127+11A and PSR B2127+11B are consistent with each other and with one published measurement of the cluster proper motion. We have discovered three binary millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster M62

  10. Pulsars and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for the studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. But even forty years after their discovery, we still do not understand their pulsed emission at any wavelength. I will review both the basic physics of pulsars as well as the latest developments in understanding their high-energy emission. Special and general relativistic effects play important roles in pulsar emission, from inertial frame-dragging near the stellar surface to aberration, time-of-flight and retardation of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Understanding how these effects determine what we observe at different wavelengths is critical to unraveling the emission physics. Fortunately the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), with launch in May 2008 will detect many new gamma-ray pulsars and test the predictions of these models with unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 300 GeV.

  11. On the evolution of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Gurevich, A. V.; Istomin, Ya. N.

    1991-01-01

    Data from a previous investigation on the angle chi between the axis of rotation and the magnetic dipole axis, determined from polarization observations, provides a complete catalog which makes it possible to carry out a detailed comparison of the theoretical results of this present investigation with the observed distribution of radio pulsars over the angel chi. Before such a comparison is made, the main features of a theory for pulsar evolution is described.

  12. Magnetic field aligned assembly of nonmagnetic composite dumbbells in nanoparticle-based aqueous ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hayato; Nagao, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kanako; Ishii, Haruyuki; Konno, Mikio

    2015-05-26

    Monodisperse, nonmagnetic, asymmetrical composite dumbbells in a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles (ferrofluid) were aligned by application of an external magnetic field to the ferrofluid. The asymmetrical composite dumbbells were prepared by two-step soap-free emulsion polymerization consisting of the first polymerization to coat spherical silica cores with cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) shell and the second polymerization to protrude a polystyrene (PSt) lobe from the core-shell particles. A chain structure of nonmagnetic dumbbells oriented to the applied magnetic field was observed at nanoparticle content of 2.0 vol % and field strengths higher than 1.0 mT. A similar chain structure of the dumbbells was observed under application of alternating electric field at strengths higher than 50 V/mm. Parallel and orthogonally combined applications of the electric and magnetic fields were also conducted to examine independence of the electric and magnetic applications as operational factors in the dumbbell assembling. Dumbbell chains stiffer than those in a single application of external field were formed in the parallel combined application of electric and magnetic fields. The orthogonal combination of the different applied fields could form a magnetically aligned chain structure of the nonmagnetic dumbbells oriented to the electric field. The present work experimentally indicated that the employment of inverse magnetorheological effect for nonmagnetic, anisotropic particles can be a useful method for the simultaneous controls over the orientation and the positon of anisotropic particles in their assembling. PMID:25927488

  13. High-energy emission of the first millisecond pulsar

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Takata, J.; Leung, G. C. K.; Cheng, K. S.; Philippopoulos, P.

    2014-06-01

    We report on X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) B1937+21 taken with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, XMM-Newton, and the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The pulsar X-ray emission shows a purely non-thermal spectrum with a hard photon index of 0.9 ± 0.1, and is nearly 100% pulsed. We found no evidence of varying pulse profile with energy as previously claimed. We also analyzed 5.5 yr of Fermi survey data and obtained much improved constraints on the pulsar's timing and spectral properties in gamma-rays. The pulsed spectrum is adequately fitted by a simple power-law with a photon index of 2.38 ± 0.07. Both the gamma-ray and X-ray pulse profiles show similar two-peak structure and generally align with the radio peaks. We found that the aligned profiles and the hard spectrum in X-rays seem to be common properties among MSPs with high magnetic fields at the light cylinder. We discuss a possible physical scenario that could give rise to these features.

  14. High-energy Emission of the First Millisecond Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C.-Y.; Takata, J.; Leung, G. C. K.; Cheng, K. S.; Philippopoulos, P.

    2014-06-01

    We report on X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) B1937+21 taken with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, XMM-Newton, and the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The pulsar X-ray emission shows a purely non-thermal spectrum with a hard photon index of 0.9 ± 0.1, and is nearly 100% pulsed. We found no evidence of varying pulse profile with energy as previously claimed. We also analyzed 5.5 yr of Fermi survey data and obtained much improved constraints on the pulsar's timing and spectral properties in gamma-rays. The pulsed spectrum is adequately fitted by a simple power-law with a photon index of 2.38 ± 0.07. Both the gamma-ray and X-ray pulse profiles show similar two-peak structure and generally align with the radio peaks. We found that the aligned profiles and the hard spectrum in X-rays seem to be common properties among MSPs with high magnetic fields at the light cylinder. We discuss a possible physical scenario that could give rise to these features.

  15. X-ray study of aligned magnetic stripe domains in perpendicular multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwig, O.; Denbeaux, G.P.; Kortright, J.B.; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2003-03-03

    We have investigated the stripe domain structure and the magnetic reversal of perpendicular Co/Pt based multilayers at room temperature using magnetometry, magnetic imaging and magnetic x-ray scattering. In-plane field cycling aligns the stripe domains along the field direction. In magnetic x-ray scattering the parallel stripe domains act as a magnetic grating resulting in observed Bragg reflections up to 5th order. We model the scattering profile to extract and quantify the domain as well as domain wall widths. Applying fields up to {approx}1.2 kOe perpendicular to the film reversibly changes the relative width of up versus down domains while maintaining the overall stripe periodicity. Fields above 1.2 kOe introduce irreversible changes into the domain structure by contracting and finally annihilating individual stripe domains. We compare the current results with modeling and previous measurements of films with perpendicular anisotropy.

  16. Magnetically Aligned Bicelles to Study the Orientation of Lipophilic Ligands in Membrane Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jianxin; Yang, De-Ping; Chari, Ravi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Pavlopoulos, Spiro; Lu, Dai; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Magnetically aligned bicelles were used as a model membrane to study the orientation and dynamic properties of two cannabinoids (Δ8-THC and Me-Δ8-THC) using 31P- and 2H-NMR. The uniform alignment of the bicelles allowed us to obtain well resolved deuterium spectra from a solution NMR spectrometer. The preferred orientations of Δ8-THC and Me-Δ8-THC were calculated based on the measurements of individual quadrupolar splittings. Our results agree with previous experiments using multilamellar membranes as well as with molecular dynamics simulation data described here. In conjunction with our earlier report using small and fast tumbling bicelles, the present work of well aligned bicelles shows that bicelle preparations can provide either pseudo-isotropic or anisotropic NMR spectra to study the conformation, orientation and dynamic properties of ligands in membrane bilayers. Such data are of critical value for understanding the interactions of lipophilic drug molecules with membrane proteins. PMID:18834109

  17. Liquid Crystalline Block Copolymers with Brush Type Architecture: Toward Functional Membranes by Magnetic Field Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Youngwoo; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Mahajan, Lalit; Kasi, Rajeswari; Osuji, Chinedum

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a novel liquid crystalline block copolymer with brush type architecture for membrane applications by magnetic field directed self-assembly. Ring-opening metathesis of n-alkyloxy cyanobiphenyl and polylactide (PLA) functionalized norbornene monomers provides efficient polymerization yielding low polydispersity block copolymers. The molecular weight of the PLA side chains, spacer length of the cyanobiphenyl mesogens are systematically varied to form well-ordered BCP morphologies at varying volume fractions. Interestingly, the system features morphology dependent anchoring condition where mesogens adopt planar anchoring on cylindrical interface while homeotropic anchoring was preferred on a planar block interface. The minority PLA domains from highly aligned materials can be readily degraded by hydrolysis to produce vertically aligned nanoporous polymer films which exhibit reversible thermal switching behavior. The polymers introduced here provide a versatile platform for scalable fabrication of aligned membranes and further functional materials based on such templates. This work was supported by NSF(CCMI-1246804).

  18. A STRONGLY MAGNETIZED PULSAR WITHIN THE GRASP OF THE MILKY WAY'S SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, N.; Torres, D. F.; Papitto, A.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Esposito, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Tiengo, A.; Pons, J. A.; Viganò, D.; Turolla, R.; Israel, G. L.; Stella, L.; Possenti, A.; Burgay, M.; Perna, R.; Ponti, G.; Baganoff, F. K.; Haggard, D.; Zane, S.; Minter, A.; and others

    2013-10-01

    The center of our Galaxy hosts a supermassive black hole, Sagittarius (Sgr) A*. Young, massive stars within 0.5 pc of Sgr A* are evidence of an episode of intense star formation near the black hole a few million years ago, which might have left behind a young neutron star traveling deep into Sgr A*'s gravitational potential. On 2013 April 25, a short X-ray burst was observed from the direction of the Galactic center. With a series of observations with the Chandra and the Swift satellites, we pinpoint the associated magnetar at an angular distance of 2.4 ± 0.3 arcsec from Sgr A*, and refine the source spin period and its derivative (P = 3.7635537(2) s and P-dot = 6.61(4)×10{sup -12} s s{sup –1}), confirmed by quasi simultaneous radio observations performed with the Green Bank Telescope and Parkes Radio Telescope, which also constrain a dispersion measure of DM = 1750 ± 50 pc cm{sup –3}, the highest ever observed for a radio pulsar. We have found that this X-ray source is a young magnetar at ≈0.07-2 pc from Sgr A*. Simulations of its possible motion around Sgr A* show that it is likely (∼90% probability) in a bound orbit around the black hole. The radiation front produced by the past activity from the magnetar passing through the molecular clouds surrounding the Galactic center region might be responsible for a large fraction of the light echoes observed in the Fe fluorescence features.

  19. Solution Processing of Ordered Thin Film Nanowire Composites by Magnetic Field Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Jonathan; Pelligra, Candice; Huang, Su; Osuji, Chinedum

    2014-03-01

    Vertically aligned nanowire forests are a desirable geometry for many applications, including as electrodes, heterojunctions, and high surface energy interfaces. Most conventional aligned nanowire structures, however, are generated by methods that require (i) high temperatures, (ii) a specific substrate, or (iii) high cost lithographic techniques. We seek to utilize the magnetic alignment of cobalt-doped zinc oxide nanowires to enable the solution processing of thin films of aligned nanowires on a generalized substrate at a fraction of the cost of other methods. By functionalization of the nanowires with various surface modifications, they can be dispersed in several solvent systems and aligned by a 6 T field. Further, by including polymer in the wire solution, we can both control the areal density and also incorporate additional functionalities to the final composite device. As an example, the use of a conjugated polymer (such as poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)) allows for the final structures to act as inorganic-organic ordered heterojunction solar cells. While final device quality depends on the simultaneous optimization of several key processing parameters, the process does not rely on top-down fabrication or costly materials. Supported by ONR YIP Award N000141210657.

  20. Thermally Switchable Aligned Nanopores by Magnetic-Field Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuji, Chinedum

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic fields provide a facile approach to direct the self-assembly of magnetically anisotropic block copolymer nanostructures in a scalable manner. Here we combine such field-based processing with materials design to enable the fabrication of polymer films with highly aligned stimuli-responsive nanopores. Etch removal of a poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) brush that is the minority component of a liquid crystalline block copolymer is used to produce nanopores of ~ 8 nm diameter. The pores can be reversibly closed and opened while retaining their alignment by appropriate heating and cooling. We present TEM and temperture resolved scattering data during pore closure and re-opening to explore the mechanism and kinetics of pore collapse. NSF DMR-0847534; DMR-1119826.

  1. Magnetically aligned polymers and nanocomposites for energy harvesting and energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Pawel; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Pelligra, Candice; Zhang, Shanju; Pfefferle, Lisa; Campos, Luis; Osuji, Chinedum

    2012-02-01

    The realization of anisotropic, nanostructured, functional materials by self-assembly is impaired by the persistence of structural defects which render the properties of the system isotropic on macroscopic length scales. We present three distinct systems including ZnO nanowire-semiconducting polymer composites, Li-ion conducting block copolymer membranes, and perylene-based block copolymers where self-assembly under a magnetic field yields alignment and global anisotropy of their physical properties. The resulting aligned nanostructured systems are attractive for ordered heterojunction photovoltaics, high performance solid polymer electrolyte membranes and electro-optical devices, respectively. Our results demonstrate that magnetic fields offer a viable route for directing the self-assembly of certain soft functional materials. The ready scalability of this approach makes it potentially important from a technological standpoint.

  2. Magnetically aligned graphite electrodes for high-rate performance Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billaud, Juliette; Bouville, Florian; Magrini, Tommaso; Villevieille, Claire; Studart, André R.

    2016-08-01

    As lithium-ion batteries become ubiquitous, the energy storage market is striving for better performance, longer lifetime and better safety of the devices. This race for performance is often focused on the search for new materials, whereas less effort has been dedicated to the electrode engineering. Enhancing the power density by increasing the amount of active material remains impractical since it impinges the transport of ions across the electrode during the charging and discharging processes. Here, we show that the electrochemical performance of a battery containing a thick (about 200 μm), highly loaded (about 10 mg cm‑2) graphite electrode can be remarkably enhanced by fabricating anodes with an out-of-plane aligned architecture using a low external magnetic field. The lower tortuosity resulting from such a simple and scalable magnetic alignment approach leads to a specific charge up to three times higher than that of non-architectured electrodes at a rate of 1C.

  3. The Radio Properties and Magnetic Field Configuration in the Crab-Like Pulsar Wind Nebula G54.1+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Cornelia C.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Lu, Fangjun; Clubb, Kelsey I.

    2010-02-01

    We present a multifrequency radio investigation of the Crab-like pulsar wind nebula (PWN) G54.1+0.3 using the Very Large Array. The high resolution of the observations reveals that G54.1+0.3 has a complex radio structure which includes filamentary and loop-like structures that are magnetized, a diffuse extent similar to the associated diffuse X-ray emission. But the radio and X-ray structures in the central region differ strikingly, indicating that they trace very different forms of particle injection from the pulsar and/or particle acceleration in the nebula. No spectral index gradient is detected in the radio emission across the PWN, whereas the X-ray emission softens outward in the nebula. The extensive radio polarization allows us to image in detail the intrinsic magnetic field, which is well-ordered and reveals that a number of loop-like filaments are strongly magnetized. In addition, we determine that there are both radial and toroidal components to the magnetic field structure of the PWN. Strong mid-infrared (IR) emission detected in Spitzer Space Telescope data is closely correlated with the radio emission arising from the southern edge of G54.1+0.3. In particular, the distributions of radio and X-ray emission compared with the mid-IR emission suggest that the PWN may be interacting with this interstellar cloud. This may be the first PWN where we are directly detecting its interplay with an interstellar cloud that has survived the impact of the supernova explosion associated with the pulsar's progenitor.

  4. Scale-Dependent Alignment of Velocity and Magnetic Fluctuations in Anisotropic MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Bigot, B.; Ponty, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The tendency of alignment between velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in MHD turbulence has been a subject of great interest theoretically [Grappin et al. 1983, Matthaeus et al. 1983, Pouquet et al. 1988] as well as observationally over many years. There has been recent theoretical interest in the effect of scale-dependent alignment of velocity and magnetic fluctuations in 3D anisotropic MHD turbulence with a large-scale magnetic field [Boldyrev 2005, 2006]. This theory predicts that the angle θ between the velocity and magnetic fluctuation vectors has a scaling of θ ∝ λ1/4, where λ is the spatial scale of the fluctuations. There have also been simulations on 3D forced MHD turbulence that supports this prediction [Mason et al. 2006, 2007]. In this paper, we demonstrate that the feature of scale-dependent alignment and the scaling of θ ∝ λ1/4 also occurs in 2D within a range of time interval and spatial scales, despite the fact that Boldyrev’s phenomenological theory appears to rely on physical mechanisms operative in fully 3D turbulence in the presence of a strong external field. High-resolution pseudo-spectral simulations and scaling analysis, based on pseudo-Alfven waves in 2D, will be presented. These findings suggests that the phenomenon of scale-dependent alignment may be a more universal feature of MHD turbulence than has been thought recently, independent of dimensionality, whether the turbulence is balanced or imbalanced. Implications for solar wind turbulence observations will be discussed. This work is supported by DOE and NASA.

  5. Influence of magnetic field alignment and defect concentration on nitrogen-vacancy polarization in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, M.; Scott, E.; Reimer, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantitative, systematic study of the polarization of the Zeeman magnetic sublevels of the NV-defect in diamond as a function of magnetic field alignment relative to the NV-defect axis. The orientation dependence of NV-polarization in the lab frame is accounted for by a Wigner rotation of a constant defect frame polarization. We also find that the NV-defect level polarizations vary with the P1 defect concentration, and that the polarization of the m s = 0 state with optical pumping decreases from 46% to 36% in samples as P1 concentrations vary from 20 ppm to 100 ppm, respectively.

  6. Can primordial magnetic fields seeded by electroweak strings cause an alignment of quasar axes on cosmological scales?

    PubMed

    Poltis, Robert; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2010-10-15

    The decay of nontopological electroweak strings may leave an observable imprint in the Universe today in the form of primordial magnetic fields. Protogalaxies preferentially tend to form with their axis of rotation parallel to an external magnetic field, and, moreover, an external magnetic field produces torque which tends to align the galaxy axis with the magnetic field. We demonstrate that the shape of a magnetic field left over from two looped electroweak strings can explain the observed nontrivial alignment of quasar polarization vectors and make predictions for future observations. PMID:21230960

  7. Pulsar Electrodynamics: a Time-dependent View

    SciTech Connect

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    Pulsar spindown forms a reliable yet enigmatic prototype for the energy loss processes in many astrophysical objects including accretion disks and back holes. In this paper we review the physics of pulsar magnetospheres, concentrating on recent developments in force-free modeling of the magnetospheric structure. In particular, we discuss a new method for solving the equations of time-dependent force-free relativistic MHD in application to pulsars. This method allows to dynamically study the formation of the magnetosphere and its response to perturbations, opening a qualitatively new window on pulsar phenomena. Applications of the method to other magnetized rotators, such as magnetars and accretion disks, are also discussed.

  8. Pulsar searching and timing with the Parkes telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. W. Y.

    2014-11-01

    Pulsars are highly magnetised, rapidly rotating neutron stars that radiate a beam of coherent radio emission from their magnetic poles. An introduction to the pulsar phenomenology is presented in Chapter 1 of this thesis. The extreme conditions found in and around such compact objects make pulsars fantastic natural laboratories, as their strong gravitational fields provide exclusive insights to a rich variety of fundamental physics and astronomy. The discovery of pulsars is therefore a gateway to new science. An overview of the standard pulsar searching technique is described in Chapter 2, as well as a discussion on notable pulsar searching efforts undertaken thus far with various telescopes. The High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) Pulsar Survey conducted with the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia forms the bulk of this PhD. In particular, the author has led the search effort of the HTRU low-latitude Galactic plane project part which is introduced in Chapter 3. We discuss the computational challenges arising from the processing of the petabyte-sized survey data. Two new radio interference mitigation techniques are introduced, as well as a partially-coherent segmented acceleration search algorithm which aims to increase our chances of discovering highly-relativistic short-orbit binary systems, covering a parameter space including the potential pulsar-black hole binaries. We show that under a linear acceleration approximation, a ratio of ~0.1 of data length over orbital period results in the highest effectiveness for this search algorithm. Chapter 4 presents the initial results from the HTRU low-latitude Galactic plane survey. From the 37 per cent of data processed thus far, we have re-detected 348 previously known pulsars and discovered a further 47 pulsars. Two of which are fast-spinning pulsars with periods less than 30 ms. PSR J1101-6424 is a millisecond pulsar (MSP) with a heavy white dwarf companion while its short spin period of 5 ms indicates

  9. Out-of-Plane Alignment of Er(trensal) Easy Magnetization Axes Using Graphene.

    PubMed

    Dreiser, Jan; Pacchioni, Giulia E; Donati, Fabio; Gragnaniello, Luca; Cavallin, Alberto; Pedersen, Kasper S; Bendix, Jesper; Delley, Bernard; Pivetta, Marina; Rusponi, Stefano; Brune, Harald

    2016-02-23

    We have studied Er(trensal) single-ion magnets adsorbed on graphene/Ru(0001), on graphene/Ir(111), and on bare Ru(0001) by scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. On graphene, the molecules self-assemble into dense and well-ordered islands with their magnetic easy axes perpendicular to the surface. In contrast, on bare Ru(0001), the molecules are disordered, exhibiting only weak directional preference of the easy magnetization axis. The perfect out-of-plane alignment of the easy axes on graphene results from the molecule-molecule interaction, which dominates over the weak adsorption on the graphene surface. Our results demonstrate that the net magnetic properties of a molecular submonolayer can be tuned using a graphene spacer layer, which is attractive for hybrid molecule-inorganic spintronic devices. PMID:26814851

  10. Radio polarimetry of Galactic Centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre (GC), we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 and 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  11. Radio polarimetry of Galactic centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic centre (GC) we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 - 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜ 12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳ 100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  12. Pulsars Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timokhin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    Current density determines the plasma flow regime. Cascades are non-stationary. ALWAYS. All flow regimes look different: multiple components (?) Return current regions should have particle accelerating zones in the outer magnetosphere: y-ray pulsars (?) Plasma oscillations in discharges: direct radio emission (?)

  13. Short-term magnetic field alignment variations of equatorial ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.L.

    1988-06-01

    The ionospheric irregularities that cause equatorial scintillation are elongated along the north-south magnetic field lines. During a 1981 field campaign at Ascension Island, 250-MHz receivers were spaced from 300 m to 1.6 km along the field lines, and the signals received from the Marisat satellite were cross correlated. Data collected during eight nights of fading showed a linear relationship between fading rate and cross correlation. The alignment of the antennas was adjusted to give a zero time lag between the widely spaced receivers with a measurement accuracy of 0.03 s. Since the average irregularity velocity was 125 m/s, this time accuracy translated to an angular measurement accuracy of 0.1 deg. During a 4-hour period of nightly fading, occasional differences in time of arrival were noted that corresponded to a tilt in the north-south alignment of + or - 1 deg. Data from several nights of fading were analyzed, and each night exhibited the same variance in the north-south irregularity alignment. It is postulated that the shift in the measured peak correlation may have been caused by patches of irregularities at different altitudes where the magnetic field lines have a slightly different direction. 13 references.

  14. Self-assembled coronene nanofibers: optical waveguide effect and magnetic alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takazawa, Ken; Inoue, Jun-Ichi; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka

    2014-03-01

    To fabricate organic nanofibers that function as active optical waveguides with semiconductor properties, a facile procedure was developed to grow single crystalline nanofibers via π-π stacking of the polycyclic aromatic molecule, coronene, through solution evaporation on a substrate. The fabricated nanofibers with millimeter-scale lengths have well-defined shapes, smooth surfaces, and low-defect structures. The nanofibers are demonstrated to function as efficient active waveguides that propagate their fluorescence (FL) along the fiber axis over their entire length. We further demonstrate that the nanofibers can be highly aligned on the substrate when solution evaporation is conducted in a magnetic field of 12 T. The mechanism of the magnetic alignment can be elucidated by considering the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of a single coronene molecule and the crystal structure of a nanofiber. Owing to the high degree of alignment, the nanofibers rarely cross each other, allowing for measurement of the waveguiding properties of single isolated nanofibers. The nanofibers propagate their FL of λ > 500 nm with a low propagation loss of 0-3 dB per 100 μm, indicating that the nanofibers function as sub-wavelength scale, low-loss waveguides. Thus, they are promising building blocks for miniaturized optoelectronic circuits.

  15. Magnetization reversal of in-plane uniaxial Co films and its dependence on epitaxial alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Idigoras, O. Suszka, A. K.; Berger, A.; Vavassori, P.; Obry, B.; Hillebrands, B.; Landeros, P.

    2014-02-28

    This work studies the influence of crystallographic alignment onto magnetization reversal in partially epitaxial Co films. A reproducible growth sequence was devised that allows for the continuous tuning of grain orientation disorder in Co films with uniaxial in-plane anisotropy by the controlled partial suppression of epitaxy. While all stable or meta-stable magnetization states occurring during a magnetic field cycle exhibit a uniform magnetization for fully epitaxial samples, non-uniform states appear for samples with sufficiently high grain orientation disorder. Simultaneously with the occurrence of stable domain states during the magnetization reversal, we observe a qualitative change of the applied field angle dependence of the coercive field. Upon increasing the grain orientation disorder, we observe a disappearance of transient domain wall propagation as the dominating reversal process, which is characterized by an increase of the coercive field for applied field angles away from the easy axis for well-ordered epitaxial samples. Upon reaching a certain disorder threshold level, we also find an anomalous magnetization reversal, which is characterized by a non-monotonic behavior of the remanent magnetization and coercive field as a function of the applied field angle in the vicinity of the nominal hard axis. This anomaly is a collective reversal mode that is caused by disorder-induced frustration and it can be qualitatively and even quantitatively explained by means of a two Stoner-Wohlfarth particle model. Its predictions are furthermore corroborated by Kerr microscopy and by Brillouin light scattering measurements.

  16. A Chandra Search for a Pulsar Wind Nebula around PSR B1055-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, B.; Spence, G.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2015-10-01

    The nearby, middle-aged PSR B1055-52 has many properties in common with the Geminga pulsar. Motivated by the Geminga's enigmatic and prominent pulsar wind nebula (PWN), we searched for extended emission around PSR B1055-52 with Chandra ACIS. For an energy range 0.3-1 keV, we found a 4σ flux enhancement in a 4\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 9-20\\prime\\prime annulus around the pulsar. There is a slight asymmetry in the emission close, 1\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5-4\\prime\\prime , to the pulsar. The excess emission has a luminosity of about 1029 erg s-1 in an energy range 0.3-8 keV for a distance of 350 pc. Overall, the faint extended emission around \\text{PSR B1055-52} is consistent with a PWN of an aligned rotator moving away from us along the line of sight with supersonic velocity, but a contribution from a dust scattering halo cannot be excluded. Comparing the properties of other nearby, middle-aged pulsars, we suggest that the geometry—the orientations of rotation axis, magnetic field axis, and the sight-line—is the deciding factor for a pulsar to show a prominent PWN. We also report on an ≳ 30% flux decrease of PSR B1055-52 between the 2000 XMM-Newton and our 2012 Chandra observation. We tentatively attribute this flux decrease to a cross-calibration problem, but further investigations of the pulsar are required to exclude actual intrinsic flux changes.

  17. Six millisecond pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and the radio/gamma-ray connection of millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, C. M.; Guillemot, L.; Çelik, Ö.; Weltevrede, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Smith, D. A.; Kerr, M.; Zavlin, V. E.; Cognard, I.; Eatough, R. P.; Freire, P. C. C.; Janssen, G. H.; Camilo, F.; Desvignes, G.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hou, X.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A.; Manchester, R. N.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Shannon, R.; Theureau, G.; Webb, N.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing ephemerides provided by various radio observatories. We also present confirmation of the gamma-ray pulsations from a sixth source, PSR J2051-0827. Five of these six MSPs are in binary systems: PSRs J1713+0747, J1741+1351, J1600-3053 and the two black widow binary pulsars PSRs J0610-2100 and J2051-0827. The only isolated MSP is the nearby PSR J1024-0719, which is also known to emit X-rays. We present X-ray observations in the direction of PSRs J1600-3053 and J2051-0827. While PSR J2051-0827 is firmly detected, we can only give upper limits for the X-ray flux of PSR J1600-3053. There are no dedicated X-ray observations available for the other three objects. The MSPs mentioned above, together with most of the MSPs detected by Fermi, are used to put together a sample of 30 gamma-ray MSPs. This sample is used to study the morphology and phase connection of radio and gamma-ray pulse profiles. We show that MSPs with pulsed gamma-ray emission which is phase-aligned with the radio emission present the steepest radio spectra and the largest magnetic fields at the light cylinder among all MSPs. Also, we observe a trend towards very low, or undetectable, radio linear polarization levels. These properties could be attributed to caustic radio emission produced at a range of different altitudes in the magnetosphere. We note that most of these characteristics are also observed in the Crab pulsar, the only other radio pulsar known to exhibit phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray emission.

  18. Pulsars for the Beginner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLavore, Phillip; Wayland, James R.

    1971-01-01

    Presents the history of the discovery of pulsars, observations that have been made on pulsar radiation, and theories that have been presented for its presence and origin. Illustrations using pulsar's properties are presented in mechanics, electromagnetic radiation and thermodynamics. (DS)

  19. Alignment of the high beta magnets in the RHIC interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Jain, A.; Tepikian, S.; Grandinetti, R.; Ganetis, G.; Wei, J.; Karl, F.

    1997-07-01

    The betatron functions inside the triplet quadrupoles in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider-RHIC are of the order of 1,500 m, necessitating additional attention in the alignment procedure. On each side of the interaction regions eight cryogenic elements (six quadrupoles and two horizontal bending dipoles) are placed inside large cryostats. The quadrupole magnetic centers are obtained by antenna measurements with an accuracy of {+-} 60 {micro}m. The signals from the antenna were cross calibrated with the colloidal cell measurements of the same magnet. The positions of the fiducials are related to the magnet centers during the antenna measurements. Elements are positioned warm inside the cryostats, with offsets to account for shrinkage during the cool down. The supports at the middle of the two central quadrupoles are fixed, while every other element slides longitudinally inside the cryostat during cool down or warm up.

  20. SAXS reveals the magnetic alignment pathway of the goethite columnar liquid crystal phase.

    PubMed

    Leferink op Reinink, Anke B G M; van den Pol, Esther; Vroege, Gert Jan; Petukhov, Andrei V

    2014-08-15

    The alignment of board-like colloidal goethite particles in the dense rectangular centred columnar liquid crystal phase in an external magnetic field is studied using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Transient SAXS-patterns show broadening of the columnar reflections in specific directions. While the reflections along the field stay at a constant Q-value, the other reflections do not. These results imply a certain pathway of reorientation. It appears that alignment proceeds via collective rotation of domains inducing 'nanoshear' between the layers of particles, which slide over each other. The results support the recently suggested martensitic transition pathway for the simple and centred rectangular columnar phases, which were found to spontaneously transform into each other in another goethite system. The results also provide a fine example of how SAXS can be used to study reorientation behaviour of liquid crystals at the nanoscale. PMID:24910068

  1. Photorefractive Bragg gratings in nematic liquid crystals aligned by a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. |

    1999-06-01

    Photorefractive Bragg gratings are observed in low-molar-mass nematic liquid crystals doped with electron donor and acceptor molecules. This is accomplished by alignment of the nematic liquid crystals in a 0.3 T magnetic field, which produces thicker homeotropic aligned samples than traditional surfactant techniques. Grating fringe spacings as low as 3.7 {mu}m are achieved with 176-{mu}m-thick samples, producing grating {ital Q} values of 33. Up to this point, low molar mass nematic liquid crystals have exhibited photorefractive gratings with Q{le}1. Asymmetric two-beam coupling and photoconductivity experiments are performed to verify the photorefractive origin of the gratings. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Magnetic hard/soft nanocomposite ferrite aligned hollow microfibers and remanence enhancement.

    PubMed

    Song, Fuzhan; Shen, Xiangqian; Liu, Mingquan; Xiang, Jun

    2011-02-01

    The nanocomposite SrFe(12)O(19)/Ni(0.5)Zn(0.5)Fe(2)O(4) ferrite aligned hollow microfibers with the hollow diameter to the fiber diameter estimated about 3/5 have been prepared by the gel precursor transformation process. The nanocomposite binary ferrites with different mass ratios are formed after the precursor calcined at 900°C for 2h, fabricating from SrFe(12)O(19) nanoparticles and Ni(0.5)Zn(0.5)Fe(2)O(4) nanoparticles with a uniform phase distribution. These nanocomposite ferrite microfibers show a combination of magnetic characteristics for the hard (SrFe(12)O(19)) and soft (Ni(0.5)Zn(0.5)Fe(2)O(4)) phase with an enhanced remanence owing to the exchange-coupling interactions. The aligned microfibers exhibit a shape anisotropy. PMID:21144534

  3. Spin-down of Pulsars, and Their Electromagnetic and Gravitational Wave Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue-zhu, Zhang; Yan-yan, Fu; Yi-huan, Wei; Cheng-min, Zhang; Shao-hua, Yu; Yuan-yue, Pan; Yuan-qi, Guo; De-hua, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Pulsars posses extremely strong magnetic fields, and their magnetic axis does not coincide with their rotation axis, this causes the pulsars to emit electromagnetic radiations. Pulsars rely on their rotational energy to compensate for the energy loss caused by the electromagnetic radiation, which leads to the gradually decelerated spin of pulsars. According to the theoretical deduction, we have calculated the initial period of the Crab Nebula pulsar, and derived the period evolution of the pulsar at any time in the future under the effect of the electromagnetic radiation. Considered the possible existence of quadrupole moment in the mass distribution of a pulsar, the gravitational wave radiation will also make the pulsar spin down, hence the variation of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the effect of gravitational wave radiation is further analyzed. Finally, combining the two kinds of radiation mechanisms, the evolution of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the joint action of these two kinds of radiation mechanisms is analyzed.

  4. Dynamics of the field-aligned current distribution during a magnetic storm: AMPERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Tepke, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Field-aligned current density in the ionosphere can be used to identify the location and intensity of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, and help identify the large-scale processes that contribute to this coupling. The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) mission effectively provides high-resolution spatial and temporal measurements of the radial current during magnetic storms. These in situ measurements are complementary to magnetic remote sensing from the ground using magnetometer arrays. Here we examine two storms, on May 29, 2010 and August 5, 2011, using AMPERE and solar wind data. We identify the regions whose radial current density has the greatest correlation with solar wind coupling functions and individual magnetic and plasma variables. We develop a statistical model of the radial current density from the magnetospheric and solar wind data which is then used to represent regions of outflowing and inflowing current in the two hemispheres. While the model is limited in representing high spatial resolution, time series of regional and global field-aligned current are reproduced with relatively large correlation coefficients (0.70-0.90) in each event.

  5. The distance indicators in gamma-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Distance measurements of gamma-ray pulsars are challenging questions in present pulsar studies. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi gamma-ray observatory discovered more than 100 gamma-ray pulsars, including 34 new gamma-selected pulsars which nearly have no distance information. We study the relation between gamma-ray emission efficiency (η=L γ/Ė) and pulsar parameters, for young radio-selected gamma-ray pulsars with known distance information. We have introduced three generation order parameters to describe gamma-ray emission properties of pulsars, and find a strong correlation between η and ζ3, the generation order parameter which reflects γ-ray photon generations in pair cascade processes induced by magnetic field absorption in pulsar magnetosphere. A good correlation between η and B LC, the magnetic field at the light cylinder radius, is also found. These correlations can serve as distance indicators in gamma-ray pulsars, to evaluate distances for gamma-selected pulsars. Distances of 35 gamma-selected pulsars are estimated, which could be tested by other distance measurement methods. The physical origin of the correlations may be also interesting for pulsar studies.

  6. Time-dependent Force-free Pulsar Magnetospheres: Axisymmetric and Oblique Rotators

    SciTech Connect

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    Magnetospheres of many astrophysical objects can be accurately described by the low-inertia (or ''force-free'') limit of MHD. We present a new numerical method for solution of equations of force-free relativistic MHD based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach with a prescription for handling spontaneous formation of current sheets. We use this method to study the time-dependent evolution of pulsar magnetospheres in both aligned and oblique magnetic geometries. For the aligned rotator we confirm the general properties of the time-independent solution of Contopoulos et al. (1999). For the oblique rotator we present the 3D structure of the magnetosphere and compute, for the first time, the spindown power of pulsars as a function of inclination of the magnetic axis. We find the pulsar spindown luminosity to be L {approx} ({mu}{sup 2}{Omega}{sub *}{sup 4}/c{sup 3})(1 + sin{sup 2}{alpha}) for a star with the dipole moment {mu}, rotation frequency {Omega}{sub *}, and magnetic inclination angle {alpha}. We also discuss the effects of current sheet resistivity and reconnection on the structure and evolution of the magnetosphere.

  7. Effect of magnetic quadrupole lens alignment on a nuclear microprobe resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolinko, S. V.; Ponomarev, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The paper reports the research trends in developing probe-forming systems with high demagnification and analysis factors that limit a nuclear microprobe resolution. Parasitic aberrations caused by tilts and offsets of magnetic quadrupoles are studied in terms of their effect on probe parameters on a target. The most common arrangements of probe-forming systems such as a triplet and "Russian quadruplet" with separated geometry are considered. The accuracy prerequisites for the positioning of the quadrupoles are defined, and practical guidelines for alignment of probe-forming systems with high demagnification factors are suggested.

  8. Highly polarized light emission by isotropic quantum dots integrated with magnetically aligned segmented nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Uran, Can; Erdem, Talha; Guzelturk, Burak; Perkgöz, Nihan Kosku; Jun, Shinae; Jang, Eunjoo; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-10-06

    In this work, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept system for generating highly polarized light from colloidal quantum dots (QDs) coupled with magnetically aligned segmented Au/Ni/Au nanowires (NWs). Optical characterizations reveal that the optimized QD-NW coupled structures emit highly polarized light with an s-to p-polarization (s/p) contrast as high as 15:1 corresponding to a degree of polarization of 0.88. These experimental results are supported by the finite-difference time-domain simulations, which demonstrate the interplay between the inter-NW distance and the degree of polarization.

  9. Beam-Based Alignment of Magnetic Field in the Fermilab Electron Cooler Cooling Section

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S. M.; Tupikov, V.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires low effective anglular spread of electrons in the cooling section. One of the main components of the effective electron angles is an angle of electron beam centroid with respect to antiproton beam. This angle is caused by the poor quality of magnetic field in the 20 m long cooling section solenoid and by the mismatch of the beam centroid to the entrance of the cooling section. This paper focuses on the beam-based procedure of the alignment of the cooling section field and beam centroid matching. The discussed procedure allows to suppress the beam centroid angles below the critical value of 0.1 mrad.

  10. Statistical studies of pulsar glitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyne, A. G.; Shemar, S. L.; Smith, F. Graham

    2000-07-01

    Shemar & Lyne have previously presented observations and an analysis of 32 glitches and their subsequent relaxations observed in a total of 15 pulsars. These data are brought together in this paper with those published by other authors. We show quantitatively how glitch activity decreases linearly with decreasing rate of slow-down. As indicated previously from studies of the Vela pulsar, the analysis suggests that 1.7per cent of the moment of inertia of a typical neutron star is normally contained in pinned superfluid which releases its excess angular momentum at the time of a glitch. There is a broad range of glitch amplitude and there is a strong indication that pulsars with large magnetic fields suffer many small glitches while others show a smaller number of large glitches. Transient effects following glitches are very marked in young pulsars and decrease linearly with decreasing rate of slow-down, suggesting that the amount of loosely pinned superfluid decreases with age. We suggest that the low braking index of the Vela and Crab pulsars cannot be caused by a decreasing moment of inertia and should be attributed to step increases in the effective magnetic moment of the neutron star at the glitches.

  11. DEATH LINE OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS WITH OUTER GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ren-Bo; Hirotani, Kouichi E-mail: hirotani@tiara.sinica.edu.tw

    2011-08-01

    We analytically investigate the condition for a particle accelerator to be active in the outer magnetosphere of a rotation-powered pulsar. Within the accelerator (or the gap), the magnetic-field-aligned electric field accelerates electrons and positrons, which emit copious gamma-rays via the curvature process. If one of the gamma-rays emitted by a single pair materializes as a new pair on average, the gap is self-sustained. However, if the neutron-star spin-down rate decreases below a certain limit, the gap becomes no longer self-sustained and the gamma-ray emission ceases. We explicitly compute the multiplicity of cascading pairs and find that the obtained limit corresponds to a modification of the previously derived outer-gap death line. In addition to this traditional death line, we find another death line, which becomes important for millisecond pulsars, by separately considering the threshold of photon-photon pair production. Combining these traditional and new death lines, we give predictions on the detectability of gamma-ray pulsars with Fermi and AGILE. An implication for X-ray observations of heated polar-cap emission is also discussed.

  12. AN EXTREME PULSAR TAIL PROTRUDING FROM THE FRYING PAN SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Bouchard, A.; Bucciantini, N.; Gaensler, B. M.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.

    2012-02-10

    The Frying Pan (G315.9-0.0) is a radio supernova remnant with a peculiar linear feature (G315.78-0.23) extending 10' radially outward from the rim of the shell. We present radio imaging and polarization observations obtained from the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, confirming G315.78-0.23 as a bow-shock pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the young pulsar J1437-5959. This is one of the longest pulsar tails observed in radio and it has a physical extent over 20 pc. We found a bow-shock standoff distance of 0.002 pc, smallest among similar systems, suggesting a large pulsar velocity over 1000 km s{sup -1} and a high Mach number {approx}200. The magnetic field geometry inferred from radio polarimetry shows a good alignment with the tail orientation, which could be a result of high flow speed. There are also hints that the postshock wind has a low magnetization and is dominated by electrons and positrons in energy. This study shows that PWNe can offer a powerful probe of their local environment, particularly for the case of a bow shock where the parent supernova shell is also detected.

  13. On the relationship between morning sector irregular magnetic pulsations and field aligned currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Potemra, T. A.; Zanetti, L. J.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Mende, S. B.; Rosenberg, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    For three magnetically disturbed days in early 1980, data from south polar masses of the Magsat satellite are compared with data from search coil magnetometer, riometer, and photometer instrumentation at Siple, Antarctica. It is found that during each Magsat polar pass in the morning sector, the level of Pi 1 activity correlates well with the intensities of three-dimensional current systems. Fine structure is often observed in the field-aligned currents during periods of intense Pi activity. Among the Birkeland currents are 2-s to 10-s (16-80 km) structured perturbations; these are evident in the transverse components of the field and are thought to indicate filamentary currents. Pi 1 amplitudes are found to be considerably larger when region 2 Birkeland currents are overhead than when they are not. In one case, detailed features are identified in the high-resolution Magsat magnetic field data that may be current fluctuations related to asymmetric Pi 1.

  14. PICsar: Particle in cell pulsar magnetosphere simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.

    2016-07-01

    PICsar simulates the magnetosphere of an aligned axisymmetric pulsar and can be used to simulate other arbitrary electromagnetics problems in axisymmetry. Written in Fortran, this special relativistic, electromagnetic, charge conservative particle in cell code features stretchable body-fitted coordinates that follow the surface of a sphere, simplifying the application of boundary conditions in the case of the aligned pulsar; a radiation absorbing outer boundary, which allows a steady state to be set up dynamically and maintained indefinitely from transient initial conditions; and algorithms for injection of charged particles into the simulation domain. PICsar is parallelized using MPI and has been used on research problems with ~1000 CPUs.

  15. The role of magnetic-field-aligned electric fields in auroral acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Block, L.P.; Faelthammar, C.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Electric field measurements on the Swedish satellite Viking have confirmed and extended earlier observations on S3-3 and provided further evidence of the role of dc electric fields in auroral acceleration processes. On auroral magnetic field lines the electric field is strongly fluctuating both transverse and parallel to the magnetic field. The significance of these fluctuations for the auroral acceleration process is discussed. A definition of dc electric fields is given in terms of their effects on charged particles. Fluctuations below several hertz are experienced as dc by typical auroral electrons if the acceleration length is a few thousand kilometers. For ions the same is true below about 0.1 Hz. The magnetic-field-aligned (as well as the transverse) component of the electric field fluctuations has a maximum below 1 Hz, in a frequency range that appears as dc to the electrons but not to the ions. This allows it to cause a selective acceleration, which may be important in explaining some of the observed characteristics of auroral particle distributions. The electric field observations on Viking support the conclusion that magnetic-field-aligned potential drops play an important role in auroral acceleration, in good agreement with particle observations boht on Viking and on the DE satellites. They also show that a large part, or even all, of the accelerating potential drop may be accounted for by numerous weak (about a volt) electric double layers, in agreement with earlier observations on the S3-3 satellite and with an early theoretical suggestion by L. Block.

  16. A bifunctional spin label reports the structural topology of phospholamban in magnetically-aligned bicelles.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Jesse E; James, Zachary M; Svensson, Bengt; Binder, Benjamin P; Thomas, David D

    2016-01-01

    We have applied a bifunctional spin label and EPR spectroscopy to determine membrane protein structural topology in magnetically-aligned bicelles, using monomeric phospholamban (PLB) as a model system. Bicelles are a powerful tool for studying membrane proteins by NMR and EPR spectroscopies, where magnetic alignment yields topological constraints by resolving the anisotropic spectral properties of nuclear and electron spins. However, EPR bicelle studies are often hindered by the rotational mobility of monofunctional Cys-linked spin labels, which obscures their orientation relative to the protein backbone. The rigid and stereospecific TOAC label provides high orientational sensitivity but must be introduced via solid-phase peptide synthesis, precluding its use in large proteins. Here we show that a bifunctional methanethiosulfonate spin label attaches rigidly and stereospecifically to Cys residues at i and i+4 positions along PLB's transmembrane helix, thus providing orientational resolution similar to that of TOAC, while being applicable to larger membrane proteins for which synthesis is impractical. Computational modeling and comparison with NMR data shows that these EPR experiments provide accurate information about helix tilt relative to the membrane normal, thus establishing a robust method for determining structural topology in large membrane proteins with a substantial advantage in sensitivity over NMR. PMID:26720587

  17. A bifunctional spin label reports the structural topology of phospholamban in magnetically-aligned bicelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Jesse E.; James, Zachary M.; Svensson, Bengt; Binder, Benjamin P.; Thomas, David D.

    2016-01-01

    We have applied a bifunctional spin label and EPR spectroscopy to determine membrane protein structural topology in magnetically-aligned bicelles, using monomeric phospholamban (PLB) as a model system. Bicelles are a powerful tool for studying membrane proteins by NMR and EPR spectroscopies, where magnetic alignment yields topological constraints by resolving the anisotropic spectral properties of nuclear and electron spins. However, EPR bicelle studies are often hindered by the rotational mobility of monofunctional Cys-linked spin labels, which obscures their orientation relative to the protein backbone. The rigid and stereospecific TOAC label provides high orientational sensitivity but must be introduced via solid-phase peptide synthesis, precluding its use in large proteins. Here we show that a bifunctional methanethiosulfonate spin label attaches rigidly and stereospecifically to Cys residues at i and i + 4 positions along PLB's transmembrane helix, thus providing orientational resolution similar to that of TOAC, while being applicable to larger membrane proteins for which synthesis is impractical. Computational modeling and comparison with NMR data shows that these EPR experiments provide accurate information about helix tilt relative to the membrane normal, thus establishing a robust method for determining structural topology in large membrane proteins with a substantial advantage in sensitivity over NMR.

  18. Wideband Observations of Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.

    2015-08-01

    Pulsars are exotic objects which have yielded a bounty of important astrophysical results. As rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars, pulsars' stable rotation and beamed radio emission enables their use as interstellar laboratory clocks. The extraordinary timing regularity of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) population permits some of the most precise measurements in astronomy. The discovery of MSPs raised the probability of directly detecting gravitational waves for the first time. Ongoing efforts by several pulsar timing array (PTA) collaborations compliment the ground- and space-based efforts of laser interferometers. One such PTA is the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav). NANOGrav has recently employed a new set of wideband instruments to increase the sensitivity of their PTA, and the future of pulsar astronomy is moving towards progressively larger bandwidths. In this dissertation, we address the benefits and issues from adopting the new instrumentation, particularly for the scientific motivations of NANOGrav. We first develop a measurement technique for simultaneously obtaining pulse times-of-arrival (TOAs) and dispersion measures (DMs) using 2D models of evolving Gaussian components. We then apply the methodology broadly to a variety of pulsars, including a bright, test MSP in a globular cluster, the Galactic Center magnetar, and the entire suite of 37 MSPs from the NANOGrav 9-year data set. For a subset of these MSPs, we make targeted observations at specific orbital phases aimed at improving the timing models and constraining the Shapiro delay. With a few exceptions, we find positive or consistent timing results from the implementation of our first generation wideband timing protocol. Some highlights include: improved measurement uncertainties, mitigation of chromatic ISM effects, a reduction in the number of timing parameters and TOAs, signs of chromatic DMs, and at least one new pulsar mass.

  19. Stability estimate for the aligned magnetic field in a periodic quantum waveguide from Dirichlet-to-Neumann map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejri, Youssef

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we study the boundary inverse problem of determining the aligned magnetic field appearing in the magnetic Schrödinger equation in a periodic quantum cylindrical waveguide, by knowledge of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map. We prove a Hölder stability estimate with respect to the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map, by means of the geometrical optics solutions of the magnetic Schrödinger equation.

  20. Electro-magnetic properties of composites with aligned Fe-Co hollow fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seungchan; Choi, Jae Ryung; Jung, Byung Mun; Choi, U. Hyeok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Kim, Ki Hyeon; Lee, Sang-Bok

    2016-05-01

    A novel Fe-Co binary hollow fiber was synthesized by electroless plating using hydrolyzed polyester fiber and its anisotropy characteristic was investigated for electromagnetic wave absorbing materials. The hollow fibers in parallel with magnetic field show higher saturated magnetization of 202 emu/g at the applied magnetic field of 10 kOe and lower coercivity (27.658 Oe), compared with the random and vertical oriented hollow fibers. From complex permittivity measurement, the Fe-Co hollow fiber composites clearly display a single dielectric resonance, located at ˜14 GHz. The Fe-Co hollow fibers not only provide excellent EM properties in GHz frequency ranges, resulting mainly from the strong resonance, but also adjust the soft magnetic properties through fiber alignments. The cavitary structure of the Fe-Co hollow fibers, not only giving rise to a dielectric loss resonance and also adjusting its peak frequency, may be a pathway to useful EM wave absorptive devices in GHz frequency ranges.

  1. Interplanetary GPS using pulsar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, W.; Bernhardt, M. G.; Jessner, A.

    2015-11-01

    An external reference system suitable for deep space navigation can be defined by fast spinning and strongly magnetized neutron stars, called pulsars. Their beamed periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. The unique properties of pulsars make clear already today that such a navigation system will have its application in future astronautics. In this paper we describe the basic principle of spacecraft navigation using pulsars and report on the current development status of this novel technology.

  2. A Search for Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, Ronald Winston

    1996-01-01

    We have built a data acquisition backend for radio pulsar search observations carried out at the NRAO 140 -foot telescope in Green Bank, West Virginia. Our system sampled 512 spectral channels over 40 MHz every 256 mus, reduced samples to one-bit precision, and wrote the resulting data stream onto magnetic tape for later, off-line processing. We have completed three surveys with this backend. In the first survey, we searched most of the Northern Hemisphere for millisecond radio pulsars. Previous surveys directed towards most of the region covered had not been as sensitive to pulsars with millisecond periods. We obtained high quality data for 15,876 deg^2 of sky. Eight new pulsars were discovered and 76 previously known pulsars were detected. Two of the eight new pulsars (PSR J1022+1001 and PSR J1518+4904) are millisecond pulsars in binary systems. PSR J1518+4904 is a 41 ms radio pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.25) 8.6 day orbit with another stellar object, probably another neutron star. It is only the fifth double neutron star system known. The system's relativistic advance of periastron has been measured to be ˙omega = 0.0112 +/- 0.0002 ^circ yr^{-1}, implying that the total mass of the pair of stars is 2.65 +/-0.07Modot. We have searched for radio pulsar companions to 40 nearby OB runaway stars. No pulsar companions to OB runaways were discovered. One previously unknown pulsar, PSR J2044+4614, was discovered while observing towards target O star BD+45,3260. However, follow-up timing observations reveal that the pulsar is not associated with the target O star. Assuming standard models for the pulsar beaming fraction and luminosity function, we conclude that most OB runaways do not have pulsar companions. We have completed a survey for pulsed radio signals towards 27 gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. No new pulsars were discovered.

  3. Electrostatic lower hybrid waves excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves scattering from planar magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, T. F.; Ngo, H. D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model for electrostatic lower hybrid waves excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves propagating in regions of the magnetosphere and the topside ionosphere, where small-scale magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities are thought to exist. In this model, the electrostatic waves are excited by linear mode coupling as the incident electromagnetic whistler mode waves scatter from the magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities. Results indicate that high-amplitude short-wavelength (5 to 100 m) quasi-electrostatic whistler mode waves can be excited when electromagnetic whistler mode waves scatter from small-scale planar magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities in the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  4. An unexpected drop in the magnetic field of the X-ray pulsar V0332+53 after the bright outburst occurred in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; D'Aì, A.; Segreto, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.

    2016-07-01

    How the accreted mass settling on the surface of a neutron star affects the topology of the magnetic field and how the secular evolution of the binary system depends on the magnetic field change is still an open issue. We report evidence for a clear drop in the observed magnetic field in the accreting pulsar V0332+53 after undergoing a bright 3-month long X-ray outburst. We determine the field from the position of the fundamental cyclotron line in its X-ray spectrum and relate it to the luminosity. For equal levels of luminosity, in the declining phase we measure a systematically lower value of the cyclotron line energy with respect to the rising phase. This results in a drop of ˜1.7 × 1011 G of the observed field between the onset and the end of the outburst. The settling of the accreted plasma on to the polar cap seems to induce a distortion of the magnetic field lines weakening their intensity along the accretion columns. Therefore, the dissipation rate of the magnetic field could be much faster than previously estimated, unless the field is able to restore its original configuration on a time-scale comparable with the outbursts recurrence time.

  5. Magnetic Field Alignment of PS-P4VP: a Non-Liquid Crystalline Coil-Coil Block Copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Zhang, Kai; Larson, Steven; Gopalan, Padma; O'Hern, Corey; Osuji, Chinedum

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic fields provide the ability to control alignment of self-assembled soft materials such as block copolymers. Most prior work in this area has relied on the presence of ordered assemblies of anisotropic liquid crystalline species to ensure sufficient magnetic anisotropy to drive alignment. Recent experiments with poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine), a non-liquid crystalline BCP, however, show field-induced alignment of a lamellar microstructure during cooling across the order-disorder transition. Using in situ x-ray scattering, we examine the roles of field strength and cooling rate on the alignment response of this low MW coil-coil BCP. Alignment is first observed at field strengths as low as 1 Tesla and improves markedly with both increasing field strength and slower cooling. We present a geometric argument to illustrate the origin of a finite, non-trivial magnetic susceptibility anisotropy for highly stretched surface-tethered polymer chains and corroborate this using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We rationalize the magnetic field response of the system in terms of the mobility afforded by the absence of entanglements, the intrinsic anisotropy resulting from the stretched polymer chains and sterically constrained conjugated rings, and the large grain size in these low molecular weight materials.

  6. A CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATION OF THE BINARY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J1023+0038

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Archibald, Anne M.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Lorimer, Duncan; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Ransom, Scott M.; Stairs, Ingrid H.

    2011-12-01

    We present a Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S variability, spectroscopy, and imaging study of the peculiar binary containing the millisecond pulsar J1023+0038. The X-ray emission from the system exhibits highly significant (12.5{sigma}) large-amplitude (factor of two to three) orbital variability over the five consecutive orbits covered by the observation, with a pronounced decline in the flux at all energies at superior conjunction. This can be naturally explained by a partial geometric occultation by the secondary star of an X-ray-emitting intrabinary shock, produced by the interaction of outflows from the two stars. The depth and duration of the eclipse imply that the intrabinary shock is localized near or at the surface of the companion star and close to the inner Lagrangian point. The energetics of the shock favor a magnetically dominated pulsar wind that is focused into the orbital plane, requiring close alignment of the pulsar spin and orbital angular momentum axes. The X-ray spectrum consists of a dominant non-thermal component and at least one thermal component, likely originating from the heated pulsar polar caps, although a portion of this emission may be from an optically thin 'corona'. We find no evidence for extended emission due to a pulsar wind nebula or bow shock down to a limiting luminosity of L{sub X} {approx}< 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg s{sup -1} (0.3-8 keV), {approx}< 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} of the pulsar spin-down luminosity, for a distance of 1.3 kpc and an assumed power-law spectrum with photon index {Gamma} = 1.5.

  7. Pulsar wind model for the spin-down behavior of intermittent pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Tong, H.; Yan, W. M.; Yuan, J. P.; Wang, N.; Xu, R. X.

    2014-06-10

    Intermittent pulsars are part-time radio pulsars. They have higher slow down rates in the on state (radio-loud) than in the off state (radio-quiet). This gives evidence that particle wind may play an important role in pulsar spindown. The effect of particle acceleration is included in modeling the rotational energy loss rate of the neutron star. Applying the pulsar wind model to the three intermittent pulsars (PSR B1931+24, PSR J1841–0500, and PSR J1832+0029) allows their magnetic fields and inclination angles to be calculated simultaneously. The theoretical braking indices of intermittent pulsars are also given. In the pulsar wind model, the density of the particle wind can always be the Goldreich-Julian density. This may ensure that different on states of intermittent pulsars are stable. The duty cycle of particle wind can be determined from timing observations. It is consistent with the duty cycle of the on state. Inclination angle and braking index observations of intermittent pulsars may help to test different models of particle acceleration. At present, the inverse Compton scattering induced space charge limited flow with field saturation model can be ruled out.

  8. Comparison of Flux-Surface Aligned Curvilinear Coordinate Systems and Neoclassical Magnetic Field Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collart, T. G.; Stacey, W. M.

    2015-11-01

    Several methods are presented for extending the traditional analytic ``circular'' representation of flux-surface aligned curvilinear coordinate systems to more accurately describe equilibrium plasma geometry and magnetic fields in DIII-D. The formalism originally presented by Miller is extended to include different poloidal variations in the upper and lower hemispheres. A coordinate system based on separate Fourier expansions of major radius and vertical position greatly improves accuracy in edge plasma structure representation. Scale factors and basis vectors for a system formed by expanding the circular model minor radius can be represented using linear combinations of Fourier basis functions. A general method for coordinate system orthogonalization is presented and applied to all curvilinear models. A formalism for the magnetic field structure in these curvilinear models is presented, and the resulting magnetic field predictions are compared against calculations performed in a Cartesian system using an experimentally based EFIT prediction for the Grad-Shafranov equilibrium. Supported by: US DOE under DE-FG02-00ER54538.

  9. Magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers with positive ordering: a new model membrane system.

    PubMed

    Prosser, R S; Hwang, J S; Vold, R R

    1998-05-01

    A stable smectic phospholipid bilayer phase aligned with the director parallel to the magnetic field can be generated by the addition of certain trivalent paramagnetic lanthanide ions to a bicellar solution of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in water. Suitable lanthanide ions are those with positive anisotropy of their magnetic susceptibility, namely Eu3+, Er3+, Tm3+, and Yb3+. For samples doped with Tm3+, this phase extends over a wide range of Tm3+ concentrations (6-40 mM) and temperatures (35-90 degrees C) and appears to undergo a transition from a fluid nematic discotic to a fluid, but highly ordered, smectic phase at a temperature that depends on the thulium concentration. As a membrane mimetic, these new, positively ordered phospholipid phases have high potential for structural studies using a variety of techniques such as magnetic resonance (EMR and NMR), small-angle x-ray and neutron diffraction, as well as optical and infrared spectroscopy. PMID:9591667

  10. The LACARA Vacuum Laser Accelerator Experiment: Beam Positioning and Alignment in a Strong Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Marshall, T. C.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao; LaPointe, M. A.

    2006-11-27

    LACARA (laser cyclotron auto-resonance accelerator) is a vacuum laser accelerator of electrons that is under construction at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is expected that the experiment will be assembled by September 2006; this paper presents progress towards this goal. According to numerical studies, as an electron bunch moves along the LACARA solenoidal magnetic field ({approx}5.2 T, length {approx}1 m), it will be accelerated from 50 to {approx}75 MeV by interacting with a 0.8 TW Gaussian-mode circularly polarized optical pulse provided by the ATF CO2 10.6{mu}m laser system. The LACARA laser transport optics must handle 10 J and be capable of forming a Gaussian beam inside the solenoid with a 1.4 mm waist and a Rayleigh range of 60 cm. The electron optics must transport a bunch having input emittance of 0.015 mm-mrad and 100 {mu}m waist through the magnet. Precision alignment between the electron beam and the solenoid magnetic axis is required, and a method to achieve this is described in detail. Emittance- filtering may be necessary to yield an accelerated bunch having a narrow ({approx}1%) energy-spread.

  11. Real-time detection of airborne asbestos by light scattering from magnetically re-aligned fibers.

    PubMed

    Stopford, Christopher; Kaye, Paul H; Greenaway, Richard S; Hirst, Edwin; Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Stanley, Warren R

    2013-05-01

    Inadvertent inhalation of asbestos fibers and the subsequent development of incurable cancers is a leading cause of work-related deaths worldwide. Currently, there is no real-time in situ method for detecting airborne asbestos. We describe an optical method that seeks to address this deficiency. It is based on the use of laser light scattering patterns to determine the change in angular alignment of individual airborne fibers under the influence of an applied magnetic field. Detection sensitivity estimates are given for both crocidolite (blue) and chrysotile (white) asbestos. The method has been developed with the aim of providing a low-cost warning device to trades people and others at risk from inadvertent exposure to airborne asbestos. PMID:23669992

  12. Probing gamma-ray emissions of Fermi-LAT pulsars with a non-stationary outer gap model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, J.; Ng, C. W.; Cheng, K. S.

    2016-02-01

    We explore a non-stationary outer gap scenario for gamma-ray emission process in pulsar magnetosphere. Electrons/positrons that migrate along the magnetic field line and enter the outer gap from the outer/inner boundaries activate the pair-creation cascade and high-energy emission process. In our model, the rate of the particle injection at the gap boundaries is key physical quantity to control the gap structure and properties of the gamma-ray spectrum. Our model assumes that the injection rate is time variable and the observed gamma-ray spectrum are superposition of the emissions from different gap structures with different injection rates at the gap boundaries. The calculated spectrum superposed by assuming power law distribution of the particle injection rate can reproduce sub-exponential cut-off feature in the gamma-ray spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT. We fit the phase-averaged spectra for 43 young/middle-age pulsars and 14 millisecond pulsars with the model. Our results imply that (1) a larger particle injection at the gap boundaries is more frequent for the pulsar with a larger spin-down power and (2) outer gap with an injection rate much smaller than the Goldreich-Julian value produces observed >10 GeV emissions. Fermi-LAT gamma-ray pulsars show that (i) the observed gamma-ray spectrum below cut-off energy tends to be softer for the pulsar with a higher spin-down rate and (ii) the second peak is more prominent in higher energy bands. Based on the results of the fitting, we describe possible theoretical interpretations for these observational properties. We also briefly discuss Crab-like millisecond pulsars that show phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray pulses.

  13. Spectral simulations of an axisymmetric force-free pulsar magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gang; Zhang, Li; Sun, Sineng

    2016-02-01

    A pseudo-spectral method with an absorbing outer boundary is used to solve a set of time-dependent force-free equations. In this method, both electric and magnetic fields are expanded in terms of the vector spherical harmonic (VSH) functions in spherical geometry and the divergence-free state of the magnetic field is enforced analytically by a projection method. Our simulations show that the Deutsch vacuum solution and the Michel monopole solution can be reproduced well by our pseudo-spectral code. Further, the method is used to present a time-dependent simulation of the force-free pulsar magnetosphere for an aligned rotator. The simulations show that the current sheet in the equatorial plane can be resolved well and the spin-down luminosity obtained in the steady state is in good agreement with the value given by Spitkovsky.

  14. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    left after a massive star explodes as a supernova at the end of its life. The pulsars in Terzan 5 are the product of a complex history. The stars in the cluster formed about 10 billion years ago, the astronomers say. Some of the most massive stars in the cluster exploded and left the neutron stars as their remnants after only a few million years. Normally, these neutron stars would no longer be seen as swiftly-rotating pulsars: their spin would have slowed because of the "drag" of their intense magnetic fields until the "lighthouse" effect is no longer observable. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) However, the dense concentration of stars in the cluster gave new life to the pulsars. In the core of a globular cluster, as many as a million stars may be packed into a volume that would fit easily between the Sun and our nearest neighbor star. In such close quarters, stars can pass near enough to form new binary pairs, split apart such pairs, and binary systems even can trade partners, like an elaborate cosmic square dance. When a neutron star pairs up with a "normal" companion star, its strong gravitational pull can draw material off the companion onto the neutron star. This also transfers some of the companion's spin, or angular momentum, to the neutron star, thereby "recycling" the neutron star into a rapidly-rotating millisecond pulsar. In Terzan 5, all the pulsars discovered are rotating rapidly as a result of this process. Astronomers previously had discovered three pulsars in Terzan 5, some 28,000 light-years distant in the constellation Sagittarius, but suspected there were more. On July 17, 2004, Ransom and his colleagues used the GBT, and, in a 6-hour observation, found 14 new pulsars, the most ever found in a single observation. "This was possible because of the great sensitivity of the GBT and the new capabilities of our backend processor," said Ingrid Stairs, a professor at the

  15. Equatorial longitude and local time variations of topside magnetic field-aligned ion drifts at solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrell, A. G.; Heelis, R. A.; Stoneback, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    In the topside ionosphere, the high mobility of the plasma along the magnetic field allows field-aligned ion drifts to occur readily as a result of field-aligned gravitational forces, collisional forces, or pressure gradients. Therefore, variations in the field-aligned ion drifts can be used to explore the influence of thermospheric, electrodynamic, and chemical processes on the ionosphere. Longitude and local time variations in the field-aligned ion drifts near the magnetic equator are presented using observations from the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation on board the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System satellite. These observations were obtained during the period of extremely low solar activity present in 2008 and 2009, allowing the seasonal, local time, and longitudinal variations to reveal the relative importance of the processes responsible for topside field-aligned plasma drifts during solar minimum. This investigation found that the low-altitude winds and tides, the net ionization or loss, and the meridional E×B drift were all influential in creating longitudinal and local time variations in the field-aligned drift, though the strength of the influence seen by each driver was found to vary with season, local time, and longitude.

  16. A Pulsar Eases Off the Brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In 2006, pulsar PSR 18460258 unexpectedly launched into a series of energetic X-ray outbursts. Now a study has determined that this event may have permanently changed the behavior of this pulsar, raising questions about our understanding of how pulsars evolve.Between CategoriesA pulsar a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star that emits a beam of electromagnetic radiation can be powered by one of three mechanisms:Rotation-powered pulsars transform rotational energy into radiation, gradually slowing down in a predictable way.Accretion-powered pulsars convert the gravitational energy of accreting matter into radiation.Magnetars are powered by the decay of their extremely strong magnetic fields.Astronomical classification often results in one pesky object that doesnt follow the rules. In this case, that object is PSR 18460258, a young pulsar categorized as rotation-powered. But in 2006, PSR 18460258 suddenly emitted a series of short, hard X-ray bursts and underwent a flux increase behavior that is usually only exhibited by magnetars. After this outburst, it returned to normal, rotation-powered-pulsar behavior.Since the discovery of this event, scientists have been attempting to learn more about this strange pulsar that seems to straddle the line between rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars.Unprecedented DropOne way to examine whats going on with PSR 18460258 is to evaluate whats known as its braking index, a measure of how quickly the pulsars rotation slows down. For a rotation-powered pulsar, the braking index should be roughly constant. The pulsar then slows down according to a fixed power law, where the slower it rotates, the slower it slows down.In a recent study, Robert Archibald (McGill University) and collaborators report on 7 years worth of timing observations of PSR 18460258 after its odd magnetar-like outburst. They then compare these observations to 6.5 years of data from before the outburst. The team finds that the braking index for this bizarre

  17. Galactic distribution of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiradakis, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The density distributions of pulsars in luminosity, period, Z-distance, and galactocentric distance were derived, using a uniform sample of pulsars detected during a 408-MHz pulsar survey at Jodrell Bank. There are indications of a fine-scale structure in the spatial distributions and evidence that there is a general correlation with other galactic populations and the overall spiral structure. The electron layer in our galaxy is shown to be wider than the pulsar layer and uniform on a large scale. The number of pulsars in the galaxy has been estimated and used to derive the pulsar birthrate.

  18. Galactic distribution of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiradakis, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The density distributions of pulsars in luminosity, period, Z-distance, and galactocentric distance were derived using a uniform sample of pulsars detected during a 408 MHz pulsar survey at Jodrell Bank. There are indications of a fine scale structure in the spatial distribution and evidence that there is a general correlation with other galactic populations and the overall spiral structure. The electron layer in the galaxy is shown to be wider than the pulsar layer and uniform on a large scale. The number of pulsars in the galaxy was estimated and used to derive the pulsar birthrate.

  19. Pair-Starved Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple analytic model for the innermost (within the light cylinder of canonical radius, approx. c/Omega) structure of open-magnetic-field lines of a rotating neutron star (NS) with relativistic outflow of charged particles (electrons/positrons) and arbitrary angle between the NS spin and magnetic axes. We present the self-consistent solution of Maxwell's equations for the magnetic field and electric current in the pair-starved regime where the density of electron-positron plasma generated above the pulsar polar cap is not sufficient to completely screen the accelerating electric field and thus establish thee E . B = 0 condition above the pair-formation front up to the very high altitudes within the light cylinder. The proposed mode1 may provide a theoretical framework for developing the refined model of the global pair-starved pulsar magnetosphere.

  20. Dust Particle Alignment in the Solar Magnetic Field: a Possible Cause of the Cometary Circular Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, L.; Koenders, C.; Rosenbush, V.; Kiselev, N.; Ivanova, A.; Afanasiev, V.

    2015-12-01

    Circular polarization (CP) produced by scattering of sunlight on cometary dust has been observed in 11 comets, and showed the values from 0.01% to 0.8%. CP of both signs was observed, although negative (left-handed) CP dominates. Recent observations of several comets using SCORPIO-2 focal reducer at the 6-m BTA telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia) allowed producing maps of CP in the comet continuum filter at 684 nm and red wide-band filter. A gradual increase of the CP with the nucleocentric distance was usually observed. The most plausible reason why the light scattered by cometary dust becomes circularly polarized is alignment of the dust particles in the solar magnetic field. However, in-situ data for comet Halley, indicated that the solar magnetic field could not penetrate deep into the coma, limited by the diamagnetic cavity, and, thus, could not be responsible for the CP observed closer than ~4000 km from the nucleus. Advanced theoretical studies of interaction of the solar magnetic field with cometary ions led to reconsidering the diamagnetic cavity boundary - it is defined by the cometary ionopause, at which a balance is achieved between the magnetic pressure in the magnetic pile up region and the neutral friction force. The nucleocentric distance where this balance is achieved depends on the comet characteristics, increasing with the increase of the gas production rate, and local solar wind conditions, approximatively given by the comet location, specifically, its heliocentric distance. The size of diamagnetic cavity was calculated for the conditions of our CP observations. We found that it could be as small as dozens (comets 73P, 8P, 290P) or hundreds (comets Q4 NEAT, K1 PanSTARRS, Tago-Sato-Kosaka) kilometers. Thus, non-zero CP close to the nucleus can be easily explained by the interaction of the dust particles with the solar magnetic field. This mechanism also explains the observed increase in CP with the distance from the

  1. Generation of field-aligned currents and Alfven waves by 3D magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Z.W.; Lee, L.C.; Otto, A.

    1995-07-01

    The authors have carried out a three-dimensional compressible MHD simulation to study the generation of field-aligned currents (FAC`s) and Alfven waves by magnetic reconnection for locally antiparallel magnetic fields across the current sheet. Reconnection is triggered by a localized resistivity. The results indicate that both FAC`s and Alfven waves are generated by the three-dimensional reconnection process. Two pairs of FAC`s are generated on each side of current sheet. The polarities of the resulting FAC pair in the leading bulge region are opposite to those of a FAC pair in the trailing quasi-steady region. It is further found that a large portion of the FAC`s ({approximately}40%) is located in the closed field line region. They examine the Walen relation between FAC and parallel vorticity and find that Alfven waves are generated and propagate away from the reconnection site. They discuss the relevance of the results to the observed Region 1 FAC`s at noon. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Magnetopause erosion during the 17 March 2015 magnetic storm: Combined field-aligned currents, auroral oval, and magnetopause observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Lühr, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Singer, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, T.; Bromund, K.; Chi, P. J.; Lu, G.; Fischer, D.; Kepko, E. L.; Leinweber, H. K.; Magnes, W.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Park, J.; Rauberg, J.; Stolle, C.; Torbert, R. B.

    2016-03-01

    We present multimission observations of field-aligned currents, auroral oval, and magnetopause crossings during the 17 March 2015 magnetic storm. Dayside reconnection is expected to transport magnetic flux, strengthen field-aligned currents, lead to polar cap expansion and magnetopause erosion. Our multimission observations assemble evidence for all these manifestations. After a prolonged period of strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field, Swarm and AMPERE observe significant intensification of field-aligned currents. The dayside auroral oval, as seen by DMSP, appears as a thin arc associated with ongoing dayside reconnection. Both the field-aligned currents and the auroral arc move equatorward reaching as low as ~60° magnetic latitude. Strong magnetopause erosion is evident in the in situ measurements of the magnetopause crossings by GOES 13/15 and MMS. The coordinated Swarm, AMPERE, DMSP, MMS and GOES observations, with both global and in situ coverage of the key regions, provide a clear demonstration of the effects of dayside reconnection on the entire magnetosphere.

  3. On the alignment of Classical T Tauri stars with the magnetic field in the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménard, F.; Duchêne, G.

    2004-10-01

    In this paper we readdress the issue of the alignment of Classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) with the magnetic field in the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud. Previous studies have claimed that the jet axis of active young stellar objects (YSO), projected in the plane of the sky, is aligned preferentially along the projected direction of the local magnetic field. We re-examine this issue in view of the numerous high angular resolution images of circumstellar disks and micro-jets now available. The images show that T Tauri stars as a group are oriented randomly with respect to the local magnetic field, contrary to previous claims. This indicates that the magnetic field may play a lesser role in the final stages of collapse of an individual prestellar core than previously envisioned. The current database also suggests that a subsample of CTTS with resolved disks but without observations of bright and extended outflows have a tendency to align perpendicularly to the magnetic field. We discuss the possibility that this may trace a less favorable topology, e.g., quadrupolar, for the magnetic field in the inner disk, resulting in a weaker collimated outflow.

  4. Pulsar Polar Cap and Slot Gap Models: Confronting Fermi Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2012-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. I will review acceleration and gamma-ray emission from the pulsar polar cap and slot gap. Predictions of these models can be tested with the data set on pulsars collected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope over the last four years, using both detailed light curve fitting and population synthesis.

  5. Aligned and exchange-coupled L1{sub 0} (Fe,Co)Pt-based magnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; George, T. A.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    Films of aligned L1{sub 0}-structure (Fe,Co)Pt with fcc Fe(Co,Pt) are synthesized by co-sputtering Fe, Co, and Pt on an (001) MgO substrate with in situ heating at 830 deg. C. The nanostructures and magnetic properties of the films are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The compositions of the samples (Fe,Co){sub x}Pt{sub 1-x} are designed to maintain an atomic Fe: Co ratio of 65: 35 while increasing the Fe,Co content in each successive sample. In samples with low Fe and Co concentration, the XRD patterns exhibit three strong peaks, namely L1{sub 0} (Fe,Co)Pt (001), L1{sub 0} (Fe,Co)Pt (002), and MgO (002). A fourth peak is observed in samples with high Fe and Co concentration and identified as fcc (002). The XRD patterns confirm the formation of L1{sub 0}-ordered (Fe,Co)Pt and its epitaxial growth on MgO. TEM shows that the (Fe,Co)Pt films form isolated magnetic grains of about 100 nm in diameter. Hysteresis-loop measurements show that the increase of the Fe,Co concentration from 57.3 to 68.3 at % enhances the saturation magnetization M{sub s} from 1245 emu/cm{sup 3} to 1416 emu/cm{sup 3}, and the coercivity decreases from 32 kOe to 8.9 kOe. The nominal maximum energy product per grain is 64 MGOe.

  6. Strong ionospheric field-aligned currents for radial interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Lühr, Hermann; Shue, Jih-Hong; Frey, Harald. U.; Kervalishvili, Guram; Huang, Tao; Cao, Xue; Pi, Gilbert; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2014-05-01

    The present work has investigated the configuration of field-aligned currents (FACs) during a long period of radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 19 May 2002 by using high-resolution and precise vector magnetic field measurements of CHAMP satellite. During the interest period IMF By and Bz are weakly positive and Bx keeps pointing to the Earth for almost 10 h. The geomagnetic indices Dst is about -40 nT and AE about 100 nT on average. The cross polar cap potential calculated from Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and derived from DMSP observations have average values of 10-20 kV. Obvious hemispheric differences are shown in the configurations of FACs on the dayside and nightside. At the south pole FACs diminish in intensity to magnitudes of about 0.1 μA/m2, the plasma convection maintains two-cell flow pattern, and the thermospheric density is quite low. However, there are obvious activities in the northern cusp region. One pair of FACs with a downward leg toward the pole and upward leg on the equatorward side emerge in the northern cusp region, exhibiting opposite polarity to FACs typical for duskward IMF orientation. An obvious sunward plasma flow channel persists during the whole period. These ionospheric features might be manifestations of an efficient magnetic reconnection process occurring in the northern magnetospheric flanks at high latitude. The enhanced ionospheric current systems might deposit large amount of Joule heating into the thermosphere. The air densities in the cusp region get enhanced and subsequently propagate equatorward on the dayside. Although geomagnetic indices during the radial IMF indicate low-level activity, the present study demonstrates that there are prevailing energy inputs from the magnetosphere to both the ionosphere and thermosphere in the northern polar cusp region.

  7. Numerical simulations of Hall-effect plasma accelerators on a magnetic-field-aligned mesh.

    PubMed

    Mikellides, Ioannis G; Katz, Ira

    2012-10-01

    The ionized gas in Hall-effect plasma accelerators spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and exhibits diverse physics some of which remain elusive even after decades of research. Inside the acceleration channel a quasiradial applied magnetic field impedes the current of electrons perpendicular to it in favor of a significant component in the E×B direction. Ions are unmagnetized and, arguably, of wide collisional mean free paths. Collisions between the atomic species are rare. This paper reports on a computational approach that solves numerically the 2D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law with no assumptions regarding the resistance to classical electron transport in the parallel relative to the perpendicular direction. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations on a computational mesh that is aligned with the applied magnetic field. This approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction and encompasses the cathode boundary where the lines of force can become nonisothermal. It also allows for the self-consistent solution of the plasma conservation laws near the anode boundary, and for simulations in accelerators with complex magnetic field topologies. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for the ion drag in the momentum equation due to ion-neutral (charge-exchange) and ion-ion collisions. The density of the atomic species is determined using an algorithm that eliminates the statistical noise associated with discrete-particle methods. Numerical simulations are presented that illustrate the impact of the above-mentioned features on our understanding of the plasma in these accelerators. PMID:23214706

  8. Interplanetary magnetic field dependency of stable Sun-aligned polar cap arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Carlson, H. C., Jr.; Fukui, K.

    1994-01-01

    This is the first analysis, using a statistically significant data set, of the morphological dependence of the presence, orientation, and motion of stable sun-aligned polar cap arcs upon the vector interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). For the one winter season analyzed we had 1392 all-sky 630.0-nm images of 2-min resolution containing a total of 150 polar cap arcs, all with corresponding values of the IMF as measured by International Monitoring Platform (IMP) 8 or International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) 2. After demonstrating an unbiased data set with smooth normal distributions of events versus the dimensions of time, space, and IMF component, we examine IMF dependencies of the properties of the optical arcs. A well-defined dependence for B(sub z) is found for the presence/absence of stable Sun-aligned polar cap arcs. Consistent with previous statistical studies, the probability of observing polar cap aurora steadily increases for larger positive values of B(sub z), and linearly decreases when B(sub z) becomes more negative. The probability of observing Sun-aligned arcs within the polar cap is determined to vary sharply as a function of the arc location; arcs were observed 40% of the time on the dawnside and only 10% on the duskside. This implies an overall probability of at least 40% for the whole polar cap. 20% of the arcs were observed during 'southward IMF conditions,' but in fact under closer inspection were found to have been formed under northward IMF conditions; these 'residual' positive B(sub z) arcs ha d a delayed residence time in the polar cap of about what would be expected after a north to south transition of B(sub z). A firm dependence on B(sub y) is also found for both the orientation and the dawn-dusk direction of motion of the arcs. All the arcs are Sun-aligned to a first approximation, but present deviations from this orientation, depending primarily upon the location of the arc in corrected geomagnetic (CG) coordinates. The arcs populating the

  9. Particles generation and cooling of pulsar magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryvdyk, Volodymyr

    2016-07-01

    The generation of secondary particles (neutrinos, neutrons, electrons, protons, mesons) and gamma-ray photons because of nuclear interactions in magnetospheres of pulsars and magnetars are considered. By means of the nuclear interactions, the primarily accelerated electrons and protons in the pulsar magnetosphere will be generated secondary particles and photons, which will also generate particles and gamma-ray photons by cascading interactions. Namely from these particles and photons, which arise because of multiple interactions, and will consist of the pulsar magnetosphere. It is important that in pulsar magnetosphere will generate the powerful flux of neutral particles (neutrons) and a neutrino that do not interact with the magnetic field and are free to go out with her, bringing out energy and cooling magnetosphere. So, we obtain a powerful new channel cooling pulsar magnetosphere. This is a new result, which shows that cooling of pulsar and magnetars is not only a result of the processes generating neutrinos in the inner core, but also due to the generation of neutrino and neutrons in the pulsar magnetosphere and subsequently their exit in the interstellar environment.

  10. Rotational evolution of the Crab pulsar in the wind braking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, F. F.; Tong, H.

    2015-06-01

    The pulsar wind model is updated by considering the effect of particle density and pulsar death. It can describe both the short-term and long-term rotational evolution of pulsars consistently. It is applied to model the rotational evolution of the Crab pulsar. The pulsar is spun down by a combination of magnetic dipole radiation and particle wind. The parameters of the Crab pulsar, including magnetic field, inclination angle, and particle density are calculated. The primary particle density in acceleration region is about 103 times the Goldreich-Julian charge density. The lower braking index between glitches is due to a larger outflowing particle density. This may be glitch induced magnetospheric activities in normal pulsars. Evolution of braking index and the Crab pulsar in P-dot{P} diagram are calculated. The Crab pulsar will evolve from magnetic dipole radiation dominated case towards particle wind-dominated case. Considering the effect of pulsar `death', the Crab pulsar (and other normal pulsars) will not evolve to the cluster of magnetars but downwards to the death valley. Different acceleration models are also considered. Applications to other sources are also discussed, including pulsars with braking index measured, and the magnetar population.

  11. Pulsar Astronomy with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsett, Stephen

    2005-09-12

    Despite their name, the rotation powered neutron stars called "radio pulsars" are actually most luminous in the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bands. GLAST will be the first high-energy satellite with sufficient sensitivity to detect and study large numbers of these pulsars. I will review GLAST's key science goals in pulsar astrophysics and summarize the extraordinary advances in low-energy pulsar surveys since the days of CGRO.

  12. General-relativistic force-free pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2016-02-01

    Pulsar magnetospheres are shaped by ultrarelativistic electron/positron plasmas flowing in a strong magnetic field and subject to strong gravitational fields. The former induces magnetospheric currents and space charges responsible for the distortion of the electromagnetic field based on pure electrodynamics. The latter induces other perturbations in these fields based on space-time curvature. The force-free approximation describes the response of this magnetosphere to the presence of currents and charges and has been investigated by many authors. In this context, general relativity has been less discussed to quantify its influence on the neutron star electrodynamics. It is the purpose of this paper to compute general-relativistic force-free pulsar magnetospheres for realistic magnetic field configurations such as the inclined dipole. We performed time-dependent simulations of Maxwell equations in the 3+1 formalism of a stationary background metric in the slow-rotation approximation. We computed the resulting Poynting flux depending on the ratio R/rL and on frame-dragging through the spin parameter as, R is the neutron star radius and rL the light-cylinder radius. Both effects act together to increase the total Poynting flux seen by a distant observer by a factor up to 2 depending on the rotation rate. Moreover we retrieve the sin 2χ dependence of this luminosity, χ being the obliquity of the pulsar, as well as a braking index close to n = 3. We also show that the angular dependence of the Poynting flux scales like sin 2ϑ for the aligned rotator but like sin 4ϑ for the orthogonal rotator, ϑ being the colatitude.

  13. Correlation between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the field-aligned current regions deduced from DE 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, M.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Slavin, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The satellite-observed high correlations between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the high-latitude field-aligned current regions are investigated by examining the dependence of the relationship between Delta-B and E on spatial scale, using the electric and magnetic field data obtained by DE 2 in the polar regions. The results are compared with the Pedersen conductivity inferred from the international reference ionosphere model and the Alfven wave velocity calculated from the in situ ion density and magnetic field measurements.

  14. Transparency enhancement for photoinitiated polymerization (UV curing) through magnetic field alignment in a piezoresistive metal/polymer composite.

    PubMed

    Knaapila, Matti; Høyer, Henrik; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Helgesen, Geir

    2014-03-12

    We use a magnetic field to align nickel particles into stringlike assemblies in urethane oligomer mixtures and create a semitransparent UV-curable nickel particle/polymer composite with anisotropic electrical conductivity and piezoresistive properties. When the particles are uniformly distributed in the oligourethane matrix, the mixture is moderately conductive at higher particle fractions but becomes insulating once the fraction is below about 5 vol %. With the particle fraction below this threshold and using an external magnetic field, the particles are aligned into continuous pathways through the oligomer mixtures following the magnetic flux lines. The matrix is subsequently cured by UV light. This results in conductivity and piezoresistivity along the alignment direction, while the material is not conducting perpendicular to the alignment direction. The lower particle fraction results in a lower number of absorbers for UV light: the decrease from 5 to 1 vol % increases optical transmission from 10% to 50% in the UV/vis region. This leads to a shorter photocuring time, typically from tens of seconds to seconds for 300-μm-thick films at a wavelength of 365 nm. We propose that this concept could be applied in areas such as pressure sensors. PMID:24527791

  15. Braking Index of Isolated Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamil, Oliver; Stone, Jirina; Urbanec, Martin; Urbancova, Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    Isolated pulsars are rotating neutron stars with accurately measured angular velocities Ω, and their time derivatives which show unambiguously that the pulsars are slowing down. The exact mechanism of the spin-down is a question of debate in detail, but the commonly accepted view is that it arises through emission of magnetic dipole radiation (MDR). The energy loss by a rotating pulsar is proportional to a model dependent power of Ω. This relation leads to the power law Ω˙ = -K Ωn where n is called the braking index, equal to the ratio (ΩΩ̈)/ Ω˙2 . The simple MDR model predicts the value of n = 3, but observations of isolated pulsars provide rather precise values of n, individually accurate to a few percent or better, in the range 1 < n < 2.8, which is consistently less than the predictions of the MDR model. In this work, we study the dynamical limits of the MDR model as a function of angular velocity. The effects of variation in the rest mass, the moment of inertia, and the dependence on a realistic Equation of State of the rotating star are considered. Furthermore, we introduce a simulated superfluid effect by which the angular momentum of the core is eliminated from the calculation.

  16. Synthesis of double-wall nanoscrolls intercalated with polyfluorinated cationic surfactant into layered niobate and their magnetic alignment.

    PubMed

    Nabetani, Yu; Uchikoshi, Akino; Miyajima, Souki; Hassan, Syed Zahid; Ramakrishnan, Vivek; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Yamato, Masafumi; Inoue, Haruo

    2016-04-28

    The orientation of nanomaterials with an anisotropic nature such as nanoscrolls is very important for realizing their efficient and sophisticated functions in devices, including nanostructured electrodes in artificial photosynthetic cells. In this study, we successfully synthesized a nanoscroll by intercalation of a cationic polyfluorinated surfactant into the interlayer spaces of layered niobate and successfully controlled its orientation by applying an external magnetic field in water. The exfoliated niobate nanosheets were efficiently rolled-up to form nanoscrolls, which have a fine layered structure (d020 = 3.64 nm), by mixing with heptafluorobutanoylaminoethylhexadecyldimethylammonium bromide (C3F-S) in water, whereas the corresponding hydrocarbon analogue (C3H-S) did not form nanoscrolls. The synthetic yield for the purified and isolated nanoscrolls from the nanosheets was estimated to be 62% by weight. It was confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that most of the niobate nanosheets (98%) were converted to nanoscrolls. An external magnetic field was applied to the nanoscrolls to force them to align. After the magnetic treatment, the orientation of the nanoscrolls was investigated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The non-uniform ring distribution of the SAXS patterns indicates that the nanoscrolls dispersed in water were aligned well on applying the magnetic field. The long axis of the nanoscroll was oriented in the direction of the applied field and long nanoscrolls were aligned more efficiently. When the intercalated C3F-S molecules were removed from the nanoscrolls by treating with an acid, the resultant nanoscrolls did not exhibit magnetic alignment, strongly suggesting that C3F-S plays an important role in the orientation control of the nanoscrolls by the magnetic field. PMID:27074750

  17. High-energy pulsar models: Developments and new questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    The past few years have seen a major advance in observational knowledge of high-energy (HE) pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and {AGILE} have increased the number of known γ-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude, its members being divided roughly equally among millisecond pulsars (MSPs), young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. Many new and diverse emission characteristics are being measured, while radio and X-ray follow-up observations increase the pulsar detection rate and enrich our multiwavelength picture of these extreme sources. The wealth of new data has provided impetus for further development and improvement of existing theoretical pulsar models. Geometric light curve (LC) modelling has uncovered three broad classes into which HE pulsars fall: those where the radio profile leads, is aligned with, or lags the γ-ray profile. For example, the original MSP and original black widow system are members of the second class, requiring co-located emission regions and thereby breaking with traditional notions of radio emission origin. These models imply narrow accelerator gaps in the outer magnetosphere, indicating copious pair production even in MSP magnetospheres that were previously thought to be pair-starved. The increased quality and variety of the LCs necessitate construction of ever more sophisticated models. We will review progress in global magnetosphere solutions which specify a finite conductivity on field lines above the stellar surface, filling the gap between the standard vacuum and force-free (FF; plasma-filled) models. The possibility of deriving phase-resolved spectra for the brightest pulsars, coupled with the fact that the HE pulsar population is sizable enough to allow sampling of various pulsar geometries, will enable much more stringent testing of future radiation models. Reproduction of the observed phase-resolved behavior of this disparate group will be one of the next frontiers in pulsar science, impacting on our

  18. High-Energy Pulsar Models: Developments and New Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have seen a major advance in observational knowledge of high-energy (HE) pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and AGILE have increased the number of known gamma-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude, its members being divided roughly equally among millisecond pulsars (MSPs), young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. Many new and diverse emission characteristics are being measured, while radio and X-ray follow-up observations increase the pulsar detection rate and enrich our multiwavelength picture of these extreme sources. The wealth of new data has provided impetus for further development and improvement of existing theoretical pulsar models. Geometric light curve (LC) modelling has uncovered three broad classes into which HE pulsars fall: those where the radio profile leads, is aligned with, or lags the gamma-ray profile. For example, the original MSP and original black widow system are members of the second class, requiring co-located emission regions and thereby breaking with traditional notions of radio emission origin. These models imply narrow accelerator gaps in the outer magnetosphere, indicating copious pair production even in MSP magnetospheres that were previously thought to be pair-starved. The increased quality and variety of the LCs necessitate construction of ever more sophisticated models. We will review progress in global magnetosphere solutions which specify a finite conductivity on field lines above the stellar surface, filling the gap between the standard vacuum and force-free (FF; plasma-filled) models. The possibility of deriving phase-resolved spectra for the brightest pulsars, coupled with the fact that the HE pulsar population is sizable enough to allow sampling of various pulsar geometries, will enable much more stringent testing of future radiation models. Reproduction of the observed phase-resolved behavior of this disparate group will be one of the next frontiers in pulsar science, impacting on

  19. Multi-wavelength analysis of young pulsars: an overview.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maritz, J. M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Buchner, S. J.

    Young pulsars emit a broad spectrum of radiation that range from radio to gamma ray energies. These pulsars are considered as rotation powered pulsars that spin rapidly and are strongly magnetized. Following the discovery of pulsars nearly four decades ago, the population of known pulsars already reached a number of roughly two thousand. This known population of pulsars includes both millisecond and normal pulsars that were discovered by several telescopes. We analyze both HartRAO radio data and Fermi gamma ray data of the Vela pulsar. We also explore a proposed method of probing the electron column density of the instellar gas through analyzing the gamma ray diffuse data associated with the Fermi two-year observation. This paper serves as an overview of gamma ray and radio timing analysis of bright young pulsars with respect to the use of open source timing analysis tools (Tempo2, Psrchive, Enrico and the Fermi tools). We reason that the multi-wavelength picture of pulsars can help clarify questions regarding the origin of pulsed radiation emission mechanisms in several energy bands, but that radio observations will prove adequate for timing noise analysis, given the accurate and long radio data sets. The process of identifying gravitational waves in timing data, rests on gaining a deeper insight into the timing noise phenomena.

  20. Synthesis models of dayside field-aligned currents for strong interplanetary magnetic field By

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masakazu; Iijima, Takesi; Rich, Frederick J.

    1996-06-01

    Using particle and magnetic field data acquired with DMSP-F6 and DMSP-F7 satellites, we have investigated interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By dependence of the global pattern of plasma regime and field-aligned currents (FACs) on dayside high latitudes during strong IMF By (averaged |By|>3.7 nT) and geomagnetically disturbed (mainly IMF Bz<0) periods. From particle data we have identified five plasma regimes: inner plasma sheet, outer plasma sheet, cleft, cusp, and mantle. All the plasma domains except the inner plasma sheet show By dependence in spatial distribution. Region 1 and ``traditional cusp'' currents appear in cusp/mantle domains, which we call midday region 1 and region 0 currents, respectively, in this paper. These currents perfectly reverse their flow directions depending on IMF By polarity. Traditional region 1 currents occurring in cleft and outer plasma sheet almost always flow into the ionosphere in the prenoon sector and flow away from the ionosphere in the postnoon sector regardless of By polarity. Thus the midday region 1 and region 0 current system that appears at local noon is not a simple continuation of flankside region 1/region 2 current system. Midday region 1 and region 0 currents are not necessarily balanced in intensity; region 0 current intensity occasionally exceeds midday region 1 current intensity. Furthermore, intensity imbalance also appears in cleft-associated region 1 currents; that is, region 1 current in the farside cleft from the reconnection site (``downstreamside'' cleft) is larger than region 1 current in the nearside cleft (``upstreamside'' cleft). On the basis of these observational facts we discuss the source mechanisms of the dayside FAC system: (1) directly coupled generation of region 0 and midday region 1 current in the cusp/mantle domains around noon and (2) generation of extra region 0 current in the tail magnetopause which is connected to the extra downstreamside cleft-associated region 1 current.

  1. Field-aligned current signatures during the March 13-14, 1989, great magnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, R. ); Fukunishi, H. ); Kokubun, S. ); Sugiura, M. ); Tohyama, F. ); Hayakawa, H.; Tsuruda, K. ); Okada, T. )

    1992-07-01

    Characteristics of field-aligned currents (FACs) in the evening and morning regions during the March 13-14, 1989, great magnetic storm have been determined using magnetic and electric field data obtained from the EXOS D spacecraft. This storm began with an SSC at 0128 UT on March 13, and the second SSC occurred at 0747 UT on the same day. The storm continued until March 14. The equatorward boundary of the FAC region began to move equatorward right after the first SSC in both the evening and morning sectors, but the poleward boundary did not immediately respond to the SSC. The equatorward boundary of the FAC system reached as low as below 48{degree} invariant latitude, which corresponds to L = 2.2, and the latitudinal width of the FAC region increased greatly, particularly in the morning sector ({approximately}33{degree} in invariant latitude). In the evening sector the conventional current system characterized by a pair of upward region 1 and downward region 2 FACs changed into complicated patterns consisting of many pairs of upward and downward FACs with the development of the storm, particularly around 22 UT on March 13 when an intense eastward electrojet was observed as low as 50{degree} invariant latitude on the ground. In the morning sector an additional large-scale upward FAC was observed poleward of the conventional downward region 1 and upward region 2 FAC system throughout the storm. In addition, a pair of FACs with a narrow latitudinal width ({approximately}1.5{degree}) was observed at the poleward boundary of the extra upward FAC.

  2. Pulsar gamma-rays: Spectra luminosities and efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The general characteristics of pulsar gamma ray spectra are presented for a model where the gamma rays are produced by curvature radiation from energetic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production. The shape of the spectrum is found to depend on pulsar period, magnetic field strength, and primary particle energy. By a comparison of numerically calculated spectra with the observed spectra of the Crab and Vela pulsars, it is determined that primary particles must be accelerated to energies of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power mc sq. A genaral formula for pulsar gamma ray luminosity is determined and is found to depend on period and field strength.

  3. Multi-point Magnetic Field Observations of Field-Aligned Currents from Swarm Constellation Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Guan; Chi, Peter; Lühr, Hermann; Gjerloev, Jesper; Stolle, Claudia; Park, Jaeheung; Rauberg, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we report the results of case studies of multi-point magnetic field measurements of field-aligned currents (FACs) from Swarm constellation mission to understand their temporal characteristics and hemispheric asymmetry. For science operations (since April, 2014), the three spacecraft were placed in slightly different polar orbits: Swarm B spacecraft in a higher altitude orbit (507km x 512km) and Swarm A and C side-by-side in lower altitude orbits (459km x 462km). In the beginning of the science operational phase, the longitudinal separations of the orbital planes were small, and Swarm A/C pair and Swarm B were nearly out of phase in the orbit. This unique orbit configuration provides opportunities to study some new features of FACs. Specifically, the Swarm satellites make multiple crossings of a FAC region within a few hours. Such data enable us to study temporal variations in several time scales, from 1 minute up to about 3 hours. Furthermore, the three satellites make nearly simultaneous observations of FACs in northern and southern hemispheres, which provide us an opportunity to study the hemispheric asymmetry.

  4. Sting-free measurements on a magnetically supported right circular cylinder aligned with the free stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideo; Kato, Hiroyuki

    The flow over cylinders of varying fineness ratio (length to diameter) aligned with the free stream was examined using a magnetic suspension and balance system in order to avoid model support interference. The drag coefficient variation of a right circular cylinder was obtained for a wide range of fineness ratios. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to examine the flow field, particularly the behaviour of the leading-edge separation shear layer and its effect on the wake. Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter ranged from 5105, while the major portion of the experiment was conducted at ReD=1.0×105. For moderately large fineness ratio, the shear layer reattaches with subsequent growth of the boundary layer, whereas over shorter cylinders, the shear layer remains detached. Differences in the wake recirculation region and the immediate wake patterns are clarified in terms of both the mean velocity and turbulent flow fields, including longitudinal vortical structures in the cross-flow plane of the wake. The minimum drag corresponded to the fineness ratio for which the separated shear layer reattached at the trailing edge of the cylinder. The base pressure was obtained with a telemetry technique. Pressure fields and aerodynamic force fluctuations are also discussed.

  5. Field-Aligned and Ionospheric Current Contributions to Ground Magnetic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M. G.; McPherron, R. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Russell, C. T.; Chu, X.

    2014-12-01

    AMPERE data provides global space-derived radial electric currents on temporal and spatial scales suited to studying magnetic fields at ULF frequencies. It responds little to ionspheric currents, which dominate ground-based measurements, so that AMPERE and ground datasets complement each other to give a comprehensive view of near-Earth electric currents. Connors et al. (GRL, 2014) found that a three-dimensional current system slightly modified from the original substorm current wedge (SCW) concept of McPherron et al. (JGR, 1973) represented substorm midnight sector perturbations well both in the auroral and subauroral regions, if a current equivalent to that found by integrating AMPERE downward current was used, located where clear SCW signatures were indicated by AMPERE, and featuring an ionospheric electrojet. The AMPERE upward current was found to exceed that in the SCW, at least in part since the evening sector electrojet fed into it. We extend these results with a more detailed accounting of field-aligned and ionospheric currents throughout the active period (including growth phase). Ionospheric currents for the study are obtained from ground perturbations through optimization of a simple forward model over regions or on a meridian chain. We also investigate the degree to which subauroral perturbations may be directly calculated from AMPERE results. We further find that auroral zone currents may be very localized, to the extent that the entire SCW ionospheric current flows in a very restricted latitudinal range near onset, possibly corresponding to a single auroral arc.

  6. The Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D.; Gotthelf, E.; Halpern, J.

    2000-10-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations of the pulsar separated by one month to search for morphological changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a morphology remarkably similar to the torus-like structure observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. The flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75 %; the 3 sigma limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer torus; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propogation velocity is ~0.5c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright, arc-shaped X-ray wisps are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind which is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula which comprises the post-shock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter of the Vela pulsar wind is required to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B ~ 4 x 10-4G.

  7. Self-propelled in-tube shuttle and control system for automated measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H. ); Pidcoe, S.V. . Space Systems Div.); Zink, R.A. )

    1990-03-01

    A magnetic field alignment gauge is used to measure the field angle as a function of axial position in each of the magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Present measurements are made by manually pushing the through the magnet bore tube and stopping at intervals to record field measurements. Gauge location is controlled through graduation marks and alignment pins on the push rods. Field measurements are recorded on a logging multimeter with tape output. Described is a computerized control system being developed to replace the manual procedure for field alignment measurements. The automated system employs a pneumatic walking device to move the measurement gauge through the bore tube. Movement of the device, called the Self-Propelled In-Tube Shuttle (SPITS), is accomplished through an integral, gas driven, double-acting cylinder. The motion of the SPITS is transferred to the bore tube by means of a pair of controlled, retractable support feet. Control of the SPITS is accomplished through an RS-422 interface from an IBM-compatible computer to a series of solenoid-actuated air valves. Direction of SPITS travel is determined by the air-valve sequence, and is managed through the control software. Precise axial position of the gauge within the magnet is returned to the control system through an optically-encoded digital position transducer attached to the shuttle. Discussed is the performance of the transport device and control system during preliminary testing of the first prototype shuttle. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  8. Self-propelled in-tube shuttle and control system for automated measurements of magnetic field alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroski, W. N.; Nicol, T. H.; Pidcoe, S. V.; Zink, R. A.

    1990-03-01

    A magnetic field alignment gauge is used to measure the field angle as a function of axial position in each of the magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Present measurements are made by manually pushing the gauge through the magnet bore tube and stopping at intervals to record field measurements. Gauge location is controlled through graduation marks and alignment pins on the push rods. Field measurements are recorded on a logging multimeter with tape output. Described is a computerized control system being developed to replace the manual procedure for field alignment measurements. The automated system employs a pneumatic walking device to move the measurement gauge through the bore tube. Movement of the device, called the Self-Propelled In-Tube Shuttle (SPITS), is accomplished through an integral, gas driven, double-acting cylinder. The motion of the SPITS is transferred to the bore tube by means of a pair of controlled, retractable support feet. Control of the SPITS is accomplished through an RS-422 interface from an IBM-compatible computer to a series of solenoid-actuated air valves. Direction of SPITS travel is determined by the air-valve sequence, and is managed through the control software. Precise axial position of the gauge within the magnet is returned to the control system through an optically-encoded digital position transducer attached to the shuttle. Discussed is the performance of the transport device and control system during preliminary testing of the first prototype shuttle.

  9. Controlling anisotropic drug diffusion in lipid-Fe3O4 nanoparticle hybrid mesophases by magnetic alignment.

    PubMed

    Vallooran, Jijo J; Negrini, Renata; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-01-29

    We present a new strategy to control the anisotropic diffusion of hydrophilic drugs in lyotropic liquid crystals via the dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles in the mesophase, followed by reorientation of the mesophase domains via an external magnetic field. We select a lipid reverse hexagonal phase doped with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and glucose and caffeine as model hybrid mesophase and hydrophilic drugs, respectively. Upon cooling through the disorder-order phase transition of the hexagonal phase and under exposure to an external moderate magnetic field (1.1 T), both the nanoparticles and the hexagonal domains align with their columnar axes along the field direction. As a result, the water nanochannels of the inverted hexagonal domains also align parallel to the field direction, leading to a drug diffusion coefficient parallel to the field direction much larger than what was measured perpendicularly: in the case of glucose, for example, this difference in diffusion coefficients approaches 1 order of magnitude. Drug diffusion of the unaligned reverse hexagonal phase, which consists of randomly distributed domains, shows values in between the parallel and transversal diffusion values. This study shows that modifying the overall alignment of anisotropic mesophases via moderate external fields is a valuable means to control the corresponding transport tensor of the mesophase and demonstrates that the orientation of the domains plays an important role in the diffusion process of foreign hydrophilic molecules. PMID:23302008

  10. Transport in a field aligned magnetized plasma/neutral gas boundary: the end of the plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher Michael

    The objective of this dissertation is to characterize the physics of a boundary layer between a magnetized plasma and a neutral gas along the direction of a confining magnetic field. A series of experiments are performed at the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD) at UCLA to study this field aligned Neutral Boundary Layer (NBL) at the end of the plasma. A Lanthanum Hexaboride (LaB6) cathode and semi-transparent anode creates a magnetized, current-free helium plasma which terminates on a neutral helium gas without touching any walls. Probes are inserted into the plasma to measure the basic plasma parameters and study the transport in the NBL. The experiment is performed in the weakly ionized limit where the plasma density (ne) is much less than the neutral density (nn) such that ne/nn < 5%. The NBL is characterized by a field-aligned electric field which begins at the point where the plasma pressure equilibrates with the neutral gas pressure. Beyond the pressure equilibration point the electrons and ions lose their momentum by collisions with the neutral gas and come to rest. An electric field is established self consistently to maintain a current-free termination through equilibration of the different species' stopping rates in the neutral gas. The electric field resembles a collisional quasineutral sheath with a length 10 times the electron-ion collision length, 100 times the neutral collision length, and 10,000 times the Debye length. Collisions with the neutral gas dominate the losses in the system. The measured plasma density loss rates are above the classical cross-field current-free ambipolar rate, but below the anomalous Bohm diffusion rate. The electron temperature is below the ionization threshold of the gas, 2.2 eV in helium. The ions are in thermal equilibrium with the neutral gas. A generalized theory of plasma termination in a Neutral Boundary Layer is applied to this case using a two-fluid, current-free, weakly ionized transport model. The electron

  11. Relation between the alignment dependence of coercive force decrease ratio and the angular dependence of coercive force of ferrite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yutaka; Kitai, Nobuyuki; Hosokawa, Seiichi; Hoshijima, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The relation of the coercive force decrease ratio (CFDR) and the angular dependence of the coercive force (ADCF) of ferrite magnets and their temperature properties were investigated. When we compared that against the angle of the magnetization reverse area obtained from these calculation results, which was obtained from the Gaussian distribution of the grain alignment and the postulation that every grain follows the Kondorskii law or the 1/cos θ law, and against the angle of the reverse magnetization area calculated from the experiment CFDR data of these magnets, it was found that this latter expanded at room temperature, to 36° from the calculated angle, for magnet with α=0.96. It was also found that, as temperature increased from room temperature to 413 K, the angle of the reverse magnetization area of ferrite magnets obtained from the experiment data expanded from 36° to 41°. When we apply these results to the temperature properties of ADCF, it seems that the calculated ADCF could qualitatively and reasonably explain these temperature properties, even though the difference between the calculated angular dependence and the experimental data still exists in the high angle range. These results strongly suggest that the coercive force of these magnets is determined by the magnetic domain wall motion. The magnetic domain walls are strongly pinned at tilted grains, and when the domain walls are de-pinned from their pinning sites, the coercive force is determined.

  12. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  13. rf surface resistance of a magnetically aligned sintered pellet of YBa2Cu3O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padamsee, H.; Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Rubin, D.; Shu, Q. S.; Hart, H. R.; Gaddipati, A. R.

    1990-02-01

    rf (radio frequency) properties of polycrystalline ceramic material are substantially inferior to those of the best microtwinned crystals. At 6 GHz and 77 K, the best surface resistance values for ceramics are ˜20 mΩ, compared to <0.5 mΩ for high-quality crystals. The microwave resistance is observed to increase at higher rf fields for ceramics, e.g., two orders of magnitude between 0.1 and 10 Oe, but remains low for crystals. A possible reason for the inferior properties in randomly oriented polycrystalline ceramics is related to the anisotropy of the superconducting properties; crystals aligned unfavorably with the sampling rf field could be responsible for the high resistance. Another possibility is related to the difficulty of carrying current across the grain boundaries due to weak links arising from second phases, impurities, cracks, etc., at the boundaries. To elucidate the contribution from these two potential problem sources, we have measured the rf properties at 6 GHz of an oriented polycrystalline ceramic pellet prepared from a suspension of high purity powder in a 4-T magnetic field. Samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray rocking curves, and x-ray pole figure studies, indicating a high degree of alignment, although not as complete as in epitaxial thin films. At liquid He temperature, the surface resistance is 28 times lower when the c axis is perpendicular to the plane in which rf currents flow than when the c axis is in the plane. At 77 K, the surface resistance is 3 mΩ, a significant improvement over the properties of the best randomly oriented material reported. At 4 K the resistance improves to 0.3 mΩ. These resistances were all measured with rf fields below 0.1 Oe, but increased by one order of magnitude when the rf field was increased to 10 Oe, as in the polycrystalline material. Our results indicate that while the low-field rf behavior is strongly improved by orientation

  14. CHANGES IN THE CRAB PULSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Scientists are learning more about how pulsars work by studying a series of Hubble Space Telescope images of the heart of the Crab Nebula. The images, taken over a period of several months, show that the Crab is a far more dynamic object than previously understood. At the center of the nebula lies the Crab Pulsar. The pulsar is a tiny object by astronomical standards -- only about six miles across -- but has a mass greater than that of the Sun and rotates at a rate of 30 times a second. As the pulsar spins its intense magnetic field whips around, acting like a sling shot, accelerating subatomic particles and sending them hurtling them into space at close to the speed of light. The tiny pulsar and its wind are the powerhouse for the entire Crab Nebula, which is 10 light-years across -- a feat comparable to an object the size of a hydrogen atom illuminating a volume of space a kilometer across. The three pictures shown here, taken from the series of Hubble images, show dramatic changes in the appearance of the central regions of the nebula. These include wisp-like structures that move outward away from the pulsar at half the speed of light, as well as a mysterious 'halo' which remains stationary, but grows brighter then fainter over time. Also seen are the effects of two polar jets that move out along the rotation axis of the pulsar. The most dynamic feature seen -- a small knot that 'dances around' so much that astronomers have been calling it a 'sprite' -- is actually a shock front (where fast-moving material runs into slower-moving material)in one of these polar jets. The telescope captured the images with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 using a filter that passes light of wavelength around 550 nanometers, near the middle of the visible part of the spectrum. The Crab Nebula is located 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  15. The effect of stress on the magnetic alignment of hot-pressed Fe-Nd-B magnets derived by computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.D.; Kwak, C.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Jang, T.S. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering); Jeung, W.Y. . Division of Materials)

    1993-11-01

    The distribution of stress during hot pressing of a cast (Fe,Cu)-Nd-B magnet was simulated by SPID. The calculated stress components were compression stress ([sigma][sub z]) and shear stress ([tau][sub rz]). The stress component causing the magnetic alignment during hot pressing was [sigma][sub z][center dot][tau][sub rz] virtually played no role in the magnetic alignment. Generally, [sigma][sub z] was higher at the center of a specimen and decreased gradually along the radial direction to the periphery of a specimen during hot pressing, while [tau][sub rz] was negligible and uniformly distributed throughout the specimen. Random orientation and grain growth of [phi] were evident at the outer part of a specimen where [sigma][sub z] is very weak.

  16. A Pulsar and a Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  17. Temporal evolution of isolated pulsars; Age-Tau problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutukcu, Pinar; Ankay, Askin

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we examine the evolution of a sample of isolated pulsars connected to Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) five of which have measured braking indices. For the pulsars in our sample without measured braking index values we have calculated the estimated braking indices adopting the supernova remnant ages as the real ages of pulsar-SNR pairs assuming short initial spin periods (10-30 ms). Some of these pulsars exhibit at least one order of magnitude differences between the characteristic pulsar ages and the ages of the SNRs they are physically connected to. We adopt an exponential B-decay model, which is the decrease in the surface dipole magnetic field component perpendicular to the spin axis, in order to explain the evolutions of such pulsars on the spin period versus the spin period change diagram. The decay can be either due to a decrease in the angle between the spin axis and the magnetic axis and/or due to a decay in the surface dipole magnetic field itself. Based on a previous work by Ankay et al. on the X-ray pulsar 1E1207-5209 we show that there are some other young isolated pulsars which experience B-decay as the predominant effect throughout their observational lifetimes. As compared to ordinary radio pulsars the magneto-dipole radiation torques are not so effective for such pulsars and the characteristic decay times are significantly shorter (about three orders of magnitude). Assuming simple exponential evolutionary tracks we give possible physical interpretations for this new class of neutron stars by examining the observational data of each pulsar-SNR pair.

  18. Polarization Properties of Rotation Powered Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding Alice K.

    2009-01-01

    Polarization measurements of rotation-powered pulsars and their nebulae have unique diagnostic potential. The polarization position angle of the pulsar wind nebula, as is know for the Crab pulsar, can tell us the orientation of the spin axis. Phase-resolved polarimetry of pulsars has had enormous diagnostic capability at radio and optical wavelengths and could also be a powerful diagnostic in the X-ray range. Measurement of the polarization properties as a function of pulse phase can therefore provide a multidimensional mapping of the pulsar emission. In the 'rotating vector' model, radiation originating near a magnetic pole is expected to show a characteristic S-shaped swing of the position angle vs. pulse phase. In this case it is possible to determine the magnetic inclination and viewing angles. Radiation originating further from the poles or further above the neutron star surface will have a more complex polarization signature, as a result of relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and may also cause depolarization of the signal. I will discuss predicted polarization properties of pulsed emission in polar cap models, where radiation originates near the neutron star surface at the magnetic poles, and in slot gap and outer gap models, where radiation originates over a range of altitudes out to the speed-of-light cylinder.

  19. Gamma-ray Pulsars: Models and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding Alice K.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is, dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10(exp 12) - 10(exp 13) G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers of the primary curvature emission around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. Next-generation gamma-ray telescopes sensitive to GeV-TeV emission will provide critical tests of pulsar acceleration and emission mechanisms.

  20. Lateral diffusion of PEG-Lipid in magnetically aligned bicelles measured using stimulated echo pulsed field gradient 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Soong, Ronald; Macdonald, Peter M

    2005-01-01

    Lateral diffusion measurements of PEG-lipid incorporated into magnetically aligned bicelles are demonstrated using stimulated echo (STE) pulsed field gradient (PFG) proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bicelles were composed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) plus dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) (q = DMPC/DHPC molar ratio = 4.5) plus 1 mol % (relative to DMPC) dimyristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DMPE-PEG 2000) at 25 wt % lipid. 1H NMR STE spectra of perpendicular aligned bicelles contained only resonances assigned to residual HDO and to overlapping contributions from a DMPE-PEG 2000 ethoxy headgroup plus DHPC choline methyl protons. Decay of the latter's STE intensity in the STE PFG 1H NMR experiment (g(z) = 244 G cm(-1)) yielded a DMPE-PEG 2000 (1 mol %, 35 degrees C) lateral diffusion coefficient D = 1.35 x 10(-11) m2 s(-1). Hence, below the "mushroom-to-brush" transition, DMPE-PEG 2000 lateral diffusion is dictated by its DMPE hydrophobic anchor. D was independent of the diffusion time, indicating unrestricted lateral diffusion over root mean-square diffusion distances of microns, supporting the "perforated lamellae" model of bicelle structure under these conditions. Overall, the results demonstrate the feasibility of lateral diffusion measurements in magnetically aligned bicelles using the STE PFG NMR technique. PMID:15475584

  1. Avoiding Tokamak Disruptions by Applying Static Magnetic Fields That Align Locked Modes with Stabilizing Wave-Driven Currents.

    PubMed

    Volpe, F A; Hyatt, A; La Haye, R J; Lanctot, M J; Lohr, J; Prater, R; Strait, E J; Welander, A

    2015-10-23

    Nonrotating ("locked") magnetic islands often lead to complete losses of confinement in tokamak plasmas, called major disruptions. Here locked islands were suppressed for the first time, by a combination of applied three-dimensional magnetic fields and injected millimeter waves. The applied fields were used to control the phase of locking and so align the island O point with the region where the injected waves generated noninductive currents. This resulted in stabilization of the locked island, disruption avoidance, recovery of high confinement, and high pressure, in accordance with the expected dependencies upon wave power and relative phase between the O point and driven current. PMID:26551119

  2. Avoiding Tokamak Disruptions by Applying Static Magnetic Fields That Align Locked Modes with Stabilizing Wave-Driven Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Hyatt, A.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lohr, J.; Prater, R.; Strait, E. J.; Welander, A.

    2015-10-01

    Nonrotating ("locked") magnetic islands often lead to complete losses of confinement in tokamak plasmas, called major disruptions. Here locked islands were suppressed for the first time, by a combination of applied three-dimensional magnetic fields and injected millimeter waves. The applied fields were used to control the phase of locking and so align the island O point with the region where the injected waves generated noninductive currents. This resulted in stabilization of the locked island, disruption avoidance, recovery of high confinement, and high pressure, in accordance with the expected dependencies upon wave power and relative phase between the O point and driven current.

  3. IMF By-controlled field-aligned currents in the magnetotail during northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z. W.; Shi, J. K.; Dunlop, M.; Liu, Z. X.

    2014-08-01

    The influence of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By component on the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) in the magnetotail during the northward IMF were investigated using the data from Cluster. There are 748 FACs cases selected to do analysis. We present that the IMF By component plays a very important role in controlling the flow direction of the FACs in the PSBL in the magnetotail. In the northern hemisphere, the influence of the positive (negative) IMF By is an earthward (tailward) FACs. To the contrary, in the southern hemisphere, the effect of the positive (negative) IMF By is a tailward (earthward) FACs. There is a clear north-south asymmetry of the polarity of the FACs in the PSBL when IMF By is positive or negative, and this asymmetry of the polarity is more distinct when IMF By is positive. The FAC density is controlled by IMF By only when |IMF By| is large. When |IMF By| is more than 10 nT the absolute FAC density in the PSBL has an obvious positive correlation with the |IMF By|. When |IMF By| is less than 10 nT, there is no correlation between the absolute FAC density and |IMF By|. There is a clear dusk-dawn asymmetry in the current densities for the FACs in the PSBL, with the dawn currents appearing larger than the dusk currents. The FAC with the largest (smallest) density is located in the range of 0100≤MLT<0200 (2100≤MLT<2200).

  4. Post-Outburst Observations of the Magnetically Active Pulsar J1846-0258: A New Braking Index, Increased Timing Noise, and Radiative Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingstone, Margaret A.; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Gavriil, Fotis P.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2010-01-01

    The approx.800yr-old pulsar J1846-0258 is a unique transition object between rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars: though behaving like a rotation-powered pulsar most of the time, in 2006 it exhibited a distinctly magnetar-like outburst accompanied by a large glitch. Here we present X-ray timing observations taken with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer over a 2.2-yr period after the X-ray outburst and glitch had recovered. We observe that the braking index of the pulsar, previously measured to be n = 2.65+/-0.01, is now n = 2.16+/-0.13, a decrease of 18+/-5%. We also note a persistent increase in the timing noise relative to the pre-outburst level. Despite the timing changes, a 2009 Chandra X-ray Observatory observation shows that the X-ray flux and spectrum of the pulsar and its wind nebula are consistent with the quiescent levels observed in 2000. Subject headings: pulsars: general pulsars: individual (PSR J1846-0258) supernovae: individual (Kes 75 X-rays: stars)

  5. Instability of field-aligned electron-cyclotron waves in a magnetic mirror plasma with anisotropic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishanov, N. I.; Azarenkov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    > Dispersion characteristics have been analysed for field-aligned electron-cyclotron waves (also known as right-hand polarized waves, extraordinary waves or whistlers) in a cylindrical magnetic mirror plasma including electrons with anisotropic temperature. It is shown that the instability of these waves is possible only in the range below the minimal electron-cyclotron frequency, which is much lower than the gyrotron frequency used for electron-cyclotron resonance power input into the plasma, under the condition where the perpendicular temperature of the resonant electrons is larger than their parallel temperature. The growth rates of whistler instability in the two magnetized plasma models, where the stationary magnetic field is either uniform or has a non-uniform magnetic mirror configuration, are compared.

  6. An ultraluminous nascent millisecond pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluźniak, Włodek; Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    If the ultraluminous source (ULX) M82 X-2 sustains its measured spin-up value of dot{ν }= 10^{-10} s^{-2}, it will become a millisecond pulsar in less than 105 yr. The observed (isotropic) luminosity of 1040 erg s-1 also supports the notion that the neutron star will spin up to a millisecond period upon accreting about 0.1 M⊙ - the reported hard X-ray luminosity of this ULX, together with the spin-up value, implies torques consistent with the accretion disc extending down to the vicinity of the stellar surface, as expected for low values of the stellar dipole magnetic field (B ≲ 109 G). This suggests a new channel of millisecond pulsar formation - in high-mass X-ray binaries - and may have implications for studies of gravitational waves, and possibly for the formation of low-mass black holes through accretion-induced collapse.

  7. High Energy Emission from Pulsar Magnetospheres and Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    Recent gamma-ray observations of pulsars and their nebulae suggest an important role played by magnetic reconnection in determining the structure of the magnetosphere and the wind and in the acceleration of particles that lead to the high energy emission. Strong current sheets that are susceptible to magnetic dissipation are found near the light cylinder of the pulsar and persist throughout the wind. This proposal investigates the processes that occur in these current sheets, and determines their structure and particle acceleration properties. A suite of relativistic MHD and particle-in-cell kinetic simulations will be used to obtain the global 3D geometry of the magnetosphere, flow geometry in the current sheet, and calculate the dissipation of the current both near the pulsar and in the termination shock of the pulsar wind. The results will be applied to modeling the beaming in pulsar gamma-ray light curves, and to understanding particle acceleration in broadband and flaring nebular emission.

  8. Enhanced alignment and magnetic properties of die-upset nano-crystal Nd2Fe14B magnets with Nb addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yilong; Chen, Dengming; Zhou, Anruo; Sun, Jianchun; Cao, Pengjun

    2012-12-01

    It is difficult to obtain the crystallographic alignment for stoichiometric Nd2Fe14B alloys by applying the melt-spun and subsequent hot-pressing and hot-deformation techniques. However, the enhanced alignment and magnetic properties of die-upset nano-crystal Nd2Fe14B magnets have been obtained by Nb addition in the present paper. The magnetic properties studies show that Nb addition leads to the remarkable increase of remanence Br and intrinsic coercivity Hci, which is due to the improvement of c-axis texture and refinement of microstructure. Microstructure studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal that Nb atoms are enriched at grain boundary and the NbFeB phase is observed with increasing Nb content. Since some Fe atoms in the Nd2Fe14B phase participate in the formation of NbFeB phase, the excessive Nd atoms may be enriched at grain boundary, which may improve the physical property of grain boundary and provide a mass transport pass for preferential growth of oriented Nd2Fe14B grains, thus leading to the enhanced alignment and magnetic properties.

  9. Phase Coherent Observations and Millisecond Pulsar Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrauner, Jay Arthur

    1997-07-01

    We have built a new radio astronomical receiving system designed specifically for very high precision timing and polarimetry of fast pulsars. Unlike most detectors currently used to study pulsars, this instrument does not square the received signal at the time of observation. Instead, voltages proportional to the instantaneous electric vectors of incoming signals are digitized, time-tagged, and recorded on high speed magnetic media. During processing, the data streams are convolved with an inverse 'chirp' function that completely removes the phase retardation introduced by interstellar dispersion. The intrinsic time resolution of this system is the inverse of the system bandwidth, typically well under 1 μs. We have tested this and another phase-coherent observing-system in observations using the Arecibo 305 m and Green Bank 140 foot telescopes. With these two sets of observations we have studied giant pulses, performed high precision timing, and obtained high-resolution polarization profiles and accurate dispersion We have verified the existence of pulses with intensities hundreds of measures. times the mean for both the main pulse and interpulse of PSR B1937+21, and have established that the amplitudes of both types of giant pulses have similar power-law distributions. The giant pulses are narrower than the average pulses, systematically delayed by 40-50 μs, and many are nearly 100% circularly polarized. We have also conducted two searches of the Northern hemisphere for pulsars. The first used the original pulsar discovery telescope in Cambridge, England to search the entire Northern hemisphere at 81.5 MHz, with an average sensitivity to slow pulsars of 230 mJy. Although we obtained flux densities and pulse profiles of 20 known pulsars, no new pulsars were discovered. The second search effort covered a total of 384 deg2 of previously unsearched sky at 430 MHz using the Arecibo telescope, with an average sensitivity to slow pulsars of 0.83 mJy. We discovered 7

  10. Observing peculiar γ-ray pulsars with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, M.; Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    The AGILE γ-ray satellite provides large sky exposure levels (>=109 cm2 s per year on the Galactic Plane) with sensitivity peaking at E ~100 MeV where the bulk of pulsar energy output is typically released. Its ~1 μs absolute time tagging capability makes it perfectly suited for the study of γ-ray pulsars. AGILE collected a large number of γ-ray photons from EGRET pulsars (>=40,000 pulsed counts for Vela) in two years of observations unveiling new interesting features at sub-millisecond level in the pulsars' high-energy light-curves, γ-ray emission from pulsar glitches and Pulsar Wind Nebulae. AGILE detected about 20 nearby and energetic pulsars with good confidence through timing and/or spatial analysis. Among the newcomers we find pulsars with very high rotational energy losses, such as the remarkable PSR B1509-58 with a magnetic field in excess of 1013 Gauss, and PSR J2229+6114 providing a reliable identification for the previously unidentified EGRET source 3EG2227+6122. Moreover, the powerful millisecond pulsar B1821-24, in the globular cluster M28, is detected during a fraction of the observations.

  11. Radio wave propagation in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. A.; Lyubarskii, Yu. E.

    Pulsar magnetospheres are known to contain an ultrarelativistic highly magnetized plasma which streams along the open magnetic lines. The radio emission observed from pulsars is believed to originate sufficiently deep in the open field line tube, so that the characteristics of outgoing waves can be influenced by propagation in the magnetospheric plasma. Refraction of radio waves in pulsar magnetospheres appears to be efficient. The effect not only influences the observed pulse width and its frequency dependency. It can alter the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region which can be derived from the observations of pulsar interstellar scintillations. Transverse ray separation versus pulse longitude calculated allowing for magnetospheric refraction appears to be in qualitative agreement with that observed. In particular, the nonmonotonic character of the curve can be attributed to nonmonotonic distribution of the plasma number density across the open field line tube which makes the rays emitted at different spatial locations deviate in the opposite directions. Proceeding from the frequency dependence of refraction some predictions are made about the frequency evolution of the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region. Magnetospheric refraction can also determine the profile shape giving rise to ray grouping into separate components. It will be demonstrated that the salient features of profile morphology can be explained within the frame of a primordial hollow-cone emission model taking into account refraction of rays in pulsar plasma. Then the frequency evolution of profile structure is naturally interpreted as a consequence of frequency dependence of refraction. As the waves propagate in the magnetospheric plasma their polarization also evolves essentially. In the vicinity of the emission region normal waves are linearly polarized and propagate independently, with the polarization plane following the orientation of the local magnetic field. As

  12. Electromagnetic processes in the atmosphere of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yukhimuk, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    The work consists of two parts. The first deals with the fine structure of radio pulses. Based on kinetic theory, processes occurring in the plasma shell of a pulsar when external electromagnetic radiation is present are investigated. It is shown that electromagnetic waves cause electrons to drift relative to ions, and initiate longitudinal oscillations. A dispersion equation describing the longitudinal oscillations in magnetized plasma is derived. Conditions for excitation of oscillations are found. Correlation functions of electron density are calculated, along with the coefficients of electromagnetic wave scattering. It is shown that variations in the amplitude of pulsar pulses are associated with scintillations caused by fluctuations in the plasma electron density. The second part of the study presents a mechanism for the radio emission of pulsars. The model of a rotating and a pulsating star, a neutron star with dipolar or more complex magnetic field, is examined.

  13. ACCELERATING HIGH-ENERGY PULSAR RADIATION CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Venter, C.; De Jager, O. C.

    2010-12-20

    Curvature radiation (CR) is believed to be a dominant mechanism for creating gamma-ray emission from pulsars and is emitted by relativistic particles that are constrained to move along curved magnetic field lines. Additionally, synchrotron radiation (SR) is expected to be radiated by both relativistic primaries (involving cyclotron resonant absorption of radio photons and re-emission of SR photons), or secondary electron-positron pairs (created by magnetic or photon-photon pair production processes involving CR gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere). When calculating these high-energy spectra, especially in the context of pulsar population studies where several millions of CR and SR spectra have to be generated, it is profitable to consider approximations that would save computational time without sacrificing too much accuracy. This paper focuses on one such approximation technique, and we show that one may gain significantly in computational speed while preserving the accuracy of the spectral results.

  14. About pulsars dynamical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Valdivia, R.; Álvarez, C.; de La Fuente, E.; Lorimer, D.; Kramer, M.

    2011-10-01

    Based on the assumption that pulsars are losing their rotational energy according to dot{ν}=-kν^n where ν is the frequency, dot{ν} its first derivative, and n is the braking index, four evolutionary models are created. Using them, thousands of artificial pulsar populations were generated. A comparison between these populations, and the no glitches and no milisecond pulsars reported by Hobbs et al. (2004) is performed using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (K-S).

  15. AB INITIO PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF AXISYMMETRIC PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2014-04-20

    We perform ''first-principles'' relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of aligned pulsar magnetosphere. We allow free escape of particles from the surface of a neutron star and continuously populate the magnetosphere with neutral pair plasma to imitate pair production. As pair plasma supply increases, we observe the transition from a charge-separated ''electrosphere'' solution with trapped plasma and no spin-down to a solution close to the ideal force-free magnetosphere with electromagnetically dominated pulsar wind. We calculate the magnetospheric structure, current distribution, and spin-down power of the neutron star. We also discuss particle acceleration in the equatorial current sheet.

  16. Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the detection of over 80 gamma-ray pulsars. Several new populations have been discovered, including 24 radio quiet pulsars found through gamma-ray pulsations alone and about 20 millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The gamma-ray pulsations from millisecond pulsars were discovered by both folding at periods of known radio millisecond pulsars or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -35 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. The higher sensitivity and larger energy range of the Fermi Large Area Telescope has produced detailed energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectroscopy on brighter pulsars, that have ruled out polar cap models as the major source of the emission in favor of outer magnetosphere accelerators. The large number of gamma-ray pulsars now allows for the first time meaningful population and sub-population studies that are revealing surprising properties of these fascinating sources.

  17. Observation of transient alignment-inversion walls in nematics of phenyl benzoates in the presence of a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Hinov, Hristo P; Vistin', Leonard K; Marinov, Yordan G

    2014-04-17

    Formation of new transient walls by a constant magnetic field at the Fréedericsz critical value has been observed. They are oriented along the initial alignment of the nematic phase of phenyl benzoates and appeared only in relatively thick samples with a thickness between 50 and 100 μm of the cells. The excellent planarity of the liquid crystal orientation is considered to be the most important condition for their presence These magnetic walls are transient as they disappear either after a few seconds for 100 μm thick nematic cells or after parts of a second for thinner (50 μm) nematic cells. Nonregular stable magnetic walls, incorporating disclinations with core, appear immediately after the relaxation of the transient walls, when the planarity of the nematic orientation is not perfect. In thinner nematic cells of 20 μm or less, a Fréedericksz transition has only been observed. The formation of transient magnetic walls can be described by a model taking into account alignment-inversion, twisted along Y regions. The transient walls accompanied by a system of Becke lines relax by going through three-dimensional twist-splay-bend deformations. PMID:24670039

  18. The space velocities of radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, A. A.; Nikitina, E. B.; Malov, I. F.

    2016-02-01

    Known models proposed to explain the high space velocities of pulsars based on asymmetry of the transport coefficients of different sorts of neutrinos or electromagnetic radiation can be efficient only in the presence of high magnetic fields (to 1016 G) or short rotation periods for the neutron stars (of the order of 1 ms). This current study shows that the observed velocities are not correlated with either the pulsar periods or their surface magnetic fields. The initial rotation periods are estimated in a model for the magnetedipolar deceleration of their spin, aßsuming that the pulsar ages are equal to their kinematic ages. The initial period distribution is bimodal, with peaks at 5 ms and 0.5 s, and similar to the current distribution of periods. It is shown that asymmetry of the pulsar electromagnetic radiation is insufficient to give rise to additional acceleration of pulsars during their evolution after the supernova explosion that gave birth to them. The observations testify to deceleration of the motion, most likely due to the influence of the interstellar medium and interactions with nearby objects. The time scale for the exponential decrease in the magnetic field τ D and in the angle between the rotation axis and magnetic moment τ ß are estimated, yielding τ β = 1.4 million years. The derived dependence of the transverse velocity of a pulsar on the angle between the line of sight and the rotation axis of the neutron star corresponds to the expected dependence for acceleration mechanisms associated with asymmetry of the radiation emitted by the two poles of the star.

  19. LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirotani, Kouichi

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the electrodynamic structure of a pulsar outer-magnetospheric particle accelerator and the resulting gamma-ray emission. By considering the condition for the accelerator to be self-sustained, we derive how the trans-magnetic-field thickness of the accelerator evolves with the pulsar age. It is found that the thickness is small but increases steadily if the neutron-star envelope is contaminated by sufficient light elements. For such a light element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity of the accelerator is kept approximately constant as a function of age in the initial 10,000 yr, forming the lower bound of the observed distribution of the gamma-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars. If the envelope consists of only heavy elements, on the other hand, the thickness is greater, but it increases less rapidly than a light element envelope. For such a heavy element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity decreases relatively rapidly, forming the upper bound of the observed distribution. The gamma-ray luminosity of a general pulsar resides between these two extreme cases, reflecting the envelope composition and the magnetic inclination angle with respect to the rotation axis. The cutoff energy of the primary curvature emission is regulated below several GeV even for young pulsars because the gap thickness, and hence the acceleration electric field, is suppressed by the polarization of the produced pairs.

  20. THE PECULIAR PULSAR POPULATION OF THE CENTRAL PARSEC

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, Jason; O'Leary, Ryan M. E-mail: oleary@berkeley.edu

    2014-03-01

    Pulsars orbiting the Galactic center black hole, Sgr A*, would be potential probes of its mass, distance, and spin, and may even be used to test general relativity. Despite predictions of large populations of both ordinary and millisecond pulsars in the Galactic center, none have been detected within 25 pc by deep radio surveys. One explanation has been that hyperstrong temporal scattering prevents pulsar detections, but the recent discovery of radio pulsations from a highly magnetized neutron star (magnetar) within 0.1 pc shows that the temporal scattering is much weaker than predicted. We argue that an intrinsic deficit in the ordinary pulsar population is the most likely reason for the lack of detections to date: a ''missing pulsar problem'' in the Galactic center. In contrast, we show that the discovery of a single magnetar implies efficient magnetar formation in the region. If the massive stars in the central parsec form magnetars rather than ordinary pulsars, their short lifetimes could explain the missing pulsars. Efficient magnetar formation could be caused by strongly magnetized progenitors, or could be further evidence of a top-heavy initial mass function. Furthermore, current high-frequency surveys should already be able to detect bright millisecond pulsars, given the measured degree of temporal scattering.

  1. The Peculiar Pulsar Population of the Central Parsec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2014-03-01

    Pulsars orbiting the Galactic center black hole, Sgr A*, would be potential probes of its mass, distance, and spin, and may even be used to test general relativity. Despite predictions of large populations of both ordinary and millisecond pulsars in the Galactic center, none have been detected within 25 pc by deep radio surveys. One explanation has been that hyperstrong temporal scattering prevents pulsar detections, but the recent discovery of radio pulsations from a highly magnetized neutron star (magnetar) within 0.1 pc shows that the temporal scattering is much weaker than predicted. We argue that an intrinsic deficit in the ordinary pulsar population is the most likely reason for the lack of detections to date: a "missing pulsar problem" in the Galactic center. In contrast, we show that the discovery of a single magnetar implies efficient magnetar formation in the region. If the massive stars in the central parsec form magnetars rather than ordinary pulsars, their short lifetimes could explain the missing pulsars. Efficient magnetar formation could be caused by strongly magnetized progenitors, or could be further evidence of a top-heavy initial mass function. Furthermore, current high-frequency surveys should already be able to detect bright millisecond pulsars, given the measured degree of temporal scattering.

  2. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or ''multiplets'') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  3. The magnetospheric structure of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    A model of pulsar magnetospheres is described which has evolved inductively from the work of Sturrock, where the radiation is produced near the surface of a neutron star. Some of the theoretical ideas of others, particularly those of Sturrock, are discussed. The braking index n and period-pulse-width distribution of pulsars are first reinvestigated by relaxing the conventional assumption that R sub Y = R sub L, where R sub Y is the radius of the neutral points marking the transition from closed to open magnetic field lines, and R sub L is the radius of the light cylinder. This is replaced by the parameterization R sub Y = R sub * (1- eta )power R sub L (eta), where R sub * is the neutron star radius. If the ratio frequency radiation is created near the surface and beamed along open field lines, it is found that a good fit to the period-pulse-width distribution can be obtained for eta in the range 0.5 = or eta = or 0.7. The relation n = 1 + 2 eta then gives n = 2.2 + or - 0.2, which is in good agreement with the values measured for the Crab pulsar.

  4. Braking index of isolated pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamil, O.; Stone, J. R.; Urbanec, M.; Urbancová, G.

    2015-03-01

    Isolated pulsars are rotating neutron stars with accurately measured angular velocities Ω , and their time derivatives that show unambiguously that the pulsars are slowing down. Although the exact mechanism of the spin-down is a question of detailed debate, the commonly accepted view is that it arises through emission of magnetic dipole radiation (MDR) from a rotating magnetized body. Other processes, including the emission of gravitational radiation, and of relativistic particles (pulsar wind), are also being considered. The calculated energy loss by a rotating pulsar with a constant moment of inertia is assumed proportional to a model dependent power of Ω . This relation leads to the power law Ω ˙ =-K Ωn where n is called the braking index. The MDR model predicts n exactly equal to 3. Selected observations of isolated pulsars provide rather precise values of n , individually accurate to a few percent or better, in the range 1

  5. Toroidal modelling of resonant magnetic perturbations response in ASDEX-Upgrade: coupling between field pitch aligned response and kink amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, D. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Kirk, A.; Suttrop, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, J. C.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Kurzan, B.; Piovesan, P.; Reinke, M.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX-Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2015-09-01

    Using the MARS-F code (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681), the single fluid resistive MHD plasma response to applied n   =   2 resonant magnetic perturbations is computed, for a plasma discharge in the ASDEX-Upgrade tokamak. The computation predicts strong kink amplification, as previously predicted in DIII-D (Haskey et al 2014 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 56 035005), which is strongly dependent on the toroidal phase shift between the upper and lower coils, Δ {φ\\text{ul}} . In particular, edge localised low n peeling modes with poloidal mode numbers just above pitch resonance—a subset of the kink response—are amplified. The robustness of the amplified peeling response with respect to truncation of the X point is investigated, by recomputing the plasma response for a range of edge geometries. It is found that the computed peeling response, when plotted against the safety factor, is not sensitive to the numerical truncation near the X point. It is also predicted that near the plasma edge where resistivity is large, the pitch aligned components are finite and also strongly dependent on Δ {φ\\text{ul}} . A previous proposal that the amplified peeling response may indirectly drive the pitch aligned components by spectral proximity (Lanctot et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 083019), is investigated by numerically applying magnetic perturbations of a single poloidal harmonic, as a boundary condition at the plasma edge. It is found that poloidal harmonic coupling causes harmonics to couple to and drive harmonics directly beneath them spectrally, and also that the pitch aligned components can be driven by this mechanism. This suggests that it is quite possible that the amplified low n peeling response can drive the pitch aligned components when it is strongly amplified, which would alter the coil configuration for optimum plasma stochastization, with implications for ELM control by RMPs.

  6. Enrichment of magnetic alignment stimulated by {gamma}-radiation in core-shell type nanoparticle Mn-Zn ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, P. P.; Tangsali, R. B.; Sonaye, B.; Sugur, S.

    2013-02-05

    Core shell type nanoparticle Mn{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} systems with x=0.55, 0.65 and 0.75 were prepared using autocombustion method. The systems were characterized using tools like XRD and IR for structure confirmation. Magnetic parameter measurements like Saturation magnetization and coercivity were obtained from hysteresis loop which exhibited a symmetry shift due to core shell nature of the nanoparticles. Nanoparticles of particle size between 21.2nm to 25.7nm were found to show 20 percent shrinkage after being radiated by the {gamma}-radiation. This is due to variation in the cation distribution which also affects the cell volume of the cubic cell. Lattice constant reduction observed is reflected in the magnetic properties of the samples. A considerable hike in the saturation magnetization of the samples was observed due to enrichment of magnetic alignment in the magnetic core of the particles. Samples under investigation were irradiated with gamma radiation from Co{sup 60} source for different time intervals.

  7. Barometric and magnetic observations of vertical acoustic resonance and resultant generation of field-aligned current associated with earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyemori, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Odagi, Yoko; Sano, Yasuharu; Takeda, Masahiko; Nose, Masahito; Utsugi, Mitsuru; Rosales, Domingo; Choque, Edwin; Ishitsuka, Jose; Yamanaka, Sadato; Nakanishi, Kunihito; Matsumura, Mitsuru; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Three rare occasions are introduced, where the excitation of vertical acoustic resonance between the ground and the ionosphere, and the resultant generation of a field-aligned current, just after earthquakes are observationally confirmed. In the case of two inland earthquakes, barometric observations very close to the epicenters (i.e., only 30 km apart) were available, and they showed a sharp spectral peak which appeared within one hour after the origin time and lasted a few hours. The observed periods of the spectral peaks around 260 seconds are close to the period of the theoretically-expected fundamental mode of the resonance. On the other hand, magnetic observations on the ground showed a dominant period at 220-230 seconds which corresponds to the first overtone among theoretically-expected major resonance peaks. In the third case, i.e., during the 2010 Chile earthquake, a long-period magnetic oscillation in the east-west direction, which has two major resonance periods at 265 and 190-195 seconds, was observed on the night-side magnetic dip equator in Peru, where the distance is more than 2600 km from the epicenter, under a very quiet geomagnetic condition. The oscillation was interpreted as the effect of field-aligned current generated through a dynamo process in the ionosphere over the epicenter caused by the resonance.

  8. First-Principles Simulations of Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    Pulsars are rotating magnetized neutron stars that produce broadband, pulsed emission. Observations with Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have uncovered more than 100 gamma-ray emitting pulsars, dramatically expanding the number of such sources known, and producing unprecedented data on light curves and spectra in the gamma-ray band. The magnetospheric processes that lead to this emission are very interesting and currently not understood in detail. The main difficulty is the absence of a self-consistent model of the pulsar magnetosphere that can predict the global shape of the magnetic field and the state of the plasma throughout the magnetosphere. The standard picture envisions the magnetosphere as filled with plasma due to space-charge-limited flow of charges from the surface of the star. These charges are accelerated by strong electric fields induced by rapid stellar rotation. As charges are curved while traveling along the magnetic fields, they emit curvature radiation that can pair-produce and fill the magnetosphere with pair plasma. The currents and charges in this plasma affect magnetic field structure and particle acceleration. Until recently, no self-consistent solutions of the pulsar electrodynamics that accounted for plasma supply and production existed. Considerable progress on the global magnetospheric structure was made under assumptions about the plasma supply in the force-free and magnetohydrodynamic limits, which assume abundant plasma throughout the magnetosphere. These solutions allowed to calculate the global structure of oblique rotators and their spin-down power at the expense of losing information about particle density and acceleration, and making it difficult to compute emission spectra. Recently, the development of multidimensional kinetic simulations has brought the goal of self-consistently calculating plasma supply and magnetospheric shape of pulsars closer to reality. In this proposal, we plan to perform first three-dimensional kinetic

  9. The Amazing Pulsar Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Large Area Telescope, Fermi

    2014-01-01

    How rotation-powered pulsars accelerate particles to PeV energies and radiate pulsed emission from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths has remained a mystery for over 40 years. But in the last few years, the Fermi Large Area Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsars and allowed us to peer deeper into the inner workings of this incredibly efficient natural accelerator. Thanks to Fermi discoveries, we now know that the high-energy emission is radiated in the outer magnetosphere, near the light cylinder, that millisecond pulsars are extremely efficient at emitting gamma-ray pulses and that the Crab nebula undergoes dramatic flaring that challenges particle acceleration theory. I will review how these discoveries, together with recent progress in global simulation of pulsar magnetospheres, are changing our models of pulsar particle acceleration, cascade pair production and high-energy emission.

  10. Observational properties of pulsars.

    PubMed

    Manchester, R N

    2004-04-23

    Pulsars are remarkable clocklike celestial sources that are believed to be rotating neutron stars formed in supernova explosions. They are valuable tools for investigations into topics such as neutron star interiors, globular cluster dynamics, the structure of the interstellar medium, and gravitational physics. Searches at radio and x-ray wavelengths over the past 5 years have resulted in a large increase in the number of known pulsars and the discovery of new populations of pulsars, posing challenges to theories of binary and stellar evolution. Recent images at radio, optical, and x-ray wavelengths have revealed structures resulting from the interaction of pulsar winds with the surrounding interstellar medium, giving new insights into the physics of pulsars. PMID:15105491

  11. Cation modulation of bicelle size and magnetic alignment as revealed by solid-state NMR and electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Alexandre; Labrot, Thomas; Oda, Reiko; Dufourc, Erick J

    2002-01-01

    The influence of salts (KCl, NaCl, CaCl(2), and MgCl(2)) on bicelles (bilayered micelles) made of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC, molar fraction X = 78%) and dicaproylphosphatidylcholine (DCPC) was investigated by solid-state (31)P- and (2)H NMR as well as by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Sizes were determined from (2)H- and (31)P NMR on the basis of a model that incorporated a planar bilayer and a (half-torus) curved rim representing the DMPC and DCPC regions of the bicelle, respectively. Good agreement was shown with sizes determined independently from freeze-fracture electron microscopy images. In the presence of K(+) and Na(+), bicelles have diameters of approximately 300 A while in the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+); their diameter increases to approximately 500 A. Bicelle magnetic alignment is considerably improved by the presence of salts. The optimum salt concentration for such an effect ranges from 50 to 200 mM. Bicelles are magnetically aligned for temperatures roughly ranging from 30 degrees C to 40 degrees C with monovalent cations; this range is slightly extended in the presence of divalent salts. In this temperature range, the dynamics of the long-chain hydrocarbon region of the bicelle (leading to a bicelle thickness of 38 A) and of water is about the same independently of cation nature and concentration. However, at higher temperatures, considerable differences in water dynamics are observed between systems with monovalent and divalent cations. In these conditions, the system consists of a mixture of micelles and extended bilayers, which show residual macroscopic alignment in the magnetic field. PMID:12414699

  12. Gamma-ray pulsars: A gold mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Isabelle A.; Harding, Alice K.

    2015-08-01

    The most energetic neutron stars, powered by their rotation, are capable of producing pulsed radiation from the radio up to γ rays with nearly TeV energies. These pulsars are part of the universe of energetic and powerful particle accelerators, using their uniquely fast rotation and formidable magnetic fields to accelerate particles to ultra-relativistic speed. The extreme properties of these stars provide an excellent testing ground, beyond Earth experience, for nuclear, gravitational, and quantum-electrodynamical physics. A wealth of γ-ray pulsars has recently been discovered with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The energetic γ rays enable us to probe the magnetospheres of neutron stars and particle acceleration in this exotic environment. We review the latest developments in this field, beginning with a brief overview of the properties and mysteries of rotation-powered pulsars, and then discussing γ-ray observations and magnetospheric models in more detail. xml:lang="fr"

  13. A magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool for quantitative analysis of strain induced cellular reorientation and actin alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademolhosseini, F.; Liu, C.-C.; Lim, C. J.; Chiao, M.

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available cell strain tools, such as pneumatically actuated elastomer substrates, require special culture plates, pumps, and incubator setups. In this work, we present a magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool (MACSAT) that can be implemented using off-the-shelf components and conventional incubators. We determine the strain field on the MACSAT elastomer substrate using numerical models and experimental measurements and show that a specific region of the elastomer substrate undergoes a quasi-uniaxial 2D stretch, and that cells confined to this region of the MACSAT elastomer substrate undergo tensile, compressive, or zero axial strain depending on their angle of orientation. Using the MACSAT to apply cyclic strain on endothelial cells, we demonstrate that actin filaments within the cells reorient away from the stretching direction, towards the directions of minimum axial strain. We show that the final actin orientation angles in strained cells are spread over a region of compressive axial strain, confirming previous findings on the existence of a varied pre-tension in the actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. We also demonstrate that strained cells exhibit distinctly different values of actin alignment coherency compared to unstrained cells and therefore propose that this parameter, i.e., the coherency of actin alignment, can be used as a new readout to determine the occurrence/extent of actin alignment in cell strain experiments. The tools and methods demonstrated in this study are simple and accessible and can be easily replicated by other researchers to study the strain response of other adherent cells.

  14. An alternative numerical method for the stationary pulsar magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamori, Yohsuke; Okawa, Hirotada; Takamoto, Makoto; Suwa, Yudai

    2014-02-01

    Stationary pulsar magnetospheres in the force-free system are governed by the pulsar equation. In 1999, Contopoulos, Kazanas, and Fendt (hereafter CKF) numerically solved the pulsar equation and obtained a pulsar magnetosphere model called the CKF solution that has both closed and open magnetic field lines. The CKF solution is a successful solution, but it contains a poloidal current sheet that flows along the last open field line. This current sheet is artificially added to make the current system closed. In this paper, we suggest an alternative method to solve the pulsar equation and construct pulsar magnetosphere models without a current sheet. In our method, the pulsar equation is decomposed into Ampère's law and the force-free condition. We numerically solve these equations simultaneously with a fixed poloidal current. As a result, we obtain a pulsar magnetosphere model without a current sheet, which is similar to the CKF solution near the neutron star and has a jet-like structure at a distance along the pole. In addition, we discuss physical properties of the model and find that the force-free condition breaks down in a vicinity of the light cylinder due to dissipation that is included implicitly in the numerical method.

  15. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Coelho, J. G.; Malheiro, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ˜ 107 - 1010 G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ˜ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission "o2" is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  16. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, M.; Coelho, J. G.

    2015-12-17

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ∼ 10{sup 7} − 10{sup 10} G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ∼ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission “o2” is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  17. Image analysis of bioparticles accumulation and diamagnetic alignment in high-gradient magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Norina, Svetlana B; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jungdae; Cho, Sungil; Shalygin, A N; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic properties of biological particles are measured in high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) analysis, revealing the concentrating process of nucleoprotein particles, ferritin, red blood cells, and eggs. A magnetic force acting on micrometer and submicrometer biological particles having diamagnetic or paramagnetic susceptibility with respect to the solution causes their movement and accumulation in gradient magnetic fields dependent on the values of the magnetic moments. The methods developed enable us to obtain the magnetic moments values of single particles and their assembly directly from magnetic separation and image analyses without assuming the detection of sizes. Our precision methods for the measurement of the capture traveling (magnetic diffusion) time and the accumulation (magnetic sedimentation) radius in HGMS show that it is really possible to determine the weak dia- or paramagnetic shifts of magnetic susceptibility up to 0.7x10(-10) (SI units). HGMS analysis of the concentrating process of nucleoprotein granules (microcells, DNA granules, or nucleosome core particles) with polarization microscopy reveals phase transitions for DNA in granules, and separation accumulation of particles enables the determination of the diamagnetic susceptibility and anisotropy properties. Magnetic concentration effects always occur in living systems because micrometer-located gradient magnetic fields inside an organism are strong enough to cause drifts of cellular complexes and organelles of micrometer and submicrometer sizes. We report the appearance of superparamagnetic contamination inside developing shrimp eggs. In the developing shrimps eggs, ferritin aggregates are observed under weak gradient magnetic fields and diaparaferromagnetic changes are detected. A significant interruption of egg development is revealed in such fields. PMID:16292954

  18. Constraining Gamma-Ray Pulsar Gap Models with a Simulated Pulsar Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierbattista, Marco; Grenier, I. A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    With the large sample of young gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), population synthesis has become a powerful tool for comparing their collective properties with model predictions. We synthesised a pulsar population based on a radio emission model and four gamma-ray gap models (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One Pole Caustic). Applying gamma-ray and radio visibility criteria, we normalise the simulation to the number of detected radio pulsars by a select group of ten radio surveys. The luminosity and the wide beams from the outer gaps can easily account for the number of Fermi detections in 2 years of observations. The wide slot-gap beam requires an increase by a factor of 10 of the predicted luminosity to produce a reasonable number of gamma-ray pulsars. Such large increases in the luminosity may be accommodated by implementing offset polar caps. The narrow polar-cap beams contribute at most only a handful of LAT pulsars. Using standard distributions in birth location and pulsar spin-down power (E), we skew the initial magnetic field and period distributions in a an attempt to account for the high E Fermi pulsars. While we compromise the agreement between simulated and detected distributions of radio pulsars, the simulations fail to reproduce the LAT findings: all models under-predict the number of LAT pulsars with high E , and they cannot explain the high probability of detecting both the radio and gamma-ray beams at high E. The beaming factor remains close to 1.0 over 4 decades in E evolution for the slot gap whereas it significantly decreases with increasing age for the outer gaps. The evolution of the enhanced slot-gap luminosity with E is compatible with the large dispersion of gamma-ray luminosity seen in the LAT data. The stronger evolution predicted for the outer gap, which is linked to the polar cap heating by the return current, is apparently not supported by the LAT data. The LAT sample of gamma-ray pulsars

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, V. M.

    2008-03-01

    Pulsar astrophysics has come a long way in the 40 years since the discovery of the first pulsar by Bell and Hewish. From humble beginnings as bits of 'scruff' on the Cambridge University group's chart recorder paper, the field of pulsars has blossomed into a major area of mainstream astrophysics, with an unparalleled diversity of astrophysical applications. These range from Nobel-celebrated testing of general relativity in the strong-field regime to constraining the equation-of-state of ultradense matter; from probing the winds of massive stars to globular cluster evolution. Previous notable books on the subject of pulsars have tended to focus on some particular topic in the field. The classic text Pulsars by Manchester and Taylor (1977 San Francisco, CA: Freeman) targeted almost exclusively rotation-powered radio pulsars, while the Mészáros book High-Energy Radiation from Magnetized Neutron Stars (1992 Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press) considered both rotation- and accretion-powered neutron stars, but focused on their radiation at x-ray energies and above. The recent book Neutron Stars 1 by Haensel et al (2007 Berlin: Springer) considers only the equation of state and neutron-star structure. Into this context appears Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars, by Pranab Ghosh. In contrast to other books, here the author takes an encyclopedic approach and attempts to synthesize practically all of the major aspects of the two main types of neutron star. This is ambitious. The only comparable undertaking is the useful but more elementary Lyne and Graham-Smith text Pulsar Astronomy (1998 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), or Compact Stellar X-ray Sources (eds Lewin and van der Klis, 2006 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), an anthology of technical review articles that also includes black hole topics. Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars thus fills a clear void in the field, providing a readable, graduate-level book that covers nearly everything you

  20. Alignment of the Earth's Magnetic Field with the Axis of Rotation and Reversals of Polarity: Laboratory Experiments on a Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Crane, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    A mechanism that can cause the earth's external magnetic field to be aligned with the axis of rotation and to reverse at random times is described. It depends upon two arbitrary assumptions: (a) A dipole magnetic source, of unspecified nature, deep within the core, wanders randomly in direction. (b) The conducting fluid at the outer boundary of the core circulates in a pattern that is symmetrical with respect to the earth's axis of rotation. It is shown that such a circulating layer will act as an anisotropic screen, which will suppress the field of the transverse component of the source dipole. The field observed outside the core will be mainly that of the axial component of the source, and it will reverse abruptly whenever the direction of the source crosses the equatorial plane. Quantitative experimental studies, made on small-scale models, of the effects and their properties are described. The only datum that even suggests a value that may be used for the angular velocity of the circulating outer layer with respect to the source is the angular velocity of the westward drift of the earth's nondipolar field. If that value is used, the anisotropic screening effect comes out to be strong enough to give alignment and reversal characteristics that are similar to those found from paleomagnetic studies. PMID:16592194

  1. Magnetic alignment and quadrupolar/paramagnetic cross-correlation in complexes of Na with LnDOTP5-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Uzi; Chandra shekar, S.; Ling, Wen; Navon, Gil; Jerschow, Alexej

    2012-03-01

    The observation of a double-quantum filtered signal of quadrupolar nuclei (e.g. 23Na) in solution has been traditionally interpreted as a sign for anisotropic reorientational motion. Ling and Jerschow (2007) [23] have found that a 23Na double-quantum signal is observed also in solutions of TmDOTPNa5. Interference effects between the quadrupolar and the paramagnetic interactions have been reported to lead to the appearance of double-quantum coherences even in the absence of a residual quadrupolar interaction. In addition, such processes lead to differential linebroadening effects between the satellite transitions, akin to effects that are well known for dipolar-CSA cross-correlation. Here, we report experiments on sodium in the presence of LnDOTP compounds, where it is shown that these cross-correlation effects correlate well with the pseudo-contact shift. In addition, anisotropic g-values of the lanthanide compounds in question, can also lead to alignment within the magnetic field, and consequently to the appearance of line splitting and double-quantum coherences. The two competing effects are demonstrated and it is concluded that both cross-correlated relaxation and alignment in the magnetic field must be at work in the systems described here.

  2. Thermal characterization of composites made up of magnetically aligned carbonyl iron particles in a polyester resin matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Esquivel, R. A.; Zambrano-Arjona, M. A.; Mendez-Gamboa, J. A.; Yanez-Limon, J. M.; Ordonez-Miranda, J.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    The thermal characterization of composites made up by magnetically aligned carbonyl iron micro-sized particles embedded in a polyester resin matrix is performed using photothermal radiometry technique. The measured experimental data show that the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the composite, in the direction of the applied magnetic field, increase with the concentration of the particles and are enhanced with respect to their corresponding values for a random distribution of the particles. This thermal enhancement has a maximum at a concentration of particles of 10% and is very low at small and high iron volume fractions, such that for particles concentrations of about 40%, the composite thermal conductivity reduces to its values for random particles. This behavior indicates that for high volume fractions, the effect of the microparticles concentration plays a dominant role over the effect of their alignment. It is shown that the thermal conductivity of the composite can be modeled in terms of the Nielsen model, under an appropriate parameterization of the form factor of the particles. The results of this work could be highly useful for improving the thermal performance of mechanical and electronic devices involving composite materials.

  3. Aligned magnetic field and cross-diffusion effects of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, C.; Sandeep, N.; Sugunamma, V.; Rushi Kumar, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of aligned magnetic field, thermal radiation, heat generation/absorption, cross-diffusion, viscous dissipation, heat source and chemical reaction on the flow of a nanofluid past an exponentially stretching sheet in porous medium. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to set of ordinary differential equations using self-similarity transformation, which are then solved numerically using bvp4c Matlab package. Finally the effects of various non-dimensional parameters on velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are thoroughly investigated and presented through graphs and tables. We observed that an increase in the aligned angle strengthens the applied magnetic field and decreases the velocity profiles of the flow. Soret and Dufour numbers are helpful to enhance the heat transfer rate. An increase in the heat source parameter, radiation parameter and Eckert number increases the mass transfer rate. Mixed convection parameter has tendency to enhance the friction factor along with the heat and mass transfer rate.

  4. Aligned magnetic field and cross-diffusion effects of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, C.; Sandeep, N.; Sugunamma, V.; Rushi Kumar, B.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of aligned magnetic field, thermal radiation, heat generation/absorption, cross-diffusion, viscous dissipation, heat source and chemical reaction on the flow of a nanofluid past an exponentially stretching sheet in porous medium. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to set of ordinary differential equations using self-similarity transformation, which are then solved numerically using bvp4c Matlab package. Finally the effects of various non-dimensional parameters on velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are thoroughly investigated and presented through graphs and tables. We observed that an increase in the aligned angle strengthens the applied magnetic field and decreases the velocity profiles of the flow. Soret and Dufour numbers are helpful to enhance the heat transfer rate. An increase in the heat source parameter, radiation parameter and Eckert number increases the mass transfer rate. Mixed convection parameter has tendency to enhance the friction factor along with the heat and mass transfer rate.

  5. Preoperative assessment of femoral rotation and its relationship with coronal alignment: A magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Catherine J; Gallie, Price; Whitehouse, Sarah L

    2016-12-01

    This MRI study explores the individual variation of the rotational axes of the distal femur, and investigate the relationship of this variation with overall coronal alignment in the osteoarthritic knee,The mean surgical epicondylar axis (SEA) was 1.7°, anatomical epicondylar axis (AEA) 5.6° and AP trochlea axis (APA) 94.3° external rotation, compared to the posterior condylar line. Investigating this relationship between different coronal alignment groups, there were statistically significant differences between excessive varus and excessive valgus knees for SEA (0.9:3.0 p < 0.001) and AEA (4.7:7.0 p < 0.001). There was no statistical difference for APA (93.9:95.3 p = 0.238). PMID:27408506

  6. The Vela pulsar in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibanov, Yu. A.; Koptsevich, A. B.; Sollerman, J.; Lundqvist, P.

    2003-08-01

    We report on the first detection of the Vela pulsar in the near-infrared with the VLT/ISAAC in the Js and H bands. The pulsar magnitudes are Js=22.71+/-0.10 and H=22.04+/-0.16. We compare our results with the available multiwavelength data and show that the dereddened phase-averaged optical spectrum of the pulsar can be fitted with a power law Fnu ~ nu -alpha_nu with alphanu = 0.12+/-0.05, assuming the color excess EB-V=0.055+/-0.005 based on recent spectral fits of the emission of the Vela pulsar and its supernova remnant in X-rays. The negative slope of the pulsar spectrum is different from the positive slope observed over a wide optical range in the young Crab pulsar spectrum. The near-infrared part of the Vela spectrum appears to have the same slope as the phase-averaged spectrum in the high energy X-ray tail, obtained in the 2-10 keV range with the RXTE. Both of these spectra can be fitted with a single power law suggesting their common origin. Because the phase-averaged RXTE spectrum in this range is dominated by the second X-ray peak of the pulsar light curve, coinciding with the second main peak of its optical pulse profile, we suggest that this optical peak can be redder than the first one. We also detect two faint extended structures in the 1.5 = 3.1 arcsec vicinity of the pulsar, projected on and aligned with the south-east jet and the inner arc of the pulsar wind nebula, detected in X-rays with Chandra. We discuss their possible association with the nebula. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Programme 66.D-0568).

  7. Pulsar Magnetohydrodynamic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Isao; Sigalo, Friday B.

    2006-12-01

    The acceleration and collimation/decollimation of relativistic magnetocentrifugal winds are discussed concerning a cold plasma from a strongly magnetized, rapidly rotating neutron star in a steady axisymmetric state based on ideal magnetohydrodynamics. There exist unipolar inductors associated with the field line angular frequency, α, at the magnetospheric base surface, SB, with a huge potential difference between the poles and the equator, which drive electric current through the pulsar magnetosphere. Any ``current line'' must emanate from one terminal of the unipolar inductor and return to the other, converting the Poynting flux to the kinetic flux of the wind at finite distances. In a plausible field structure satisfying the transfield force-balance equation, the fast surface, SF, must exist somewhere between the subasymptotic and asymptotic domains, i.e., at the innermost point along each field line of the asymptotic domain of \\varpaA2/\\varpi2 ≪ 1, where \\varpiA is the Alfvénic axial distance. The criticality condition at SF yields the Lorentz factor, γF = μ\\varepsilon1/3, and the angular momentum flux, β, as the eigenvalues in terms of the field line angular velocity, α, the mass flux per unit flux tube, η, and one of the Bernoulli integrals, μδ, which are assumed to be specifiable as the boundary conditions at SB. The other Bernoulli integral, μɛ, is related to μδ as μɛ = μδ[1-(α2\\varpiA2/c2)]-1, and both μɛ and \\varpiA2 are eigenvalues to be determined by the criticality condition at SF. Ongoing MHD acceleration is possible in the superfast domain. This fact may be helpful in resolving a discrepancy between the wind theory and the Crab-nebula model. It is argued that the ``anti-collimation theorem'' holds for relativistic winds, based on the curvature of field streamlines determined by the transfield force balance. The ``theorem'' combines with the ``current-closure condition'' as a global condition in the wind zone to produce a

  8. Nucleation field and energy product of aligned two-phase magnets -- Progress towards the '1 MJ/m[sup 3]' magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, R.; Coey, J.M.D. . Dept. of Pure and Applied Physics)

    1993-11-01

    Exchange hardening of nanostructured two-phase systems composed of an aligned hard phase and a soft phase with high magnetization is Investigated using a micromagnetic approach which accounts for interactions between the soft regions. For Sm[sub 2]Fe[sub 17]N[sub 3](2.5nm)/Fe[sub 65]Co[sub 35](9nm) multilayers an energy product as high as 1 MJ/m[sup 3] (120 MGOe) is predicted, with a rare-earth content of only 5wt%. Giant energy products may also be achieved In suitable cellular and disordered structures.

  9. High-School Teams Joining Massive Pulsar Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    High school students and teachers will join astronomers on the cutting edge of science under a program to be operated by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU), and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The program, called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, will engage West Virginia students and teachers in a massive search for new pulsars using data from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Sue Ann Heatherly Sue Ann Heatherly, NRAO Education Officer CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) The NSF announced a $892,838 grant to NRAO and WVU to conduct the three-year program. The project will involve 60 teachers and some 600 students in helping astronomers analyze data from 1500 hours of observing time on the GBT. The 120 terabytes of data produced by some 70,000 individual pointings of the giant, 17-million-pound telescope is expected to reveal dozens of previously-unknown pulsars. "The students in this program will be partners in frontier research, discovering new pulsars and measuring changes in pulsars already known," said Sue Ann Heatherly, the NRAO Education Officer in Green Bank and Principal Investigator in the project. Pulsars are superdense neutron stars, the corpses of massive stars that have exploded as supernovae. As the neutron star spins, lighthouse-like beams of radio waves, streaming from the poles of its powerful magnetic field, sweep through space. When one of these beams sweeps across the Earth, radio telescopes can capture the pulse of radio waves. Pulsars serve as exotic laboratories for studying the physics of extreme conditions. Scientists can learn valuable new information about the physics of subatomic particles, electromagnetics, and General Relativity by observing pulsars and the changes they undergo over time. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) combines the capabilities of NRAO and WVU to provide a unique opportunity for teachers and students

  10. An axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic model for the Crab pulsar wind bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    1992-01-01

    We extend Kennel and Coroniti's (1984) spherical magnetohydrodynamic models for the Crab Nebula to include the pinching effect of the toroidal magnetic field. Since the bulk nebular flow is likely to be very submagnetosonic, a quasi-static treatment is possible. We show that the pinching effect can be responsible for the observed elongation of the pulsar wind bubble, as indicated by the surface brightness contours of optical synchrotron radiation. From the observed elongation we estimate a value for sigma, the ratio of Poynting flux to plasma kinetic energy flux in the free pulsar wind, which is consistent with previous results from spherical models. Using the inferred magnetic field configuration inside the pulsar wind bubble, combined with the observed dimensions of the X-ray nebula, we are able to constrain the particle distribution function. We conclude that, for a power-law injection function, the maximum energy has to be much larger in the pulsar equatorial region than in the polar region.

  11. On the valve nature of a monolayer of aligned molecular magnets in tunneling spin-polarized electrons: Towards organic molecular spintronics

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sudipto; Pal, Amlan J.

    2014-01-06

    We form a monolayer of magnetic organic molecules and immobilize their moments pointing either upwards or downwards with respect to the substrate through an electrostatic-binding process. Such a monolayer is probed with a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which is also magnetized with the magnetization vector pointing towards (or away from) apex of the tip. From spin-polarized tunneling current, we show that the current was higher when magnetization vectors of the tip and molecules were parallel as compared to that when they were anti-parallel. We show that for tunneling of spin-polarized electrons, aligned organic molecular magnets can act as a valve.

  12. Fermi Pulsar Analysis

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates how analysis of Fermi data reveals new pulsars. Fermi's LAT records the precise arrival time and approximate direction of the gamma rays it detects, but to identify a pul...

  13. Cosmic Ray Positrons from Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars are potential Galactic sources of positrons through pair cascades in their magnetospheres. There are, however, many uncertainties in establishing their contribution to the local primary positron flux. Among these are the local density of pulsars, the cascade pair multiplicities that determine the injection rate of positrons from the pulsar, the acceleration of the injected particles by the pulsar wind termination shock, their rate of escape from the pulsar wind nebula, and their propagation through the interstellar medium. I will discuss these issues in the context of what we are learning from the new Fermi pulsar detections and discoveries.

  14. Joint USSR-Australia Shklovskii Memorial Symposium on Supernova Remnants and Pulsars, Pushchino, USSR, June 8-11, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Various papers on SNRs and pulsars are presented. The topics discussed include: synthesis surveys of southern SNRs, structure and source of radio emission in old SNRs, daily observations of three period jumps of the Vela pulsar, two types of pulsar, 843 MHz observations of Cir X-1 and G321.9-0.3, radio emission model of a 'typical' pulsar, relationship between supernova type and their remnants, atlas of SNR magnetic fields, and models for the emission line spectra of oxygen-rich SNRs. Also addressed are: nonstationary phenomena in the radiation of young SNRs, SNR morphology, biannular structure in SNRs, problems of estimating distances to pulsars, spatial distribution of pulsars and SNRs, correlation properties of a short-scale microstructure of pulsar radio emission within a 100 kHz bandwidth, SNRs with jets, and decametric emission by pulsars.

  15. Experimental study of laser-detected magnetic resonance based on atomic alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Di Domenico, Gianni; Bison, Georg; Groeger, Stephan; Knowles, Paul; Pazgalev, Anatoly S.; Rebetez, Martin; Saudan, Herve; Weis, Antoine

    2006-12-15

    We present an experimental study of the spectra produced by optical-radio-frequency double resonance in which resonant linearly polarized laser light is used in the optical pumping and detection processes. We show that the experimental spectra obtained for cesium are in excellent agreement with a very general theoretical model developed in our group [Weis, Bison, and Pazgalev, Phys. Rev. A 74, 033401 (2006)] and we investigate the limitations of this model. Finally, the results are discussed in view of their use in the study of relaxation processes in aligned alkali-metal vapors.

  16. Pulse Portraiture: Pulsar timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulse Portraiture is a wideband pulsar timing code written in python. It uses an extension of the FFTFIT algorithm (Taylor 1992) to simultaneously measure a phase (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM). The code includes a Gaussian-component-based portrait modeling routine. The code uses the python interface to the pulsar data analysis package PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) and also requires the non-linear least-squares minimization package lmfit (ascl:1606.014).

  17. Observations of accreting pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Thomas A.; Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Wilson, Robert B.; Finger, Mark H.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss recent observations of accreting binary pulsars with the all-sky BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. BATSE has detected and studied nearly half of the known accreting pulsar systems. Continuous timing studies over a two-year period have yielded accurate orbital parameters for 9 of these systems, as well as new insights into long-term accretion torque histories.

  18. Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes Comprising Magnetically Sensitive Metal Oxides in Nanofluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G. P. 'Bud' (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a nanoparticle mixture or suspension or nanofluid comprising nonmagnetically sensitive nanoparticles, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles, and surfactant(s). The present invention also relates to methods of preparing and using the same.

  19. Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes Comprising Magnetically Sensitive Metal Oxides in Nanofluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G. P. " Bud" (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is a nanoparticle mixture or suspension or nanofluid comprising nonmagnetically sensitive nanoparticles, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles, and surfactant(s). The present invention also relates to methods of preparing and using the same.

  20. The Twisting Jet from the Vela Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teter, M. A.; Pavlov, G. G.; Sanwal, D.; Kargaltsev, O.

    2002-05-01

    Observations of the Vela pulsar-wind nebula (PWN) with Chandra have revealed a long, thin filament -- an extension of the pulsar's jet beyond the bright outer arc confining the PWN in the direction of the pulsar's proper motion. This curved external jet terminates in a region of enhanced emission (a blob) at a distance of about 100'' (0.15 pc) from the pulsar, larger than the size of the PWN. The shape of the jet and its brightness are seen to vary on a timescale as short as a few days, its remote parts move in the sky plane with apparent velocities of up to 0.2 c. The X-ray spectrum of the external jet, including the termination blob, shows no spectral features. It is well described by a power-law model with a photon-index of γ ~= 1.2 (slightly harder than the average spectrum of the PWN, γ ~= 1.5). This indicates that the jet's radiation is due to synchrotron emission of relativistic particles in a magnetic field. The fact that the jet remains confined, although it twists at large distances from the pulsar, suggests a self-confining structure of its magnetic field. The varying shape and intensity of this stream of relativistic particles can be associated with varying local conditions in the Vela SNR and/or large-scale MHD instabilities and internal variations of the magnetic field within the jet. We will present a movie with a sequence of 12 Chandra images over past two years, demonstrating the structure of the twisting jet, and discuss various interpretations of these observations. The work was partially supported by SAO grant GO2-3091X and NASA grant NAG5-10865.

  1. Is Jupiter's magnetosphere like a pulsar's or earth's?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1974-01-01

    The application of pulsar physics to determine the magnetic structure in the planet Jupiter outer magnetosphere is discussed. A variety of theoretical models are developed to illuminate broad areas of consistency and conflict between theory and experiment. Two possible models of Jupiter's magnetosphere, a pulsar-like radial outflow model and an earth-like convection model, are examined. A compilation of the simple order of magnitude estimates derivable from the various models is provided.

  2. Strangelets accelerated by pulsars in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K. S.; Usov, V. V.

    2006-12-15

    It is shown that nuggets of strange quark matter may be extracted from the surface of pulsars and accelerated by strong electric fields to high energies if pulsars are strange stars with the crusts, comprised of nuggets embedded in a uniform electron background. Such high energy nuggets called usually strangelets give an observable contribution into galactic cosmic rays and may be detected by the upcoming cosmic ray experiment Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02 on the International Space Station.

  3. The Fermi LAT Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2011-08-01

    The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi satellite is an impressive pulsar discovery machine, with over 75 pulse detections and counting. The populations of radio-selected, γ-selected and millisecond pulsars are now large enough to display observational patterns in the light curves and luminosities. These patterns are starting to teach us about the physics of the emission zone, which seems dominated by open field lines near the speed of light cylinder. The sample also provides initial inferences about the pulsar population. Apparently a large fraction of neutron stars have a young energetic γ-ray emitting phase, making these objects a good probe of massive star evolution. The long-lived millisecond γ-ray pulsars are even more ubiquitous and may produce a significant fraction of the γ-ray background. In any event, it is clear that the present LAT pulsar sample is dominated by nearby objects, and there is every expectation that the number, and quality, of pulsar detections will increase in years to come.

  4. Chandra Examines a Quadrillion-Volt Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    The high-voltage environment of one of the most energetic and strongly magnetized pulsars known has been surveyed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. A team of astronomers found a powerful jet of high-energy particles extending over a distance of 20 light years and bright arcs believed to be due to particles of matter and anti-matter generated by the pulsar. The team of US, Canadian, and Japanese scientists pointed Chandra at the rapidly spinning neutron star B1509-58, located 19,000 light years away in the constellation of Circinus, for over five hours. These results were announced at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium in Washington, DC. "Jets and arcs on this vast scale have never been seen in any other pulsar," said Bryan Gaensler of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. "The spectacular images we have obtained of this source are letting us test theories as to how pulsars unleash so much energy." The features seen with Chandra give the scientists insight into the process by which voltages of more than 7000 trillion volts are created around rotating neutron stars (the dense remnants of supernova explosions) and how these extreme voltages affect their environment. B1509-58 is of particular interest because it has a much stronger magnetic field than the Crab Nebula pulsar, which exhibits similar features on a much smaller scale. The general picture emerging from these results is that high-energy particles of matter and antimatter are streaming away from the neutron star along its poles and near its equator. The particles leaving the poles produce the jets; astronomers speculate that only one side of the jet is apparent in B1509-58, indicating that this one side is beamed in our direction, while the other is rushing away. "Until this observation, no one knew for sure whether such tremendous voltages and energy outputs were a trademark of all pulsars, or if the Crab was an oddball," said Vicky Kaspi of McGill University in Montreal. "Now thanks

  5. Magnetic and optical properties of Mn-doped ZnO vertically aligned nanorods synthesized by hydrothermal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, J.; Sasmal, I.; Nath, T. K.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we have reported the synthesis of high quality vertically aligned undoped and Mn-doped ZnO single crystalline nanorods arrays on Si (100) substrates using two steps process, namely, initial slow seed layer formation followed by solution growth employing wet chemical hydrothermal method. The shapes of the as grown single crystalline nanorods are hexagonal. The diameter and length of the as grown undoped ZnO nanorods varies in the range of 80-150 nm and 1.0 - 1.4 μm, respectively. Along with the lattice parameters of the hexagonal crystal structure, the diameter and length of Mn doped ZnO nanorods are found to increase slightly as compared to the undoped ZnO nanorods. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of Mn atoms in Mn2+ state in the single crystalline ZnO nanorods. The recorded photoluminescence spectrum contains two emissions peaks having UV exciton emissions along with a green-yellow emission. The green-yellow emissions provide the evidence of singly ionized oxygen vacancies. The magnetic field dependent magnetization measurements [M (H)] and zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) magnetization [M(T)] measurements have been carried out at different isothermal conditions in the temperature range of 5-300 K. The Mn doped ZnO nanorods clearly show room temperature ferromagnetic ordering near room temperature down to 5 K. The observed magnetization may be attributed to the long range ferromagnetic interaction between bound magnetic polarons led by singly charged oxygen vacancies.

  6. A magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool for quantitative analysis of strain induced cellular reorientation and actin alignment.

    PubMed

    Khademolhosseini, F; Liu, C-C; Lim, C J; Chiao, M

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available cell strain tools, such as pneumatically actuated elastomer substrates, require special culture plates, pumps, and incubator setups. In this work, we present a magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool (MACSAT) that can be implemented using off-the-shelf components and conventional incubators. We determine the strain field on the MACSAT elastomer substrate using numerical models and experimental measurements and show that a specific region of the elastomer substrate undergoes a quasi-uniaxial 2D stretch, and that cells confined to this region of the MACSAT elastomer substrate undergo tensile, compressive, or zero axial strain depending on their angle of orientation. Using the MACSAT to apply cyclic strain on endothelial cells, we demonstrate that actin filaments within the cells reorient away from the stretching direction, towards the directions of minimum axial strain. We show that the final actin orientation angles in strained cells are spread over a region of compressive axial strain, confirming previous findings on the existence of a varied pre-tension in the actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. We also demonstrate that strained cells exhibit distinctly different values of actin alignment coherency compared to unstrained cells and therefore propose that this parameter, i.e., the coherency of actin alignment, can be used as a new readout to determine the occurrence/extent of actin alignment in cell strain experiments. The tools and methods demonstrated in this study are simple and accessible and can be easily replicated by other researchers to study the strain response of other adherent cells. PMID:27587150

  7. Optical study of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanwal, Divas

    The Crab Pulsar emits radiation at all wavelengths from radio to extreme γ-rays including the optical. We have performed extremely high time resolution multicolor photometry of the Crab Pulsar at optical wavelengths to constrain the high energy emission models for pulsars. Our observations with 1 microsecond time resolution are a factor of 20 better than the previous best observations. We have completely resolved the peak of the main pulse of the Crab Pulsar in optical passbands. The peaks of the main pulse and the interpulse move smoothly from the rising branch to the falling branch with neither a flat top nor a cusp. We find that the peak of the Crab Pulsar main pulse in the B band arrives 140 microseconds before the peak of the radio pulse. The color of the emission changes across the phase. The maximum variation in the color ratio is about 25%. The bluest color occurs in the bridge region between the main pulse and the interpulse. The Crab Pulsar has faded by 2 +/- 2.8% since the previous observations in 1991 using the same instrument. The statistics of photon arrival times are consistent with atmospheric scintillation causing most of the variations in addition to the mean pulse variations in the shape. However, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the Crab Pulsar light curve shows extra correlations at very short time scales. We identify two time scales, one at about 20 microseconds and another one at about 1000 microseconds at which we observe a break in the ACF. We conclude that these short timescale correlations are internal to the pulsar. We attribute the extra correlation observed in our data to microstructures. This is the first time evidence for microstructures has been observed outside the radio wavelengths. The upturn in the ACF at short time scales depends on the color. The U band shows about 10% more correlation at short time scales while the R band shows only about 3% change. We have also observed the young X-ray pulsar PSR 0656+14 at optical

  8. STRONG FIELD EFFECTS ON PULSAR ARRIVAL TIMES: GENERAL ORIENTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yan; Creighton, Teviet; Price, Richard H.; Jenet, Frederick A.

    2009-11-10

    A pulsar beam passing close to a black hole can provide a probe of very strong gravitational fields even if the pulsar itself is not in a strong field region. In the case that the spin of the hole can be ignored, we have previously shown that all strong field effects on the beam can be understood in terms of two 'universal' functions: F(phi{sub in}) and T(phi{sub in}) of the angle of beam emission phi{sub in}; these functions are universal in that they depend only on a single parameter, the pulsar/black hole distance from which the beam is emitted. Here we apply this formalism to general pulsar-hole-observer geometries, with arbitrary alignment of the pulsar spin axis and arbitrary pulsar beam direction and angular width. We show that the analysis of the observational problem has two distinct elements: (1) the computation of the location and trajectory of an observer-dependent 'keyhole' direction of emission in which a signal can be received by the observer; and (2) the determination of an annulus that represents the set of directions containing beam energy. Examples of each are given along with an example of a specific observational scenario.

  9. VLT polarimetry observations of the middle-aged pulsar PSR B0656+14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, R. P.; Moran, P.; Shearer, A.; Testa, V.; Słowikowska, A.; Rudak, B.; Krzeszowski, K.; Kanbach, G.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Optical polarisation measurements are key tests for different models of the pulsar magnetosphere. Furthermore, comparing the relative orientation of the phase-averaged linear polarisation direction and the pulsar proper motion vector may unveil a peculiar alignment, clearly seen in the Crab pulsar. Aims: Our goal is to obtain the first measurement of the phase-averaged optical linear polarisation of the fifth brightest optical pulsar, PSR B0656+14, which also has a precisely measured proper motion, and to verify a possible alignment between the polarisation direction and the proper motion vector. Methods: We carried out observations with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to measure the phase-averaged optical polarisation degree (PD) and position angle (PA) of PSR B0656+14. Results: We measured a PD of 11.9% ± 5.5% and a PA of 125.8° ± 13.2°, measured east of north. Albeit of marginal significance, this is the first measurement of the phase-averaged optical PD for this pulsar. Moreover, we found that the PA of the phase-averaged polarisation vector is close to that of the pulsar proper motion (93.12° ± 0.38°). Conclusions: Deeper observations are needed to confirm our polarisation measurement of PSR B0656+14, whereas polarisation measurements for more pulsars will better assess possible correlations of the polarisation degree with the pulsar parameters. Based on observations collected at ESO, Paranal, under Programme 090.D-0106(A).

  10. Disc polarization from both emission and scattering of magnetically aligned grains: the case of NGC 1333 IRAS 4A1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Li, Zhi-Yun; Looney, Leslie W.; Cox, Erin G.; Tobin, John; Stephens, Ian W.; Segura-Cox, Dominque M.; Harris, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    Dust polarization in millimetre (and centimetre) has been mapped in discs around an increasing number of young stellar objects. It is usually thought to come from emission by magnetically aligned (non-spherical) grains, but can also be produced by dust scattering. We present a semi-analytic theory of disc polarization that includes both the direction emission and scattering, with an emphasis on their relative importance and how they are affected by the disc inclination. For face-on discs, both emission and scattering tend to produce polarization in the radial direction, making them difficult to distinguish, although the scattering-induced polarization can switch to the azimuthal direction if the incident radiation is beamed strongly enough in the radial direction in the disc plane. Disc inclination affects the polarizations from emission and scattering differently, especially on the major axis where, in the edge-on limit, the former vanishes while the latter reaches a polarization fraction as large as 1/3. The polarizations from the two competing mechanisms tend to cancel each other on the major axis, producing two low polarization `holes' (one on each side of the centre) under certain conditions. We find tantalizing evidence for at least one such `hole' in NGC 1333 IRAS 4A1, whose polarization observed at 8 mm on the 100 au scale is indicative of a pattern dominated by scattering close to the centre and by direction emission in the outer region. If true, it would imply not only that a magnetic field exists on the disc scale, but that it is strong enough to align large, possibly mm-sized, grains.

  11. High Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos from Newborn Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Olinto, Angela

    2013-04-01

    Newborn pulsars offer favorable sites for cosmic ray acceleration and interaction. Particles could be striped off the star surface and accelerated in the pulsar wind up to PeV-100 EeV energies, depending on the pulsar's birth period and magnetic field strength. Once accelerated, the cosmic rays interact with the surrounding supernova ejecta until they escape the source. By assuming a normal distribution of pulsar birth periods centered at 300,ms, we find the combined contribution of extragalactic pulsars produce ultrahigh energy cosmic rays that agree with both the observed energy spectrum and composition trend reported by the Auger Observatory. Meanwhile, we point out their Galactic counterparts naturally give rise to a cosmic ray flux peaked at very high energies (VHE, between 10^16 and 10^18 ,eV), which can bridge the gap between predictions of cosmic rays produced by supernova remnants and the observed spectrum and composition just below the ankle. Young pulsars in the universe would also contribute to a diffuse neutrino background due to the photomeson interactions, whose detectability and typical neutrino energy are discussed. Lastly, we predict a neutrino emission level for the future birth of a nearby pulsar.

  12. Ab Initio Pulsar Magnetosphere: Three-dimensional Particle-in-cell Simulations of Oblique Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Cerutti, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    We present “first-principles” relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the oblique pulsar magnetosphere with pair formation. The magnetosphere starts to form with particles extracted from the surface of the neutron star. These particles are accelerated by surface electric fields and emit photons capable of producing electron-positron pairs. We inject secondary pairs at the locations of primary energetic particles whose energy exceeds the threshold for pair formation. We find solutions that are close to the ideal force-free magnetosphere with the Y-point and current sheet. Solutions with obliquities ≤40° do not show pair production in the open field line region because the local current density along the magnetic field is below the Goldreich-Julian value. The bulk outflow in these solutions is charge-separated, and pair formation happens in the current sheet and return current layer only. Solutions with higher inclinations show pair production in the open field line region, with high multiplicity of the bulk flow and the size of the pair-producing region increasing with inclination. We observe the spin-down of the star to be comparable to MHD model predictions. The magnetic dissipation in the current sheet ranges between 20% for the aligned rotator and 3% for the orthogonal rotator. Our results suggest that for low obliquity neutron stars with suppressed pair formation at the light cylinder, the presence of phenomena related to pair activity in the bulk of the polar region, e.g., radio emission, may crucially depend on the physics beyond our simplified model, such as the effects of curved spacetime or multipolar surface fields.

  13. Unraveling the drift behaviour of the remarkable pulsar PSR B0826-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y.; Gil, J.; Kijak, J.; Sendyk, M.

    2004-10-01

    Pulsars with drifting subpulses are thought to be an important key to unlocking the mystery of how radio pulsars work. We present new results from high sensitivity GMRT observations of PSR B0826-34 - a wide profile pulsar that exhibits an interesting but complicated drifting pattern. We provide a model to explain the observed subpulse drift properties of this pulsar, including the apparent reversals of the drift direction. In this model, PSR B0826-34 is close to being an aligned rotator. Using information about the polarization and frequency evolution of the pulse profile, we solve for the emission geometry of this pulsar and show that the angle between the rotation axis and the dipole magnetic axis is less than 5 °. As a result, our line of sight samples a circular path that is entirely within the emission beam. We see evidence for as many as 6 to 7 drifting bands in the main pulse at 318 MHz, which are all part of a circulating system of about 15 spark-associated subpulse emission beams that form, upon averaging, one conal ring of the mean emission. We also see evidence for a second ring of emission, which becomes dominant at higher frequencies (above 1 GHz) due to the nature of the emission geometry. We model the subpulse drift behaviour of this pulsar in detail, providing quantitative treatments of the aliasing problem and various effects of geometry which play an important role. The observed drift rate is an aliased version of the true drift rate which is such that a subpulse drifts to the location of the adjacent subpulse (or a multiple thereof) in about one pulsar period. We show that small variations, of the order of 3-8%, in the mean drift rate are then enough to explain the apparent reversals of drift direction seen in the data. We find the mean circulation time of the drift pattern to be significantly longer than the predictions of the original \\citet{RS75} model and propose an explanation for this, which relates to modified models with temperature

  14. Pulsar lensing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqi; Pen, Ue-Li; Macquart, J.-P.; Brisken, Walter; Deller, Adam

    2016-05-01

    We test the inclined sheet pulsar scintillation model (Pen & Levin) against archival very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data on PSR 0834+06 and show that its scintillation properties can be precisely reproduced by a model in which refraction occurs on two distinct lens planes. These data strongly favour a model in which grazing-incidence refraction instead of diffraction off turbulent structures is the primary source of pulsar scattering. This model can reproduce the parameters of the observed diffractive scintillation with an accuracy at the percent level. Comparison with new VLBI proper motion results in a direct measure of the ionized interstellar medium (ISM) screen transverse velocity. The results are consistent with ISM velocities local to the PSR 0834+06 sight-line (through the Galaxy). The simple 1-D structure of the lenses opens up the possibility of using interstellar lenses as precision probes for pulsar lens mapping, precision transverse motions in the ISM, and new opportunities for removing scattering to improve pulsar timing. We describe the parameters and observables of this double screen system. While relative screen distances can in principle be accurately determined, a global conformal distance degeneracy exists that allows a rescaling of the absolute distance scale. For PSR B0834+06, we present VLBI astrometry results that provide (for the first time) a direct measurement of the distance of the pulsar. For most of the recycled millisecond pulsars that are the targets of precision timing observations, the targets where independent distance measurements are not available. The degeneracy presented in the lens modelling could be broken if the pulsar resides in a binary system.

  15. Superfluidity in Millisecond Pulsars (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pines, D.; Alpar, A.

    The authors review the evidence for superfluidity in the Vela pulsar, the Crab pulsar and PSR 0525+21, and examine the prospects for observing similar consequences of superfluidity in the already-discovered millisec pulsars. They consider, inter alia, the likelihood of observing glitches, the expected post-glitch behavior, and pulsar heating by energy dissipation due to the creep of neutron vortex lines in pinned superfluid regions of the crust.

  16. Classical Accreting Pulsars with NICER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Soft excesses are very common center dot Lx > 1038 erg/s - reprocessing by optically thick material at the inner edge of the accretion disk center dot Lx < 1036 erg/s - photoionized or collisionally heated diffuse gas or thermal emission from the NS surface center dot Lx 1037 erg/s - either or both types of emission center dot NICER observations of soft excesses in bright X-ray pulsars combined with reflection modeling will constrain the ionization state, metalicity and dynamics of the inner edge of the magnetically truncated accretion disk Reflection models of an accretion disk for a hard power law - Strong soft excess below 3 keV from hot X-ray heated disk - For weakly ionized case: strong recombination lines - Are we seeing changes in the disk ionization in 4U1626-26? 13 years of weekly monitoring with RXTE PCA center dot Revealed an unexpectedly large population of Be/X-ray binaries compared to the Milky Way center dot Plotted luminosities are typical of "normal" outbursts (once per orbit) center dot The SMC provides an excellent opportunity to study a homogenous population of HMXBs with low interstellar absorption for accretion disk studies. Monitoring with NICER will enable studies of accretion disk physics in X-ray pulsars center dot The SMC provides a potential homogeneous low-absorption population for this study center dot NICER monitoring and TOO observations will also provide measurements of spinfrequencies, QPOs, pulsed fluxes, and energy spectra.

  17. Self-Assembled Fibers Containing Stable Organic Radical Moieties: Alignment and Magnetic Properties in Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Eimura, Hiroki; Umeta, Yoshikazu; Tokoro, Hiroko; Yoshio, Masafumi; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi; Kato, Takashi

    2016-06-20

    Macroscopically oriented stable organic radicals have been obtained by using a liquid-crystalline (LC) gel composed of an l-isoleucine-based low molecular weight gelator containing a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl moiety. The LC gel has allowed magnetic measurements of the oriented organic radical. The gelator has formed fibrous aggregates in liquid crystals via intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The fibrous aggregates of the radical gelator are formed and oriented on cooling by applying a magnetic field to the mixture of liquid crystals and the gelator. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements have revealed that both oriented and nonoriented fibrous aggregates exhibited antiferromagnetic interactions, in which super-exchange interaction constant J is estimated as -0.89 cm(-1) . PMID:27219716

  18. Generative pulsar timing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentati, L.; Alexander, P.; Hobson, M. P.

    2015-03-01

    A new Bayesian method for the analysis of folded pulsar timing data is presented that allows for the simultaneous evaluation of evolution in the pulse profile in either frequency or time, along with the timing model and additional stochastic processes such as red spin noise, or dispersion measure variations. We model the pulse profiles using `shapelets' - a complete orthonormal set of basis functions that allow us to recreate any physical profile shape. Any evolution in the profiles can then be described as either an arbitrary number of independent profiles, or using some functional form. We perform simulations to compare this approach with established methods for pulsar timing analysis, and to demonstrate model selection between different evolutionary scenarios using the Bayesian evidence. The simplicity of our method allows for many possible extensions, such as including models for correlated noise in the pulse profile, or broadening of the pulse profiles due to scattering. As such, while it is a marked departure from standard pulsar timing analysis methods, it has clear applications for both new and current data sets, such as those from the European Pulsar Timing Array and International Pulsar Timing Array.

  19. Pulsar Radiation Models - Radio to High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice

    Rotation-powered pulsars emit over nearly 19 decades of energy. Although an all-encompassing answer as to the origin of this broad-band emission remains elusive nearly 50 years after their discovery, the theorist does have a few tools in his / her toolkit to aid investigation. Phase-averaged spectra give clues as to the emitting particles, their acceleration, environment, and the radiation mechanism. Moreover, the phase-evolution of spectra constrains the radiation energetics and environment as different parts of the magnetosphere are exposed to the observer during the pulsar's rotation. A detailed model furthermore critically depends on the specification of the emission geometry. Modeling the light curves probes this fundamental geometric assumption, which is closely tied to the posited magnetospheric structure. Studying many versions of the same system helps to constrain critical population-averaged quantities, discover population trends, and probe model performance for different regions of phase space. When coupled with population synthesis, such modeling can provide powerful discrimination between competing emission models. Polarization properties may provide complementary constraints on the magnetic field orientation and pulsar geometry. Lastly, comparison of parameters inferred from independent models for the different wavebands yields necessary crosschecks. It is indeed fortunate that the past few years have witnessed an incredible increase in number and improved characterization of rotation-powered pulsars. We will review how the enhanced quality and quantity of data are providing impetus for further model refinement.

  20. The Origin of Radially Aligned Magnetic Fields in Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Shimoda, Jiro; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-08-01

    It has been suggested by radio observations of polarized synchrotron emissions that downstream magnetic fields in some young supernova remnants (SNRs) are oriented radially. We study the magnetic field distribution of turbulent SNRs driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI)—in other words, the effect of rippled shock—by using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. We find that the induced turbulence has radially biased anisotropic velocity dispersion that leads to a selective amplification of the radial component of the magnetic field. The RMI is induced by the interaction between the shock and upstream density fluctuations. Future high-resolution polarization observations can distinguish the following candidates responsible for the upstream density fluctuations: (1) inhomogeneity caused by the cascade of large-scale turbulence in the interstellar medium, the so-called big power-law in the sky; (2) structures generated by the Drury instability in the cosmic-ray modified shock; and (3) fluctuations induced by the nonlinear feedback of the cosmic-ray streaming instability.

  1. THE ORIGIN OF RADIALLY ALIGNED MAGNETIC FIELDS IN YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Shimoda, Jiro; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-08-01

    It has been suggested by radio observations of polarized synchrotron emissions that downstream magnetic fields in some young supernova remnants (SNRs) are oriented radially. We study the magnetic field distribution of turbulent SNRs driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI)-in other words, the effect of rippled shock-by using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. We find that the induced turbulence has radially biased anisotropic velocity dispersion that leads to a selective amplification of the radial component of the magnetic field. The RMI is induced by the interaction between the shock and upstream density fluctuations. Future high-resolution polarization observations can distinguish the following candidates responsible for the upstream density fluctuations: (1) inhomogeneity caused by the cascade of large-scale turbulence in the interstellar medium, the so-called big power-law in the sky; (2) structures generated by the Drury instability in the cosmic-ray modified shock; and (3) fluctuations induced by the nonlinear feedback of the cosmic-ray streaming instability.

  2. Optical Second Harmonic Generation in the BaTiO3 phase of magnetically aligned multiferroic nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperi, Katia

    Multiferroic materials enable the exploration of electrical control of magnetic properties and vice versa. Their increasing interest is especially due to their potential applications in the industry of information storage. Thanks to recent progress in nanotechnology, they have also been found to have many other applications such as transducers and sensors, and they already occupy a unique place in the biomedical field. The objective of this project is to study multiferroic nanofibers made of cobalt ferrite CoFe2O 4 (CFO) and barium titanate BaTiO3 (BTO) with a specific focus in the characterization of the ferroelectric phase. We researched the state of knowledge concerning the size effects on phase transition for nanoparticles and polycrystals BTO. The ferroelectric phase transition of BTO occurs when it changes from a tetragonal (anisotropic) crystal structure to a cubic (isotropic) structure. This change suggests that optical second harmonic generation (SHG) is a good measurement technique for monitoring the phase transition of the BTO half of the nanofibers. We designed and prepared a temperature dependent SHG experiment on magnetically aligned fibers in transmission with the possibility to investigate the polarization dependence of the signal. We also prepared interdigital electrodes on glass for the future study of the fibers in an external electric field.

  3. NANOGrav Millisecond Pulsar Observing Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nice, David J.; Nanograv

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves from sources such as supermassive black hole binary systems are expected to perturb times-of-flight of signals traveling from pulsars to the Earth. The NANOGrav consortium aims to measure these perturbations in high precision millisecond pulsar timing measurements and thus to directly detect gravitational waves and characterize gravitational wave sources. By observing pulsars over time spans of many years, we are most sensitive to gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies.In this presentation we describe the NANOGrav observing program. We presently observe an array of 45 millisecond pulsars, evenly divided between the Arecibo Observatory (for pulsars with declinations between -1 and 39 degrees) and the Green Bank Telescope (for other pulsars, with two pulsars overlapping with Arecibo). Observation of a large number of pulsars allows for searches of correlated perturbations between multiple pulsar signals, which will be crucial for achieving high-significance detection of gravitational waves in the face of uncorrelated noise (from gravitational waves and rotation noise) in the individual pulsars. As new high-quality pulsars are discovered, they are added to the program.Observations of each pulsar are made with cadence of 20 to 30 days, with observations of each pulsar in two separate radio bands. Arrival times for nearly all pulsars are measured with precision better than 1 microsecond (averaged over a typical observation of 20 minutes), and in the best cases the precision is better than 100 nanoseconds.We describe the NANOGrav nine-year data release, which contains time-of-arrival measurements and high quality timing solutions from 37 pulsars observed over spans ranging between 0.7 to 9.3 years.

  4. Gamma-ray pulsars: Radiation processes in the outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    1996-01-01

    We describe an emission model for gamma ray pulsars based on curvature radiation-reaction limited charges in the outer magnetosphere. We show how pair production on thermal surface flux can limit the acceleration zones. Estimates for the efficiency of GeV photon production eta gamma and the gamma-ray beaming fraction are derived, including their dependence on pulsar parameters. In general eta gamma increases with pulsar age, but is decreased for low magnetic fields and for small magnetic inclinations. We argue that this produces GeV pulse profiles, curvature spectra and detection statistics consistent with the observations. We also describe the optical through X-ray pulsar synchrotron spectrum and the spectral variations with pulsar phase. A test computation for Vela-like parameters reproduces phase-resolved GeV spectra consistent with those observed by EGRET. Finally we comment on very high energy pulsed emission and particle production and note extensions needed to allow a more complete pulsar model.

  5. Modelling pulsar glitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, Brynmor

    2016-07-01

    Pulsar glitches, i.e. sudden jumps in the spin frequency of pulsars, are thought to be due to the presence of large scale superfluid components in neutron star interiors, and offer a unique insight into the physics of matter at high densities and low temperatures. Nevertheless, more than forty years after the first observation, many open questions still exist on the nature of pulsar glitches. In this talk I will review our current theoretical understanding of glitches, of their trigger mechanisms and of the hydrodynamics of superfluid neutron stars. In particular I will focus on 'superfluid vortex avalanches' and recent advances in applying this paradigm to glitch observations, and I will discuss hydrodynamical modelling of the post-glitch recovery.

  6. Gamma Ray Pulsars: Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The six or more pulsars seen by CGRO/EGRET show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. Unless a new pulsed component appears at higher energies, progress in gamma-ray pulsar studies will be greatest in the 1-20 GeV range. Ground-based telescopes whose energy ranges extend downward toward 10 GeV should make important measurements of the spectral cutoffs. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2005, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

  7. Tempo2: Pulsar Timing Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Edwards, Russell

    2012-10-01

    Tempo2 is a pulsar timing package developed to be used both for general pulsar timing applications and also for pulsar timing array research in which data-sets from multiple pulsars need to be processed simultaneously. It was initially developed by George Hobbs and Russell Edwards as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project. Tempo2 is based on the original Tempo (ascl:1509.002) code and can be used (from the command-line) in a similar fashion. It is very versatile and can be extended by plugins.

  8. The Investigation of Neutron Star Spin Period Evolution: Crab Pulsar and Magnetar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Zhang, Y.; Guo, Y.; Pan, Y.; Wang, D.; Yang, Y.

    2016-02-01

    After the birth of a pulsar, its spin frequency will slow down by the EM emission if the magnetic dipole rotating model is assumed. With the present spin period and its derivative of the pulsar, we cannot know exactly the initial period, unless the age of pulsar is given. The spin evolution history of Crab pulsar and some neutron stars, magnetars (SGR/AXP) for instance, with the estimated SNR ages can be evaluated, by which we investigated their initial period and future period.

  9. An extremely bright gamma-ray pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    PubMed

    2015-11-13

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars, created in the gravitational collapse of massive stars. We report the detection of pulsed giga-electron volt gamma rays from the young pulsar PSR J0540-6919 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. This is the first gamma-ray pulsar detected in another galaxy. It has the most luminous pulsed gamma-ray emission yet observed, exceeding the Crab pulsar's by a factor of 20. PSR J0540-6919 presents an extreme test case for understanding the structure and evolution of neutron star magnetospheres. PMID:26564852

  10. An XTE Observation of the VELA Pulsar and Inner Region of the VELA SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickman, Mark

    Using three XTE pointing fields in the inner region of the Vela Supernova Remnant, we propose to answer three fundamental questions concerning this most interesting object: 1) What is the spectrum of the Vela Pulsar between 1 keV (ROSAT) and 60 keV (OSSE)? If a cutoff is detected, it may constitute a measurement of the pulsar magnetic field in the production region. 2) Does unpulsed emission recently detected by OSSE actually come from the compact nebula surrounding the pulsar? 3) Is the asymmetry of emission NE and SW of the pulsar as viewed by ROSAT and EINSTEIN reflected at higher energies?

  11. Detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars through blind frequency searches using the Fermi LAT.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bignami, G F; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Gwon, C; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Primack, J R; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wolff, M T; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-08-14

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars emitting radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. Although there are more than 1800 known radio pulsars, until recently only seven were observed to pulse in gamma rays, and these were all discovered at other wavelengths. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) makes it possible to pinpoint neutron stars through their gamma-ray pulsations. We report the detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches using the LAT. Most of these pulsars are coincident with previously unidentified gamma-ray sources, and many are associated with supernova remnants. Direct detection of gamma-ray pulsars enables studies of emission mechanisms, population statistics, and the energetics of pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants. PMID:19574346

  12. Search for Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars with the Fermi LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2009-01-01

    Prior to the launch of Fermi, only weak gamma-ray pulsations from a single millisecond pulsar, PSR J0218+4232, had been reported. A firm detection of gamma rays from a member of this class of pulsar having periods near neutron star break-up and magnetic dipole moments well below those of normal pulsars would provide new insights into pulsar acceleration and emission. Using accurate ephemerides obtained from several radio telescopes as well as the unprecedented accuracy of the GPS-derived clocks used by Fermi and the LAT, we have searched for gamma-ray pulsations from known pulsars over a broad range of timing parameters. We will present some results from our search for pulsed gamma rays from millisecond pulsars.

  13. Measurement of magnetic field aligned potential differences using high resolution conjugate photoelectron energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Doering, J. P.; Potemra, T. A.; Bostrom, C. O.; Brace, L. H.; Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous high-resolution observations of a distinctive feature in the energy spectrum of conjugate photoelectrons and spacecraft potential relative to the local ionosphere have allowed the net potential difference between magnetic conjugate points at latitudes below the region of low-energy (i.e., lower than 100 eV) auroral electron precipitation to be determined. Measurements made at 300 km from Atmosphere Explorer C show that there is normally no net potential difference between hemispheres in this region, which extended up to invariant latitudes as high as 74 deg. Two types of apparently related anomalous behavior were infrequently observed at high latitudes. During these periods the incident flux of conjugate photoelectrons was either decelerated by about 3 eV or was not detected.

  14. OSCILLATION-DRIVEN MAGNETOSPHERIC ACTIVITY IN PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Meng-Xiang; Xu, Ren-Xin; Zhang, Bing E-mail: r.x.xu@pku.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    We study the magnetospheric activity in the polar cap region of pulsars under stellar oscillations. The toroidal oscillation of the star propagates into the magnetosphere, which provides additional voltage due to unipolar induction, changes Goldreich-Julian charge density from the traditional value due to rotation, and hence influences particle acceleration. We present a general solution of the effect of oscillations within the framework of the inner vacuum gap model and consider three different inner gap modes controlled by curvature radiation, inverse Compton scattering, and two-photon annihilation, respectively. With different pulsar parameters and oscillation amplitudes, one of three modes would play a dominant role in defining the gap properties. When the amplitude of oscillation exceeds a critical value, mode changing occurs. Oscillations also lead to a change of the size of the polar cap. As applications, we show the inner gap properties under oscillations in both normal pulsars and anomalous X-ray pulsars/soft gamma-ray repeaters (AXPs/SGRs). We interpret the onset of radio emission after glitches/flares in AXPs/SGRs as due to oscillation-driven magnetic activities in these objects, within the framework of both the magnetar model and the solid quark star model. Within the magnetar model, radio activation may be caused by the enlargement of the effective polar cap angle and the radio emission beam due to oscillation, whereas within the solid quark star angle, it may be caused by activation of the pulsar inner gap from below the radio emission death line due to an oscillation-induced voltage enhancement. The model can also explain the glitch-induced radio profile change observed in PSR J1119–6127.

  15. Vertically aligned dust particles under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields in the sheath of a radio frequency discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttscher, M.; Melzer, A.

    2015-07-01

    We present experiments on two dust particles with a size of a few microns that are levitated in the sheath region of an rf discharge in the presence of an external magnetic field transverse to the sheath electric field. The two particles are vertically aligned due to the ion focusing effect. First, it is observed that the magnetic field causes a displacement of the dust particles either in the E → × B → - or in the opposite direction. Second, at a sufficiently large neutral gas pressure, the vertical alignment breaks up when the magnetic field strength is increased. The occurrence of this dissociation is described by the horizontal force balance on the two particles.

  16. High-Energy Emission From Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Usov, Vladimir V.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of rotation-powered millisecond pulsars is investigated in a model for acceleration and pair cascades on open field lines above the polar caps. Although these pulsars have low surface magnetic fields, their short periods allow them to have large magnetospheric potential drops, but the majority do not produce sufficient pairs to completely screen the accelerating electric field. In these sources, the primary and secondary electrons continue to accelerate to high altitude and their Lorentz factors are limited by curvature and synchrotron radiation reaction. The accelerating particles maintain high Lorentz factors and undergo cyclotron resonant absorption of radio emission, that produces and maintains a large pitch angle, resulting in a strong synchrotron component. The resulting spectra consist of several distinct components: curvature radiation from primary electrons dominating from 1 - 100 GeV, synchrotron radiation from primary and secondary electrons dominating up to about 100 MeV, and much weaker inverse-Compton radiation from primary electrons a t 0.1 - 1 TeV. We find that the relative size of these components depends on pulsar period, period derivative, and neutron star mass and radius with the level of the synchrotron component also depending sensitively on the radio emission properties. This model is successful in describing the observed X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of PSR J0218+4232 as synchrotron radiation, peaking around 100 MeV and extending up to a turnover around several GeV. The predicted curvature radiation components from a number of millisecond pulsars, as well as the collective emission from the millisecond pulsars in globular clusters, should be detectable with AGILE and GLAST. We also discuss a hidden population of X-ray-quiet and radio-quiet millisecond pulsars which have evolved below the pair death line, some of which may be detectable by telescopes sensitive above 1 GeV. Subject headings: pulsars: general

  17. By-controlled convection and field-aligned currents near midnight auroral oval for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taguchi, S.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Winningham, J. D.; Slavin, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Dynamics Explorer (DE) 2 magnetic and electric field and plasma data, B(sub y)- controlled convection and field-aligned currents in the midnight sector for northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined. The results of an analysis of the electric field data show that when IMF is stable and when its magnitude is large, a coherent B(sub y)-controlled convection exists near the midnight auroral oval in the ionosphere having adequate conductivities. When B(sub y) is negative, the convection consists of a westward (eastward) plasma flow at the lower latitudes and an eastward (westward) plasma flow at the higher latitudes in the midnight sector in the northern (southern) ionosphere. When B(sub y) is positive, the flow directions are reversed. The distribution of the field-aligned currents associated with the B(sub y)-controlled convection, in most cases, shows a three-sheet structure. In accordance with the convection the directions of the three sheets are dependent on the sign of B(sub y). The location of disappearance of the precipitating intense electrons having energies of a few keV is close to the convection reversal surface. However, the more detailed relationship between the electron precipitation boundary and the convection reversal surface depends on the case. In some cases the precipitating electrons extend beyond the convection reversal surface, and in others the poleward boundary terminates at a latitude lower than the reversal surface. Previous studies suggest that the poleward boundary of the electrons having energies of a few keV is not necessarily coincident with an open/closed bounary. Thus the open/closed boundary may be at a latitude higher than the poleward boundary of the electron precipitation, or it may be at a latitude lower than the poleward boundary of the electron precipitation. We discuss relationships between the open/closed boundary and the convection reversal surface. When as a possible choice we adopt a view that the

  18. Inhomogeneous magnetic-field-aligned ion flow measured in a Q machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, M. E.; Zintl, M. W.; Teodorescu, C.; Reynolds, E. W.; Wang, G.; Good, T. N.

    2002-08-01

    Radial profiles of ion flow vd(r) are measured with laser-induced fluorescence for cases in which the flow direction is parallel (vd>0) and/or antiparallel (vd<0) to the equilibrium magnetic field. Experiments are conducted in the barium-ion plasma of a double-ended Q machine. In cases where the ionizers associated with the two ends are not biased relative to each other, two distinct, counterstreaming ion-beam populations are evident. The insertion of blocking electrodes introduces inhomogeneity into the density profiles of the ion populations without effecting the homogeneity of the radial profile of each population's drift velocity. In cases where the two ionizers are biased relative to each other, a single ion population exists. Variation in the radial profile of the ion population's parallel drift velocity vd is produced such that (dvd/dr) can be negative or positive with magnitudes 0-70% of the ion gyrofrequency ωci. These results are discussed in the context of beam-driven and velocity-shear-driven instabilities. Laboratory and space measurements of sheared parallel flow and counterstreaming ion beams are compared.

  19. Scientific uses of pulsars.

    PubMed

    Counselman, C C; Shapiro, I I

    1968-10-18

    The recently discovered celestial sources of pulsed radio energy can be used to test general relativity, to study the solar corona, and to determine the earth's orbit and ephemeris time. The vector positions and transverse velocities of pulsars can be measured with radio interferometers; in combination with pulse-arrival-time data, the distance determination will yield the average interstellar electron density. PMID:17836655

  20. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, R.; Heatherly, S.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Boyles, J. R.; Wilson, M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lynch, R.; Ransom, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) (NSF #0737641) is a joint project between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to interest high school students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics related career paths by helping them to conduct authentic scientific research. The 3 year PSC program,…

  1. Student Discovers New Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    A West Virginia high-school student has discovered a new pulsar, using data from the giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Shay Bloxton, 15, a participant in a project in which students analyze data from the radio telescope, spotted evidence of the pulsar on October 15. Bloxton, along with NRAO astronomers observed the object again one month later. The new observation confirmed that the object is a pulsar, a rotating, superdense neutron star. Bloxton is a sophomore at Nicholas County High School in Summersville, West Virginia. "I was very excited when I found out I had actually made a discovery," Bloxton said. She went to Green Bank in November to participate in the follow-up observation. She termed that visit "a great experience." "It also helped me learn a lot about how observations with the GBT are actually done," she added. The project in which she participated, called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC), is a joint project of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University, funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Pulsars are known for their lighthouse-like beams of radio waves that sweep through space as the neutron star rotates, creating a pulse as the beam sweeps by the Earth. First discovered in 1967, pulsars serve as valuable natural "laboratories" for physicists studying exotic states of matter, quantum mechanics and General Relativity. The GBT, dedicated in 2000, has become one of the world's leading tools for discovering and studying pulsars. The PSC, led by NRAO Education Officer Sue Ann Heatherly and Project Director Rachel Rosen, includes training for teachers and student leaders, and provides parcels of data from the GBT to student teams. The project involves teachers and students in helping astronomers analyze data from 1500 hours of observing with the GBT. The 120 terabytes of data were produced by 70,000 individual pointings of the giant, 17-million-pound telescope. Some 300 hours of the

  2. Ion-temperature-gradient sensitivity of the hydrodynamic instability caused by shear in the magnetic-field-aligned plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June; Koepke, M. E.

    2014-07-15

    The cross-magnetic-field (i.e., perpendicular) profile of ion temperature and the perpendicular profile of the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) plasma flow are sometimes inhomogeneous for space and laboratory plasma. Instability caused either by a gradient in the ion-temperature profile or by shear in the parallel flow has been discussed extensively in the literature. In this paper, (1) hydrodynamic plasma stability is investigated, (2) real and imaginary frequency are quantified over a range of the shear parameter, the normalized wavenumber, and the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths, and (3) the role of inverse Landau damping is illustrated for the case of combined ion-temperature gradient and parallel-flow shear. We find that increasing the ion-temperature gradient reduces the instability threshold for the hydrodynamic parallel-flow shear instability, also known as the parallel Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or the D'Angelo instability. We also find that a kinetic instability arises from the coupled, reinforcing action of both free-energy sources. For the case of comparable electron and ion temperature, we illustrate analytically the transition of the D'Angelo instability to the kinetic instability as (a) the shear parameter, (b) the normalized wavenumber, and (c) the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths are varied and we attribute the changes in stability to changes in the amount of inverse ion Landau damping. We show that near a normalized wavenumber k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} of order unity (i) the real and imaginary values of frequency become comparable and (ii) the imaginary frequency, i.e., the growth rate, peaks.

  3. The interplanetary magnetic field B sub y -dependent field-aligned current in the dayside polar cap under quiet conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M. Kyoto Univ. ); Araki, T. )

    1989-03-01

    Spatial distribution and temporal variation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B{sub y}-dependent cusp region field-aligned currents (FACs) during quiet periods were studied by use of magnetic data observed by Magsat. The analysis was made for 11 events (each event lasts more than one and a half days) when the IMF B{sub y} component was steadily large and B{sub x} was relatively small ({vert bar}B{sub z}{vert bar} < {vert bar}B{sub y}{vert bar}). Results of the analysis of total 62 half-day periods for the IMF B{sub y}-dependent cusp region FAC are summarized as follows: (1) the IMF B{sub y}-dependent cusp region FAC is located at around 86{degree}-87{degree} invariant latitude local noon, which is more poleward than the location of the IMF B{sub z}-dependent cusp region FAC; (2) the current density of this FAC is greater than previous studies ({ge} 4 {mu}A/m{sup 2} for IMF B{sub y} = 6 nT); (3) there are two time scales for the IMF B{sub y}-dependent cusp region FAC to appear: the initial rise of the current is on a short time scale, {approximately} 10 min, and it is followed by a gradual increase on a time scale of several hours to a half day; (4) the seasonal change of this FAC is greater than that of the nightside region 1 or region 2 FACs; (5) the IMF B{sub z}-dependent cusp region FAC is not well observed around the cusp when the IMF B{sub y}-dependent cusp region FAC is intense.

  4. Field-Aligned Current Reconfiguration and Magnetospheric Response to an Impulse in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field BY Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, F. D.; Eriksson, S.; Korth, H.; Hairston, M. R.; Baker, J. B.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is dawnward or duskward, magnetic merging between the IMF and the geomagnetic field occurs near the cusp on the dayside flanks of the magnetosphere. During these intervals, flow channels in the ionosphere with velocities in excess of 2 km/s have been observed, which can deposit large amounts of energy into the high-latitude thermosphere. In this study, we analyze an interval on 5 April 2010 where there was a strong dawnward impulse in the IMF, followed by a gradual decay in IMF magnitude at constant clock angle. Data from the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar and the DMSP spacecraft were used to investigate ionospheric convection during this interval, and data from the Active Magnetospheric and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) were used to investigate the associated Field-Aligned Current (FAC) system. Additionally, data from AMPERE were used to investigate the time response of the dawn-side FAC pair. We find there is a delay of approximately 1.25 hours between the arrival of the dawnward IMF impulse at the magnetopause and strength of the dawnward FAC pair, which is comparable to substorm growth and expansion time scales under southward IMF. Additionally, we find at the time of the peak FAC, there is evidence of a reconfiguring four-sheet FAC system in the morning local time sector of the ionosphere. Additionally, we find an inverse correlation between the dawn FAC strength and both the solar wind Alfvénic Mach number and the SYM-H index. No statistically significant correlation between the FAC strength and the solar wind dynamic pressure was found.

  5. Magnetically aligned iron oxide/gold nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotube hybrid structure as a humidity sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewook; Mulmi, Suresh; Thangadurai, Venkataraman; Park, Simon S

    2015-07-22

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs), particularly CNTs decorated with nanoparticles (NPs), are of great interest because of their synergic effects, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering, plasmonic resonance energy transfer, magnetoplasmonic, magnetoelectric, and magnetooptical effects. In general, research has focused on a single type of NP, such as a metal or metal oxide, that has been modified on a CNT surface. In this study, however, a new strategy is introduced for the decoration of two different NP types on CNTs. In order to improve the functionality of modified CNTs, we successfully prepared binary NP-decorated CNTs, namely, iron oxide/gold (Au) NP-decorated CNTs (IA-CNTs), which were created through two simple reactions in deionized water, without high temperature, high pressure, or harsh reducing agents. The physicochemical properties of IA-CNTs were characterized by ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, a superconducting quantum interference device, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. In this study, IA-CNTs were utilized to detect humidity. Magnetic IA-CNTs were aligned on interdigitated platinum electrodes under external magnetic fields to create a humidity-sensing channel, and its electrical conductivity was monitored. As the humidity increased, the electrical resistance of the sensor also increased. In comparison with various gases, for example, H2, O2, CO, CO2, SO2, and dry air, the IA-CNT-based humidity sensor exhibited high-selectivity performances. IA-CNTs also responded to heavy water (D2O), and it was established that the humidity detection mechanism had D2O-sensing capabilities. Further, the humidity from human out-breathing was also successfully detected by this system. In conclusion, these unique IA-CNTs exhibited potential application as gas detection materials. PMID:26112318

  6. Three-dimensional Non-vacuum Pulsar Outer-gap Model: Localized Acceleration Electric Field in the Higher Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotani, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the particle accelerator that arises in a rotating neutron-star magnetosphere. Simultaneously solving the Poisson equation for the electro-static potential, the Boltzmann equations for relativistic electrons and positrons, and the radiative transfer equation, we demonstrate that the electric field is substantially screened along the magnetic field lines by pairs that are created and separated within the accelerator. As a result, the magnetic-field-aligned electric field is localized in higher altitudes near the light cylinder and efficiently accelerates the positrons created in the lower altitudes outward but does not accelerate the electrons inward. The resulting photon flux becomes predominantly outward, leading to typical double-peak light curves, which are commonly observed from many high-energy pulsars.

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL NON-VACUUM PULSAR OUTER-GAP MODEL: LOCALIZED ACCELERATION ELECTRIC FIELD IN THE HIGHER ALTITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Hirotani, Kouichi

    2015-01-10

    We investigate the particle accelerator that arises in a rotating neutron-star magnetosphere. Simultaneously solving the Poisson equation for the electro-static potential, the Boltzmann equations for relativistic electrons and positrons, and the radiative transfer equation, we demonstrate that the electric field is substantially screened along the magnetic field lines by pairs that are created and separated within the accelerator. As a result, the magnetic-field-aligned electric field is localized in higher altitudes near the light cylinder and efficiently accelerates the positrons created in the lower altitudes outward but does not accelerate the electrons inward. The resulting photon flux becomes predominantly outward, leading to typical double-peak light curves, which are commonly observed from many high-energy pulsars.

  8. Renormalized theory of ion temperature gradient instability of the magnetic-field-aligned plasma shear flow with hot ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V. Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2015-10-15

    The developed kinetic theory for the stability of a magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) shear flow with inhomogeneous ion temperature [Mikhailenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072117 (2014)] predicted that a kinetic instability arises from the coupled reinforcing action of the flow velocity shear and ion temperature gradient in the cases where comparable ion and electron temperatures exist. In the present paper, the nonlinear theory was developed for the instability caused by the combined effects of ion-temperature-gradient and shear-flow (ITG–SF). The level of the electrostatic turbulence is determined for the saturation state of the instability on the basis of the nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for a nonlinear scattering of ions by the developed turbulence in a sheared flow. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the turbulent scattering of ions by ITG–SF driven turbulence, was derived and employed for the estimation of the turbulent ion viscosity, the anomalous ion thermal conductivity, and anomalous ion heating rate at the saturation state of the instability.

  9. Transport in a field-aligned magnetized plasma and neutral gas boundary: the end of the plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher; Gekelman, Walter

    2012-10-01

    A series of experiments at the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD) at UCLA study the Neutral Boundary Layer (NBL) between a magnetized plasma and a neutral gas in the direction of the confining field. A lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathode and semi-transparent anode create a current-free, weakly ionized (ne/nn<5%), helium plasma (B˜250 G, Rplasma=10cm, ne<10^12cm^3, Te<3eV, and Ti˜Tn) that terminates on helium gas without touching any walls. Probes inserted into the plasma measure the basic plasma parameters in the NBL. The NBL begins where the plasma and neutral gas pressures equilibrate and the electrons and ions come to rest through collisions with the neutral gas. A field-aligned electric field (δφ/kTe˜1) is established self-consistently to maintain a current-free termination and dominates transport in the NBL, similar to a sheath but with a length L˜10λei˜10^2λen˜10^5λD. A two-fluid weakly-ionized transport model describes the system. A generalized Ohm's Law correctly predicts the electric field observed. The pressure balance criteria and magnitude of the termination electric field are confirmed over a scaling of parameters. The model can also be used to describe the atmospheric termination of aurora or fully detached gaseous divertors.

  10. Physics of radio emission in gamma-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    > Propagation of radio emission in a pulsar magnetosphere is reviewed. The effects of polarization transfer, induced scattering and reprocessing to high energies are analysed with a special emphasis on the implications for the gamma-ray pulsars. The possibilities of the pulsar plasma diagnostics based on the observed radio pulse characteristics are also outlined. As an example, the plasma number density profiles obtained from the polarization data for the Vela and the gamma-ray millisecond pulsars J1446-4701, J1939+2134 and J1744-1134 are presented. The number densities derived tend to be the highest/lowest when the radio pulse leads/lags the gamma-ray peak. In the PSR J1939+2134, the plasma density profiles for the main pulse and interpulse appear to fit exactly the same curve, testifying to the origin of both radio components above the same magnetic pole and their propagation through the same plasma flow in opposite directions. The millisecond radio pulse components exhibiting flat position angle curves are suggested to result from the induced scattering of the main pulse by the same particles that generate gamma rays. This is believed to underlie the wide-sense radio/gamma-ray correlation in the millisecond pulsars. The radio quietness of young gamma-ray pulsars is attributed to resonant absorption, whereas the radio loudness to the radio beam escape through the periphery of the open field line tube.

  11. Be/X-Ray Pulsar Binary Science with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Accretion disks are ubiquitous in astronomical sources. Accretion powered pulsars are a good test bed for accretion disk physics, because unlike for other objects, the spin of the neutron star is directly observable allowing us to see the effects of angular momentum transfer onto the pulsar. The combination of a sensitive wide-field monitor and the large area detector on LOFT will enable new detailed studies of accretion powered pulsars which I will review. RXTE observations have shown an unusually high number of Be/X-ray pulsar binaries in the SMC. Unlike binaries in the Milky Way, these systems are all at the same distance, allowing detailed population studies using the sensitive LOFT WFM, potentially providing connections to star formation episodes. For Galactic accreting pulsar systems, LOFT will allow measurement of spectral variations within individual pulses, mapping the accretion column in detail for the first time. LOFT will also provide better constraints on magnetic fields in accreting pulsars, allowing measurements of cyclotron features, observations of transitions into the centrifugal inhibition regime, and monitoring of spin-up rate vs flux correlations. Coordinated multi-wavelength observations are crucial to extracting the best science from LOFT from these and numerous other objects.

  12. Mildly Recycled Pulsars at High-Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    Mildly recyled pulsars (MRP), conventionally defined as neutron star having spin period in the 20-100 ms range and surface magnetic field <1011 Gauss, probably rise from binary systems (disrupted or not) with an intermediate or an high mass companion. Despite their relatively low spin-down energies compared to the ``fully'' recycled millisecond pulsars (arising from common low mass X-ray binaries), nearby MRPs can be detected by deep X-ray observations and by timing analysis of the very long data span provided by gamma-ray space detectors. The discovery of peculiar timing and spectral properties, possibly transitional, of the MRPs can be of the utmost importance to link different classes of neutron stars and study their evolution.

  13. Extreme-Ultraviolet Observations of Nine Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Edelstein, Jerry

    1998-05-01

    We report the observation of nine pulsars using the Lexan (100 Å) band of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer scanning telescopes. The observations, none of which resulted in positive detections, are used to derive limits to the temperature of surface thermal radiation from the objects. We compare the temperature limits with predictions from neutron star cooling models. The N_H I toward our targets limits our ability to establish rigorous limits needed to discriminate among the models. We also derive a limit to heating by magnetic monopole flux-catalyzed nucleon decay for the very old pulsar PSR J1455-3330, which is similar to the limit derived for PSR B1929+10 and 3 orders of magnitude larger than the limit for PSR J0437-4715.

  14. Initial results on the correlation between the magnetic and electric fields observed from the DE-2 satellite in the field-aligned current regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Farthing, W. H.; Heppner, J. P.; Ledley, B. G.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Initial results of the electric and magnetic field observations from the DE-2 satellite show a remarkably good correlation between the north-south component of the electric field and the east-west component of the magnetic field in many passes of the field-aligned current regions. For a dayside cusp pass on August 15, 1981 the coefficient of correlation between these components was 0.996. A preliminary inspection of the available data from the first 6 months of the DE operation indicates that the similarity between the electric and magnetic field signatures of the field-aligned currents is a commonly observed feature at all local times. This high correlation is interpreted to be an indication that the closure of the field-aligned current is essentially meridional. When the correlation between these components is not good, the closure current is likely to be flowing along the auroral belt. When the correlation between the electric and magnetic fields is high, it is possible to estimate the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity from the observed field components.

  15. The Optimization of GBT Pulsar Data for the GBNCC Pulsar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Ashlee Nicole; Green Bank NRAO, GBNCC

    2016-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope collects data from the Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap (GBNCC) pulsar survey in order to find new pulsars within its sensitivity and also, to confirm previously found pulsars within its sensitivity range. The collected data is then loaded into the CyberSKA website database where astronomers are tasked with rating the data sets based on its potential to be a pulsar from 0(unclassified), 1(class 1 pulsar), 2(class 2 pulsar), 3(class 3 pulsar), 4(radio frequency interference), 5(not a pulsar), 6(know pulsar), 7(harmonic of a known pulsar). This specific research done was to use previously classified pulsars to create a python script that will automatically identify the data set as a pulsar or a non-pulsar. After finding the recurring frequencies of radio frequency interference (RFI), the frequencies were then added to a pipeline to further discern pulsars from RFI.

  16. PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN YOUNG PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    The model for pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) as a result of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) downstream flow from a shocked, relativistic pulsar wind has been successful in reproducing many features of the nebulae observed close to central pulsars. However, observations of well-studied young nebulae like the Crab Nebula, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9 do not show the toroidal magnetic field on a larger scale that might be expected in the MHD flow model; in addition, the radial variation of spectral index due to synchrotron losses is smoother than expected in the MHD flow model. We find that pure diffusion models can reproduce the basic data on nebular size and spectral index variation for the Crab, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9. Most of our models use an energy-independent diffusion coefficient; power-law variations of the coefficient with energy are degenerate with variation in the input particle energy distribution index in the steady state, transmitting boundary case. Energy-dependent diffusion is a possible reason for the smaller diffusion coefficient inferred for the Crab. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport allowing for advection and diffusion of particles suggest that diffusion dominates over much of the total nebular volume of the Crab. Advection dominates close to the pulsar and is likely to play a role in the X-ray half-light radius. The source of diffusion and mixing of particles is uncertain, but may be related to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the outer boundary of a young PWN or to instabilities in the toroidal magnetic field structure.

  17. Designing an optimum pulsed magnetic field by a resistance/self-inductance/capacitance discharge system and alignment of carbon nanotubes embedded in polypyrrole matrix.

    PubMed

    Kazemikia, Kaveh; Bonabi, Fahimeh; Asadpoorchallo, Ali; Shokrzadeh, Majid

    2015-02-01

    In this work, an optimized pulsed magnetic field production apparatus is designed based on a RLC (Resistance/Self-inductance/Capacitance) discharge circuit. An algorithm for designing an optimum magnetic coil is presented. The coil is designed to work at room temperature. With a minor physical reinforcement, the magnetic flux density can be set up to 12 Tesla with 2 ms duration time. In our design process, the magnitude and the length of the magnetic pulse are the desired parameters. The magnetic field magnitude in the RLC circuit is maximized on the basis of the optimal design of the coil. The variables which are used in the optimization process are wire diameter and the number of coil layers. The coil design ensures the critically damped response of the RLC circuit. The electrical, mechanical, and thermal constraints are applied to the design process. A locus of probable magnetic flux density values versus wire diameter and coil layer is provided to locate the optimum coil parameters. Another locus of magnetic flux density values versus capacitance and initial voltage of the RLC circuit is extracted to locate the optimum circuit parameters. Finally, the application of high magnetic fields on carbon nanotube-PolyPyrrole (CNT-PPy) nano-composite is presented. Scanning probe microscopy technique is used to observe the orientation of CNTs after exposure to a magnetic field. The result shows alignment of CNTs in a 10.3 Tesla, 1.5 ms magnetic pulse. PMID:25725890

  18. Designing an optimum pulsed magnetic field by a resistance/self-inductance/capacitance discharge system and alignment of carbon nanotubes embedded in polypyrrole matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemikia, Kaveh; Bonabi, Fahimeh; Asadpoorchallo, Ali; Shokrzadeh, Majid

    2015-02-01

    In this work, an optimized pulsed magnetic field production apparatus is designed based on a RLC (Resistance/Self-inductance/Capacitance) discharge circuit. An algorithm for designing an optimum magnetic coil is presented. The coil is designed to work at room temperature. With a minor physical reinforcement, the magnetic flux density can be set up to 12 Tesla with 2 ms duration time. In our design process, the magnitude and the length of the magnetic pulse are the desired parameters. The magnetic field magnitude in the RLC circuit is maximized on the basis of the optimal design of the coil. The variables which are used in the optimization process are wire diameter and the number of coil layers. The coil design ensures the critically damped response of the RLC circuit. The electrical, mechanical, and thermal constraints are applied to the design process. A locus of probable magnetic flux density values versus wire diameter and coil layer is provided to locate the optimum coil parameters. Another locus of magnetic flux density values versus capacitance and initial voltage of the RLC circuit is extracted to locate the optimum circuit parameters. Finally, the application of high magnetic fields on carbon nanotube-PolyPyrrole (CNT-PPy) nano-composite is presented. Scanning probe microscopy technique is used to observe the orientation of CNTs after exposure to a magnetic field. The result shows alignment of CNTs in a 10.3 Tesla, 1.5 ms magnetic pulse.

  19. Gamma-ray connection of Pulsars-Pulsar Wind Nebulae: From GeV to TeV energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Coto, Rubén; de Ona Wilhelmi, Emma

    2015-08-01

    Pulsars are the remnants of massive star explosions and Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) are the bubbles of relativistic particles and magnetic field surrounding pulsars. The acceleration in PWNe is produced when the pulsar's relativistic wind interacts with its surrounding medium and particles are accelerated at the shock region. The non-thermal photon emission ranges from the radio to the very-high-energy (VHE) range and it is believed to be originated in synchrotron, curvature and inverse Compton processes.So far, pulsars and PWNe represent the largest population of identified GeV and TeV sources. In this contribution, we will describe the recent measurements on young PWNe such as the Crab whose inverse Compton peak was recently accurately determined. We will also discuss the origin of the GeV gamma-ray flares and their non-detection at any other wavelength, together with the recent reports of pulsed emission up to TeV energies. This result evidences the extreme acceleration of electrons in the surrounding of the Crab pulsar, up to Lorenz factors of 5 × 106. We will also put in context the recent discovery of VHE pulsed emission from the Vela pulsar. We will discuss the case of the inefficient pulsar at the center of 3C 58, a PWN discovered by Fermi at GeV energies and by MAGIC at TeV. In addition, we will also present population studies comparing several properties of the central engine such as age or spin-down power with the gamma-ray luminosity of their surrounding PWNe. We will finally show the measurement prospects for this kind of sources with the future Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  20. X-RAY EVOLUTION OF PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Aya; Anada, Takayasu; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Yamazaki, Ryo; Vink, Jacco

    2010-08-20

    During the search for counterparts of very high energy gamma-ray sources, we serendipitously discovered large, extended, low surface brightness emission from pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) around pulsars with the ages up to {approx}100 kyr, a discovery made possible by the low and stable background of the Suzaku X-ray satellite. A systematic study of a sample of eight of these PWNe, together with Chandra data sets, has revealed that the nebulae keep expanding up to {approx}100 kyr, although the timescale of the synchrotron X-ray emission is only {approx}60 yr for typical magnetic fields of 100 {mu}G. Our result suggests that the accelerated electrons up to {approx}80 TeV can escape from the PWNe without losing most energies. Moreover, in order to explain the observed correlation between the X-ray size and the pulsar spin-down age, the magnetic field strength in the PWNe must decrease with time.

  1. Pulsar-supernova remnant associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    1994-04-01

    Pulsars and supernova remnants (SNRs) are both believed to be formed in the supernova explosions of massive stars. Therefore one might expect to see associations between the two classes of object. In fact, up until a couple of years ago, there was only a handful of believable associations and even now there are only nine or ten. It is relatively easy to explain why such a small fraction of the 600 or so known pulsars are associated with supernova remnants. The average pulsar lifetime is of the order of 106 years, whereas the average supernova remnant is detectable for about 104 years. Therefore, one would expect only about one percent of pulsars to be still associated, as is observed. It is somewhat more difficult to explain why so few of the 150 known supernova remnants have associated pulsars. The main factor is that supernova remnants are seen throughout the Galaxy whereas most pulsars are detectable only relatively close to the Sun, within a few kiloparsec. Another factor is that pulsar emission is beamed, so even if a pulsar exists in a relatively nearby supernova remnant, it may be undetectable. The most believable of the suggested associations are listed. Associations which are possible but by no means certain are indicated by question mark. For the more certain associations, the pulsar position is within the SNR boundaries (an exception is 'The Duck', where the pulsar is at the tip of the 'beak'), the distance estimates for the pulsar and SNR are compatible, and the age estimates are likewise compatible. References to most of these associations may be found in the pulsar catalog of Taylor, Manchester and Lyne (1993, Astrophys. J. Suppl., 88, 529). Recent references not included in the catalog are for PSR B1706-44 (McAdam, Osborne and Parkinson, 1993, Nature, 361, 516) and PSR B2334+61 (Kulkarni et al., 1993, Nature, 362, 135).

  2. 'Fixed-axis' magnetic orientation by an amphibian: non-shoreward-directed compass orientation, misdirected homing or positioning a magnetite-based map detector in a consistent alignment relative to the magnetic field?

    PubMed

    Phillips, John B; Borland, S Chris; Freake, Michael J; Brassart, Jacques; Kirschvink, Joseph L

    2002-12-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the earlier prediction that prolonged exposure to long-wavelength (>500 nm) light would eliminate homing orientation by male Eastern red-spotted newts Notophthalmus viridescens. As in previous experiments, controls held in outdoor tanks under natural lighting conditions and tested in a visually uniform indoor arena under full-spectrum light were homeward oriented. As predicted, however, newts held under long-wavelength light and tested under either full-spectrum or long-wavelength light (>500 nm) failed to show consistent homeward orientation. The newts also did not orient with respect to the shore directions in the outdoor tanks in which they were held prior to testing. Unexpectedly, however, the newts exhibited bimodal orientation along a more-or-less 'fixed' north-northeast-south-southwest magnetic axis. The orientation exhibited by newts tested under full-spectrum light was indistinguishable from that of newts tested under long-wavelength light, although these two wavelength conditions have previously been shown to differentially affect both shoreward compass orientation and homing orientation. To investigate the possibility that the 'fixed-axis' response of the newts was mediated by a magnetoreception mechanism involving single-domain particles of magnetite, natural remanent magnetism (NRM) was measured from a subset of the newts. The distribution of NRM alignments with respect to the head-body axis of the newts was indistinguishable from random. Furthermore, there was no consistent relationship between the NRM of individual newts and their directional response in the overall sample. However, under full-spectrum, but not long-wavelength, light, the alignment of the NRM when the newts reached the 20 cm radius criterion circle in the indoor testing arena (estimated by adding the NRM alignment measured from each newt to its magnetic bearing) was non-randomly distributed. These findings are consistent with the earlier

  3. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ~12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  4. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution.

    PubMed

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir; Oral, Ahmet

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ∼12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system. PMID:25362401

  5. Effects of magnetic pre-alignment of nano-powders on formation of high textured barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystals via a magnetic forming and liquid participation sintering route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junliang; Zeng, Yanwei; Zhang, Xingkai; Zhang, Ming

    2015-05-01

    Highly textured barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystal with narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width is believed to be a potential gyromagnetic material for self-biased microwave devices. To fabricate barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystal with a high grain orientation degree, a magnetic forming and liquid participation sintering route has been developed. In this paper, the effects of the pre-alignment of the starting nano-powders on the formation of barium quasi-single crystal structures have been investigated. The results indicated that: the crystallites with large sizes and small specific surfaces were easily aligned for they got higher driving forces and lower resistances during magnetic forming. The average restricting magnetic field was about 4.647 kOe to overcome the average friction barrier between crystallites. The pre-aligned crystallites in magnetic forming acted as the "crystal seeds" for oriented growth of the un-aligned crystallites during liquid participation sintering to achieve a high grain orientation. To effectively promote the grain orientation degrees of the sintered pellets, the grain orientation degrees of the green compacts must be higher than a limited value of 15.0%. Barium hexa-ferrite quasi-single crystal with a high grain orientation degree of 98.6% was successfully fabricated after sintering the green compact with its grain orientation degree of 51.1%.

  6. The Extended Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinos, Kalapotharakos; Demosthenes, Kazanas; Ioannis, Contopoulos

    2012-01-01

    We present the structure of the 3D ideal MHD pulsar magnetosphere to a radius ten times that of the light cylinder, a distance about an order of magnitude larger than any previous such numerical treatment. Its overall structure exhibits a stable, smooth, well-defined undulating current sheet which approaches the kinematic split monopole solution of Bogovalov 1999 only after a careful introduction of diffusivity even in the highest resolution simulations. It also exhibits an intriguing spiral region at the crossing of two zero charge surfaces on the current sheet, which shows a destabilizing behavior more prominent in higher resolution simulations. We discuss the possibility that this region is physically (and not numerically) unstable. Finally, we present the spiral pulsar antenna radiation pattern.

  7. WHY DO THE BRAKING INDICES OF PULSARS SPAN A RANGE OF MORE THAN 100 MILLIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shuangnan; Xie Yi

    2012-12-20

    Here we report that the observed braking indices of the 366 pulsars in the sample of Hobbs et al. range from about -10{sup 8} to about +10{sup 8} and are significantly correlated with their characteristic ages. Using the model of magnetic field evolution we developed previously based on the same data, we derive an analytical expression for the braking index which agrees with all the observed statistical properties of the braking indices of the pulsars in the sample of Hobbs et al. Our model is, however, incompatible with the previous interpretation that magnetic field growth is responsible for the small values of braking indices (<3) observed for ''baby'' pulsars with characteristic ages of less than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr. We find that the ''instantaneous'' braking index of a pulsar may be different from the ''averaged'' braking index obtained from fitting the data over a certain time span. The close match between our model-predicted ''instantaneous'' braking indices and the observed ''averaged'' braking indices suggests that the time spans used previously are usually smaller than or comparable to their magnetic field oscillation periods. Our model can be tested with the existing data by calculating the braking index as a function of the time span for each pulsar. In doing so, one can obtain for each pulsar all the parameters in our magnetic field evolution model, and may be able to improve the sensitivity of using pulsars to detect gravitational waves.

  8. Why Do the Braking Indices of Pulsars Span a Range of More Than 100 Millions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Xie, Yi

    2012-12-01

    Here we report that the observed braking indices of the 366 pulsars in the sample of Hobbs et al. range from about -108 to about +108 and are significantly correlated with their characteristic ages. Using the model of magnetic field evolution we developed previously based on the same data, we derive an analytical expression for the braking index which agrees with all the observed statistical properties of the braking indices of the pulsars in the sample of Hobbs et al. Our model is, however, incompatible with the previous interpretation that magnetic field growth is responsible for the small values of braking indices (<3) observed for "baby" pulsars with characteristic ages of less than 2 × 103 yr. We find that the "instantaneous" braking index of a pulsar may be different from the "averaged" braking index obtained from fitting the data over a certain time span. The close match between our model-predicted "instantaneous" braking indices and the observed "averaged" braking indices suggests that the time spans used previously are usually smaller than or comparable to their magnetic field oscillation periods. Our model can be tested with the existing data by calculating the braking index as a function of the time span for each pulsar. In doing so, one can obtain for each pulsar all the parameters in our magnetic field evolution model, and may be able to improve the sensitivity of using pulsars to detect gravitational waves.

  9. Strain relaxation and enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in BiFeO{sub 3}:CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenrui; Jiao, Liang; Li, Leigang; Jian, Jie; Khatkhatay, Fauzia; Chu, Frank; Chen, Aiping; Jia, Quanxi; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Wang, Haiyan

    2014-02-10

    Self-assembled BiFeO{sub 3}:CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (BFO:CFO) vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films have been fabricated on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The strain relaxation mechanism between BFO and CFO with a large lattice mismatch has been studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The as-prepared nanocomposite films exhibit enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as the BFO composition increases. Different anisotropy sources have been investigated, suggesting that spin-flop coupling between antiferromagnetic BFO and ferrimagnetic CFO plays a dominant role in enhancing the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy.

  10. Particle Acceleration in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Z.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Harding, A.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsar magnetospheres represent unipolar inductor-type electrical circuits at which an EM potential across the polar cap (due to the rotation of their magnetic field) drives currents that run in and out of the polar cap and close at infinity. An estimate ofthe magnitude of this current can be obtained by dividing the potential induced across the polar cap V approx = B(sub O) R(sub O)(Omega R(sub O)/c)(exp 2) by the impedance of free space Z approx eq 4 pi/c; the resulting polar cap current density is close to $n {GJ} c$ where $n_{GJ}$ is the Goldreich-Julian (GJ) charge density. This argument suggests that even at current densities close to the GJ one, pulsar magnetospheres have a significant component of electric field $E_{parallel}$, parallel to the magnetic field, a condition necessary for particle acceleration and the production of radiation. We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents, charge densities, spin down rates and potential drops along the magnetic field lines of pulsar magnetospheres which do not obey the ideal MHD condition $E cdot B = 0$. By relating the current density along the poloidal field lines to the parallel electric field via a kind of Ohm's law $J = sigma E_{parallel}$ we study the structure of these magnetospheres as a function of the conductivity $sigma$. We find that for $sigma gg OmegaS the solution tends to the (ideal) Force-Free one and to the Vacuum one for $sigma 11 OmegaS. Finally, we present dissipative magnetospheric solutions with spatially variable $sigma$ that supports various microphysical properties and are compatible with the observations.

  11. RADIO-TO-TeV PHASE-RESOLVED EMISSION FROM THE CRAB PULSAR: THE ANNULAR GAP MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. J.; Wang, W.; Qiao, G. J.

    2012-04-01

    The Crab pulsar is a quite young, famous pulsar that radiates multi-wavelength pulsed photons. The latest detection of GeV and TeV pulsed emission with an unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio, supplied by the powerful telescopes Fermi, MAGIC, and VERITAS, challenges the current popular pulsar models, and can be a valuable discriminator to justify the pulsar high-energy-emission models. Our work is divided into two steps. First, taking reasonable parameters (the magnetic inclination angle {alpha} = 45 Degree-Sign and the view angle {zeta} = 63 Degree-Sign ), we use the latest high-energy data to calculate radio, X-ray, {gamma}-ray, and TeV light curves from a geometric view to obtain crucial information on emission locations. Second, we calculate the phase-averaged spectrum and phase-resolved spectra for the Crab pulsar and take a theoretical justification from a physical view for the emission properties as found in the first step. It is found that a Gaussian emissivity distribution with the peak emission near the null charge surface in the so-called annular gap (AG) region gives the best modeled light curves. The pulsed radio, X-ray, {gamma}-ray, and TeV emission are mainly generated from the emission of primary particles or secondary particles with different emission mechanisms in the nearly similar region of the AG located in the only magnetic pole, which leads to the nearly 'phase-aligned' multi-wavelength light curves. The emission of peak 1 and peak 2 originates from the AG region near the null charge surface, while the emission of the bridge primarily originates from the core gap (CG) region. The charged particles cannot co-rotate with the pulsar and escape from the magnetosphere, which determines the original flowing primary particles. The acceleration electric field and potential in the AG and CG are huge enough and are in the several tens of neutron star radii. Thus, the primary particles are accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies and produce numerous

  12. Alignment without Magnet Fiducials

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert; Mulhaupt, Gottfried; Rohrer, Martin; Wiegand, Peter; /PSI, Villigen

    2005-08-17

    Presently, the demand for high quality synchrotron radiation is increasing all over the world. One of the fascinating aspects of this novel tool is the broad range of scientific users interested in synchrotron radiation. They come from physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine, to name just a few. Third generation storage which recently became available for users will by far not be able to satisfy all the beam-time requests. In addition, it is also recognized that long-term scientific efficiency and technological success is heavily dependent on ease of access to a home based facility nearby and continuing fine-tuning of all components of a beam line. Based on the high quality user community in Switzerland and their prospective research activities, the Paul Scherrer Institute, in close collaboration with interested research groups from the Swiss universities and the Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology, has worked out a proposal to build an advanced synchrotron light source in Switzerland, which will come into operation in the year 2001. It has been named SLS as acronym for Swiss Light Source.

  13. Genesis stories for the millisecond pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, M. A.; Shaham, J.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical models proposed to explain the origin of the millisecond pulsar (MP) PSR 1937+214 are reviewed, examining their ability to explain its low surface dipole magnetic field (B), its low birth temperature (less than 10 to the 8th K), the absence of a companion or remnant, and its low velocity perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The models discussed are a single isolated explosion forming a rapidly spinning neutron star, spin-up of a dead pulsar by accretion from a companion, collapse of an accreting spinning white dwarf, and fusion of a tight binary composed of two old neutron stars. Although all of the models have difficulties in explaining one or more of the MP characteristics, the second model is found to be most probable in the light of present knowledge. The lack of a companion is explained by its tidal disruption after it had fed the accreting pre-pulsar for 1 Gyr or more and its mass had decreased to about 0.01 solar mass. Neutron stars accreting in this way have been observed in Galactic-bulge X-ray sources.

  14. Chandra Observations of the Pulsar B1929+10 and Its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misanovic, Z.; Pavlov, G. G.; Garmire, G. P.

    2008-10-01

    We report on two Chandra observations of the 3 Myr old pulsar B1929+10, which reveal a faint compact (~9'' × 5'') nebula elongated in the direction perpendicular to the pulsar's proper motion, two patchy wings, and a possible short (~3'') jet emerging from the pulsar. In addition, we detect a tail extending up to at least 4' in the direction opposite to the pulsar's proper motion, aligned with the ~15' long tail detected in ROSAT and XMM-Newton observations. The overall morphology of the nebula suggests that the shocked pulsar wind is confined by the ram pressure due to the pulsar's supersonic speed. The shape of the compact nebula in the immediate vicinity of the pulsar seems to be consistent with the current MHD models. However, since these models do not account yet for the change of the flow velocity at larger distances from the pulsar, they are not able to constrain the extent of the long pulsar tail. The luminosity of the whole nebula as seen by Chandra is LPWN ~ 1030 ergs s-1 in the 0.3-8 keV band, for the distance of 361 pc. Using the Chandra and XMM-Newton data, we found that the pulsar spectrum is composed of nonthermal (magnetospheric) and thermal components. The nonthermal component can be described by a power-law model with photon index Γ ≈ 1.7 and luminosity LnonthPSR ≈ 1.7 × 1030 ergs s-1 in the 0.3-10 keV band. The blackbody fit for the thermal component, which presumably emerges from hot polar caps, gives the temperature kT ≈ 0.3 keV and projected emitting area A⊥ ~ 3 × 103 m2, corresponding to the bolometric luminosity Lbol ~ (1-2) × 1030 ergs s-1.

  15. Pulsar Bursts Coming From Beachball-Sized Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    mystery. With the help of engineers at the NRAO, Hankins and his team designed and built specialized electronic equipment that allowed them to study the pulsar's radio pulses on extremely small time scales. They took this equipment to the National Science Foundation's giant, 1,000-foot-diameter radio telescope at Arecibo. With their equipment, they analyzed the Crab pulsar's superstrong "giant" pulses, breaking them down into tiny time segments. The researchers discovered that some of the "giant" pulses contain subpulses that last no longer than two nanoseconds. That means, they say, that the regions in which these subpulses are generated can be no larger than about two feet across -- the distance that light could travel in two nanoseconds. This fact, the researchers say, is critically important to understanding how the powerful radio emission is generated. A pulsar's magnetosphere -- the region above the neutron star's magnetic poles where the radio waves are generated -- is "the most exotic environment in the Universe," said Kern. In this environment, matter exists as a plasma, in which electrically charged particles are free to respond to the very strong electric and magnetic fields in the star's atmosphere. The very short subpulses the researchers detected could only be generated, they say, by a strange process in which density waves in the plasma interact with their own electrical field, becoming progressively denser until they reach a point at which they "collapse explosively" into superstrong bursts of radio waves. "None of the other proposed mechanisms can produce such short pulses," Eilek said. "The ability to examine these pulses on such short time scales has given us a new window through which to study pulsar radio emission," she added. The Crab pulsar is one of only three pulsars known to emit superstrong "giant" pulses. "Giant" pulses occur occasionally among the steady but much weaker "normal" pulses coming from the neutron star. Some of the brief subpulses

  16. Physical Conditions in the Reconnection Layer in Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    The magnetosphere of a rotating pulsar naturally develops a current sheet (CS) beyond the light cylinder (LC). Magnetic reconnection in this CS inevitably dissipates a nontrivial fraction of the pulsar spin-down power within a few LC radii. We develop a basic physical picture of reconnection in this environment and discuss its implications for the observed pulsed gamma-ray emission. We argue that reconnection proceeds in the plasmoid-dominated regime, via a hierarchical chain of multiple secondary islands/flux ropes. The inter-plasmoid reconnection layers are subject to strong synchrotron cooling, leading to significant plasma compression. Using the conditions of pressure balance across these current layers, the balance between the heating by magnetic energy dissipation and synchrotron cooling, and Ampere's law, we obtain simple estimates for key parameters of the layers—temperature, density, and layer thickness. In the comoving frame of the relativistic pulsar wind just outside of the equatorial CS, these basic parameters are uniquely determined by the strength of the reconnecting upstream magnetic field. For the case of the Crab pulsar, we find them to be of order 10 GeV, 1013 cm-3, and 10 cm, respectively. After accounting for the bulk Doppler boosting due to the pulsar wind, the synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from the reconnecting CS can explain the observed pulsed high-energy (GeV) and very high energy (~100 GeV) radiation, respectively. Also, we suggest that the rapid relative motions of the secondary plasmoids in the hierarchical chain may contribute to the production of the pulsar radio emission.

  17. Physical conditions in the reconnection layer in pulsar magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-01-01

    The magnetosphere of a rotating pulsar naturally develops a current sheet (CS) beyond the light cylinder (LC). Magnetic reconnection in this CS inevitably dissipates a nontrivial fraction of the pulsar spin-down power within a few LC radii. We develop a basic physical picture of reconnection in this environment and discuss its implications for the observed pulsed gamma-ray emission. We argue that reconnection proceeds in the plasmoid-dominated regime, via a hierarchical chain of multiple secondary islands/flux ropes. The inter-plasmoid reconnection layers are subject to strong synchrotron cooling, leading to significant plasma compression. Using the conditions of pressure balance across these current layers, the balance between the heating by magnetic energy dissipation and synchrotron cooling, and Ampere's law, we obtain simple estimates for key parameters of the layers—temperature, density, and layer thickness. In the comoving frame of the relativistic pulsar wind just outside of the equatorial CS, these basic parameters are uniquely determined by the strength of the reconnecting upstream magnetic field. For the case of the Crab pulsar, we find them to be of order 10 GeV, 10{sup 13} cm{sup –3}, and 10 cm, respectively. After accounting for the bulk Doppler boosting due to the pulsar wind, the synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from the reconnecting CS can explain the observed pulsed high-energy (GeV) and very high energy (∼100 GeV) radiation, respectively. Also, we suggest that the rapid relative motions of the secondary plasmoids in the hierarchical chain may contribute to the production of the pulsar radio emission.

  18. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  19. Sensitivity of Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemens, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    For the better part of the last decade, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) has been using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes to monitor millisecond pulsars. NANOGrav, along with similar international collaborations, the European Pulsar Timing Array and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array in Australia, form a consortium of consortia: the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA). The goal of the IPTA is to directly detect low-frequency gravitational waves which cause small changes to the times of arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars. In this talk I will discuss the work of NANOGrav and the IPTA as well as our sensitivity to gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. I will show that a detection is possible by the end of the decade.

  20. Gamma-ray pulsar light curves as probes of magnetospheric structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    > The large number of -ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope since its launch in 2008 dwarfs the handful that were previously known. The variety of observed light curves makes possible a tomography of both the ensemble-averaged field structure and the high-energy emission regions of a pulsar magnetosphere. Fitting the -ray pulsar light curves with model magnetospheres and emission models has revealed that most of the high-energy emission, and the particles acceleration, takes place near or beyond the light cylinder, near the current sheet. As pulsar magnetosphere models become more sophisticated, it is possible to probe magnetic field structure and emission that are self-consistently determined. Light curve modelling will continue to be a powerful tool for constraining the pulsar magnetosphere physics.

  1. An Atlas for Interpreting γ-Ray Pulsar Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, Kyle P.; Romani, Roger W.; Weltevrede, Patrick; Johnston, Simon

    2009-04-01

    We have simulated a population of young spin-powered pulsars and computed the beaming pattern and light curves for the three main geometrical models: polar-cap emission, two-pole caustic ("slot gap") emission and outer-magnetosphere emission. The light curve shapes depend sensitively on the magnetic inclination α and viewing angle ζ. We present the results as maps of observables such as peak multiplicity and γ-ray peak separation in the (α, ζ) plane. These diagrams can be used to locate allowed regions for radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars and to convert observed fluxes to true all-sky emission.

  2. A self-consistent two-dimensional resistive fluid theory of field-aligned potential structures including charge separation and magnetic and velocity shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent two-fluid theory that includes the magnetic field and shear patterns is developed to model stationary electrostatic structures with field-aligned potential drops. Shear flow is also included in the theory since this seems to be a prominent feature of the structures of interest. In addition, Ohmic dissipation, a Hall term, and pressure gradients in a generalized Ohm's law, modified for cases without quasi-neutrality, are included. In the analytic theory, the electrostatic force is balanced by field-aligned pressure gradients (i.e., thermal effects in the direction of the magnetic field) and by pressure gradients and magnetic stresses in the perpendicular direction. Within this theory, simple examples of applications are presented to demonstrate the kind of solutions resulting from the model. The results show how the effects of charge separation and shear in the magnetic field and the velocity can be combined to form self-consistent structures such as are found to exist above the aurora, suggested also in association with solar flares.

  3. Cosmic-ray Positrons from Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.; Büsching, I.

    2015-07-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  4. Studies of Westward Electrojets and Field-Aligned Currents in the Magnetotail during Substorms: Implications for Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Our studies elucidated the relationship between the auroral arcs and magnetotail phenomena. One paper examined particle energization in the source region of the field-aligned currents that intensify at substorm onset when the arc brightens to form the westward electrojet. A second paper examined the relationship between the precipitating particles in the arcs, the location of the westward electrojet, and magnetospheric source regions. Two earlier papers also investigated the roles that field aligned currents and particle acceleration have during substorms.

  5. Faint X-Ray Structure in the Crab Pulsar Wind Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, F. D.; Tucker, W. H.; Fesen, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    We report on a Chandra observation of the Crab Nebula that gives the first clear view of the faint boundary of the Crab's X-ray-emitting pulsar wind nebula. There is structure in all directions. Fingers, loops, bays, and the south pulsar jet all indicate that either filamentary material or the magnetic field is controlling the relativistic electrons. In general, spectra soften as distance from the pulsar increases but do not change rapidly along linear features. This is particularly true for the pulsar jet. The termination of the jet is abrupt; the east side is close to an [O III] optical filament, which may be blocking propagation on this side. We argue that linear features have ordered magnetic fields and that the structure is determined by the synchrotron lifetime of particles diffusing perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. We find no significant evidence for thermal X-rays inside the filamentary envelope.

  6. Elementary Wideband Timing of Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M.

    2014-08-01

    We present an algorithm for the simultaneous measurement of a pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM) from folded wideband pulsar data. We extend the prescription from Taylor's 1992 work to accommodate a general two-dimensional template "portrait," the alignment of which can be used to measure a pulse phase and DM. We show that there is a dedispersion reference frequency that removes the covariance between these two quantities and note that the recovered pulse profile scaling amplitudes can provide useful information. We experiment with pulse modeling by using a Gaussian-component scheme that allows for independent component evolution with frequency, a "fiducial component," and the inclusion of scattering. We showcase the algorithm using our publicly available code on three years of wideband data from the bright millisecond pulsar J1824-2452A (M28A) from the Green Bank Telescope, and a suite of Monte Carlo analyses validates the algorithm. By using a simple model portrait of M28A, we obtain DM trends comparable to those measured by more standard methods, with improved TOA and DM precisions by factors of a few. Measurements from our algorithm will yield precisions at least as good as those from traditional techniques, but is prone to fewer systematic effects and is without ad hoc parameters. A broad application of this new method for dispersion measure tracking with modern large-bandwidth observing systems should improve the timing residuals for pulsar timing array experiments, such as the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves.

  7. Elementary wideband timing of radio pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M. E-mail: pdemores@nrao.edu

    2014-08-01

    We present an algorithm for the simultaneous measurement of a pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM) from folded wideband pulsar data. We extend the prescription from Taylor's 1992 work to accommodate a general two-dimensional template 'portrait', the alignment of which can be used to measure a pulse phase and DM. We show that there is a dedispersion reference frequency that removes the covariance between these two quantities and note that the recovered pulse profile scaling amplitudes can provide useful information. We experiment with pulse modeling by using a Gaussian-component scheme that allows for independent component evolution with frequency, a 'fiducial component', and the inclusion of scattering. We showcase the algorithm using our publicly available code on three years of wideband data from the bright millisecond pulsar J1824–2452A (M28A) from the Green Bank Telescope, and a suite of Monte Carlo analyses validates the algorithm. By using a simple model portrait of M28A, we obtain DM trends comparable to those measured by more standard methods, with improved TOA and DM precisions by factors of a few. Measurements from our algorithm will yield precisions at least as good as those from traditional techniques, but is prone to fewer systematic effects and is without ad hoc parameters. A broad application of this new method for dispersion measure tracking with modern large-bandwidth observing systems should improve the timing residuals for pulsar timing array experiments, such as the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves.

  8. SPEAR3 Construction Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    LeCocq, Catherine; Banuelos, Cristobal; Fuss, Brian; Gaudreault, Francis; Gaydosh, Michael; Griffin, Levirt; Imfeld, Hans; McDougal, John; Perry, Michael; Rogers, Michael; /SLAC

    2005-08-17

    An ambitious seven month shutdown of the existing SPEAR2 synchrotron radiation facility was successfully completed in March 2004 when the first synchrotron light was observed in the new SPEAR3 ring, SPEAR3 completely replaced SPEAR2 with new components aligned on a new highly-flat concrete floor. Devices such as magnets and vacuum chambers had to be fiducialized and later aligned on girder rafts that were then placed into the ring over pre-aligned support plates. Key to the success of aligning this new ring was to ensure that the new beam orbit matched the old SPEAR2 orbit so that existing experimental beamlines would not have to be reoriented. In this presentation a pictorial summary of the Alignment Engineering Group's surveying tasks for the construction of the SPEAR3 ring is provided. Details on the networking and analysis of various surveys throughout the project can be found in the accompanying paper.

  9. Millisecond pulsars: Timekeepers of the cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    1995-01-01

    A brief discussion on the characteristics of pulsars is given followed by a review of millisecond pulsar discoveries including the very first, PRS B1937+21, discovered in 1982. Methods of timing millisecond pulsars and the accuracy of millisecond pulsars as clocks are discussed. Possible reasons for the pulse residuals, or differences between the observed and predicted pulse arrival times for millisecond pulsars, are given.

  10. THE DOUBLE PULSAR ECLIPSES. I. PHENOMENOLOGY AND MULTI-FREQUENCY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Breton, R. P.; Kaspi, V. M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lyutikov, M.; Kramer, M.; Stairs, I. H.; Ransom, S. M.; Ferdman, R. D.; Camilo, F.; Possenti, A.

    2012-03-10

    The double pulsar PSR J0737-3039A/B displays short, 30 s eclipses that arise around conjunction when the radio waves emitted by pulsar A are absorbed as they propagate through the magnetosphere of its companion pulsar B. These eclipses offer a unique opportunity to directly probe the magnetospheric structure and the plasma properties of pulsar B. We have performed a comprehensive analysis of the eclipse phenomenology using multi-frequency radio observations obtained with the Green Bank Telescope. We have characterized the periodic flux modulations previously discovered at 820 MHz by McLaughlin et al. and investigated the radio frequency dependence of the duration and depth of the eclipses. Based on their weak radio frequency evolution, we conclude that the plasma in pulsar B's magnetosphere requires a large multiplicity factor ({approx}10{sup 5}). We also found that, as expected, flux modulations are present at all radio frequencies in which eclipses can be detected. Their complex behavior is consistent with the confinement of the absorbing plasma in the dipolar magnetic field of pulsar B as suggested by Lyutikov and Thompson and such a geometric connection explains that the observed periodicity is harmonically related to pulsar B's spin frequency. We observe that the eclipses require a sharp transition region beyond which the plasma density drops off abruptly. Such a region defines a plasmasphere that would be well inside the magnetospheric boundary of an undisturbed pulsar. It is also two times smaller than the expected standoff radius calculated using the balance of the wind pressure from pulsar A and the nominally estimated magnetic pressure of pulsar B.

  11. Clusters in the distribution of pulsars in period, pulse-width, and age. [statistical analysis/statistical distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    The question of whether pulsars form a single group or whether pulsars come in two or more different groups is discussed. It is proposed that such groups might be related to several factors such as the initial creation of the neutron star, or the orientation of the magnetic field axis with the spin axis. Various statistical models are examined.

  12. On the primary beam deceleration in the pulsar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofev, V. V.; Arzamasskiy, L. I.; Beskin, V. S.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the motion of the primary beam outside the light cylinder in the pulsar wind. Inside the light cylinder both primary and secondary plasma move along dipole magnetic field lines where their energies can be arbitrary. But at larger distances the theory predicts quasi-radial motion with the velocity exactly corresponding to the drift velocity which cannot be the same for primary and secondary plasma. Hence, the deceleration of the primary beam is to take place simultaneously resulting in the acceleration of the secondary plasma. We investigate this process in the three-fluid magnetohydrodynamical approximation and demonstrate that for most pulsars the energy of the beam remains practically unchanged. Only for young radio pulsars (Crab, Vela) essential deceleration up to the energy of the secondary plasma takes place outside the fast magnetosonic surface rF ˜ (10-100)RL, the energy of secondary plasma itself increasing insufficiently.

  13. Pulsar interpretation of lepton spectra measured by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Zhang, Hong-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) recently published its lepton spectra measurement. The results show that the positron fraction no longer increases above ˜ 200 GeV. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility that the excess of positron fraction is due to pulsars. Nearby known pulsars from the ATNF catalog are considered to be a possible primary positron source of the high energy positrons. We find that the pulsars with age T˜eq (0.45{-}4.5)× 105 year and distance d<0.5 kpc can explain the behavior of positron fraction of AMS-02 in the range of high energy. We show that each of the four pulsars—Geminga, J1741-2054, Monogem, and J0942-5552—is able to be a single source satisfying all considered physical requirements. We also discuss the possibility that these high energy e{}^{± } are from multiple pulsars. The multiple pulsar contribution predicts a positron fraction with some structures at higher energies.

  14. Searches for Pulsars at the Center of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Walid

    2015-08-01

    Pulsars are highly magnetized, rapidly rotating neutron stars that emit a beam of electromagnetic radiation that could be detected at Earth, if the emission beam is pointing toward the Earth, analogous to the way a lighthouse can be seen when the light is pointed in the direction of the observer. Pulsars within the central parsec of our Galaxy is expected to make excellent probes of not only the environment of the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy, but also in the case of pulsar/black hole binary systems expected in this region, of their own rich environment dominated by relativistic gravity effects. In this presentation I will give an overview of why it is important to search for pulsars in the center of the galaxy, and a summary of previous and ongoing efforts to survey this region with radio telescopes. I will describe the difficulties encountered with current surveys and prospects for detection of perhaps hundreds of pulsars in this region with new generations of radio telescopes now under construction.

  15. Discovery of New Gamma-Ray Pulsars with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Possenti, A.; Chen, A.; Giuliani, A.; Trois, A.; Caraveo, P.; Del Monte, E.; Fornari, F.; Fuschino, F.; Mereghetti, S.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Burgay, M.; Cognard, I.; Corongiu, A.; Costa, E.; D'Amico, N.; De Luca, A.; Esposito, P.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Johnston, S.; Kramer, M.; Longo, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Theureau, G.; Weltevrede, P.; Barbiellini, G.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cocco, V.; D'Ammando, F.; DeParis, G.; Di Cocco, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Fiorini, M.; Froysland, T.; Galli, M.; Gianotti, F.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lipari, P.; Mineo, T.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Perotti, F.; Piano, G.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Sabatini, S.; Soffitta, P.; Trifoglio, M.; Vallazza, E.; Vercellone, S.; Vittorini, V.; Zambra, A.; Zanello, D.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Preger, B.; Santolamazza, P.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Bignami, G. F.

    2009-04-01

    Using gamma-ray data collected by the Astro-rivelatore Gamma ad Immagini LEggero (AGILE) satellite over a period of almost one year (from 2007 July to 2008 June), we searched for pulsed signals from 35 potentially interesting radio pulsars, ordered according to F_{γ}∝ √{\\dot{E}} d^{-2} and for which contemporary or recent radio data were available. AGILE detected three new top-ranking nearby and Vela-like pulsars with good confidence both through timing and spatial analysis. Among the newcomers we find pulsars with very high rotational energy losses, such as the remarkable PSR B1509 - 58 with a magnetic field in excess of 1013 Gauss, and PSR J2229 + 6114 providing a reliable identification for the previously unidentified EGRET source 3EG 2227 + 6122. Moreover, the powerful millisecond pulsar B1821 - 24, in the globular cluster M28, is detected during a fraction of the observations. Four other promising gamma-ray pulsar candidates, among which is the notable J2043 + 2740 with an age in excess of 1 million years, show a possible detection in the timing analysis only and deserve confirmation.

  16. The Unusual Binary Pulsar PSR J1744-3922: Radio Flux Variability, Near-Infrared Observation, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, R. P.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Ransom, S. M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Durant, M.; Bergeron, P.; Faulkner, A. J.

    2007-06-01

    PSR J1744-3922 is a binary pulsar exhibiting highly variable pulsed radio emission. We report on a statistical multifrequency study of the pulsed radio flux variability which suggests that this phenomenon is extrinsic to the pulsar and possibly tied to the companion, although not strongly correlated with orbital phase. The pulsar has an unusual combination of characteristics compared to typical recycled pulsars: a long spin period (172 ms); a relatively high magnetic field strength (1.7×1010 G); a very circular, compact orbit of 4.6 hr; and a low-mass companion (0.08 Msolar). These spin and orbital properties are likely inconsistent with standard evolutionary models. We find similarities between the properties of the PSR J1744-3922 system and those of several other known binary pulsar systems, motivating the identification of a new class of binary pulsars. We suggest that this new class could result from: a standard accretion scenario of a magnetar or a high magnetic field pulsar; common envelope evolution with a low-mass star and a neutron star, similar to what is expected for ultracompact X-ray binaries; or accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf. We also report the detection of a possible K'=19.30(15) infrared counterpart at the position of the pulsar, which is relatively bright if the companion is a helium white dwarf at the nominal distance, and discuss its implications for the pulsar's companion and evolutionary history.

  17. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves in Vacuum and Force-Free Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; DeCesar, Megan E.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that gamma-ray pulsar light curves are very sensitive to the geometry of the pulsar magnetic field. Pulsar magnetic field geometries, such as the retarded vacuum dipole and force-free magnetospheres have distorted polar caps that are offset from the magnetic axis in the direction opposite to rotation. Since this effect is due to the sweepback of field lines near the light cylinder, offset polar caps are a generic property of pulsar magnetospheres and their effects should be included in gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling. In slot gap models (having two-pole caustic geometry), the offset polar caps cause a strong azimuthal asymmetry of the particle acceleration around the magnetic axis. We have studied the effect of the offset polar caps in both retarded vacuum dipole and force-free geometry on the model high-energy pulse profiles. We find that, compared to the profiles derived from symmetric caps, the flux in the pulse peaks, which are caustics formed along the trailing magnetic field lines, increases significantly relative to the off-peak emission, formed along leading field lines. The enhanced contrast produces improved slot gap model fits to Fermi pulsar light curves like Vela, with vacuum dipole fits being more favorable.

  18. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves in Offset Polar Cap Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; DeCesar, Megan; Miller, M. Coleman

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that gamma-ray pulsar light curves are very sensitive to the geometry of the pulsar magnetic field. Pulsar magnetic field geometries, such as the retarded vacuum dipole and force-free magnetospheres, used to model high-energy light curves have distorted polar caps that are offset from the magnetic axis in the direction opposite to rotation. Since this effect is due to the sweepback of field lines near the light cylinder, offset polar caps are a generic property of pulsar magnetospheres and their effects should be included in gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling. In slot gap models (having two-pole caustic geometry), the offset polar caps cause a strong azimuthal asymmetry of the particle acceleration around the magnetic axis. We have studied the effect of the offset polar caps in both retarded vacuum dipole and force-free geometry on the model high-energy pulse profile. We find that. corn pared to the profile:-; derived from :-;ymmetric caps, the flux in the pulse peaks, which are caustics formed along the trailing magnetic field lines. increases significantly relative to the off-peak emission. formed along leading field lines. The enhanced contrast produces greatly improved slot gap model fits to Fermi pulsar light curves like Vela, which show very little off-peak emIssIon.

  19. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, Richard N.

    2015-08-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project uses the Parkes 64-m radio telescope to observe 22 millisecond pulsars in three bands: 40cm (band centre 732 MHz), 20cm (1369 MHz) and 10cm (3100 MHz). Coherent de-dispersion systems are used for the 40cm and 20cm bands and digital polyphase filterbanks are used for the 20cm and 10cm bands. Observations are made at intervals of two to three weeks and observations times for each pulsar in each band are typically one hour. Regular PPTA observations commenced in early 2005 but earlier timing data, primarily in the 20cm band, exist for many of the pulsars back to 1994. Pipeline processing scripts are based on PSRCHIVE routines and take into account instrumental offsets. Timing analyses include modelling of dispersion variations and red and white noise in the data. The primary scientific goal of the PPTA project is the detection of gravitational waves, either a stochastic background from supermassive black-hole binary systems in distant galaxies or from individual binary systems. The PPTA data sets have many other applications including establishment of a pulsar-based timescale, improvement of solar-system ephemerides and studies of the individual pulsars. PPTA data sets have been made available to the International Pulsar Timing Array consortium and analysis of the combined data sets is progressing. Recent developments, both instrumental and science-related, will be described.

  20. Possible radio emission mechanism for pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalev, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented and discussed as a possible mechanism to describe radio emission from pulsars. The model determines that the magnetic field in the neutron proton electron (npe) layer of a neutron star results from a quasistationary eddy current of superconducting and normal protons relative to normal electrons, which generates radio emission by the Josephson effect. The radiation propagates in the magnetically active medium, from the optically thick npe layer to the magnetosphere through breaks in the crust. As a result, hot radio spots form on the surface of the star, and a radiation pattern forms near the magnetic poles, the cross section of which gives the observed pulse structure. Due to the specific properties of the mechanism, variations of the quasistationary current are converted to amplitude frequency variations of the radiation spectrum. Variations of the fine structure of the spectrum pulse amplitude and spectral index, as well as their correlation are discussed.

  1. CONSTRAINTS ON THE EMISSION GEOMETRIES AND SPIN EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.; Çelik, Ö.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Smith, D. A.; Hou, X.; Den Hartog, P. R.; Lande, J.; Ray, P. S. E-mail: Christo.Venter@nwu.ac.za

    2014-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using a maximum likelihood technique. We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed.

  2. Constraints On the Emission Geometries and Spin Evolution Of Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.; Guillemot, L.; Smith, D. A.; Kramer, M.; Celik, O.; den Hartog, P. R.; Ferrara, E. C.; Hou, X.; Lande, J.; Ray, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using amaximum likelihood technique.We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed.

  3. Field-aligned currents and magnetospheric generator in experiments on a laser-produced plasma flowing around a magnetic dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Antonov, V. M.; Zakharov, Yu. P.; Boyarintsev, E. L.; Melekhov, A. V.; Posukh, V. G.; Ponomarenko, A. G.

    2014-07-01

    A laboratory experiment on modeling the magnetospheric generator of the field-aligned currents and the Earth's transpolar potential in the absence of IMF is illustrated. The measurements of the total field-aligned current in the generator shorted mode and the transpolar potential in the circuit disconnection mode made it possible to determine the generator internal resistance. A model that explains the saturation current and internal resistance by the feedback between the field-aligned current and plasma flank motions has been proposed. This feedback is described through the effective resistance, which is proportional to the flow rate and the ratio of the boundary layer to the dimension of the magnetosphere. For the experimental conditions, the calculated generator resistance was in good agreement with the measured value. The estimates for the Earth's magnetosphere indicate that the MHD generator internal resistance in the boundary layer is usually much lower than the reverse integral conductivity of the ionosphere.

  4. Polar cap arcs: Sun-aligned or cusp-aligned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Zhang, Qinghe; Xing, Zanyang

    2016-08-01

    Polar cap arcs are often called sun-aligned arcs. Satellite observations reveal that polar cap arcs join together at the cusp and are actually cusp aligned. Strong ionospheric plasma velocity shears, thus field aligned currents, were associated with polar arcs and they were likely caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz waves around the low-latitude magnetopause under a northward IMF Bz. The magnetic field lines around the magnetopause join together in the cusp region so are the field aligned currents and particle precipitation. This explains why polar arcs are cusp aligned.

  5. PSR J0737-3039B: A PROBE OF RADIO PULSAR EMISSION HEIGHTS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, B. B. P.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lomiashvili, D.; Gourgouliatos, K. N.; Lyutikov, M.

    2012-05-10

    In the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B, the strong wind produced by pulsar A distorts the magnetosphere of pulsar B. The influence of these distortions on the orbital-dependent emission properties of pulsar B can be used to determine the location of the coherent radio emission generation region in the pulsar magnetosphere. Using a model of the wind-distorted magnetosphere of pulsar B and the well-defined geometrical parameters of the system, we determine the minimum emission height to be {approx}20R{sub NS} in the two bright orbital longitude regions. We can determine the maximum emission height by accounting for the amount of deflection of the polar field line with respect to the magnetic axis using the analytical magnetic reconnection model of Dungey and the semi-empirical numerical model of Tsyganenko. Both of these models estimate the maximum emission height to be {approx}2500R{sub NS}. The minimum and maximum emission heights we calculate are consistent with those estimated for normal isolated pulsars.

  6. Magnetic moment of the 13 /2 + isomeric state in 69Cu: Spin alignment in the one-nucleon removal reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusoglu, A.; Georgiev, G.; Sotty, C.; Balabanski, D. L.; Goasduff, A.; Ishii, Y.; Abe, Y.; Asahi, K.; Bostan, M.; Chevrier, R.; Chikamori, M.; Daugas, J. M.; Furukawa, T.; Nishibata, H.; Ichikawa, Y.; Ishibashi, Y.; Lozeva, R.; Miyatake, H.; Nagae, D.; Nanao, T.; Niikura, M.; Niwa, T.; Okada, S.; Ozawa, A.; Saito, Y.; Shirai, H.; Ueno, H.; Yordanov, D. T.; Yoshida, N.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a new measurement of the g factor of the (13 /2 + ) isomeric state in the neutron-rich nucleus 69Cu. This study demonstrates the possibility of obtaining considerable nuclear spin alignment for multi-quasiparticle states in single-nucleon removal reactions. The time-dependent perturbed angular distribution (TDPAD) method was used to extract the gyromagnetic factor of the (13 /2+ ) [T1 /2=351 (14 ) ns] isomeric state of 69Cu. Its g factor was obtained as g (13 /2+) =0.248 (9 ) . The experimentally observed spin alignment for the state of interest was deduced as A =-3.3 (9 )% .

  7. An extremely bright gamma-ray pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi LAT Collaboration; Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbieri, C.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Desiante, F. de Palma R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hagiwara, K.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Johnson, T. J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marshall, F.; Martin, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naletto, G.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Romani, R. W.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zampieri, L.

    2015-11-01

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars, created in the gravitational collapse of massive stars. We report the detection of pulsed giga-electron volt gamma rays from the young pulsar PSR J0540-6919 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. This is the first gamma-ray pulsar detected in another galaxy. It has the most luminous pulsed gamma-ray emission yet observed, exceeding the Crab pulsar’s by a factor of 20. PSR J0540-6919 presents an extreme test case for understanding the structure and evolution of neutron star magnetospheres.

  8. PSR J0357+3205: A FAST-MOVING PULSAR WITH A VERY UNUSUAL X-RAY TRAIL

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Mignani, R. P.; Marelli, M.; Salvetti, D.; Sartore, N.; Caraveo, P. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Belfiore, A.; Saz Parkinson, P.

    2013-03-01

    The middle-aged PSR J0357+3205 is a nearby, radio-quiet, bright {gamma}-ray pulsar discovered by the Fermi mission. Our previous Chandra observation revealed a huge, very peculiar structure of diffuse X-ray emission originating at the pulsar position and extending for >9' on the plane of the sky. To better understand the nature of such a nebula, we have studied the proper motion of the parent pulsar. We performed relative astrometry on Chandra images of the field spanning a time baseline of 2.2 yr, unveiling a significant angular displacement of the pulsar counterpart, corresponding to a proper motion of 0.''165 {+-} 0.''030 yr{sup -1} at a position angle (P.A.) of 314 Degree-Sign {+-} 8 Degree-Sign . At a distance of {approx}500 pc, the space velocity of the pulsar would be of {approx}390 km s{sup -1} assuming no inclination with respect to the plane of the sky. The direction of the pulsar proper motion is aligned very well with the main axis of the X-ray nebula (P.A. = 315. Degree-Sign 5 {+-} 1. Degree-Sign 5), pointing to a physical, yet elusive, link between the nebula and the pulsar space velocity. No optical emission in the H{alpha} line is seen in a deep image collected at the Gemini telescope, which implies that the interstellar medium into which the pulsar is moving is fully ionized.

  9. Pulsar Polar Cap Heating and Surface Thermal X-ray Emission. 1; Curvature Radiation Pair Fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the effect of pulsar polar cap (PC) heating produced by positrons returning from the upper pair formation front. Our calculations are based on a self-consistent treatment of the pair dynamics and the effect of electric field screening by the returning positrons. We calculate the resultant X-ray luminosities and discuss the dependence of the PC heating efficiencies on pulsar parameters, such as characteristic spin-down age, spin period, and surface magnetic field strength. In this study we concentrate on the regime where the pairs are produced in a magnetic field by curvature photons emitted by accelerating electrons. Our theoretical results are not in conflict with the available observational x-ray data and suggest that the effect of PC heating should significantly contribute to the thermal x-ray fluxes from middle-aged and old pulsars. The implications for current and future x-ray observations of pulsars are briefly outlined.

  10. Newly Commissioned Green Bank Telescope Bags New Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's newly commissioned Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have discovered a windfall of three previously undetected millisecond pulsars in a dense cluster of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope "This globular cluster, known as Messier 62, has been very well studied, and it would have been an exciting discovery to find just one new pulsar. The fact that we were able to detect three new pulsars at one time is simply remarkable," said Bryan Jacoby, a graduate student at the California Institute of Technology who led the research team. Results of the discovery were recently announced in an International Astronomical Union Circular. Jacoby and his colleague Adam Chandler, also a graduate student at Caltech, used the GBT to search for new pulsars in addition to the three already known in this cluster. Their research was part of the GBT's Early Science Program, which allows scientific investigations during the testing and commissioning of the telescope. The researchers used the Berkeley-Caltech Pulsar Machine, a new instrument whose development was overseen by Donald Backer at the University of California at Berkeley, to process the signals from the GBT and record them for later analysis. After their data were analyzed, the researchers discovered the telltale signatures of three additional pulsars and their white dwarf companion stars. Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars that emit intense beams of radio waves along their misaligned magnetic axes. When these beams intersect the Earth, we see the pulsar flash on and off. Due to their exquisitely steady rotation, pulsars allow astronomers to study the basic laws of physics and the ways in which these dense clusters and exotic stellar systems are formed. Astronomers study globular clusters because they are among the oldest building blocks of our Galaxy. With their very dense stellar populations, these

  11. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Harding, Alice K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Parent, Damien

    2012-01-01

    The high-quality Fermi LAT observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems, The high statistics allow for careful modeling of the light curve features as well as for phase resolved spectral modeling. We modeled the LAT light curves of the Vela and CTA I pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission models. within the vacuum retarded dipole and force-free fields. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method was used to explore the phase space of the magnetic inclination angle, viewing angle. maximum emission radius, and gap width. We also used the measured spectral cutoff energies to estimate the accelerating parallel electric field dependence on radius. under the assumptions that the high-energy emission is dominated by curvature radiation and the geometry (radius of emission and minimum radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines) is determined by the best fitting light curves for each model. We find that light curves from the vacuum field more closely match the observed light curves and multiwavelength constraints, and that the calculated parallel electric field can place additional constraints on the emission geometry

  12. Radio Observations of Elongated Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Stephen C.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    The majority of pulsars' rotational energy is carried away by relativistic winds, which are energetic particles accelerated in the magnetosphere. The confinement of the winds by the ambient medium result in synchrotron bubbles with broad-band emission, which are commonly referred to as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). Due to long synchrotron cooling time, a radio PWN reflects the integrated history of the system, complementing information obtained from the X-ray and higher energy bands. In addition, radio polarization measurements can offer a powerful probe of the PWN magnetic field structure. Altogether these can reveal the physical conditions and evolutionary history of a system.I report on preliminary results from high-resolution radio observations of PWNe associated with G327.1-1.1, PSRs J1015-5719, B1509-58, and J1549-4848 taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Their magnetic field structure and multiwavelength comparison with other observations are discussed.This work is supported by a ECS grant of the Hong Kong Government under HKU 709713P. The Australia Telescope is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility managed by CSIRO.

  13. Higgs portals to pulsar collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Elahi, Fatemeh

    2015-06-01

    Pulsars apparently missing from the Galactic center could have been destroyed by asymmetric fermionic dark matter (mX=1 - 100 GeV ) coupled to a light scalar (mϕ=5 - 20 MeV ), which mixes with the Higgs boson. We point out that this pulsar-collapsing dark sector can resolve the core-cusp problem and will either be excluded or discovered by upcoming direct detection experiments. Another implication is a maximum pulsar age curve that increases with distance from the Galactic center, with a normalization that depends on the couplings and masses of dark sector particles. In addition, we use old pulsars outside the Galactic center to place bounds on asymmetric Higgs portal models.

  14. FSSC Science Tools: Pulsar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the typical pulsar analysis, giving tips for screening of the data, the use of time series analysis, and utility tools. Specific information about analyzing Vela data is reviewed.

  15. Fermi's New Pulsar Detection Technique

    NASA Video Gallery

    To locate a pulsar in Fermi LAT data requires knowledge of the object’s sky position, its pulse period, and how the pulse rate slows over time. Computers check many different combinations of posi...

  16. Initial Follow-up of Pulsar Discoveries from the HTRU Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Cherry; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Burgay, Marta; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Stappers, Benjamin; Bates, Samuel; Keane, Evan; Levin, Lina; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Tiburzi, Caterina; Petroff, Emily; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris

    2014-10-01

    This is a request for observing time for the initial follow-up of pulsar discoveries from the low-latitude Galactic plane section of the HTRU survey (P630). We have already discovered (50 pulsars from just 40% of processed data. Extrapolation and population synthesis show that the Galactic plane survey will result in at least a further 100 discoveries. Currently, with data processing on-going employing all available computing resources, we expect about 20 new discoveries per semester. The discovery of pulsars is just a first step and interesting science can usually only be revealed when a follow-up timing campaign is carried out. One year of initial timing is the minimal timespan required to fully-characterise any newly-discovered pulsars, essential for deriving pulsar parameters such as the characteristic age, magnetic field strength, spin-down rate, as well as to detect any unexpected behaviour of the pulsar which might result from emission instabilities. This follow-up timing project is necessary for identifying any individual interesting pulsar systems discovered from the HTRU Galactic plane survey. Since all of the pulsars on the observing list here are followed-up for the first time, they will produce completely new and exciting results. In addition, this timing project will enable a large-scale examination of the Galactic plane pulsar population, exploring the true boundaries of pulsar phase space. Given the large number of discoveries expected and the long integration length required, this dedicated follow-up timing campaign is vital for achieving our science goals.

  17. Initial Follow-up of Pulsar Discoveries from the HTRU Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Cherry; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Burgay, Marta; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Stappers, Benjamin; Bates, Samuel; Keane, Evan; Levin, Lina; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Tiburzi, Caterina; Petroff, Emily; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris

    2014-04-01

    This is a request for observing time for the initial follow-up of pulsar discoveries from the low-latitude Galactic plane section of the HTRU survey (P630). We have already discovered 40 pulsars from just 30% of processed data. Extrapolation and population synthesis show that the Galactic plane survey will result in at least a further 120 discoveries. Currently, with data processing on-going employing all available computing resources, we expect about 20 new discoveries per semester. The discovery of pulsars is just a first step and interesting science can usually only be revealed when a follow-up timing campaign is carried out. One year of initial timing is the minimal timespan required to fully-characterise any newly-discovered pulsars, essential for deriving pulsar parameters such as the characteristic age, magnetic field strength, spin-down rate, as well as to detect any unexpected behaviour of the pulsar which might result from emission instabilities. This follow-up timing project is necessary for identifying any individual interesting pulsar systems discovered from the HTRU Galactic plane survey. Since all of the pulsars on the observing list here are followed-up for the first time, they will produce completely new and exciting results. In addition, this timing project will enable a large-scale examination of the Galactic plane pulsar population, exploring the true boundaries of pulsar phase space. Given the large number of discoveries expected and the long integration length required, this dedicated follow-up timing campaign is vital for achieving our science goals.

  18. Stellar structures and the enigma of pulsars rotation frequency decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, H. O.; Marinho, R. M., Jr.; Maglhaes, N. S.

    2015-07-01

    Pulsars are astrophysical objects normally modelled as compact neutron stars that originated from the collapse of another star. This model, that we name canonical, assumes that pulsars are described by spherical magnetized dipoles that rotate, usually with the magnetic axis misaligned to the rotation axis. This misalignment would be responsible for the observation of radiation emitted in well-defined time intervals in a certain direction (lighthouse effect), the typical observational characteristic of this kind of star. It has been noticed that the rotation frequency of pulsars is slowly decaying with time (spin down), implying a gradual decrease of the rotational angular velocity (Ω). Such decay can be quantified by a dimensionless parameter called “braking index” (“n”), given by n = ΩΩ/(Ω)2, where a dot indicates a time derivative. The canonical model predicts that this index has one only value for all pulsars, equal to three. However, observational data indicate that actual braking indices are less than three, representing an enigma. The main goal of this research is the exploration of a more precise model for pulsars’ rotation frequency decay.

  19. Millisecond radio pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Van Paradijs, Jan

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the number of millisecond radio pulsars, in globular clusters, should be larger than 100, applying the standard scenario that all the pulsars descend from low-mass X-ray binaries. Moreover, most of the pulsars are located in a small number of clusters. The prediction that Teran 5 and Liller 1 contain at least about a dozen millisecond radio pulsars each is made. The observations of millisecond radio pulsars in globular clusters to date, in particular the discovery of two millisecond radio pulsars in 47 Tuc, are in agreement with the standard scenario, in which the neutron star is spun up during the mass transfer phase.

  20. An oblique pulsar magnetosphere with a plasma conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gang; Zhang, Li; Sun, Sineng

    2016-09-01

    An oblique pulsar magnetosphere with a plasma conductivity is studied by using a pseudo-spectral method. In the pseudo-spectral method, the time-dependent Maxwell equations are solved, both electric and magnetic fields are expanded in terms of the vector spherical harmonic functions in spherical geometry and the divergencelessness of magnetic field is analytically enforced by a projection method. The pulsar magnetospheres in infinite (i.e., force free approximation) and finite conductivities are simulated and a family of solutions that smoothly transition from the Deutsch vacuum solution to the force-free solution are obtained. The sin2α dependence of the spin-down luminosity on the magnetic inclination angle α in which the full electric current density are taken into account is retrieved in the force-free regime.

  1. Implications of HESS Observations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jager, Ocker C.; Djannati-Ataï, Arache

    Even before the discovery of pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) like the Crab Nebula were identified as belonging to a class of cosmic radio sources with rela-tivistic electrons moving in magnetized plasmas to give the continuum radiation as observed. Visionaries like [36] already predicted that we should be able to measure the magnetic field strength in PWN using the combination of synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) radiation. Following this, [43] were the first to provide us with a sophisticated one dimensional (1D) magneto hydrodynamical models (MHD) model of the Crab Nebula, which predicted a magnetic field strength distribution, consistent with broadband multi-wavelength (radio through very high energy gamma-ray) constraints [12,25, 39].

  2. Relativistic Pulsar Winds with Pressure Anisotropy and Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenbarge, Jason; Hazeltine, Richard; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2008-11-01

    A newly developed covariant fluid model for magnetized plasmas, incorporating anisotropy in both temperature and heat flow, is used to study equatorial radial profiles of density, velocity, magnetic field, pressure, and heat flow in the hot, strongly magnetized wind region beyond the light cylinder of pulsar magnetospheres. Radiative losses are assumed to have isotropized the wind region plasma so that PP. Fluid velocities are taken as mildly relativistic, while temperatures are ultra-relativistic. This study of pulsar magnetospheres extends the work by Tsikarishvili et al. to a more general fluid closure including heat flow. The general covariant fluid model in spherical geometry and equations of state for arbitrary temperature will also be presented for more general applicability. J. M. TenBarge, R. D. Hazeltine, and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Plasmas 15, 062112 (2008)., E. G. Tsikarishvili, A. D. Rogava, and D. G. Tsiklauri, Ap. J. 439, 822 (1995).

  3. Pulsar distance measurements with VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, Adam

    A reliable estimate of the distance to a pulsar underpins the interpretation of observational results across all wavebands. While there are many model-dependent methods available, most prominently the combination of the pulsar dispersion measure and a Galactic electron density distribution model, the underlying models must be anchored by a collection of accurate, model-independent measurements. By far the largest number of reliable and model-independent pulsar distance measurements have been obtained via a determination of annual geometric parallax with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations. With high sensitivity and a good control of systematic effects via careful calibration, the milli-arcsecond level native resolution means that relative positional accuracies of a few 10s of micro-arcseconds are achievable. This precision means that in principle a parallax distance is feasible for the majority of the known radio pulsar population; however, actually observing every feasible pulsar would cost a prohibitive amount of telescope time. Here, I will first describe several recent VLBI astrometry results where the provided distance has been crucial in furthering the understanding of the system. Second, I will describe the recently completed "PSRPI" program, which measured over 50 pulsar parallaxes using the Very Long Baseline Array - by far the largest pulsar parallax program to date. Third, I will describe the recently commenced "MSPSRPI" extension to the PSRPI program, which targets exclusively millisecond pulsars and aims to greatly improve the tie between the solar system barycentric frame and the International Celestial Reference Frame. Finally, I will briefly discuss the impact of developments in VLBI instrumentation, including the forthcoming Square Kilometre Array.

  4. Pulsar Observatory for Students (POS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.; Gopakumar, A.; Mitra, D.; Bagchi, Joydeep; Saikia, D. J.

    2012-07-01

    A new program, to initiate motivated undergraduate students to the methodology of pulsar astronomy in particular and radio astronomy in general, is being launched at the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). The ORT is a 530 m X 30 m cylindrical radio telescope operating at 325 MHz, having an equatorial mount. Its equatorial mount allows modestly trained students to make pulsar observations without any substantial help from the observatory. Due to its large collecting area, it is a sensitive instrument for pulsar astronomy, capable of detecting a large number of pulsars with short observation time. The program consists of biannual workshops that will introduce scores of students to basics of radio-astronomy and pulsars. It will also train them in the use of the ORT as well as expose them to the future prospects and excitements in the field. The second leg of the program involves live ORT observations by these trained students during various academic breaks. There is a possibility for a follow up program of highly motivated students, selected from this program, to pursue projects of their interest from the data obtained in these sensitive observations. The long term aim of the program is to enlarge the pulsar astronomy community in the country. The presentation will highlight the main features of this program and describe the experience drawn from such programs.

  5. The LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexov, A.; Hessels, J.; Mol, J. D.; Stappers, B.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2010-12-01

    The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) for radio astronomy is being built in the Netherlands by ASTRON, with extensions throughout Europe. LOFAR operates at radio frequencies below 250 MHz. The project is an interferometric array of radio antennas grouped into stations that are distributed over an area of hundreds of kilometers. LOFAR will revolutionise low-frequency radio astronomy. Transient radio phenomena and pulsars are one of six LOFAR Key Science Projects (KSPs). As part of the Transients KSP, the Pulsar Working Group has been developing the LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipeline to both study known pulsars as well as search for new ones. The pipeline is being developed for the Blue Gene/P (BG/P) supercomputer and a large Linux cluster in order to utilize enormous amounts of computation capabilities (˜ 50 Tflops) and data streams of up to 23TB/hour. The LOFAR pipeline output will be using the Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) to efficiently store large amounts of numerical data, and to manage complex data encompassing a variety of data types, across distributed storage and processing architectures. We present the LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipeline overview, the pulsar beam-formed data format, the status of the pipeline processing as well as our future plans for developing additional transient pipelines.

  6. Ion-proton pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  7. Pulsars In The Headlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Puerto, C.

    1967 was the year of the so-called “war of the six days” or “third Arab Israeli war”, the year of the Che Guevara's death in Bolivia, the year of the military coup in Greece and, in medicine, the year of the first human heart transplant. Moreover, the signing of the international agreement on the use of space with peaceful means and the crash of the Russian shuttle Soyuz-1, with Cosmonaut Vladimir Kamarov on board also happened that year. Likewise, Spanish writer and professor of journalists, José Azorín, passed away. However, here we are interested in 1967 because it was the year of the detection of pulsars, which astronomers initially confused with signals from extraterrestrials or Little Green Men. Nowadays, they are still present in the headlines.

  8. Ion-proton pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-04-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  9. New Pulsars from Arecibo Drift Scan Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Backer, D. C.; Cordes, J. M.; Fruchter, A.; Lommen, A. N.; Xilouris, K.

    2003-01-01

    We report new pulsars discovered in drift-scan data taken by two collaborations (Berkeley/Cornell and STScI/NAIC) during the latter stages of the Arecibo upgrade period. The data were taken with the Penn State Pulsar Machine and are being processed on the COBRA cluster at Jodrell Bank. Processing is roughly 70% complete and has resulted in the detection of 10 new and 31 known pulsars, in addition to a number of pulsar candidates. The 10 new pulsars include one pulsar with a spin-period of 55 ms and another with a spin period of 5.8 ms. At the completion of the processing, we expect to have discovered roughly 20 new pulsars. All new pulsars are being subjected to a program of followup observations at Arecibo to determine spin and astrometric parameters.

  10. Millisecond pulsars - Nature's most stable clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Joseph H., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    The author describes the role pulsars might play in time and frequency technology. Millisecond pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars: spherical flywheels some 20 km in diameter, 1.4 times as massive as the Sun, and spinning as fast as several thousand radians per second. Radio noise generated in a pulsar's magnetosphere by a highly beamed process is detectable over interstellar distances, as a periodic sequence of pulses similar to the ticks of an excellent clock. High-precision comparisons between pulsar time and terrestrial atomic time show that over intervals of several years, some millisecond pulsars have fractional stabilities comparable to those of the best atomic clocks. The author briefly reviews the physics of pulsars, discusses the techniques of pulsar timing measurements, and summarizes the results of careful studies of pulsar stabilities.

  11. Fermi Finds Youthful Pulsar Among Ancient Stars

    NASA Video Gallery

    In three years, NASA's Fermi has detected more than 100 gamma-ray pulsars, but something new has appeared. Among a type of pulsar with ages typically numbering a billion years or more, Fermi has fo...

  12. The Inclination Angle and Evolution of the Braking Index of Pulsars with Plasma-filled Magnetosphere: Application to the High Braking Index of PSR J1640-4631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekşi, K. Y.; Andaç, I. C.; Çıkıntoğlu, S.; Gügercinoğlu, E.; Vahdat Motlagh, A.; Kızıltan, B.

    2016-05-01

    The recently discovered rotationally powered pulsar PSR J1640–4631 is the first to have a braking index measured, with high enough precision, that is greater than 3. An inclined magnetic rotator in vacuum or plasma would be subject not only to spin-down but also to an alignment torque. The vacuum model can address the braking index only for an almost orthogonal rotator, which is incompatible with the single-peaked pulse profile. The magnetic dipole model with the corotating plasma predicts braking indices between 3 and 3.25. We find that the braking index of 3.15 is consistent with two different inclination angles, 18.°5 ± 3° and 56° ± 4°. The smaller angle is preferred given that the pulse profile has a single peak and the radio output of the source is weak. We infer the change in the inclination angle to be at the rate ‑0.°23 per century, three times smaller in absolute value than the rate recently observed for the Crab pulsar.

  13. What brakes the Crab pulsar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čadež, A.; Zampieri, L.; Barbieri, C.; Calvani, M.; Naletto, G.; Barbieri, M.; Ponikvar, D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Optical observations provide convincing evidence that the optical phase of the Crab pulsar follows the radio one closely. Since optical data do not depend on dispersion measure variations, they provide a robust and independent confirmation of the radio timing solution. Aims: The aim of this paper is to find a global mathematical description of Crab pulsar's phase as a function of time for the complete set of published Jodrell Bank radio ephemerides (JBE) in the period 1988-2014. Methods: We apply the mathematical techniques developed for analyzing optical observations to the analysis of JBE. We break the whole period into a series of episodes and express the phase of the pulsar in each episode as the sum of two analytical functions. The first function is the best-fitting local braking index law, and the second function represents small residuals from this law with an amplitude of only a few turns, which rapidly relaxes to the local braking index law. Results: From our analysis, we demonstrate that the power law index undergoes "instantaneous" changes at the time of observed jumps in rotational frequency (glitches). We find that the phase evolution of the Crab pulsar is dominated by a series of constant braking law episodes, with the braking index changing abruptly after each episode in the range of values between 2.1 and 2.6. Deviations from such a regular phase description behave as oscillations triggered by glitches and amount to fewer than 40 turns during the above period, in which the pulsar has made more than 2 × 1010 turns. Conclusions: Our analysis does not favor the explanation that glitches are connected to phenomena occurring in the interior of the pulsar. On the contrary, timing irregularities and changes in slow down rate seem to point to electromagnetic interaction of the pulsar with the surrounding environment.

  14. A MODEL OF THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shuta J.; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-06-01

    We study the spectral evolution of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) taking into account the energy injected when they are young. We model the evolution of the magnetic field inside a uniformly expanding PWN. Considering time-dependent injection from the pulsar and coolings by radiative and adiabatic losses, we solve the evolution of the particle distribution function. The model is calibrated by fitting the calculated spectrum to the observations of the Crab Nebula at an age of a thousand years. The spectral evolution of the Crab Nebula in our model shows that the flux ratio of TeV {gamma}-rays to X-rays increases with time, which implies that old PWNe are faint in X-rays, but not in TeV {gamma}-rays. The increase of this ratio is because the magnetic field decreases with time and is not because the X-ray emitting particles are cooled more rapidly than the TeV {gamma}-ray emitting particles. Our spectral evolution model matches the observed rate of the radio flux decrease of the Crab Nebula. This result implies that our magnetic field evolution model is close to the reality. Finally, from the viewpoint of the spectral evolution, only a small fraction of the injected energy from the Crab Pulsar needs to go to the magnetic field, which is consistent with previous studies.

  15. a Surprise from the Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    New observations of the spectrum of the rapidly spinning neutron star (the `pulsar') in the Crab Nebula have been carried out with the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT) by a group of Italian astronomers [1]. Because of greatly improved spectral resolution which allows to register even very fine details in the pulsar's spectrum, they are able to determine for the first time with high accuracy the overall dependance of the emission on wavelength, i.e. the `shape' of the spectrum. Quite unexpectedly, they also detect a hitherto unknown 100 A (10 nm) broad `absorption dip', which can be securely attributed to the pulsar. These results open an exciting new window for the study of the extreme physical processes close to a pulsar. The Nature of Pulsars It is estimated that there may be as many as 100 million neutron stars in our Galaxy. A neutron star is the superdense remnant of the extremely violent supernova explosion that occurs at the end of the life of a comparatively massive star. In fact, all stars that are more than about 6 times heavier than the Sun are believed to end their lives as supernovae. During the explosion, the central core of the dying star collapses in a few milliseconds and the matter at the centre is compressed to a density comparable to that of an atomic nucleus. Due to the enormous inward pressure, the atomic particles are squeezed together into a kind of neutron jam. The outcome is the formation of a neutron star with a diameter of 10-15 kilometres, weighing as much as the Sun. In accordance with the physical law that implies that the rotation momentum of the exploding star must be conserved, newborn neutron stars will rotate very rapidly around their axis, in some cases as fast as 100 times per second. In the same way, the new neutron star is expected to possess a strong magnetic field. Of these myriads of neutron stars, about 700 have been observed to emit radio pulses (hence the name `pulsar'). A few of these can also be detected

  16. Magnetar-Like Emission from the Young Pulsar in Kes 75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, F. P.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Kaspi, V. M.; Livingstone, M. A.; Woods, P. M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the detection of magnetar-like x-ray bursts from the young pulsar PSR J1846-0258, at the center of the supernova remnant Kes 75. This pulsar, long thought to be exclusively rotation-powered, has an inferred surface dipolar magnetic field of 4.9deg 10(exp 13) gauss, which is higher than those of the vast majority of rotation-powered pulsars, but lower than those of the approximately 12 previously identified magnetars. The bursts were accompanied by a sudden flux increase and an unprecedented change in timing behavior. These phenomena lower the magnetic and rotational thresholds associated with magnetar-like behavior and suggest that in neutron stars there exists a continuum of magnetic activity that increases with inferred magnetic field strength.

  17. A fan beam model for radio pulsars. I. Observational evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. G.; Pi, F. P.; Deng, C. L.; Wen, S. Q.; Ye, F.; Guan, K.Y.; Liu, Y.; Xu, L. Q.; Zheng, X. P.

    2014-07-01

    We propose a novel beam model for radio pulsars based on the scenario that the broadband and coherent emission from secondary relativistic particles, as they move along a flux tube in a dipolar magnetic field, form a radially extended sub-beam with unique properties. The whole radio beam may consist of several sub-beams, forming a fan-shaped pattern. When only one or a few flux tubes are active, the fan beam becomes very patchy. This model differs essentially from the conal beam models with respect to the beam structure and predictions on the relationship between pulse width and impact angle β (the angle between the line of sight and the magnetic pole) and the relationship between emission intensity and beam angular radius. The evidence for this model comes from the observed patchy beams of precessional binary pulsars and three statistical relationships found for a sample of 64 pulsars, of which β were mostly constrained by fitting polarization position angle data with the rotation vector model. With appropriate assumptions, the fan beam model can reproduce the relationship between 10% peak pulse width and |β|, the anticorrelation between the emission intensity and |β|, and the upper boundary line in the scatter plot of |β| versus pulsar distance. An extremely patchy beam model with the assumption of narrowband emission from one or a few flux tubes is studied and found unlikely to be a general model. The implications of the fan beam model for the studies on radio and gamma-ray pulsar populations and radio polarization are discussed.

  18. Youngest Radio Pulsar Revealed with Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-04-01

    times weaker than that from the famous pulsar in the Crab Nebula (the remnant of an explosion in the year 1054 recorded by Chinese astronomers and possibly also by Native Americans of the Anasazi tribe in modern-day Arizona and New Mexico). "Although we knew what we were looking for," said Camilo "it took the new Green Bank Telescope with its unmatched sensitivity -- and, importantly, location in the National Radio Quiet Zone -- to make this remarkable detection." A pulsar is formed when a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel and dies in a cataclysmic explosion called a supernova. The outer layers of the star are blown off into space, and are often seen as an expanding remnant shell of hot gas. The core of the star, with 40 percent more mass than our Sun, collapses under its own gravity to a sphere only about 10 miles in diameter, composed mostly of neutrons. These densest objects known in the Universe typically are born spinning very rapidly; the newly detected pulsar, known as PSR J0205+6449, presently rotates 15 times every second. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. The spinning neutron star has very powerful magnetic and electric fields that accelerate electrons and other subatomic particles, causing them to emit beams of radio waves, X-rays, and other forms of radiation. If these beams intersect the Earth as the star rotates, we can then detect the pulsar, as it appears to flash on-and-off, much like a lighthouse. As the pulsar ages, it gradually slows down and loses its rotational energy. After a few million years it is no longer powerful enough to generate radio emission and "turns-off." By detecting this pulsar in the radio spectrum, astronomers may now follow its evolution with greater ease and flexibility than with X-ray telescopes on satellites, study the pulsar emission mechanisms, and also characterize the dynamic interstellar medium between the Earth and the pulsar. "Finding a radio pulsar this young could be somewhat of a gold

  19. Wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles of 100 radio pulsars with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Zagkouris, K.; Hassall, T. E.; Bilous, A. V.; Breton, R. P.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Keane, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Serylak, M.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Bîrzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; de Geus, E.; de Jong, A.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Heald, G.; Horneffer, A.; Jonker, P.; Juette, E.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Nelles, A.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2016-02-01

    Context. LOFAR offers the unique capability of observing pulsars across the 10-240 MHz frequency range with a fractional bandwidth of roughly 50%. This spectral range is well suited for studying the frequency evolution of pulse profile morphology caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic effects such as changing emission altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere or scatter broadening by the interstellar medium, respectively. Aims: The magnitude of most of these effects increases rapidly towards low frequencies. LOFAR can thus address a number of open questions about the nature of radio pulsar emission and its propagation through the interstellar medium. Methods: We present the average pulse profiles of 100 pulsars observed in the two LOFAR frequency bands: high band (120-167 MHz, 100 profiles) and low band (15-62 MHz, 26 profiles). We compare them with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and Lovell Telescope observations at higher frequencies (350 and 1400 MHz) to study the profile evolution. The profiles were aligned in absolute phase by folding with a new set of timing solutions from the Lovell Telescope, which we present along with precise dispersion measures obtained with LOFAR. Results: We find that the profile evolution with decreasing radio frequency does not follow a specific trend; depending on the geometry of the pulsar, new components can enter into or be hidden from view. Nonetheless, in general our observations confirm the widening of pulsar profiles at low frequencies, as expected from radius-to-frequency mapping or birefringence theories. We offer this catalogue of low-frequency pulsar profiles in a user friendly way via the EPN Database of Pulsar Profiles, http://www.epta.eu.org/epndb/

  20. Understanding pulsar magnetospheres with the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karastergiou, A.; Johnston, S.; Karastergiou, A.; Johnston, S.; Andersson, N.; Breton, R.; Brook, P.; Gwinn, C.; Lewandowska, N.; Keane, E.; Kramer, M.; Macquart, J. P.; Serylak, M.; Shannon, R.; Stappers, B.; van Leeuwen, J.; Verbiest, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Wright, G.

    The SKA will discover tens of thousands of pulsars and provide unprecedented data quality on these, as well as the currently known population, due to its unrivalled sensitivity. Here, we outline the state of the art of our understanding of magnetospheric radio emission from pulsars and how we will use the SKA to solve the open problems in pulsar magnetospheric physics.

  1. Search for Millisecond Pulsars for the Pulsar Timing Array project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milia, S.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetised neutron stars (i.e. ultra dense stars, where about one solar mass is concentrated in a sphere with a radius of ~ 10 km), which irradiate radio beams in a fashion similar to a lighthouse. As a consequence, whenever the beams cut our line of sight we perceive a radio pulses, one (or two) per pulsar rotation, with a frequency up to hundred of times a second. Owing to their compact nature, rapid spin and high inertia, pulsars are in general fairly stable rotators, hence the Times of Arrival (TOAs) of the pulses at a radio telescope can be used as the ticks of a clock. This holds true in particular for the sub­class of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs), having a spin period smaller than the conventional limit of 30 ms, whose very rapid rotation and relatively older age provide better rotational stability than the ordinary pulsars. Indeed, some MSPs rotate so regularly that they can rival the best atomic clocks on Earth over timespan of few months or years.This feature allows us to use MSPs as tools in a cosmic laboratory, by exploiting a procedure called timing, which consists in the repeated and regular measurement of the TOAs from a pulsar and then in the search for trends in the series of the TOAs over various timespans, from fraction of seconds to decades.For example the study of pulsars in binary systems has already provided the most stringent tests to date of General Relativity in strong gravitational fields and has unambiguously showed the occurrence of the emission of gravitational waves from a binary system comprising two massive bodies in a close orbit. In last decades a new exciting perspective has been opened, i.e. to use pulsars also for a direct detection of the so far elusive gravitational waves and thereby applying the pulsar timing for cosmological studies. In fact, the gravitational waves (GWs) going across our Galaxy pass over all the Galactic pulsars and the Earth, perturbing the space­time at the

  2. Alignment of the VISA Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert

    1999-04-15

    The Visible-Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) undulator consists of four 99cm long segments. Each undulator segment is set up on a pulsed-wire bench, to characterize the magnetic properties and to locate the magnetic axis of the FODO array. Subsequently, the location of the magnetic axis, as defined by the wire, is referenced to tooling balls on each magnet segment by means of a straightness interferometer. After installation in the vacuum chamber, the four magnet segments are aligned with respect to themselves and globally to the beam line reference laser. A specially designed alignment fixture is used to mount one straightness interferometer each in the horizontal and vertical plane of the beam. The goal of these procedures is to keep the combined rms trajectory error, due to magnetic and alignment errors, to 50{micro}m.

  3. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Manchester, Dick; Verbiest, Joris P. W.; Sarkissian, John; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Jenet, Rick; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Yardley, Daniel Roger Billing; Ravi, Vikram; Oslowski, Stefan; Hotan, Aidan; Champion, David; Khoo, Jonathan; Shannon, Ryan; Chaudhary, Ankur

    2011-10-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband systems (CPSR2; APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project. We request continuing status for this project.

  4. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Manchester, Dick; Sarkissian, John; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Coles, William; van Straten, Willem; Yardley, Daniel Roger Billing; Ravi, Vikram; Oslowski, Stefan; Khoo, Jonathan; Shannon, Ryan; Wang, Jingbo; Levin, Yuri

    2013-04-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband systems (CPSR2; APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project. We request continuing status for this project.

  5. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Manchester, Dick; Verbiest, Joris P. W.; Sarkissian, John; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Jenet, Rick; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Yardley, Daniel Roger Billing; Ravi, Vikram; Oslowski, Stefan; Hotan, Aidan; Champion, David; Khoo, Jonathan; Shannon, Ryan; Chaudhary, Ankur

    2012-04-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband systems (CPSR2; APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project. We request continuing status for this project.

  6. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Manchester, Dick; Verbiest, Joris P. W.; Sarkissian, John; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Jenet, Rick; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Yardley, Daniel Roger Billing; Oslowski, Stefan; Hotan, Aidan; Champion, David; Khoo, Jonathan; Shannon, Ryan; Chaudhary, Ankur

    2011-04-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband systems (CPSR2; APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project. We request continuing status for this project.

  7. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Manchester, Dick; Sarkissian, John; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Coles, William; van Straten, Willem; Ravi, Vikram; Oslowski, Stefan; Khoo, Jonathan; Shannon, Ryan; Wang, Jingbo; Levin, Yuri

    2013-10-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband systems (CPSR2; APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project. We request continuing status for this project.

  8. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Manchester, Dick; Verbiest, Joris P. W.; Sarkissian, John; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Jenet, Rick; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Ravi, Vikram; Oslowski, Stefan; Hotan, Aidan; Champion, David; Khoo, Jonathan; Shannon, Ryan; Chaudhary, Ankur

    2012-10-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband systems (CASPSR; APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project. We request continuing status for this project.

  9. Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Safi-Harb, S.; Landecker, T.L.; Kothes, R.; Camilo, F.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nontherma1 nebula 40" in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.63, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. Morphologically, the nebula appears to be slightly extended along a direction, in projection on the sky, previously demonstrated to be of significance in radio and ASCA observations; we argue that this represents the orientation of the pulsar spin axis. At smaller scales, a narrow X-ray feature is seen extending out 5" from the point source, but energetic arguments suggest that it is not the resolved termination shock of the pulsar wind against the ambient medium. Finally, we argue based on synchrotron lifetimes in the nebular magnetic field that DA 495 represents the first example of a pulsar wind nebula in which electromagnetic flux makes up a significant part, together with particle flux, of the neutron star's wind.

  10. Modelling high-energy pulsar light curves from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoît; Philippov, Alexander A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2016-04-01

    Current models of gamma-ray light curves in pulsars suffer from large uncertainties on the precise location of particle acceleration and radiation. Here, we present an attempt to alleviate these difficulties by solving for the electromagnetic structure of the oblique magnetosphere, particle acceleration, and the emission of radiation self-consistently, using 3D spherical particle-in-cell simulations. We find that the low-energy radiation is synchro-curvature radiation from the polar-cap regions within the light cylinder. In contrast, the high-energy emission is synchrotron radiation that originates exclusively from the Y-point and the equatorial current sheet where relativistic magnetic reconnection accelerates particles. In most cases, synthetic high-energy light curves contain two peaks that form when the current sheet sweeps across the observer's line of sight. We find clear evidence of caustics in the emission pattern from the current sheet. High-obliquity solutions can present up to two additional secondary peaks from energetic particles in the wind region accelerated by the reconnection-induced flow near the current sheet. The high-energy radiative efficiency depends sensitively on the viewing angle, and decreases with increasing pulsar inclination. The high-energy emission is concentrated in the equatorial regions where most of the pulsar spin-down is released and dissipated. These results have important implications for the interpretation of gamma-ray pulsar data.

  11. Quasispherical subsonic accretion in X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakura, Nikolai I.; Postnov, Konstantin A.; Kochetkova, A. Yu; Hjalmarsdotter, L.

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical model is considered for quasispherical subsonic accretion onto slowly rotating magnetized neutron stars. In this regime, the accreting matter settles down subsonically onto the rotating magnetosphere, forming an extended quasistatic shell. Angular momentum transfer in the shell occurs via large-scale convective motions resulting, for observed pulsars, in an almost iso-angular-momentum \\omega \\sim 1/R^2 rotation law inside the shell. The accretion rate through the shell is determined by the ability of the plasma to enter the magnetosphere due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, with allowance for cooling. A settling accretion regime is possible for moderate accretion rates \\dot M \\lesssim \\dot M_* \\simeq 4\\times 10^{16} g s ^{-1}. At higher accretion rates, a free-fall gap above the neutron star magnetosphere appears due to rapid Compton cooling, and the accretion becomes highly nonstationary. Observations of spin-up/spin-down rates of quasispherically wind accreting equilibrium X-ray pulsars with known orbital periods (e.g., GX 301-2 and Vela X-1) enable us to determine the main dimensionless parameters of the model, as well as to estimate surface magnetic field of the neutron star. For equilibrium pulsars, the independent measurements of the neutron star magnetic field allow for an estimate of the stellar wind velocity of the optical companion without using complicated spectroscopic measurements. For nonequilibrium pulsars, a maximum value is shown to exist for the spin-down rate of the accreting neutron star. From observations of the spin-down rate and the X-ray luminosity in such pulsars (e.g., GX 1+4, SXP 1062, and 4U 2206+54), a lower limit can be put on the neutron star magnetic field, which in all cases turns out to be close to the standard value and which agrees with cyclotron line measurements. Furthermore, both explains the spin-up/spin-down of the pulsar frequency on large time-scales and also accounts for the irregular short

  12. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  13. Magnetospheric Interactions of Binary Pulsars as a Model for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vietri, Mario

    1996-11-01

    I consider a model of gamma -ray bursts in which they arise right before the merging of binary pulsars. A binary pulsar moving through its companion's magnetic field experiences a large, motional electric field E = v X B/c, which leads to the release in the pulsar's magnetosphere of a pair cascade and the acceleration of a wind of pure pairs. The energy and energy deposition rate of the wind are those of gamma -ray bursts, provided the pulsars have a field of ~1015 G. Baryon contamination is small and dominated by tidal heating, leading to Mbaryon ~ 10-6 Msolar, as required by the dirty-fireball model of Meszaros, Laguna, & Rees.

  14. CONSTRAINING THE EVOLUTIONARY FATE OF CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS: ''OLD'' RADIO PULSARS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-09-10

    Central compact objects (CCOs) constitute a population of radio-quiet, slowly spinning (≥100 ms) young neutron stars with anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities. Their spin-down properties imply weak dipole magnetic fields (∼10{sup 10-11} G) and characteristic ages much greater than the ages of their host supernova remnants (SNRs). However, CCOs may posses strong ''hidden'' internal magnetic fields that may re-emerge on timescales of ≳10 kyr, with the neutron star possibly activating as a radio pulsar in the process. This suggests that the immediate descendants of CCOs may be masquerading as slowly spinning ''old'' radio pulsars. We present an X-ray survey of all ordinary radio pulsars within 6 kpc that are positionally coincident with Galactic SNRs in order to test the possible connection between the supposedly old but possibly very young pulsars and the SNRs. None of the targets exhibit anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities, suggesting that they are genuine old ordinary pulsars unrelated to the superposed SNRs. This implies that CCOs are either latent radio pulsars that activate long after their SNRs dissipate or they remain permanently radio-quiet. The true descendants of CCOs remain at large.

  15. a Comparative Study of Sfxts and Long-Period Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, Makoto; Enoto, Teruaki; Makishima, Kazuo; Yamada, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2012-07-01

    Super-giant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs), composed of super-giant stars and highly magnetized neutron stars, are characterized by a rather low luminosity in quiescence and very drastic flares. However, these features are also observed, at least to some extent, from other types of HMXBs, including in particular binary pulsars with long pulse periods (>1000 sec). Through wide-band spectroscopy with Suzaku, we aim at a comparison between SFXTs and long-period pulsars, with particular emphasis on the possibility that both have strong magnetic fields. So far, several SFXTs were observed with Suzaku, including IGR J16195-4945 in particular. We re-analyze the archival Suzaku data of this object, obtained on 2006 September 20 for 39 ksec. As reported by Morris et al. (2009), a prominent flare lasting for 10 ksec was recorded in the XIS (1- 10 keV) and HXD (12 - 40 keV) data. We found that the absorbing column density remained the same within ~10 % during the flare. Moreover, the flare was accompanied by weakening or broadening of the fluorescent Fe-K line. These results are inconsistent with the popular SFXT scenario that clumpy stellar winds occur flares. Instead, they prefer an alternative scenario of ``magnetic gating", which assumes the neutron star like magnetars Using Suzaku, we also analyzed the long-period pulsar 4U0114+65 on 2011 July 11 for 100 ksec. The XIS and the HXD detected clear flaring behavior. the known period of ˜10,000 sec which is indicative of strong magnetic field like magnetars was observed. We obtained spectra, with a clear fluorescent Fe-K line, over a very broad (1-100 keV) band From these results, we compare properties of SFXTs and long period pulsars, and discuss their possible relations to magnetars.

  16. Pulsars as cosmic ray particle accelerators: Proton orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielheim, K. O.

    1985-01-01

    Proton orbits are calculated in the electromagnetic vacuum field of a magnetic point dipole rotating with its angular velocity omega perpendicular to its dipole moment mu by numerical integration of the Lorentz-Dirac equation. Trajectories are shown and discussed for various initial conditions. A critical surface is shown separating initial positions of protons which finally hit the pulsar in the polar region from those which finally recede to infinity.

  17. CURVATURE-DRIFT INSTABILITY FAILS TO GENERATE PULSAR RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Alexander; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2010-10-01

    The curvature-drift instability has long been considered as a viable mechanism for pulsar radio emission. We reconsidered this mechanism by finding an explicit solution describing the propagation of short electromagnetic waves in a plasma flow along curved magnetic field lines. We show that even though the waves could be amplified, the amplification factor remains very close to unity; therefore, this mechanism is unable to generate high brightness temperature emission from initial weak fluctuations.

  18. Monitoring The Crab Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rots, Arnold H.; Swank, Jean (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The monitoring of the X-ray pulses from the Crab pulsar is still ongoing at the time of this writing, and we hope to be able to continue the campaign for the life of the XTE mission. We have established beyond all doubt that: (1) the X-ray main pulse leads the radio pulse by approximately 300 microseconds, (2) this phase lag is constant and not influenced by glitches, (3) this lag does not depend on X-ray energy, (4) the relative phase of the two X-ray pulses does not vary, and (5) the spectral indices of primary, secondary, and inter-pulse are distinct and constant. At this time we are investigating whether the radio timing ephemeris can be replaced by an x-ray ephemeris and whether any long-time timing ephemeris can be established. If so, it would enable use to study variations in pulse arrival times at a longer time scales. Such a study is easier in x-rays than at radio wavelengths since the dispersion measure plays no role. These results were reported at the 2000 HEAD Meeting in Honolulu, HI. Travel was paid partly out of this grant. The remainder was applied toward the acquisition of a laptop computer that allows independent and fast analysis of all monitoring observations.

  19. Dynamics of exciton recombination in strong magnetic fields in ultrathin GaAs/AlAs quantum wells with indirect band gap and type-II band alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamirzaev, T. S.; Debus, J.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Glazov, M. M.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Bayer, M.

    2016-07-01

    The exciton recombination dynamics is studied experimentally and theoretically in two-monolayer-thick GaAs/AlAs quantum wells characterized by an indirect band gap and a type-II band alignment. At cryogenic temperatures, the lifetimes of the excitons that are indirect both in real and k space are in the millisecond range. The exciton recombination time and the photoluminescence (PL) intensity are strongly dependent on strength and orientation of an applied magnetic field. In contrast to the very weak influence of an in-plane field, at 2 K temperature a field applied parallel to the growth axis drastically slows down the recombination and reduces the PL intensity. With increasing temperature the magnetic field effects on PL intensity and decay time are vanishing. The experimental data are well described by a model for the exciton dynamics that takes into account the magnetic-field-induced redistribution of the indirect excitons between their bright and dark states. It allows us to evaluate the lower bound of the heavy-hole longitudinal g factor of 2.5, the radiative recombination time for the bright excitons of 0.34 ms, and the nonradiative recombination time of the bright and dark excitons of 8.5 ms.

  20. Crystallographic alignment evolution and magnetic properties of anisotropic Sm0.6Pr0.4Co5 nanoflakes prepared by surfactant-assisted ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M. L.; Wu, Q.; Li, Y. Q.; Liu, W. Q.; Lu, Q. M.; Yue, M.

    2015-08-01

    The microstructure, crystal structure and magnetic properties were studied for Sm0.6Pr0.4Co5 nanoflakes prepared by surfactant-assisted high-energy ball milling (SAHEBM). Effect of ball-milling time on the c-axis crystallographic alignment, morphology and magnetic properties of Sm0.6Pr0.4Co5 nanoflakes was systematically investigated. With increasing milling time from 1 h to 7 h, the intensity ratio between (002) and (111) reflection peaks indicating degree of c-axis crystal texture of the (Sm, Pr)Co5 phase increases first, peaks at 3 h, then drops again, revealing that the strongest c-axis crystal texture was obtained in the nanoflakes milled for 3 h. On the other hand, the coercivity (Hci) of the flakes increases gradually from 1.71 to 14.65 kOe with the increase of ball milling time. As a result, an optimal magnetic properties of Mr of 10.23 kGs, Hci of 11.45 kOe and (BH)max of 24.40 MGOe was obtained in Sm0.6Pr0.4Co5 nanoflakes milled for 3 h, which also displayed a high aspect ratio, small in-plane size, pronounced (001) out-of-plane texture.